Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Robert W. Dempsey
Location: Hopewell, VA
Email: BLKBEARJK at aol.com
Date: 12/31/2004
Remote Name: 152.163.100.134

Comments

It is sad when ever a sailor is lost at sea whether it be on a lake or an ocean. The Great Lakes ore carriers are some of the most handsome ships in the world and I am fascinated with their appearance every time I see one. To the families of those lost I send my deepest sympathy.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Lyndon P. Rose
Location: Missouri
Email: chip71757 at yahoo.com
Date: 12/30/2004
Remote Name: 67.65.132.153

Comments

I will never be able to explain my excitement, relationship, or yearning for the Fitz. The Hull was laid the year I was born. He sank the year I graduated. I was reunited with a first grade school chum 10 days before Fits sank. Somehow this bonded a friendship, and every time G. Lightfoot's song would play, it was like we were to stand at attention. After 30 years of a close friendship, my best friend died. One day, I happen to hear "The wreck..." playing on the radio. I knew I had to get to Michigan. I had to get as close as I could to Fits. So with my 80 year old parents, my wife and I drove from St. Louis to Whitefish Point. I can not describe the U.P. If you've never been anywhere, or if you've been everywhere - This place is awesome. My hats off to all of Michigan, and residents living there. I'm jealous. Salute (29 times) to the Fits. It was an emotional trip.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: trevor mac millan
Location: morriston ontaro
Email: tmacmillan at netscape.ca
Date: 12/25/2004
Remote Name: 209.47.31.6

Comments

I was at my grandmothers cottage on Nov.10 1975. It's on the shore line of lake Huron, but like lake Superior it to can get really rough. That day in 1975 was the roughest I can ever remember It. How ever If you look at her corse she was very close to 6 fathom shoal if the ship bottomed out and punctured the hull it would be very unsafe. Fizgerald was radioed about two big waves. If it was taking on water faster than the pumps could pump the water out it would definitely nose dive when the two big waves hit the vessel.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Perry Greisinger
Location: Oregon, WI
Email:
Date: 12/15/2004
Remote Name: 205.213.6.3

Comments

I would give anything (including my life) to have wrapped my arms around all those men, giving them a big hug during their final moments on the Fitz (but I am sure God did). The Great Lakes are awesome. I love the Fitz, and the ice cold winters. The life boats of the Fitz at the Valley Camp ship museum in the Soo make me tremble.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bobby Batyko
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Email: batykor at zoominternet.net
Date: 12/12/2004
Remote Name: 24.239.209.128

Comments

I listened to Gordon Lightfoot's song of the great ship, and, it is almost eerie to think of that ship going down.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Brent Whitehead
Location: Lake Forest, IL
Email: PatriotsFan85 at yahoo.com
Date: 12/10/2004
Remote Name: 134.84.206.80

Comments

I'm deeply sadden by this event that occurs some many years ago. I do have one thought as to why the Fitzgerald sank. As Captain McSorley said, "this is the worst storm he's ever seen." I believe that the Edmund Fitzgerald may has struck some rocks by the Three Fathom Shoal, and began taking on water. As the Fitzgerald continued, it took on water and began to sink lower into the water, and by this happening would make the waves and the storm look much worse than it was. Now I am not saying that the storm wasn't bad, but I am saying that the waves may have looked bigger than they actually were. And finally at the point in which she sank, the Fitzgerald was low enough in the water that a wave either came over her bow or her stern, and that was the end of the great ship. Those are just my thoughts as to why she sank.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Stromer
Location: U.P. Michigan
Email:
Date: 12/4/2004
Remote Name: 24.208.42.80

Comments

It will always remain a mystery why the Edmund Fitzgerald sank. Way to many guesses and Theories. She sank, let's leave it at that. I feel very bad for the Families that lost loved ones on that fateful day in November. I'm glad for Gordon Lightfoot's song " The Wreck Of Edmund Fitzgerald". May all the sailor's that died on Lake Superior rest in peace. It is the most unforgiving waters in the great lakes region.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Brett
Location: Sparta MI
Email: qb38 at charter.net
Date: 12/3/2004
Remote Name: 24.247.250.6

Comments

I may not have been around when the fitz went down but I have read/seen enough two make me believe that the fitz was snapped in two by a wave. I'm sorry for anyone who lost a family member in the sinking.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Sara
Location: Brooklyn Park, Minnesota
Email: lil_chica81593 at yahoo.com
Date: 12/2/2004
Remote Name: 4.159.125.141

Comments

I think the story about the ship was very non-fictional and very true it was fun for me to look at all what had happened also! well thank you for letting us be a part of it by putting it on the internet I thanked you and just wanted to say how great it was to me!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Darren Muljo
Location: Marquette, Michigan
Email: dmuljo at neasphalt.com
Date: 12/1/2004
Remote Name: 66.84.241.2

Comments

I find it truly remarkable the hold of which the Edmund Fitzgerald has over people 29 years later. As the grandson of Watchman Ransom Cundy I appreciate all of the thoughts and prayers given for those lost and their families.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kjersten
Location: Bloomington, MN
Email: awesome71 at hotmail.com
Date: 11/27/2004
Remote Name: 4.158.48.53

Comments

My great uncle was working on another ship when the Edmund Fitzgerald sunk. My mom and my grandmother were relieved when they found out he was still alive.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Eric John
Location: Saint Albans, Vermont
Email: ebeauregard at adelphia.net
Date: 11/26/2004
Remote Name: 69.171.209.54

Comments

An attempt at any explanation other than the ship breaking apart would imply that these brave seaman were somehow at fault for this tragedy. Instead of the seemingly endless speculation, let's let their families put this behind them and honor the sailors for their hard work and sacrifice. And let's thank Mr. Lightfoot for his contribution in keeping their memories alive. As I listened to Lightfoot's version of the tale last summer, my only regret was that those 29 souls weren't sitting in the front row of the concert with me. Happy sails and happy trails--Eric


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Paige Mayville
Location: Flint, MI
Email: pbandj at comcast.net
Date: 11/19/2004
Remote Name: 68.53.88.206

Comments

I'm in 8th grade and I'm writing a poem on the Edmund Fitzgerald. When I was looking for information I was shocked by what I read. Every time I read about her I cry. It just breaks me. I've never felt the fury of a Lake Superior storm though I do go sailing with my uncle in Florida. He has a 25 ft boat we fish on. Now that I know so much about the Fitz, I doubt that I will ever spend a night on the open ocean. I think that instead of having the Fitz's bell in Detroit that they should hang it at the city the Fitz is closest to. Bless those brave souls and let their final resting place be forever at the hands of Gitchee-Gummee.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Gordy Garris
Location: Saginaw, Michigan
Email: susiegar at msn.com
Date: 11/15/2004
Remote Name: 63.27.167.178

Comments

I believe that this giant freighter had sunken because the hatch covers weren't tightened enough and water had seeped into the ship causing the ship to be more sinkable, then when the ship had got out on Lake Superior the wave that had formed behind the vessel had lowered to water under the ship causing it to ground on a reef-which had made to ship crack in two and finally sink.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: JASON, U.S. COAST GUARD
Location: PACIFIC OCEAN
Email: coasty706 at earthlink.net
Date: 11/15/2004
Remote Name: 69.75.23.57

Comments

I grew up in Buffalo, NY and I have recently begun researching the sinking of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald. What a horribly sad story. May God Bless and Keep these sailors. "Crossing the bar" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson "Sunset and evening star And one clear call for me! And may there be no moaning of the bar When I put out to sea, But such a tide as moving seems asleep, Too full for sound and foam, When that which drew from out the boundless deep Turns again home. Twilight and evening bell, And after that the dark! And may there be no sadness of farewell, When I embark; For tho' from out our bourne of Time and Place The flood may bear me far I hope to see my Pilot face to face When I have cross'd the bar." The official NTSB report is linked below for anyone who wants to take a look. For all of the theories about the grounding at "6 Fathom Shoals", the report talks about such a place determined to be non-existant. http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-cp/history/WEBSHIPWRECKS/EdmundFitzgeraldNTSBReport.html


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jon S
Location: Green Bay, Wisconsin
Email: xcaliber at itol.com
Date: 11/13/2004
Remote Name: 24.208.43.74

Comments

Being a family member of one of the lost crew... I would like to thank you all for the kind words and for remembering the "Big Fitz". After 29 years the loss is still felt strongly in my family.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: caleb clark
Location: Virginia
Email:
Date: 11/13/2004
Remote Name: 4.152.9.4

Comments

It was so horrible what happend that day. My the Lord bless all the families who had a loe one die.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Gus Williams
Location: Charlotte, MI
Email: misfit2042 at yahoo.com
Date: 11/12/2004
Remote Name: 12.75.28.128

Comments

Being born in Michigan I have always had a special connection to the great lakes. This story, like all shipwreck stories, fascinated me. It still does. Gordon lightfoots song always hits me hard. I love it. It is a fitting tribute to the 29 brave souls who are restungin peace. I have only recently found out lots of facts about the ship.I did not realize she sank 2 years before i was born or that she was so close to the shipwreck museum. I do believe that site is to remain sacred and off limits to people trying to profit off of memoriabilia from the ship.They need to realizethat this is a grave. It is the final resting place of 29 men and should be respected as such. Now, when the expedition to retreive the bell happened i felt that was O.K. because the bell was put in the museum to honor their memory. That was done with dignity and respect for the crew and their families. Anything else would be in poor taste. The wreck is a sad and fascinating tragedy. I think that November 10th, 2004, will be the most significant anniversary of the wreck cause now it has been down one year for every man on board. We may never know what caused her to sink and perhaps it should be that way, for her mystery is part of her allure. May GOD BLESS the crew and families of the EDMUND FITZGERALD!!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Doug
Location: Hamilton Ont. Canada
Email: dpruder at cogeco.ca
Date: 11/12/2004
Remote Name: 216.221.81.96

Comments

I was on Lake Erie that nite it was brutal. personally I would tend to think that the hatch covers were not all dogged down as this was a common practice at the time when you had iron ore you only did every other one or third. just what I think.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tom Eret
Location: Santa Ysabel,Ca. USA
Email: teret at ltsp.com
Date: 11/11/2004
Remote Name: 66.81.197.158

Comments

Except since 1986,here in So.Cal.,I was always living near the Great Lakes.Born in Hammond,In. ,On Lake Michigan,Paternal Folks All from Saginaw,Bay City,Flint,Lake Huron, 1800's On,I've always been fascinated with Them Lakes.Grandpa used to play in Army Band on Lake Erieafter WW1.Used to get my legs Numb wading in Superior. Went across the "Soo" by Ferry back in 50's.Only one haven't seen is Lake Ontario. As I memorially Tipped my hat and played Gordon Lightfoot's CD yesterday, I felt so Proud of the Brave crew of the "Fitz".They will always be with me, and I hope all the families are well,and my prayers with them.I'm building a model of the ship that more than any other,sends that "chill" down my spine,when I think of Her,and the Crew,especially "When The Gales Of November Come Calling" Amen!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Phyllis Freeman
Location: Youngstown,Ohio
Email: n8mvaham at hotmail.com
Date: 11/10/2004
Remote Name: 4.224.39.169

Comments

The sinking happened 2 weeks before my 15th birthday,and I remember it well.I still think about it this time of year.I hope the families of these brave men find peace and the souls of these brave men rest well.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dave Lester
Location: Eau Claire, Michigan
Email: dave.lester at flightsafety.com
Date: 11/10/2004
Remote Name: 66.90.233.235

Comments

I was living in northern Illinois at the time of the sinking and remember fully well that afternoon and night when the storm came roaring through the northern prairie region of Illinois. I can remember a Milwaukee television station making a special announcement that a ship had disappeared and was presumed lost. Like so many others, I too have been haunted by Gordon's song. May we never forget their spirit and may we never take these magnificant Lakes for granted.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Richie D
Location: Thomaston, Ct
Email: Richied42 at yahoo.com
Date: 11/10/2004
Remote Name: 67.86.232.217

Comments

I have always been fascinated by this great ship.I lived in Buffalo N.Y. when this happened and I remember it like it was yesterday. I was just thinking about the men, on this... the 29th anniversary of the sinking. God Bless them and their families.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Doug Allen
Location: Longmont, CO
Email: cdouglasallen at hotmail.com
Date: 11/10/2004
Remote Name: 170.131.131.254

Comments

I grew up in Indiana, near the southern tip of Lake Michigan and our family went to the lake often. I have been fascinated by these Great Lakes leviathans since childhood. It amazes me that a lake can just swallow something as large as the Edmund Fitzgerald. I was 11 when Fitz went down and like many of you have been fascinated by the tragedy and mystery ever since. My thoughts and prayers go out to the families that lost their husbands, fathers, sons, brothers, loved ones 29 years perhaps to the minute of my writing this. May they know that many people will never forget the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald. God bless them and all the Great Lakes mariners.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Robert
Location: Asheville,NC.
Email: bcems19 at msn.com
Date: 11/10/2004
Remote Name: 66.169.86.135

Comments

Every time I hear the song it sends chills down my spine. I can't imagine what they wen't through. May they rest in peace.


 

Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jeff
Location: Traverse City, MI
Email: jwwinkler at charter.net
Date: 11/10/2004
Remote Name: 66.227.189.255

Comments

I went to the memorial service at the Great Lakes Maritime Academy today - it was very nice, and the weather held.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Rich
Location: Portland Oregon
Email:
Date: 11/10/2004
Remote Name: 198.133.149.69

Comments

Taken by Lake Superior, but always in our hearts.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Derek
Location: Lexington, KY
Email:
Date: 11/10/2004
Remote Name: 207.246.93.71

Comments

I have always like this song and today for some reason decided to buy it from iTunes. After listing to it a few times I started to look around the internet for more information. It took me a little while until I realized that today is the 29-year anniversary of its sinking! Boy that gave me a weird feeling, as if something had prompted me to be interested in the wreck today! May God bless the souls of all the men lost on the Edmund Fitzgerald that day.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tammy
Location: Twin Lake MI
Email:
Date: 11/10/2004
Remote Name: 65.129.215.63

Comments

May god bless each and everyone of you.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Sheri
Location: Youngstown, Ohio
Email:
Date: 11/10/2004
Remote Name: 64.18.36.4

Comments

I woke up this morning remembering that day so well. I lived in a cottage on Lake Erie with my Husband of two Weeks. I was awed by the huge waves and wind and cold out over the Lake. My husbands best friend was on the Fitz on what was to be his last trip, he had saved enough money to go to college and would no longer work the boats. I can still remember picking up the paper the next day and seeing the headlines and having to show it to my husband. Thank you that after 29 years you still keep the memory of those men lost alive. For those of us who lost a loved one that day we can never forget.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Joseph
Location: Elyria, OH
Email: elyri at integrity.com
Date: 11/9/2004
Remote Name: 68.16.80.183

Comments

Simple explanation for the sinking: negligence as to weather forcasts and physical maintainence of vital ship strutures; i.e. keelson reinforment and plating. The rest is all a "cover up".


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Paul Groves
Location: st cloud
Email:
Date: 11/9/2004
Remote Name: 65.103.4.99

Comments

Let us all remember that the loss of the Fitz although tragic as it was, is one of many on the lake in its history. Even though Lake Superior is a lake it should be treated as a small ocean it still has the power to humble all of us. God bless those who lost their lives on the Fitz.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jeff
Location: Traverse City, MI
Email: jwwinkle at eotech.com
Date: 11/7/2004
Remote Name: 66.227.189.255

Comments

I was 10 years old in Traverse City and remember the storm. My parents and two siblings were coming back from Wisconsin through the U.P. I remember watching TV in the evening and being very worried about the weather and my family. My sister, who was watching me, said not to worry - my parents and bro and sis were going to be okay. That was also the first time I cut my own hair and hacked it up pretty well. My sister fixed it as best she could (thanks, sis!). My parents stopped near Menominee, MI by the river for a break. They saw waves in the river breaking over the sides, and large fish washed on shore. They decided to keep going. They were just west of the Mackinac Bridge and stopped for a bite to eat. When the neighboring gas station's overhead lights blew over, they got back in the car to come home. They were stuck on the north side of the bridge, because it was closed at that time (about the time the Fitzgerald sank). Waves were breaking over the causeway. After about five hours, the bridge authority set up a caravan of semis to provide a wind break for passenger cars. My family went across SLOWLY after the wind break was set up. Somewhere on the bridge a semi had tipped over on to a Volkswagen Beetle. I believe they saw a tipped over phone booth on the south side of the bridge, but it could have been the north side.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Curtis
Location: Burkburnett, Texas
Email: cheptner at yahoo.com
Date: 11/2/2004
Remote Name: 63.145.41.162

Comments

I heard the song by Gordon Lightfoot when I was a senior in high school (1978) and didn't even realize it was about the sinking of a real ship until many years later. The great thing about the world wide web is being able to research things you don't fully understand. The lyrics to the song haunt you and I came to this site to find out what really happened. After I have read the account of the tragedy and the many postings here, I don't think it really matters right now in November 2004. It matters not if the captain might have sailed on that night with a fearless disregard for the safety of his crew. It matters not that the ship was might have been repaired with inferior materials. It matters not if the storm was the worst their ever was. It matters not if the hatches gave way. What really matters, and this goes for all tragedies, is that we have learned something from it. It hurts me too see people lose their life, when if it might have been prevented. But, the next captain that sails his ship will think twice. I can only imagine that ship construction, weather warning systems and all those things for these big ships have gotten so much better, because of a tragedy like the Fitz. Prevention is the key. God bless the families of the men that lost their lives that night.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Wayne R.
Location: Nova Scotia
Email: thurmo3182 at yahoo.ca
Date: 10/19/2004
Remote Name: 142.177.87.116

Comments

I am from Canso, Nova Scotia. In Dec.1964 a fishing Trawler, (Acadia Seahawk)  from our port was lost in a bad storm off Sable Island with all her crew. God bless all ships and those who make their living on the sea.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: nicole
Location: pa
Email: everyonesprob11 at aol.com
Date: 10/19/2004
Remote Name: 24.154.78.21

Comments

I feel really bad and I wish this would have never happened but it did and we should honor all the brave men that went down with the ship... god bless America~`!!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John Domb
Location: Sparton, New York
Email: none
Date: 10/15/2004
Remote Name: 66.133.136.150

Comments

The way the E.F. sank I think is that they lost there course and the waves had hidden the shoal.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Chris
Location: Michiagn,Royal Oak.
Email:
Date: 10/8/2004
Remote Name: 68.62.6.171

Comments

I think we should leave the ship alone, and remember the crew well every november 10th. God bless you Fitz and your crew you're a great ship and we will never forget you!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Joe
Location: Elyria ohio
Email: majorssfam1 at aol.com
Date: 10/3/2004
Remote Name: 207.235.15.92

Comments

This wreck is one of the most fascinating ones on the Great Lakes. The best explanation that I have read is by Captain Dudley Paquette who was the Captain of The Wilfred Sykes. The Wilfred Sykes was a weather reporting ship as well as an ore carrier. In the book "The Night The Fitz went down" he sites a hull fracture in the hinge are of the ship at the number 7 Ballast tank as the cause of the sinking with facts and testimony that cant be ruled out and makes more sense. The Fitz had keel problems where the hull became detached from the keel. Her last keel repairs that was known to have in done was during layup of 73. Given everything I have read this makes the most sense and I do recommend reading the book. It will give you a new prospective of what might have happened.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Russ Tomberlin
Location: Frankfort ,Ky
Email: evet at mindspring.com
Date: 10/1/2004
Remote Name: 66.147.94.242

Comments

to the 29 brave souls of November 10, 1975. you will never be forgotten. may you rest in peace. your voyage was not taken in vain. 


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Milla
Location: LAke Orion, MI
Email:
Date: 9/30/2004
Remote Name: 68.60.157.52

Comments

I heard of the story last night and have just listened to the song. I am not originally from the US or from an English-speaking country but the song really moved me and I cried. God bless the souls of the people who found their deathbed in the cold waters.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Sandy
Location: Superior, Wi.
Email: lksuperiorlvr at yahoo.com
Date: 9/30/2004
Remote Name: 64.33.183.132

Comments

I was 18 that night when on the TV came the report that the Fitz. was going down and all Coast Guard personnel were to report to their ships. Living at the Head of the Lakes I have seen what the big pond can do when the gales of November hit. I had a connection to the Fitz. the father of one of my good friends was on the ship. He and I were together that stormy November night waiting for the call to come. We both knew how the lake and the storm would make survival impossible the lake temp. of 32 degrees gives a hypothermia time index of approx. 2mn. The call came in to confirm what we both knew, The Edmund Fitzgerald was lost with all hands. "God bless the men of the Fitz. the families, and friends left behind." I will always love and hold a great respect for Superior, largest of the Great Lakes or as we in the Twin Ports call her the Big Pond.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: joe snyder
Location: milwaukee wisconsin
Email: jsnyder59 at sbcglobal.net
Date: 9/20/2004
Remote Name: 69.210.33.169

Comments

I was 16 when the fitz sank .I seen a lot shows and read some books on the sinking of the fitgerald and it is so hard to say what how it realy went down but it seams to me that it hit a shoal.But we will never know for shure.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: jahoman
Location: Bridgton, ME
Email: jahoman at megalink.net
Date: 9/8/2004
Remote Name: 216.195.147.202

Comments

Not sure why the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald touches me so and runs chills up my spine. I gieve for the family and friends of the crew and pray to never be in thier shoes. God bless all sailors!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: KEVIN LIMBERT
Location: CLEVELAND OH
Email: klimbert at markstrucksales.com
Date: 8/24/2004
Remote Name: 67.39.200.144

Comments

I can still remember sitting on my fathers lap. I was only 4 years old, he held the front page of the paper for me to view. It was the CLEVELAND PRESS. I can still see the illustration of the FITZGERALD. The drawing showed HER in 2 pieces.......That my friends is the earliest memory of my life. Growing up on the shores of Lake Erie, I have watched the ever changing water. Sometimes wondering if the very water that intrigues me has ever flowed through the skeleton of the FITZGERALD. She shall be forever lost, but forgotten she will never be..


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: ghostrideryyz
Location: a space in time
Email: ghostrideryyz at yahoo.com
Date: 8/23/2004
Remote Name: 68.78.238.253

Comments

I was a deckhand ...I lived through my nightmare...I come here a few times a year, read each name and spend a few minutes thinking time with each man. Mostly I think the about the final twenty minutes........


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Darren Flanagan
Location: Kamloops B.C.
Email: subby70 at yahoo.com
Date: 8/22/2004
Remote Name: 216.232.176.202

Comments

I was only 5 years old when the Edmund Fitzgerald sank. I heard about it after hearing Gordon Lightfoots song "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald". I saw a documentory about the Edmund Fitzgerald on The Descovery Channel, I was 33 years old then and I chose right there and then that I would make a feature film about the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald in the future because I'll be getting into the film business, and one of my screenplays and films will be about the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: CHUCK ROWE
Location: NASHIVLLE,TN USA
Email: BIGFITZ975 at CS.COM
Date: 8/20/2004
Remote Name: 205.188.116.138

Comments

AS A NEW YORK NATIVE I UNDERSTAND THE AWSOME POWER OF THE GREAT LAKES. THIS SHIP WAS BUILD LIKE THE PEOPLE OF HER TIME,STRONG,DID MORE THAN THEN THEY HAD TO,AND BUILT TO STAND THE TEST OF TIME.THE FITZ HAS AND ALWAYS WILL AS I PASS HER STORY TO MY BOYS.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: shanon gray
Location: white horse yukon
Email: repro90 at hotmail.com
Date: 8/19/2004
Remote Name: 216.126.123.208

Comments

my father was on a ship that had the fitz gerald on her radar ..... i thought you might have som info on a canadain cargo ship called the sankcliff hull if you could find anything on this ship i would be great full thank for your time. shanon gray


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jim Wilson
Location: N. Olmsted, OH
Email: polmarine at sbcglobal.net
Date: 8/9/2004
Remote Name: 65.43.160.18

Comments

Regarding breaking on surface. Board of investigation did not support this as sections would have been much further apart.. As to grounding the vessel did not have the watertight subdivision to stay afloat for the 3.5 hours from report of problem until sinking. Cargo shift did occur after vessel exceeded angle of repose of cargo--about 25 degrees. This was after plunge commenced. Before that the characteristics of the vessel would not have led to that degree of roll. Reason Bard did not rule out these as causes was that a combination of them could have led to the vessel's demise-- unlikely but not impossible. Video shows hatch clamps broken on some hatches--effect of striking lake bottom; off and damaged on others- probably from same cause; but off and undamaged on others-- indicating not tight. It was later discovered(after Board's report) that five ships had been built with very thin hatch cover gaskets. Three had to have gaskets replaced before they could be made weather tight, one(Arthur B. Homer) was in shipyard and hose testing wasn't conducted (ship never sailed again). The Fitzgerald was the fifth.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Justin
Location: Coopersville
Email: shipwatcher1 at yahoo.com
Date: 8/8/2004
Remote Name: 204.39.211.72

Comments

I believe the Fitz sank due to flooding from a grounding in the Six Fathom Shoals area. The flooding increased the vessels weight and a final wave over the deck cause it to go under. As the bow went down the cargo shifted forward causing the bow to increase speed, the bow hit the bottom. The vessel was longer than the lake was deep so when the bow hit, that force cause the vessel to break.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Rickie Moneyhun
Location: Whitehall, Michigan
Email: Fitzgerald1975 at aol.com or Jrhocfn at aol.com
Date: 8/5/2004
Remote Name: 64.12.116.138

Comments

I've been a Shipwreck researcher for many years and the story of the Fitzgerald still haunts me today. I love seeing pitures of shipwrecks it moves me. The loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald is extremely hard for me,(although I wasn't born until 7 years after the sinking) not know exactlly happened on that faithful night but I imagine it probably sank like the Carl D. Bradley or the Daniel J. Morrell that sank in Lakes Michigan and Huron just batteling the waves and the extreme pressure on the ship. She was quite a ship. May god be with the families of the crew on the Fitzgerald. God bless them all. Oh hear us when we cry to thee for those in peril on the sea.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Grif757
Location: Appleton, Wi
Email: grif757 at sbcglobal.net
Date: 8/1/2004
Remote Name: 68.248.142.58

Comments

As a student of accident investigation in aviation I was taught that it is rarely one event that causes a disaster of this magnitude. I am a firm believer that the Captain although very experienced in the Great Lakes, was on his last season and was maybe a bit complacent in his practices in Navigation. Not to undermine his skill, but I have seen it many times, the best of captains have made mistakes after 30 plus years of operating aircraft (or ships) safely. In flying we have an ailment we call "gethomeitis" meaning that we are looking to get home and may make a poor decision or comprimise our better judgement in order to get home. I think that those 29 men and all of the people who have ever sailed the Great Lakes are courageous men and should be commended. I am convinced that because of a navigational oversight, the boat came too close to the shoal and ran aground. She then took a list. As the boat took water it became even more overloaded than it already was. A large wave ran across the boat and the overloaded Fitz broke in two. She was at the bottom in short order. There were few sings of the crew trying to escape except that the door to the bridge was open suggesting that they were the only ones who saw it coming....and even they only had a moment to react. just my humble opinion.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kurt Klein
Location: Puerto de Santa Maria, Spain
Email: kklein25 at hotmail.com
Date: 7/24/2004
Remote Name: 209.22.11.124

Comments

I was born and raised in Michigan and became interested in the "Fitz" after I heard Lightfoot's song. Although I was only seven when she went down I have always been fascinated with her story. One of the great legends of the Lakes.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John D Fitzgerald III
Location: Courtland VA
Email: j.fitzgerald at charter.net
Date: 7/20/2004
Remote Name: 68.115.187.241

Comments

Gordon's song has always brought goose bumps since I was a child. Though my connection to the boat is only by my fathers uncle Edmund. I truly feel for the familes who lost sons, fathers & friends on that tragic night.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kyle Dorsty
Location: Burnsville, Minnesota
Email: kcdmsp at aol.com
Date: 7/18/2004
Remote Name: 152.163.252.200

Comments

I always had a thing For big Fitz since National Geographic Mysteries of the deep


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ken Rusilowski
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Email: kjr at iserv.net
Date: 7/14/2004
Remote Name: 208.224.10.173

Comments

Could Have Been Prevented since the "Fitzgerald" was reported to encountered some "rolling" in the waves near Isle Royale Island in the beginning of the storm. Captain should have sought safety harbor.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Andrew
Location: Clinton Twp., Mi
Email:
Date: 7/9/2004
Remote Name: 209.101.50.227

Comments

If you do the math and look at the wreck site a intresting conclusion can be drawn. The ship is about 700'lg. It sank in about 500' of water with estimated swells of 25'-50'. If you do a study on the pitching of the ship you can see that the bow could have struck bottom with the ship intact. If this happend the massive propellers could have had enough torque to twist the ship in two after the center section had been chrushed like an acordion from the impact.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Andrew
Location: Clinton Twp., Mi
Email:
Date: 7/9/2004
Remote Name: 209.101.50.227

Comments

If you do the math and look at the wreck site a intresting conclusion can be drawn. The ship is about 700'lg. It sank in about 500' of water with estimated swells of 25'-50'. If you do a study on the pitching of the ship you can see that the bow could have struck bottom with the ship intact. If this happend the massive propellers could have had enough torque to twist the ship in two after the center section had been chrushed like an acordion from the impact.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Patricia Nagel
Location: Medford Wi
Email: docdj42 at yahoo.com
Date: 7/9/2004
Remote Name: 66.191.83.95

Comments

I to this current date think this wreck as all wrecks are a tragedy.My heart goes out to the men of the Fitzgerald and especially to the families left behind. I will not speculate on what hapened I will just say I cannot help but to think what each man was thinking their last moments this side of earth,makes me ill.Many years have passed since this happened but they will live as will the Fitzgerald forever if only in our hearts..


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John
Location: New Jersey
Email: john.drucker at comcast.net
Date: 7/5/2004
Remote Name: 69.240.10.152

Comments

I don't know why the Edmund Fitzgerald sank that fateful night. I just wanted to express my condolences to the family and friends of the crew. God Bless


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bob Emms
Location: Portland OR
Email: bobemms at comcast.net
Date: 7/5/2004
Remote Name: 24.20.55.30

Comments

My thought of the wreck is that when the bow of the ship was pushed down with the wave the cargo rolled forward so all the weight went for forward. Does anyone know how the cargo holds were designed? I have not seen a blue print of the ship, but sure would like to see one. It is my guess that it was one big cargo hold. When they filled it up it would tend to level out.This would work alright if the ship did not have much turbulance. Once the bow was forced down the iron ore, which was round pellets, all rolled forward causing the ship to keep going down and not righting itself. Can think of two ways this could have been kept from happening. One is if the cargo hold had seperate comparments under each cargo hatch, the ship might have surived. Also the weight of the cargo was cut down for saftey,which seems to make sense. But this could have contibuted to the wreck by allowing the cargo to all roll forward causing the wreck just like the first reason. Only in this version if the cargo hold had been full to the top there would be no place for the iron ore to go. Does any one know how much more weight this would have added to the ship,could the ship carry this much iron ore? Bob Emms bobemms at comcast.net


Subject: The urs of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Rick Baker
Location: Leeton,Missouri
Email: bmydoll at hotmail.com
Date: 6/24/2004
Remote Name: 216.74.201.35

Comments

Ive always loved the song Gordon Lightfoot wrote about the fitzgerald and the brave men who lost their lives aboard her. As a kid I listened to the song, now as an adult Ive gotten the sheet music and guitar cords and often sing in tribute to the ship, her brave lost souls that were aboard and there families left behind. My heart goes out to the ones left behind. God Bless.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: patrick joyce
Location: osage I.A
Email: ptjoi at osage.net
Date: 6/23/2004
Remote Name: 66.43.197.197

Comments

I remember my father crying when we heard about the ship i was 11 years old at the time im 40 now and it still brings tears to eyes, we remember you boys god bless.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jimmy Bill
Location: wetmore MI
Email: mwiddis at up.net
Date: 6/18/2004
Remote Name: 208.4.88.48

Comments

I thought the loss was a tragedy, even though I'm 13.This may sound weird but I've built it out of legos. I also thought it was sad that the crew didn't have a chance. This is dedicated to all the crew members their families and to the S.S. EDMUND FITZGERALD.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: lisab
Location: Ft Thomas, AZ
Email: oliver88girl at yahoo.com
Date: 5/28/2004
Remote Name: 4.240.141.138

Comments

I have been a student of this tragic shipwreck for many years, and I remain convinced that the 'Three Sisters' in concert with the incredible stresses put on the ship during the fury of the storm broke the Fitz in two, or at least caused a catastrophic breach in her hull on the surface, which was unrecoverable and unsurvivable. I still get goose bumps when I see them bring up the ship's bell...I'm glad the families got to see that done in remembrance of their men.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: henri
Location: meppel , drenthe
Email: ipcress at planet.nl
Date: 5/27/2004
Remote Name: 195.121.70.238

Comments

god bless the loss of all the men who where a board of the edmund , and all the other ships al over the world ,estonia, herold of free enterprise,titanic...


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: mike parella
Location: Sayreville, NJ
Email: pirate1971 at verizon.net
Date: 5/26/2004
Remote Name: 138.89.162.163

Comments

I remember that day as if it where yesterday. I was a deck hand aboard the Tug Chippewa II out of Perth Amboy, NJ. We wher in Long Island Sound towing a barge to Bridgeport CN. at the time it sent shivers up my spine. I could not help but think what the families and friends of the crew of the "Fitz" must be dealing with. Two months later I knew exactly what they must have felt. The tug Chippewa II was lost at Sea with all hands in January 1976 off the coast of Florida. A freak accident caused me to leave the tug on Dec.29th. 1975. Those two events will remain etched in my mind forever. My thoughts and prayers are with all of those who will some day return to us when the sea gives up her dead.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Norm
Location: Neebish Island
Email: enormish at yahoo.com
Date: 5/24/2004
Remote Name: 207.73.200.76

Comments

I remember seeing her that August of 75' like it was yesterday...it doesn't matter how she sank anymore, just that she is gone and so are her crew. I will maintain positive memories of both!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bob
Location: Saline, MI
Email: impala2 at earthlink.net
Date: 5/20/2004
Remote Name: 207.69.137.37

Comments

I have always believed that the Fitz grounded in the large swells and fractured the hull in the bow area enough to allow the Taconite to soak up water like a sponge. It would happen slowly transfering the weight aft but making the ship nose heavy. The ship recovered less with each breaking swell over the bow. Finally the weight was enough in the bow that it couldn't recover the last and final time and plunged down to the bottom in a couple of seconds at about 25 knots. When it hit the bottom nose first the ship broke into pieces. The stern of the ship was still on the surface and connected when the bow hit the bottom. It sunk in 530 feet of water. If you could have stood the Fitz on end it would stick out of the water 200 feet. The stern dissapeared as soon as the breakup below. The crew on the bridge would have probably been blown down the companionways to the interior with the incoming force of the water. Like the Titanic, I believe that the site should still be explored. But not exploited! The wreck is a gravesite AND a part of Maritime history which should be granted site access for historical purposes.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jon
Location: Winneconne Wi.
Email: mom_of_4_cute_kids at charter.net
Date: 5/19/2004
Remote Name: 66.190.33.167

Comments

The books, The night the fitz went down, and Gales of November really gets you thinking they bottomed out did damage to the hull .Pumps couldnt keep up,they started sinking slowly , and probalbly nose dove into the bottom quickly,hit bottom and broke in two. If it broke in two on the surface they would of been seen by the Andersons radar longer ,and more debri would of been found, or survivors.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Frank 15y
Location: New York City, NY
Email: FrankyRizzlo at US-PIZZA.COM
Date: 5/17/2004
Remote Name: 80.57.169.175

Comments

I think the ship couldn't handle the torsion produced by the fierce wind and the waves. Because at the back of the ship there's a bridge and at the front there is another one. The produce very large forces on the middle part of the ship wich couldn't handle the torsion. So probably it was an error in the construction of the boat.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Cliffy R. (7years old)
Location: Clinton Twp. MI
Email: cliffy
Date: 5/16/2004
Remote Name: 69.47.90.147

Comments

I think that it's the biggest shipwreck in the Great Lakes. All the water came right into the compartments from the waves. I feel bad for all the people who went down with the ship. I like the song.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dwayne Sessions, PhD.
Location: St. Amant,LA
Email: privatepilot1 at hotmail.com
Date: 5/15/2004
Remote Name: 209.124.227.104

Comments

I also greew up listening to the song by Gordon Lightfoot. The song captures the spirit of the ship and her crew. After studying about the sinking of the ship, I would have to conclude that a powerful wave might have broke the hull in two. The men of the ship gave their lives in service to their country in that they were helping industry build the products needed for a strong US and Canadian economy. They are heroes.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: thomas walsh
Location: shelby twp. mi
Email: currently changing email address
Date: 5/9/2004
Remote Name: 68.61.16.34

Comments

when the hatch coamings were inspected and found to be faulty, why were repairs allowed to be put off until the end of the season? I don't understand why something like that could be ignored. I guess it is easy for someone like myself to second guess, but it sure makes me wonder.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: justin
Location: NE
Email: agroozis50 at yahoo.com
Date: 5/2/2004
Remote Name: 65.172.143.196

Comments

heres my theory she was damaged with a gash on six fathom shoal letting watter in to the *MIDDLE* holds later she was taking water into this "leak" and when picked up by the two waves the water goes towards the middle and straddles her afterwords the taconite (iron ore)ran towards the front of their holds dragging the ship down is seconds thank you *_*


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Matt
Location: Guelph,Ontario
Email: whitesidematt at hotmail.com
Date: 5/2/2004
Remote Name: 65.93.140.55

Comments

We have been learning about the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald for about a week now in my english class. Learning about the tough and unforgiving weather they had to go through. The first time I had heard the song by Gordon Lightfoot I was about 10 years old, at that time it was only a song to me, it means so much more to me now knowing what had happened on November,10th,1975.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Nate Jurmu
Location: Baraga, MI
Email: jurmu_36 at hotmail.com
Date: 5/2/2004
Remote Name: 205.242.56.60

Comments

I have been a boat lover since I can remember. And to hear of a great mighty ship sinking in our Lake Superior stunned me. Superior isin't just a lake to me now, it is a formidable water route, that took the Fitzgerald down to the bottom in a violent storm. My thoughs on what occured that night is that it was hit by the Three Sisters waves, it made it over 2 of them,. And as it passed the crest on the second, and hit the shallows at the bottom, and the third wave overtook it. May god bless the souls of those brave crewmen and thier families...


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Keith
Location: Theresa, NY
Email: gman19542000 at yahoo.com
Date: 5/2/2004
Remote Name: 198.26.122.12

Comments

I share the comments and feelings of all who have written. I spend 8 years on Lake Ontario as a fist mate. Our ship was a charter fishing boat, but I have seen what the lakes can do. The Fitz has had my attention long before she went down. I have recntly retired from the U. S. Army and intend to study her short life more now. Any insights to literature would be a help. Thanks in advance. May God hold the crew close to him.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Justin Higner
Location: Niagara Falls, N.Y.
Email: -
Date: 4/30/2004
Remote Name: 199.29.216.253

Comments

I am a boat lover and ocean liner historian. I belive the Edmund Fitzgerald bottomed out at the 6-fathum shoals as she dipped with the waves. She must have had her hull breached with a long gash of around 100 feet or so. Coupled with a few leaky hatches, she gradually sat lower in the water as she sank. Finally, after about a half hour, she dove to the bottom with the next big wave. God bless those men and their families.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Justin Higner
Location: Niagara Falls, N.Y.
Email: -
Date: 4/30/2004
Remote Name: 199.29.216.253

Comments

I am a boat lover and ocean liner historian. I belive the Edmund Fitzgerald bottomed out at the 6-fathum shoals as she dipped with the waves. She must have had her hull breached with a long gash of around 100 feet or so. Coupled with a few leaky hatches, she gradually sat lower in the water as she sank. Finally, after about a half hour, she dove to the bottom with the next big wave.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: LWJensen Captain (R) USA
Location: San Antonio-TX
Email: blackknight35719 at hotmail.com
Date: 4/29/2004
Remote Name: 65.40.102.136

Comments

I have study great mysteries of history for over thirty years and this combined with my experience as a retired active duty army officer has given me a unique perspective on some of histories great stories. The loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald while tragic and sad, reminds me however of the great bravery, day to day, hour by hour that is necessary for men and women to make their living upon the great waters of the earth. Rest assured the men of the "Fitz" are not forgotten nor will they ever be forgotten. Every historian and child that does a report on this great story ensures there living memory. GOD bless the families and friends of these men and "all of those who go down to the sea".


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Merlin
Location: Thunder Bay
Email: newfies_rock5 at hotmail.com
Date: 4/27/2004
Remote Name: 24.76.208.156

Comments

I am doing this project for school and i have to write a newspaper report on this and this site helps me!! thankz alot and GOD BLESS THE FAMILIES THAT HAD PEOPLE ON THE EDMUND FITZGERALD! :'(


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bertha Richard
Location: Churchill,Manitoba
Email: snowbird20_99 at yahoo.com
Date: 4/25/2004
Remote Name: 142.161.197.177

Comments

Its been almost 20 years since the Edmund went down. People are still felling the saddnes and how those men were not able to be saved. I have a 15 year old son who would like to do a book report on this subject. If i hadn't listened to the song. I probably would not have known that Edmund Fitzgerald was a boat. Gordon Lightfoot wrote an excellent song and it made more real for me cause I would have probably thought the song was about a man who gals came early......thanks


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: William Craine
Location: Mt.Morris.MI
Email: Johndeerewillie
Date: 4/24/2004
Remote Name: 152.163.252.167

Comments

I am a 9 year old kid.I really like ships.My very favorite ship is the great Edmund Fitzgerald.I am ben thinking that the Fitz about 1 or 2 miles from sheiter.But,she probly broke a part,took water, and sank.It's sad that all of the crew died


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: tom
Location: oshkosh, wi
Email: t_n_d_repair at hotmail.com
Date: 4/23/2004
Remote Name: 24.166.138.100

Comments

I was 5 when "big fritz" went down on nov 10, 1975 i would like to say it was the biggest freighter built it was built to haul 26,000 tons most freighters only had 17 hatches "big fritz" had 21 it could sail at top speed of about 14 and 1/2 knots or 16 mph she was the fastest ship on the lakes at the time, she was a beuty she was the best on the lakes. but see the lakes are the worst to be on during a storm becouse the ocean has so many more miles to have the waves stop but on the lakes they just go from shore to shore alot quicker back and forth so the storms are worse. and also the radar on the "big fritz" was downed during the storm so they did bottom out on the rocks and had damage to the balast tubes which lets water out of the ship and yes you take all of the factors the ship sank .........."GOD BLESS ALL THAT WAS ON THE SHIP FROM THE 63 YR OLD CAPT DOWN TO THE 22 YR OLD CADET AND EVERYONE INBETWEEN"............." POEM " THE EDMUND FITZGERALD Towering waves lap over the hull, Spraying up with the bow's rise and fall. Across the deck the wind howls, While down below, metal strains and growls. The crew fights valiantly to save their ship, Their efforts in vain as they watch her slip Farther down, pulled by the angry waves, Taking the crew to a watery grave. She took with her the lives of 29 men, Husbands, brothers, sons and friends. Divers brought up the ship's bell From the murky depths that hold her well. Loved ones rang the bell to herald The lives lost on the Edmund Fitzgerald. written by Sheri Kyle-Stump November 1995


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kelly
Location: Cadillac,MI
Email: fozchic_3 at hotmail.com
Date: 4/20/2004
Remote Name: 69.54.202.141

Comments

I am doing a report on the edmund fitzgerald for histor fest. I think that the story of the sinking of the edmund fitzgerald is a sad story. I went to the memorial in whitehall and i cried.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Erica Snyder
Location: Mt. Pleasant, Michigan
Email: angel_1302at chartermi.net
Date: 4/14/2004
Remote Name: 24.231.180.176

Comments

I am doing a report on the Edmund Fitzgerald and I don't know really much about it but I know that it sunk in our very own Lake Superior. I would love for you all to e-mail me and tell me what your perspective of the Edmund Fitzgerald and what makes you think why did this have to happen to all of those people and how bad their families had felt. This is a really neat thing for me to do a report on and I hope that you all will give me your perspective of the whole sinking of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald. Thank for your time and i hope to hear from you all. and tell me what you think about it.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Don
Location: Toronto,Ontario,Canada
Email: vatchat sympatico.ca
Date: 4/11/2004
Remote Name: 65.92.173.243

Comments

I was only 9 years old when the Edmund Fitzgerald went down but I have no recollection of my parents discussing the tragedy..we were living in Montreal at the time. A year later I remember hearing GORDON LIGHTFOOT'S "WRECK OF THE EDMUND FITZGERALD" on the radio for the first time and being just a kid I had no Idea what he was singing about...until we did an assignment on the tragedy 3 years later in Grade 6. I recall the teacher playing the song in class and reading a copy of the lyrics....It only dawned on me and I had a better understanding what happened that Night in 1975 !!! I hope they will do a big memorial tribute to the 29 brave men who perished aboard the ship when November 10th 2005 rolls around..it will be 30 years!!!! THEY WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ronny
Location: Marine City, MI
Email: rjsfolksat i-is.com
Date: 4/7/2004
Remote Name: 66.103.234.146

Comments

The Fitzgerald was damaged on the shoal. There were no survivors. The Fitzgerald did not break in half at the surface, but instead, at the bottom. I am very interested in boats. The Fitzgerald was a good bulk freighter. My dad and all of his brothers and sisters that went to school at Holy Cross, seen the ship go up and down the St. Clair River in Marine City. When I went on vacation to White Fish Point, I went to the Valley Camp and inside was a bunch of stuff from the Fitzgerald, including the lifeboats and in a museum, I saw the Fitzgerald bell. This is something that I'll never forget.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John
Location: Whitefish Bay, Michigan
Email: 2000rabfamat yahoo.com
Date: 4/6/2004
Remote Name: 64.88.86.3

Comments

I believe that the Fitzgerald's hatches were not sealed correctly, she took in to much water, had a bad list and eventualy went down cracking in two once she slammed into the bottom.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Amy lamb
Location: detroit,MI
Email: somebodyat yahoo.com
Date: 4/2/2004
Remote Name: 152.163.252.167

Comments

I think what happened to the edmund fitzgerald is very sad. I feel realy bad for the family members. My dad talks about the night it went down. And how sad it was. Let the men rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: benlarson
Location: silverbaymn
Email: mom911at lakenet.com
Date: 3/31/2004
Remote Name: 216.70.39.181

Comments

the reason i think the fitz sank is mcsorley was always full ahead and when the boat loader pulled away he was under way and hatches where put on at sea and he never held up in bad wheather he always was on the lake in bad wheather going fullspeed


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: adrian english
Location: terang, victoria . australia
Email: adrianenglishat hotmail.com
Date: 3/19/2004
Remote Name: 218.142.214.47

Comments

when i was young i i heard a song about a ship called the edmund fitzgerald . but unknown to me was what kind ofship was she , how big was this lake she was sailng in and why was this song so haunting? i have now come to understand the sadness of this tragedy and also he legend of this once mighty ship !


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mackenzie
Location: MI,Flushing
Email: alyparat yahoo.com
Date: 3/14/2004
Remote Name: 205.188.209.10

Comments

I am doing a report on the Fitzgerald and how it sunk. I have got books and found Sites on the Internet. I am in 6th grade but to me the lose of the Fitzgerald is very sad. God is with the families of the 29 men. God let the 29 men RIP.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Greg Hahn
Location: Canton, Ohio
Email: gregory jhahnat ol.com
Date: 3/13/2004
Remote Name: 216.26.143.2

Comments

In my opinion the Fitz struck bottom near the shallows of caribou island. The Fitz was slowly sinking from that point on. The captain of the Authur M. Anderson was quoted saying "he had the Fitz on radar and he felt the Fitz was to close to the shallows". A later radio conversation between the two ships indicated that the ship had a list to starboard. This is a clear indication that the Fitz was taking on a lot of water. The Fitz eventually lost buoyancy and dove under the waves. The bow of the Fitz drove into the bottom of the lake so hard it created a long trench. The tremendous force of impact weight and gravity caused the ships midsection to implode and the Ship to break in two on the bottom of Lake Superior.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Brian
Location: Albany, NY . USA
Email: lordbryan76at hotmail.com
Date: 3/13/2004
Remote Name: 12.107.155.135

Comments

I just wanted to saythat whatever happened on Lake Superior that night, God is watching over those brave men, who were working fora nations industry.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Robert Follon
Location: Cambridge,United Kingdom
Email: robert.follonat btopenworld.com
Date: 3/12/2004
Remote Name: 213.122.182.81

Comments

I know of the "Edmund Fitzgerald" only from the documentary about it,even though it was now so long ago these things always haunt you,personally,l believe the "big fitz" bottomed out on the shoal and then the storm broke her in two when giant waves caught her,none of this makes any difference any more of course,suffice to say that we will never have the beating of the oceans or the elements,now it is time to leave the "big fitz" b. I hope the salvaging of her bell helps the families put this disaster behind them,and they can now remember their loved ones with pride.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jason Purzycki
Location: Fairfield Ct
Email: jason.purzyckiat uconn.edu
Date: 3/11/2004
Remote Name: 204.60.152.83

Comments

To the person who thought it should be an official grave site......... it already is dude, keep on researching


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Garret Moeller
Location: Elk River Mn.
Email: gmoeller69at hotmail.com
Date: 3/7/2004
Remote Name: 208.38.89.131

Comments

Whatever happened to the good men of the Edmund Fitzgerald, we cannot take away the tragedy.Whether you know of this story by song,or by legend;it is difficult to place blame.would anyone knowingly jeopardize the lives of twenty-nine men,for some cast iron pellets?


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: ricky bixler
Location: texas.
Email: rickybixlerat yahoo.com
Date: 3/4/2004
Remote Name: 66.171.155.164

Comments

the .loss of edmund fitzgerald and her crew of 29 is a loss i know she will be missed i will always thing about her and crew of 29 shes not lost shes found and her crew 29 may rip.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: David Schwiderson
Location: Marquette
Email: Rcer01at aol.com
Date: 2/27/2004
Remote Name: 24.213.40.14

Comments

I am doing a research paper on the Edmund Fitzgerald and from what i know so far this ship was not only famous it broke most of the shipping records and it a sad thing that this ship was lost and if only the captain listend to the Andersons captain they would of mad it and the ship made into a memorial for all to see. p.s. i think that they showld stop going down to see it and make it a offical grave site.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike Polaski
Location: Rochester, NY USA
Email: mjp1051at aol.com
Date: 2/20/2004
Remote Name: 157.225.178.51

Comments

Your article shed new light on the story. Having lived my entire life on the Great Lakes (Erie, Pa, Ann Arbor, MI, and Rochester, NY), I was always intrigued by the story. Mr. Lightfoot obviously did his research well...from the cargo capacity ("26,000 tone more...") to the geographical reference points, notably Whitefish Bay. While greater, FAR greater, tragedies have occurred down the ages, the loss of 29 hard-working (as all deckhands and sailors are) is nothing to scoff at. Very noble of you to dedicate a page to the memory of those lost men...and their survivors.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Marvin Burgess
Location: Chocowinity, NC
Email: 0
Date: 2/18/2004
Remote Name: 68.83.30.23

Comments

Since 1975, when I first heard the song. I have often thought if the story was true. When I had seen a documentary on the discovery channel. along with the song and story, now when I listen to Gordon Lightfoot's version there is a different feeling. I can image what the sailors went through. I was once in the navy aboard a guided missile cruiser out in the English channel and the wave was coming over bow and every once in awhile the ship would dip below the waters and believe me I was frighten. So knowing the end was coming must have been very frightful for the crew. I know it has been a long time since the sinking. But my thoughts truly are with the sons and the daughters of the Edmund Fitzgerald. Thank you for this time.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Steven Kemp CC
Location:
Cypress, CA
Email:
potagekempccat earthlink.net
Date: 2/13/2004
Remote Name: 209.178.147.132

Comments

I remember "Gordon Lightfoot Song" about the Edmund Fitzgerald and thought it was a folk song. I am from northern New York and have seen ships pass through the St. Lawrence Seaway until I left home. I also spent 4-years in the U.S. Navy aboard a "tanker". I have been below decks for four years and I can see why the sunk so fast. It will not take very many hatches or water tight sections too leak and the water to come in faster then you can pump it out with bilge pumps. I like your web site and glad I found it. I was in my vfw club when a sailor told me that was a real ship wreck; as all i knew was the song. I would like too be put on your email list if you send out information. Thanks, Steven J. Kemp Cc


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ethan
Location: Ohio
Email: Ethan23at epals.com
Date: 2/10/2004
Remote Name: 198.234.252.9

Comments

Today, I learned of the Edmund Fitzgerald in TAG class today, and its quiet sad how the Edmund Fitzgerald went down


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: jerry
Location: spnecer In.
Email: jerprovinat aol.com
Date: 2/3/2004
Remote Name: 152.163.252.167

Comments

So many times I have come to this site. many other sites of pain and sudden loss I stop and read. They died doing their duty. Mere words cannot describe their bravery and dedication to duty. The pain and sorrow of loss. Do not be sad, but be glad. They are now in a much better place where they will hurt no more.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Nicole
Location: ontario
Email: 0
Date: 2/3/2004
Remote Name: 206.172.124.148

Comments

We learned about the Edmund Fitzgerald in class today. The class was unusually quiet. We also listened to the song and I thought it was a remarkable ship.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: courtney and kris
Location: gaylord,mi
Email: www.mileanneat aol.com
Date: 1/31/2004
Remote Name: 205.188.209.12

Comments

We wish that it doesn't happen to other ships that sail through the Great Lakes. But we wish that the love ones don't remember anything about a shipwreck in the Superior (lake).


