The Belliveau Ships Gallery

Presented here with pictures and history are the seven ships that were operated by the Belliveau family from 1887 to 1933.

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Urbain B. 1887 - 1905

Built at Belliveau Cove, Nova Scotia in 1887 as a two-masted wooden schooner. Dimensions unknown. Net tonnage: 97 tons. Official registry number 83436. No historical information is known about her career. Went ashore near Port George, Nova Scotia on November 28, 1905 and became a total wreck. Registry closed on December 4, 1905

The Urbain B. at Belliveau Cove, NS (From the Belliveau family collection)

Cropped view of previous picture showing Ben Belliveau (left) and Edward P. Theriault (right) (From the Belliveau family collection)

   

 

Basile 1906 - 1913

Built at Belliveau Cove, Nova Scotia in 1906 as a two-masted wooden schooner. Dimensions unknown. Gross tonnage: 182 tons. Net tonnage: 157 tons. Official registry number 111900. No historical information is known about her career. Totally lost at Gay Head Lighthouse, Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts on March 23, 1913. Registry closed on May 6, 1913

Basile at unknown port. (From the Belliveau family collection)

Low tide at Belliveau Cove, NS. Unknown ship in foreground, possibly Basile in on the flats in the background (From the Belliveau family collection)

   

 

Rosalie Belliveau 1909 - 1926

Built at Belliveau Cove, Nova Scotia in 1909 by C. C. LeBlanc as a three-masted wooden schooner. Dimensions: 114’ length x 29’ beam x 10’ depth. Gross tonnage: 230 tons. Net tonnage: 196 tons. Official registry number 122035. Her registry transferred to the Barbados and later to St. John’s, Newfoundland. Vessel had many owners during her career including the Malcolm Bros. After several years of trading to the West Indies she was bought by Newfoundland owners and then passed on to J. S. Webster & Sons of Jamaica. The last voyage of the Rosalie Belliveau began on November 15, 1926 when she left Kingston, Jamaica loaded with general cargo bound for the Turks Islands. The ship was reported off Jacmel, Haiti on December 7, 1926 and was never seen again.

Rosalie Belliveau under construction at Belliveau Cove, NS 1909 (From the Belliveau family collection)

Rosalie Belliveau under construction at Belliveau Cove, NS 1909 (From the Belliveau family collection)

Rosalie Belliveau just prior to launch at Belliveau Cove, NS 1909 (From the Belliveau family collection)

Launch of Rosalie Belliveau at Belliveau Cove, NS 1909 (From the Belliveau family collection)

Rosalie Belliveau at dock in Belliveau Cove, NS July 1913 (From the Belliveau family collection)

     

 

 

M. A. Belliveau 1914 - Unknown

Built at Belliveau Cove, Nova Scotia in 1914 by C. C. LeBlanc for Belliveau interests as a three-masted wooden schooner. Dimensions: 115’ length x 30.2’ beam x 10.2’ depth. Gross tonnage: 237 tons. Net tonnage: 199 tons. Official registry number 130516. Ben Belliveau & Co. operated this vessel until after WWI and then sold her to Kirkconnel Bros. of Tampa, FL. No historical information is known about her career or final disposition.

M. A. Belliveau with a load of lumber at unknown port (From the Belliveau family collection)

Cropped view of the stern of the previous photo showing a woman and child on board in the stern section (From the Belliveau family collection)

 

 

 

 

 

Emma Belliveau 1916 - 1920

Built at Belliveau Cove, Nova Scotia in 1916 by C. L. LeBlanc for Ben Belliveau & Co. as a three-masted wooden schooner. Dimensions: 125’ length x 30’ beam x 10.5’ depth. Gross tonnage: 263 tons. Net tonnage: 223 tons. Official registry number 130520. While on a voyage under command of Captain A. Nicholls from Saint John, New Brunswick to Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island the vessel was stranded on December 8, 1918 off Cap La Ronde on the coast of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. The ship was salvaged but three lives were lost in this incident. The Emma Belliveau was lost 20 miles west of the Isle of Flores in the Azores off Portugal on November 24, 1920. Registry was closed in 1921.

Emma Belliveau (Drawing by John Belliveau)

Full Hull version of Emma Belliveau (Drawing by John Belliveau)

Bow Detail (Drawing by John Belliveau)

Hull Detail (Drawing by John Belliveau)

Stern Detail (Drawing by John Belliveau)

Prints of the Emma Belliveau (waterline or full hull versions) are available for purchase at Digital Shipyard Website

 

Edithe Belliveau 1919 - 1933

Built at Belliveau Cove, Nova Scotia in 1919 by Ben Belliveau & Co. and operated by Ben Belliveau & Co. as a three-masted wooden schooner. Dimensions: 122’ length x 30.2’ beam x 10.2’ depth. Gross tonnage: 287 tons. Net tonnage: 238 tons. Official registry number 138807.  No historical information is known about her career. The vessel ran ashore at Cockburn Harbor in the Caicos Islands, Bahamas on August 14, 1933 and was a total loss. Registry closed September 21, 1933.