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tyler
Location: st.clairshores
Email: whatzthebuzz1at aol.com
Date: 1/31/2004
Remote Name: 69.47.80.121

Comments

I wasn't even born when this terrible tragedy happened I learned about it yesterday in school. my the lord bless the families and the souls that died


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kyle Benik
Location: W.I
Email: ss.benikat worldnett.att.net
Date: 1/29/2004
Remote Name: 12.73.145.236

Comments

I really liked your web site and I'm sorry that the Edmund Fitzgerald sank. I'm learning about the Edmund Fitzgerald in school. I'm really interested in the history of the ship.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: BRIAN HOULE
Location: MASSACHUSETTS
Email: CAMAROKING30at AOL.COM
Date: 1/27/2004
Remote Name: 64.12.96.134

Comments

It's amazing to think back to that day. I was only 4 years old at the time, and remember up to this day, my dad talking about this tragedy. I can only imagine what it was like when the this sad news came across the television. Though it means little now, God bless the families who suffered this terrible loss.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: K. Lewis
Location: Waukesha, WI
Email: Karilynnlewisat rr.com
Date: 1/24/2004
Remote Name: 24.209.131.139

Comments

I recently received the CD by Gordon Lightfoot and am very moved by his song in tribute to the singing of the Edmund Fitzgerald. What a sad day that was on November 10, 1975. I was just about 8 years old and do not remember much about the sinking. The song just takes you back to that day of great tragedy. God bless those 29 souls and their families.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Sean Kane
Location: Wilmington Delaware
Email: Choochoodanielat aol.com
Date: 1/23/2004
Remote Name: 68.82.49.169

Comments

The ship was a terrible lost. The ship was amazing though I never saw it in real life. From what I see the ship went down from lost of radar, a cracked hull, a rocky shoal, and the hatch covers coming off. The ship was amazing and I wish could've seen it once. The song inspired me to look it up and before then I never heard of it.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Sean Kane
Location: Wilmington Delaware
Email: Choochoodanielat aol.com
Date: 1/23/2004
Remote Name: 68.82.49.169

Comments

The ship was a terrible lost. The ship was amazing though I never saw it in real life. From what I see the ship went down from lost of radar, a cracked hull, a rocky shoal, and the hatch covers coming off. The ship was amazing and I wish could've seen it once.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: David Woloszyn
Location: North Tonawanda, New York
Email: David_Woloszynat msn.com
Date: 12/29/2003
Remote Name: 162.130.1.254

Comments

My Father was a Merchant Marine, working mainly on the great lakes. I have heard many stories told about the great lake freighters that traveled on the "inland seas". I remember when "Big Fitz" went down. That tragedy brought to mind the strength and dedication of the men who work the big lakes. May God rest the soles of those lost, and bless the families of those who lost them.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Chris S.
Location: Fort Atkinson Wisconsin
Email: csargentazat hotmail.com
Date: 12/25/2003
Remote Name: 66.181.141.7

Comments

On Christmas day, we'd like to take a minute to post for the families who lost. God bless.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Brian Campbell
Location: sanborn new york
Email: bcampb7228at aol.com
Date: 12/23/2003
Remote Name: 205.188.209.12

Comments

Every time i hear the song i get a tear in my eyes and cry for every man who died that night. I will always remember the day and I know tell my grandchildren about it and play the song for them to hear. Gordon Lightfoot did a wonderful tribute. GOD Bless the men and their families


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Gabe Pitman
Location: Florida
Email: RGPitmanat aol.com
Date: 12/22/2003
Remote Name: 64.12.96.134

Comments

729' long and 126 tons of ore and that storm tossed them around like a rag doll.80MPH winds& 25' waves. UNREAL!! Such a tragedy. They will never be forgotten thanks to Gordon Lightfoot. Makes me feel bad for all the others who have lost there lives up there in other accidents, but the Fitzgerald will never be forgotten. God rest there souls.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dominick Prendergast
Location: Readville MA 02136
Email: domat 110.net
Date: 12/16/2003
Remote Name: 216.41.122.138

Comments

I don't recall this tragedy although I should I am old enough. I just heard the song recently and I looked up the Ship on the Internet. It is a great song and tells a very sad story.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dan F
Location: St. Paul, mn
Email: dfixat prons.net
Date: 12/12/2003
Remote Name: 208.210.151.200

Comments

How do you vote for all of the above. No single factor sank the Edmund Fitzgerald. Some or all of them did. First, the ship was originally designed to take about 18,000 tons of cargo. Over the years she suffered several structural problems due to increasing her load. These were issues such as the keelson cracking from over flexing and having to be reinforced and several episodes of steel plates cracking due to over flexing. She also suffered from low speed handing problems, a hallmark of overloading, resulting with several encounters with lock walls. You also add weight from leaking hatch covers, a possible encounter with a reef, or just stress cracking causing a list and blown ballast vents. Add one storm of the century and you have the making of a disaster. The interesting thing is that you take away one thing and you have a retired Laker in a museum instead of a pile of scrap iron on the bottom of Lake Superior. Any human behavior to eliminate one of the above and you get away with it. The problem is its no one's fault because its every one's fault. You see how everyone KYA.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mr. Esposito
Location: Rochester, NY
Email: xat z.com
Date: 12/9/2003
Remote Name: 199.190.224.144

Comments

It was very sad.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: jake
Location: kingdom city mo
Email: lj
Date: 12/4/2003
Remote Name: 204.184.172.80

Comments

I think that the Edmund Fitzgerald is an interesting story. We are learning about it in the 5th grade. We think it is cool


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Keith F
Location: Sault Ste Marie Ontario
Email: buckocowboyat yahoo.com
Date: 12/3/2003
Remote Name: 206.130.64.213

Comments

Well for me the Fitz was an awesome ship her crew was the best at what they did, And she Will always be remembered, I was to young to remember her going down I was a year old but today I still think about that dreadful night, growing up around the great lakes all my life you get to know some of the guys who work on the ships trying to make a living, My brother ken is 21 and works on the ships Algoma Central, its hard for me sometimes knowing that he is out there on the big lakes, I myself never got the chance to work on the ships but I still dream about them, it takes a good bunch of men to work on those " big boats" and i give them credit everyday.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: jamie latoski
Location: wyandotte michigan
Email: jlatoskiat whipbeat.com
Date: 11/25/2003
Remote Name: 68.40.211.46

Comments

thought I was not alive when the Fitz went down I have read up on it quite a bit I believe there were many contributing factors to her going under including the hatches overloaded which would cause the body to stress and ultimately breakup. I am sincerely sorry for all the lives lost on that fateful November night and wish nothing less than the very best to all surviving relatives I really like the song by Gordon yet it saddens me every time I here it. This is something that should and will live on forever there fore "memorializing those who came to rest with the Big Fitz forever"


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Andy Stockey
Location: Hammond, WI
Email: eoilersfan1at yahoo.com
Date: 11/24/2003
Remote Name: 64.33.169.147

Comments

Even though I was only ten months old when this tragedy happened, I feel sad when I think about it. I think that there were several factors that contributed to the wreck. First of all I think she was probably overloaded. I think there is a good chance that she bottomed out on Six Fathom Shoal. Also, I think there was a strong possibility of faulty hatch covers. The shoaling and faulty hatch covers may have caused a loss of buoyancy for the ship. Finally the same series of waves that attacked the Arthur Anderson may have been what put the Fitzgerald under. May this ship and her 29 crew members rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jesse Diaz
Location: Downey, Ca.
Email: jessediazat lycos.com
Date: 11/23/2003
Remote Name: 66.80.222.58

Comments

Grew up in Port Huron, I remember the day well, we were celebrating the marine corps birthday at the VFW when my wife paged me. My sister had called from Port Huron giving us the bad news. I've been on the lakes in a storm, and on the pacific in a storm. I'll take my chances with the ocean. too much force on the lakes. Ask any one who's sailed. Smooth water and sunny skies to all who sail. jesse


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: corrine
Location: dul. mn.
Email: Cande1at charter.net
Date: 11/23/2003
Remote Name: 24.197.184.70

Comments

My Father was a sailor on the great lakes. My Mother woke us early in the a.m to tell us it could possibly be Dad. Imagine our relief to know it wasn't him, Yet, our pain for those that lost their Fathers.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: jim cullen
Location: Valpo, In
Email: james1844at msn.com
Date: 11/21/2003
Remote Name: 67.27.157.223

Comments

Three months b/4 the "FITZ" sank I was newly promoted to Engineer on the "J" (EJ&E railroad) working the HiLine job at  U.S.Steel, Gary Works. I looked down toward the ore docks watching the routine of unloading ore that had been done so many countless times b/4. I also was working a yard job 200 ft from Lake Michigan the night she dove to the bottom of Lake Superior. I looked out over the treacherous waters that night wondering, could any ship like the "FITZ" survive that night? I sure wish Ronnie Howard would consider making this epic saga an epic movie that's long over due. Come on Hollywood! Get with it.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: caleb
Location: somers mt
Email: 123at none.com
Date: 11/21/2003
Remote Name: 209.206.189.74

Comments

I hope this legend never dies.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Travis McEwen
Location: Raymond Maine
Email: saleen351at hotmail.com
Date: 11/21/2003
Remote Name: 24.31.129.53

Comments

I just saw a show on the History Channel about the "Fitz", its amazing that Mother Nature can bring a ship like that to the bottom. No matter how modern or advanced humans become Mother Nature will always find a way to flex her muscle as a reminder of who really is in control. RIP all Members of the Fitz.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Russ Eiseman
Location: Pittsburgh, Pa
Email: rfecat salsgiver.com
Date: 11/21/2003
Remote Name: 151.201.227.203

Comments

I sailed the Great Lakes with the Bradley Fleet, USS Fleet, and finally with Interlake. At the time of the sinking I was off because of an injury (J.L. Mauthe) and I would have to agree with the Lake Carriers Association as to the reason for sinking. We all thought (my shipmates) that Superior Shoal was responsible and that she cracked upon hitting said shoal and slid beneath the waves. rfe ,oiler, SS J.L. Mauthe


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Charlene Perryman
Location: Escanaba, Michigan
Email: lizzie_rubyat hotmail.com
Date: 11/19/2003
Remote Name: 24.213.23.194

Comments

I think its kind of sad that 29 men died in the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald .its also sad for the families had to go through when the men died .I saw the preview of the wreck on TV of what happened on the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Steve Buck
Location: Andover,NH
Email: deilat fred.org
Date: 11/18/2003
Remote Name: 64.223.179.231

Comments

Such a waste. I think it could have been avoided had the captain heeded weather reports and not placed profits over lives.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kyle Larabee
Location: New Brunswick
Email: larabeeat nbnet.nb.ca
Date: 11/17/2003
Remote Name: 204.81.7.13

Comments

I know how it is to lose a family member. I feel extremely bad for the families. That was a Great Ship to lose. I read a book About Edmund Fitzgerald. It was a ship and a ruler of Great Lakes. Rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: james nesbitt
Location: wyandotte,mi
Email: wrongwayjamesat yahoo.com
Date: 11/17/2003
Remote Name: 67.36.19.228

Comments

I was 21 the night the big Fitz went down. I always looked for her on the Detroit river where I fished (and still do) and there was no mistaking her when we did spot her. my late brother john nesbitt worked for great lakes steel-and was also very intimate with the Fitz, as was his fellow workers on zug island. a friend of mine in fact has a picture of the Fitz going through the locks into lake superior-up bound several days before she went down-but he refuses to share it, let alone part with it-in spite of my pleas to do so...the night she went down on I was on a date-and the news of the sinking totally ruined the evening-and she could not understand my being so bummed out...ahhh the non boating person.. jbn


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: George Parsons
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Email: george.parsonsat primus.ca
Date: 11/10/2003
Remote Name: 24.76.61.253

Comments

I remember that fateful day November 10, 1975 like it was yesterday. As a young 17 year old working after high school at a heavy equipment dealership, I was asked to go outside to retrieve some motor oil and hydraulic oil for the parts department from a cold storage shed located at the back of the property. As I went outside I noticed the wind howling with the greatest force I had ever seen (and have seen to date) the sky was as black as midnight at 3:00 o'clock in the afternoon. The wind was so strong it was blowing empty 45 gallon drums around like paper! You just knew it was going to be a very bad, long night. It was the most eerie feeling I have ever experienced. Later that night my buddies and I were driving around in our city, located right on the north east shore of Lake Superior or as the natives call it Lake Gitchie Gumie. We saw trees blown down, power lines down all kinds of rubbish blowing around all over the place. It was the strangest feeling you will ever have. You just had the feeling something somewhere was very wrong! Then we heard the radio report that a lake freighter had gone missing, it was terrifying to think that some poor soles were out there on Superior having to deal with the worst storm in years on the big lake. You just knew it would be the worst for that majestic vessel and crew. When morning arrived our little city was alive with activity trying to located the Edmund Fitzgerald. When news broke that she had went down it was devastating, the 29 crew members had lost their lives. I remember it like yesterday. It was such a tragedy. It was a very fitting tribute by Gordon Lightfoot to create "The Wreck of The Edmund Fitzgerald" every time I here that song I think of that fateful night and feel for the families that lost so much November 10, 1975 when the "Fitz" disappeared off the radar screens. May she rest in peace and Bless you all.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tom
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Email: NA
Date: 11/10/2003
Remote Name: 67.164.234.33

Comments

As a ten year old boy growing up in Albany, NY I remember hearing about the "Fitz". I have been living in Michigan for the last 9 years and it was shortly after I moved here that I took an interest in this story. I have made sure that my sons know what happened and that on November 10th of every year we talk about the ship wrecks of the Great Lakes. I hope my sons will pass on their knowledge to their kids. May God rest the souls of those 29 men.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Frances Hunter
Location: Rossville, Ga
Email: fahunter#9at msn.com
Date: 11/10/2003
Remote Name: 68.60.26.57

Comments

Cheryl, every time I hear the Fitz song it really touches my heart to think someone (Your Dad) from within a few miles of where I lived perished on that ship. My thoughts and prayers are with all the families today.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: randy reamsma
Location: grand blanc mi
Email: randmann77at aol.com
Date: 11/10/2003
Remote Name: 64.12.96.134

Comments

I was looking through home movies and found some of the Edmund Fitzgerald going through the locks along with the Tom M Girdler


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: George Stariha
Location: Shoreview, MN
Email: Ruthstariha.com
Date: 11/10/2003
Remote Name: 152.163.252.167

Comments

My sympathy to all the families who lost love ones one this boat. I worked for the BN Railroad for over 43 years. I made the initial accident report from Superior to our headquarters in St. Paul. A very good friend of mine was Chief Engineer on the Fitzgerald for a couple of months before the accident. By the grace of God he was fortunate to get off one trip before it went down. He (Jim) told me it was his opinion it was caused due to loose hatches. A number of the crew lived in Superior and again my sincere sympathies


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: randy reamsma
Location: grand blanc mi
Email: randmann77at aol.com
Date: 11/10/2003
Remote Name: 64.12.96.134

Comments

I was looking through home movies and found some of the Edmund Fitzgerald going through the locks along with the Tom M Girdler


Subject: Today's Anniversary of the Loss
From: Laura Davis
Location: St. Louis MO
Email: ldavis52at hotmail.com
Date: 11/10/2003
Remote Name: 209.240.198.63

Comments

Today at the store, I heard Gordon Lightfoot's song "Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald". When I realized today's date, and thus the anniversary, I felt an icy chill flash through my body. I have felt that chill only once before: on Sept. 11, 2001. The story, the song, the anniversary: truly haunting.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: eNorm
Location: Haslett, Mi
Email: scott_nmat elps.k12.mi.us
Date: 11/10/2003
Remote Name: 207.73.200.76

Comments

I watched the Fitz lock down in the Soo late that August. I was 12 then, but I will never forget how glorious she looked that sunny day. It is still so hard to believe that anything could harm her. All positive thoughts are with the families of the crew on this most difficult day. They will never be forgotten.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: RJ Schindler
Location: Marine City, MI
Email: rjsfolksat i-is.com
Date: 11/10/2003
Remote Name: 66.103.234.165

Comments

I am 7 and I like boats. I love to read about the Fitzgerald and other shipwrecks. I went to see the bell that was brought up from the Fitzgerald. I watch the movie about the sinking of the Fitztgerald all the time. I live near the St. Clair river and we see freighters go by all the time. My dad saw the Fitzgerald go down the St. Clair river when he was younger.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Sally Jones
Location: Elk City, OK
Email: LILYALYSSA2003at yahoo.com
Date: 11/9/2003
Remote Name: 63.164.140.71

Comments

As I sit here, thinking about what to say, I am truly at a loss. I was 4 years old when the wreck occured. I never fully understood anything about it until one day when I REALLY listened to the words of the Gordon Lightfoot song and realized he was singing about REAL men on a REAL ship who REALLY died. From then on, I became almost obsessed with it, watching every available documentary over and over, trying to figure out what exactly caused those men to die. My personal thoughts are, it was a combination of hitting the shoal and the massive weight of the many waves causing it to break in two. Many times during the day and especially on November 10th of every year, I think about those last words, "We are holding our own." I can only pray that their deaths were quick and painless and that they are in a better place. My deepest sympathy goes out the every family member and every friend of those who died. I'll never forget those 29 brave men.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jerry Bielicki
Location: Marquette, Michigan
Email: bielickiphotosat yahoo.com
Date: 11/9/2003
Remote Name: 204.38.54.141

Comments

There were several factors indeed. Not least of which was an enormous rogue wave washing over the Fitzgerald from stern to bow. Check Anderson skipper Cooper's report. He talks about the colossal comber and times it to the vessel's radar signal vanishing.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Eugene M Baas
Location: East Troy, Wisconsin
Email: bugsbaasat aol.com
Date: 11/8/2003
Remote Name: 205.188.209.12

Comments

It's my belief that the Fitzgerald with its radars dissabled, wondered to close to six phathom shoal and bottomed out. From that point on she was sinking. Every year at this time I always think of the sailors that were on the good ship and their families you are in my prayers. None of those men were lost, they will always be remembered.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: cheryl rozman
Location: gwinn,michigan
Email: cotton47at charter.
Date: 11/8/2003
Remote Name: 68.188.205.36

Comments

I lost my father,Ransom Cundy, on the Edmund Fitzgerald on Nov 10,1975. There are many theories on the sinking & only the good Lord & the 29 men know what happened. The bell was raised so we family members would have a link between the ship & our men. It is safe at the museum at Whitefish Point, the closest point to where the Fitzgerald lies in Lake Superior. I want to thank each & every one of you who show an interest in the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald & are keeping the memory of her & her crew alive. My family & I appreciate your support. It is hard at this time of year but I know the men are resting in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Harold Folkestad
Location: MN
Email: folk1at wcta.net
Date: 11/7/2003
Remote Name: 216.189.132.107

Comments

I too am looking for blue prints of the Fitzgerald. If someone does have them, I would appreciate a set or how to buy a set.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dave Willkens
Location: Hickory, Pa
Email: poohat hky.com
Date: 11/6/2003
Remote Name: 209.195.170.139

Comments

I was living in Rochester,NY in 1975 and I can still remember hearing the news report of an ore carrier lost in Lake Superior with no survivors. I remember thinking, how can this happen today with all our advanced navigation and life saving methods. I served in the US Navy aboard an aircraft carrier and the sea can be a real foe to a ship. I always think of the families every time I hear the song. Sleep in peace brothers until we all meet in the great beyond.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Lawrence Ripani
Location: Waukesha, WI
Email: elrip12yahoo.com
Date: 11/5/2003
Remote Name: 65.56.223.97

Comments

Northwest winds and 30 foot waves with a large load? 30 foot waves will knock any ship over. I've talked to men who would rather sail the oceans, than to sail lake Superior in November! God bless the families and the friends.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kristen
Location: S. Burlington, VT
Email: mabeldog1at juno.com
Date: 11/4/2003
Remote Name: 65.235.166.49

Comments

I have always had a love for the Great Lakes. This love came from saluting freighters from my Uncle's cottage on the St. Clair Flats from the age of 4. I learned of the history of the Great Lakes Freighters, from my cousin Michael, as soon as I was able to retain that knowledge (probably 7). Still to this day, every November 11 & 12th, instead of mourn, I celebrate the lives of the men on the Edmund Fitzgerald, and celbrate the history of the Great Lakes.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: christopher mckearney
Location: lakewood,ohio
Email: chrisat sbcyahoodsl.com
Date: 11/4/2003
Remote Name: 68.76.109.54

Comments

the "fitz"was a great ship and fastest on the great lakes even with a full load.i liked lightfoot's sad and great song.thank you for the great song mr.lightfoot!!!!!!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Trish Schiesser
Location: Chula Vista, CA
Email: Idareedblanfordat aol.com
Date: 11/3/2003
Remote Name: 198.81.26.106

Comments

As a guest of Captain Mitch Hallin (deceased)master of the SS ELTON HOYT 2nd (Interlake)I passed over the Edmund Fitzgerald's grave back in 1988, the month of August, many times. Each time, I saluted the old ship - may she rest in peace, as well as Captn. Mitch... I wrote the book IDA'S RIDE (see this site) many years later. I've never been able to get the trip, nor the site of the Fitz far from my mind. I felt the history of her, and the remains of the crew calling out to their loved ones, letting them know that they were not unhappy, yet they missed them all.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Olivia and Isaac B.
Location: Aurora,IN
Email: ISAACB5at YAHOO.COM
Date: 11/2/2003
Remote Name: 206.162.192.40

Comments

I listen to Gorden Lightfoot in the car. The words are so sad yet happy. The Edmund Fitzgerald is my favorite song. Isaac age 8 I miss you Edmund Fitzgerald. Olivia age 5


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Timothy P. Caruso
Location: South Newfane, Vermont
Email: KingEiderat hotmail.com
Date: 11/1/2003
Remote Name: 216.114.166.254

Comments

Many of us still care. God bless you who are so intimately connected. We are so sorry and can't imagine your pain. So Sincerely, Tim Caruso


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Arthur S. Hurd
Location: Charleston, South Carolina
Email: ahurd1019at wmconnect.com
Date: 10/31/2003
Remote Name: 192.152.249.227

Comments

I remember the sinking of the S.S. Edmund Fitzgerald as if it were yesterday. I was only five years old and my father was a Master Chief Engineman on a Navy mine sweeper. I had heard the news on the radio while riding in the car with my father on the way to the Charleston Naval Base. I question him as to why the ship sank and the possibility of that happening to his ship. All the while he was trying his best to answer my questions as well calm my fears, for his ship was scheduled to get underway on November 11, 1975. My only thought was that I was never going to see my father again. He returned home as promised and a unique interested in the sea was born. In the very near future I look forward to being an Engine Cadet at the Great Lakes Maritime Academy. I hope that one I will serve aboard a ship whether on the lakes or deep sea with at least one fourth the pride, courage, and honor that these 29 men displayed. If I accomplish this task then I too, hopefully, will know the feeling of a job well done.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kyle Dorsty
Location: Burnsville MN
Email: Kcdmspat aol.com
Date: 10/28/2003
Remote Name: 152.163.252.162

Comments

I really like the song by Gordon Lightfoot. Even though I am only 11 years old I am really touched. What started my interest in the big Fitz was The Deep Sea Detectives.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Brett
Location: Lower, Michigan
Email: hotmail
Date: 10/24/2003
Remote Name: 141.218.213.20

Comments

Being a fan of the Fitz and more so of the History Channel, I believe they have to have one of the more sound theories to how the Fitzgerald sank. As the waves poured into the broken front hatch it added tremendous weight to the bow. As the Fitz crested a huge wave it had more than enough weight and a little extra help from its props to keep right on going to the bottom, digging the bow into the ground. This would explain the damaged bow, and why the stern, except for the fact that it is dislodged from the bow, was undamaged.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mary Soyring
Location: Sturgeon Bay,WI
Email: marysunshineat itol.com
Date: 10/22/2003
Remote Name: 209.62.164.153

Comments

My brother BUCK [ Oliver J, Champeau ]was lost on the Fitz along with the whole crew. There were NO survivors. I want to thank FRED SHANNON and his diving team for putting the 1st memorial plague with all the guys names on it under water. It was such a nice thought. THESE MEN DO HAVE NAMES!In my opinion FRED's findings should have been published. He is the most knowledgeable on the FITZ subject. As far as us families , We will always miss our family member in my case my brother. Time does NOT change that or ease it. THANKS FRED for all the other things you have done; REGARDS Mary


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Michael Horan
Location: Yardley, PA
Email: mhoranat comcast.net
Date: 10/18/2003
Remote Name: 68.32.0.100

Comments

I can't even imagine what the crew went through. I grew up on the lakes and can't imagine the lakes taking lives. My parents took me to see Mr light foot at a night club, he sang this song and I wept. I weep now every time I hear this song.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Sharon Johnson
Location: Memphis, Tennesee
Email: tatto 2 at  yahoo
Date: 10/15/2003
Remote Name: 67.163.69.10

Comments

When I heard the song by Gordon, I almost started to cry. I never heard the song before until I heard it in school. The book about The Big Fitz was good. I think the waves were about 50 ft. tall. That boat tip over and just sunk. Its Sad the way they died. I am sorry for the 29 crew members and their family. I also care about the people on the boat.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: truman vinson
Location: harrisville mi.
Email: twvinson1at yahoo
Date: 10/15/2003
Remote Name: 24.231.171.41

Comments

I have a real personal interest in the Fitzgerald, I worked in the yard that built her. I built the wheel house, the masts, engine foundations and worked on many other parts of the "Fitz" My wife was present at the launching and we observed the Fitz many times as she went thru the "soo" locks. I too think she bottomed out, took water went down fast, broke into when she hit bottom. Any way Thank You Gordon Lightfoot. My family loves the song. Truman Vinson


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Terrance Moore
Location: Spring Grove, MN
Email: Terrancemoore_69at hotmail
Date: 10/15/2003
Remote Name: 204.248.121.130

Comments

I think the waves were heading for all sides. But i don't think the waves were all headed the same way. I think a wave hit her on the back half of the ship portside. this caused the back to break off due to the weight of her cargo. Then the bow flooded and because of the collision, landed facing southeastward. Then the wave rolled the back half and it landed upside down. it's lying direction might be a result of all other waves rolling and pushing it. This, i believe is how the Edmund Fitzgerald sank.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kathy
Location: Kipling Sask
Email: prairiemumat yahoo.ca
Date: 10/15/2003
Remote Name: 64.110.196.48

Comments

I am 13 and have to write a report on the Fitz. I came to your web site. I cried when I read about all 29 crew going down with the ship. I just wanted to say how much I love your site and have told lots of other homeschoolers about it. Thanks~Kathy levey


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Sheri
Location: Youngstown, Ohio
Email: youn_cxrat access-k12.or
Date: 10/15/2003
Remote Name: 64.18.33.5

Comments

As the anniversary is getting closer, each year at this time my thoughts turn back to that day. There will always be a sadness in my heart for the friend lost that day. My son is named after him and he grew up knowing all we knew about the ship and that day. We were blessed with a visit from him just days before the ship sank when it was in Ashtabula Harbor over night. How could we know just a few days later such a thing would happen. I thank you for your web site I every so often go on just to feel close to Paul.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Chanse Craft
Location: Wise
Email: chanse24at excite.com
Date: 10/14/2003
Remote Name: 216.24.109.52

Comments

I think it's sad of the loss of a famous cargo ship. It's also sad of the loss of the 29 crew members because they worked so hard on the Edmund Fitzgerald trying to keep her in ship shape. Also they went through a heck of a lot on that stormy and cold evening. I really feel sorry for the families that had a relative on the ship that died and even though I don 't know the families I just want them I will be praying for them. This is my letter to the families of the Edmund Fitzgerald. By, Chanse Craft Age 11 Years old


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Justin Tibbo
Location: St. John's , NL
Email: justintibbo1980at Hotmail.com
Date: 10/14/2003
Remote Name: 205.251.177.13

Comments

Every time I hear the Gordon's song about "The wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald it sends chills up my spine and nearly brings tears to my eyes. You see, My father, William, Is a wheels man for the CSL Niagara (L=740 ft W=78 ft) and is up on the water as I speak. Such awful accidents as the Edmund Fitz. makes me worry about him at times, but as he has told me many times before, the crew are always there, so no matter what happens he is never alone. Not the most settling thing to hear your father say, but I guess it could be worse. I remember the closest call he had was when they went out into the lake when it was to stormy, got out so far and realized it was to bad and tried to turn around to go back. When doing so a giant wave hit them side on and tipped them to the point that the wheel house dipped in the water, and only for the wave bottomed out, the boat would have fully tipped over. So now, every time before my Dad goes back to work, I make a point to see him, because with the Great Lakes, when you go out, your never 100% guaranteed to come home. My heart still goes out to the families of the victims of the Edmund Fitzgerald, all I can hope is that I will not be able to relate such a loss to these people. I wish safe passage to all the men a women on the lakes.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Michael Fikes
Location: Granite city Ill
Email: michaelfikesat msn.net
Date: 10/14/2003
Remote Name: 65.239.190.116

Comments

To me. what is sad about the loss of these people is in parallel with the loss of the people on the Titanic. It did not have to happen. solutions to elementary problems were over ridden by pure greed. As a result, there are 29 graves at the bottom of that lake, when they didn't have to be. I agree with the wave theory.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: bill hoffman
Location: rockville md
Email: avonguy2000at yahoo.com
Date: 10/12/2003
Remote Name: 68.49.53.20

Comments

they died doing what they loved may they all rest in peace


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Laura
Location: Lajord Sk
Email: laura_hockey_8at hotmail.com
Date: 10/12/2003
Remote Name: 66.46.119.85

Comments

I listened to that song for a music class i have never heard it before or even heard of the Edmund Fitzgerald. But when i heard it, it was so sad to just think of those sailors and how they would have lived if they would have put "15 more miles behind her," The song is not only sad it also gives you facts about the ship and how much it weighed. Even though the song is very old i still like it.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: micah
Location: edgartown
Email: none
Date: 10/10/2003
Remote Name: 67.75.9.154

Comments

Firstly, my condolences to the family of every man lost that night. I feel that the Fitz went down because it bottomed out on six fathom shoal (basically from then on she was sinking) and McSoroley might have thought it was wave action; then one of 2 monster waves that hit the Arthur M. Anderson earlier could have pushed the fitz's bow beneath the surface of the lake. The crew probably didn't know she wasn't coming back up until the windows imploded.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jason Hicks
Location: Texas
Email: nitrors4mtat hotmail.com
Date: 10/7/2003
Remote Name: 24.242.41.169

Comments

I don't know a whole lot about this, but given the fact that there was reported damage to the hatches, that was supposed to be fixed after the season of 75, i think that with that there was water leaking in the whole time soaking the load of are making it heavier and making it sit lower in the water making it possible to be more likely to plunge into the waves versus staying on top, the extra weight also could have contributed, maybe with the extra weight and all the pressure of the storm, the hulls structural integrity was not great enough, we can all speculate, but we may never know...God Bless them all...


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Gina
Location: Hillsville, PA
Email: dskgem1at aol.com
Date: 10/7/2003
Remote Name: 152.163.252.162

Comments

I had never heard of the Edmund Fitzgerald before the song by Gordon Lightfoot. After hearing it, i read many books and articles on it. May all of those souls lost at sea, rest in peace. Just to hear that song sends a chill through me.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Brian W
Location: Montrose, MN
Email: gilly775at yahoo.com
Date: 9/29/2003
Remote Name: 12.27.46.130

Comments

The Fitz didn't hit a shoal. Divers inspected the hull and the nearest shoals and did not find any evidence that it did. I feel it was a combination of structural integrity and the possibility of hatches not being properly closed.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ron Verville
Location: South Dakota
Email: rveyat iw.net
Date: 9/28/2003
Remote Name: 216.16.56.83

Comments

I have read nearly every book on the loss of the Fitzgerald including the lengthy reports by the Coast Guard and NTSB. While it is possible that the Fitz shoaled, I am convinced it did not. The closest shoal it came close to was Chummy Bank. If it had sailed over it it could have sustained bottom damage. The track of the ship was not even close to Superior Shoal which some say it came in contact with. It was several miles away from Six Fathom shoal in my opinion. If it did not allow water into the hatches, which I believe, the best explanation is that it came apart on the surface of the lake. The reason: Structural failure. i.e. metal fatigue! The ship's hull was overstressed!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Nick Draegger
Location: Los Angelos California
Email: kknqradioat yahoo.com
Date: 9/21/2003
Remote Name: 64.136.146.173

Comments

The first time I had ever learned about the Edmund Fitzgerald was when I was listening to the radio. Gordon Lightfoot's song was so memorizing and interesting I decided to write and essay on the shipwreck to learn more about it.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: william holloway/sfc.us navy
Location: tampa,fl
Email: whollo3at aol.com
Date: 9/19/2003
Remote Name: 205.188.209.6

Comments

may all the souls that are with the sea stay with the sea god gave us a blessing with such beauty in the ocean but god bless the crew of the Edmund Fitzgerald


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Justin
Location: Coopersville, MI
Email: startrek421at hotmail.com
Date: 9/19/2003
Remote Name: 204.39.215.117

Comments

The real reason it sank was because it hit the shoals and split the hull. Combined with that all the heavy waves and the loss of the radar equipment.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Anthony
Location: Chatham ONT
Email: S.S.E.F.at  netrover.com
Date: 9/10/2003
Remote Name: 206.172.38.223

Comments

Since she had no radar they could not guide her around the Six Fathom Shoals and after she hit the Shoals she sunk. But she did not break in two she went down so fast that the load of pellets broke her in two!!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: sean cady
Location: donnelly mn
Email: krunch_77at hotmail.com
Date: 9/8/2003
Remote Name: 199.199.227.130

Comments

I think we'll never know what happen on board the ship only the crew who was aboard that ship only know's. because it happen so fast i don't think that they had time to react to the sinking of the ship.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: josh minks
Location: us ( famington ,mo
Email: minks j
Date: 9/6/2003
Remote Name: 152.163.252.162

Comments

am only 14 and my dad told me about the FITZGERALD and what happened it is sad that the men didn't get out in time those family they left behind its sad.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Neal Fifer
Location: NW OHIO
Email: nealdealat bright.net
Date: 8/28/2003
Remote Name: 216.201.42.152

Comments

The ship had been taking on water, and had lost her radar, My theory is that a very large wave enveloped her from behind and she went under. then went at an angle backwards towards the bottom. where she broke in two and layed to rest.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: MRURSU
Location: DURAND MICHIGAN
Email: MRURSUat EXCITE.COM
Date: 8/27/2003
Remote Name: 207.179.84.44

Comments

I DON'T THINK NO ONE WILL EVER HAVE THE RIGHT ANSWER AS TO HOW OR WHY THE FITGERALD SANK. JUST ABOUT EVERYTHING EVERYONE SAYS ABOUT THE FITZGERALD SINKING MAKES SENSE. I DON'T HAVE ANY ONE THEORY, BUT A FEW: 1. THE EDMUND FITZGERALD DID HAVE A LOAD OF TACONITE PELLETS WEIGHTING TWO TIMES OF THAT OF THE WEIGHT OF THE FITZGERALD WHEN EMPTY, THEREFOR THE FITZGERALD COULD HAVE EASILY BROKEN IN TWO AS A RESOLUTE OF A WAVE OR WATER UNDER THE BOTTOM OF EACH END AND NOTHING UNDER THE MIDDLE OF THE SHIP (BOTTOMED OUT). 2. THE FITZGERALD COULD HAVE BEEN PUSHED DOWN NOSE FIRST BY A BIG WAVE. 3. THE FITZGERALD COULD HAVE PASSED OVER THE SIX FATHOM SHOAL AND SANK. (STRUCK THE SHOAL). WHAT EVER HAPPENED IT WAS BAD AND VERY QUICK. I SAW THE LIFE BOATS TWO YEARS AGO, AND THEY WERE BADLY DAMAGED. THE BACK OF LIFE BOAT NO. 2 WAS TORN RIGHT OFF!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: dave dillon
Location: Green Bay Wi. 54313
Email: ddillonat wtaq.com
Date: 8/13/2003
Remote Name: 12.155.249.123

Comments

I believe the "Fitz" did strike the shoal and with 30 foot waves at her stern probably nose dived to the bottom after losing buoyancy.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Shannah, Justin, Niki
Location: Boyne City, Michigan
Email: morgman1at hotmail.com
Date: 8/7/2003
Remote Name: 64.7.173.151

Comments

we think that the cargo shifted forward as she slide across a shoal, while already taking on water from dislodged hatch covers. As she hit the sea bottom with her bow, the stern, under stress breaks, allowing more water in and she comes to rest in her current position. (we couldn't come to one reason, so we used them all!)


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Susie
Location: texas
Email: e
Date: 8/7/2003
Remote Name: 67.64.157.9

Comments

I've always felt something in my heart about that ship going down. I would not have even known or remembered that accident, had it not been for G. Lightfoot's song. I always loved the song, then I started tracking down info about it and it affects me in some way that I cannot explain. I'm so sorry for the loss of those men, but their families should be proud as they are heros of the sea.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tim
Location: Parma, OH
Email: a
Date: 8/5/2003
Remote Name: 65.43.145.163

Comments

What a horrible loss, I cannot believe how this happened, but hopefully cargo ships today will learn from this.11-15-75 Never Forget


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jim H.
Location: Minnesota
Email: jhergetat reprisedesign.com
Date: 8/4/2003
Remote Name: 209.173.229.18

Comments

I personally believe that anything other than shoaling would have never sunk "Big Fitz". The question in my mind is where did she bottom out... Most readings point you to the "Six Fathom Shoal" near Caribou Island. I was very interested in the "Superior Shoal" theory I read recently. I feel that this theory is a possible one (Superior Shoal is near the center of the lake near the path of travel of The Fitz on her last downbound trip). I would encourage anyone interested to further look into this possibility and formulate your own opinions. It is very unfortunate that we will probably never know the true reason for her demise.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Micah
Location: Edgartown
Email: fjagnoliat earthlink.net
Date: 7/27/2003
Remote Name: 67.75.2.57

Comments

I believe that the Fitz went down because of a series of events: 1.Because of waves continually smashing into them, the hatch covers loosened allowing water to flood in 2.when she bottomed out on 6 fathom shoal, another wound was opened in the ship 3. low in the water, the ship is hit by a monster wave that lifted up the stern and pushed the bow under 4. the cargo shifts forward 5. the ship sinks immediately 6.the bow hits bottom the sudden stop causes the ship to telescope into itself which why 200 feet of the ship is missing. I'm sorry to say that most of the crew probably never knew what hit them. Let god bless their souls and their families.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kyle
Location: Upland, In
Email: jimnlynnat aol.com
Date: 7/24/2003
Remote Name: 205.188.209.6

Comments

I believe that because the radars were out and the captain was then sailing blind at this point that damage was done to the bottom of the hull from striking the shole in shallow water. This led to a continuous flow of water that the pumps couldn't keep up with. The Fitz was then setting much lower to water and was lifted up by a huge wave which drove the bow straight down into a wall of water and the ship couldn't recover because of its tremendous payload it was carrying. I don't agree with the idea of to much hatch damage because the documentary stated that the pumps on board could pump 14,000 gal. of water per minute. The pumps would have been able to keep up with water coming in from a deck hatch, but not the bottom of the hull.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jim
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Email: unlisted
Date: 7/24/2003
Remote Name: 198.97.67.58

Comments

Godspeed, brave crew....


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John
Location: NY City
Email: JSGreene55at aol.com
Date: 7/23/2003
Remote Name: 205.188.209.6

Comments

This tragedy happened on my 20th birthday, so I always stop and think of those brave 29 men who went to their premature deaths answering the call of the sea.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jo
Location: Pa
Email: geg99at comcast.net
Date: 7/23/2003
Remote Name: 68.82.92.39

Comments

what a sad peice of history! I pray for all the many familes who have lost there loved ones in this most tragic occurance ! This site is most beautiful and sad verysad ! god bless them and all who lost there loved ones Jo


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Gene C.
Location: Baton Rouge, La
Email: Charliesangelsmanat hotmail.com
Date: 7/23/2003
Remote Name: 64.12.96.134

Comments

I have enjoyed reading and looking at this site very much. I agree with the comments posted by others.... My heart goes out to all of the families brought together with the bond of this terrible accident. I hate to admit, but until just a couple of weeks ago, I had no idea that the "Edmund Fitzgerald" was a 'real' ship until someone at  work told me "you know that is a true story"; I am glad they did. Being someone with an extreme interest in ships (lost or surviving) now the Ed. Fitz. holds a special place in my memory along with Andrea Doria, Lusitania, Titanic, Bismark, Impress of Ireland (which, by the way sank in the great lakes related to fog), {the airship} Hindenburg, and NOW Edmund Fitzgerald....... unfortunatly/sadly, we can not bring these sailors back, but we can remember one thing...... At least a peice of their memory hangs on to our present day world as long as there are those like us who continue to tell of 'their' story to our children, grandchildren; and they in turn, pass it on to generation after generation..... On a final note, (this is my opinion and not meant to insult anyone elses religious beliefs) remember that for those of the Christian faith, you will be reunited with your lost loved one, in heaven one day. Thank you to the authors of this wonderful/compassionate/well written-edited site...... God Bless and take care.... Regards


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: kendra
Location: orlando,fl
Email: d1a2n3estinyat msn.com
Date: 7/23/2003
Remote Name: 24.26.48.27

Comments

I believe she sank due to several events coming together. First she was overloaded and setting low. Heavy weather caused some hatches to take water resulting in more weight. Apon being pounded and lifted by a wave to her rear,she was slammed bow first downward. Most likely due to her weight and a load shift towards the bow she never recovered. Hatches may have popped off because of air pressure inside escaping as she went down or maybe they separated as ship hit bottom. It`s possible she was damaged by running into the shoal earlier on, but I doubt it because I believe she would have sunk sooner, giving the severe sea conditions and possible problems with removing water accummulated in her bilge. If I had to pin down the most significant factor in the sinking of the Edmund Fitz, I`d say definitely overloaded for the weather conditions ; making every other factor that much more significant. I believe the crew had no way of saving this vessel! God rest their souls! I feel for their families and those who loved them. This event has touched my life a great deal also. Sincerely Kendra Lea


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jeanne Soyring
Location: Sturgeon Bay, WI
Email: beazlyat itol
Date: 7/22/2003
Remote Name: 209.62.165.24

Comments

I am a niece to Oliver Champeau (Buck) who was aboard the Fitzgerald when it sank in '75. Many years have come and gone, but the memories are felt by our family every day. It is so very sad. November 10th will always be remembered. My heart goes out to family and friends of the captain and crew of the Fitzgerald.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: bobby
Location: salisbury nc
Email: ronew3at aol.com
Date: 7/17/2003
Remote Name: 64.12.96.134

Comments

I will never forget that great ship, and the way Gordon Lightfoot sang about it and the fate of those men, Does anyone know where I might find a photo or a painting of the fitz< thanks


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Charlene
Location: Monroe, OH
Email: ckhimesat earthlink.net
Date: 7/14/2003
Remote Name: 67.29.192.70

Comments

We just came back from a vacation spot near Whitefish Point. While there we visited the Greatlakes Shipwreck Museum to saw the ship's bell from the Fitzgerald. Looking at it and touching it allowed us to share, in some small way, the sadness oflosing those 29 men. I will always remember this experience.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Rita
Location: Rhinelander, WI
Email: moodyat yahoo.com
Date: 7/11/2003
Remote Name: 216.56.10.146

Comments

The Edmund Fitzgerald sustained damage to her hull after running over Six Fathom Shoal, allowing water to come in. When the waves hit her bow, she was unable to come back up due to the water that was already in her. The iron ore pellets shifted forward, and helped in bringing the bow down. A wave then came across the afterdeck with such force that she broke in two.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Daryl
Location: Gold Hill,Oregon
Email: rizzobadazzat hotmail.com
Date: 7/10/2003
Remote Name: 67.1.56.236

Comments

My heart goes out to all of the members of the Fitzgerald and to all of the families who lost loved ones. God bless you all.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: W Solberg
Location: Duluth, Mn
Email: mrwsolbergat yahoo.com
Date: 6/16/2003
Remote Name: 152.163.252.162

Comments

My Father was a boilerman on the Edmund and he was one of the 2 men that got off in Superior in Nov when in it came in to port. He was ill. He told me ever since the ship was made longer it made some scary sounds. (creaking, sounds of metal twisting and bending) Frank Stelzer was the other man that got off the ship when it came to port he was my "uncle", another boilerman. My Dad retired the day after it sank. He had served almost thirty years as a merchant marine and served in 2 wars.(ww2 and korean war) That was his ship and his best of friends. He died in August the following year. Frank retired a short time after and is enjoying his retirement on his boat in the Florida keys. I believe the welds broke in the waves of the November Gails. My Dad said he never did like Lake Gitchigumi after November it was a nightmare to be on the Edmund or any ship.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: john jorden
Location: holland,ohio
Email: jwj1061at sbcglobal.net
Date: 6/12/2003
Remote Name: 68.73.213.162

Comments

I 1st saw the fitz sept 75 inbound to toledo while perch fishing 100yds away-I waved to the crew. 2 months later she was gone.that connection will stay with me forever.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Allan Gauthier
Location: Sudbury,Ontario.
Email: janus1975at hotmail.com
Date: 6/10/2003
Remote Name: 66.206.225.152

Comments

I was but only a fraction of a year old when it happened, but painted a picture capturing the wreck going down as my respect for those men lost. it was in ninty six that the painting was done and I was wondering if any body could help me with blueprints of the ship so I could finish a new project I would like to have done before 2005 , thirty years after the loss.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Steve
Location: Hutchinson, MN
Email: sjgat hutchtel.net
Date: 6/8/2003
Remote Name: 66.103.161.14

Comments

I have always been interested in the wreck of 'Fitz'. I have read a couple books on it and am a big Gordon Lightfoot fan. I think his song was a great tribute to the 29 brave men who perished that cold November day. To the families of those men, your in my thoughts and prayers. God Bless!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: MARGO LANSAT
Location: WATERFORD MICH
Email: JLANSATat AOL.COM
Date: 6/3/2003
Remote Name: 205.188.209.6

Comments

I WAS 9 YEARS OLD WHEN THE SHIP WENT DOWN. I ALSO HAVE CRUISED THE GREAT LAKES AND KNOW FOR A FACT THOSES WATERS TURN WICKED WITH A BAT OF AN EYE AND TO NEVER UNDERESTIMATE THE FORCE OF WIND& H20. COULD IT BE POSSIBLE THAT UNDER THE CIRCUMSTANCES THAT DURING ALL THE WIND CHANGES AND THE CARGO BEING SHIFTED AROUND THAT WHEN THAT FINAL WAVE CAME AND THE WEIGHT AND OR SHIFT OF THE CARGO THAT IT MADE FOR A PERFECT WRECKAGE AND THAT IT HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH THE HATCHES AT ALL. SHE'LL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN,FOR GORDEN LIGHTFOOT EXPRESSED IT BEST.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: alex vargas
Location: bronx nyc
Email: C.CHINOat VERIZON.NET
Date: 6/1/2003
Remote Name: 141.155.151.80

Comments

im deeply sorry for the lose of the fitz crew.and i know there in a better place now.god bless there soul.and there familys as well


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: kelsey
Location: MI
Email: kegriggat aol.com
Date: 6/1/2003
Remote Name: 64.12.96.134

Comments

I was very touched when I heard the edmund fitzgerald went down with all 29 men.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Willie
Location: Oklahoma
Email: shotgun7574465at yahoo.com
Date: 5/31/2003
Remote Name: 204.61.4.163

Comments

I was living 18 miles north of the Sault Ontario the night of the storm any wind that can blow hard enough that the rain and ice cuts human flesh can cause waves large enough to snap a large ship like the fitz what a great loss to the crew R.I.P. men to the loved ones God be with you


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Chris
Location: Atlantic Beach, FL
Email: crtm0924at comcast.net
Date: 5/17/2003
Remote Name: 66.177.49.105

Comments

I am in the US Navy on my 3rd ship. I have sailed the Atlantic several times and all points inbetween and have been through several major storms. What I went through doesn't compare to what the men of the Fitz went through. Prayers go out to their family.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Gary E. Banfield
Location: Lincoln Park Mi.
Email: lbanfield0822at wideopenwest.com
Date: 5/11/2003
Remote Name: 65.219.124.65

Comments

I went to my hunting camp in the Eastern U.P. on the morning of Nov.11 1975 and was astounded to see numerous trees,(mostly large whitepines), just absolutely sheared off about 30 feet up their trunks. This showed us the strength of the wind that the men of the Fitzgerald faced the day before. I will remember that day as long as I live.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jeff Kohlmann
Location: Shelby Twp. Mi.
Email: shadowkohlmannat aol.com
Date: 5/4/2003
Remote Name: 205.188.209.6

Comments

I went to Whitefish Point Sept. 2001 for the first time.And again last summer. For anyone that hasn't been you should go. Very informative and what a beautiful place. Knowing that the Fitz had passed so close to the Point so many times. My feeling is that the storm was so feirce it just overwhelmed the Great Laker and she had no chance. Superior is so Beautiful yet so Unforgiving. May all the men rest in peace. Long live the memory of the EDMUND FITZGERALD. I hope to make it to the Old Mariners Church in Detroit for the service this year.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Charlie peters
Location: Knoxville, Tn.37938
Email: chuckinknoxvilleat aol.com
Date: 4/30/2003
Remote Name: 67.32.63.130

Comments

I think what happened to the Edmund Fitzgerald was awful. I still wonder how a wonderful ship could have went down just like that. I hope that the family members will be alright and know that mother nature is DEADLY!! I hope that nothing like this will happen again but I know it will and could have been a whole lot worse.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mr Gnome Mr Gnome
Location: gnomevile
Email: Gnomeat 90210.ca
Date: 4/26/2003
Remote Name: 142.154.117.4

Comments

i think that it all started when the ship probally cracked it's keel on six fathom shoal and this caused water to come in and damaged the superstructure and then a big wave known as the three sisters hit it and snapped it like a toothpick in pliers this would explain the sudden disapearence of the ship.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John Janks
Location: Houston, TX
Email: jsjanksat msn.com
Date: 4/6/2003
Remote Name: 67.192.148.170

Comments

I too have always been interested in why the Fitzgerald sank, and have been suspicious that it hit bottom on Six-Fathom Shoal. I just had a paper published on the use of Landsat satellite data correlating it with water depth over the shoal. The satellite imagery shows much detail than the current Chart 2310. The paper was published by the Institute of Nautical Archeology at Texas A&M University in Bryan/College Station. The reference is: Janks, J. S.,2002, Landsat Bathymetric Analysis of Six-Fathom Shoal, Lake Superior: The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald, INA Quarterly, Vol. 29, No.3/4, pp. 23-27. Just for the record: As with all scientific publications, the publisher holds the copyright and writers are not compensated. The editor, Christine Powell, can be contacted at: inaat tamu.edu


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: james clark
Location:
Email: livonia, mich
Date: 4/3/2003
Remote Name: 64.12.96.134

Comments

hatch covers not tight allowed water intake with full cargo in hull to shift forward when the three sister waves raised the stern and the fitz., was unable to recover and nose-dived to the bottom. she broke in two as result of impact, prop still turning twisted her structure durning a handstand, bow buried, and stern in the air. a very quick demise.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: james clark
Location:
Email: livonia, mich
Date: 4/3/2003
Remote Name: 64.12.96.134

Comments


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Email: uefaat europe.com
Date: 3/14/2003
Remote Name: 24.200.221.194

Comments

Hard to believe I recenlty heard of this wreck through Mr. Lightfoot's song. Incredible to comprehend that a wreck of this nature could happen as recently as 1975 in a lake. My heartfelt warmest condolences to all those that lost on that horrible day. God be with you. May their memory live on forever through the song.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Greg
Location: Brisbane Australia
Email: gjburgeat bigpond.com
Date: 3/14/2003
Remote Name: 144.139.125.200

Comments

i FIRST HEARD ABOUT THIS STORY WHEN i HEARD THE song on the radio. I thought it was a ship that must have been around during the 1800s or something. I couldnt believe it when i saw the ship for the first time on this web site. Just goes to show you that even with modern technology the natural elements can still have there way. May god be with those who were lost and may he also look over those left


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: bob
Location: Ontario
Email: ccelwat aol.com
Date: 3/10/2003
Remote Name: 64.12.96.134

Comments

However the Fitzgerald sank, my prayers go out to the families that lost their loved ones. Like Gordon Lightfoot said: "the lake, it is said, never gives up her dead when the skies of November turn gloomy." I hope that the bodies of the 29 men who lost their lives stay in their resting place forever.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Gregory J. Christiano
Location: Hopatcong, N.J.
Email: falon at optonline.net
Date: 2/26/2003
Remote Name: 67.85.9.0

Comments

The wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald always haunted me as one of a series of great tragdies on the Great Lakes. But it is special in legend and history. This sinking holds a prominent place because it developed a mythology of its own...the debate of how and why it sank. It will forever hold a place in my heart for the fearless sailors that lost their lives that day. I share the grief with their families even after all these years.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: chris
Location: millville nj
Email: winchwest1at aol.com
Date: 2/20/2003
Remote Name: 209.3.205.36

Comments

the big fitz was a tragaty in its self the crew are gone the ship went down by the head the crew did not have a chance sory ernest mcsorley capt. of the fitz


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: SWK
Location: Wisconsin
Email: xxxxxxxxx
Date: 2/19/2003
Remote Name: 216.153.248.135

Comments

to me she is still steaming full ahead on that heavenly body of water in the sky. the memory of the big fitz still burns brightly in the fraternal order of great lakes cargo ships. she is testimony to man's engineering ability as well as the frailty of the human race.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bob
Location: Richmond, VA
Email: Scubahokieat hotmail.com
Date: 2/18/2003
Remote Name: 24.125.105.77

Comments

No other ship since the Titanic has captured the imagination of so many people. She was a beautiful vessel and still rides the waves in people's memories. What a spectacular yet tragic story.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: cperusek
Location: lorain,ohio
Email: chuckoneat adelphianet.com
Date: 2/18/2003
Remote Name: 68.68.163.44

Comments

the fitz wintered in lorain the year before she sank I have photos of her at the old b.o. coal docks that year. such pretty lines.My mother woke my brother and i up early before school to tell us ,we watched the today show in horror and were sick along with our parents for days and weeks to come.As for the cause how can anyone argue with captian coopers assesment of what might have happened.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: mike
Location: appleton ,wi
Email: blackdogodieat yahoo.com
Date: 2/16/2003
Remote Name: 152.163.197.211

Comments

the edmund fitzgerald is a peice of history for me our family had a loved one on there and i sing karaoke and when i sing that i get the place where im singing all stop to hear me i'm in the prosesse of building the model. thank you for this site


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: mike
Location: appleton ,wi
Email: blackdogodieat yahoo.com
Date: 2/16/2003
Remote Name: 152.163.197.211

Comments

the edmund fitzgerald is a peice of history for me our family had a loved one on there and i sing karaoke and when i sing that i get the place where im singing all stop to hear me i'm in the prosesse of building the model. thank you for this site


Subject: The Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Chad age 9
Location: NEW YORK
Email: lws4589
Date: 2/15/2003
Remote Name: 205.188.209.78

Comments

I love THE Edmond Fitzgerald it's my favorit ship. I think it sank cause the cargo was in the middle and two waves were at the bow and stern and it slit in half. Now it's resting in peace at the bottom of Lake Superior.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: noah ryan
Location: toledo ohio
Email: no4ryat aol.com
Date: 2/12/2003
Remote Name: 152.163.197.69

Comments

i think what happened was terrible i know a survivor from the ship he is my grandfather he used to sing to me the song he and his crew mates sang on the decks of the great ship he told me never to forget what he did on the edmond then he stoped breathing and he was crying when he sang the old song from the edmond fitsgerald i have a picture of the ship befor it went down let never forget the people who died on the great ship and the survivor who god saved his name is william e ryan


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Megan
Location: Canton MI
Email: d2dehartat aol.com
Date: 2/10/2003
Remote Name: 152.163.204.207

Comments

I think the Edmund Fitzgerald sank beacause it rode up on two waves and there was nothing to supportthe middle so it broke in two.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kyap
Location: Austell, GA.
Email: Kyapat msn.com
Date: 2/7/2003
Remote Name: 67.210.172.90

Comments

I'm not sure waht happened, but may god bless their souls. What I think happened is: it was to rough out there, and the ship's bow went under a wave. Due to the weight, and the old technology structure of the ship, it casued to much stress on the hull, and she cracked.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kyap
Location: Austell, GA.
Email: Kyapat msn.com
Date: 2/7/2003
Remote Name: 67.210.172.90

Comments

I'm not sure waht happened, but may god bless their souls. What I think happened is: it was to rough out there, and the ship's bow went under a wave. Due to the weight, and the old technology structure of the ship, it casued to much stress on the hull, and she cracked.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: jerry m.
Location: northern michigan
Email: slapshotjrat yahoo.com
Date: 2/4/2003
Remote Name: 24.50.251.88

Comments

i am originally from northern michigan..and was in the navy fpr 4 years on a destroyer..i cant explain it..but i get tears in my eyes everytime i hear gordon light foots song..i have been to the musuem and to whitefish bay snowmobiling..it is sad ..my thoughts..i think they were overloaded..and the weather can get real nasty up there on that lake..rest in peace ...


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Gary
Location: USA, KY
Email: financewiz_2at yahoo.com
Date: 1/26/2003
Remote Name: 24.159.157.56

Comments

I was there the night the Fitz went down. I was in the US Coast Guard stationed at Traverse City, MI. We flew the first "fixed wing" search that night. I flew as radar operator and radioman. A wild ride. The Fitz song still gets me.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Alexander R.
Location: Massachusetts
Email: arullo123at attbi.com
Date: 1/25/2003
Remote Name: 24.60.204.109

Comments

Being due to enter a Maritime Academy within the next two years i cannot completely, at least yet, understand what a career on the ocean is like. What i would like to add, however, is that while we remember those crew members onboard the E.F. and we remain reverant over the loss, we should not forget the thousands of men that have found their resting place at the bottom of the sea. The Maritime industry is not typical of any other that you will find on land. It is an industry full of folklore, rich in history, and full of loss. To all those on the Edmund Fitzgerald, all those who have gone before myself in the industry, and those that have lost their lives serving in our merchant marines and in our armed services, i would like to say...None of you will ever be forgotten


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Micah
Location: Edgartown,MA
Email: none
Date: 1/25/2003
Remote Name: 67.30.189.45

Comments

I just would like to add about my othe comment-the way "suspended" is written- it looked like it was right when I wrote it because the screen was shorter.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Micah
Location: Edgartown,MA
Email: none
Date: 1/25/2003
Remote Name: 67.30.189.45

Comments

I think the E.F. went down because:1)Her hatches came loose;2)her bow rode up a wave;3) her bow went down the first wave and another wave was right behind the first one;4)Her bow goes up the second wave while her stern was still on the top of the first wave and her midriff was sus- pended in mid-air;5) her midriff was too heavy and she split in half;6) the halves fall between the waves;7) the waves wash over the halves and sink them immidiatly,thus no mayday call,no survivors, and not much wreckage.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ron Ormson
Location: Elmira
Email: rormsonat city.waterloo.on.ca
Date: 1/18/2003
Remote Name: 216.209.172.71

Comments

I was only 5 years old when she went down. My father, Bill, a truck driver for the Hudson Bay Company brought home a newspaper (either a Toronto Star or Globe & Mail with a picture of her before the sinking?) Now I'm 33 and can understand the pain of this tradgedy. I feel this terrible loss with our American Brothers and Sisters. RGO. Jan.18.03


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Sheila Murray
Location: Zanesville, Ohio
Email: smurray3at columbus.rr.com
Date: 1/17/2003
Remote Name: 24.208.164.101

Comments

I still cry when I think of the crew of the Edmund Fitzgerald. I will remember them in my heart forever.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: jtoc
Location: williamsport, pa
Email: jtocat suscom.net
Date: 1/17/2003
Remote Name: 64.78.95.138

Comments

The Fitzgerald reported a list to one side prior to sinking. I would think the weather caused the steel pellets(cargo), to shift to one side and place the load against the side wall of the ship. The ship most likely could not recover from the list and once the load was against the sidewall of the ship it most likely caused the ship to split being that the tremendous weight of the load was pushing down on the side of the ship.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: jtoc
Location: williamsport, pa
Email: jtocat suscom.net
Date: 1/17/2003
Remote Name: 64.78.95.138

Comments

The Fitzgerald reported a list to one side prior to sinking. I would think the weather caused the steel pellets(cargo), to shift to one side and place the load against the side wall of the ship. The ship most likely could not recover from the list and once the load was against the sidewall of the ship it most likely caused the ship to split being that the tremendous weight of the load was pushing down on the side of the ship.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jim Slette
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Email: dapapa120at attbi.com
Date: 1/16/2003
Remote Name: 24.118.213.72

Comments

I feel she broke in half due to a load shift in the middle of heavy seas. She should have stayed in port and saved her load.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jim Slette
Location: Minneapolis Minnesota
Email: dapapa120at attbi.com
Date: 1/16/2003
Remote Name: 24.118.213.72

Comments


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Captain Donald L. Ghiata
Location: Oregon, Ohio
Email: Captghiataat aol.com
Date: 1/11/2003
Remote Name: 64.12.96.134

Comments

As I review the comments on the sinking of the Fitz again, I am reminded of that storm. We were anchored for 5 days under Grand Island on Lake Superior, with 2 anchors down "spread eagled", & with the engine half speed ahead to hold our position and keep from "dragging anchor". Weather reports gave much advance warning of the storm. When I read comments of the "brave" men who died in that tragedy, I am sure that they were terribly afraid, and any sailor who has been in a great lakes storm will agree that they were terrified. The tragic thing is that the Captain has the power over the lives of every crew member. As a retired Captain of Great lake ships, I beleive that the Captains have far too much power. A "heavy weather" Captain is a risk to every man aboard. When tragedy strikes, several theories emerge as to the cause. Imagine a car driven at full speed on an ice covered road, and goes out of control, crashing and killing all passengers, resulting in speculation if there was a fault in the mechanism of the car. (Perhaps the driver should have parked the car). If The Fitz had sought safe anchorage, this tragedy would have been avoided. True, the Anderson, and others out there made it OK. Some heavy weather Captains make it and some don't.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Wycliffe Fahie
Location: Forest Anguilla British West Indies
Email: wfahieat gov.ai
Date: 1/8/2003
Remote Name: 209.88.232.8

Comments

I first learnt of the tragedy looking at Discovery Channel and I became facinated with the occurrence. At this point, it is not necessary to debate about the cause of the sinking because the odds are against any vessel in a terrible storm like that. Hopefully the lesson learned from the tragedy is that one has to be very detailed when dealing with the water and this will lessen the possiblity of such a tragedy in the future.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ronda
Location: Antigo, WI
Email: kittenroniat msn.com
Date: 1/5/2003
Remote Name: 206.176.223.100

Comments

I completely feel for all the families of the 29 brave and wonderful men who were lost. God Bless them All. I think the wreck caused by a terrible combination of things. I think the Fitz was probably too close to the island and did scrape which contributed to her taking on water. I also thing with the hurricane force wind and waves, the hatch covers were probably damaged as well, allowing water in that way. But, I think the biggest contributing factor was the two giant waves that the captain of the Anderson reported hitting his vessel. With the Fitz already listing and taking on water, those two waves were a major factor in my opinion. I believe the Fitz broke in half when she hit the bottom, bow first, with enough impact to break her apart, shattering her midsection and flipping her stern over.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Clint schubert
Location: New Zealand usa cup holder
Email: akaclintschuat hotmail.com
Date: 1/3/2003
Remote Name: 219.88.251.78

Comments

It is a tragick moment in time.But we are all at the mercy of the sea.And those who sail on her, know only to well her true power.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Clint Schubert
Location: Auckland NZ Kiwi
Email: akaclintschuat hotmail.com
Date: 1/3/2003
Remote Name: 219.88.251.78

Comments

the song has allways moved me just as the sea moved those 27 mere men that day.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: matt
Location: C.T.
Email: Yankfan10591at aol.com
Date: 1/2/2003
Remote Name: 64.12.96.134

Comments

Ifeel that the loss of the FITZ was a terrible thing to happen. the loss of 29 brave men is a great one


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: paul
Location: erie pa
Email: vetreanat certainty.net
Date: 12/25/2002
Remote Name: 65.164.70.10

Comments

as a retired lake sailor i would like to say that i believe that the FITZwas lost dur to her hitting bottom on her last trip down she was way to close to the island when she made her turn.the wat the weather was that night they didnt have a chance.29 brave men were lost that night thats all we should be concerned with.gob bless the crew and their families


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: paul
Location: erie pa
Email: vetreanat certainty.net
Date: 12/25/2002
Remote Name: 65.164.70.10

Comments

as a retired lake sailor i would like to say that i believe that the FITZwas lost dur to her hitting bottom on her last trip down she was way to close to the island when she made her turn.the wat the weather was that night they didnt have a chance.29 brave men were lost that night thats all we should be concerned with.gob bless the crew and their families


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: paul
Location: erie pa
Email: vetreanat certainty.net
Date: 12/25/2002
Remote Name: 65.164.70.10

Comments

as a retired lake sailor i would like to say that i believe that the FITZwas lost dur to her hitting bottom on her last trip down she was way to close to the island when she made her turn.the wat the weather was that night they didnt have a chance.29 brave men were lost that night thats all we should be concerned with.gob bless the crew and their families


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: paul
Location: erie pa
Email: vetreanat certainty.net
Date: 12/25/2002
Remote Name: 65.164.70.10

Comments

as a retired lake sailor i would like to say that i believe that the FITZwas lost dur to her hitting bottom on her last trip down she was way to close to the island when she made her turn.the wat the weather was that night they didnt have a chance.29 brave men were lost that night thats all we should be concerned with.gob bless the crew and their families


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: buffilo comes running
Location: minesota / crosby
Email: alandbooat yahoo.com
Date: 12/23/2002
Remote Name: 216.251.177.152

Comments

what happened here on this lake were my people called home many years ago was made to happen to show that the lake could not be defeted by the future the men who died on that titan of an ore shipwill forever be thanked by the spirits of nature and may it leave a mark on all that come in contaced with the lake to respect it an not try to take it over thank you for reading my veiws of this disatser thank you buffilo comes running


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jeremy Duvall
Location: Bullhead City, AZ
Email: gbpackat mohveaz.com
Date: 12/23/2002
Remote Name: 216.163.97.101

Comments

I am just starting to learn about the sinking of this large ship. The more I read about it, the more interested I get. My heart goes out to the families of those brave men who lost their lives that stormy November night.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: tim
Location: CONNEAUT-OHIO
Email: GEBHat AOL,COM
Date: 12/20/2002
Remote Name: 205.188.209.78

Comments

I TALKED TO MY GRANDFATEHR AND A FEW HARBORS GUYS--THEY SWEAR SHE BROKE IN TWO AFTER A CARGO SHIFT AND CRAPPY JOB ON DOGGING THE HATCHES-HE SAILED FOR THE 20 TIL MAYBE THE LATE OR EARLY 60-S--I TRUST HIS OPINION


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mitchel J.
Location: Saginaw,Michigan
Email: MJJacqmain829at msn.com
Date: 12/12/2002
Remote Name: 24.236.163.170

Comments


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Scott G. Smith
Location: Bakersfield,Ca.
Email: smithsat etronline.com
Date: 12/10/2002
Remote Name: 206.169.45.183

Comments

Like many people, I learned of the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald by way of Gordon Lightfoot's song. I am still saddened by that song. I have stood on the shores of Lake Michigan during a storm and I can fully appreciate what Captain McSorely and his crew must have felt in the dark moments before the end came. Although there are many theories and accusations still being bandied about they cannot change the inescapable fact that we are powerless when nature chooses to do her worst. This is a fact for those "Who go down to the sea in ships".


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: A Caring Individual
Location: California
Email:
Date: 12/9/2002
Remote Name: 130.191.26.86

Comments

Personally, the Edmund Fitzgerald has been a mystery to me all of my life. I do have a few theories about exactly why she went down. It's possible that the ore was too heavy for a ship that long under those conditions. If the waves were tall enough, strong enough, and numerous enough, the ship would possibly be held in the troughs. The fast, huge waves might have been powerful enough to smash in the bridge windows, causing the captain to lose control. If the ship turned parallel to the waves, it could have flipped over, loosing the ore. The ore containers would cause a tremendous amount of buoyancy. This would allow the next wave to right and swamp her. She would then hit the bottom righted and in one piece.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Leon
Location: Racoon City
Email: schouestat bellsouth.net
Date: 12/8/2002
Remote Name: 209.214.157.157

Comments

My theory is that the cargo is in the back of her. A "sunami"crashed over her bow. The weight of the cargo resisted to move up, because it weighed so much, she broke>I heard the song Friday and I have seen the documentaries, so, I'm gonna make a social studies project on it.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Micah
Location: Edgartown,MA
Email: none
Date: 12/3/2002
Remote Name: 63.214.86.233

Comments

I'm only in 5th grade but I am very interested in the "Big Fitz." I think that one of the same waves that hit the Anderson forced the Fitz's bow beneath the lake. A local builder just disappeared while returning from Providence in his plane. The reason I have mentioned that is because he needlessly pressed on in a storm just as Capt. McSorley had. I don't think, as the Coast Guard does, that loose cargo hatches contributed to the sinking because hatches THAT BIG are heavy enough to seal themselves. Another theory that I'm also behind is that the cargo shifting, the incoming water, and possibly inferior welds caused her to snap in half and quickly sink. The lack of a mayday call also suggests a sudden catastrophe. "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" is one of my favorite songs. I am shocked to hear that Gordie Lightfoot is in the hospital. I would recommend the book "Shipwrecks" by Cathie Cush. It tells a lot about the "Big Fitz" and many other shipwrecks including the Monitor, the Titanic, the Lusitainia, the S.S. Central America, and many more. I am deeply saddened every Nov. 10th when I remember the 29 men who lost their lives that tragic evening. I live on Marthas Vineyard so I know a lot about the Andria Gale- a fishing trawler that sank in the No Name Storm. It's story is told in the box-office hit,"The Perfect Storm."


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: WILLIAM
Location: HENNING ,IL
Email: none
Date: 11/30/2002
Remote Name: 66.19.20.111

Comments

The EDMOND FITZGERALD was a good ship. With the cargo and the heavy water being blown in made it to heavy so it snaped in half.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jeff
Location: Agoura, California
Email: jsemaphoreat aol.com
Date: 11/27/2002
Remote Name: 205.188.209.78

Comments

I am quite saddened about the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald as I have learned much about its crew and the ship's history over the last few months. I was at Mackinaw Island two years ago and had spoken to a man about Lake Superior. One thing that stood out in our conversation was that he said youhave to have respect for the Lakes, especially with storms and the month of November. I understand that one of the crew members was from Agoura, Calif., where I presently live. Would anyone know more information about this crew member (don't know name)?


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: DAVID
Location: DAVISON, MI
Email: DAVIDUSCGat BOATNERD.COM
Date: 11/27/2002
Remote Name: 204.80.212.1

Comments

I spent 15 years in the U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Division-USCG, working with Marine Inspections on various vessels including break bulk carriers of the Great Lakes. The one resounding theme I can cite about the loss of The Edmund Fitzgerald is the fury of the storms over Lake Superior, and other Great Lakes, and Mother Nature reigns dominant at times, and during November, mariners sail by the grace of God. And analogous to the perfect storm that raised havoc on Halloween, along the Atlantic New England Coast, so goes those souls to the perils of the sea. So in respect to those whom depart our prescence, we pay tribute and say good bye, and god bless.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: DAVID
Location: DAVISON, MI
Email: DAVIDUSCGat BOATNERD.COM
Date: 11/27/2002
Remote Name: 204.80.212.1

Comments

I spent 15 years in the U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Division-USCG, working with Marine Inspections on various vessels including break bulk carriers of the Great Lakes. The one resounding theme I can cite about the loss of The Edmund Fitzgerald is the fury of the storms over Lake Superior, and other great lakes, and mother nature reigns dominant at times, and during November, mariners sail by the grace of God. And analogous to the perfect storm that raised havoc on Halloween, along the Atlantic New England Coast, so goes those souls to the perils of the sea. So in respect to those whom depart our prescence, we pay tribute and say good bye, and god bless.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: DAVID
Location: DAVISON, MI
Email: DAVIDUSCGat BOATNERD.COM
Date: 11/27/2002
Remote Name: 204.80.212.1

Comments

I spent 15 years in the U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Division-USCG, working with Marine Inspections on various vessels including break bulk carriers of the Great Lakes. The one resounding theme I can cite about the loss of The Edmund Fitzgerald is the fury that storms over Lake Superior that mother nature reigns dominant at tiems, and during November, mariners sail by the grace of God. And analogous to the perfect storm that raised havoc on Halloween, along the Atlantic New England Coast, so goes those souls to the perils of the sea. So in respect to those whom depart our prescence, we pay tribute and say good bye, and god bless.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mildred M.Weiner
Location: Spencerport, NY
Email: mweinerat objectframe.com
Date: 11/26/2002
Remote Name: 24.93.8.218

Comments

The first time I heard the haunting melody about the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald, was during a Windjammer cruise in Sept. of 1994. My sister treated me to that event for my birthday, the year our mother died (Feb.4) I love the song, and have it on a tape played in by the artists who were there singing it for the guests on the Mercantile and her sister ship, the first night out (on Penobscot Bay). I appreciate learning so much more about the topic, especially with the added comments from Eric Hanson, whose suggestions might well be heeded by others. There frequently would be a point where an individual could have changed the outcome from an accident. As a member of the US Coast Guard Auxiliary, I've been told of other cases, fortunately with not all with quite as serious results, where someone along the chain of command might have spoken out with further information crucial to an event, but chose to remain silent, thinking that the person in charge certainly knew how to handle the situation, and would not at all appreciate interference with various odd suggestions or interjections of "possibilities." We are warned to be continually reevaluating every possible factor related to any given situation, including how long a captain or crew has been on duty already, before answering any distress, especially in unusually heavy seas. Communication on status is so essential that we are frequently reminded to call out to verify an action each time we prepare to do and each time we complete one. I'm a little puzzled about that command, apparently given by the captain, that no crew was to be on the deck. It sounds like a good precaution when decks were awash, but, might that not have left undone something fairly vital, like checking out the hatches for "holding tight," as might be "one of the series of possible causes" that Eric has hinted at? I'm not sure what size pellets are in such a load, but might those not have fouled the bilge pumps? Thanks for the link(s). Mildred M. Weiner, 09E-04-47-072


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Celena Morales
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Email: powerpuff_2002at msn.com
Date: 11/24/2002
Remote Name: 65.43.144.10

Comments

I'am doing a report on Edmund Fitz Gerald can you give me more information please.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bruce
Location: Sarasota, FL
Email: bruceat thisisbruce.com
Date: 11/23/2002
Remote Name: 68.56.104.190

Comments

Thank you for posting this site. Being a native of Milwaukee, living 1400 miles away seems like an eternity. I can't spread flowers on lake Michigan, or stand on her shores to remember the Fitz like I used to. I remember how quickly the still, calm summer waters turned violent in the fall. Anyway, thank you again for posting this site, it makes me feel closer to home reading everyone's comments.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: ed
Location: Pa
Email: bubblesat certainty.net
Date: 11/22/2002
Remote Name: 65.164.70.10

Comments

i swas on lake Huron the night that the FITZ went missing.and i believe that she shifted her cargo.there isw no way that she could have made it through a storm like that. with her cargo shifting.we heard the Anderson call the coast guard.god bless the crew of the Fitz and their families


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: ed
Location: Pa
Email: bubblesat certainty.net
Date: 11/22/2002
Remote Name: 65.164.70.10

Comments

i swas on lake Huron the night that the FITZ went missing.and i believe that she shifted her cargo.there isw no way that she could have made it through a storm like that. with her cargo shifting.we heard the Anderson call the coast guard.god bless the crew of the Fitz and their families


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Eric Hanson
Location: Phoenix Arizona
Email: pizzaz318at yahoo.com
Date: 11/21/2002
Remote Name: 67.40.94.105

Comments

I welcome any responses to this post. I'm an airplane pilot, and my first love is aviation. However, I've always been fascinated by Great Lakes shipping too. But I've spent lots of time looking into the causes of plane crashes, and one thing that's always struck me is how, with the exception of structural or mechanical failures not perceivable by the pilot, or terrorist acts, most plane crashes resulted from a whole string of events. There was no ONE thing that caused them. However! In many many cases, the pilot of the crashed plane could have prevented the tragedy by 1) not taking off in the first place because they knew the flying conditions were marginal or 2) ending the flight early rather than press on to their destination. And my take on the Fitz disaster comes from that. If any of Capt. McSorley's relatives are reading this, I apologize if I offend you... but it seems to me that McSorley could have made some different decisions along the way. He knew he was in trouble HOURS before they went down. Listing, taking on water, radar out, weather getting worse by the minute... yet on he went. Presumably by the time they went down, they were out of options and hoping the Fitz would hold together for the hour or two it would take to get to Whitefish Bay...but what about 3:00 that afternoon? I've read stories of captains who ran their ships aground to save the crew... what if they had turned east and just headed for shore? It's been suggested that McSorley was under pressure to deliver his cargo in a timely fashion, but he must have known at some point well before the sinking that he had bigger issues to deal with than getting taconite to Zug Island. One of his crew's family remembers him saying that McSorley scared him because he wouldn't give in to storms. So was it faulty hatch covers? Maybe. Was it two or three huge waves? Maybe. Was it 26,000 tons of cargo shifting? Maybe. We can speculate on all those things. We can talk about the shifting wind and resulting fetch from the northwest. We can talk about welding problems on other ships like the Fitz. But one fact that's indisputable is, the person ultimately responsible for the ship's fate, her captain, kept her on the course that led her to a place 530 feet beneath the waves. Could he have put in to shore somewhere, anywhere? You can attack me for saying these things, knowing that I'm no expert, but I just wonder.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Capt. Charlie Lampman
Location: Sault, MI
Email: captlampmanat sault.com
Date: 11/12/2002
Remote Name: 207.1.204.126

Comments

re: My comments dated 11/06/2000 After throwing my two cents worth into the pot, I took a fellow sailors advice and picked up the book, "The Night the Fitz Went Down.", and read it cover to cover. I believe Capt. Paquette did his homework and that his theories and resulting conclusions are valid. This I believe, because there were three other vessels that were built at Great Lakes Engineering Works,(GLEW), during WW II, the A.H.Ferbert, Leon Fraser and Enders M. Voorhees. There were two others built at Lorain,OH, the Benjamin F. Fairless and the Irving S. Olds. This comprised the class of vessels then known as the "Supers" or "AA's". They were also built in a hurry to help support the war effort so it's possible that "shortcuts" were taken to hasten the construction process. You see, like the Fitz, these vessels were composed of almost entirely welded construction. The first three vessels also had construction deficiencies that were not discovered until after the Fitz investigation. Near the end of the '76 season, all three vessels were called in to various shipyards, for ultra sound and x-ray of suspected, welds on their main decks. I was wheeling on the Ferbert that season and we were called into Fraser Shipyard in Superior, WI, near the first part of November to have our deck welds inspected. The results showed that the joints which were x-rayed contained unburned weld rod, wire and other scraps of steel in the joints between the deck plates, that had been filled that way to save time and then welded over. These vessels sailed through many storms over a course of 32 years with these "less than perfect", welds. It is amazing to me that they never became a source of trouble during that time. Our COI was "pulled", and we were given a temporary certificate to load, proceed to a lower lakes port, deliver our cargo and proceed immediately to the nearest shipyard for repair. We arrived in Lorain, OH, around the second week in November, layed up, and work began. All of the identified welds had to be "scarfed", (burned out), and re-welded in a proper manner. On the Ferbert there were over twenty of them and even more than that on the Fraser. The Voorhees wasn't quite so bad. You may ask,why weren't the Fairless and Olds included in this investigation of poor welding methods. The answer is that they were constructed at American Shipbuilding in Lorain, OH, and therefore did not fall under suspicion or the close scrutiny that the three vessels built at GLEW did. You can form your own conclusions from all the information that has been gathered and published over the last 27 years, and I can form mine. The one thing remains, which is udisputable, and that is that she has no witnesses that can tell us what happened and that she still lies in 530 feet of water. With all souls missing, she took all of her secrets with her and is very reluctant to give them up. It was a terrible tragedy that probably needn't have happened and though I think about this event every yaar, I think it is time to "give it a rest", along with her crew. All one can do now is say prayers for the men that perished and their family members, and hope that all who sail the Lakes have learned from past experience so that this may never happen again.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Wm. Burke (Bill)
Location: Elyria,Oh.
Email: wlburkeat kellnet.com
Date: 11/11/2002
Remote Name: 216.29.74.108

Comments

Every year at this time i remember it very well,because I too was in the same storm as the Fitz.We too were on L.Superior that night,it was a sad night for all,and I thank God that we made it safely to shore.It was hard to belive that something that big and that powerful was lost so fast in a short period of time. At this time I'm retired and am enjoying it more all the time. May God Bless all thise that are still out there.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dave of Southwest Michigan
Location: Eau Claire, Mi
Email: achief0128at yahoo.com
Date: 11/11/2002
Remote Name: 216.192.138.3

Comments

Every year for the past 20 years, on this day, or as close to this date as possible, I find a way to return to one of the Lakes in the evening to cast flowers on the waters, and to say a word of pray for the 29 lives that were lost, and for all the others who lives have been lost on these beautiful Lakes. It's at times like this that I am humbled by the awesome power and majesty of these Inland Seas, and how frail is man who ventures onto their waters. I pray that the memories of the Fitz's crew will never be forgotten.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bill Easterling, Jr
Location: Grand Haven
Email: weast643at msn.com
Date: 11/11/2002
Remote Name: 198.110.181.100

Comments

I have been trying to find that indian legend that speaks "The lake never gives up her dead when the skies of November turn gloomy" for my 14 year old son. I would like to read the whole legend of the chippewa. If anyone can let me know where to look I would appreciate it.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: SYLVEN A. KONKEL
Location: ALGOMA, WI 54201
Email: RAMBOat ITOL.COM
Date: 11/10/2002
Remote Name: 209.62.166.50

Comments

EVERY YEAR, THE THOUGHT OF THE SINKING OF THE EDMUND FITZGERALD SADDENS MY HEART. I FEEL THAT SEVERAL EVENTS LEADING UP TO THAT NIGHT MAY HAVE CAUSED HER LOSS. THE BOOK THAT WAS WRITTEN BY CAPT. DUDLEY J. PAQUETTE POINTS OUT SEVERAL VERY GOOD REASONS. I ALSO FEEL THAT THE 6 FATHOM SHOAL PLAYED SOME PART IN THE SINKING. RIGHT AFTER THAT, THEY REPORTED A LIST. CAPT. COOPER ALSO WARNED CAPT. MCSORLEY ABOUT TWO VERY LARGE WAVES THAT WERE HEADED HIS WAY. THIS COULD HAVE CAUSED THE BOAT TO TAKE A NOSE DIVE LIKE CAPT. COOPER SUGGESTED. REGARDLESS OF WHAT HAPPENED, 29 MEN LOST THEIR LIVES AND THEIR FAMILIES LOST A LOVE ONE. MY PRAYERS GO OUT TO THE FAMILIES AND LET THEM KNOW THAT THEIR LOVED ONES ARE NOW RESTING IN CALM WATERS WITH THE LORD.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dave Weiser
Location: Saint Paul, Minnesota
Email: daveweiserat prodigy.net
Date: 11/10/2002
Remote Name: 65.56.61.69

Comments

At this time of the year I always think of the great loss of this ship on Lake Superior. I pray that all sailors are safe when crossing the lakes in November.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Michael
Location: Grand Haven
Email: archangel17at mindspring.com
Date: 11/10/2002
Remote Name: 63.23.174.201

Comments

Today's the anniversary of the sinking of the Fitz. Sad in many ways for their families. I wish I could be in Detroit at the Mariners Church to attend the ceremony there. By the way, the book "The Night the Fitz Went Down" is well written, and insightful in what may have happened. Also, the Coast Guard did report improper sealing on the hatch covers during an inspection in Toledo about a month before the accident. (This is often times overlooked in the continuing debates.) It may have played a role, but I will not ascribe to any one theory. I've met and known "boat nerds" who have ALL the answers about the Fitz, and other tops as well. I've actually seen and overheard people arguing over the Fitzgerald's demise with raised, angry voices! Why do that? It's no way to honor the memories of the people who lost there lives that night, or the brave mariners that went back into the storm to search for them.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Geneva Avant
Location: Newark-NJ
Email: not available
Date: 11/9/2002
Remote Name: 152.163.188.226

Comments

Although I do not have a personal connection to the Fitzs' crew or the family members I have always been deeply saddened by their loss. I will never forget them or their loved ones. I honor them always.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jacob Voelker
Location: Kewaunee,Wisconsin
Email: Not avalible
Date: 11/8/2002
Remote Name: 209.62.167.69

Comments

I feel sad about the people that lost there lives. I am a Fitz fan. I want to know all about the Edmund Fitzgerald. Maybe I will find out why and how the Edmund Fitzgerald sunk.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tim Bowman
Location: Eau Claire, WI 54703
Email: 89091169at ecasd.k12.wi.us
Date: 11/8/2002
Remote Name: 198.150.162.33

Comments

I am a big Fitz fan and I think her cargo shifted and she went under a wave and didn't recover and hit bottom and then she broke in two.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Morgan Merritt
Location: Windsor Ontario
Email: MorganMerritt878at hotmail.com
Date: 11/5/2002
Remote Name: 216.221.81.98

Comments

I never knew the ship but I learned in school how it sunk and all that and it is a sad story!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Scott
Location: Michigan
Email: kx167at hotmail.com
Date: 11/1/2002
Remote Name: 68.60.187.201

Comments

That makes a groan man cry hearing about that any 1 know were i could download the book (The Night the Fitz Went Down) send web sites to my email kx167at hotmail.com


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Rose Pugh
Location: Willard Ohio
Email: rosepetal509
Date: 10/10/2002
Remote Name: 65.25.76.60

Comments

as a child i would listen to Gordon Ligthfoot singing the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald, so sad, i would think to my self, as an adult now when ever i hear the song my heart & prayers go out to the victims & there loved ones, such a tragic loss, my eyes still swell & my heart bleeds. for the lost of the Edmund Fitzgerald! thank you Gordon Ligthfoot::..for such a beautiful & sad song. one of my favorite oldies....without that song i really would have never known of the Edmund Fitzgerald & the lost it endured that tragic Nov. Nigth..God Be With Them All.


 


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Robin
Location: Maple WI (near Superior/Duluth
Email: angel_12_2008@yahoo.com
Date: 10/5/2002
Remote Name: 64.33.183.23

Comments

I have visited this site over fifty times now and I am still moved by the report on the page, and the music to the song is really emotional to me. If any of the family members are reading this I hope you are all well and prospering. I always feel horrible when someone dies, and the "Fitz" is no exception, but there are many other ships lost on the Great Lakes, and I grieve for all the lives lost. Considering that I am young, I am sure that I will hear of many other shipwrecks, but I will always remember the Edmund Fitzgerald for all of my life, and on November 10th, (just 2 days after my birthday,) I will carry on a tradition of my family by playing the song, "The wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" and release a red balloon with "DEDICATED TO THE LIVES LOST ON THE EDMUND FITZGERALD."


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Rollie Renaud
Location: Toronto
Email: rrenaud@trebnet.com
Date: 10/2/2002
Remote Name: 64.231.73.248

Comments

I'm revisiting the site probably for the second or third time now. Always touched by the comments of visitors. Two things drew me back this time, one seeing the Alpena this past weekend while sailing back across Lake Ontario and the other, the news that Gordie Lightfoot is in hospital intensive care. Somehow, his song which you still hear regularly and not only on the anniversary of the tragic loss of the "Fitz" and crew, will always remind me of the souls lost at sea that November night.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike Goymerac
Location: Green Bay, WI 54155
Email: mgoymerac@yahoo.com
Date: 9/28/2002
Remote Name: 63.156.36.164

Comments

Read the Night The Fitz Went Down by Hugh E. Bishop. Captain Dudley J. Paquette did a fantastic job explain all theories relevant to the sinking of the Fitz.....a must for all readers.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: travis
Location: ct
Email: springman946@aol.com
Date: 9/18/2002
Remote Name: 152.163.188.226

Comments

I have to say that it is very sad that all of the men died and the captain tried to save his ship


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Alan Muxlow
Location: Michigan
Email: muxlow@blclinks.net
Date: 9/13/2002
Remote Name: 63.144.100.202

Comments

There is no way the hatch covers came loose or that she had hit bottom. If she hit bottom McSorley would have felt the jolt and immediately radio Cooper. The hatch covers were no doubt tight when she left Superior for Cleveland. Unlike 1 of the ships that sailed into the "Great Storm of 1913" right onto lake Superior while the deckmen were still tightening the hatch covers. She must of broke in 2 like the Daniel J. Morrel on Lake Huron. It only took a few seconds for her to go down so she didn't hit bottom cause she would of developed a list. she couldn't of had untight hatch covers cause the captain would of saw that some were missing when he looked aft.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Marilyn F.
Location: Azusa CA.
Email: dmforster2@yahoo.com
Date: 8/29/2002
Remote Name: 4.43.224.88

Comments

I was 9 the first time I saw the Edmund Fitz. I grew up in Welland Ont. and my father worked on the seaway he tied up ships then became a Lock Master. My Grandfather was a bridge master on the welland bridge. My brothers and I spent alot of time around the canal. The day the Edmund sank my Dad came home from work with this look on his face we knew something was wrong. I remember him saying with tears in his eyes that the Fritz had gone down. I will never forget that day . God Bless the Dear Men of that ship and their families.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: D. Gross
Location: Wagoner.OK
Email: okiered51@hotmail.com
Date: 8/12/2002
Remote Name: 205.240.75.77

Comments

I just finished a book on ships that have gone down at sea and in the lakes. Then someone ask if the Edmund Fitzgerald was in the book and it wasn't bec the book was printed before the Edmund sank. I was in the Navy at the time she sank and it is a terrible loss of lives. The North Atlantic is the roughest water I have ever seen and I hear the lakes can be very bad at times. May God Bless the families


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: B. Pyke
Location: Owen Sound, Ont
Email: bpyke@bmts.com
Date: 8/12/2002
Remote Name: 66.46.61.167

Comments

I was engineering cadet on the Tadoussac upbound nearing Thunder Bay the night of the sinking. My room mate passed on the news. My father was on the Fort William and my brother was on the Frontenac, both were anchored inside Whitefish Bay that night.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: David Mackenzie
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Email: rdavidmack@aol.com
Date: 8/2/2002
Remote Name: 64.12.96.134

Comments

It is absolutely absurd the Coast Guard inquiry came to conclusion the hatch covers were not tight on the Fitz. I grew up on the shores of Lake Huron at the mouth of the St. Clair river in Sarnia. I have seen tremendous storms suddenly appear and whip the lakes into a tremendous frenzy. From the few facts I know, I believe the Fitz was breached in the large waves and broke in two. She may have also been weakened by hitting bottom before being trapped in the waves.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bob DeGroft
Location: Cedar Crest, NM
Email: rdegroft@aol.com
Date: 7/27/2002
Remote Name: 198.81.17.182

Comments

I lived in Detroit in the mid '50s and worked for Browning Steamship Co. as a kid. (Bob-Lo) I remember a new seaman reporting for work for Browning that had just finished a stint working construction on the Fitz. His comment stays with me. He said the ship was a construction nightmare with joints as much as twelve inches off when pieces of the hull were assembled! Then, at launch the hull went sideways as intended into a narrow quay, but went all of the way over to the other side and hit the seawall hard broadside. This could have caused stress fractures that could have caused her doom later. I always wonder if there has been any research done on the inspection reports made during construction. She was a great boat. I remember her going down the Detroit River many times.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: brad bethea
Location: Lansing,Michigan
Email: radiorat01@msn.com
Date: 7/25/2002
Remote Name: 12.245.222.179

Comments

The loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald is scary. I have fished Lake Michigan and seen storms appear out of a clear blue sky. The Lakes have always been know for there storms..Alot has been said and sung about the ship..The crew knew about the Lakes and there lore. I do not think it is/was the fault of the crew. The lighthouse went out during the storm(if you go to Whitefish Point they will confrim this).At night you can not tell land from water on the Lakes,it is a errie feeling when you know that land is x amount of degrees and miles from you--But without a lighthouse, you could run a ground easily. At three miles out on Lake Michigan, at night you can not see the lights of South Haven as you get closer the first light you see is the Lighthouse.Anyway I think with the storm and HURRICANE force winds and waves that night ,plus the lighthouse going out the Skipper had no idea where or how far he was from land..I think the ship touched bottom enough to but a dent in the bottom that weakend the ship and when it got in between the swells it buckeled(pickeled) in the middle..The water rushed in and drove the Edmund Fitzgerald down ripping it apart as it went..If the Lighthouse was working the Skipper would have been able to make course adjustments and this would not have happened..I know the Fitzgerald was having to run the pumps before she went down, but in a hurricane all ships run there pumps..


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike
Location: Sudbury
Email: tecumseh29@yahoo.com
Date: 7/24/2002
Remote Name: 142.51.7.43

Comments

Although I am studying at L.U. in Sudbury, my own hometown is not very far from Lake Superior, and the storms from the lake is very unforgiving, and generates its own weather patterns. It is quite frightening to see massive waves hit the shorelines along the north shore, but nothing is more chilling than to see the storms of November on Lake Superior. The loss and rememberance of such a massive ship is imbedded in my mind, and holds a picture that this is no lake to be trifled with. More than 500 ships are lying at the bottom of the lake, and are a silent testimony of the power of nature and what it is capable of. My thoughts and prayers go to the crew of the Edmund Fitzgerald and to their families that still suffer from great loss since that terrible day in 1975.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: TJ Johnston
Location: CT
Email: wolf001@snet.net
Date: 7/21/2002
Remote Name: 204.60.60.209

Comments

I remember seeing the Fitzgerald back in the early to mid 70's. It wasn't until the 80's that I started researching the shipwreck. I've read the Coast Guard's report on the loss, and the various expeditions that have gone since then. Based on the information available, I feel that the shoul theory makes the most sense. Damage below the water line coupled with extreme wave height could have caused the upset that sent her to the bottom. I wonder, since alot of people seem to feel that the cargo hatches are the main cause to the sinking, wouldn't that have been obivious to the crew? The cargo hold are accessable via the tunnels that ran down the port and starboard sides fore to aft. Sometime prior to 19:10 the vessle had developed a list. Wouldn't someone have checked the status of the cargo holds at that time? If the problem was there, wouldn't that given the crew time to either close with the Arthur Anderson much faster than they were? Or wouldn't they considered altering course and beach her? Also, the video of the wrecked bow section, starboard side there is a breach in the hull with the metal bent inward. The damage appears to be above the waterline and doesn't look, (at least to me) like impact damage because of its location. Does anyone have any thoughts on this? I feel for the families of those lost, but the fact is, no one knows for sure what caused their deaths. I think that they deserve that much. Nothing will bring them back, but they might rest easier.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John E.
Location: Allendale, Mi
Email: GLfmMI@aol.com
Date: 7/14/2002
Remote Name: 64.12.96.134

Comments

The day the "Fitz" went down I took my son out to the channel at White Lake(lived in Montague at the time). We stood up on the low dunes overlooking Lake michigan to watch the waves which were breaking over the top of the beacon at the end of the pier. The spray from the waves broke over the top of the beacon 60+ ft. We could hardly stand up without falling down. I have watched many storms come in off of Lake Michigan in my 62 years and that was the most violent. I play the Gordon Lightfoot song from his greatest hits CD at least once a week and the "Fitz" song gives me chills everytime I play it. I believe the version of the Anderson master(Bernie Cooper) who of course was following behind the "Fitz" that night. He still thinks she bottomed out on the shoal and took on too much water and probably nose dived into a big wave. That would also account for her breaking in two when her bow hit bottom. Would also explain how the stern ended in an upside down position. God bless all the brave lost seamen from the "Fitz" and all the lost mariners from the storms of the past(1905,1913 & 1940 the most memorable ones)


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Brian Keith O'Hara
Location: Atlanta, Georgia USA
Email: bkohatl@excite.com
Date: 7/6/2002
Remote Name: 67.192.31.77

Comments

I am writing a biography of Anissa Jones, "Buffy" on Family Affair. One of my themes is ours was the "Wonder Years" Generation. http://www.geocities.com/bkohatl/AnissaJones.html One of the greatest songwriters of our time is Gordon Lightfoot, a poet who writes his to music. Certainly "If I Could Read Your Mind" is a great song, but it is the "Wreck of the Edmund Fitgerald" which I find to be most memorable. And certainly there is no greater Memorial to the brave men and women, living and dead, who have sailed the seas, and, more particularly, the brave men of the Edmund Fitzgerald. I considerate a fitting memorial...


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dereck white
Location: Moreno Valley Ca.
Email: hhhaul@gte .net
Date: 7/1/2002
Remote Name: 67.219.117.22

Comments

I had just heard the song from G. Lightfoot ,and have a habbit of hearing or seeing something .Then tryingto get some info on the subject of which im intrested in . Anyway if any of you fine people out here can educate me or send some info ,for im crazy intrested. Thank you so much


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dale Sutherland
Location: Windsor,Ontario
Email: msutherland@cogeco.ca
Date: 6/29/2002
Remote Name: 24.57.33.164

Comments

My grandfather was driving truck in that storm as the edmond fitzgerald,with all due respect to the crew and family members,my thoughts and prayers are with the edmond fitzgerald god bless.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dale Sutherland
Location: Windsor,Ontario
Email: msutherland@cogeco.ca
Date: 6/29/2002
Remote Name: 24.57.33.164

Comments

My grandfather was driving truck in that storm as the edmond fitzgerald,with all due respect to the crew and family members,my thoughts and prayers are with the edmond fitzgerald god bless.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: gary mcalpine
Location: nottawa mi
Email: hog84@aol.com
Date: 6/8/2002
Remote Name: 205.188.201.196

Comments

ive read minute to minute capt logs ,radio trans .i think the hatches were not tight. its hard for me to fathom a storm, that huge on the great lakes. i know there massive i think someone made a mistake and didnt do there job.she took on water u cant stop that kind of force.the shole idea i dont think so.bad storm hatches not tight she took on water.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: hog84@aol.com
Location: mi
Email: hog84@aol.com
Date: 6/8/2002
Remote Name: 205.188.201.196

Comments

u people want to try something,listen to gordons song and remember the shipmates go to a fritz site and while your listins . think about it it brings tears to my eyes


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ron
Location: Plano, Texas
Email: kline1@airmail.net
Date: 6/6/2002
Remote Name: 4.35.90.177

Comments

Being born and raised in Toledo Ohio, I got to see the Edmund Fitzgerld docked in the Maumee River. Also finding out that my friends Father was also one of the 29 that went down makes me have a deep feeling towards the Ship and the PEOPLE on it. My heart goes out to the FAMILIES of all those who went down with the ship. I get a cold chill every time I hear the song or seeing anything on it. All that has been written and shown on TV makes it a story that will be around for many years.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jennifer E
Location: Wichita, Ks
Email: LittleFyreLilly1@aol.com
Date: 6/4/2002
Remote Name: 64.12.102.158

Comments

I am only 20 years old and live in the middle of America, therefore I have no real experience with any kind of large water craft like The Fitz. I recently stumbled upon the story and the heart-wrentching song by G.Lightfoot. Like so many others, it brought tears to my eyes and an obsession to my brain. I feel what happend is a great and terrible tragedy and wish someone would make a beautiful tributary motion picture that would trump the Titanic. My heart and prayers go out to the families of The Fitzgerald and to G.Lightfoot who wrote a beautiful song that will forever make people realize the true wretchedness of the disaster.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Harvey Knight
Location: Antelope, Calif.
Email: hknight@mail.com
Date: 5/22/2002
Remote Name: 12.246.45.244

Comments

God's ways are mysterious, and for reasons known only to Him He allows these tragedies to occur. The song sung by Mr. Lightfoot brought home to me a sense of the awesome power of the Great Lakes and a sense of the deep tragedy the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald evokes. A line in the song asks "Does anyone know where the love of God goes when the waves turn the minutes to hours?" I know the love of God was with those that perished that awful night, as I know that God is with us in every tragic situation. When I was in battle in Viet Nam I could feel His tangible, loving presence there, right in the midst of all that terror. I know that He was with that crew as well. The Lord Himself said "Not so much as a sparrow shall fall to the ground without your heavenly father." May the Lord comfort all those who were left behind and suffered this painful loss of their loved ones.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: steve
Location: duluth mn
Email: steve7681@aol.com
Date: 5/15/2002
Remote Name: 152.163.206.198

Comments

VERY TRAGIC EVENT. BUT IT SEEM TO TAKE ON NEW LIGHT AFTER THE SONG CAME OUT.WHICH IN MY OPINION IS EVEN MORE TRAGIC. THE SONG MADE IT SEEM MORE REAL TO THE REST OF US, BUT WHAT ABOUT THE FAMILIES?


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Callista
Location:
Email: callista_winter@hotmail.com
Date: 4/26/2002
Remote Name: 209.131.224.20

Comments

This pertains to a certain picture of the fitz that I'm trying to find and just so you don't think I'm heartless: this is for a presentation i'm doing on the Fitzgerald. I don't know what year it was but there's a picture somewhere of the Fitzgerald AND the Anderson side by side in the Soo Locks together. If you know hwere i can find this Picture PLEASE e-mail me.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kelly C. Hagen
Location: Kansas City, Missouri
Email: smokey831831@aol.com
Date: 4/20/2002
Remote Name: 65.31.222.125

Comments

I have always wondered why such a tragedy happen to these men. I've tried to gather all the information available to me to better understand this diaster. I'm not a seaman, but from what I can understand, a storm like what was that night was a monster. The likes of the crew and captain were not beginners by any measure. The only fault I can see was not turning back when it may have made a difference. Other than this one chance to avoid diaster, the lost souls on board didn't really have a chance. For a vessel the size of the Fitzgerald to go down so quickly and ultimately in hit the bottom in two or three pieces tells us it was swift and certain. My field of expertise is large aircraft. From this I understand what forces it takes to do such enormous damage so fast. My heart goes out to the families who lost their son's, husbands and fathers. May their souls rest in peace and let us never forget the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald.....