The Edithe Belliveau (far left) at Belliveau Cove, NS. along with two unidentified schooners. (From the Belliveau family collection)

Storage shed for cargo for Edithe Belliveau at unknown port. (From the Belliveau family collection)

 

 

 

 

 

Rose Anne Belliveau 1919 - 1929

Built at Belliveau Cove, Nova Scotia in 1919 by Ben Belliveau & Co. and operated by Ben Belliveau & Co. as a three-masted wooden schooner. Dimensions: 130.5’ length x 30.8’ beam x 10.5’ depth. Gross tonnage: 310 tons. Net tonnage: 281 tons. Official registry number 141230.  At an unknown date during her career, a Boston newspaper item stated the Rose Anne, under command of Captain Raymond Vincent Comeau, made a very fast run from Belliveau Cove to the Boston Lightship, a distance of 240 miles, in 24 hours. On another occasion she left Boston for Belliveau Cove, loaded 250,000 board feet of rough spruce and returned to Boston in 17 days; this was considered as good as a steamship of the time could have done. The Rose Anne Belliveau ran aground and wrecked at White’s Cove, Nova Scotia (ironically, only about a half mile north of where she was built and launched ten years earlier) on January 19, 1929. Registry closed on February 1, 1929.

Rose Anne Belliveau with a deck load of lumber at Barcelóna, Spain. (From the Belliveau family collection)

Rose Anne Belliveau (left) and Edithe Belliveau (right) at Belliveau Cove, NS (From the Belliveau family collection)

Rose Anne Belliveau (left) and Edithe Belliveau (right) at Belliveau Cove, NS (From the Clareshopper.com archives)

Rose Anne Belliveau at dock, date unknown. (From the Hon Alan R Abraham Collection) New

Wreck of the Rose Anne Belliveau on January 19, 1929 rolled over on her starboard side at White's Cove, NS about a half mile north of Belliveau Cove. (From the Belliveau family collection)

Another view of the wreck of the Rose Anne Belliveau on January 19, 1929 at White's Cove, NS (From the Belliveau family collection)

Wreck without masts, White's Cove, NS (From the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic Archives)

Remains of the Rose Anne Belliveau at White's Cove, NS September 1978 (Photo by Hector Belliveau)

Remains of the Rose Anne Belliveau at White's Cove, NS September 1978 (Photo by Hector Belliveau)

Remains of the Rose Anne Belliveau at White's Cove, NS September 1978 (Photo by Hector Belliveau)

Remains of the Rose Anne Belliveau at White's Cove, NS September 1978 (Photo by Hector Belliveau)

Remains of the Rose Anne Belliveau at White's Cove, NS September 1978 (Photo by Hector Belliveau)

 

Ben Belliveau & Co. and the Belliveau Family Ships Namesakes

Ben Belliveau & Co. store in Belliveau Cove, NS (From the Belliveau family collection)

Benjamin (Ben) Belliveau, along with business partner and brother Charles Belliveau, formed Ben Belliveau & Co. with Ben being the “driving force” of the business and owning more than 50% of the company.  Ben Belliveau & Co. owned lumbering land and operated a sawmill about 5 miles south east of Belliveau Cove located in a logging camp called “Margo”.  The lumber produced there was used to build the schooners launched at Belliveau Cove and shipped out sold as cargo on those ships.

Ben Belliveau (left) and Edward P. Theriault (right) (From the Belliveau family collection)

The Belliveau ships were named by Ben and Charles after family members. I believe the first Belliveau ship, the Urbain B., was named after Ben and Charles' father Urbain Belliveau (1816-1897).  The Basile (pronounced Bah-zil) was named after Charles Belliveau’s first son.  The Rosalie Belliveau was named after Ben’s 4th and youngest daughter.  The Emma Belliveau was named after Ben’s first  daughter.  The Rose Anne Belliveau was named after Ben’s third daughter.  Regarding the M. A. Belliveau and Edithe Belliveau. we are still gathering information.

 

Ben Belliveau & Co. store sign (From the Alan Abraham collection)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More information and photos wanted

If you have any photos or information about the Belliveau ships you would like to have included on this webpage, it would be most appreciated and credited appropriately.  Please feel free to contact me (John Belliveau) at: digitalshipyard@hotmail.com

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   Copyright John Belliveau 2015