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dick Marshall
Location: Juneau, Alaska
Email: dmarsh43@hotmail.com
Date: 4/20/2002
Remote Name: 66.58.162.67

Comments

I grew up near Minneapolis MN and I remember hearing about the wreck on TV. Some reporter was standing on some beach of Superior and he picked up either a sign or a life preserver with the name Edmund Fitzgerald on it. I was 18 at the time. My family has always spent alot of time on the north shore and seeing the ships come and go as we camped in our little travel trailer. To make a long story even longer, we were camping on the north shore and had gone to the store to get some things and ran into a friend from our home town that worked on one of the ships and he gave my dad and me a grand tour of his ship. Being about 12 at the time it was mind boggeling how big the ship was as I walked from one end to the other. I remember how nice the crew was to me, from the cook offering me some dessert to the crew in the engine room answering my questions. I remember having to yell in there even though the ship was in dock. We walked through a black cloud where the taconite was being fed into the hold of the ship. I never really wondered why the Fitzgerald sank,just that it did and saddness of the loss of the 29 and to their families. I have seen some of the museums around the Duluth area and hope to return there soon. My heart still goes out to the families and friend of those brave souls. And I want to thank everyone who has put an entry into this site.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Randall Cote
Location: Austin, Texas
Email: zapagap@ev1.net
Date: 4/10/2002
Remote Name: 66.69.211.11

Comments

I do an extensive amount of study on famous maritime disasters; I have been doing research on the Titanic since I was 10 years old and have quite a collection of memorabilia. I?ve studied The Bismarck, Andréa Doria, Lusatainia, Normandy, and a vast array of other ship disasters now I have completed all the study on the Edmund Fitzgerald and come to the following conclusions on the foundering of the Edmund Fitzgerald. The weather that night was the worst the area had ever seen much like what happened to the Andrea Gail The winds where very strong that night over the lakes causing very high swells, due to the pitch and roll of the ship this caused severe weaknesses in the midriff of the ship. One or several of the cargo hatches may have popped and due to the amount of rain and lake water getting washed to the deck she began to take on water. But he primary result of her foundering was again what happened to the Andrea Gail, was she rode up a large swell and met another of equal height this caused the middle to be completely out of the water and the stress on the hull was to great so the ship just literally snapped in half, and the two swells met washing over the two half?s of the Fitzgerald much like closing a book. The sinking was instant and very powerful. My prayers and condolences go to the crewmen and there families. God Bless you all and God speed. Randall L. Cote If any one has questions on any famous ship disasters please ask.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Melody Scott
Location: Belton, TX USA
Email: harmonyscott@hotmail.com
Date: 4/9/2002
Remote Name: 66.196.31.237

Comments

I'm student teaching in an elementary music classroom. My fourth grade class are doing a unit of ballads. One of the ballads we're studying is "The Ballad of the Edmund Fitzgerald". I have never heard of it before last week. We played the song for our fourth graders and they were really interested. After talking about it, the students were asking us a lot of questions. We are going to watch a documentary about the Edmund Fitzgerald. I think that it is a very sad but intersting story because nobody knows exacly what happened to make it sink. I wasn't born yet when the Edmund Fitzgerald went down. My condolences to the families of the crew of the Edmund Fitzgerald. God Bless.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: the Spiering family
Location: northern minnesota
Email: jtn29125@gvtel.com
Date: 4/6/2002
Remote Name: 209.32.236.194

Comments

We were in Duluth/Superior about 3 weeks ago,as we crossed the bridge from Superior to Duluth,I looked out the window to the north.There to my suprise sat the "Arthur Anderson",docked for the winter.That ship looked so proud and strong,as it waits for the harbor to thaw,to resume its business.It sent A real chill down my spine to think what it had been through.Our thougts and prayers go out to the family and friends who lost there loved ones when "the gailes of november came early" 11/10/75


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: yy
Location: mass
Email: none
Date: 4/5/2002
Remote Name: 24.49.150.152

Comments

ppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppp


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: tony
Location: N.H.
Email:
Date: 4/5/2002
Remote Name: 24.49.150.152

Comments

we all pray for the 29 brave people that lost thire lives.I am sorry that you lost your loved ones.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: KC
Location: Dover,Fl
Email: hwyflyer99@aol.com
Date: 3/30/2002
Remote Name: 152.163.205.67

Comments

I am a avid reader of all famous ships that have went down mysteriously. The Fitz and Titanic are at the top of the must see and must read list. Only the Lord is watching over the crews and passengers until judgement day when they all will reunited with their loved ones. Viewing film footage and documentaries dont completely explain there dissappearences but it was a major loss to the U.S. of one of it's first super tankers. Patience and faith in the Lord for all the surviving relatives of the departed sailers and the passengers on the ships.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tyler Small
Location: Roanoke, VA
Email: mountainbiker519
Date: 3/29/2002
Remote Name: 206.230.21.4

Comments

I am doin a report on the Fitz in English and even though i hate doin reports i don't mind researching such a tragedy as the sinking of this great ship. My heart goes out to the families and friends of the people on the ship.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Katie
Location: Clawson, Michigan
Email: bob101@aol.com
Date: 3/28/2002
Remote Name: 216.11.55.3

Comments

I believe that the broke open the bottom on 6 fathom soal and they slowly lost the cargo in the center. When this happened the front and the rear end of the cargohold became heavy and broke the ship in two.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: David Zornow
Location: Wisconsin
Email: ruggy420@hotmail.com
Date: 3/22/2002
Remote Name: 205.213.92.64

Comments

I think this was just as bad as the Titanic, no one deserves to die like this. I wasn't even born when this event happened, but I did see the info on it while I was on vacation in Sault Sainte Marie. I think it was a great tragedy.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Wendy & Jack Crawford
Location: Schaumburg, IL
Email: duluthmn79@hotmail.com
Date: 3/17/2002
Remote Name: 208.40.47.21

Comments

The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald was a loss to all. We vacation every year in the Duluth, MN and Two Harbors, Mn area-it pains to me look out onto Superior knowing that she took down a beauty like the "Fitz". And it bothers me more to look out and know that the "Fitz" will never be coming back to the harbor in Duluth. My thoughts and prayers go out to all the families and friends left behind by her captain and her crew. May the captain and her crew rest in calm waters.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: STEVEN DIEHL
Location: HYNDMAN, PA
Email: DCKSS
Date: 3/12/2002
Remote Name: 208.20.40.128

Comments

THE EDMUND FITZGERALD IS AND FOREVER WILL BE MY FAVORITE ORE CARRIER IN THE GREAT LAKES AND I JUST WANT YOU TO TELL THE FAMILIES OF THOSE MEN THAT GOD PROTECTED THEM UNTIL THE LAST. GOD WILL BE WITH YOU ALL THE TIME AND HE WILL PROTECT YOU, TOO.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: AMANDA
Location: BRENTWOOD NY
Email: AMANDASDOGGIES@AOL.COM
Date: 3/11/2002
Remote Name: 205.188.200.166

Comments

I AM DOING A REPORT ON THE EDMUND AND I THINK IT IS SO SAD WHAT HAPPENED. I WILL ASK ALL OF YOU TO PRAY FOR THE CREWS FAMILY AND FRIENDS.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: adam
Location: fort myers
Email: hockeyfan546@aol.com
Date: 3/9/2002
Remote Name: 205.188.198.23

Comments

I am truly sorry for those who died 11,10,75and hope god will be with there familys


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: J B
Location: NEWPORT MI.
Email: WALLEYEGUY77@HOTMAIL.COM
Date: 3/8/2002
Remote Name: 64.152.157.40

Comments

I would like everyone who visits this page to realize that 11/10/75 was the same as 9/11/01 to all of us who live and sail these great lakes of michigan. We will never forget where we were that day,and will never,ever,forget.GOD BLESS THEM ALL,and may god be with the familys.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dan Giallombardo
Location: Cary Illinois
Email: ParrotheadDan@lightfirst.com
Date: 3/5/2002
Remote Name: 216.105.64.143

Comments

It's always, always ,tragic, when a great lady goes by the ways. The loss of her crew onlydeepens the sadness.Truly a sad story.-----Dan


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: cody
Location: florida
Email: swilder@tampabay.rr.com
Date: 3/3/2002
Remote Name: 24.28.34.28

Comments

I was sad to here about the lost of the edmund fitsgerald and the lost of the 29 men.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: cody
Location: florida
Email: swilder@tampabay.rr.com
Date: 3/3/2002
Remote Name: 24.28.34.28

Comments

I was sad to here about the lost of the edmund fitsgerald and the lost of the 29 men.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dale Sutherland
Location: Windsor,Ontario
Email: msutherland@cogeco.ca
Date: 2/10/02
Remote Name: 24.57.46.130

Comments

i'm only 25 but,god bless those 29 crew members and the,family members who lost them brave people!god bless!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Xfiles
Location: OHIO
Email: Xfiles7687@yahoo.com
Date: 2/4/02
Remote Name: 205.132.76.26

Comments

After studying the reports describing the sea state during the period which the Fitzgerald was making transit, along with the amount of taconite that it was carrying, any one person who has done time in a storm even close to that degree would know that they would have been riding LOW in the water with almost no freeboard. This opened the door wide, allowing water over the weatherdeck, and if there were any loosened or damaged hatchcovers, combings, etc, as well as damaged vents, this would have, and most likely did allow water in to the holds.The water would have never have been detected until it could be seen above the taconite pellets. By that time, it would have been way too late to recover the ship. The crew more than likely never realized that their fate had been sealed up to that point. Once the ships bouyancy was completely lost, along with an overly large wave from the bow, the Fitzgerald received a "double whammy", which either broke her back and tearing her apart at the midsection, or put her into a high speed descent to the bottom, breaking her in half upon impact.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: GERALD HOWARTH
Location: OSCODA,MI
Email: badmoon3h@yahoo.com
Date: 2/4/02
Remote Name: 216.93.41.119

Comments

I THINK THE BOOK,THE NIGHT THE FITZ WENT DOWN,BY HUGH E .BISHOP,SOMES IT UP QUITE WELL. COMMENTS FROM CAPT. DUDLEY PAQUETTE,WHO WAS ON THE LAKE THAT NIGHT.REASON NEGLIGENCE.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: kevin cummins
Location: princeton ky
Email: kpcummins@vci.net
Date: 2/3/02
Remote Name: 207.162.163.19

Comments

we miss you all, my God bless you and your families,in your absence.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jennifer
Location: St.John's
Email: jennypooh_13@hotmail.com
Date: 1/31/02
Remote Name: 205.251.130.202

Comments

I am doing a poem on the wreck of the edmund fitzgerald in school and i came here... it is a very sad story!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jennifer
Location: St.John's
Email: jennypooh_13@hotmail.com
Date: 1/31/02
Remote Name: 205.251.130.202

Comments

I am doing a poem on the gitche gumme in school and i came here... it is a very sad story!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: CAPT.MERRILL
Location: PORT WASHINGTON
Email: JKJSAFJKFDSL
Date: 1/31/02
Remote Name: 205.213.111.50

Comments

SHE WAS A GOOD SHIP. IVE BEEN IN A COUPLE OF STROMS MYSELF.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: ms. julie rawls
Location: bryn mawr pa
Email: julierawls@43hotmail.com
Date: 1/23/02
Remote Name: 24.4.252.10

Comments

i like to here about ships ect. and actully go to see the ship pieces ect.. my aunt is in michigan every summer.. she loves it up there. never been to that state at all.. help me get there some one.. tell me aunt i deserve to see that state.. right away. thank you. julie usa


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: scott tennant
Location: kannapolis,nc
Email: scott_tennant@hotmail.com
Date: 1/20/02
Remote Name: 24.74.9.107

Comments

what with the list to the side that cpt. mcsorley reported to cpt. cooper on the anderson makes me beleive that the fitzgerald had bottomed out at 6 fathom shoal and was vertaken by a single monster wave which drove her to the bottom.the other theory of metal fatigue causing a break in half is also viable but with the way the wreckage is scattered on the lakebottom makes me think that the big fitz was allready damaged before she sunk.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: CB  Hair
Location: South Carolina
Email: c_hair@ntinet.com
Date: 1/16/02
Remote Name: 208.150.174.5

Comments

Stumbled across this board while looking for the lyrics to "The Wreck of the Edmond Fritzgearld" I have enjoyed reading many of your comments and theory's about what might have happended.

I also stumbled across this site that some of you might be interested in. It looks like there will be a motion picture soon.

Check out http://home.pacbell.net/chabpyne/fitzgerald.html


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: JIM DONOHUE
Location: PALM HARBOR FLORIDA
Email: boilermanjjd@cs.com
Date: 1/16/02
Remote Name: 205.188.199.158

Comments

I feel as most do that we will never conclusively know why it sank but a saying is " Ship's belong at sea, and sailors belong on ship's". I am sure they are together.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Loren A Falk, Ret., Capt.
Location: Brooksville,Fl
Email: ac4hj@innet.com
Date: 1/16/02
Remote Name: 63.148.240.15

Comments

always concluded that the Fitz had sustained bottom damage crossing over Chummy Bank just hours before foundering. Her position reported by the Anderson indicates the Chummy Bank was involved.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: ed hepler
Location: Pa.
Email: sky2@stargate.net
Date: 1/13/02
Remote Name: 208.11.233.205

Comments

as a former salior on the lakes there is no doubt as to whattook the Fitz down.i was in whitefish bay that night and the storm was one of the worst i had ever seen.we were asked to help in the search . but being empty the skipper had to say no even though he knew the skipper and first mate very well.no way did leaky hatch covers take her down


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Daniel
Location: Houston,TX
Email: daniel_p34@yahoo.com
Date: 1/9/02
Remote Name: 209.244.117.91

Comments

I was ten when she sank, and lived north of Buffalo,NY. Wind blew so strong that night I could not sleep. I remember watching CBS news and being shocked that such a massive ship could be lost on my beloved great lakes, those of us who have grown up in and around the lakes understand the awesome force of nature, which smashed Fitz.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Morgan
Location: Traverse City
Email: nedowclan@aol.com
Date: 1/3/02
Remote Name: 205.188.197.33

Comments

I feel bad for the people who lost their lives. I think the boat snapped when it hit the bottom. It is as long as two football fields. My class is studying it. I watched the movie in my class. I wonder if there going to build another one that looks like it. I think the boat is really big. I wonder what it would be like if I was on it. I wonder what it looked like inside it. My family will remember those lost on Nov. 10th from now on. God bless those people who died and their families who lived.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Morgan
Location: Traverse City
Email: nedowclan@aol.com
Date: 1/3/02
Remote Name: 205.188.197.33

Comments

I feel bad for the people who lost their lives. I think the boat snapped when it hit the bottom. It is as long as two football fields. My class is studying it. I watched the movie in my class. I wonder if there going to build another one that looks like it. I think the boat is really big. I wonder what it would be like if I was on it. I wonder what it looked like inside it. My family will remember those lost on Nov. 10th from now on. God bless those people who died and their families who lived.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Emily
Location: Iowa
Email: ember_wolf_36@hotmail.com
Date: 1/2/02
Remote Name: 205.221.150.5

Comments

I've been interested in the Edmund Fitzgerald since visiting Lake Superior last summer on a family vacation. I've chosen to do a school report on it, and have found many interesting things about the Fitz, but nothing can explain the sinking. I think that it'll never be completely understood, but we can take our logical guess. I would say, after studying the material, that the Fitz's cargo shifted, making it take a nose dive. When it hit bottom, it broke in two. I hope to see the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum on my next trip to the Great Lakess, maybe there will be an explination there.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Emily
Location: Iowa
Email: ember_wolf_36@hotmail.com
Date: 1/2/02
Remote Name: 205.221.150.5

Comments

I've been interested in the Edmund Fitzgerald since visiting Lake Superior last summer on a family vacation. I've chosen to do a school report on it, and have found many interesting things about the Fitz, but nothing can explain the sinking. I think that it'll never be completely understood, but we can take our logical guess. I would say, after studying the material, that the Fitz's cargo shifted, making it take a nose dive. When it hit bottom, it broke in two. I hope to see the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum on my next trip to the Great Lakess, maybe there will be an explination there.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Chris
Location: Grayslake, IL
Email: cwe3h@allstate.com
Date: 12/19/01
Remote Name: 167.127.24.25

Comments

As I have read most of the commens on here, I have to agree with most. In all likelyhood we shall never find out what happened to "The Big Fitz", bu the consensus seems to be agreed upon, that is that she struck the shoal and got caught in the grasp of sister waves and split. Even though the loss of life was a great tradgedy those men aboard that ship will never be forgotten. Every November 10, just remember to bow your head and have a moment to reflect about not only those men aboard the Fitzgerald, but all the men that head out to open water to provide for their families.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Blake Kishler
Location: Ohio
Email: FerrariKid14@hotmail.com
Date: 12/6/01
Remote Name: 216.127.0.73

Comments

In my previous message, which I left on October 6th, I said I was setting out to discover more about the Fitzgerald and the Great Lakes freighters of her time. I have done that, thanks to my grandfather who is an excellent resource on the subject and owns many books about the great ore carriers.

The exact position of the Edmund Fitzgerald on the bottom of Lake Superior suggests that she did indeed break underwater, after she dipped below the surface. The rear of the ship is upside-down and on an angle in relation to the bow section. The damage received by the pilot house suggests that the Fitzgerald nose-dove - my theory is, she was weakened by minor shoal contact and her hull (which had not been properly repaired on a dry-dock for quite some time). As the bow dove into a trough between two huge waves, the midsection of the ship was further weakened, and when the bow began ascending the next wave, she cracked - but did not separate - then sank. Under the surface, the force of her nose-dive eventually caused the stern section of the ship to separate, and it was inverted by the force of its descent.

I was attending a piano concert on November 10th, 2001. I knew this was the night on which the Fitzgerald went down 26 years ago, and when I checked my watch, the time was 7:25 - around the time she dropped off the Arthur M. Anderson's radar. A chill ran up my spine, and a familiar song began to play in my head...


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tim
Location: Florida
Email: tim110@atlantic.net
Date: 12/5/01
Remote Name: 209.208.5.86

Comments

i was born in ny and moved to florida, my dad was on the search for the Fritz. my dad knew one of the guys. sowe moved to ny before i was born and then to florida to get away from michigan. every nov. 10 my dad plays the song. i finaly know why.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: terry
Location: Seattle WA
Email: tscott@hotmail.com
Date: 11/30/01
Remote Name: 208.184.138.16

Comments

It was reported that the hatch locks were damaged in an earlier inspection. They were due to be fixed, if the hatches leaked and water got into the cargo, the added weight could lower the ships waterline causing even more water to be taken in. If the added water exceeded the ships limit and its mid section was suspended between two waves it could cause the ship tp break into, more likely the cargo shifted forward due to broken hatches and forced the ship down nose first lifting the back out of the water and thus breking the ship into two pieces, the forward momentum would explane why the back of the ship is so close to the front and since the two halves are in two positions we know it went down in two parts. Just my thoughts after reading the accounts of the day and seeing the unwater photos.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Krista Kreger
Location: Midland, Michigan
Email: boy_craze69420@yahoo.com
Date: 11/29/01
Remote Name: 204.38.32.6

Comments

I think that the ship was brok into two pieces like the Titanic did, becasuse if you were to think about it, if she went down on her side there wouldn't be any way to break in half. but if it went down like the titanic did then there would still be 199 ft. in theair and she would of broke in half. but i might be wrong. but still think about it, the reporters might be wrong too!!!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Krista Kreger
Location: Midland, Michigan
Email: Boy_cRaZe69420@yahoo.com
Date: 11/29/01
Remote Name: 204.38.32.6

Comments

i think the ship went down like the Titanic, because if you were to think about it, the people say that she went down on her side, how did she break into two pieces? She might of went down bow or head first there would of been 199 ft. of the ship left still in the air and it might of broke off like the Titanic did. But you never know I might be wrong but then again the reporters might be wrong too!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Krista Kreger
Location: Midland, Michigan
Email: Boy_cRaZe69420@yahoo.com
Date: 11/29/01
Remote Name: 204.38.32.6

Comments

i think the ship went down like the Titanic, because if you were to think about it, the people say that she went down on her side, how did she break into two pieces? She might of went down bow or head first there would of been 199 ft. of the ship left still in the air and it might of broke off like the Titanic did. But you never know I might be wrong but then again the reporters might be worng too!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Vincenzo Pavano
Location: Rockford, Michigan
Email: Vincenzo4_382@msn.com
Date: 11/28/01
Remote Name: 65.224.199.162

Comments

My teacher this year explained the wreck and how it happend. We played a game called the shipping game and my boat sank on Nov. 10,75. He started by telling us about Bob Rafferty to the wreck.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Vincenzo Pavano
Location: Rockford, Michigan
Email: Vincenzo4_382@msn.com
Date: 11/28/01
Remote Name: 65.224.199.162

Comments

My teacher this year explained the wreck and how it happend. We played a game called the shipping game and my boat sand on Nov. 10,75. He started by telling us about Bob Rafferty to the wreck.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Samuel W. Kittle
Location: Newport  Mich.
Email: skittle@chartermi.net
Date: 11/28/01
Remote Name: 65.29.121.169

Comments

I Have many fond memories of the Fritz, as I was there when she was born, and when she was launched,as I was One of the men who helped build her,at Great Lakes Enginerring.She was a well built ship, but no amount of abuse,by not keeping her in top shape,any ship that is not taken care of,or is overloaded to beyound the capicity that she was intended to carry, will all lead to failer. I belive the Fritz,with her load and the 35 foot waves ,that she got peaked on two waves, and with her weight and the waves, she just could not take the struss,and snaped into. I will always remeber her the day we launched her,it was a beautiful site to see, and one I will alway cherish. Rest in peace,You will Always be rememrered.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mary Meisling
Location: Brighton, MI
Email: mmeislin@bas.k12.mi.us
Date: 11/27/01
Remote Name: 204.39.125.247

Comments

I am a middle school teacher in Brighton, MI. I will never forget the newscast the night the Edmund Fitzgerald was listed as missing. It made an indelible impression on me. Now I am a teacher and I feel it's my duty to help our Michigan students to understand their marine heritage. Brighton, Michigan, is not directly on one of the Great Lakes but they affect us, nonetheless. Each year, in November, I show my students a slide show of freighters on Lake Superior and I play the song by Gordon Lightfoot. Most of my students are very moved by this. They often say "Oh, I've heard that song I just never knew what it was about!" Now they know. Now they will carry the memory in their hearts. We, in Brighton Michigan, will never forget you!


Subject: a caring young person
From: Roy Brown
Location: 412 Minnaqua DR, PH ILL
Email: Madmanrag3000@aol.com
Date: 11/22/01
Remote Name: 152.163.197.67

Comments

Nov 10th has passed, the ships aneversiry. That day, a kareokee party was at my house and for every family who had a loved one lost Nov 10 1975, I sung Gordon Lightfoot's song about the disater. That day, I hope every family was blessed by their hubands up in heaven.

Roy brown age 11 yrs old


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: B.G.
Location: Monroe,Michigan
Email: lgoins@delepro.com
Date: 11/21/01
Remote Name: 12.64.12.97

Comments

To start with,lets remember that the Great Lakes Engineering Works was going out of business,so the workmanship could be questionable.I've been reading everything I can get my hands on about this from the day she sank,so this would be my guess.Supposedly McSorely had differing charts on the location of the shoal.with this in mind ,I believe that the Fitz bottomed out on the shoal,and with the storm ragging no one noticed.She already had her freeboard line reduced so she could be loaded heavier,this put her deeper in the water than what she was designed to be.Cpt.Cooper reported a huge wave rocked the Anderson.This wave I believe hit the Fitz.With water already in her hold from the grounding,this wave hit her stern and rolled to the bow,pushing it down in the water,the iron ore shifted forward and pushed her to the bottom,no time for anything.My prayers are with the men(and probably by now)women sailing now.May God bless them...


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: B.G.
Location: Monroe,Michigan
Email: lgoins@delepro.com
Date: 11/21/01
Remote Name: 12.64.12.97

Comments

To start with,lets remember that the Great Lakes Engineering Works was going out of business,so the workmanship could be questionable.I've been reading everything I can get my hands on about this from the day she sank,so this would be my guess.Supposedly McSorely had differing charts on the location of the shoal.with this in mind ,I believe that the Fitz bottomed out on the shoal,and with the storm ragging no one noticed.She already had her freeboard line reduced so she could be loaded heavier,this put her deeper in the water than what she was designed to be.Cpt.Cooper reported a huge wave rocked the Anderson.This wave I believe hit the Fitz.With water already in her hold from the grounding,this wave hit her stern and rolled to the bow,pushing it down in the water,the iron ore shifted forward and pushed her to the bottom,no time for anything.My prayers are with the men(and probably by now)women sailing now.May God bless them...


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Andrew Lipsey
Location: Salem, Oregon
Email: AJTHEPIRATE@AOL.COM
Date: 11/18/01
Remote Name: 152.163.207.178

Comments

I grew up in Michigan and remember hearing about the loss. We studied it in grade school. I have studied it extensively since. Having been in the Navy and working on merchant vessels, I am not convinced any one of the current theories totally explain the loss of the vessel and her crew.

The major evidence that confuses me is the loss of her 2 vents and fence rail. This does not fit in with any explanation except total structural failure, which is not supported by underwater photos or by the resting position of the forward and aft sections. How the vent and fence rail damage occurred does not fit in to any scenario I can think of. These items are located on the weather deck! With the exception of the report of the vents and fence rails missing, I would have to lean toward a shoal grounding (midships) that lead to severe structural damage and lake water intake. Due to the increased weight of the water and the decreased freeboard, the ship most likely did a nosedive which was unrecoverable.

We will most likely never know the truth. The one thing we do know is that one November 10th evening, we lost an brave crew and a great vessel. We need to always honor the memory of the men lost that day and never forget that the loss of a crew is more important than the loss of a vessel.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Steve Chapates
Location: Tustin, MI
Email: tazchevy@hotmail.com
Date: 11/18/01
Remote Name: 216.65.167.202

Comments

I am a 3rd assistant engineer aboard these freighter and have been for four seasons. The reason that the mighty Fritz went down was due to the fact that she was poorly constructed but well maintained by the Columbia Transportation Corp. She met her fate on the shoals when the pumps couldn't keep up with the water flow in. The hatches could have been poorly battened down, with an unseasoned crew but not these guys. The pumps couldn't have kept up with the water flow in. With the "witch" throwing 2 30 plus waves at the boat, no ship would have survived that much of a plunge to the deep. Only God knows the true answer to this mystery.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Brian Shields
Location: Lansing, MI
Email: B_rock70483@yahoo.com
Date: 11/17/01
Remote Name: 65.227.40.152

Comments

I am 18yrs old, and have watched many of the theories on the terrible, sinking. but this is my thought.... i believe that it had bottomed out on the shoal, and began her decent there, than was caught between to giant waves, where there was nothing underneath the middle section, it than broke in two and sank rapidly. like i stated Before, i am 18 yrs. old, and i plan to command one of these giant vessels and look forward to doing so. my deepest condolences to the family and friends of there losses. But we the young men and women of the waters will keep on sailing no matter what is in store for our futures. God bless u.......


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: AmyK
Location: decatur, AL
Email: catchick37@hotmail.com
Date: 11/15/01
Remote Name: 66.0.36.97

Comments

I doubt there will ever be a definitive reason on why that ship went down. As with most disasters, there were probably a number of contributing factors. I imagine the ship was taking on more water than the pumps could handle, thus flooding the cargo hold and causing the load to shift, which also caused unequal weight on one side, increasing the ship's instability. From other reading I've done, I saw that she was sitting fairly low in the water to start with, and this was exacerbated by her large load and the heavy seas. Also, the storm winds changed from NE to NW, meaning the ship no longer had the land to "break" the wind. The coup de grace may have been the hull striking a shoal. As I said, it was probably a combination of events. In any case, it was a tragic loss of life. I am grateful to Gordon Lightfoot for penning such a memorable song that keeps the memories of those sailors fresh in many minds, and introduces others, like me, to the event. May God continue His care over their families, and to all who breast the waves, wherever they are.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: mitch housey
Location: tawas city, michigan
Email: houseym@i-star.com
Date: 11/12/01
Remote Name: 209.69.192.181

Comments

We will never really know the reason for the sinking but in reading different info I feel that the ship was in high seas with a tail wind . When it began down a wave (bow down), a sister wave kept the stern from coming down and the ship went into a nose-dive to the bottom.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Zach Cook
Location: Omaha,Nebraska
Email: Lcook 35209 @ AOL.com
Date: 11/11/01
Remote Name: 65.90.98.9

Comments

It is to bad the Edmund Fitzgerald had to go. Even though it is a sad memory, the Edmund Fitzgerald will always live on in my heart. I'll miss you S.S. Edmund Fitzgerald bye.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Judy Kirby
Location: Reno, Nevada
Email: KirbyNV@AOL.com
Date: 11/11/01
Remote Name: 65.231.18.224

Comments

I grew up in Northern Minnesota and knew young men who worked the ore boats. When the wreck happened, I remember the shock and sadness my family and neighbors all felt. A few years ago, I took my husband to visit the Split Rock Lighthouse We read about the wreck and saw many photos of the Fitzgerald's tragic accident and history. As a result, we now play the Gordon Lightfoot song on Nov. 10 and remind other people we know about the loss. It is a way of remembering and honoring those who died in that horrid storm. That time and wreck stays in my memory.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Parks
Location: Grand Rapids
Email: Woilf9610@aol.com
Date: 11/11/01
Remote Name: 205.188.193.164

Comments

I don't know why,but they are like brothers to me.I'll never forget.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike Melland
Location: Wisconsin
Email: melland@charter.net
Date: 11/10/01
Remote Name: 24.196.119.232

Comments

I lived and worked in Bayfield County, Wisconsin for many years. I remember the night the Fitz went down and the dark cloud that hung over the Port Wing and Iron River area where local crew members were lost. May they rest in piece...


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ed Biser
Location: San Jose, CA
Email: mebiser@yahoo.com
Date: 11/10/01
Remote Name: 198.81.17.189

Comments

As many not remotely connected to the 11/10/75 tragedy I somehow feel a great loss for the crew and sympathy for the families of the "Fitz", as she was affectionately known. 20-20 hindsight, what-ifs, etc., continue to this day on whether the ship should have been out of safe haven. Other ships were on or near the same waters that fateful night besides the "Fitz". Who's to know? None of us on earth, that's for sure. On this 22nd anniversary of this great loss let's continue to remember the brave souls who perished and to the brave souls who continue today plying the same and sometimes deadly waters of the Great Lakes. God bless you all.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Joseph Glitman
Location: Portersville Pennsylvania
Email: jif3030@msn.com
Date: 11/10/01
Remote Name: 24.154.62.235

Comments

Eternal Rest Grant on to Them O'Lord and May Thy Perpetual Light Shine upon the 29 souls of the Edmund Fitzgearld. Amen.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: larry morgan
Location: bucyrus ohio
Email: larrymorgan83@hotmail.com
Date: 11/10/01
Remote Name: 24.166.235.67

Comments

Today is nov.10.As usual I think of my follow sailors on the Big Fitz. May God grant them peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: larry morgan
Location: bucyrus ohio
Email: larrymorgan83@hotmail.com
Date: 11/10/01
Remote Name: 24.166.235.67

Comments

Today is nov.10.As usual I think of my follow sailors on the Big Fitz.May God grant them peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dave lepkowski
Location: Reston, VA
Email: Davelep@juno.com
Date: 11/10/01
Remote Name: 63.215.154.144

Comments

My thoughts are with the friends and families of the the captains and crew of the ore carrier U.S.S. Edmund Fitzgerald and the fishing boat Andrea Gail.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike Kotwica
Location: Memphis, Mi.
Email: mkotwica@hitechmold.com
Date: 11/10/01
Remote Name: 209.187.233.130

Comments

My thoughts are always with the families of the 29 men who lost their lives on that dreadful night. Please say a prayer for them on this 26th Anniversary.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Capt. Donald Ghiata
Location: Oregon Ohio
Email: Captghiata@aol.com
Date: 11/9/01
Remote Name: 152.163.201.69

Comments

There is a time to sail, and a time to seek safe anchorage. The intensity of the storm that sank the Fitz called for the latter. On the evening prior to the Fitz sinking, we anchored under Grand Island on Lake Superior. We were at anchor for 5 days, unable to safely get under way. The exact incident that sank the Fitz is unknown, but she should have waited out the storm in a sheltered anchorage.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: william orchard
Location: shedden, ontario
Email: smokencinders@hotmail.com
Date: 11/9/01
Remote Name: 154.11.162.206

Comments

" may their souls rest in peace"

they have gone to a better place!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dan Snow
Location: Grandville, Mi
Email: HaulMyLoad2u@aol.com
Date: 11/8/01
Remote Name: 205.188.192.49

Comments

With regard to the tragic loss of the steamer Edmund Fitzgerald, I Myself am a Great Lakes Sailor. One of the last ships I crewed was the Oglebay Norton compamy's steamer ARMCO. I was an Oiler down in the engine room. The ARMCO is probably the closest thing on the lakes to the same design as the FITZ and while out on Superior one night, we were in a storm that kind of snuck up and formed itself on us. we ended up in waves of nearly 40 feet! and the fitz was lost in 30 footers. And the really eary part was that we were only a few nauticle miles from the FITZ's final resting place. I guess the only reason we made it through the night was the fact that the Captains of today never run in weather that bad and when they do get caught up in it, they always find a safe harbor until it is over. also, Our storm was only about 6 hours long and when the FIYZ went down she had been battered for more than a day already. After having been in a storm of that magnitude once myself, I can only imagine the horror those men had endured through it all. If you are a surviving family member of a FITZ crew member, My heart and prayers are with you and may God guide you through your loss and reunite you with you'r loved ones in heavan.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dan Snow
Location: Grandville, Mi
Email: HaulMyLoad2u@aol.com
Date: 11/8/01
Remote Name: 205.188.192.49

Comments

With regard to the tragic loss of the steamer Edmund Fitzgerald, I Myself am a Great Lakes Sailor. One of the last ships I crewed was the Oglebay Norton compamy's steamer ARMCO. I was an Oiler down in the engine room. The ARMCO is probably the closest thing on the lakes to the same design as the FITZ and while out on Superior one night, we were in a storm that kind of snuck up and formed itself on us. we ended up in waves of nearly 40 feet! and the fitz was lost in 30 footers. And the really eary part was that we were only a few nauticle miles from the FITZ's final resting place. I guess the only reason we made it through the night was the fact that the Captains of today never run in weather that bad and when they do get caught up in it, they always find a safe harbor until it is over. also, Our storm was only about 6 hours long and when the FIYZ went down she had been battered for more than a day already. After having been in a storm of that magnitude once myself, I can only imagine the horror those men had endured through it all. If you are a surviving family member of a FITZ crew member, My heart and prayers are with you and may God guide you through your loss and reunite you with you'r loved ones in heavan.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Carolyn
Location: Green Bay,WI
Email: Sdpcmp@aol.com
Date: 11/7/01
Remote Name: 152.163.201.72

Comments

I believe that it hit a shoal which caused the damage that allowed it to take on water and, eventually a list. It broke in two when it hit bottom.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jonathon Lallo
Location: Hartville, Ohio
Email: jonathonlallo@excite.com
Date: 11/5/01
Remote Name: 24.166.112.182

Comments

These valiant men of the merchant marine, were unsung Great Lakes heros. Their death was not in vain. Lives have been saved since as a result of what we have learned of this tragedy. The Great Lakes are a beautiful creation of God, requiring our respect at all times.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: vince
Location: rochester,ny
Email: vcid@aol.com
Date: 11/4/01
Remote Name: 152.163.207.62

Comments

MY DEEPEST SYMPATHYS TO THE FAMILYS WHO LOST LOVED ONES WHEN THE EDMUND FITZGERALD SANK NOV.75,,BUT I MUST SAY,,THANK GOD FOR SINGER,SONGWRITER GORDEN LIGHTFOOT,WHO WROTE A GREAT SONG ABOUT THAT DREADFULL DAY,,WITHOUT THAT SONG,,TO BRING IT TO PEOPLES ATTENTION,,I DONT THINK THERE WOULD BE SUCH A GREAT INTREST,,THANK YOU GORDEN!!,,TO THE FAMILYS,,MY PRAYERS,,


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Emily K. Blackmore
Location:
Email: NatureNutEm
Date: 11/4/01
Remote Name: 198.81.16.176

Comments

I think it is very sad.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Curt Kikkert
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Email: Alanecurt@aol.com
Date: 11/3/01
Remote Name: 205.188.195.32

Comments

The cause of the sinking lies in the book, "The Night the FITZ Went Down" by Hugh Bishop with Captain Dudley J. Paquette, Master of Inland Steel's boat the Wilfred Sykes. Having been trained by the NTSB in accident investigation in the field of aviation, I can say that if the NTSB were to investigate the sinking today, the Probable Cause would agree with Captain Paquette. This book is a must read for anyone with an interest in the FITZ or Great Lakes Shipping. Captain Curt Kikkert, US Airways.


Subject: The 29 good men lost
From: Roy Brown
Location: 412minnaqua dr, prospect hights ill
Email: madmanrage3000
Date: 11/2/01
Remote Name: 205.188.192.183

Comments

As said the galles of november came early. The 29 men lost should be alive today but I think god thought their cance for heaven was then. when 29 bells rang at the sailor's cathedral every family member was told their husbands were loking down at them and keeping them safe.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ed B.
Location: Channahon, IL
Email: ebennetts@richardswilcox.com
Date: 11/2/01
Remote Name: 216.43.208.5

Comments

The waves that night were 30 footers on average. All the twisting and turning of the hull may have caused fatigue failure. Then maybe a rogue 50 foot wave came along that did her in. Last weekend I was in Marquette, MI and witnessed from the south shore of Superior one of the roughest storms I've ever seen. Two steamers were in port. My prayers went out to all those on board.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tim
Location: Lexington, Mi
Email: bismark4@yahoo.com
Date: 11/1/01
Remote Name: 64.12.102.179

Comments

I think she hit bottom at the 6 phantom shaol. Seeing the diagrams and photos of the wreck site, you can see that the debris field is not that large. For this fact alone it states that the boat did not break in 2 on the surface. Rather she just lost buoyancy and hit bottom.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kameron
Location: E. Lansing, MI
Email: southwo2@msu.edu
Date: 10/30/01
Remote Name: 35.8.167.68

Comments

I believe the boat struck bottom somewhere on Six Fathom Shoal and began taking on water more quickly than the pumps could remove it. Eventually it just reached the point of negative buoyancy. A tragedy I recall nearly every day, and also must wonder when the next freighter be claimed by the lakes.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Forrest Dickens
Location: Vancouver,P.M.T.C
Email: forrestdickens@hotmail.com
Date: 10/26/01
Remote Name: 142.232.73.28

Comments

The ship sank and lives were lost. I do not have the experiance to comment on what sank the great ship. But i do belive that any sink is only as safe as the weakest link on board, one persons failure to due their job can and will put the ship and her crew in danger. Did an able seaman forget to dog the hatch we will never know. My thoughts are with you sailors how lost your lives. Safe seas to all.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: korey
Location: glenview ill
Email: khenry@glenbrook.k12.il.us
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 199.189.14.66

Comments

I think that one side got heavier than the other and pushed the ship down. Then a big wave picked the boat up and pushed the boat down.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: kate and oksana
Location: glenview
Email: OXANA 22@aol.com
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 199.189.14.66

Comments

That was a very horrible thing that happened to the people on the Edmund Fitzgerald. Innocent lives were taken away by the tragic incident. I feel bad for all the families that lost there loved ones. In class we studied this problem and we think that the ship broke in two pieces.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mara dominguez
Location: Glenview IL
Email: none
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 199.189.14.66

Comments

what had happend on november 10 , 1975 a boat had sunk but noone knows how it did so my guess would be the open hatch cover maybe when the waves were blowing really hard and also while it was raining the cargo probbly moved really hard and then it might of made a hole and that's how the water came in the boat.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: EVA
Location: Illionois
Email: @
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 199.189.14.66

Comments

What i think happened to the Edmund Fitzgerald is that something happened on Fathom Shoal on November 10,1975 and that caused the ship to sink. The 29 people will always be in every ones heart.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Nicole Gilkey
Location: Glenview IL
Email: Hotti55190@Hotmail.com
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 199.189.15.140

Comments

I think that the sinking of the ship was a very tragic and unforgetable loss. Many people have lost there loved ones the sinking. May GOD BLESS those families.

I believe that the Edmund Fitzgerald sunk because of loose hatch covers. The strong waves came up the sides of the boats and washed on to the deck. Because the hatch covers were open the water was able to seep into the cargo holdmaking the ship to begin sinking. Also the ocking of the boat from the rough water made the argo to sift causing the the boat to have a list.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bogus
Location: Glenview , IL
Email: Ghandzel@home.com
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 199.189.14.66

Comments

I think that the fitz nosed dived and sunk and I pray for all the lost ones famliy's.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: kurt
Location: Glenview,IL
Email: none
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 199.189.14.74

Comments

I think that the hatch covers were faulty because the coast guard said on an inspection that the covers would take water when water would come on deck of the ship. too much water went in the cargo hold and made it tilt and sink.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: lewis leigh
Location: glenview
Email: accord5432
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 199.189.14.66

Comments

my comments are that the fitz rubbed up against the shoal and it leaked water insank and ripped in ta two.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mara dominguez
Location: Glenview IL
Email: none
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 199.189.14.66

Comments


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: pat
Location:
Email: ibchilin2x@aol.com
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 199.189.15.130

Comments

i think it rode two giant waves and broke in half


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Eic Ocampo
Location: Glenview,IL
Email: erico100@msn.com
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 199.189.14.194

Comments

I think the ship broke in two pieces and sank to the bottom of the lake.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: jc palma
Location: Glenview,IL
Email: cyco252@aol.com
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 199.189.15.130

Comments

i think it rode two waves and broke in half and maybe took water into the hach covers to.


Subject: My View
From: Anthony Lan
Location: Glenview,il
Email: madrapper0609@aol.com
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 199.189.14.66

Comments

I think the Fitzgerald sank because the very fact that the two waves hit the ship.Im sorry for the loss and my condollences go out. Anthony Lan GlenBrook South High School


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike Roosevelt
Location: Wausau, Wi
Email: FullMetalMike@aol.com
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 152.163.213.211

Comments

My belief is that the Fitz suffered some sort of structural failure around 3:00 PM on 11/10/1975. Culminating in the loss of the ship later that evening.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike Roosevelt
Location: Wausau, Wi
Email: FullMetalMike@aol.com
Date: 10/25/01
Remote Name: 152.163.213.211

Comments

My belief is that the Fitz suffered some sort of structural failure around 3:00 PM on 11/10/1975. Culminating in the loss of the ship later that evening.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: ian lambert
Location: northern england uk
Email: ian.lam@ntlworld.com
Date: 10/24/01
Remote Name: 62.254.64.4

Comments

In 1994 i was working in a university, the song came over the radio, a catchy tune i thought, i asked someone about the song, i was told the most chilling story about the fitzgerald,i went home that day and cryed for the crew, 7 years later, i was looking for the song on the net, i came across this site, now there will be many months ahead of me searching for the complete history of the edmund fitzgerald and its crew. any reply is welcome.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Denise Slattery
Location: Oklahoma City, OK
Email: dslattery@mmcable.com
Date: 10/24/01
Remote Name: 164.58.10.124

Comments

Like Blake (who wrote his comments on the 6th of October), I,too, do not have any direct connections to the Fitzgerald, save for Gordon Lightfoot's ballad. I might have had some interest in the Fitz beforehand, but the song increased my interest. Since then, I have visited the Whitefish Point Museum twice and read several books on the reasons why the Fitz went down. Navigation on the water, and my respect for the deep waters of the Great Lakes, especially Superior, prompted my going into the Coast Guard. I spent 4 years in the Reserves in Michigan, before moving to Oklahoma. I have since gotten out (too landlocked here), but my interest in the Fitz and in the Great Lakes has always been there.

My thoughts are always with the families of the 29 men who lost their lives on that dreadful night in 1975.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: darin
Location: ft walton beach,fl
Email: dace0012@aol.com
Date: 10/24/01
Remote Name: 198.26.118.38

Comments

I'am very delighted that someone went and deditcated a powerful like gordon lightfoot did. Just too bad the ending came out like it did. give all family and friends my heart felt wishes


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Robbi Welty
Location: Maple Wisconsin
Email: robbi1@win.bright.net
Date: 10/22/01
Remote Name: 64.33.183.86

Comments

On November 10th 1975, The Edmund Fitzgerald went down, and is now under about 530 feet of water. Somehow, she managed to break in half on the way down. I do not think that that was the cause how ever. I believe that the cargo of the Fitz shifted to one side after a big wave, and she started to go down. She also might of hit the shoal, but it is not very likely. I hope that the families of the men on the boat have recoverd from this tragic loss. PLEASE FOR ALL THAT READ THIS ON NOVEMBER 1Oth, I WOULD REQUEST A MOMENT OF COMPLETE SILENCE AT 12:00 UNTIL 12:05, FOR THE MEN THAT LOST THERE LIVES ON THAT TRAGIC NIGHT. THANK YOU!!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jim Finlayson
Location: Grand Blanc, MI
Email: cliffsvic@home.com
Date: 10/22/01
Remote Name: 12.47.224.12

Comments

The fact that there was damaged rail has to point to significant hull damage that eventually caused total hull failure. Rail does not come apart very easily. That damage could only have occured by touching bottom at Superior Shoal. I'm sure hatch covers were coming loose but that was likely, again, the result of a twisting, damaged hull. The captain of the Sykes (can't remember his name) overheard McSorley yell "no one on deck!!" while having a conversation with him and that must have been a desperate desire by crew to tighten down hatches.

I was in the Soo at the time and had never experienced a storm or wind like that night. Wow!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: william green
Location: marion,ohio
Email: wmorgon@aol.com
Date: 10/16/01
Remote Name: 64.12.103.41

Comments

I CANNOT SEE ANY OTHER WAY BUT THE SIX THAMON SHOLE THAT TOOK THE EDMAN FITZGERAL TO THE BOTTOM ON NOV 10 1975.. I WAS 10 YEAR OLD THE NIGHT SEE WENT DOWN. SEE DIDNOT TAKE WATER FROM TOP SIDE . AS THE CAPTAIN OF THE ANDERSON SAID SEE WAS IN TO CLOSE TO THE SHOLE THAT NIGHT. SEE HAD NO MEAN OF KNOWING WERE SEE WAS GOING ALL OF HER SYSTEM WAS RIP OFF THE BOAT. SEE WAS RUNNING BLIND AND CRIPEL IN 100 MILE HR. WIND 20 30 FOOT WAVE WITH ONLY A RADIO PHONE TO KEEP IN CONTACT WITH OTHER SHIP. AFTER THE SHOLE SEE RADIO THE ANDSON SHE HAD FENCH RAIN WAS DOWN SEE WAS MISSING VENT AND SEE TAKEN LIST THAT TELL SEE HIT THE SHOLE.NO ONE FAULT SOME BAD THING GEST HAPPEN.TO THE CREW FAMILY GOD BLESS YOU ALL MY PRAY ARE WITH YOU.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jerry L Moore Jr
Location: Paradise Mi./Whitefish Pt.
Email: biskitisking@yahoo.com
Date: 10/15/01
Remote Name: 12.37.13.107

Comments

People can blame the wreck on hatches, six mile sholes, the three sisters, overloading, crashing in the locks, exc. But the bottom line is that Lake Superior was very treacherous on that evening. I was born and raised on Lake Superior. I remember the night she sank. I was eight years old and a guy by the name of John Leclair took me to the pier in Grand Marais Mi. We went to see the how bad it was blowing out. My family owned a commercial fishing buisness in this town at the time. The wind was blowing so hard that it literally "sandblasted" the paint of the side of John's truck. Now that is a storm. Those "salties" that were out there that night, could not believe that a "lake" could get like that. May all the families and victims of this tragedy rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Richard L
Location: Jacksonville, Fl
Email: palatkaman7@aol.com
Date: 10/9/01
Remote Name: 152.163.213.56

Comments

The anals of history record many things about ocean shipwrecks and the bravery of ocean seamen. It is good that we can remember, too, that many brave seamen have served and been lost on the Great Lakes. More cargo is delivered from the Great Lakes ships by far than the ocean ships. They serve for the most part unheralded, but vital to our country, nonetheless!

You were a proud ship, Fitz and you served to the death!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Megan Clarke
Location: Quebec Saint-Timothée
Email: clarke@rockler.qc.ca
Date: 10/7/01
Remote Name: 204.101.164.132

Comments

I'm not positive about the singking of the fitzgerald, but I'm lerning about it in my class. I do know that in chuches every November 10 theyed ring the bell 29 times for each men that had deid in the fitz.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Megan Clarke
Location: Quebec Saint-Timothée
Email: clarke@rockler.qc.ca
Date: 10/7/01
Remote Name: 204.101.164.132

Comments

I'm not positive about the singking of the fitzgerald, but I'm lerning about it in my class. I do know that in chuches every November 10 theyed ring the bell 29 times for each men that had deid on the fitz.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Blake Kishler
Location: Granville, OH
Email: FerrariKid14@hotmail.com
Date: 10/6/01
Remote Name: 216.127.0.83

Comments

I have almost no connections with the Edmund Fitzgerald disaster (although my father knew one of the 29 men lost in the wreck), but once I heard Gordon Lightfoot's haunting song, I have become fascinated with the whole saga and am gathering as much information on the subject as I can. Every summer, my family spends some time on Lake Michigan, and there are usually a couple of freighters coming in and out of the cement plant located a few miles from our cottage. It's hard to believe that something so huge, so strong, could be swept away to the bottom of Lake Superior in one night. Someday, I hope to visit the wreck, and see the Fitzgerald for myself. Since I wasn't alive during this time, I would like to know just how much of an impact that the loss of this ship had on so many people.

My theory on the sinking of the Fitzgerald is like many others' - I believe that the ship was weakened by water leaking into the hull; a large breach of waves probably snapped her in two. The bow sank first, then the stern, which was turned upside-down by the force of the storm and waves.

"They might have split up, or they might have capsized, They may have broke deep and took water,

But all that remains is the faces and the names of the wives, the sons, and the daughters..."


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: David
Location: Dardanelle
Email: davhut64@yahoo.com
Date: 10/1/01
Remote Name: 66.112.8.133

Comments

I am very interested in this subject but know very little about it except the song. I would love to know of any material on-line or off that is available for me. Feel free to email me. thanks!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Robin Welty
Location: Maple Wisconsin (outside of duluth)
Email: robbimariew@hotmail.com
Date: 10/1/01
Remote Name: 64.33.183.46

Comments

I feel that the Sinking of the FITZ could have been prevented. But all is done now, and there is no going back now. I give my thoughts and hope to the familys of the tragic loss of the Edmund Fiztgearald


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Owen Rafferty
Location: Decatur, IA 50067
Email: catmeringue@worldnet.att.net
Date: 9/30/01
Remote Name: 66.43.228.68

Comments

Get as technical as ye wish - the fact is, and was admitted by a captain with 42 years exp. - he'd never seen the conditions that bad - never! Like the song says - the big ship and crew was a bone ta be chewed!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: JJ Martin
Location: Hot Springs, AR
Email: jjmartin@arkansas.net
Date: 9/29/01
Remote Name: 216.152.4.35

Comments

I have always been interested in the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald and had seen some of the artifacts in Duluth. I was happy that the survivors were able to have a memorial. Though I believe that the song by Gordon Lightfoot was probably the single most moving memorial that everyone can share with the survivors. Just a thought.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jerry G. Slater
Location: Orange, CA
Email: Jerry@Slatronics.com
Date: 9/29/01
Remote Name: 24.24.244.16

Comments

It seems evident in the reports from the Captain that the ship was taking on water. From what source, we will never know, but as the other sources that have sailed with the same cargo on the same seas have said, it seems unlikely it was just "hatch cover" failure, more likely a shoal collision in a downward void.

Taking on water, as we know in the Titanic case, and in the case here, leads to structural stress that has NEVER been tested.

First, the ship takes on a posture that is NOT within its designed limits, second, the water enters and most likely floods some compartments, not all (until the very end) and makes it equivicable to loading the ship in an unbalanced manner.

Listing (as was reported by the Captain) also shows that the cargo (iron ore pellets) had shifted. The cargo holds were open side to side and the entering water made it easier for the pellets to shift in the gale.

With the added weight of the water, and the increasing gale force, it is not unlikely that the ship "bridged" two waves and snapped sending both pieces to the bottom in a moments notice. (Verifiable by the fact that no distress call was received, but radio contact was still possible)

We still wonder, in the Titanic case, and in the E.F. case, is the "delay" worth the lives?

The Titanic could have "stopped" when it was made aware of icebergs in the area, the E.F. could have simply put her nose into the wind and assumed a "ride it out" posture closer to the Canadian side.

The haunting song reminds us.... we never know when it is our turn.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Robert H
Location: Boston,MA
Email: m204prgmr@aol.com
Date: 9/27/01
Remote Name: 141.154.110.159

Comments

On November 8th, 1975 James Pratt and I spoke at Lakewood Library, Lakewood,OH. The next day he was to meet 'The Fitz' at the Soo Locks as she went upbound for her load. I grew up in Lakewood, OH during the 60's and early 70's and I remember one specific time when I was young..my father and I were driving along the shore line at night and as I looked out into Lake Erie, I saw a string of lights..it was an ore boat. It wasn't untill I became a deckhand on the Reserve did I remember this. I remember too, and too well, the first day I saw an ore boat up close. I had to drive from Cleveland to Toledo to meet the Reserve and for 20 minutes I could not see it even after following the directions exactly. I could not see it because it was right in front of me....:). Is what happened haunting? A tad. I feel blessed to be somewhat connected and to have been one of the last to speak to a crew member. And I wonder why. Recently, I was given a pillow case and a wash cloth from the Fitz from a friend who once sailed her. He and I were deckhands toghether for one week on the Reserve. When I hear the song, I get goosebumps..even at 48 yrs old. I am confident that what happened was she came too close to land and hit bottom.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Morene Leavy Novak
Location: Houston, TX USA
Email: dennisandmorene@netzero.net
Date: 9/27/01
Remote Name: 204.149.20.50

Comments

I grew up in Manitowoc, WI. My father(Robert Leavy) sailed the Great Lakes (Chief Engineer) his entire career. He did sail on the Fitz for a time. I was fortunate, my father took me on a tour of the ship and my brother was able to sail with my father on the Fitz. Dad always thought that it was the "Sister Waves" that caused the Fitz to sink. The "Sister Waves" is a phenomenon of hugh waves that can break a ship in two.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jacob Baars
Location:
Email: none
Date: 9/27/01
Remote Name: 205.213.111.51

Comments

I think that the Edmund Fitzgerald scraped bottom on the six fanthom shoals and that allowed water to come in to the ship and drag her to the bottom.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: brandon
Location: garnet,Mi
Email: raven45678@metallica.com
Date: 9/26/01
Remote Name: 24.4.252.151

Comments

I have been to whitefish pointe many times and it still shocks me to read the last words herd from the edmund fritzgerald to think that that's the last we ever herd from her....


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Clyde La Forest
Location: E. Tawas Mi.
Email: cleforest@earthlink.net
Date: 9/16/01
Remote Name: 216.40.137.116

Comments

I feel as if the Fitz. was pushed to hard in the high seas, and that caused her to work so hard that she just split open and sank.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: matthew
Location: whitter ca
Email: auntie 188 aol
Date: 9/15/01
Remote Name: 64.12.102.32

Comments

I feel that the fitzgerald may have broke up and sank. I cant realy understand how all 29 people could have gone down with the ship.Do you know ?


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: matthew
Location: whitter ca
Email: auntie 188 aol
Date: 9/15/01
Remote Name: 64.12.102.32

Comments

I feel that the fitzgerald may have broke up and sank. I cant realy understand how all 29 people could have gone down with the ship.Do you know ?


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: D.J.
Location: Wyandotte Mi
Email: wholzhueter
Date: 9/14/01
Remote Name: 209.69.50.101

Comments

I am a 9 year old I have large opinions so I know that when the Anderson called the Fitzgerald and said about the waves I knew the E.F. had had those waves push up and all of the cargo shifted into the middle so eventually it cracked.


Subject: The Shoal
From: Tommy MacLuckie
Location: New Orleans, Louisiana
Email: tmacluckie@hotmail.com
Date: 9/13/01
Remote Name: 129.81.242.223

Comments

From reading 'Gales Of November' the best popint made in the book was the fact that their shoal maps were wrong and that they went right over them in heavy running seas. From a big rouge wave heaving the ship down in its trough, of course no one is going to hear or feel the ship crunching on the bottom. As the ship travelled on, the waves obviously tore her wide open, and the squall obviously had some nasty waves riding with it when it hit the Fitzgerald because that's when she disappeared from the radar screen. Another point well made in the book is how the ship bent back and forth in running seas. With all the weight from the cargo, the smashing on the shoal, there was now more give than take in the structure of the ship. Whether it broke in two on the surface or when it smashed into the bottom, the Lake destroyed that ship. The fact that not one person got off the ship shows that it went under the surface probably in less time it takes to read this post. The loose hatches couldn't've sunk the ship with the bilge pumps she had. No way. I'm glad Hollywood hasn't touched this story like they did The Perfect Storm.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Leon Wilde
Location: southgate,mi
Email: leon375@aol.com
Date: 9/10/01
Remote Name: 24.168.238.48

Comments

Being a captain myself (airplane not ship) I know we captains take on the responsibility for whatever happens with those in our keep. I am sure the captain would never have done anything to put his crew and ship in peril and I hope I am never put in a no win situation!! I would think he would have known if he had hit the ground and notifyed everyone. he did not. God bless all who loose their lives too soon … and in the end that is all of us.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Allison
Location: Pecotonica  IL
Email: ssgdano863@hotmail.com
Date: 9/6/01
Remote Name: 4.4.7.232

Comments

Ilearned about "The Big Fitz" in school. I feel very sorry for the crew and there families.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike O'Hara
Location: Red Deer, Alberta, Canada
Email: darendor@hotmail.com
Date: 8/27/01
Remote Name: 216.126.12.137

Comments

Is it true that they have filmed the bodies of the crew at their stations within the wrecked hulls?


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bill Jandreau
Location: Ishpeming, MI
Email: BILVISLAND@MSN.COM
Date: 8/22/01
Remote Name: 65.231.120.130

Comments

I think it will always be a mystery


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Doug Lee
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario
Email: stein@tbaytel.net
Date: 8/17/01
Remote Name: 206.186.170.154

Comments

I understand that in haste to leave the port of Duluth, the hatches weren't completely water-tight, contributing to her demise. Gives meaning to the phrase "Batten the hatches."


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Adam Grimes
Location: Wheeling,WV
Email: AGBODYMAN@msn.com
Date: 8/10/01
Remote Name: 63.17.222.109

Comments

I just watched a special on TLC, They say the three sisters (three huge waves in storms) is what did in the BIG FITZ I would love to go visit the great lakes site, I love THE BIG FITZ. AND THE CREW PEACE TO THE SURVIORS!!!!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: T. Holub
Location: Currituck, NC
Email: timdonna@inteliport.com
Date: 8/9/01
Remote Name: 198.26.132.101

Comments

I believe the leaking hatch covers started it all. Listing, pumps operating, etc. Possibly a pitch pole from cargo shifting due to water accumulation in the hull. Then stern then breaking and dropping forward.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Todd Criswell
Location: Fresno, Ca.
Email: WhyteMegladon@aol
Date: 8/6/01
Remote Name: 152.163.207.72

Comments

My belief is that on that awful night, the Edmund Fitzgerald was lost due too waves created by a powerful storm. I have heard a lot of conjecture on other causes of this accident, but stand firm in my beliefs. Whatever the cause, I think this tragedy should never be forgotten. My hat goes off to Gordon Lightfoot for singing a song that reminds us of what happened to those 29 men on that cold dark night. God bless the Captain and the Crew of the Edmund Fitzgerald.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Vince Terrazzino
Location: Chicago Ill
Email: VinceandGrace@prodigy.nrt
Date: 8/4/01
Remote Name: 209.254.173.131

Comments

Besides it breaking in two, the storm and it being overloaded were contributing factors.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mark Kihn
Location: Calgary
Email: mkihn@ncc-on.org
Date: 8/1/01
Remote Name: 209.82.120.82

Comments

I just purchased the 50-minute CineNova documentary about the Fitz. Let me say it entertains, haunts, and educates in an eerie type of way. About two years ago I was flying to Toronto via commercial airliner. We encountered turbulence and so the pilot took us higher to about 45,000 ft. (my guess). At that height on a clear Sept. day, I could see the slight curvature of the earth -- never have I seen a wonder like that. We were right on top of Superior -- it is huge. Good website.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Sheri
Location: Ohio
Email: youn_cxr@access-k12.org
Date: 8/1/01
Remote Name: 205.133.16.230

Comments

The loss of the Fitzgerald and her men has haunted me since that day. My Husband lost his best friend, he was a deckhand on the ship. We named our son after him and he grew up hearing the story of that day. We were blessed with being able to see his friend one last time before the ship left for that last journey. It was to be his last trip as he was planning on entering college. I believe the storm was more than the ship could handle and it took on water. The Fitzgerald will always be a part of our lives and memories.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Timothy J.O'Leary
Location: Painesville,Ohio
Email: tjoleary@ncweb.com
Date: 7/21/01
Remote Name: 64.240.52.132

Comments

I would like any e-mails from anyone that was on any great lakes ships that may have served with my uncle Vernie J. Koski.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: T Owczarzak
Location: Bay City  MI
Email: www.sowczarzak@aol.com
Date: 7/20/01
Remote Name: 24.4.252.135

Comments

she hit a shoal that was marked by a light house that was reported to be not working, coast guard knew that it wasn't working and never had the time to get to and repair lighthouse i feel that damage to hull started the sinking slowly, taking on water she flooded forward and drove herself to the bottom and broke in two


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Rickie Moneyhun
Location: Whitehall,Michigan
Email: Jrhocfn@aol.com
Date: 7/20/01
Remote Name: 152.163.213.62

Comments

The Edmund Fitzgerald was a great ship. She broke cargo records and broke through the hearts of ours with the massive ship size and the spectacle of the view of the Fitz. And it broke our hearts when the Fitzgerald went down to the bottom of Lake Superior, where she will lie forever more and it breaks my heart to not know what happened that night. I must only imagine that it went down like the Carl D. Bradley or the Daniel J. Morrell did whom also sank thanks to the tolls of November gales. A Grand Condolences to the family and the friends of the crew who went down with the vessel my thoughts and prayers be directed to you all. And though we cry to the for those in peril on the sea. The Legend lives on form the Chippewa on down of the big lake they call gitche gumme Superior they said never gives up her dead when the gales of November come early. The Legend Will Always live on especially in our hearts and in our souls. Thank you and Good Night.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Barry
Location: Sandy, Utah
Email: haaagoth@hotmail.com
Date: 7/15/01
Remote Name: 216.67.122.37

Comments

Lightfoot's words are easily understood in the song (unlike the words of so many other performers), so when I listened to them closely I became interested in the story of the song. Why should the deaths of 29 men be such an object of fascination with people? Well, this is life. We take great interest in the events of this world, especially the tragic ones.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: aljasar
Location: zamboanga city
Email: aljasar@freeze.com
Date: 7/15/01
Remote Name: 202.134.246.230

Comments

where the story of the Edmund Fitzgerald only that?


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Charles B
Location: Sweetwater, Texas
Email: rapomnam@aol.com
Date: 7/11/01
Remote Name: 66.90.168.247

Comments

"The church bell chimed till it rang twenty-nine times... for each man on the Edmund Fitzgerald" May God rest the souls of all who have lost their lives on the seas.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Fred Brennion
Location: Los Angeles
Email: fbrennion@socal.rr.com
Date: 7/8/01
Remote Name: 66.27.162.26

Comments

Bernie Cooper, following in the Arthur Anderson, seemed quite sure that the Fitz was WAY too close to the shoal. I'm convinced the Fitzgerald opened up her bottom on the shoal. The loss of buoyancy caused a nosedive when she was overtaken by a huge couple of waves from the stern. The bow impact cause the ship to buckle and break.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Michael Virro
Location: Whitehall Mi.
Email: mvirro@yahoo.com
Date: 7/7/01
Remote Name: 63.23.174.149

Comments

Well it is sad the Edmund Fitzgerald went down but I think it hit the shoal and took on water so badly the ship was so heavy the waves looked as they were I than they were. If you don't agree it's okay but want to know the real cause.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: jon t. wildes
Location: somewhere in texas
Email: ensure@volcano.com
Date: 7/7/01
Remote Name: 12.41.239.160

Comments

any time a great ship like the "fitz" goes down we all lose a little something of ourselves in the process it is re-assuring to know that the men did not suffer but the end came quickly


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jonathan Graves
Location: Hannover Pk. IL
Email: jjgraves@juno.com
Date: 7/5/01
Remote Name: 209.244.67.47

Comments

I always wanted to find out what caused the "Fitz" to go down, and I think it sank by taking a nose dive in the water and broke in half underwater taking the lives of the 29 men with it. I'm surprised that a 1994 expedition recorded on video tape of what they thought was a crewmember's body at the bow!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bruce Solov
Location: Deerfield Beach, FL
Email: solov99@aol.com
Date: 7/4/01
Remote Name: 205.188.195.57

Comments

I have always been interested in learning about maritime disasters. What prompted me to want to know more about the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald, was I was eating dinner with my wife last night, at a local restaurant, and Gordon Lightfoot's "Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" came in loud and clear over the speaker. Well, needles to say not a word was spoken between us during the whole time the song was playing. It made me wonder how and why the Fitz went down. It also made me think of the 29 men that died in this disaster. I was for a long time researching, since I was a child, on the sinking of the Titanic, well, this is just as important. I was only eight years old when the disaster occurred. But because of my longtime interest in maritime disasters, I feel that my contribution to their memory would be to know as much as I can about it. As far as my theory of the cause is concerned, I totally blame it on the on the hatch, and the waves spilling on to the deck, and damaging the hatch. It was a terrible tragedy, and my hat goes off to the 29 men that lost their lives, and the families they left behind.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bruce
Location: Deerfield Beach, FL
Email: solov99@aol.com
Date: 7/4/01
Remote Name: 205.188.195.57

Comments

I have always been interested in learning about maritime disasters. What prompted me to want to know more about the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald, was I was eating dinner with my wife last night, at a local restaurant, and Gordon Lightfoot's "Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" came in loud and clear over the speaker. Well, needles to say not a word was spoken between us during the whole time the song was playing. It was a terrible tragedy.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Timothy J.O'Leary
Location: Painesville,Ohio
Email: tjoleary@ncweb.com
Date: 7/2/01
Remote Name: 64.240.54.156

Comments

My uncle had been a captain on the Great Lakes and had retired the year before the "Fitz" went down. I had the chance to go on a cruise one year with my uncle on the "Fitz" and many of the people that died on that boat are still remembered today because some were from a town that is very close to my residence. I had a "terrific" time going on those cruises back in 50's and getting to meet some very good deckhands and others that helped the boats function day/night. I was definitely a "great" loss to many people when the "Fitz" went down.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Brynn
Location: BC, Canada
Email: brynn1957@hotmail.com
Date: 6/28/01
Remote Name: 24.77.169.128

Comments

I am totally amazed that there is still so much conversation regarding the Fitz. I'm glad to see that we won't let the memory of the crew of the ship fade. I was living in Duluth Minn at the time and remember well the dark sadness. I have never forgotten nor do I think I ever will. Wonderful website you have here...Thank you so very much


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jared
Location: Toivola
Email: jlbean65@yahoo.com
Date: 6/28/01
Remote Name: 198.110.143.227

Comments

I don't know a whole lot about the Fitz, but I think she went down from the 3 sisters. Which is, for people who don't know what that is, when a wave comes from the back, another comes from the front, which puts the middle out of the water, and another wave comes from the side and splits it in half. That's my thought though so if you don't agree, don't get mad at me.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike King
Location: San Diego, California
Email: agapathos@nethere.com
Date: 6/20/01
Remote Name: 208.50.80.71

Comments

Judging by the fact that she rests on Gitchee Goomee's floor with her bow upright and her stern inverted, and by the rip tides that generally follow rough water, I think it likely that the Fitzgerald was caught in heavy seas that brought shear forces to bear on her hull. I imagine that dumping some taconite may have occurred to the captain, which would have made the shear forces less, however she would then have bobbed like a cork on the whitecaps.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: codyg
Location: wv
Email: greaver@iolinc.net
Date: 6/17/01
Remote Name: 208.134.215.93

Comments

the ship haled iron ore and it was a big ship every time I listen to the song I get a lump in my throat for the crew of the great ship.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Rollie Renaud
Location: Toronto On
Email: rollie.renaud@monstermoving.com
Date: 6/13/01
Remote Name: 205.150.213.77

Comments

I grew up on the shores of our inland seas. I have an affinity for the Lakes and those who travel them either for commerce or recreation. I've pleasure sailed now for over forty years but I shall never forget the sinking of the "Fitz". Nor will I forget how soon the tragedy seemed to be forgotten until Gordie Lightfoot's song and the book, "Gales of November" Thank God we don't forget nor continue to express sympathy towards the survivors. As for what happened that night, I think she started to break up in proximity to the shoals, developed her list and simply failed to recover after a wave and "submarined" in. The photos of the wheelhouse and plate buckling inwards seem to bear that theory out. No one, who has read the Gales of November or heard the song will ever forget the 29 lost souls.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: jerry
Location: great falls MT
Email: jero78@hotmail.com
Date: 6/13/01
Remote Name: 63.166.59.114

Comments

I think she was caught hanging in the air between the two huge waves that she was warned were approaching. Then she broke in half, nothing they could do to avoid it...'nuff said.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: marc trehey
Location: madison, wi.
Email: itrey@mac.com
Date: 6/12/01
Remote Name: 158.252.99.92

Comments

I have a different theory more based on science and physics, than engineering flaws or even severe winds. Magnetic poles are all over the earth and with a load of iron ore pellets over 26,000 tons , and the fact that iron is highly attracted to magnetic fields and although the Fitz may have made this voyage many times , I think it was a disaster bound to happen. So with all do respect to the capt. and crew and no matter how buoyant a ship may be... If I drop an iron anvil in the bathtub, well...


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John Markahm
Location: Trenton
Email: boatcrazy788@hotmail.com
Date: 6/11/01
Remote Name: 24.213.53.174

Comments

I think the Edmund Fitzgerald went down because a big wave flip it up and the bow of the boat went down and it broke into two when the bow hit the bottom. I could be wrong but that is who I think the ship sank


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John Markahm
Location: Trenton
Email: boatcrazy788@hotmail.com
Date: 6/11/01
Remote Name: 24.213.53.174

Comments

I think the Edmund Fitzgerald went down because a big wave flip it up and the bow of the boat went down and it broke into two when the bow hit the bottom. I could be wrong but that is who I think the ship sank


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Eileen
Location: Kulpmont Pa.
Email: pussy_cat6@hotmail.com
Date: 6/9/01
Remote Name: 207.42.36.36

Comments

Please e-mail me with the total weight she carried on that night. I have heard a few different stories and would like to know the true weight. I have been very interested in the story of the great Edmund. I respect the crew and in no way think they were at fault. I will hope to visit the lake so I can pay my respects to her crew.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ricky
Location: westland mi
Email: Nova 68 S Sport
Date: 6/8/01
Remote Name: 152.163.213.177

Comments


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: k. williams
Location:
Email: www.kdwilliams.com
Date: 6/7/01
Remote Name: 205.231.185.232

Comments

I think she was caught from behind by a big wave ,and drove into the bottom.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: k. williams
Location:
Email: www.kdwilliams.com
Date: 6/7/01
Remote Name: 205.231.185.232

Comments

I think she was caught from behind by a big wave ,and drove into the bottom.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Terry S
Location: Sioux Falls Sd
Email: trsaj@msn.com
Date: 6/5/01
Remote Name: 63.17.231.92

Comments

I remember quite well that fateful day in November. Growing up on Schroeder, MN, on the shores of Lake Superior I knew how wicked and vicious it could be. I recall my mom telling us to be quiet because a news flash was coming over the TV. Then we heard the what had happened. At this time I was only 8 years old and could not understand why she was crying. I found out that day that my Uncle was aboard that ship. I have no memory of him since I had only seen him as an infant. It was my Grandma's brother. She always hated the song by Gordon Lightfoot. She could not believe that someone would take a tragedy like this and make a profit from it. Although I can respect her opinion I must say I enjoy it. Much like captain Mcsorley, this too was my uncles last voyage because he was about to retire. What happened that day to cause her to go down doesn't matter to me. But I will say that it definitely was not an error by the crew.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: mark moore
Location: bristol,in.
Email: cashewbooo2@yahoo.com
Date: 6/3/01
Remote Name: 35.8.214.219

Comments

There is no conclusive evidence that says that the fitz broke in two on the surface. If you'll think back to when McSorley radioed Captain Cooper, He didn't report the list until after he had passed the six fathom shoal area. Please do not go according to what Mr. Jacques Cousteau said about her breaking in two on the surface. Cousteau was a great explorer, but I am firmly rooted in the belief that she shoaled and sank later. Although she is in two parts at the bottom of Superior, I believe she broke in two as a result of hitting the lake bottom stern first. Had she broken in two on the surface, the two halves would be farther apart, instead of 170ft. apart.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Geoffrey Ashcroft
Location: Manitoba
Email: tallships_
Date: 6/1/01
Remote Name: 206.45.44.10

Comments

To the families of the lost crewmen, I truly feel sorry for your losses. I believe that the cargo had shifted on the Fitzgerald, it could be possible but we will never know what truly happened. I have been a man of the sea all my life, till the world realizes that the Fitzgerald is a grave, all we can do is wait.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Douglas Lentz
Location: Albany, Ga. USA
Email: douglaslentz@hotmail.com
Date: 5/30/01
Remote Name: 205.188.197.38

Comments

I have read two books and viewed several videos on the sinking of the great ore carrier, Edmund Fitzgerald. I personally believe she bottomed out at Caribou Island. I would like to express my sorrow to the family and friends of the crew of the Fitzgerald.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Robb Linkowski
Location: Buffalo
Email: Tmirobb@webtv.net
Date: 5/25/01
Remote Name: 209.240.220.199

Comments

It has been over 25 years since the events of that tragic night. I, for on, have to agree with those who disagree about the Coast Guard's findings. Seeing as Capt. McSorley reported his damage (broken vents, fence rail down, etc..) in such detail I cannot see as how he wouldn't have noticed-much less reported- any failure in his hatch covers. Considering Capt Cooper's expert opinion that he gathered in the midst of the storm I believe the Caribou Shoal theory has to be given the most consideration. However, no matter what conjecture one may dwell upon all we really need to keep in focus is that those 29 men will forever be at eternal rest beneath Superior's waves.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ted Marshall
Location: London, Ont. Canada
Email: tmarshall@odyssey.on.ca
Date: 5/21/01
Remote Name: 209.213.229.81

Comments

To whom it may concern:

The demise of the S.S. Edmund Fitzgerald does not rest on the shoulders of the crew of the ship.

Who in their right mind would sail Lake Superior with hatch covers loose in November with 5 days crossing ahead of them?

In addition, McSorley's maps were not accurate; he shoaled the ship and it was sinking from 3:30pm on.

McSorley was too close to Carribou Island, shoaled the ship and sank it because he was too confident.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Luke
Location: wyandotte Michigan
Email: JTAILdog@wyan.org
Date: 5/19/01
Remote Name: 209.69.102.28

Comments

I was so sad when I read it in newspaper every year I go up to survivor and sometimes I wish I was on the great SHIP


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Katie
Location: Clawson
Email: bob@aol.com
Date: 5/16/01
Remote Name: 216.11.55.3

Comments

I think that she hit bottom of the shoal and slowly took on water until she finally had too much and a wave forced her to the bottom.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jim Bintz
Location: Reston VA
Email: jimva2000@aol.com
Date: 5/14/01
Remote Name: 152.163.194.201

Comments

In November 1975, I was a newlywed attending SUNY Oswego on the shore of Lake Ontario. When Lightfoot's song was released it was an instant local hit, getting a lot of play on the campus radio station.

I'm partial to the Three Sisters Theory, that a series of unusual wave peaks, driven by the gale force winds, combined to suspend the ship beyond the hull's endurance. In essence, the supporting water drew out from beneath the hull, with the bow and stern suspended in the wavetops, and she folded like a beer can. The heavier load only added to the stress on her keel.

This is all the more likely if she was downwind of the shoals in shallower water. The wind pressure along the length of Superior would have driven the storm surge to unexpected amplitudes.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: DAN Sweet
Location: Brunswick,Ohio USA
Email: RE SWEET@SPRYNET.com
Date: 5/12/01
Remote Name: 165.121.207.187

Comments

It was a grate ship I'm 9 years old. I'm going to bring her up her life will be in memory forever


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dan Peterson
Location: blackduck mn
Email: mindmeld2000@yahoo.com
Date: 5/8/01
Remote Name: 209.191.218.75

Comments

my father was on the Patton when the Fitzgerald sank, he what 30 minutes behind the ship when it sunk, the Edmund Fitzgerald was part of the Cleveland Cliffs ship company, they said like the titanic it was unsinkable, but anyway according to my father when it happened (the hit on the iceberg) it happened so fast that there was absolutely no time, to do anything, as a matter of fact, the crew didn't realize what was happening, and basically they all drowned without realizing it. I don't believe that even the cap knew what hit the ship or where he was at the time, everything happened so suddenly and swiftly, they did not have a chance those many years ago.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dawn Fitzgerald Race
Location: Stormville,NY
Email: mcymama@aol.com
Date: 4/30/01
Remote Name: 64.12.102.158

Comments

Strange how we all remember where we were and what we were doing when theses kind of things happen. the assignation of JFK etc. I was on my way to work when I first heard Gordon Lightfoot's song on the car radio. It gave me chills. My fathers name was Edmund Fitzgerald and he had been missing from out family since I was 4 years old. My uncles searched for years for him with no results. I wonder if any one knows where this ship got it's name. I know it has nothing to do with my father as he was located after his death in California, but the name has always fascinated me. thank you.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Greg Meehan
Location: Danville,Ill
Email: Grgkrnme@home.com
Date: 4/28/01
Remote Name: 24.22.154.189

Comments

One of the hardest things for those of us to say who loved the "Big Fitz" is.."The Captain made a mistake"

When Dwight Boyer wrote about the sinking of the Fitz he mentions that shortly after passing "Caribou Shoals" Capt.McSorley states that he has picked up a 9 degree list.

Mr.Boyer believes that the Fitz.was already sinking at this point. The Capt.of the Arthur M.Anderson has stated that the Fitz. was close....way too close to the Caribou Shoals.

When you think it out 2 key factors come into play.

1.My God! He was only 3 miles off the beacon! Statement of capt.of the Arthur M.Anderson.

2.I have a 9 degree list.Statement from capt.McSorley.

Other boats weathered the storm.Unlike the Daniel J.Morrel & the Carl D.Bradley the Fitz.was not constructed of pre ww2 steel which was more subject to stress fractures.

I do not wish to condemn Capt.McSorley but we all make mistakes.Sometimes with fatal consequences.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: MikeVa
Location: Richmond, Va.
Email: mikeva@cavtel.net
Date: 4/13/01
Remote Name: 64.83.6.111

Comments

By the way.. I was in the US Navy during the Vietnam era. And no, I never sailed a "laker" :-o)


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: MikeVa
Location: Richmond, Va.
Email: mikeva@cavtel.net
Date: 4/13/01
Remote Name: 64.83.6.111

Comments

I can't really say what it was that brought me here today. I was a sailor myself in my younger days. I'm 54 now and my sailing days are over. I did want to mention, however, that there is a site that explains the Lightfoot song line-by-line id anyone is interested..

http://home.europa.com/~random7/fitz.htm


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John Lovell
Location: Kenosha, WI
Email: excathedra37@hotmail.com
Date: 4/13/01
Remote Name: 24.167.235.226

Comments

I can't even imagine the hell that the officers and crew experienced that night. The one thing I am certain of is that I DO NOT accept the findings of the Coast Guard and NTSB. I would rely on Captain Cooper's assessment that the FITZ was in too close to Six Fathom Shoal, mainly due to a false reckoning of their position, as is theorized in "Gales of November." I can also accept the theory that the Fitz may have suffered a stress fracture, but only due to the damage already caused by the hull breach and subsequent flooding. I don't want to second-guess Captains McSorley and Cooper, but why didn't they shoot for the southernmost track on Lake Superior, given the weather forecast? I would try to get across Lake Superior as quickly as possible, knowing that I am far closer to land and assistance if a crisis ensues. The spectre of underwater shoals is also less likely to appear. How much time would they have saved? Probably several hours, just by looking at the map.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: chad
Location: myhren
Email: chadmyhren@hotmail.com
Date: 4/9/01
Remote Name: 24.213.32.25

Comments

growing up on the shore of lake superior, i have always had the deepest intrique over the events that unfolded. I don't think there is anyone who doesnt get chills when gordon lightfoot's song comes on the radio. It just goes to show the power this lake has. I dont think we will ever know exactly what happened that night, but i know i will always remember the lost lives.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Andrew V
Location: Lancaster PA
Email: Karatekid622
Date: 4/8/01
Remote Name: 155.68.3.9

Comments

The Edmund Fitzgerald sank a little more than 25 years ago. All men went down with the ship. With me I have a copy of the newspaper articals from when the Fitzgerald sank. The story didn't come out until two days later! I have the articals from the Intelligencer Journal, my local paper, and the New york times. One thing I find very sad is that after a weeek or so, the incident was forgotten and the only rememberance was with the family and friends of the crewmembers. Not until the song came out by Gordon Lightfoot did anyone really care what happened. Now I know that the Fitz was not one of the most disasterous shipwrecks of history, accualy, a very small amount of people died compared to otther shipwrecks such as the Emperess of Irerland or the Titanic. this year for school I am doing a report on the Edmund fitzgerald, and I have learned alot. Andrew V grade 6 age 12 bye


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: greg meehan
Location: danville ill
Email: grgkrnme@home.net
Date: 4/8/01
Remote Name: 24.22.154.189

Comments

The most damaging evidence that the "Big Fitz"hit shallow shoals came from the capt.of the "Amderson"who said.."My God! He was only 3 miles off the beacon!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Eric
Location: Shrewsbury, Massachusetts
Email: Tazauntie@aol.com
Date: 4/7/01
Remote Name: 152.163.213.203

Comments

I'm not sure why, but ever since I heard the Gordon Lightfoot song years ago I've been intrigued with the story of the Edmund Fitzgerald. I was only Five years old when it happened, and I've never been out of the New England states yet. Yet I find this horrible tragedy, while sad, both very interesting and haunting at the same time. To know that they were hauling ore to build cars I guess is the only way I can truly connect myself as I am a collector of vehicles built from the late seventies. I notice from all the websites and all the entries on this one alone that I am NOT alone in my interest of this story. I would like to express my deepest sympathies to all the families of that brave crew. May those 29 great men rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Sean Moore
Location: London, Ontario
Email: seanmoore@home.com
Date: 4/6/01
Remote Name: 24.112.158.228

Comments

As a Great Lakes sailor myself, you have to look at the conditions back then. When the Edmund Fitzgerald came out it set all ore records by taking the largest loads. Years later the Algoontario came out and beat the Fitz. That same season the Fitzgerald beat the Algoontario. I believe years of overloading the vessel stressed framing amidships and the short period of the waves on the lake during the storm caused the midships to be unsupported and resulted in structural failure. From personal experience, the lake can get very dangerous, very fast. I've been on it in 20-25' in November and you can see the deck heaving in the seas. It's like a piece of electrical wire. If you bend it enough times it will break.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tim
Location: wauseon, ohio
Email: burner_44@yahoo.com
Date: 3/29/01
Remote Name: 198.234.34.212

Comments

I believe that the hull was seriously damaged on a shoal near Caribou Island and that it was made worse by the waves, the twisting, and the bending of the boat as she tried to make Whitefish Point. I think that the breach became worse, allowing water to fill the ballist tanks, caused the irreversible list, got into the cargo hold, and with the help of the waves, caused the bow to submerge and not recover. Once this happened, water found it's way through the ship, into the cargo hold and other places. With all the water in the bow end of the cargo hold and the degree of it's downward decent, the taconite pellets shifted to the bow causing it to decend faster to the bottom. With no weight in the center, I believe the ship snapped in two from the weight in the bow and the weight from the propultion decks. In summary, I believe that in order for the other things to have happened, it ultimately was shoaled due to inaccurate charts, whether it be U.S. or Canadian charts. I feels that the captain was right in trying to reach the point. He wasn't close enough to any land, other than Whitefish Point, to try beachnig her.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tim
Location: wauseon, ohio
Email: burner_44@yahoo.com
Date: 3/29/01
Remote Name: 198.234.34.212

Comments

I think that it's a tragic loss and should always be remembered. I also think that it's a disgrace allowing others to dive on the wreckage and to loot it. The area needs to have diving prohibited and strictly enforced.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Andrew V
Location: Lancaster,Pa
Email: D_Verrier@fandm.supernet.com
Date: 3/28/01
Remote Name: 207.44.114.174

Comments

IT IS VERY SAD THAT THE EDMUND FITZGERALD SANK. 29 MEN LOST THERE LIVES TO THE GAPING JAWS OS THE POWEREFUL LAKE SUPERIOR. ALSO WHAT WAS SAD WAS THAT MANY PEOPLE SOON FORGOT ABOUT WHAT HAPPENED. UNTIL THE GORDON LIGHTFOOT BALLAD, THE ONLY PEOPLE THAT REALLY REMEMBERED IT WERE THE FRIENDS AND FAMILY OF THE PEOPLE WHO WERE LOST THAT DAY. THE EDMUND FITZGERALD WAS VERY FOMOUS WHEN IT SAILED. IT HELD SO MANY RECORDS, AND WAS EVEN CALLED THE "QUEEN OF THE INLAND SEAS" WHEN SHE SANK, IT WAS YEASTERDAYS NEWS. THE ONLY THING THAT BROUGHT IT BACK TO PEOPLES MEMORYS WAS THE SONG. IT WILL GO DOWN IN HISTORY AS NOT ONE OF THE MOST TRAGIC, BUT ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS SHIPWRECKS IN HISTORY.

BY ANDREW V AT THE NEWSCHOOL OF LANCASTER. GRADE 6, AGE 12


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Andrew V
Location: Lancaster,Pa
Email: D_Verrier@fandm.supernet.com
Date: 3/28/01
Remote Name: 207.44.114.174

Comments

IT IS VERY SAD THAT THE EDMUND FITZGERALD SANK. 29 MEN LOST THERE LIVES TO THE GAPING JAWS OS THE POWEREFUL LAKE SUPERIOR. ALSO WHAT WAS SAD WAS THAT MANY PEOPLE SOON FORGOT ABOUT WHAT HAPPENED. UNTIL THE GORDON LIGHTFOOT BALLAD, THE ONLY PEOPLE THAT REALLY REMEMBERED IT WERE THE FRIENDS AND FAMILY OF THE PEOPLE WHO WERE LOST THAT DAY. THE EDMUND FITZGERALD WAS VERY FOMOUS WHEN IT SAILED. IT HELD SO MANY RECORDS, AND WAS EVEN CALLED THE "QUEEN OF THE INLAND SEAS" WHEN SHE SANK, IT WAS YEASTERDAYS NEWS. THE ONLY THING THAT BROUGHT IT BACK TO PEOPLES MEMORYS WAS THE SONG. IT WILL GO DOWN IN HISTORY AS NOT ONE OF THE MOST TRAGIC, BUT ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS SHIPWRECKS IN HISTORY.

BY ANDREW V AT THE NEWSCHOOL OF LANCASTER. GRADE 6, AGE 12


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Andrew V
Location: Lancaster,Pa
Email: D_Verrier@fandm.supernet.com
Date: 3/28/01
Remote Name: 207.44.114.174

Comments

IT IS VERY SAD THAT THE EDMUND FITZGERALD SANK. 29 MEN LOST THERE LIVES TO THE GAPING JAWS OS THE POWEREFUL LAKE SUPERIOR. ALSO WHAT WAS SAD WAS THAT MANY PEOPLE SOON FORGOT ABOUT WHAT HAPPENED. UNTIL THE GORDON LIGHTFOOT BALLAD, THE ONLY PEOPLE THAT REALLY REMEMBERED IT WERE THE FRIENDS AND FAMILY OF THE PEOPLE WHO WERE LOST THAT DAY. THE EDMUND FITZGERALD WAS VERY FOMOUS WHEN IT SAILED. IT HELD SO MANY RECORDS, AND WAS EVEN CALLED THE "QUEEN OF THE INLAND SEAS" WHEN SHE SANK, IT WAS YEASTERDAYS NEWS. THE ONLY THING THAT BROUGHT IT BACK TO PEOPLES MEMORYS WAS THE SONG. IT WILL GO DOWN IN HISTORY AS NOT ONE OF THE MOST TRAGIC, BUT ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS SHIPWRECKS IN HISTORY.

BY ANDREW V AT THE NEWSCHOOL OF LANCASTER. GRADE 6, AGE 12


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Andrew V
Location: Lancaster,Pa
Email: D_Verrier@fandm.supernet.com
Date: 3/28/01
Remote Name: 207.44.114.174

Comments

IT IS VERY SAD THAT THE EDMUND FITZGERALD SANK. 29 MEN LOST THERE LIVES TO THE GAPING JAWS OS THE POWEREFUL LAKE SUPERIOR. ALSO WHAT WAS SAD WAS THAT MANY PEOPLE SOON FORGOT ABOUT WHAT HAPPENED. UNTIL THE GORDON LIGHTFOOT BALLAD, THE ONLY PEOPLE THAT REALLY REMEMBERED IT WERE THE FRIENDS AND FAMILY OF THE PEOPLE WHO WERE LOST THAT DAY. THE EDMUND FITZGERALD WAS VERY FOMOUS WHEN IT SAILED. IT HELD SO MANY RECORDS, AND WAS EVEN CALLED THE "QUEEN OF THE INLAND SEAS" WHEN SHE SANK, IT WAS YEASTERDAYS NEWS. THE ONLY THING THAT BROUGHT IT BACK TO PEOPLES MEMORYS WAS THE SONG. IT WILL GO DOWN IN HISTORY AS NOT ONE OF THE MOST TRAGIC, BUT ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS SHIPWRECKS IN HISTORY.

BY ANDREW V AT THE NEWSCHOOL OF LANCASTER. GRADE 6, AGE 12


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jeffrey Rookard
Location: Woodhaven, Michigan
Email: 4hockey@home.net
Date: 3/25/01
Remote Name: 24.2.253.140

Comments

I believe what caused it to sink was that it split in 2. With waves of 30 feet, and a load that heavy, you know there had to be a lot of stress on that hull. With 26,000 tons of iron ore being bounced around like that, those poor guys didn't stand a chance!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: mike harris
Location: Penetanguishene
Email: mikeharris57@hotmail.com
Date: 3/24/01
Remote Name: 24.141.197.117

Comments

Travelling across the North I have run into a few people who remember that night in 1975. One truck driver I drove with remembers the night as snowy, windy,an awfull evening he was driving to T-Bay from Wawa. Another fellow I ran into from Bachewana Bay claims he saw the lights of the ship off Whitefish Bay.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Lawrence
Location: Fredericton
Email: Lmarch@nbnet.nb.ca
Date: 3/24/01
Remote Name: 198.164.200.217

Comments

Tragic events are well documented after the circumstances leading to them. If this is the case then why does it take movies and songs to make us take notice? People directly involved with such events are the ones who want to scream "Listen and take notice". We should all be 'directly involved' to prevent what we can only pretend to control. Till we are all one again.....


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Rachel Q.
Location: St. Cloud, MN
Email: bunny7290
Date: 3/20/01
Remote Name: 24.219.42.139

Comments

I know a song with seven verses in it about the Edmund Fitzgerald and it says that the Edmund Fitzgerald was in a very bad storm and that it sank because it hit a rock underneath the water then split in two and sank. I miss that old ship.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: wes
Location: mi
Email: norseman@gte.net
Date: 3/18/01
Remote Name: 139.177.224.101

Comments

@ the time of the storm that sank the Fitz I was living in Marquette Mi in a house set on a ridge line about 2 miles inland from the lake. As such I had a spectacular view of Superior. Even at that distance I could see whitecaps on the lake. It was as angry and boiling a mass of water as I had ever seen. I had trouble opening my car door due to the huricaine force winds. I cannot forget the extreme sense of forboding I felt that evening and I prayed no one would be out on the lake that night. God rest their souls.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: JOSEPH HARPER
Location: ROYAL OAK MICHIGAN
Email: MRJOE371@AOL.COM
Date: 3/16/01
Remote Name: 205.188.198.173

Comments

I just love to read about it I do like the song by gordon lightfoot that is how i got to read about the edmund fritzgerald I do feel sorry for the lost of the crew


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: H Kristine
Location: West Point, VA
Email: HHayes8246@aol.com
Date: 3/16/01
Remote Name: 152.163.204.192

Comments

I was a teenager in 10th grade when I remember a teacher speaking about the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald in 1975. This website should remind all who have any care or interest that those brave 29 souls have inspired lives in so many ways, even 25 plus years later. For me, as a teenager, Gordon Lightfoot's brilliant words gave me a mental image that will never be erased from my mind. His music has remained my favorite throughout the years. As I ponder the tragedy, I pray the families of the crew can look upon our words and be amazed as how everyday people you might pass on the street have not forgotten the terrible course of events. My father was a mariner, as is my husband, and I may only bow my head for all the faces of the wives and the sons and the daughters. With greatest respect, H Kristine


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: mike
Location: chicago
Email: mikemotokoski@aol.com
Date: 3/16/01
Remote Name: 152.163.201.209

Comments

My father grew up on a finnish settelment outside the town of Washburn Wi. so he spent alot of time on the big lake. As I grew up we naturally spent alot of time up and around the great lakes. One person I remember was our tombstone pizza delivery man at my grandmas bar in Pence Wi. I had a facination with the big ore boats on the lakes and this man worked on one, the Edmund Fitzgerald when not delivering. In 1973 or 74 I was around 9 years old and we went to Deluth. My father stopped so I could get a close up look of some of the big ships, one was the Fitz and I think one was named the Mesbian Minor(if someone knows please email me). The day still stands out to me staring in aw at the ships. So when in november a couple of years later my father told me she went down with all hands I was very upset. I was more upset to find out the man who brought me the pizzas i liked so much was on board. I dont remember his name but if one of his family see this we still remember him.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: KITENATOR
Location: OH
Email: kitenator6@cs.com
Date: 3/15/01
Remote Name: 152.163.197.203

Comments

JUST FINISHED READING ALL entrys. I think we all realize that the water temp is cold enough to perserve a person.(not to be morbid) Now that we have the tech. why not bring up the crew for burial? That is the only way that their family's will ever have an ending to this tradgetety.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: KITENATOR
Location: lucas,OH
Email: KITENATOR6@CS.COM
Date: 3/15/01
Remote Name: 152.163.197.192

Comments

Boy ther is so much to say. I was about 4Yrs. old when Big Fitz was lost. I am afraid that I COMPLETELY disagree with the slanderous statement that Cap'n Mcsorely was to blame. Even though I have not been able to read and see every scrap about this tradgetity. My theory is simple, they bottomed out on the shoul. The maps on board the Fitz incorrectly showed the shouls farther inland than they should have been. "Butt there was no damage to the rocks to indicate the ship hit" i have bee unable to find out officialy who sent the dive team down on the rocks. Butt all indications suggest the Coast Guard was in charge of that. Therefore would they have found anything? After she bottomed out the Cap'n knew they were taking on water. He was very experienced, and had been aboard Big Fitz for a long time. He assumed that he could make it in to port. Any damage would surely be repaired at the scheduled maintenence. All very logical for a Cap'n of his years. After she headed out away from the rocks, the storm got worse. Not much choice at that time. They couldnt stop and wait for a tow truck. Then at approx. 17 miles out from his destination, she hit 2 large swells. she cleared the first, but nosed straight into the second. She then tilted down by the nose and hit the bottom with all the force of her load rushing up from behind. The nose then was pushed a ways before the middle section could no longer take the strees and shaterd. SUDDEN and CATOSTROPHIC!! No time for even a mayday. The greif I feel for the familys is strong. Sometimes these things happen, only God knows why. Gordon Lightfoot is my all time favorite singer I have seen him in concert. When he penned that song, there was no way he could have known how maney people he would effect. I pray peace and comfort to the famillys. I will never forget this ship or her crew. REST IN PEACE


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: KITENATOR
Location: Lucas, Oh
Email: kitenator6@cs.com
Date: 3/15/01
Remote Name: 152.163.197.192

Comments


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Craig S.
Location: Saulte Ste Marie, MI
Email: crugman@hotmail.com
Date: 3/14/01
Remote Name: 12.23.26.19

Comments

I remember that fateful night, I was 9 years old. Part of my childhood was lost on that night when those 29 men lost there lives. I remember thinking "There mommie and daddie couldn't protect them"? Ive read every book on the accident, and a continually shake my head at the Coast Guards findings, in reality i think they (Coast Guard) were caught with their pants down that night, I have to side with the ship captains version of the Fitz bottoming out on that shoal, taking in vast amounts of water. Like Captain Cooper stated, the Fitz was sinking from the time it hit the Shoal. God Rest their souls


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jeff
Location: Brownstown Michigan
Email: zarenski@home.com
Date: 3/8/01
Remote Name: 65.3.107.223

Comments

Having read many books on the fitz and shipwrecks on the great lakes ,I have a opinion thats probably not that popular. First of all the fitz had a history of a loose keel which would mean the hull plates would not be secured (she was sceduled for this repair during her winter lay up). Second Captain Mcsorly was know for pushing his boat as hard as he could ,thru all kinds of weather,putting undue stress on her. He ran the ship as inexpensivly as possible. (refusing to pay overtime if he could) On nov. 9 he had the up to date weather report and knew there was a very bad storm coming. Instead of choosing the more protected route to the north, he chose the more direct route that put him right in the center of the storm. I dont believe thay hit 6 fathom shoal. Due too fact there were 5 very experianced navigators on board, two of them on the bridge, the radar was still working at the time they passed the shoal, and the wind and current would be pushing them east of the shoal. After the wreck, divers searched the shoal and no marks on any rocks where a ship may have touched bottom, nor were any marks on the bottom of ship. Captain Mcsorly was running full ahead up till the time they developed the list, despite the rough seas. Putting agreat deal of stress on a already weakened hull. I beleve the hull ripped into from the beating she had taken. I think the captain was negligent!!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Andrew
Location: Lancaster,Pa
Email: D_Verrier@fandm.supernet.com
Date: 3/8/01
Remote Name: 207.44.114.174

Comments

I feel really sorry for all the lives that were lost on that fateful day on November 10, 1975. The people who lost their family member or friend on the "Fitz". I hope someday, we will find what happened. By andrew 6th grade


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: andrew
Location: lancastor PA.
Email: Karatekid62288
Date: 3/8/01
Remote Name: 207.44.114.174

Comments

it was a shame that it drouned


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: andrew
Location: lancastor PA.
Email: Karatekid62288
Date: 3/8/01
Remote Name: 207.44.114.174

Comments

it was a shame that it drouned


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kevin
Location: Bayfield, WI
Email: ksoulier@students.uwsuper.edu
Date: 3/7/01
Remote Name: 137.81.161.179

Comments

After researching the FITZ and hearing other peoples comments, I have to believe that the ships stern was caught up on a large wave, her cargo may have shifted, and she took a nose dive to the bottom. Thats my humble opinion. Whatever happened, It is still a terrible loss, and will never be forgotten. Gordon Lightfoots song still brings tears to my eyes. And seeing how popular this site is, I'm sure the families of the crew know how much we still care. We miss you Michael... May you rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: TIM
Location: BUFFALO N.Y.
Email: TRSONGBIRD@AOL
Date: 3/1/01
Remote Name: 64.12.103.32

Comments

UPON FINDING AND READING EVERYBODYS COMMENTS ON THIS WEBSITE, I'M GLAD THAT THERE ARE PEOPLE THAT HAVE NOT FOR FORGOTTEN THIS GREAT TRADGEDY. I'M CURRENTLY LEARNING THE MUSIC AND LYRICS ON MY GUITAR AND MY WIFE AND I ARE GOING TO SEE GORDON LIGHTFOOT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BUFFALO PERFORMING ARTS CENTER IN APRIL. GOD BLESS THOSE MEN AND THIER FAMILYS.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Travis
Location: Sherwood, ND
Email: russtred@hotmail.com
Date: 2/24/01
Remote Name: 216.221.111.19

Comments

I think it either broke in two after slamming the bottom. Or the midsection gave out after the bow and the stern were lifted by waves. It may seem far fetched for a ship to suddenly strike the lake floor 530 feet below, but remember, 200 feet of the ship would stick out of the water if it were stood on end. Also, the many incidents the Fitz had running aground and slamming into lock walls might have greatly weakened her structure. No one will ever know for sure what happened on that stormy night in November. .I feel that the sinking of the Fitzgerald is even more intriguing than that of the Titanic, because we know why it sank. I would probably never have become interested in this Great Lakes tragedy had it not been for Gordon Lightfoot's haunting ballad. I would very much like to see a movie that depicts the last voyage of the Edmund Fitzgerald in an accurate and tasteful manner. Does anyone know if such a movie exists? In any case, it was a great tragedy and no one can imagine what those 29 brave men faced that night, or how the families must have felt, losing their loved ones at sea.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Joey Dee
Location: Lorain, OH
Email: elyri@Integrity.com
Date: 2/23/01
Remote Name: 206.242.84.7

Comments

Does anyone out there ever wonder if the conclusions reached by the Coast Guard and/or the Lake Carriers Association were set up in order to effect a controversy as to the exact cause of the sinking of the Fitzgerald? So that legally, if no cause could be found...negligence could not be proven and no one would have to pay out big bucks in lawsuits? Also, does anyone out there know what the statute of limitations is for filing a lawsuit based on negligence in this sinking? I wonder if it could be 25 years??


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: thor granlund
Location: coldwater mi
Email: t_granlund@hotmail.com
Date: 2/23/01
Remote Name: 209.45.201.194

Comments

living near the great lakes, the loss of this big ship has always fascinated me. It remains as one of the biggest mysteries in Michigan history.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Sal LaPuma
Location: Cleveland Ohio
Email: Minnajitsu@aol.com
Date: 2/22/01
Remote Name: 152.163.204.19

Comments

The Big Fitz has been a fascination to me since she slipped from the maritime marine register on 11-10-75 with all hands , it has always been my opinion that she was propelled downward and broke at the bottom , if she was taking on water , or if she capsized , or even if she went down slowly the crew would have been able to jump ship , I think she went down to quickly and I think she hit the bottom of lake superior before any of the crew knew it , if she did scrape the shoal they would have known it and taken counter measures to get in ,I don't believe she was in bad shape , Capt. McSorley and his crew treated her like a baby , they would not have gotten under way if she wasn't good to go , my fondest memory of the Big Fitz is seeing her in Ashtabula Harbor when I was 7 years old .


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: harry d
Location: gun lake, mi
Email: doele@waycom.com
Date: 2/20/01
Remote Name: 209.172.9.187

Comments

I would concur with Captain Bernie Anderson, the ship bottomed out at 6 fathom shoal and was sinking from 1600 hours in the afternoon. He was in the best position to determine what most likely happened since he followed the Fitz all day long. He appears to be a believable man and experienced captain to me. Folks who live around the Great Lakes like me have little problem understanding the fierce storms that can put any and all sailors to the test. Nice Web Page!


Subject: The Shipwreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Travis Darling
Location: Owosso MI
Email: n/a
Date: 2/20/01
Remote Name: 63.14.181.202

Comments

I think that there are 2 possible reasons that the Edmund Fitzgerald went down. Either the cargo shifted or her ends were on waves and the unsupported middle cracked. God bless the families of Captain Ernest McSorley, Thomas Bentsen, Ransom Cundy, and the other 26 on the Edmund Fitzgerald!


Subject: The Shipwreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Travis Darling
Location: Owosso MI
Email: n/a
Date: 2/20/01
Remote Name: 63.14.181.202

Comments


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Lew C.
Location: Greensburg, PA
Email: none
Date: 2/20/01
Remote Name: 204.171.48.3

Comments

I believe, whatever the cause of it, the sinking was a great loss.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: michael
Location: dayton oh
Email: lovingmischief@hotmail.com
Date: 2/19/01
Remote Name: 216.163.255.1

Comments

I have been fascinated about the "Big Fitz" ever since I read a book on it in junior high many years ago. The song while not entirely accurate does pay tribute to the brave souls who sail the majestic waters of our Great Lakes. I think it was a combination of things happening. There was already a slight list on the ship and she was taking on water. The documentary by the Discovery channel said the other ship was hit by a large (approx. 40' wave). Given the taking on of water, a slight list and a rogue monster wave, I believe the cargo shifted when the Fitz was hit. This caused the cargo to shift forward and broke the ship in half as she went down by the bow.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Thomas Bryan Pate
Location: West Yarmouth, MA/ Cape Cod
Email: tpate@apexmail.com
Date: 2/16/01
Remote Name: 24.128.190.214

Comments

I am 29 years old, and I just learned of the story of "Big Fitz" tonight. Being from Cape Cod, I have always had a love for the waters, and this story has touched me deeply. I would just like to take a moment to say God Bless those who sailed aboard her that night, and the families that were left behind, and also all sailors who have lost their lives to the waters!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Suzi Sanders
Location: Idaho    USA
Email: rattlesnakesue@hotmail.com
Date: 2/16/01
Remote Name: 207.173.234.142

Comments

It is my personal opinion that the Fitz was sunk due to one of two circumstances: the fore and aft were hit by rogue waves causing the center section to be unsupported thus the ship broke in half. The other, considering the length of the ship and the depth at Six Fathom Shoal, she bottomed out or up-ended then was slammed into the bottom. I do not believe the holds were left unsecured, the load shifted or that the crew was negligent. This sinking has fascinated me since 1975 because of the Gordon Lightfoot song, which happens to be my husband and my song as we met and married in 1975. We both feel very strongly about what had happened, about the families, the raising of the bell and the memorials to the Fitz. May the 29 men rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Chad
Location: Glendale,AZ
Email: fergiec@netzero.net
Date: 2/15/01
Remote Name: 38.29.64.156

Comments

I can't believe that Captain McSorley would push his ship to the limit where it would endanger his ship and crew. I also seriously doubt that the pride of the Great Lakes Fleet would be suffering from neglect. My personal opinion is in agreement with Bernie Cooper's. The Fitz bottomed out on Six Fathom Shoal, and she either broke in two while when the center of the ship was in the trough between the two gigantic waves, or they drove her bow first into the bottom, and she broke in two on the way down. Regardless, it is a tragedy to lose so many people at such different stages of their lives. May they rest in peace, aboard the ship they loved so dearly.


Subject: Sinking
From: Philip Stone
Location: Grand Blanc,Mi
Email: www.stnrphilip@netscape.net
Date: 2/14/01
Remote Name: 198.110.18.212

Comments

Why did they not avoid the 6-Fathom shoals?. And how did the vent cover blow off?.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Philip Stone
Location: Grand Blanc,Mi
Email: www.stnrphilip@netscape.net
Date: 2/14/01
Remote Name: 198.110.18.212

Comments

Why did they not avoid the 6-Fathom shoals?. And how did the vent cover blow off?.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: cody
Location: s.s.m.
Email: kcj.jones@sympatico.on.ca
Date: 2/12/01
Remote Name: 209.226.179.65

Comments

How come the BIG FITZ had to tri to get one more sail before the lake froze over???


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: cody
Location: wv
Email: TheGreavers@aol.com
Date: 2/11/01
Remote Name: 152.163.207.59

Comments

At the age of 8 I have don some research on it and I would say that it ether capsized or split up. In search of more information email me. May the souls of the Edmund Fitzgerald rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kris
Location: Green Bay, Wi
Email: knshortstuff16@aol.com
Date: 2/11/01
Remote Name: 24.130.247.56

Comments

Even though I am 16 years of age, I have a great interest on what happened that fateful night. I did some research and I believe that the hatch covers were improperly covered. Look at reports before they set sailed. The hatch covers were rusted through. That night could have been avoided if they had put her in dry dock. But then, that is only my opinion.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike
Location: Marion, Ohio
Email: mike764@gte.net
Date: 2/8/01
Remote Name: 206.29.5.8

Comments

The Fitz sank from a cracked hull, a captain who pushed the ship to it's limits, and from a freakish combination of weather and physics. If you need to know further, read "The Night the Fitz Went Down" by Captain Dudley Paquet. Please remember, no damage or evidence of shoaling has ever been recorded from underwater surveys of this once great ship. So, with this, I throw out the notion that the Fitz scraped bottom. The ship was simply poorly maintained, old, weatherbeaten, and pushed too hard. She broke deep, and this lead to the untimely demise of the Fitz and her brave crew of 29.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: steve
Location: duluth
Email: proximity5@hotmail.com
Date: 2/6/01
Remote Name: 63.16.23.233

Comments

I just recently have become interested in the sinking of the Big Fitz. I live on Lake Superior and I know how violent she can be. I can't imagine the horror felt by the men of the Fitzgerald as the ship sank beneath them. I believe without doubt that the ship struck the six fathom shoal, the only possible way that a ship of that size could succumb to the water within several hours. Captain Mcsorley reported water in the ballast, not the cargo hold! If water was to leak in through the ship's hatches, it would flood the cargo hold. Anyway, may this horrible tragedy always remind us that the Great Lakes need to be respected. May God have mercy on the souls of the crew and may their families be at peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Adam Grimes
Location: Wheeling ,WV
Email: AGBODYMAN@msn.com
Date: 2/2/01
Remote Name: 63.17.222.167

Comments

I have done some research/reading about the loss of BIG FITZ.I think she bottomed out on 6fathom shole,then two massive waves the Anderson encountered minutes before ,drove her to the bottom.I hope the 29 rings of the ships bell bring PEACE to the crew!!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Katie
Location: Rice Lake WI
Email: khaines88@yahoo.com
Date: 1/31/01
Remote Name: 205.213.72.75

Comments

even though I wasn't around during the time of the "FITZ". I have still heard a lot about her and how she sank. but I want to know more. so if anyone has any information in the Edmund Fitzgerald could you please send it to me at khaines88@yahoo.com. it really touches me that people all over the states have heard her story. I really hope that everyone out there understands that it really had a great impact on the way we do things today and that her story will live on forever.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kim
Location: MI
Email: tazzania02@cs.com
Date: 1/31/01
Remote Name: 205.188.197.42

Comments

My family went 2 Whitefish Point and I was only in 5th grade and now I am 16 and I am still interested in the "Fitz". Every time I hear the song I think of the Fitzgerald. I thought the museum is still a very interesting place 2 see....I learned a lot from it and still looking at the pics and hearing the song....I will never forget this amazing ship.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: alex hicks
Location: Bentonville,AR
Email: hickskatgirl@aol.com
Date: 1/26/01
Remote Name: 205.188.193.157

Comments

The Edmund Fitzgerald is personally my favorite ship and every time I hear the song it makes me cry even though I am 12.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: greg
Location: buffalo
Email: a-m-anderson@boatnerd.com
Date: 1/26/01
Remote Name: 207.41.195.75

Comments

well, being only 15 right now, I am still greatly interested by the EDMUND FITZGERALD. The ultimate mystery of how she sunk still intrigues me today. Just recently I had to write a poem, about something from the past, for my English class. I wrote a poem about the FITZ. I wrote as if I was the captain of the ARTHUR M. ANDERSON. If anyone as additional information about either of these ships, preferably the ANDERSON, could you please send it to my address -- a-m-anderson@boatnerd.com. Thank you and my the crew of BIG FITZ rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: philipp Kienitz
Location: Port Dover
Email: Noa 1n8
Date: 1/25/01
Remote Name: 209.167.107.194

Comments

My mom is amazed. I liked the ship a lot and I am only 10 years old. The ship was fascinating


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Breadan Robinson
Location: Port Dover Ont.
Email: RR#1 port dover
Date: 1/24/01
Remote Name: 209.167.107.194

Comments

I am amazed that it sunk. I am even doing my speech on it because it is so popular of the sinking. I love the history of the great ship, and I will never forget it.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mark L. Lendvay
Location: Stafford, VA USA
Email: DGCSBOY@AOL.COM
Date: 1/19/01
Remote Name: 64.12.102.32

Comments

The loss of the “FITZ” is truly an American tragedy on the Great Lakes. Only GOD above and the proud sailors that sailed this magnificent vessel truly know what caused her demise. As a sailor myself of the Great Lakes (Erie and Michigan) and most recently the Potomac River, this story personally touches me, along with the words of Gordon Lightfoot’s song.

Each year as November approaches, I reflect on the past boating season, and thank GOD that I have reached my homeport safely after every journey. My father and I have been sailing together for over 20 years, and have experienced many storms together. We have an appreciation of what the wind and waves can do, as well as the deepest respect for Mother Nature.

Although the men aboard the “FRITZ” didn’t make their homeport on the evening of November 10, 1975, their spirits did, and they continue to guide sailors on the Great Lakes home safely. Each time you depart your homeport, think about the men aboard the “FRITZ” and the true meaning of Gordon Lightfoot’s song.

GOD Bless the men aboard the “FRITZ”

May your sails be full of gentle breezes and your journeys trouble free.

‘Red Sky and Night, Sailors Delight”

Mark L. Lendvay “Winters Dream”


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Christopher Boian
Location: Stockholm, SWEDEN
Email: csboian@hotmail.com
Date: 1/19/01
Remote Name: 213.89.100.104

Comments

I have been haunted by the Fitz's untimely demise since it happened when I was 13 years old. I do not come from anywhere near the Great Lakes, but for some reason I reflect on this story several times a week to this day. I would offer my humble condolences to any and all family or friends of the Fitz's ill-fated crew.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: tristan
Location: brockville,ontario
Email: maitlanddevil@hotmail.com
Date: 1/16/01
Remote Name: 206.47.98.151

Comments

I've been researching the fitzgerald and i'm positive that the waves were so big and that it was near a shallower spot on superior so that on one of the biggest waves the bottom of the lake was visible and the ship's cargo slid to the front of and she went straight to the bottom at top speed and broke in half on impact. Therefore the crew had no chance of lowering a lifeboat.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: randy
Location: superior,wi.
Email: freakme@chartermi.net
Date: 1/16/01
Remote Name: 12.23.137.199

Comments

I've done alot of reading on the fitz. and talked to alot of people about it and I've look at all the comments on the issue and for one thing, it did not follow the same path as the anderson through the caribou island, and if the hatch cover's were leaking would'nt overwelm 2-7'000 GPM pump's by any means. 10 to 15 minutes after he went over the six fathom shoals his pumps could'nt handle the amount of water entering into his vessel. yes there was alot of factors involved, like a tired ship in need of alot of repairs. and the exstreme weather that they had to go through, and the loss of the radar on top of that spells trouble. by any means it was a tragic event and the family's and crew will always be remembered, god bless them.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From:   Allington
Location: howard city
Email: allingto@wmis.net
Date: 1/15/01
Remote Name: 216.109.205.16

Comments

My family thinks it was multiple factors, 1st a hatch cover leaked, then came shoal damage and finally broke in two from bow and stern cresting on waves with middle unsupported. May God be with our lost mariners.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: beverly berry
Location: so fulton tn
Email: berrybeverly@msn.com
Date: 1/14/01
Remote Name: 63.30.154.74

Comments

I got to attend the anniversary and would be glad to hear from anybody that likes to talk about this great ship. e-mail


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: beverly berry
Location: so fulton tn
Email: berrybeverly@msn.com
Date: 1/14/01
Remote Name: 63.30.154.74

Comments

I was fortunate enough to get to attend the 25th anniversary this year. I went up there for that reason only. I have always been interested in this ship and I was glad to see other people like myself there from everywhere. It really touched me to get to sit in on this private meeting. I got to sit in with the families. When they rang that bell it made me realize this was also a funeral. I was so glad I got to attend.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Anthony Bennett
Location: Marianna, Florida
Email: antben@digitalexp.com
Date: 1/13/01
Remote Name: 204.49.137.117

Comments

I don't live near the area, but it seems to me that it was due to the Three Sisters, a never-before-seen weather event: three waves, so huge and powerful that no ship, not even the 718' Fitzgerald. It sounds impossible, but it is the only logical option.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Chistopher E. Reed
Location: Kalamazoo, MI
Email: x99reed8@wmich.edu
Date: 1/13/01
Remote Name: 198.108.163.138

Comments

i remember recieving i phone call, once the telephone lines had been repaired, from my grandparents. they lived in paradise, 11 miles south of the point and in the lee of the storm that consumed the fitzgerald, and they stated that they were very fearful for their safety on that november night. they had, at least, 20 to 30 miles of woodland area to break the storm, yet their triple pane windows were bowing inward to the point that they were concerned they would shatter. reinforcing them with duct tape did not reassure them, so they retreated to the inner bedrooms until the storm subsided. their home was, and still remains, located on the shore of whitefish bay. as a child, i recall the panic of my parents trying to reach them as all telecommunications had been severed, only to here from them within 48 hours with accounts of a horrible fall storm. its was from that point forward that i took a keen interest into the demise of a great freighter, as i watched the great ships come and go with each summer i spent with my grandparents on lake superior.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bill
Location: osage city, ks
Email: blondy@kanza.net
Date: 1/12/01
Remote Name: 209.172.207.233

Comments

I believe that the weather took the Fitz's down. She took on a storm with so much force from the wind and waves. If you look at most of the pic's you would see the waves coming over her deck.

I would like to talk with someone about this Great Ship. That seem's to pass through the times with great passion for this wonderful ship. Plus the Memory of the crew and families.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: jmc
Location: Superior, WI
Email: n/a
Date: 1/7/01
Remote Name: 63.11.63.153

Comments

The comments I would like to add to this site dedicated to the Fitz is that as a relative of one of the crew members who perished in the sinking, I am so glad that people still pause to remember the great loss. I, too, have read several items on the sinking, including the court transcripts and the testimony of the captain of the Anderson. To read the description of the bad seas they experienced during that fateful storm are truly beyond our comprehension. Thank you to all of you who share your interest in concern in regard to the ship and its crew. I'm so glad they haven't been forgotten.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: JON MCLAUGHLIN
Location: DEER RIVER,MN
Email: N/A
Date: 1/5/01
Remote Name: 206.144.246.36

Comments

I BELIEVE IT SANK DO TO THE FACT SHE WAS NEGLECTED OF REPAIAR FOR SO LONG,AND,THE ADDED FACTOR HER CAPTAIN DID NOT WANT TO DEAL WITH THE ADDED STRESS AND COST&TIME TO THE COMPANY.I MIGHT ALSO BELIEVE THAT THER PROBABLY WAS A COVER-UP IN THE OFFICES HIGHER UP,WHETHER THAT IS TRUE OR NOT,REMAINS TO BE SEEN.BUT,BASICALLY,SHE TOOK ON TOO MUCH WATER FROM THE KEEL,AND THE STORM AND DETERMINATION OF THE CAPTAIN FINALLY TOOK IT'S TOLL AT THE WORST TIME IN HISTORY.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: big red
Location: b p ohio
Email: n/a
Date: 1/2/01
Remote Name: 12.76.72.18

Comments

The Fitz did not hit a shoal. It sank due to a loss of buoyancy. Now the debate is, what caused the loss of buoyancy? Hatch covers? From all accounts that I have read or saw, this is not the cause of the wreck. Other freighters were on the same lake that night, and all downbound ships made it except the Fitz. All of those ships were either newer, or had been modified, hence they all had new structural steel added. The Fitz, I believe sank due to flooding from a crack in the hull. That ship was pushed hard, and Mcsorley was a "heavy weather" captain. He pushed his ship beyond it's capabilities. Why did the shorter Anderson take the same route, yet make a safe voyage? The Fitz had a "loose keel", poor design from when it was built. It's sister ship, at the time of the sinking was being lengthened by 96 feet, yet was sold basically for scrap in 1980- four years after it underwent a multi-million dollar refit? Seems odd? Mcsorley was just going thru the motions his last year as captain, so he just wanted to get the year done and retire. Another thing to ponder, why was the Fitz making the "last run" of the year, when the 1975 shipping season lasted until January of 1976?


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike
Location: Michigan, Sterling Heights
Email: n/a
Date: 1/1/01
Remote Name: 63.44.201.102

Comments

I think consideration ought to be given to a video recently out, which is footage of the Fitz underwater. This video is controversial because it shows a crew member floating with life jacket on. Objectively speaking, the crew member having a life jacket on may lend credence to the fact that the Fitz did not go down suddenly, but instead, the crew knew what hit them and that they were going down, taking precautions which included putting on life jackets. Just something to ponder (although my opinion is that this video should not be marketed. It is tacky and disrespectful to market a video showing the Fitz with a dead crew member).


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: ducksix 6
Location:
Email: ducksix 6 aol
Date: 12/24/00
Remote Name: 205.188.195.59

Comments

the fitz sunk from a hugh swell that the anderson experinced shortly before


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Joseph DuBois
Location: Elyria, OH
Email: elyri@Integrity.com
Date: 12/21/00
Remote Name: 206.242.84.7

Comments

The question of what caused the sinking of the "Fitz" is the wrong question to ask. What should be asked is, "why was it that the "Fitz" could no longer stay afloat?" The answers come easily and rapidly from that point of view. She was overloaded with ore to the point where there was inadequate freeboard to give her better protection from the seas. The captain reported that she was taking on water. If the water had not entered her ballast tanks (thats where the pumps were reported to be working)and water had not come in from above (if it did) she would not have gone under. It's just that simple. Today's "scientific mind" always has to have "just one more bit of information" to "prove" some theory. People are paid "big bucks" to perform those kinds of studies and are ofter "bought and sold" on the market.....

The way I look at it, business ethics, greed, and a "macho" attitude that controls the mind and convinces a person (or persons) that they can take risks and get by with it, lies at the heart of the tragedy that took 29 lives. The suddenness of it all should make us take stock of how we stand in relation to our Maker, whom we may face within a split second of time, at ANY time.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Lyle Bosley
Location: Las Vegas NV (Formerly from Superior WI
Email: daboz42@aol.com
Date: 12/20/00
Remote Name: 64.12.104.28

Comments

With the huge success of the movie "The Perfect Storm", do you think there is a possiblity of a film being made of the Fitz? Why not? Titanic, "Perfect Storm", Edmund Fitzgerald? Who do we contact?


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Leah Frost-Schell
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario Canada
Email: Minasv@hotmail.com
Date: 12/20/00
Remote Name: 206.152.225.110

Comments

I have read just about every book about the Fitzgerald as well as seen every special and film made about it accept for the footage of the wreck taken by Fred Shannon. I have to say that it could have been a couple of thigns that contibuted to the sinking. I think that I was a stress fracture of the hold or they bottomed out. I think that the hatch cover theory is very stupid. I agree with Captain Bernie Cooper. I think that the fizgerald hit the shoal and took a nose dive.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ron Verville
Location: Sioux Falls, SD
Email: arvy@iw.net
Date: 12/19/00
Remote Name: 216.16.3.147

Comments

I have read nearly every book on the subject and taped Discovery Channel's presentation. I also have viewed Keweenaw Video's tape, which featured Professor Paul Hainault's theories. Recently, I finished reading THE NIGHT THE FITZ WENT DOWN, by Captain Dudley Paquette. From these,I believe the Fitzgerald broke up while on the surface of Lake Superior due to structural metal failure. I would like to hear from other shipwreck purists (completests)who have done some independent study of this fatal voyage off-web.

 


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: D. Richard Bockus
Location: St. Catharines Ont.
Email: rbockus@sympatico.ca
Date: 12/17/00
Remote Name: 206.172.191.103

Comments

As a former ship master SS Senator of Canada 1984, I can safely say that the Frizt, although not the biggest ship on the lakes at that time, note the dimensions of the SS Comodoc, the Edmond held the record cargo through the Soo locks all the while both these vessels were in the same trade. The Edmond Fritz was abused: She worked something awlfull in rough weather and the area where she founded was well known by senior masters that when there are 12 footers on the open lake, 16 footers where encountered in the area between Michipicoten and Caribou. Conclusion, a weak ship in a bad area at the wrong time. Was the Master to blame? No. He made his voyage as any other Master would have under those conditions. Why did she founder? His stern was lifted and the bow nosed down, never to recover. Did the weaken state cause her to sink? Unknown, she might of cracked when the stern was lifted, a real possibility, or she cracked and broke up when the bow buried itself into the bottom. She hit the bottom with a tremendous force,note the pictures. I was wrned privately during conversions that there was many a mysterious conditions in that area, giant waves etc. Of course these are just old Indian lengends.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike R
Location: east-central Minnesota
Email: dragonscrol@hotmail.com
Date: 12/17/00
Remote Name: 199.174.184.41

Comments

I've been researching the sinking of the Fitz for about twelve years, talked to enginers, lake boat captains, and other authors and I still have to say that shoaling and improperly dogged hatch covers are the most plausable theories in my oppinion. The thoughts about the vent covers being a major player in the sinking I dont see being realistic because the math doesnt indicate that you can fit over 15000 gallons of water through a pipe that is the diameter indicated of the vents in such a period of time. Any one with any feed back please feel free to E-mail me, I'd love to hear from you.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kurt Schwoppe
Location: Woodbridge, VA
Email: schwoppe@erols.com
Date: 12/17/00
Remote Name: 207.172.11.147

Comments

The best clue we have to the actual sinking of the Fitzgerald is the top side damage as reported by Capt. McSorley. Grounding or working in heavy seas cannot explain BOTH the rail down and vents being lost. Additionally, whatever could shear a off a steel vent pipe could certainly of damaged hatch clamps or even the coaming. Another key clue came a few hours after the damage report. McSorley was overheard shouting off-mike, "don't allow nobody on deck". At the time of this radio conversation, the storm was at its absolute peak. Given the conditions, it seems ridiculous that McSorley would have to give this command unless the crew felt someone NEEDED to go on deck! To me it is perfectly clear that whatever caused the initial damage was still causing enough trouble that some on the crew thought they needed to risk their lives by going on deck to fix the problem. And we know that a vent being down isn't serious enough... it had to be a problem with a hatch or hatches.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Edge
Location: Beaver Bay, Minneesota
Email: faiths@lakenet.com
Date: 12/16/00
Remote Name: 209.240.224.226

Comments

Forgot to mention the obvious 3 sisters. What a hell that must have been. If the Fitz wouldn't have been under so much stress ( what ever it was ) she probrably would have made it thru the storm. The Anderson took on the 3 sisters and won. If the Fitz could have stayed buoyant just a little longer. She would have made it and would still be comming into Silver Bay along side Armco, Reserve, Middletown, Buckeye, and Courteny B. Rats! That family of lakers is missing something without the Fitz around. I'll always be a kid when it comes to ore boats.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Edge
Location: Beaver Bay
Email: Faiths@lakenet.com
Date: 12/16/00
Remote Name: 209.240.224.226

Comments

In our day of technology, would it be possible for someone to scan the Fitz's bow from the surface to find evidence of a gash from her bottuming out at 6 Fathom? I still don't think a whole army of divers could dive down to the shoal and try to find evidence from a ship grounding out. With all the weight the Fitz had on board that night and the heavy seas at hand, it wouldn't seem to take much of a bang on the rocks to put a small gash in her skin. Its either that or a structural failure. Hatch covers, forget it! UFOs, what an insult! I think McSorely thought the Fitz could handle any job. He pushed the good ship till she just plain could'nt stay afloat no more. The Fitz needed a major overhaul and didn't get one. The new Fitz book is a fine piece of work. God bless, all the sailors present and gone. Its a hard life but, the pay is sure good now days. LONG LIVE THE FITZ!!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: J.P.
Location: Mississauga, Ontario
Email: jprico1@hotmail.com
Date: 12/16/00
Remote Name: 216.154.1.61

Comments

As a former sailor on the Great Lakes, I have a bit of an understanding of how a "Laker" will behave in a storm. Last year I believed as most people did that the "Fitz" hit 6 fathom shoal which later led to her subsequent loss. After a year viewing a CD of the wreck and reading research into the loss, I think she was well clear of the shoal. I reconsidered the fact that her fence rails were down. This could only be caused by excessive working in the seas. A grounding would not have caused her fence rails to come down. Viewing the way the stern and bow section are lying on the bottom, I believe she had to have broken up on the surface. If she nose dived she may have split up once she hit bottom but the stern section would have remained upright. The breaking up on the surface would have been related to a structural failure inherent in her design. As far as the hatch clamp theory goes, that is not even worthy of comment. The coast guard are responsible for inspecting ships prior to their fit-out each season, their explanation of the sinking is wholly biased. It was arrived at to seperate them from any responsibilty for the sinking. Unfortunately Captain McSorely is partly to blame to. He has to be because the Captain is ultimately responsible for what happens. If he was aware of the "Fitz's" weakness he should have played safe. I know he could not forsee that the storm would be arguably the worst one on "Superior" in ages, but the fact still remains he new that a severe storm was coming. He should have anchored.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Thom
Location: Superior, WI
Email: twrecks@boatnerd.com
Date: 12/14/00
Remote Name: 155.79.143.18

Comments

There has been a lot of very interesting and thoughtful discussion here. I hope this space will be continued for another month or so. Special thanks to the former sailors who have taken the time to share their experiences. Thanks to each of you for participating.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Andre Pichette
Location: Menominee, MI
Email: vindalu@cybrzn.com
Date: 12/12/00
Remote Name: 207.250.143.29

Comments

I firmly believe the Fitz grounded out and was sinking from that piont onward. That, with 3 Sisters did her in. It seems that the Coast Guard based its finding of the improperly sealed hatches on the fact that many of the hatch clamps were off when they dived on the wreck. I sailed for Inland Steel from '89 to '94. I don't care if the hatch clamps were not put on at all, you could not get that much water in the holds just by taking seas. Every fall we would have to adjust the clamps, one by one. If you tightend them too tight, the would some times pop open if they were jolted. This would happen sometimes when breaking ice off of a hatch cover. It is not hard for me to believe that they hatch clamps "poped" off when the boat hit bottom. That much of a jolt would have knocked the clamps off with no problem. thanks, Andre


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John C. Augustine
Location: The Dalles, OR
Email: Osgood1955@hotmail.com
Date: 12/17/00
Remote Name: 205.162.196.31

Comments

As a native of Cleveland Ohio, it was expected to hear of the tragedy of the crew of The Fitz or a ship like her, witnessing the storms and seeing the ore boats come in covered in ice. Also having spent time on submarines in the Atlantic demonstrated the power of waves and wind as deep as 400 ft. below the surface where we rolled and pitched at the same time past 30 degrees which caused problems with our reactor etc. On another sub, we transited northward on the surface to Philadelphia Naval Shipyard (1970} and were passed by a private oil tanker and as usual custom, dipped flags to each other and waved, off of Ft. Lauderdale FLA. Since we could make only 15 knots she blew by us. We recieved orders the next day / evening to look for her survivors off Cape Hatteras. Let me inform anyone who hasn't been there, it was very cold and windy with 35 ft. waves coming with sets to 50 ft. and we were tied inside the sail with ice on our clothes and faces taking turns searching. We saw only oil and debris and were helpless.

Therefore it is a chilling reminder of what both crews may have thought and how I feel when I play Gordon Lightfoot's song. I have seen him in concert and appreciate his tribute to the Fitz and anyone who faces nature whether on the Lakes or the oceans. I have visited Maritime Sailor's Cathedral to pay tribute and found the experience a closure. God bless the 29 souls.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Greg Varga
Location: New York State
Email: svarga6180@aol.com
Date: 12/14/00
Remote Name: 205.188.197.181

Comments

The story has always touched my heart since the song first came out in the 70's.I remember having very lonely moments while listening to the song.It is so remarkable how a song could match a ship,and event in such a matching way that it really is so heart touching,and haunting!My heart truly goes out to all of those people involved in this time,and event in our history.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: kevin zimmerman
Location: st. clair mi.
Email: zimmsix@juno.com
Date: 12/13/00
Remote Name: 207.155.210.245

Comments

ship encountered many things, combination of taking water on through hatches, also through a vent that was sheared off,and also, most likely by hitting bottom near the shoals that might of sprung leaks, along with the other conditions that the pumps could not keep up causing the ship to slowly fill then settelling lower and lower finally causing a listing condition, then while batteling high waves the bow did not recover off a wave and plunged to the bottom breaking into the three or so pieces on inpact with bottom. but most likly we will never no for sure,because lake superior never gives up her dead.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: JESSE CLIFFORD
Location: LONDON ,ONTAIRO, CANADA
Email: 122485
Date: 12/12/00
Remote Name: 206.47.22.88

Comments

I WAS 11 YEARS OLD WHEN THE EDMUND FITZGERALD WAS FOUND.AND THE FITZGERALD'S BELL WAS RAISED FROM LAKE SUPERIOR OFF WHITE FISH POINT ON JULY 5TH 1995.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: schyler
Location: los angeles
Email: howleywolf@aol.com
Date: 12/11/00
Remote Name: 152.163.201.214

Comments

the EDMUND FITZGERALD is a very big mystery. I doubt that we will ever know what happend that night but what ever happend, it happend quick becuase the cpatain did not send a mayday. God blesthe men on theEDMUND FITZGERALD. It is very sad. I can not listen to the song THE WREAK OF THE EDMUND FITZGERALD without feeling sad for the 29 men who lost their lives on the ship that was their life. I hope who ever reads this feels the way I do.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Nancy
Location: Huntsville
Email: booktek@hotmail.com
Date: 12/11/00
Remote Name: 216.109.16.103

Comments

I was ten years old when the Fitzgerald sank. My father sailed on Navy ships back then and now my husband does too. I couldn't imagine getting the call that the families got. I will never forget that terrible feeling I had for the crew and families. I can't hear "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" ballad without a lump in my throat.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John H. Smith
Location: Philadelphia, Pa.
Email: JohnnyJ2000@Hotmail.com
Date: 12/11/00
Remote Name: 63.26.13.203

Comments

The cause of wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald will most likely never be truely found because of the complete loss of life of all hands. Facts indicate that she had earlier problems after possible bottoming out. If she hit two rouge waves and broke in two, the debris feild would be much wider and longer than reported. She either nosed in on a rouge wave due to her listing and went right down, or capsized and went down. The Captain was at "arms reach" with no Mayday sounded, thus it had to be very quick. There was reports that cork life vests do not float aat the depth that the fitz is at and that there was a body discovered on the floor of the ocean near the bow. I do not know if this is true, but would be interested in finding out. They say the coldness of the water preserves everything.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jeff Ostberg
Location: Lancaster pa
Email: jkostberg@aol.com
Date: 12/10/00
Remote Name: 152.163.194.197

Comments

After watching all stories about the"Fitz" I beleve she took a large wave from the stern and dipped the bow into the lake and split her in two!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mark Tomlinson
Location: Kansas City,MO
Email: matomlinson1@juno.com
Date: 12/10/00
Remote Name: 206.133.171.193

Comments

I believe that the fitzgerald hit the shoal near karibou island. There's no way the hatch covers could have leaked. Those things weigh several tons and they needed cranes just to move them.If any of you have any questions or comments about this theory feel free to email me


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: B. Pony Newman
Location: Thomson,  Georgia
Email: Ponygirl062@sylcom.net
Date: 12/6/00
Remote Name: 63.169.35.65

Comments

Being no authority, but having a view nonetheless. I've always thought the "Big Fitz" slashed her belly on 6-Fathom Shoal and was sinking untill she went down 17 miles from Whitefish. The type of waves called "Three Sisters" (Which were reported to have hit the Anderson minutes before the Fitzgerald went down), seem like the likely "nail in the coffin" of the 'Big Fitz". We miss her, she's always a legend! Love and support Pony....


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: mr bob
Location: WI
Email: darthvador2001@yahoo.com
Date: 12/6/00
Remote Name: 24.216.64.15

Comments

I am 14 years old. I just recently started to study more about the Edmund Fitzgerald and I think that all her cargo and water taken on shifted forward and she took a noise dive to the bottom. Please e-mail me with your thoughts.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: James Martindale
Location: Niagara Falls Ontario
Email: pugsleyaddams@yahoo.com
Date: 12/6/00
Remote Name: 206.172.191.108

Comments

To me I think that the FITZGERALD struck six fathom shoal. I went over the ship's route on a map and noticed it went pretty close to Caribou Island. The resulting flooding must have then caused the ship to literaly Submarine to the bottom of Lake Superior thus ending the lives of all 29 crew members on board


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Rosco
Location: Wixom, MI
Email: andymetz2@excite.com
Date: 12/5/00
Remote Name: 63.252.146.235

Comments

I think that the cargo may have shifted towards the bow from extreme pounding of waves. During the storm, winds came down very hard from the north. This might have caused the stern of the Fitz to raise and helped drive the bow into the waves.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dan Iverson
Location: Sioux Falls, SD
Email: iversond@ideasign.com
Date: 12/5/00
Remote Name: 208.230.216.174

Comments

After watching the big ore boats coming into Duluth harbor, and reading the profiles of the men that were out in the big storm, I think that the Big Fitz had a loose keel. The heavy seas that day, combined with the loose keel, created a stress fracture in the hull. I am of the belief that the crew of the Fitz knew how to navigate in the Carabou Island location. This stress fracture, along with the "three sister waves" led to the Big Fitz foundering to the bottom. I also think that the Captain knew that the keil was loose, but felt it could survive the heavy seas. He along with every other salior on Lake Superior that fateful day, underestimated the magnitude of that storm. If the Big Fitz would have ancored off the lee of Isle Royal or somewhere else along the Northshore, She and her crew would still be with us today. Preventitive maintenances in 1974 or early 1975 would have prevented this the foundering also.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Robert
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
Email: RobertCGRO@yahoo.ca
Date: 12/4/00
Remote Name: 198.103.161.1

Comments

Sorry for the double post but here's a link to an article about a rogue wave that hit the QEII http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf109/sf109p11.htm


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Robert
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
Email: RobertCGRO
Date: 12/4/00
Remote Name: 198.103.161.1

Comments

I belive that Mr. Carl R. Larson, AB, posting is probably the most correct regarding the cause of the sinking. I've always believe in the "rogue wave" theory. A sudden wall of water that is driven up by the leading waves that can't get out of the way fast enough. The period of waves is very short on Superior, and rogue waves have been reported. In a dark, driving storm, you wouldn't even see the black wall of water till it hit you, and took you down to the bottom. You can't compress water, and hundreds of tons of water from a rogue wave just smashes into you like a sledge hammer hitting a pea. Everything else leading up to the sinking is ancedotal, in my opinion. Tugs pulling massive flat barges, under the right condition, can create a literal wall of water, in their wake, that looks like a gray solid stone wall very high and very long. Imagine something moving at 30 to 50 knots and a hundred or move feet high!! I just pray to God that they didn't know what hit them.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: william burke
Location: elyria ohio,USA
Email: wlburke@kellnet.com
Date: 12/4/00
Remote Name: 63.166.202.115

Comments

I gave a comment about this before ,and still the same way as before


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Anson
Location: Albany, NY
Email: awm75@email.com
Date: 12/4/00
Remote Name: 63.20.126.49

Comments

I never believed that the hatch covers could leak that much water. I also never believed the Fitz went over 6 fathom. I've always thought that the top side damager reported at 2:30 was much more extensive than thought and included damage below the water line. It seem like the Fitz was pumping a great deal of water and had a growning list. Well, be design, if the Fitz was taking water through the hatches she couldn't have been pumping much out because her drain was located in the center of the hold and that would trap the water in the hold once a list began. Some water would have come through the hatches, but not a signifigant amount. With the list caused by some water entering through the hatches, top side damage, and unreported damage, the Fitz was rolled under by one of those 30 foot waves and went down like Capt. Cooper believed. I always like the Coopers idea that she had a stress fracture of the hull, which could have happened from shuddering when she came very near the shoals. All I can say is I don't buy a single theory, I think it was an odd combination of factors.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Joe
Location: Boulder, CO
Email: potzi@aol.com
Date: 12/3/00
Remote Name: 128.138.114.103

Comments

I am writting a paper for class on the Edmund Fitzgerald and I was wondering if there is a memorial for the 29 men that have died. Also if there are any rituals or acts that take place every year in rememberance of the sinking, I would appreciate the help?


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: shane price
Location: tunnel hill georgia
Email: price_189@hotmail.com
Date: 12/3/00
Remote Name: 168.30.236.28

Comments

it stinks


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Greg Wooldridge
Location: Duncan, British Columbia
Email: gwooldridge1@excite.com
Date: 12/3/00
Remote Name: 192.245.204.138

Comments

There are many theories. The Big Fitz may have been damaged by the Shoals, The Shoals, or By leakage through the hatches..regardless of that, but still Still taking one or both of those into consideration..I think the Big Fitz went down in one piece..hitting the bottom and then splitting in half. A large ship such as Big Fitz is capable of going down if enough downward momentum is created, this including the weigh of the ship is enough to send a ship to the bottom...that is what I feel happened. This is based off of theory, but it can happen.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Stephen D. James
Location: Mississauga, Ontario
Email: stephenjis1@yahoo.com
Date: 12/2/00
Remote Name: 24.112.158.245

Comments

I have followed this as close as the next guy. Seen all the stories that have been ON VIDEO,T.V & what is writen on the EDMUND FITZGERALD. I do not claim a proffessor of great lakes shiptology but, I really believe that she struck the shoals and curcumstances led to the downing of this ship. On calm days most ships can travel over the 6 fathom shoals and miss by what 11' of clearance. But this ship came in to close, in very precarious waters to say the least, for that paricular day. With the waves reaching 6-15' in the area it would seem very strange that this veteran captain of the lakes would have brought his ship in so close, to the dangerous waters that they would have become. The markings on the charts indicated clearance, that they was a danger even on good days. I would say that she struck and with the waves pounding,the crew felt nothing more than what they had been feeling along. With the ship traveling out of the area and heading into deeper waters with a small or deep cut into her side, she would have been sinking deeper as she traveled.The waves would have become higher and more dangerous as the heights of the waves grew taller as the ship went deeper. As she traveled along I would almost bet, that at some point, she became so unstable with the list, that she just nosed in to the right.As she went down the fracture that had developed would have caused the ship mt her cargo along the floor of Lake Superior. With the cargo sliding forward and the instability, the weight of the cargo would have caused the ship to twist and break in two. Now lets be serious about the depths of where she is, 533' is not very far to go. Really, stand her on her nose and 200't is sticking out above the water,so i would say that as she dove in nose first, it would have taken about 3-4 seconds to smack the bottom. The butt would have become dislodged due to the impact and snapped away spilling out the cargo where ever the weight could have pushed thru. In short: the hatch covers released as the cargo fell onto them, as the aft section became dislodged because of the twist as the ship broke apart.The weight of the ore pushed against the covers in an inverted position and caused all the combings that were attached to fatigue very fast and stretching the ones attached. with the cargo shifting because of the collapes in the stability, the aft section, she simply turned over and never recovered. Hitting the lake bottom shortly after the bow. Maybe the crash with the HOCHOLAGA a few years back did more damage than was inspected, perhaps the hitting of the lock walls cracked the ship at the spot where she split, and with the ship becoming very unstable, the ship twisting in the storm due to the crash at 6 fathom shoals.Made for a situation that not everyone or anyone knew about. If you look at the pictures from THE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC -they show a very unique shot of the ship from 533' and as you look at the picture you can see that all the cargo may not have left the ship, say 12000 tones fell out, the rest remains inside the holds now inverted on the aft section. Some say something about the propellers, if you take a model airplane, start the engine and hold it horizontal and turn the plane slightly, you can feel the torque as the balance is no longer centered. I would say the engines, that were on the go at the time, may have caused the aft section to twist due to the torque, as she broke in two.Then with the ore spilling out and onto the inner covers appling pressures against the combings. As she struck bottom, the waters filled the intakes and stalled the motors and the lake bottom haulted the prop as you see it. Sir I love Life, I really believe that in the time that she struck the bottom, the sailors inside this vessel would have been in the cabins as the water rushed in, not knowing what had just happened. It turns my heart to think of those poor souls and the time they had to say goodbye.They NEVER STOOD A CHANCE. MAY THEY REST IN PEACE. As a final- the shoals began the end of the EDMUND FITZGERALD, cracks opened allowing the waters in, causing the laker to travel deeper with every mile. With the waves pounding and the winds blowing, this created the ship to become so very unstable. With the water coming in,thru the vents and the the cracks, she just kicked up and dove down to the right, splitting, the engines turning the prop, caused the ship to twist and the cargo spilling with the weight, she simply could not handle that type of pressures and simply fell apart and struck bottom, as I said in seconds. Fundamentals as simplistic as they could be or as complex as they can be,one event lead to another that no one man was to figure out. They knew there was a problem that they were not willing to say. That this mightest of vessels was about to end its life and take what ever was within its bowels to the bottom. Is there a coverup, no, no one can answer why and everyone can say what they want- U.F.O's, GREAT LAKES TRIANGLE, what ever mystery one wants to put upon these men and their ship, the truth shall always remain a secret beneathe the waters of the MIGHTY LAKE SUPERIOR.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Paul Hoffmeyer
Location: Carleton Mi
Email: nasmeyer@hotmail.com
Date: 12/2/00
Remote Name: 216.86.64.12

Comments

Unfortunately the Coast Guard and the Lake Carriers Association came up with conflicting reports in their respective investigations, had they both agreed and came up with what I would consider more conclusive explanations we would not be discussing this 25 years later, I do feel with time and technological advances evidence will be found to help solve this mystery. I feel something such as a hatch cover, hatch crane, or spare prop blade will eventually (hopefully) be found along the ships route the night of the sinking helping to explain the "taking on water" theory.

I feel for the families of the lost sailors but this is part of history and will not go away until something is solved.

I think that a number of events lead up the sinking, the Fitz had her loadline increased a few times throughout her career, although this is a common practice I feel it creates a much harder life to a ship when done. This, added to prior hull damage, and the 3:30 pm report of topside damage which could have been more severe than thought, allowed water to enter the holds adding more weight and probably shifting the cargo, then whether she rode high at each end and snapped, or rode high at the stern and dove under bow first, she went in too fast to get a distress call off.

The reports of hatch cover clamps not tightened raises a question with me, wouldn't a ship going under fast have enough inward external pressure to cause the hatch covers to press down or partially "implode" and cause the clamps to loosen or come unclamped? if so the clamp theory has some holes in it.

The shoaling theory might have played a part but again no evidence has been found proving this to me.

I also think that we should not forget the other estimated 12,000 lives lost during the other 5,000 or so shipwrecks on the Great Lakes, this is of course one of the more recent tragedies but many others either have not been found at all or have equally mysterious circumstances around their sinkings.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Leigh Fryling
Location: Vicksburg, Michigan
Email: chiki@iserv.net
Date: 12/1/00
Remote Name: 216.120.158.164

Comments

I am a 14 year old 8th grader at VMS, and my class has been studying the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald. I heard the folk song when our teach er played it in class, and something about the haunting lyrics touched me. I know that whatever happens concerning the wreck and its remains, we should all remember the 29 lost souls on board the Queen of the Lakes, and the beauty that this amazing story has inspired to people of all ages.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: B.I.M.
Location: Waukegan, IL (port)
Email: muenchbooks@juno.com
Date: 12/1/00
Remote Name: 208.176.52.29

Comments

I was out on Lake Michigan in a commercial fishing vessel on Novemeber 10th. The wind shifted suddenly and came up a gale out of the northwest. Water was going over the ship and freezing on the surfaces. The vessel was not responding to rudder very well and pumps were barely keeping up with water. The Capt. called the coast guard who had a hard time coming out to us. They followed us into port in Waukegan. Everyone learned new prayers. I wrote a poem about this, "November on the Great Lakes"


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jim Macdonald
Location: Batchawana Bay Ontario
Email: jimzltd@vianet.on.ca
Date: 11/30/00
Remote Name: 206.130.64.125

Comments

I have been a commercial fisherman for over fifty years and live @ Mamainse Harbor, just north of Coppermine Pt. in Ontario, which is about 12 miles from where the Fitz went down. Our fishing vessel "James D", which is 75ft. long, received a public service commendation ffor our efforts in the search for the Fitzgerald or possible survivors. We were on the lake that day and was one of the first boats in on the search. We brought in one of the lifeboats, along with a lot of life jackets, oars, ladders, an inflatable raft and much other debris which we turned over to the Coast Guard and Ontario Provincial Police. I have been out in 35ft. seas on Lake Superior, in fact it was Labor Day - 1970, we were handling nets on the north end of Caribou Island, where some think the Fitz might have bottomed. After seeing these kind of seas I can't imagine that Perry Hiltz could say these waves can be no more than 20-30 feet between crests. Believe me, with the weather that day they definitley would be in the 100's of feet between crests...My theroy that she crested on a huge sea and broke her back was substantiated this past summer when the "Algowood"broke in the middle because the bow and stern was loaded and the center of the ship became the main portion of bouyancy...of course, this is just my opiion, to each his own.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Phil
Location: Grand Junction, Colorado
Email: philh@landesign-gj.com
Date: 11/30/00
Remote Name: 209.181.67.65

Comments

I was living in Calumet, Michigan at the time and remember witnessing the storm on November 9 and 10 of 1975 It was a real howler and bad even for the Keweenaw which is known for bad winter storms. The day after the sinking, for some reason, my wife and I took a trip out to Copper Harbor in the tip of the Keweenaw just to see the results of the storm. In many areas the road runs near the shore. Even then, the day after the storm, the waves hitting the rocks were shooting spray across the road in many places. I had never seen that before and it really impressed upon me the power of Lake Superior and the storms which happen in the month of November. After hearing and reading about the sinking of the Fitz, I became very interested in the shipwrecks on Lake Superior. Since that time I have continued my interest, study and fascination with the subject even while living in Colorado.

I think the Fitz bottomed out on the shoal and cracked Her hull. The working and flexing of the hull in the storm finally split the hull in half. Most of us who followed the Coast Guards investigation and final report were surprised by their findings.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: mr. bob
Location: WI
Email: darthvador2001@yahoo.com
Date: 11/29/00
Remote Name: 24.216.64.15

Comments

I think reaserch teams should be able to explore the wreck. If thy don't, we may never know how she sank.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: mrbob
Location: WI
Email: N/A
Date: 11/29/00
Remote Name: 24.216.64.15

Comments

I think reaserch teams shold be able to explore the wreck. If they don't, we may never know how the ship sank.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Schyler Williams
Location: Los Angels California
Email: howleywolf@aol.com
Date: 11/29/00
Remote Name: 152.163.213.62

Comments

I believ that the Fitz should be left alone. That is the final resting place of 29 men.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Larry Curnow
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
Email: mcurnow@bresnanlink.net
Date: 11/27/00
Remote Name: 209.32.226.166

Comments

I thought it was a loss of life that should not have happen. Being a Great Lakes sailor, Iwas out in that storm on the C. L. Austin on Lake Michigan. Before we left the Skipper Asked What I thought about going out, I said with the barmitor bottom falling out I thought we should stay in Green Bay. With the wind at 65 miles an hour out of the Southwest we left port. Around 1000 the wind shifted and was out of the Northwest at 75 miles an hour. By 1400 we had no where to go but up the lake in the trough. I said my prayers , I honestly didn,t think we had much of a chance. Sometimes we should go and hide, instead of trying to be super seamen.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Paul Stelter
Location: St. Peter MN
Email: pauls@scems.mankato.mn.us
Date: 11/26/00
Remote Name: 204.73.93.77

Comments

I have read almost every book about the sinking. The lastest book looks at the cause of the sinking as possible stress fracture in the hull. McSorely was know to sail in all types of weather. Also within the last 5 years she had keel work done to her during winter layup. (Keel was loose from hull plates) I do not believe she shoaled, there is no photographic evidence at the shoals or on her visible bottom at the wreck site. The undamaaged hatch clamps are probably because they were never fastened from the beginning of her trip. We may never know what truly happened that night. God bless the souls of those that went with her.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Paul Stelter
Location: St. Peter MN
Email: pau
Date: 11/26/00
Remote Name: 204.73.93.77

Comments


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Paul Stelter
Location: St. Peter MN
Email: pa
Date: 11/26/00
Remote Name: 204.73.93.77

Comments


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: stanley klemecky
Location: roblin manitoba canada
Email: stanii@hotmail.com
Date: 11/25/00
Remote Name: 205.200.58.117

Comments

Just another short comment to-nite. I have a pretty good book on the sinking of the Fitz.It seems to try to answer a lot of questions. It's called"The wreck of the Edmond Fitzgerald" by Frederick Stonehouse. Stan


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: stanley klemecky
Location: roblin manitoba canada
Email: stanii@hotmail.com
Date: 11/25/00
Remote Name: 205.200.73.64

Comments

I was on the "viscount bennett" on lake michigan the nite the Bradly went down. i was always engine room personnel.However, i cannot see the Fitz breaking up by hitting a shoal nor can i see her breaking in half on her way down but i can see her see her sitting on the crests of two waves and breaking her back that way. I am a very sentimental guy and still get tears in my eys when i hear of a disaster at sea. Stan


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Able Bodied Seaman
Location: Mqt. Mi. USA
Email: genebert@aol.com
Date: 11/24/00
Remote Name: 24.247.34.197

Comments

Just ask one who was there.....deck watch-Ernie Kemp. USS. Anderson. He told me the last lights went out in 3 waves time. HE was the last to see HER. Shoals ? Not nearly close enough in that part of the Lake. Poor hatchfarm work by deck hands is the most likey cause.Faulty hatch coverings and missaligned hatches are in second place. I miss the food. abs bert


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: joe russell
Location: lititz pa usa
Email: jdcruss@desupernet.net
Date: 11/23/00
Remote Name: 64.41.29.230

Comments

I love the FITZ. If they knew they hit the shoal why no radio signal? Does human error & pride enter into the equation?


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: adam salinas sr.
Location: pasadena,texas
Email: salinaspatti@cs.com
Date: 11/23/00
Remote Name: 205.188.200.32

Comments

very sad piece of history,god bless their families and may they rest in peace for god takes of his people.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Frances Davies
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Email: franmac38@yahoo.ca
Date: 11/22/00
Remote Name: 209.82.45.217

Comments

WOW.....after reading all of this.. (all good theories) who the hell knows what happened? All the speculation on earth can't tell the truth. Let's just make sure we accumulate all of these ideas as guideposts to ensure the safety of other ships. The loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald was a bad thing, but good in the way that it ensures that every consideration is given in regards to safety in storms.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Perry Hiltz
Location: Mount Clemens Michigan
Email: hiltzy@yahoo.com
Date: 11/22/00
Remote Name: 166.90.227.32

Comments

I have read every single posting in this thread. I must admit, I have heard alot of assumptions about what happened to the vessel and how opinioned they are.

1. The waves on Lake Superior are not 100-500 feet apart. They generally are at worst about 20-30 feet appart. Large amplitude (the distance between wave crests) are generated when waves build over several hundred miles of open water. Lake Superior is not that large.

2. "The Fitz didn't break in two I don't believe...there just isn't enough space between the two parts." Lets recount facts. 729 feet overall. About 230 feet of the foward end intact, about 260 feet of the stern intact. That leaves about 230 feet of hull that is missing. Where did it go?

3. Superior Shoal. Visit Superior in a gale. The evident of longitudinal stiffeners and as other Laker Seamen have noted, the vessel pitches quite a bit. Hitting the shoal would have been reported. Having hit a few walls, you know when you hit something with these vessels. Hitting a shoal would have to be reported to the Coast Guard. Try driving your car into huge rock and tell me if you notice it or not.

3. Suspision about the hatch clamps. They pop off even in normal seas. Any First mate who has just loaded his ship will ensure that the hatches are clamped properly for the weather. In the summer it is common to clamp down every other clamp. But even the most green seaman knows to clamp down every clamp later in the year. By the way, if a clamp doesn't snap down, most clamp wrenchs are manufactured with a bolt wrench that can be used to tighten or loosen it appropriately.

I sailed on several ships in the various Canadian Fleets, and can attest to gales on Superior. Been there, done that. I have never seen the weather that put the Fitz down but have been out there in near huricane winds in 1986. Please quite making assumptions with out the experience. As I have said before, visit the middle of Superior in a gale as a massive low moves across the lake, then see how the ship moves, bends and twists. Then think back to hitting that rock with your car. Do you think it would have been a small bump? No.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John Rowley
Location: Vadnais Heights, MN
Email: jrowley006@aol.com
Date: 11/22/00
Remote Name: 64.12.104.34

Comments

I beleive the Fitz bottomed out on the Shoal and cracked Her hull. When those 35 foot waves that the Anderson reported hit Her she snapped in half and went down. Thats why she went down so fast. DOES ANY ONE KNOW WHERE THE LOVE OF GOD GOES WHEN THE WAVES TURN THE MINUTES TO HOURS THE SEARCHERS ALL SAY THEY'D HAVE MADE WHITEFISH BAY IF THEY'D PUT FIFTEEN MORE MILES BEHIND HER THEY MIGHT HAVE SPLIT UP OR THEY MIGHT HAVE CAPSIZED; MAY HAVE BROKE DEEP AND TOOK ON WATER. AND ALL THAT REMAINS IS THE FACES AND THE NAMES OF THE WIVES AND SONS AND THE DAUGHTERS........G.LIGHTFOOT


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John Rowley
Location: Vadnais Heights, MN
Email: jrowley006@aol.com
Date: 11/22/00
Remote Name: 64.12.104.34

Comments

I beleive the Fitz bottomed out on the Shoal and cracked Her hull. When those 35 foot waves that the Anderson reported hit Her she snapped in half and went down. Thats why she went down so fast. DOES ANY ONE KNOW WHERE THE LOVE OF GOD GOES WHEN THE WAVES TURN THE MINUTES TO HOURS THE SEARCHERS ALL SAY THEY'D HAVE MADE WHITEFISH BAY IF THEY'D PUT FIFTEEN MORE MILES BEHIND HER THEY MIGHT HAVE SPLIT UP OR THEY MIGHT HAVE CAPSIZED; MAY HAVE BROKE DEEP AND TOOK WATER. AND ALL THAT REMAINS IS THE FACES AND THE NAMES OF THE WIVES ANS SONS AND THE DAUGHTERS........G.LIGHTFOOT


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bill Davis
Location: Sheffield Lake, Ohio
Email: wglad@erienet.net
Date: 11/22/00
Remote Name: 207.54.173.128

Comments

I can't vote for any of the above causes, because I don't believe any of those given was the initial problem. The first report from the Captain was he had a fence rail down and two vents gone. Something caused both to happen - 1] The hatch crane came lose and went over or the report of a spare propeller [or propeller blade[s]] went over the side. In either case it took the vents out which permitted water to enter the hull; with the pumps unable to keep up a wave over the stern pushed the water forward and hence the nose dive. But also why was the forward mooring winch lines played out?


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Terri West
Location: Southeastern, Ohio
Email: tlwest3@juno.com
Date: 11/22/00
Remote Name: 131.187.149.211

Comments

I forgot to mention that I definitely don't believe it was ineffective hatchcovers that sank the Fitz!!!!!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Terri West
Location: Southeastern Ohio
Email: tlwest3@juno.com
Date: 11/22/00
Remote Name: 131.187.149.211

Comments

I have done a lot of reading over the years on the Fitz and her sinking. I am no expert by any means. And really all anyone can give is a theory. I don't even think the good captain and his crew knew what went wrong. Maybe one day it will be made clear at the time when all questions will be anwered. But until then we can give our opinions and continue to be fascinated with this ship and the tradgedy that befell it. Without a doubt I believe the sinking was weather related...because even if she did hit bottom or had a stress fracture and was having problems.... if the weather hadn't of been so severe she would have most likely made it to the safety of Whitefish Bay and the Soo Locks. I think Captain Dudley Paquette in the book The Night the Fitz Went Down sheds interesting new light on the situation. She was working hard before she even got to the shoal area......so it's possible that she had a loose keel and the fierce working in the storm worked her loose causing her to take on water which inevidably caused the succesion of events to bring her down. I believe the problems were severe before she reached the shoal area but if in addition to those problems she could of hit the shoal also which brought her demise all the quicker. Maybe one day we will know for sure....but it's good to keep the families and friends of the crew in our prayers, as well as for the safety of all the American Merchant Marines who risk their lives daily in the transport of cargos across the Great Lakes for even with the progress that has been made since the Fitz tragedy, it can still happen again.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tom
Location: Chicago
Email: Thomasamoht@aol.com
Date: 11/22/00
Remote Name: 152.163.204.48

Comments

The wreck site should be opened up to the public. The are a lot of qualified divers who should be granted access to this site. Who knows, perhaps one of them could discover something about the wreckage that could help solve the mystery of the sinking.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tom Fante
Location: Madison Heights, MI. 48071
Email: tomk8@earthlink.net
Date: 11/21/00
Remote Name: 206.133.125.210

Comments

I think that after the hatch gave way the "Fitz" took on enough water that she was unstable. Then she broke in two after getting caught between two wave crest.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Brian
Location: Lansing, MI
Email: B_rock70483
Date: 11/20/00
Remote Name: 207.73.235.73

Comments

I'm only 17yrs old I am thinking heavily on someday sailing on the great lake's, on one of 1000 fotters. I know a guy on the ship Reserve. When Nov. rolls around I hope all ships get to there port all in one peice. I believe that the Fitz. was to close the shoal and bottomed out, and started the thing. My prayer's are with them and their families.

If anyone has info on Maritime school there in T.C. and wouldn't mind relaying it to me e-mail me at B_rock70483@yahoo.com. Thank you Much


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kendra
Location: Bay City, MI
Email: ironjane35@aol.com
Date: 11/19/00
Remote Name: 205.188.197.36

Comments

God bless all of the families of the 29 courageous men who lost their lives.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Eric
Location: Mansfield, Ohio
Email: eaph@richnet.net
Date: 11/19/00
Remote Name: 208.4.237.24

Comments

Perhaps the answer is not INEFFECTIVE hatch covers, but wheather or not they were properly fastened. Can any of those who advocate the sholing theory explain WHY the majority of those clamps are undamaged? One would think that the wave action and trama to the vessel during it's dive would have peeled those hatches right off, and in doing so mangled a tight clamp into a pretzel. Yet the photos of the wreck show the hatch covers strewn about and alot of the clamps looking like they are ready to be used again.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jean
Location: Michigan
Email: rog45357@aol.com
Date: 11/18/00
Remote Name: 12.76.102.253

Comments

Pictures have been taken from bow to stern. It's time to let this "lady of the lakes" and her friends rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jason O'Grady
Location: Marquette Michigan
Email: jogrady@nmu.edu
Date: 11/18/00
Remote Name: 204.38.200.103

Comments

The Fitz didn't break in two I don't believe...there just isn't enough space between the two parts...I think she hit Caribou shoal and was sinking from there...and massive waved pushed her down from the bow. God Bless the crew and the familes


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Crowyyz
Location: U.S.A.
Email: Crowyyz@juno.com
Date: 11/17/00
Remote Name: 38.30.79.223

Comments

I think the ship was overtaken by the storm,I also think maybe the hatch covers weren't tighted. There is a chance the ship was damaged on the rocks as the coastguard said. lets just say a November Witch took her down.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tizzy
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Email: DorothyDAL1@aol.com
Date: 11/17/00
Remote Name: 205.188.193.188

Comments

I feel that the wreck should not be disturbed. It should be given the respect of a grave, which it is.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John Rowley
Location: Vadnais Heights, MN
Email: jrowley006@aol.com
Date: 11/17/00
Remote Name: 152.163.207.71

Comments

Ive always been vey intrigued by the sinking of the "Big Fitz" Ive brought my daughter to Duluth and often told her the story about the sinking and play The Wreck by Gordon over and over. The other night she watched the documntry about the 20TH anniversary and the raising of the bell. When we listened to the stories of the surviving families it brought tears to her eys and now she is begining to understand my fascinaction with the Fitz!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Gary Lundquist
Location: Iowa City, IA 52240
Email: lundy@inav.net
Date: 11/17/00
Remote Name: 205.160.208.47

Comments

Sorry about my double post here but I mentioned this Web site to my wife this morning after I posted something late last night. And she reminded me that The Fitzgerald went down 16 days after we got married I had said near our first anniversary. But having a few cups of coffee this morning I did remember a bit more. First my wife and I met at Northwestern MI College. Two of my three roommates were in the Great Lakes Maritime Academy GLMA. We had people in the program coming and going all the time I got to know some a little and some a bit more. Anyway the two Guys from NMC that were on the Fitzgearld were Thomas Bentsen who was a full time Oiler and the other was David Weiss he was a 3rd year cadet. I remember him a little. I play guitar and I believe I remember he did as well. Anyway as I said before when we heard the news we were both shocked and worried for we knew so many people who were on the Lakes. My roommate Bob Eastment for one and if he reads this I hope he sends me a note as I have been trying to find him all these years. My wife also reminded me that just two weeks before Capt. Louis Carter the Capt. of the T.W. Robinson and his wife and daughter (a friend of my wife’s) attended our wedding. I am rambling I know I do have one final thought that in retrospect seems a bit eerie. In I think January of 1975 there was a talent show at the college and I selected two songs to play both were Gordon Lightfoot songs. Gordon btw set up a scholarship fund for GLMA and has been a great supporter and friend of NMC every since this terrible tragedy. Again God be with all whose lives were touched by this terrible event.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Joel Hollihan
Location: Highland,CA
Email: Deerekeeper@aol.com
Date: 11/17/00
Remote Name: 152.163.213.74

Comments

God be with the 29 brave men who went down on the Fitz and be with their families. My mother grew up in Duluth,Mn, and can still remember how quickly the lake and the weather could change. The bell ceremony was a fitting tribute to the crew. May they rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jim
Location: Garfield Heights,Ohio
Email: Jim1951@webtv.net
Date: 11/17/00
Remote Name: 209.240.200.136

Comments

Working my way through college on oreboats, I can never forget getting that call from the hall asking me to board "the Fitz." for a deckhand relief position. I asked Jack her Name after he told me her tie up. Never did I ask for the vessels name. All I cared about was where her tie up was located and the time she's weighing out. I aksed for her name a few times. Jack said will you board her? I said "nah I'll catch the next vessel weighing out." Jack called me two more times and I still turned her down. Being a relief deckhand I ran into other mariners...I remebered Rusty the Boss'n and a few other members from sight. She was a fit vessel and a great Old man ran her well. I remember from earlier vessels as I measured the ballast tank drafts that many ships worried about CopperHead and the shallows nearby. Since Superior has a mind of her own with a Nor'easterly you can find yourself fighting 20 to 30 foot white caps under clear skies. They would shift your load and stretch a vessel to her maximum. Gitche Gumee kicks ass. You stay off deck and run fore and aft through the catwalks in the cargo holds. You hear her whining and feel her bounce. Your forward end will be crashing into the wave,while amidships she's bending down and aft the fan tail rises. I was on a vessel this past Septemeber where we had to run off course to cut away from the waves. Our coal kept shifting and almost causing her to list. There's good pay but the life on the lakes is parallel to the North Atlantic. God rest the souls of my brothers. Superior is so cold she won't let us rise. Even the rubber rescue suits offer only 2-3 hours survival time. Show respect when sailing, keep your vessels squared away, purchase quality rescue gear, flares to radio equipment, practice emerergency steps and wear a life jacket! That vest can save you! It takes only 5 minutes for a ship to sink. Think about what the crew experienced...Ho-Hut!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Curt Penland
Location: Gibraltar, Mi
Email: curt.penland@diverseylever.com
Date: 11/17/00
Remote Name: 204.110.170.5

Comments

How many of you have read the story of the S. S. DANIEL J. MORRELL sinking? It was in 300' feet of water and broke in two. No shoals in site... One inch thick metal does have its limits on the Morrell, and it did on the Fitz. The Morrell never got a mayday off on the radio when it was going down.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: spain
Location: nashville,Tn
Email: spainbmi@aol.com
Date: 11/17/00
Remote Name: 152.163.188.229

Comments

I never knew much about the details of this disaster until seeing a Discovery Channel documentary last night. What I find interesting is how the memory of the victims of the tragedy are kept alive by all the people who show an interest in this shipwreck. All the interest generated is a tribute to the men who died and the families who grieve their passing.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: June
Location: Newmarket,NH
Email: CabooseJune@aol.com
Date: 11/17/00
Remote Name: 205.188.198.54

Comments

It's the song my little boy used to play over and over, he's thirty now but didn't forget. It's my husband who watches anything pertaining to The Edmund Fitzgerald on t.v., he didn't forget. Most of all it's that song that I hear on occassion no matter where I am tears come to my eyes, I won't forget. A piece of us all that cared that day went down with those men! ;_;


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ava Lee
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
Email: AVAN588649@aol.com
Date: 11/17/00
Remote Name: 152.163.207.193

Comments

I'm 42 years old; I was about to grad from high school when the Fitzgerald went down. I am watching a story on Discovery about it--I watch it every time it comes on. Every November, I offer up a prayer for the brave men who were lost that night. Though I didn't know them, I want their families to know that they will not be forgotten--they'll live in my memory and in my heart. I will go to Whitefish Point to see the memorial one day--I really have to. Ava Lee 11/16/00


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Gary Lundquist
Location: Iowa City, IA
Email: lundy@inav.net
Date: 11/17/00
Remote Name: 64.6.68.27

Comments

I remember the time well it was just a few days after my wife and my first anniversary. We had met the year before going to school at Northwestern MI College in Traverse City, MI . The Great lakes Maritime Academy is part of that school two of my roommates in school were cadets and my wife’s closest friend in colleges Dad was a ships Capt. (Capt. Carter) US Steel. We both were in shock thinking of all the people we knew who could have been on that ship. Every November I think of the terrible loss. I think one or more of our classmates went down in her too (though guys we did not know). God be with the souls of those men and their families.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Roy C. Wolf
Location: Cedarville, Illinois
Email: rcw@aeroinc.net
Date: 11/16/00
Remote Name: 208.247.251.254

Comments

.....And, the men go down to seas in ships!!!!!All is known only by God. We sit or stand upon the shores and wonder: Why?.....And, the men again go down to the seas in ships!!!!!!!!!!!"We now comend them all to the seas.........


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ted Knack
Location: St. Paul Park,Minn.
Email: tksteam@ webtv.net
Date: 11/15/00
Remote Name: 209.240.220.178

Comments

The loss of the Edmond Fitsgerald and crew will always be a mystery of how it sank.I,ve read 3 books on the sinking and have video tape.Still the theory of grounding on that shoal, if it did ,was the start of what happened to the ship.The Andersons radar showed the ship close to the shoul.I have made a model of the Fits out of the kit and it is displayed in a glass case.I see itevery day and it still makes me think of the ship.I made a trip to Whitefish bay 6 years ago.The wind was in the north, 5ft waves,2 ships past the point. It put it all in perspective.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: tim
Location: moline,il
Email: fordboy2@boatnerd.com
Date: 11/14/00
Remote Name: 63.14.191.190

Comments

The Fitz was a great boat that had and unfortunate end considering ship was the pride of the American side, by setting records of all kinds. The Fitz had to had run over Six Faothom Schoal because on how the ship was tracked by teh Anderson it was right over the top of it. It hit it enough to cause it to take on water but didn't have enough water to sink it till later in the trip. Several of them were the problem but i think the schoal is the one that did it in.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: WILLIAM GREEN
Location: MARION,OH 43302
Email: BADBILL302000 .COM
Date: 11/14/00
Remote Name: 131.187.140.108

Comments

I WAS 9 YEAR OLD WHEN EDMAN FITZGERALD WENT DOWN. I DO NOT CARE WHAT THE OTHER SAY SHE HAD TO HIT SIX FALOM SHOLE THAT NIGHT. BECAUSE SHE WAS TAKEING IN WATER AFTER THAT . AND THEY COULD NOT GET IT OUT OF CARGO HOLE . BUT THE CAPTAIN OF THE ANDERSON SAW FITZ TO CLOSE TO SIX FALOM SHOLE. HE SHOULD OF WARN THEM .BECAUSE FITZ WAS BLIND AT THE TIME BECAUSE OF THE STORM, BUT THAT WAS THE PAST BUT WE SHOULD NOT FORGET WHAT HAPPEN THAT NIGHT. THE FITZGERAL WENT DOWN AND TO THE FAMLEY AND FRIEND MY DEAPEST HEART FELT REGREAT TO YOUR LOSE

SIRSERLY

WILLIAM GREEN


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Al
Location: Tucson, AZ
Email: yooper@theriver.com
Date: 11/13/00
Remote Name: 205.216.137.82

Comments

I spent a good part of the night the Fitz went down parked at the head of the Locks in the Soo listening to my marine radio as the C.G. and ships in the area talked about what had happened. I've lived along Lake Superior all my adult life and I do not recall ever having experienced such a storm as I did that night.

A prof. and some engineering students at Michigan Tech did some studies and published a report contending that the Fitz shoaled out and cracked in such a manner that she eventually weakened into three sections that were still tied together when two following seas lifted her stern and bow sections in such a manner that she broke apart and plunged to the bottom. This theory may explain the layout of the debris field.

May their souls rest in peace and light perpetual shine upon them.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: mike m.
Location: superior wi.
Email: mflipper01@aol.com
Date: 11/13/00
Remote Name: 205.188.193.152

Comments

I am a deck hand on the great lakes and all I know is hatch clamps need constant attention/adjustment for them to work properly if they are to tight they dont clamp down and if they are to loose they dont stay clamped down. it is an important safty issue and is easily overlooked. we just went over all of the ones on my ship in oct. that is the most logical reason in my mind that happed to the fitz. Because of the radio call that they were taking on water.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Randy Shereda
Location: Las Vegas,  NV
Email: TimeRanger@lvcm.com
Date: 11/13/00
Remote Name: 24.234.133.63

Comments

Ok, I posted certain thoughts and memories before I read the other posts. Now for my theory as to why the Fitz and her crew were lost. 1) Another poster mentioned the photos that showed many of the hatch clamps undone. These clamps could have easily come loose as the ship broke up...they were not necessarily left unsecured. 2) The Fitz *was* taking on water due to ballast tank vent cover(s) that were lost to the storm, but the ballast pumps would-should easily keep up with this inflow. 3) The ballast tanks are separate/sealed from the cargo compartments. 4) The Fitz was traveling with a following sea. If (here comes my theory) she has lost steering ability - although her rudder is intact, we do not know the state of the steering gear/mechanism - she would have been turned broadside to the seas in a matter of seconds. Following seas of the size that the Fitz was running in can be extremely stressful to the steering apparatus. (Yes, backup steering systems are available, but these can take 15 minutes or more to rig even in decent weather.) After being turned broadside, into the trough, it would only be a couple of more seconds before capsizing could occur. 5) Capsizing: A ship is designed and built to carry her cargo in the belly. If cpasizing were to occur, the cargo would quickly come to rest on the underside of her deck and hatches. This would cause the deck integrity to fail and the ship would rip open (while upside-down). Remember, this all happens within a few seconds. The Captain would have no time to make a distress call. His first reaction would be to find out what is going on. As soon as the ship started going sideways, everybody would be trying to hold on to something and trying to remain upright.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Randy Shereda
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Email: TimeRanger@lvcm.com
Date: 11/13/00
Remote Name: 24.234.133.63

Comments

I was a lowly deckhand aboard US Steel's T.W. Robinson at the time of the Fitz's sinking. We were anchored about 1 1/2 miles off of Oscoda MI. Even that close to shore, we had 10 - 15 foot seas. Word from the Brain Box (Pilot House) that a ship was missing spread throughout the ship in seconds. Even people that were asleep were awakened and told. Nobody slept much that night or the next day. Even though the ship was not one of "ours" and we did not know the crew, we all felt a sense of loss. The next morning when wreckage was found, an impromtu prayer meeting was held in the Officers Mess (naturally followed by a round of "toasts" to the crew). For days afterward, we all reflected on just how vulnerable we really were. I still dispute the finding that faulty hatch covers were at fault, but until somebody can enter the hull and look at the steering gear, my theory will have to be put on hold. The only "good" thing that resulted from the loss of the Fitz was that in 1976, US Steel equipped every crew member with a "survival suit" that would work if you could get to it.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Carl R. Larson
Location: Minneapolis MN
Email: buffington@boatnerd.com
Date: 11/13/00
Remote Name: 216.177.136.147

Comments

1. I sailed on the Fitz in 1968. It was an oreboat, no more no less.

2. The crew was a group of "homesteaders". Once they got on the Fitz they stayed. That means that they were experts on that specific boat as well as being well seasoned seamen. It took a lot on seniority to get a berth on that boat.

3. The difference between the configuration of the boat was about 3 foot of freeboard. I have been informed that the adjustment was due to a change from coal to oil. For some reason that does not seem right, but I am not an engineer, let alone a stability engineer.

4. Since the cause of the sinking has not been determined and I still have a trip or two left in me I hope the people keep diving on the Fitz and find out what caused the sinking. Yes I knew some of the people on the Fitz. In fact I grew up with one. I think the seamen that went down would like all to know why it sunk.

5. My theory is that she was hit with enough water across the deck to drive her down.

Carl R. Larson AB


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: jason
Location: bangor
Email: jasonb_49013
Date: 11/13/00
Remote Name: 207.73.84.230

Comments

I think its sad to know what happend to the crew and how they died that nite my prayers go to the family of the crew men.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: andrew potter
Location: marlette mi
Email: thexy_pimp_69@yahoo.com
Date: 11/13/00
Remote Name: 209.142.148.10

Comments

she was a good ship and took a lot before she went


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Brian
Location: South Bend, IN
Email: brianl111@aol.com
Date: 11/13/00
Remote Name: 152.163.207.177

Comments

I can clearly remember the loss of the Fitzgerald. I was 10 yrs old, living near Cleveland and I can remember the constant updates and the aftermath. I do have one question for the readers of this site. It was my impression, and mentioned in the Lightfoot song that the ship was bound for Cleveland. However recent articles I have read mention that the ship was bound for Detroit. Can someone clarify this for me? Thanks for your help.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Derik Brown
Location: Marlette MI
Email: sweet_deal_g@yahoo.com
Date: 11/13/00
Remote Name: 209.142.148.10

Comments

the ship was a great one i love it a lot


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: william burke
Location: elyria,oh
Email: wlburke@kellnet.com
Date: 11/13/00
Remote Name: 63.166.202.72

Comments

I was a crew member of the C.j.Callaway at the time of this storm and we were on our way yo the head of the lakes.I do remember that it was a sleep less night and I sure was glad to see the sunrise the next day.We heard of the Loss of the Fitz from the bumb boat in Duluth.but at first ,I really did'nt give it much throught.but after a few minutes it sure it home,because it could have been us. I remember every thing was a mess on matter what part of the ship you when to.The paint locker was just one big paint mess.Just everything was a mess. As i look abck at it today,God still is in charage!No matter what.. And to this day I always remember the Fitz,and thank God that it was'nt me. I'm retired now and miss it some what,and always think about the storms on the lakes,but sure don't miss them thats for sure And I'm happy to be on the beach now.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Marty
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Email: Zooperior@aol.com
Date: 11/12/00
Remote Name: 152.163.213.206

Comments

My husband and I drove all the way up to the U.P. and Whitefish Point to be a part of the memorial service for the anniversary of the sinking of the Fitz. It was unbelievable, the attendance. The line to get into the museum was cut off with 4 people in front of us and we were asked to go to the gift shop for the 'over flow' of the people who came. We waited about 10 minutes before we finally went, hopeing we would be able to fit in. Needless to say, the disappointment was seen in my eyes by my husband. We went over to watch the service on the T.V. that was being video taped for the extra people. During that video tape, some people were talking and the sound went out. It was very difficult for me to contain my let down feelings. As the bell was being tolled by members and others, in memory of the 29 who died, I whispered to my husband that I bet I could hear the bell outside, so we went outside and I leaned against a side door which was near the bell. I cannot describe the emotions I was felling as I leaned against the door, the wind from the lake was blowing in my face, and the clouds would cover the full moon as they drifted by. It was an evening I will never forget.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Norm Barton
Location: Harrow Ont.
Email: maverck@mnsi.net
Date: 11/12/00
Remote Name: 208.28.50.236

Comments

I'd be interested in hearing from anyone who has read the book " The Night The Fitz Went Down" by Hugh E. Bishop. The book deals with Capt. Dudley J. Paquette's take on what happened to the Fitzgerald. For those who have not read it, get it and read it.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Janie Thomson
Location: Cedar Rapids,Ia.
Email: BOB9309@webtv.net
Date: 11/12/00
Remote Name: 209.240.200.136

Comments

No doubt about it, the loss of the 29 crew members was tragic. My thoughts are with their families that were left behind. If anyone attended any of the special programs for the 25th anniversary in Duluth this weekend please log in a little of what they were lke. We unfortunally could not make any of them and i would like to hear about them. Thankyou!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Sharon P.
Location: Romulus, Mi.
Email: IamCheyenneToo@aol.com
Date: 11/12/00
Remote Name: 165.121.208.41

Comments

This tragedy is of a magnitude too deep to fathom. It is almost like a personal loss even though I did not know any of the crew members. It touched me deeply and I will always observe this day when it comes around. God bless and keep the families of the crew.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Violet
Location: Michigan
Email: Violet@provide.net
Date: 11/11/00
Remote Name: 216.86.64.12

Comments

It's very sad to think what those 29 men went through twenty-five years ago. Imagine their horror as they realized they weren't far from death, that there was no way for them to get to safety, being trapped out there in Lake Superior's wrath. Blaming others for this tragedy doesn't help the situation, let the men rest in peace. I am glad Neil put this tribute to the Edmund Fitzgerald on his site, and I hope some of the family and friends of the crew members lost will read what's been said here and know that those 29 brave men will always be remembered.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Annie James
Location: London
Email: iloveaaroncarter@aol.com
Date: 11/11/00
Remote Name: 152.163.204.83

Comments

Hi, this is Annie James I am going to tell you something. I really like the song Edmund Fitzgerald and I am really interested in the history of the ship wreck. When the ship wrecked in 1975 that was the year my mom was graduating. Anyway I am doing a report about the Edmund fitzgerald and I am having a whole lot of fun looking at the history. I feel really bad for the people who lost some one in this tragic ship wreck, I feel really sorry for the people who built it because it took a long time to build, and I feel bad for the people who died in that aweful ship wreck. ~Annie~


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Hidie Greene
Location: Battle Creek,Michigan 49017
Email: partygirl2@aol.com
Date: 11/11/00
Remote Name: 152.163.204.83

Comments

thank God for what you have now and then you'll be happy for the rest of your life. Here's to you God. THANX!!!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: gary
Location: michigan
Email: gustafsm@baydenoc.cc.mi.us
Date: 11/11/00
Remote Name: 198.110.154.40

Comments

I saw Interlake Steamship's Charles Beeghly securely tied up in our harbor at appx. 6:45pm on the anniversary of the Fitzgerald sinking. Although a different company, the ship colors are very similar to the Columbia colors. I couldn't help but think about how warm and safe the Beeghly crew was, but how different things were on the Fitz at that exact time 25 years ago. May God be them and their families.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Perry Hiltz
Location: Mount Clemens, Michigan
Email: hiltzy@yahoo.com
Date: 11/11/00
Remote Name: 63.212.146.226

Comments

Reviewing the information regarding the course that the ships take enroute from Superior/Duluth/Taconite Harbor to Whitefish Point, the usual time is around 30 hours for the average vessel. A lot can change in 30 hours in terms of the weather. Yes, weather can be forecasted but no one really anticipated the level of decreased pressure that made such a storm possible. Initally the Captain headed into the weather which was from the Northeast. Yes this does take the vessel out of the most favored route of using Copper Harbor as a turning point heading for Whitefish, but it provided the most shelter from the weather.

As the low moved across the lake and headed along the South Shore, the winds, and waves moved from the Northeast to the Northwest. Hence, there was a lot more lake available for the wind and waves to build.

Having experienced quite a few gales on Superior during my 7 years of sailing on the Great Lakes, I have seen more than once two weather fronts on each side of Superior and the hell these release on any floating object.

Don't blame the Captain, I would have done what he had done. Visit the Canadian Shore of Lake Superior, see the rocks, see the granit... See Superior, out there in a hell of a gale... Then you will realize that once out there, you have no where to hide.

Don't blame him. I have seen alot more Skippers make mistakes that have cost a lot of money to resolve. His mistake was the ship he was on... it was thier time. So for the sakes of the families, lets stop laying blame on people. Nothing will bring them back.

As for the theory of hitting Superior Shoal, she would have gone down a whole lot quicker. Seeing these ships in average sees, as they pitch and roll. There is actually a lot of stress put on the longitudinal beams that run fore and aft. Superior Shoal is an unforgiving rock... hitting it on a night like they had, would have dropped her a lot closer to Superior Shoal but with an opportunity to drop boats. I stongly believe in the theory of waves hitting the foreward house dropping the bow into a wave. Then a second wave driving the bow under which would have caused the Taconite pellets (very much like marbles ) to shift in the cargo hold. As the cargo shifted the stresses on the ship would easily have explained the mass destruction of her midships area.

Learning a bit more about ship stability and physics allows you to take a more logical suggestive view of the situation. But hey we don't really know what happened and likely will never know.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bobby Schiebner
Location: Saginaw, Michigan
Email: Redsk8er58@aol.com
Date: 11/11/00
Remote Name: 205.188.193.22

Comments

I was'nt born when the big FITZ went down, but me and my nephew who is 15 just like me, heard about the Edmund Fitzgerald when we were about 10 years old in a book. We just fell in love with the boat. And we just had to learn and know more about the boat so we fgot more books and learned just about everything there is about the boat that there is to know about the ship. We fell soo sorry for the 29 families who lost there loved ones that faithful night God Bless them.But we think that the FITZ went down by breaking into two pieces. If it was'nt for the Edmund Fitzgerald we might not be as dedicaed to Great Lakes shipping as we are now, and be into things that we should'nt be, so for that we thank the Edmund Fitzgerald for such an intresting and great topic to study, learn, and watch about. THANK YOU


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Butch Lewis
Location: Michigan
Email: mcldbutch@tir.com
Date: 11/11/00
Remote Name: 208.167.79.36

Comments

It has been 25 years since we lost the FITZ. Probably the greatest tragedy of the Great Lakes. People are still speculating what happened. No one will ever know, this is sad. 29 "FAMILIES" were affected by this great loss. I think the ceremony that was done to raise the bell and replace it should be the closing ceremony. Let the families live in peace and those lost rest in peace. Let us not forget the loss, but lets try to quit speculating and opening up old wounds that are trying to heal.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: aubrey shore
Location: battle creek,mi 49017
Email: tjamm112@aol.com
Date: 11/11/00
Remote Name: 205.188.200.34

Comments

I know a lot about the Edmund Fitzgerald. I think it' very sad that it sunk because it was one of the biggest ships and one of the best and fastest. I also think the captain should have stayed on course because when he changed course he just ran into a bigger storm. I feel really bad for the people who lost a family member or a best friend. I hope nothing like the Edmund Fitzgerald shipwreck ever happens again. Not even in a million years. I'm glad the Edmund Fitzgerald was made because if ti wasn't we would have automobiles and our trainsportation wouldn't be very good. So I give the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald a good prayer to all the people who lost their friends,family,and neighbors.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: shelby lynn readel
Location: millbury,ohio
Email: Hotgurl100086588@aol.com
Date: 11/11/00
Remote Name: 64.12.105.49

Comments

i'm so sorry for what had happened to the Edmund Fitzgerald.and to all the dads on board and the mothers,children i'm so sorry for what happened when i heard thats i was like o m g means o..my....gosh bye sincerly shelby


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: aubrey shore
Location: battle creek,mi 49017
Email: tjamm112
Date: 11/11/00
Remote Name: 205.188.200.34

Comments


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Joe Komjathy
Location: Charlevoix, MI
Email: jkomjathy@stacharlevoix.uscg.mil
Date: 11/11/00
Remote Name: 152.121.200.200

Comments

I think she hit Six Fathom Shoals to cause her to sink.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Steve
Location: Flint, Mich
Email: sjp264@aol.com
Date: 11/11/00
Remote Name: 205.188.197.58

Comments

Most importantly, I wish to send my deepest sympathy and prayers to all 29 families. My grandfather worked 36 years on the great lakes as a cook on the "Chief Wawatam" a railroad ferry in the straits. I grew up listening to his pride of his profession and know that all the sailors feel the same. We may never know what really happened, and it does not matter. Knowing the true cause won't bring her back. I do agree that her final resting place should be declared off limits as a gravesite, and respected as such.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Fred
Location: Hammond,IN
Email: FBagin8391@aol.com
Date: 11/11/00
Remote Name: 205.188.193.164

Comments

God be with the families of the 29. Those 29 are sailing for God now. I would like to respond to Hugh from Grand Rapids. The reason they were out that night was because they set sail on Nov. 9, the day before. You can't just turn a ship of that size around, put it on a trailer and take it out of the water. Maps that I've seen show very few bays along the shoreline that they could have sought refuge in. Having over 30 years experience boating on southern Lake Michigan, I know how quickly these lakes can go from dead calm to life threatening. The crew of the Fitz were highly experienced, and just doing the jobs they had chosen. You can't blame the captain/company for a tragedy like this. When God says your time is up... your time is up. As for the resting site, I feel that the only thing that should be taken are pictures of the damaged areas to determine the cause of the tragedy, and not of any of the victims that may be there. May they rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Laurence
Location: Surrey, BC
Email: luckyman99@home.com
Date: 11/11/00
Remote Name: 24.113.31.225

Comments

I don't know any of the crew or their famlies but everytime i hear Lightfoots' song about the sinking i say a little prayer for the crewmen and also their famlies. God be with you on this the 25th anniversary. I would like to add my voice to getting your site deemed a burial ground NOT TO BE DISTURBED!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Hugh
Location: Grand Rapids, MI.
Email: Grewco1@cs.com
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 205.188.197.153

Comments

God bless the poor souls who lost their lives on such a dreadful voyage- however- why the heck was McSorely out that night for God's sake? It is my contention that the sinking is the fault of the captain/ corporation, not the inanimate objects such as the ship, shoals, or the damned weather. My Family has sailed the lakes on commercials forever, & the old argument for reasons of why ships sank during heavy seas was: The Company ordered the captain to sail, but the captain is in charge of the ship.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Frances Davies
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Email: franmac38@yahoo.ca
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 209.82.45.211

Comments

Visited Whitefish Point today, on this, the 25th anniversary of the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald. A crisp, windy day on the bay with an awesome atmosphere of remembrance. How beautiful the lake looked, how blue and crisp and inviting......yet menacing!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Michael R.
Location: Wausau, WI
Email: RoosTrain@aol.com
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 152.163.201.61

Comments

My sympathies to the families of the 29 crewmen. Something happened to the Fitz around 3:00 - 3:30 that afternoon. Probably a grounding on 6 fathom shoal.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: KEN HARTLEY
Location: WEATHERFORD TEXAS
Email: KWH1989@AOL.COM
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 152.163.205.33

Comments

there are only 29 who knows what happend. god bless their familes


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike Dee
Location: Wadsworth, Ohio
Email: MichaelD66@aol.com
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 64.12.105.182

Comments

God Bless the children of the men who parished on this sad night 25 years ago. Remember them forever, for they brought you into this world and deemed you to be happy. God gives us all a hard deck of cards to play with, its up to you to how you play the hand. Gold bless the families of the 29 men.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jeff
Location: Toledo
Email: jeffmac@bright.net
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 209.143.2.214

Comments

It was a very unfortunate event for maritime travel and these brave men will be remembered forever in all of our thoughts and prayers.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: robin
Location: minn.
Email: jmcintyre@isd.net>
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 198.144.6.226

Comments

it still saddens me to think about the loss of lives aboard the fitzgearld .i am a painter and i was looking for some pictures of the edmund fitzgerald to paint.The memory of her will live on in my mind and heart.and also on my canvas, it is a painting i will forever treasure.rest in peace crew members,we will all meet again.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Perry Hiltz
Location: Mount Clemens, Michigan
Email: hiltzy@yahoo.com
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 64.152.159.84

Comments

First and foremost, my sincere condolences to all family members of the Fitzgerald.

As a child the announcement of the sinking of the Fitzgerald didn't ring much to me. I was only 10 years old and had never seen a ship of that size as I grew up in Northern Ontario. It wasn't until much later that I saw the magnitude of these vessels.

I eventually had a desire to join up with ships and embarked on a journey I am glad I the opportunity to begin. I joined the Algoway of Algoma Central Marine.

As a former Great Lakes Sailor, the story of the Fitz was a horror story I could not ever wish on anyone. I joined my first ship in 1985 as a Deck Cadet with the Georgain College of Marine Technology in Owen Sound, Ontario. One day stands out as a day I will never forget. We were downbound on Lake St. Clair. I was barely three weeks into being 20 years old. I am on my first ship.

I stood the 4-8 Watch with the First Mate and he and I had just gone aft to have dinner. Once we returned to the bridge, we were just coming up on the USCG Station light on Belle Isle on the Detroit River. Something just felt definitely wrong... I wasn't able to put my finger on it. About an hour later, we were at the Ambassodor Bridge and as the I was the Cadet, it was now my responsibility to get the mail and newspapers from the J.W. Wescott II and return to the wheelhouse.

Once back inside, I pulled the Detroit News from the Mail bag. Suddenly I knew the reasoning for my grim feelings... It was the 10th anniversary of the sinking. I was only 10 years old when she went down, so suddenly I remembered watching channel 11 from Toledo and seeing the news bulletin running across the bottom of the screen....

I spent 7 years plying the Great Lakes on several different vessels. I am happy I had the opportunity. Now I work programming Computers and one day would like to take what I know now, couple that with my knowledge of ships to make everything safer and more profitable for the shipping companies.

But I will NEVER ever forgot November 10th... Your loss will forever be in my minds. GOD BLESS all of the people who lost love ones on the Great Lakes. While they are lovely bodies of water, the weather can be very unforgiving.

Thanks for the opportunity to share this with you.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: BLT
Location: HARDEE'S
Email: BURGER
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 207.170.15.66

Comments

I have a teacher that said he had a relative on the ship. It was the cook. So today at school when they played the song about this by a Canadian, he got real emotional.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bruce
Location: Charlotte, NC
Email: be7@rocketmail.com
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 12.126.30.62

Comments

I have been thinking about what happened twenty-five years ago today. I remember the Duluth news station interrupting the program informing viewers the Fitzgerald was missing, listening to the radio that night until 1 am and praying that the crew would be found safe and sound on the boat.

My God comfort everybody who suffered a loss of a family member and/or friends.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: hailey
Location: ohio
Email: ameotiu@aol.com
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 152.163.206.183

Comments

Thanks for all your wonderful thoughts and prayers on this 25th anniversary. This is a sad time for many people.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Natalie Bergan
Location: Avon Lake
Email: natti565@hotmail.com
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 156.63.189.64

Comments

i think that it sunk because of the weather because if you think about it the point was that it got caught in a storm. In the movie about the ship it said that the rain was covering the boat more than the pumps could get out. They didnt suspect any problems in making it.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: r. campbell
Location: Milford  , Mi USA
Email: robert.h.campbell @gm.com
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 208.223.205.165

Comments

The crew of this vessel will be in my thoughts all day on this anniversary date.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Marie Castonguay
Location: Lewiston, ME  USA
Email: lomom2@altavista.com
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 32.101.48.90

Comments

Today marks the 25th anniversary of the tragic end of the Fitz and it's long remembered crew that left behind loving families and friends. I feel it is important for us all to pray for the crew and their families.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Sheri
Location: Ohio
Email: SherBear5285@aol.com
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 152.163.201.81

Comments

The Fitz very well could have grounded on the Shoal, but computer analysis found that even if she did tear her bottom out in the foward 2/3 of the vessel, and didn't rip into the cargo hold, but only into the water tanks, she STILL could have made it to Whitefish bay. This theory is not able to substanciate. Not to mention that she turned to wide to ground on the shoal.. which is why its clear that the most probable cause of the Fitzgerald sinking was that she took water from another source through cargo hatches which wernt closed right, and lost her boyancy.. I also wanted to give my sympathy to all the families of the Fitzgeralad. I, like many others, will give a moment of silence today at 7:15 PM for the 29 men who lost their lives on the great ship. May God continue to be with you.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dan Corbat
Location: Midland, MI.
Email: dcorbat@thermico.com
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 207.179.84.34

Comments

My thoughts and prayers are with the families of those who lost their lives that terrible day 25 years ago. Peace be with you.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bob
Location: OK, USA.
Email: g31m@yahoo.com
Date: 11/10/00
Remote Name: 63.73.6.169

Comments

With all due respect to the crew and the families. I will observe, as I do every year at 7:15 pm Nov, 10th, a moment of silence along with a toast to the brave men. May God bless all 29.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: JOHN DENNIS
Location: SOUTHGATE MICHIGAN
Email: bigdadyjd1@aol.com
Date: 11/9/00
Remote Name: 152.163.204.35

Comments

to the families of those lost on NOV 10 1975 my family and i wish to exspress our condolences fir your lost loved ones . we will give silence at 7 15 pm on NOV 10 2000 to remember then on SUNDAY november 12 at 11am in mariners church in detroit mich we will join others in the remembrance mass for your loved ones we dont know if any family members of those lost will be there but if there is we hope to meet some of them my family thru our catholic beliefs know that your loved ones are with god in his kingdom . we also can say we know they are sailing in smooth waters forever may god bless you and your loved ones THE DENNIS FAMILY SOUTHGATE MICHIGAN


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: ELAINE
Location: YPSILANTI, MICHIGAN
Email: elaine367@earthlink.net
Date: 11/9/00
Remote Name: 63.48.19.13

Comments

I HAVE READ EVERY COMMENT AT THIS LOCATION AND TO HEAR THE LOVE FOR THOSE MEN WHO WENT DOWN WITH THE SHIP, IS VERY TOUCHING. THIS WAS THE BIGGEST SINKING ON THE GREAT LAKES OF THAT ERA, I THINK. FROM ALL THAT I HAVE READ OVER THE YEARS, I COULD BE WRONG. IT IS VERY HARD TO SAY IF IT WAS JUST ONE THING THAT MADE IT SINK, COULD BE ALL THAT HAS BEEN STATED HERE AND ON THE REPORTS, I ONLY REMMBER AT THE TIME HOW SORRY FOR THE FAMILES. I WAS 25 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME AND I CAN'T BELIEVE THAT IT HAS BEEN 25 YEARS AGO, EVERY TIME I HEAR THE SONG ABOUT THE FITZ. I GET COLD SHILLS. IT WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN THAT IS FOR SURE, WE MUST REMMBER ALL WHO HAVE LOST THERE LIFE ON THE WATER. MAY GOD BLESS THEIR FAMLIES.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Joyce
Location: Franklin, NC
Email: captg@primeline.com
Date: 11/9/00
Remote Name: 206.100.232.174

Comments

I think the Fitzgerald sank because, due to the severity of the storm, she was unable to keep out of the trough. And that is what did her in.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ned Gang
Location: Ohio
Email: mnfish@eriecoast.com
Date: 11/9/00
Remote Name: 216.29.74.91

Comments

I have read almost everything I have been able to get my hands on about the sinking of the "fitz" in the past 25 years, and as having sailed as a deckhand and wheelsman many years ago, I never felt at ease about the reasons for the disaster until I read Captain Paquette's "The Night the Fitz went down". It does not change my sadness for the lost seamen and their survivors, but I now finally understand why one of the largest and newest boats on the lake that night sunk! Thank you Capt.Paquette!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Todd Stephan
Location: Zurich,Ont, Canada
Email: edmund_fitzgerald@hotmail.com
Date: 11/9/00
Remote Name: 216.46.130.227

Comments

I was 7 when the "Fitz" sank, and I remember the storm well! I live 5 minutes from St.Josephs Ont. Right on Lake Huron, I know of her ferosity during storms, and can just imagine the horror those poor 29 men suffered that night on Lake Superior when they died. My thoughts are with their families, I will observe a moment of silence at 7:15pm Nov 10 as that is the alleged time she sank, according to her dissappearing off Arthur M Andersons radar during the sqaul which lasted only 5 minutes, obscuring her mast lights from the Anderson and other ships , almost as if in a very sad way it was part of Gods master Plan.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tony Laginess
Location: River Rouge Mi.
Email: laginess@msn.com
Date: 11/9/00
Remote Name: 64.31.27.32

Comments

I am a councilman for the city of River Rouge and proud to say that our fair city is the birth place of the Edmund Fitzgerald and many other ships of her kind. As far as what caused the demise of this great ship I do believe that she was taking on water through her hatches and at that point she was heavy and low in the water when she came face to face with a couple of rogue waves and drove herself to the bottom. So for the 29 men I will leave 29 flowers in the waters at the site of her birth. May God rest their souls.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Heidi K.
Location: St Paul, MN
Email: heidik@boatnerd.com
Date: 11/9/00
Remote Name: 199.199.164.10

Comments

It seems to me that three of the four contributed to the sinking. It went up on the shoal which damaged the ship, causing it to stop, causing the cargo to shift forward, causing the ship to split in two and sink.

Thoughts?


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jim Strang
Location: Avon, OH
Email: Hortator@Centurytel.net
Date: 11/9/00
Remote Name: 206.3.134.6

Comments

As a then-general assignment reporter for the Plain Dealer, I drew the assignment of covering Bernie Cooper's testimony before the Coast Guard board of inquiry. I heard him lay out his theory in great detail -- that the Fitz had bottomed on the shoal in an abnormally deep trough. It is the only answer that ever made sense to this landlubber. McSorely was to good a skipper to go into that storm with unbattened hatches. The theory slanders his record and his memory. It was the shoal. And God rest the 29 souls.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Aaron Murray
Location: Avon Lake, OH
Email: duty_eatr@excite.com
Date: 11/9/00
Remote Name: 156.63.25.59

Comments

It obviously broke in two because they foung the boat on the bottom of the lake broken into two pieces, sothat is the only reasonable explanation.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Stephen Lynch
Location: Darien, Wi.
Email: slynch@elknet.net
Date: 11/9/00
Remote Name: 204.95.180.22

Comments

I've always believed that the Fitz's shoaling in the six fathom shoal area was the cause for the sinking.

Having just read Hugh Bishops novel of the account of that fateful night by Captain Dudley Paquette (The Wilfred Sykes), I now seriously question my previous beliefs. I would most strongly urge anyone with an interest in the Fitz to read this excellent book.

Whatever the cause, I think it important that our thoughts, as this 25th anniversary approaches be with the families of the crewmembers.

As my wife and I head for Whitefish Point tommorrow, our thoughts will be of that fateful night.

Godspeed to the crew and there families.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Chris and family
Location: Staten Island New York
Email: Tsunami57@yahoo.com
Date: 11/8/00
Remote Name: 24.23.28.32

Comments

It seems as if it was only yesterday that this terrible targedy occurred. As the 25 th Anniversary approach's We wanted to send and express our Prayer's for the Men aboard the Edmund Fitzgerald. May they always sail in clear weather and find a Port in every storm, they will never be forgotten. God Bless the family's of the Men lost aboard the Edmund Fitzgerald may they find eternal peace and comfort in knowing that your men will always be there with you.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mary Beth Dannhardt
Location: Greensburg, PA
Email: Mbd801gbg@aol.com
Date: 11/8/00
Remote Name: 152.163.194.184

Comments

I just wanted to say that the crew of "The Fitz" will never be forgotten. Everytime I hear the song by Gordon Lightfoot I absolutely get chills. At this, the 25th anniversary of that fateful night, my thoughts and prayers will certainly be with all the family members who lost loved ones.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Patrick Waldron
Location: Muskegon, Michigan
Email: bevpb1375@aol.com
Date: 11/8/00
Remote Name: 152.163.213.48

Comments

I also have been interested in this shipwreck since I have been a little boy. Now I am 18 and still fantasize what it must have been like on board at that time. It would make a good movie and if a movie was brought from the Fitz tragedy it would surely beat the Titanic movie. Anybody out there know anybody in Hollywood that could make a movie? If so call them and tell them our idea.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Marc Loree
Location: Lapeer, MI
Email: none
Date: 11/8/00
Remote Name: 64.0.99.137

Comments

The Fitz reported having a fence rail down and other damage done shortly after passing near the shoal area. Bernie Cooper swore all along that he believed the Fitz had touched on six fathom shoal. Considering that he was the closest thing we have to a witness on that fateful night, I tend to agree with his theory. I am going to be passing near the Fitz 11/10, but around 2200. My thoughts will be with them.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dan Cobb
Location: Oregon, WI 53575
Email: dancobb@alliant-energy.com
Date: 11/8/00
Remote Name: 198.7.47.100

Comments

As we can only speculate what really happened, only One Higher Being will ever really know the true answer. I have thought alot about this and I think someone should make a movie about the sinking of the "Big Fitz". It may not come up to the colosalness of the Titanic but there is alot personal interest about the ship and her crew leading up to her disapperance. I believe it would make for a great movie.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: The Wallace Family
Location: Waterdown Ontario
Email: Wally.Wallace @ Sympatico.com
Date: 11/8/00
Remote Name: 209.226.183.163

Comments

As the end of the shipping season draws near the loss of the Edmund Fitzgearld comes to the minds and hearts of us all. It is easy for us to forget that the cargos that these ships carry are not important to us in their raw form but we depend on them in our everyday lives. Everyday the Officers and Sailors of these ships go about their daily routines with the thought of the Lakes and their changing moods at this time of season. On this 25th Anniversary of the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald our family would like to send our condolences and feelings to the Families of the crewmembers of the Fitzgerald. As they sail over the horizon of eternity they will never be forgotten Godspeed to you all THE WALLACE FAMILY


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Francis O'Mara
Location: Winter Haven Florida 33884
Email: SailorFran@webtv.net
Date: 11/7/00
Remote Name: 209.240.222.32

Comments

As a retired seaman on the Great Lakes I was out in Lake Superior the night the Fitz.went down and i lost many friends I sailed with many of the crew over the years. The captain,1st mate 2nd mate Chief Eng,2nd Eng.and many of the crew. May you all be sailing the seas in haven.Fran


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Lenvil King, Jr.
Location: Marquette, MI
Email: jaynar_paladin@hotmail.com
Date: 11/7/00
Remote Name: 204.38.56.134

Comments

I have been close to her resting place several times, while sailing the last couple years. It may have been before my time, but it is always a somber experience, for me. Whatever the reason for her loss, one fact remains, 29 of my brother mariners lost their lives. That is a fact that I cannot, and will not ever forget. On the 10th I will unfortunately be able to travel anywhere, but I will be praying that God will be with the families on the anniversary of this tragedy, and also praying that this will be the last vessel and crew that we will have to mourn. May God bless and keep watch over my fellow brothers of the sea.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Kalamazoo
Location: mi
Email: cbosch73@aol.com
Date: 11/7/00
Remote Name: 172.132.34.66

Comments

Its not mentioned a whole lot, when you hear about the sinking, but to me it makes the most sense, the storm of 75 was a fierce one especially in Lake Superior, and with all that natural force being exerted on the Edmund Fitzgerald on that night could have made the ship hit the shoal harder than if the seas were calm, with all the ships tonnage and force of the waves pounding into Her, it might of made the hull of the ship weak enough..therefore causing it to eventually split in two also causing a rapid submersion. Thats my theory.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ralph Carr
Location: Kalamazoo MI
Email: racekzoo@aol.com
Date: 11/6/00
Remote Name: 152.163.204.197

Comments

As a Toledo river rat growing up, I remember the night well. At 10 years old, I felt like I`d lost one of my friends. I remember riding my bike down to the river to check "on my boats". Not sure why I did that; but it`s what I remember to this day. Tears filled my eyes when the Mid States dock was empty. At my age; I didn`t know which boats came to "my" dock; but I was sure the Fitz had been there. I now know that she did come to Toledo, but not for grain. As a young adult; I was an ambulance attendant. I transported Mrs. Mc Sorley a few times. Being in the home of Capt. McSorley brought all of my childhood memories came back to me.

Every November I feel a great loss. An emptyness, I pray for those who work the boats as well as their families.

I plan on being at Whitefish Pointe Friday. It`s a must for me.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Capt. Charlie Lampman
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, MI
Email: captlampman@sault.com
Date: 11/6/00
Remote Name: 206.152.252.5

Comments

I too have a theory, one that closely follows a combination of those previously mentioned. I believe it was a series of events commencing with the grounding near Caribou Is. that culminated in a vessel that was too heavily damaged by that event and the storm itself to make her way to calmer waters. They were fighting the clock and inrushing water and time had just run out for them.

I was 27 years old, a wheelsman on the Benjamin F. Fairless that season. We passed upbound through the Soo sometime around 2:30 AM and made our way out into Whitefish Bay. We passed the Point around 4:30 or 5:00 and steered the course for Crisp Pt. After receiving the 6 AM MAFOR the captain ordered the ship turned off Crisp Pt. and we proceeded back towards Whitefish Bay. I'll never forget the ugly yellowish, dark sky that morning.(one of the nastiest I've ever seen) I was on the 8-12 watch that year. We ran back into the bay and ran south about Parisiene Is. and dropped the port anchor with two shots (180) feet of chain, in Goulais Bay about 9:30 AM. It rained on and off all morning, but we were warm and cofortable in the pilot house. The wind picked up speed and was shifting from the SE to the SW at about twenty-five to forty knots. Around 11:00 AM we started dragging anchor, and dropped the starboard anchor with two shots of chain, and put out another ninety feet on the port. This held throughout the remainder of the storm. The William R. Roesch joined us in the bay sometime that afternoon. Late that afternoon, the wind had shifted more to the west and increased to about fifty knots or so. The guys in the pilot house had been listening to some of the radio chatter when I came up to visit after supper.(about 6:00 PM) They said that the Anderson and the Fitz had been talking back and forth for awhile and that the Anderson was tracking them on RADAR. We Listened intently for the next several hours but it is ironic that we somehow missed the final radio message. We heard everything leading up to that point and everything afterwards. I think our first hint that something was very wrong was when Capt. Cooper spoke with the pilots on the two upbound salties and was informed that they had not met the Fitz as they were coming out of the bay. By this time the anemometer had been hitting sixty to seventy knots, with occasional sustained gusts to ninety. That's right, ninety knots! When Capt. Cooper called the Coast Guard at the Soo there was a brief silence at the other end before Soo Control answered. I think this is when we all realized the worst had happened. We were asked to go out and search that night, and the "old man" pondered the situation for hours. We were moderately low powered, in ballast, and a very limber hull, which had many welded up cracks from years of service. Around midnight, he finally and reluctantly told Soo Control that he felt that he could not take the chance of endangering his vessel and crew, and we stayed the night. I think we were all relieved but I didn't sleep much that night. I don't think anybody did. I sat up in my room for a couple hours jotting down thoughts about the whole round of events that had just transpired, and had a very uneasy feeling about everything. I was concerned for the guys over on the Anderson and the William Clay Ford and wondered if anyone off the Fitz had survived. Even the pilots on the salties who kept on heading for the Lakehead were overheard on the radio as saying," I wish we had stayed behind the point." The season before I had sailed with Fred Armogost, whom I believe was the brother of Michael Armogost, the Third Mate. Somehow I felt a connection. Regardless of that, though, we all feel a connection when a member of our seafaring family is lost let alone 29 all at once.

My heart and my prayers go out to the families of our departed brethern, and I hope to meet some of you at the ceremony to be held at Whitefish Point this coming Friday. It is going to be hard not to remember the events of that terrible day and and force back memories that you try to forget.

God bless them all!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Chris Laczek A.K. Silverbolt
Location: Michigan
Email: JMC_Silverbolt@hotmail.com
Date: 11/6/00
Remote Name: 209.206.210.152

Comments

I put my therory up there and thought it was the shoual. but I am here to say remember the Edmund Fitzgreld. This will be its 25th year since it has sunk. Let us all remember


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Brian Zuchowski
Location: Lowell,IN
Email: mollyo@netnitco.net
Date: 11/6/00
Remote Name: 4.4.243.34

Comments

After reading Capt. Paquette's comments I was surprised to hear the once proud flagship was neglected to the point where it could not survive this Novemember storm. I think a combination of factors led to the disaster. I worked for 15 years on the coal dock in South Chicago and saw many a boat leave with only the minimal amount of hatch clamps fastened. I would like to think Capt. McSorley knew of the oncoming conditions and if only the minimal fasteners were in place, then he would have ordered the rest to be clamped. The Coast Guard's ineffective hatch closure finding is laughable. The Coast Guard is directly responsible for reducing the freeboard of the vessel. The Fitz could have shoaled. It's also possible that stress fractures would have caused the foundering. Whatever the cause, may we all remember all the mariners who have served and died for our betterment. On Nov.10,2000 I will make my annual trip to the lighthouse in Michigan City,IN to place my memorial and say a prayer for all who have perished on the lakes. I will always REMEMBER!!


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Greg Caucci
Location: Eveleth, MN
Email: gcooch@ispchannel.com
Date: 11/6/00
Remote Name: 24.246.25.82

Comments

I remember the night like yesterday. While working at my desk in Hibbing, Dennis Anderson of WDIO TV broke in with the news bulletin. I have always felt the shoal theory has merit,and given the reports I have heard of the abuse the ship took, hitting docks, trying to break speed records, etc, the old girl was probably suffering structural or metal fatigue, and everything caught up to her that fateful night. A fellow I know was a crewman for several years in the early 70's, and said the Master before McSorley pushed her pretty hard. By the way, Dennis Anderson, a personal friend of mine, is still with WDIO TV in Duluth. I am sure they will have a retrospective Friday night. God bless her crew, and the families after 25 years. It truly feels like yesterday.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Heidi Viar
Location: Kalamazoo, MI
Email: juneau90@ivillage.com
Date: 11/6/00
Remote Name: 141.218.190.125

Comments

I was a little girl at the time of the Fitzgerald loss, but I still remember the reports of it as if it were not so long ago. The Great Lakes community suffered the loss together, and now 25 years later we are still sensitive to and mindful of it. May God make his presence known to the families at this difficult time.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ron Walsh
Location: Kingston , Ontario
Email: ve3go@rac.ca
Date: 11/6/00
Remote Name: 207.176.195.51

Comments

I was 13, in 1957, and I took a picture of the Fitz, from the Golden Hind in July of that yeear. I believe that she did grounf as there is still controversy about the Canadian nad American charts. The video with the Captain of the Arthur M. Anderson commenting about the voyage is an excellent source of info. I still have deep sympathy for those who lost their relatives or friends on the ship.

I have been a ship enthusiast since I was about 8 years old , have travelled four times on great lakes freighters, work as a minor waters master here in Kingston and am a member of the Canadian Coast Guard auxilliary.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Heidi
Location: Wisconsin
Email: wadthree@baysat.net
Date: 11/5/00
Remote Name: 63.170.47.48

Comments

I have no theory just my own thoughts, but I remember it very well. My brother and my brother-in-law work in the sailing industry and were out in those lakes on that night. The horror that was etched on everyone's faces when the news came out is something I will never forget and think about the gales of November often for my husband, my brother, and brother-in-law are still out there working and I pray that they stay safe as well as any other sailor. My deepest sympathies to all who lost a loved one.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Patti
Location: CA
Email: helmikuu24@yahoo.com
Date: 11/5/00
Remote Name: 172.160.82.120

Comments

In Memory of the Edmund Fitzgerald and her 29 crew. They will be remembered forever, and to those family members who lost their loved ones our thoughts and prayers to you. To my family sailors on the Lakes. I think of you always and send my love. Take care.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Brian Johnson
Location: Kingston, Ontario
Email: appajohn@kingston.net
Date: 11/5/00
Remote Name: 199.126.168.79

Comments

Since last year, after reviewing comments from others, having studied charts of the area and reading the transcript of the accident from Captain Cooper of the Arthur M. Anderson, I too, think she struck bottom. I also noted too, that she wouldn't be permitted to sail without extensive work to her hull the following spring. I remember the night very well. The ferry Wolfe Islander tied up due to the heavy seas in our area. Piloting blind with no reliable means of obtaining a fix, Captain McSorley had no choice but to keep going. With a bad list her course over the bottom was probably carrying her "to the left" into dangerous waters. Again, with no reliable means of obtaining a fix for yourself and probably knowing she was "setting in" had to be a terrible gut feeling for captain and crew. "...One of the worst seas I've ever been in" from a veteran lake captain said it all. May they all be remembered in a very special ceremony this Friday.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: silverbolt
Location: MI
Email: JMC_Silverbolt@hotmail.com
Date: 11/5/00
Remote Name: 209.206.210.52

Comments

I think that the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald was from crashing into the shoal. My reasons for this is, 1. The cargo will almost always shift on any vessel so I don`t think it would be from that. 2. If the hatches were leaking They have pumps on the ships so it would be able to pump water out. 3.If it broke in half I would say that it broke going down to the bottom. Or here is my theroy. After being hit on the shoal, it did major damage to the hull of the ship. As it was going it was starting to break apart. As it is breaking apart it is taking on much water that would explain the rapid sinking. I honestly think this is what happened.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: David Paral
Location: Lisbon, Wisconsin
Email: dparal@worldnet.att.net
Date: 11/4/00
Remote Name: 12.76.82.132

Comments

Regardless of the cause let us never forget the crew of the Edmund Fitzgerald. My thanks to Gordon Lightfoot for immortalizing the ship and crew. This song is one of the most popular songs to this day in the state of Wisconsin and is one of my favorites. Our prayers go out to the familys of the men lost. We will not forget.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Denny Seifried
Location: Springfield, OH
Email: ddsbstrb@voyager.net
Date: 11/4/00
Remote Name: 207.90.107.10

Comments

I feel very saddened for all of the families who lost husbands, sons, fathers, relatives and friends on the Fitz. My son and I cherish being able to see the ship's bell at Whitefish Pt. this summer. It will remain in my memory for ever and ever. I would like to read the book mentioned in other posts, as I have always believed in the grounding theory. May all of the crew rest in eternal peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dianne
Location: Toronto
Email: Dfcollin1@AOL.com
Date: 11/4/00
Remote Name: 152.163.213.192

Comments

As a young adult living in SSM Ontario that night it was horrible! I remember listening to WSOO and hearing that a ship was lost from radar. My own father was not home yet and I began to imagine what I would feel like if my father was a sailor. I remember the songs I heard, Layla, Conquistador & Taxi... to this day any one of these songs take me back. I feel that the Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald is a personal event even though no one in my immediate family died.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ray Darragh
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Email: ray210@aol.com
Date: 11/4/00
Remote Name: 152.163.204.181

Comments

since nobody survived the Fitz, we can only opinionate. That being said, I have to disagree with Jerry Lawsons'statement of "six fathom shoals" being "ten fathom shoals". According to the USCG report #16732/64216 (the official report on the SS Edmund Fitzgerald) there was never menctioned that aspect of the foundering of the Fitz in the casualty report. p.s. Rear Admiral W.W. Barrow, USCG, Captain A.S Zabinski, USCG, and Commander C.S. Loosmore, USCG also signed that report and I've heard nothing in print from them to the contrary.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: John Hoeldke
Location: Orangeville,Ontario
Email: hoeldke@hurontario.ca
Date: 11/4/00
Remote Name: 209.135.91.174

Comments

Often thought of, but never forgotton. Much has been written about the "Big Fitz " but have fellow boat watchers noted how quick Fleet Owners were to scrap great Lakes Vessels of that era. To me it speaks volumes on Ship Owners and the Coast Guards Report on the loss of a good Ship and crew.....forshame on you. P. S. I spent 25 years on Lake Ontario in Marine search and Rescue.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Steve Bursey
Location: Maine Maritime Academy
Email: midnbursey@hotmail.com
Date: 11/4/00
Remote Name: 130.111.42.26

Comments

On behalf of the Academy and the midshipmen who attend here, we will always remember the tragedy of the Edmund Fitzgerald. Most of us are too young to remember the event, but we will always take it as a loss from 29 of our own.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: NEWT WILLIAMS
Location: ALGONAC,MICHIGAN
Email: k8qlo@digidom.net
Date: 11/4/00
Remote Name: 209.69.166.65

Comments

heavy seas and high wind.caused ship to bottom on the shoal.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: sharon l pollack
Location: boynton beach florida
Email: fxeman@aol.com
Date: 11/4/00
Remote Name: 152.163.213.54

Comments

if one new how the cargo ship sunk you should be in the raffle for free.thas what i think.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tom Stewart
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
Email: tomstewart@tbaytel.net
Date: 11/4/00
Remote Name: 206.186.168.168

Comments

I have also read the book "The Night the FITZ Went Down" as mentioned earlier by Dale Pohto. I too - after hearing all the possible theories of her sinking - had believed that the most probable cause of her sinking was the grounding on Six Fathom Shoal. After reading this book and hearing Capt. Paquette's comments about the loose keel, how the vessel was always run hard, etc. I have changed my opinion on what caused her sinking. I highly recommend this book - not to those just interested in the FITZGERALD - but to anyone who is interested in the Great Lakes.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: JERRY LAWSON
Location: DULUTH, MINNESOTA
Email: jerryatblackwood@qwest.net
Date: 11/4/00
Remote Name: 207.109.199.127

Comments

I WAS SUPRISED TO SEE HOW MANY PEOPLE HAD VOTED FOR GROUNDING AS THE CAUSE OF THE SINKING OF THE FITZ. NOTHING COULD BE FARTHER FROM THE TRUTH. THE ONLY PART OF THE COAST GUARD INVESTIGATION THAT HAD MERIT WAS THEIR DISCOVERY THAT THE 6 FATHOM SHOAL 'DID NOT ACTUALLY EXIST. IT WAS ACTUALLY A 10 FATHOM SHOAL AND THE PRINTED DATA THAT SHOWED IT AS 6 FATHOMS WAS A TRANSCRIBING ERROR WHEN THE DATA WAS COPIED FROM THE CANADIAN CHARTS, MANY YEARS PAST. THIS STATEMENT IS TRUE AS CITED BY UNITED STATES COAST GUARD CAPTAIN JAMES WILSON WHO WAS A MEMBER OF THE OFFICIAL BOARD OF INVESTIGIATION. CAPTAIN WILSON ALSO ATTESTED TO THE TRUTH OF THIS FINDING TO ME PERSONALLY DURING HIS VISIT TO DULUTH FOR THE FILMING OF THE MAY DAY SERIES FOR THE DISCOVERY CHANNEL WHICH WAS DONE BY THE BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPERATION,


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Andy Cayer
Location: Hancock Wis
Email: cships@boatnerd.com
Date: 11/4/00
Remote Name: 209.94.160.253

Comments

The evening November 10th 1975,I was twelve years and a boatnerd as of two, says mom. Living in a mariner city, So.Chicago,Ill. back then, was common to see ships in and out all the time.Storms are unpredictable this time of year. As I was watching T.V.like normal,a warning came over the screen "FRIEGHTER LOST ON LAKE SUPERIOR" and it repeats several times.I grow big eyes,not knowing what ship this was,I needed to know!At this time, it became late at night.The name became the Edmund Fitzgerald,no other updates at this time.Knowing several fleets,still no clue of this ship. Update came late''Ore Carrier Edmund Fitzgerald Lost Lake Superior Possibe All Hands Lost",and something Oglebay Norton,to me a 'C'boat. Never seen ship in port,but others of fleet came in regularly.Knowing the community this was tragic,at my age group ,I seem to be alone with dealing with news.Saddening by the moment,this was going to be talk among the docks.Never to believe this was going to effect me the rest of my life.BOATS were my life, growing up there,I needed to sleep to deliver the Chicago Sun-Times,and the Daily Tribune,morning paper.Morning came and so did the head lines,I could not believe it was a big ship,I seen the photo,shocked terribly!Not much movement at port,as I delivered the morning news.As I walked block to block, my eyes filled with tears,having to deliver the paper with a smile,not happening!PEOPLE,customers waiting on the porches, waiting for me to get the paper,unusual.Maybe they knew just like me.Turn,passing south of shipyard,looking for ships that morning.Can't recall one,wishing that everything was Okay.I was done delivering the papers and read the articles,the paper that morning was gold to me,and saved them ever since.Seeing that fleet come into port afterwards,I stood there watching in silence,praying with them,even though I wasn't in their presents.I followed the story all week until it was no longer an issue.To me at twelve,never really found out about the facts,until I was older and read the book,STONEHOUSE PUBLISHING.To me I feel the captain was very much in control,years sailing,leaving Superior Wis. with a sound ship,hatch covers secured,just the high seas and where they were at the time, may have bottomed out causing extensive flooding,listing,the seas gave her one final twist,sending her to the bottom,without warning to abandoned ship.My thoughts of the lights not operating that night at Whitefish Pt.,Captain McSorley,new the direction of course to take,but fate had it,didn't make it to shelter.Without radar and ANDERSON behind her assisting,helping to correct course if needed,until silence.From that date on, I remembered the anniversary and for a moment silence I commit myself in prayer,to all the family and friends,boatnerds,to all mariners at sea,who brave their lives through rough seas as the crew of the Edmund Fitzgerald did that November night.I myself dedicated to the memory, by adding to my personal checks,that I write out daily to pay bills,a caption below(IN MEMORY OF EDMUND FITZGERALD)again I'll add,this has affected me for the rest my life.GOD BLESS! Andy Cayer


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Frances
Location: Sault Ste. Marie,Ontario
Email: franmac38@yahoo.ca
Date: 11/4/00
Remote Name: 209.82.45.199

Comments

My own account of November 10, 1975 isn't very exciting but I remember it like it happened just yesterday. I was 13 years old attending a sewing class at St. Bernadette School. Class started at 6:30 and we were there about 15 minutes when the power went out. I remember the instructor asking me to go to her car because she had candles in the glove compartment. I went out in the weather and couldn't find the damn candles. The school was pitch black inside because the windows were covered over with displays and what-not. We had to sit and wait for the power to come back on. Only 3 of us showed up for the class that night. I guess the rest stayed home because of the weather. Luckily, the phones were operating and I called home for a ride. I waited outside the school for my sister to pick me up (in Dad's "68" Sport Fury. As I waited, I leaned into the wind, and remained, easily, on a 45degree angle. I thought it was fun. When we got home, my father, (God rest his soul) was watching the weather on TV 9&10 {Traverse City, Soo, Michigan} and the word had just come about that a ship was in questionable danger. I didn't pay much attention to it because nothing was certain. But I will always remember November 11 (our Canadian Remembrance Day) when we heard of the final report of the demise of the Edmund Fitzgerald. I will, as will my family, always remember November 10 and 11 as a day of "huge" remembrance for those who have lost their lives in service and for the service of others.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Frances
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Email: franmac38@yahoo.ca
Date: 11/4/00
Remote Name: 209.82.45.199

Comments

On November 10, 1975, north of Soo, Ontario...Eugene Dufresne and George Isaacson were moose hunting on an island on Gaber Lake. Along with them was a man named "Holder". No one really knows what happened that night, except that Dufresne and Isaacson may have tried to make it to the main land in a 12' Sportspal Canoe. The reason, everyone thinks, is because Holder may have had a heart attack. All 3 men were found dead. (Holder, apparently, had no water in his lungs, which lead them to believe that he may have had a heart attack. That may have explained the mens' reason for heading out in such a severe storm........They tried to get Holder to the mainland.....No one really knows what happened. (Much like everything else that happened that night)


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dorne
Location: Maine
Email: granmeme@midmaine
Date: 11/3/00
Remote Name: 216.220.229.184

Comments

She was and will be the best ship in mind that ever sailed.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Fred Baginski
Location: Hammond,IN
Email: FBagin8391@aol.com
Date: 11/3/00
Remote Name: 216.214.218.89

Comments

Judging from the pictures of the wreck, I'm inclined to say that the Fitz probably sustained hull damage on the shoals, and was taking on water for a while. She either was lifted by the first wave and broke as it hit the center of the ship or collapsed between two large waves. The position of the stern section to the bowleads me to think that she broke on the surface. God Bless all the surviving relatives, and all who still work on the Great Lakes.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ed Chaput
Location: Rockwood, Mich
Email: eddyfitz@boatnerd.com
Date: 11/3/00
Remote Name: 64.12.104.162

Comments

Remember these 29 brave sailors in your prayers this time of the year. I would have to think that the ship broke up after it hit the shoals earlier in the day.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Ray
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Email: ray210@aol.com
Date: 11/3/00
Remote Name: 205.188.195.23

Comments

Concerning everything I have read, I believe that the Fitz was too close to six fathom shoals and did indeed scrape bottom whereas she ripped a hole in her hull to take on water. As she plowed foward, the additional weight of the water impeded her progress and also made her ride lower in the water i.e. lower freeboard, more tons of water coamed her decks inbetween waves to add to the weight. I believe that Bernie Cooper's siting of two to three huge waves that hit the Anderson and continued towards the Fitz also factured in her demise in the fact that if they hit her from the stern, and the bow of the ship was on a downward slide off of a wave, it could have literaly pushed the ship through the water and downwards into the lake bottom. If that happened, the shifting of the cargo and the water moving foward (there were only screens inside the holds seperating the cargo if I'm not mistaken)would have caused a huge increase in weight at the bow, which would have took her to the bottom in a matter of seconds. That would account for no distress signals being sent, since the pilothouse was already underwater. Also, with the sudden increase of weight foward and little weight aft, when the Fitz hit bottom (she sank in 540 feet of water, but she was 728 feet long!) the sudden impact sheared the heavy bow of the ship from the light stern of the ship.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Dale Pohto
Location: Mentor-on-the-Lake, Ohio
Email: atondale@nls.net
Date: 11/3/00
Remote Name: 216.144.8.204

Comments

I just finished Mr. HUGH BISHOP'S book, "THE NIGHT THE FITZ WENT DOWN", which included much insite by Capt. PAQUETTE who was in command of the SYKES out on Lake Superior that night, downbound, hours behind the FITZ and ANDERSON. As a former Columbia 'deckhand', I'm inclided to agree with his opinion that the hull platings were not securely welded to the keel, leading to a breach in the hull around ballast tank #7 as a result of 'working' in the heavy seas. This may have led to a hogging of the hull, causing the fence (railing) to part, and vents to detach from the deck, and quite possibly the deck to twist and lose one or more of the watertight seals around the hatch covers. This is more plausible than the "floating object" that the Coast Guard offered as a cause for this damage. I have always questioned the large number of UNDAMAGED hatch clamps, hanging, UNFASTEND, in underwater photographs I have seen, and he too, suspects that most were NEVER secured to properly seal the hatches and make them watertight. (If this is true, then a gross case of negligence is evident.) As for the groundng on the 6-fathom shoal, I belived this to be the case -UNTIL- the dives made in the mid 1990's revealed NO evidence of grounding on the accssible portion of the hull, AND, there was NO evidence of grounding on the rocks of that shoal when divers inspected them. The FITZ had hull work done in 1969, and again in 1974 to repair faulty welds to the keel, and was supposed to receive additional work in 1975-76 layup. The A.B. HOMER, sister of the FITZ, was lengthened 96 feet in 1975, and then went into permanent layup in 1980. Could it be that she, too, had similar weld problems too costly to justify repair??? I strongly encourage anyone looking for REAL answers to read this book and then make up your own mind...


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Lil
Location: Wi
Email: nca@pressenter.com
Date: 11/3/00
Remote Name: 209.224.18.138

Comments

You know, if you read the story they have on this site, it just almost makes you want to cry.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: a Friend
Location:
Email: x
Date: 11/3/00
Remote Name: 205.188.197.159

Comments

Sad, very very sad. Let's remember the crew with a prayer at 7:10 November 10, 2000.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Tim
Location: Lexington
Email: bismark4@yahoo.com
Date: 11/3/00
Remote Name: 205.188.197.159

Comments

I was 17 the night the "Fitz" went down. I remember hearing it on the news. Looking at the pictures of the debris field, I feel that she did hit bottom and continued to loose buoyancy throughout the rest of her voyage. The 3 sister wave theory may have some creedence if they hit the Fitz when she was most vunerable.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Joshua Juel
Location: Ithaca, NY
Email: jhj7@cornell.edu
Date: 11/3/00
Remote Name: 152.163.207.204

Comments

Anyone who has sailed the Great Lakes knows it is seldom a hatch cover is watertight. It is extremely unlikely that this vessel would succumb to Lake Superior due to a problem that all lakers have. The rogue wave theory is not out of the question, but it is more probable the Fitzgerald sank due to damage obtained by touching bottom on the shoal.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Bob Schaar
Location: Westphalia, Mich
Email: SCHAARB@STATE.MI.US
Date: 11/3/00
Remote Name: 204.23.28.103

Comments

On the night the Fitz sank....Captain Bernie Cooper reported being hit from behind by two huge wave3s that were heading in the direction of the Fitzgerald. Captain Cooper, himself was afraid that the waves would catch up with the Fitz. I, personally, think that scraping the shoals may have caused the list that Captain McSorley had reported, making the Fitz even more helpless to the two giant waves that surely cought up to her...


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Jake
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Email: jake@boatnerd.com
Date: 11/2/00
Remote Name: 63.11.55.97

Comments

I think that the fitz was a big tragedy. I wanted to go to Duluth for the Gales of November event, but my parents wouldn't take me, because they have to go to a Gordon Lightfoot concert. I will remember the 29 men that died that night.


Subject: The Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald
From: Mike
Location: Flint
Email: mikef@boatnerd.com
Date: 11/2/00
Remote Name: 204.79.43.4

Comments

I remember the night the Fitz. went down. It was a tragic loss and those men should not be forgotten. I think it was the shoal that caused them to sink. I will observe a moment of silence for her crew and their families on November 10, 25 years after the loss.

Mike


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Scott
Location: Sarnia, Ontario
Email: wingnut4vr@yahoo.com
Date: 12/10/99
Remote Name: 216.94.229.106

Comments

I would also like to take this opportunity to respond to Jared Ramsey's comments seen below: Firstly, a visual inspection of the cargo hold would not have revealed any flooding of the compartment, it was in excess of 18 feet, full of taconite pellets. They were aware of the flooding, hence all four pumps going, trying to correct the list. This was known due to electronic monitoring of the holds, and ballast tanks. Secondly, and most importantly, McSorley NEVER, EVER, reported having lost 2 hatch covers. HE did report the fence lines down, the list, and that the 2 BALLAST VENT COVERS and PIPES had been lost. The amount of water entering the tanks through these 18 inch openings is not enough to cause a ship to lose boyancy and founder, or cause stresses on her hull in heavy seas, split into 2, and founder. Hatches weighing in excess of 14,ooo lbs, fastened with kestner clamps do not move. Even unfasted (no clamps), they would be very unlikely to move off of the hatch combings.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Scott
Location: Sarnia, Ontario
Email: wingnut4vr@yahoo.com
Date: 12/9/99
Remote Name: 216.94.229.117

Comments

Perhaps the best explanation of the events leading to the foundering of "Big Fitz" are those of J.B. Cooper, master of the Anderson. It was his opinion that after losing both radar antenna, the Fitz was too close in to six fathom shoals, off the tip of Caribou Island. He stated that the hatch covers weigh 7 tonnes, and no amount of shifting of cargo, or water over the decks would affect them to the point of slipping off the hatch combings. Therefore, in his opinion (I would suggest he could be considered an expert of ships, and their responses in heavy seas) that she bottomed out on the shoals, where water entered the hold from below. Even with two 7000 gallon per minute pumps, and two 3500 gallon per minute back-up pumps, the ship was in peril. Captain McSorley's only alternative was to run for White Fish Bay, which he attempted to do. Cooper also stated that McSorley undoubtedly knew what the condition of the ship was, thus the run for cover. She foundered not due to faulty hatch covers, but due to a series of events, and, a culminating incident, being one huge wave the overburdened ship could not recover from. The Great Lakes Carriers Association agreed.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: James Martindale
Location: Niagara falls ontario
Email: jame@yahoo.com
Date: 12/7/99
Remote Name: 209.5.118.51

Comments

Its me again. I wrote this because I feel a sense of anger towards an incident in 1995 in which a young man on an expedition managed to take a photograph of a crewmembers body! Moraly, the thought of somebody taking pictures of a body is shocking. Myself,and the famillies of the dead think that this wreck is gravesite. A gravesite of some men who shoudn't have died in the first place. Whoever took that picture, I hope your'e happy with yourself!


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: James Martindale
Location: Niagara Falls Ontario
Email: jame@yahoo.com
Date: 12/7/99
Remote Name: 209.5.116.137

Comments

I think that the FITZGERALD broke in half. The reason being that the survey by the submarine CURVIII showed that apperantly cargo shifted and caused a weak point admidships. then two gigantic waves then caused the FITZ to break.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Don Peterson
Location: Marquette Mich.
Email: dkpeters@up.net
Date: 12/3/99
Remote Name: 205.242.58.236

Comments

J. B. Cooper, Master of the Arthur Anderson has to be one of the biggest players here, and certainly expremely courageous. How you turn a ship back into a gale like that must be an act of very unselfish seamanship.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Jay Gunn
Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Email: jashagu@mindspring.com
Date: 12/1/99
Remote Name: 199.174.153.111

Comments

I remember well the night that the Edmund Fitzgerald sank. It was hard for me to believe that the waters that I loved could turn and be so unforgiving. I believe that the ship hit a shoal on the downflow of a swell, began to take on water, split in half and went down in moments. May God give rest to the souls of the crew of the Edmund Fitzgerald.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Humberto Fortes
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Email: h_fortes@hotmail.com
Date: 12/1/99
Remote Name: 207.164.29.7

Comments

I think the ship broken in two. During the storm the ship's hull, pipes and ballast tanks were damaged due to the hagging and sagging moments caused by the waves.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: paul
Location: nevada
Email: sagbrushmen2@yahoo.com
Date: 12/1/99
Remote Name: 206.194.217.53

Comments

I was only a kid back in 1975 here in Nevada but what got me interested in the Edmund Fitzgerald was ,Gordon Lightfoots Song; The Wreck Of the Edmund Fitzgerald. I didn't know when I was a kid when I first heard the song that it was about an actuall shipwreck. In fact what may have got me interested in ships may have been that but I am not sure.I am a ship Buff as some may call it. I have not been at see on a ship at all. Isn't odd how things like The Titanic,the Edmund Fitzgerald and other famous shipwrecks tend to have legends of their own.. Thanks paul Nevada


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: paul
Location: nevada
Email: sagbrushmen2@yahoo.com
Date: 12/1/99
Remote Name: 206.194.217.53

Comments

I was only a kid back in 1975 here in Nevada but what got me interested in the Edmund Fitzgerald was ,Gordon Lightfoots Song; The Wreck Of the Edmund Fitzgerald. I didn't know when I was a kid when I first heard the song that it was about an actuall shipwreck. In fact what may have got me interested in ships may have been that but I am not sure.I am a ship Buff as some may call it. I have not been at see on a ship at all. Isn't odd how things like The Titanic,the Edmund Fitzgerald and other famous shipwrecks tend to have legends of their own.. Thanks paul Nevada


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: jeff
Location: owensboro,ky
Email: jhawk 42597@aol.com
Date: 11/30/99
Remote Name: 205.188.196.58

Comments

Seen it on a tv program last night, very sad to say the least..just wish i could have learned about it sooner, did any one out there know any of these men ...can,t get it off my mind for some reason.........


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Jim M.
Location: Mitchell S.D.
Email: jackcamp@jacks campers.com
Date: 11/30/99
Remote Name: 63.83.211.65

Comments

The Fitgereld was a great ship but whait I think what happend to make it sink was damage in the shull.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Dennis Halverson
Location: Moose Lake MN
Email: denhal@uswest.net
Date: 11/29/99
Remote Name: 207.109.200.97

Comments

As to the comments about not letting a crew member go out on deck, nobody in their right mind would let anyone do that in the storm they were in. With the ship having already sustained damage and the deck awash it would have amounted to suicide. Also if they would have hit a shoal it may well be possible that they didn't hear or feel it. I went through a typhoon on an aircraft carrier and unless you have experienced something like this you can not imagine all the noise being generated by the ship and the storm. May all these fine sailors rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: larry jr.
Location: duluth mn.
Email: mcurnow@bresnanlink.net
Date: 11/29/99
Remote Name: 209.32.226.166

Comments

let us not forget these vessels are put in drydock every 5 years for inspection. stress cracks happen all the time but hatches dont just cave in. also anyone who sails the lakes would not leave port without making sure to "batton all hatches" securely before leaving.because lake superior is unforgiving to those who make mistakes like this. a grand salute and a final farewell to all who have given everything on the great lakes!


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: larry jr.
Location: Duluth mn.
Email: mcurnow@bresnanlink.net
Date: 11/29/99
Remote Name: 209.32.226.166

Comments

first of all i would like to comment on what (moon)had to say:( anyone who has sailed "the lakes" knows that these vesseles quite often "rub" against any number of objects on their way up and down the great lakes.second;the fitz according to vessel ages at the time was still new; a baby if you will. mother nature can be very VERY unrelenting when november rolls in with teeth bared. there are any number of boats still plying the "lakes" today that are (it is november) much older than the fitz was. sail for kinsman one season and find out for yourself. only GOD knows for sure what happened. i have personally seen lakers limp to port with holes 136' by 9' in their bottoms granted the seas werent near so rough. please dont take anything away from the fitz or put her down because she truley was and still is one of the grand ladys of the lakes!


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Rick Johnson
Location: flinttown
Email: RCJOHNSON@IAVBBS.COM
Date: 11/29/99
Remote Name: 209.69.163.39

Comments

THE PRIOR COMMENT I READ FROM DON FROM SOMEWHERE WAS TO GIVE IT A BREAK, HEY DON, HAVE YOU EVER READ A GOOD MYSTERY BOOK AND FOUND YOURSELF LATER PICKING UP THAT SAME BOOK AND READING IT AGAIN? THE MYSTERY OF THE FITZ WILL CONTINUE ON FOR YEARS TO COME. I HAVE MY CONCLUSIONS ON WHAT HAPPENED BUT WHAT I THOUGHT MIGHT HAVE HAPPENED CHANGED WHEN I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO BECOME FRIENDS WITH A GENTLEMEN THAT DIVED THE WRECKAGE. HIS DESCIPTIONS OF HOW THE VESSEL WAS LAYING ON THE LAKE FLOOR, THE DEBRIS FIELD, AND OTHER THINGS CHANGED MY MIND ON WHAT HAPPENED. NEVER THE LESS, THE SINKING OF THE EDMUND FITZGERALD WILL BE A TOPIC OF CONVERSATION FOR YEARS TO COME. MY FAMILY IS FROM SAULT.STE.MARIE AND I VISIT THEIR ALMOST YEARLY, AND I SPEND A GREAT PORTION OF MY TIME WATCHING THESE FREIGHTERS GO IN AND OUT OF THE LOCKS, AND I STILL WONDER HOW A STORM COULD BE SO VIOLENT IT COULD HAVE BEEN THE DEMISE OF THE FITZ, AND IM SURE MANY TO THIS DAY WONDER THEMSELVES. TO THE 29 THAT GAVE THEIR LIVES THAT NOV.10TH DAY, YOU WILL ALWAYS BE THE WATCHMEN OF THE GREAT LAKES.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Don Peterson
Location: Marquette
Email: dkpeters@up.net
Date: 11/28/99
Remote Name: 205.242.58.227

Comments

Give it a rest ---- no one will ever REALLY know the cause of the sinking. Twenty five years of speculation ought to be enough.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Russ Plumb
Location: Las Vegas
Email: COGIT8R@aol.com
Date: 11/26/99
Remote Name: 205.188.200.41

Comments

The following info was abstracted from a letter prepared by Paul E. Trimble, Vice Admiral USCG (Ret.), President of Lake Carriers Association:

At 1520 hours on 11/10/75, the SS Arthur Anderson was logged abeam Michipicoten Island West End Light at a distance of 7.7 miles. Captain Cooper charted a new course of 125 degrees to clear Six Fathom Shoal north of Caribou Island and reach a point 8 miles off the Island. At that point, the Fitzgerald was 17 miles ahead of the Anderson and in the immediate vicinity of Six Fathom Shoal. Captain Cooper told the Mate on Watch that the Fitz was closer to the shoal than he wanted the Anderson to be. This point is frequently cited. What is less frequently cited is the fact that Captain Cooper made a "confidential report" to his home office following the sinking. Captain Cooper stated that he had both the Fitzgerald and Caribou Island simultaneously on his radar screen that made it possible for him to pinpoint the Fitz location. He was positive the Fitz went over the shoals. A subsequent survey of Six Fathom Shoals by the Canadian Hydrologic Service identified a shoal at a depth of less than six fathoms (36 feet) more than one mile east of any shoal cluster dipicted on the most recent navigation charts. This newly verified shoal was in the track of the Fitz as observed by Captain Cooper. In calm waters, the Fitz would have cleared the shoals by less than 9 feet but she was loaded to 27'6" and in 25 foot plus waves.

Between 1530 and 1535 hours, 10-15 minutes after the Fitz was observed in the vicinity of the shoals, Captain McSorley advised the Anderson that he had a list, some fence railing down, a loss of 2 8" ballast tack covers (but no hatch covers). Minutes after passing Six Fathom Shoal, the Fitz reported a list and her pumps were in use. If water was entering through the hatches, it is questionable if this would have induced a list because it would not be restricted to one side of the vessel. If water entered in the foreward holds, as theorized by the Coast Guard, the bow plane would have been down and the pumps located in the aft end would not have been activated.

The only scenario that fits all the facts that have been pieced together is that the Fitz was holed in the vicinity of Six Fathom Shoal and took on water in one or more ballast tanks. After initial damage caused by the shoaling, the Fitz was in constantly worsening seas for more than 3 hours. The constant rolling and pitching would have continued to damage the weakened hull and lead to the tragic sinking.

To First Mate John McCarthy, Captain Ernest McSorley, and the rest of the crew, rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Leo Ames
Location:
Email: newyorkcentral@mailexcite.com
Date: 11/25/99
Remote Name: 205.232.180.85

Comments

Bob Voss, tell that to the families of those 29 men that were lost on 11/10/75!


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Patty H
Location: Mn
Email: cepmha40@cpinternet.com
Date: 11/23/99
Remote Name: 209.240.244.23

Comments

I remember seeing the Fitz come and go from Dulutn/Superior many times. She is missed by many and may her captain and crew rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Roger Noon
Location: Chicago
Email: rnoon@hotmail.com
Date: 11/23/99
Remote Name: 199.174.160.232

Comments

I said she broke in two because of the fact that she was in such bad shape that the Coast Guard had forbidden her to sail in the Spring of 1976 without extensive repairs. The break could possibly have been caused by the grounding also. Also she had hit the Soo wall a couple of times and had other accidents. She was not "the pride of the American side". This is information I have got from the www. If anyone can contradict it please do so as I am accepting it as fact at this time.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Harvey Hansen
Location: Posen,Mi.
Email: Hansenh@alpena.cc.mi.us
Date: 11/22/99
Remote Name: 198.108.225.192

Comments

My Father Capt.Alferd Hansen Retired from the John Sherwin after 47 years at Sea Met me on my Rural Mail Rte to see if I'd heard of the sinking. His comment then was She Hit Bottom and it would take that long for Her to Sink.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Jared Ramsey
Location: St. Louis, MO
Email: jared.ramsey@att.net
Date: 11/21/99
Remote Name: 12.75.43.234

Comments

Secondly, McSorley's years of experience would have led him to send someone to inspect for the list and although not totally visible because of cargo, an experienced eye would have been able to recognize some sort of hull damage had been sustained.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Jared Ramsey
Location: St. Louis, MO
Email: jared.ramsey@att.net
Date: 11/21/99
Remote Name: 12.75.43.234

Comments

Also remember this, McSorley lost two hatch covers which to me indicates a sudden fierce blow to the hull of the ship which in turn punctured a ballast tank and the pressure from the ballast tank rupture blew the hatch covers off. This would/did account for the list McSorley reported.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: scott lee
Location: west  manchester   ohio
Email: skl@infinet.com
Date: 11/20/99
Remote Name: 216.28.55.194

Comments

ok people,,,think about it , how can a hatch cover of that size and weight move even at a pitch of 45 degrees. now think about how much money the gov't saved by covering up the fact that the boat stuck bottom. the shoal was "uncharted"


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: scott lee
Location: west amnchester oh
Email: skl@infinet.com
Date: 11/20/99
Remote Name: 216.28.55.194

Comments

ok people,,,think about it , how can a hatch cover of that size and weight move even at a pitch of 45 degrees. now think about how much money the gov't saved by covering up the fact that the boat stuck bottom. the shoal was "uncharted"


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Pat Waldron
Location: Muskegon, Michigan
Email: bevpb1375@aol.com
Date: 11/19/99
Remote Name: 152.163.207.84

Comments

I think the Fitz hit the shoal the Berniw Cooper said they did. I even think that McSorley the captian knew he was going to or knew that he hit that shoal and that it was going to sink after that moment. Its too bad, I never got to see the Fitz because I am only 17 years old but I read every book there is about her at Barnes and Noble. I've got the song and listen to it night and day. I bet she was very beautiful when she was a float and still is in Superior. I went to Whitefish in 1995 and was standing 17 miles away form where she lay and I was so thrilled.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Pat Waldron
Location: Muskegon, Michigan
Email: bevpb1375@aol.com
Date: 11/19/99
Remote Name: 152.163.207.84

Comments

I think the Fitz hit the shoal the Berniw Cooper said they did. I even think that McSorley the captian knew he was going to or knew that he hit that shoal and that it was going to sink after that moment. Its too bad, I never got to see the Fitz because I am only 17 years old but I read every book there is about her at Barnes and Noble. I've got the song and listen to it night and day. I bet she was very beautiful when she was a float and still is in Superior. I went to Whitefish in 1995 and was standing 17 miles away form where she lay and I was so thrilled.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Sue Raker
Location:
Email: sraker@up.net
Date: 11/18/99
Remote Name: 208.16.240.208

Comments

The morning after that storm I heard about it on Armed Forces Radio, in a place far away that I hope I never see again! I will never forget how suddenly I was taken 'home' by the words of the newscaster, and later, a fellow soldier. But, if Gordon Lightfoot hadn't written that song, I think it would be relegated to the same historical chapter as the Bradley, the Rogers City and other ships. It was the fury of the wind gusts and the suddeness of the loss of life that combined with the ballad to make a "mystery". Since then, a plethora of romantic 'what-ifs' and 'how come' have flourished. Hats off to all who work on the water, and the skill of those who keep 'em going...no mystery, just hard work.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: SAM
Location: PORT AUSTIN,MI
Email: DIDNTPAYEMAIL@BILL
Date: 11/18/99
Remote Name: 209.252.121.108

Comments

WHAT ABOUT THE BRADLEY,MORRELL AND THE TOWNSEND? THE SHIP COULD HAVE STRUCTURALLY FAILED (CRACKED) AND TAKEN ON WATER EVENTUALLY SINKING AND BREAKING APART ON STRIKING THE BOTTEM.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: plokl,'l]]llkll(confidentiol)
Location: (confidentiol)
Email: confidentiol
Date: 11/17/99
Remote Name: 207.229.13.134

Comments

I never new that! i picked the last one.whoops!


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Mike Roosevelt
Location: Wausau, Wi
Email: roostrain@aol.com
Date: 11/15/99
Remote Name: 152.163.213.73

Comments

From 3:30, or sometime prior, the Fitz was taking on water and had topside damage. Probably from a shoaling, stress fracture of the hull, or what if a hatch had come off in the rough seas. If not toatlly off at least partially open to the point large amounts of water were pouring through. Why did someone want to go on deck and Capt. McSorley tell them no? We'll never have all the answers. Rest in peace crew of the Edmund Fitzgerald and my condolences to the families.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Bob Voss
Location: Iron City, MI
Email: bigbob@rc.freedom.net
Date: 11/15/99
Remote Name: 198.111.2.12

Comments

I too have grown up on Lake Superior and I think the lake is a tad over rated. I've been on it during storms and it doesn't get THAT bad...not like some ocean during a hurricane(which I've been on a typhoon before). I think poeple who've never been on the lake should stop telling us all how dangerous and bad it is. The Fitz broke up becuze it his some rocks...nothing more and no great mystery. People sholud stop always talking about it...it's not the Titanic!


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Kevin M Gough
Location: Springfield Ontario
Email: goombah@kanservu.ca
Date: 11/15/99
Remote Name: 216.129.36.111

Comments

As a certified structural steel welder and having many discussions with engineers on problems that arise on the shop floor one thing stands out the most- integrity!!!! materials have abilities to withstand multiple stresses if engineers specify the right material and if workers follow the proper procedures and end users follow the guidelines and specifications of the engineer- we buy cars expecting them to be safe and they are engineered by people who want them to be operated in the way they designed them- the government legislates laws to ensure that both parties are doing thier job- unfortunately the crew of the Fitzgerald became victims to this system because there were enough failures that occured that night [ radar, the Whitefish Beacon, structural, loading,etc]that contributed to the demise of this great and mighty freighter.The captain a seasoned veteran of the lake would have a small amount of complaicancy of the situation but would still be mindful of the hazards-He would not have decided to go for the North shore had He not been through something like this before,once realizing what He was in was nothing like He had been in before and not having the resources He should have had [radar and shore communication and location data ] did what He could- and that is what He only knew to do-work through it and advise His crew accordinly[ don't go on deck ]-why would He say that? We will never know [ remember-He had seen storms like this before-Like a Sergeant-Major who knows his men someone would be scared enough to do so, He knew what would happen if they did ]-I am convinced after all of my research on this incident and hearing radio interviews from individuals on the Woodridge as well as on the web that the ship indeed broke apart based on many factors that relate back to the structural integrity of the hull [ which had been repaired on two major occaisions] It makes me think more seriously of my job welding buildings that people will occupy-by cutting corners or trying to fulfill a quota to keep my job COULD end up costing lives- I'd rather be on welfare than to be a slave to profits.

A moment of silence-NO, A moment of ME saying thankyou to the families of the Fitz and ALL others [veterans,friends,families and associates who have lost someone dear who was just doing thier job- to THOSE WHO DID LOSE THIER LIVES TO TRY AND MAKE OURS BETTER- tearfully THANKYOU- Lest We Forget!!!!!! There is a roof over my head, there is food in my stomach and clothes on my back and the same for my children thanks to you, and by the Grace of God so be it for those you left behind, forget them not kmg


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Cheryl
Location: Lansing, MI
Email: Cherylf@worldnet.att.net
Date: 11/14/99
Remote Name: 12.76.68.147

Comments

Being born and raised in the U.P. of Michigan and having been on all the Great Lakes in Michigan, I can tell you one thing...I have been on Lake Superior....And that is one massive lake in Michigan you don't want to mess with. That massive body of water is so powerful in Lake Superior (different than the other Great Lakes)...and so strong...it's amazing....In fact, you can stand on the shore on Lake Superior and on a windy day with little waves, it can knock your socks off. You don't mess with Lake Superior...the waves are huge coming in on shore at times and the weather changes quickly out in Lake Superior (very fast). God Bless the 29 men that went down. That's history and I don't think anything negative should be said about it...We don't know what happened for sure (there were no survivors, and we may never know). One of my friend's ... well their father was one of the men that went down in that shipwreck. We will never know what happened to the Fitz, but I believe Lake Superior had a very large role in the sinking of the ship.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Cliff Stockman
Location: Erie Mich.
Email: cliff325@yahoo.com
Date: 11/13/99
Remote Name: 209.81.184.148

Comments

The one good thing to come of this, is the fact that more Capts. will drop the hook now. If that had happened we wouldn't be wondering about it now. REST IN PEACE GUYS YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: David French
Location: MN
Email: Frenchy104@aol.com
Date: 11/13/99
Remote Name: 205.188.199.46

Comments

Okay this topic always seems to ignite debate and without a solid explanation we will always talk about it (Appears part of human nature). First what can we prove. Well the Fitz sank (DUH!) and 29 lives were lost. She most have taken on water in order to sink. Now what strikes me is that first if the ballast tanks were damaged the ship would be fine since pumps could fend off the water, therefore we know water got into the hold. I believe it was water got there from under the waterline therefore she bottomed out and had a stress fracture or shoaled I lean towards a stress fracture as I feel that it would cause a vent rail to collapse. Regardless we all then know the water forced the Fitzgerald to the lake floor sometime later. I believe she broke after striking the floor bow first otherwise the cargo would have been dumped all over the place. Bow damage seems to support this as well. This is my opinion, respect it as I have done with all before and after but lest we forget that nothing will ever make up for this, and all we can do now is preserve the memory be it through service, song, salute or a bell tolling. To The 29 men lost on November 10th 1975, rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: John Hoeldke
Location: Orangeville,Ontario
Email: hoeldke@hurontario.net
Date: 11/12/99
Remote Name: 209.135.104.198

Comments

Given the history of stuctural repairs done over the life of this vessel and the winter work list to be completed , its no suprise when you are in the worst Great Lakes storm in recent memory. Lets not forget the uncharted shoals or the sea stae at the time of this tragic loss.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: J.F. Boutin
Location: Lévis, QC
Email: jean-francois_boutin@agora.ulaval.ca
Date: 11/12/99
Remote Name: 132.215.56.215

Comments

The Fitzgerald disaster was awful, but life did go on and almost everybody, ironically, forgot about this mess, as usual... except families, friends and Great Lakes boatnerds, for God sake. I was 4 years old when the drama occured but, as a Quebecer, nobody told me about the wreckage until I started to surf on the WEB, three years ago. Thank you all for keeping the memory of a very badlucky crew. There's a strong taboo in the maritime industry about drownings at sea. Big Old Fitz is as taboo as Group Desgagnés' AIGLE OCÉAN is... Mariners hate to speak about a lost vessel and lost friends. Aigle Ocean was a small freighter which sank about the same time as the Fitz, in a freezing Labrador coast squall. What is terrible about this tragedy is the fact that people onboard a CCG icebreaker, unable to get as close to recue the drowing vessel in a totaly insane ocean, was able to film the sinking LIVE! I saw, last year, these terifying images of five mariners trying to escape death on a reversed lifeboat as their ship was fastly heading for the bottom... This downed me for a couple of days... I felt like a jerk, well installed in front a t.v. screen, looking with disguss - but safely - at this no mercy fate... This VIDEO TAPE is TABOOED around here. Don't ever ask a Desgagnés experienced sailor about Aigle Ocean, because you'll end up with a kick in the face or, worst, a big guy crying like a baby because he luckyly did survive the sinking... Aigle Ocean is tabooed. The video is only available by underground linking... So, as these images come back to mind, I'm thinking about 29 men left all alone with wind, waves rain, snow, a very cold lake - a sea... - and a few seconds... A few seconds before leaving everybody on the shore forever... A few seconds waiting for the body to drink an ocean, to silencely freeze, to stop slowly blood from moving... A few seconds of maelstorm, not enought time for a last prayer... Hey boatfriends, sailors died that november night. Mens with soul, spirit, courage, family... So, when we speak about about shoals, waves and hatches, let's not ever forget about some last few seconds... (Sorry for my bad English, but I'm French speaking...)


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Rob Citino
Location: Ypsilanti, MI
Email: rcitino@online.emich.edu
Date: 11/12/99
Remote Name: 164.76.22.170

Comments

Interesting that the NTSB report finding (which spoke of catastrophic failure of one or more hatch covers) isn't even listed as one of the possibilities in your survey. It's simply too implausible. Equally implausible is the notion that one of the most experienced masters on the Great Lakes would have bottomed out without reporting it to anyone. I have no answer.

May the "crew and good captain" rest in peace. And a special prayer for Captain Cooper on the "Anderson"--a true hero.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Peter A.
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
Email: paustgen@yahoo.com
Date: 11/11/99
Remote Name: 206.141.246.124

Comments

My opinion is that she probably went through 6 fathom shoal area, sustained damaged and when she entered the squall, she must have taken a dive when a wave picked her up from the stern, and she plowed into an oncoming wave and because of the water taken on, could not recover. As for the break, probably occured when she went under or when she hit the bottom. But I still wonder when Captain Mcsorly yelled " Don't let anybody on deck!!" if it was a crewman wanting to tell of an emergency downbelow. But why would anybody go on deck w/ rails down in those seas? May there be 29 seconds of silence for her brave crew and families.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: bmellstead
Location: Sandusky, MI
Email: bmellstead@hotmail.com
Date: 11/11/99
Remote Name: 204.254.122.200

Comments

All of the theories are well founded. Could have been the leaky hatches, the bad chart or just high seas. What is ignored is the mystery of Lake Superior. Anyone who spends time on the Great Lakes knows they are predictable and very dangerous. I've seen 6-foot waves come up in minutes. And, just as quickly, fog come in that negated vision. There is something mysterious about the the biggest of the big lakes that may cause us to never know the truth about the Fitz. But I know this, as I looked out over Lake Huron yesterday, I got a tear in my eye remembering 24 years ago. Amen.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: john Ruehle
Location: reno, Nevada
Email: john@eurosec.reno.nv.us
Date: 11/11/99
Remote Name: 207.228.2.216

Comments

I know it is one day after the disaster 24 years ago. may the memory of the valiant crew and ship continue to be remembered. I agree with some of the other people, let us have 29 seconds of silence for the crew and thier families. Rest in peace Gentlemen.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Mike Bennett
Location: Chatham, Ont.
Email: chathamnews&cha.southam.ca
Date: 11/11/99
Remote Name: 204.101.86.49

Comments

Just a thought ... what would do you suppose the fate of the Edmund Fitzgerald be today, Nov. 10, 1999, had she survived that storm in 1975? Would she have been lengthened and coverted to a self-unloader? Would she be next on the tug-barge conversion? Or, would she have wound up like her sister the Homer, sold for scrap overseas? She was a young 17 years old in 1975 but she would be 40 today. Hard to believe. Rest in peace, gentlemen, and special wishes to all families of the 29.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Doug Hollister
Location: Toledo OH
Email: Doug86@softhome.net
Date: 11/11/99
Remote Name: 209.81.184.240

Comments

There is no way the ship broke in two because there is about 200 feet missing.Of 729 feet, 511 feet was found. If it struck the bottom,they would have felt it. The ship couldn't have taken a nose dive because the weight of the ship would have slammed it into the bottom hard enough to disinagrate the front end.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: kc
Location: ontario
Email: theclakes@goldennet.ca
Date: 11/10/99
Remote Name: 209.183.133.93

Comments

I was on Huron the day the Fitz went down...it was a ride on all the lakes...our captain 15 hours before while we were hauling down lake huron off Cove Island light heard the weather report for Superior (19886)and said..."What a good night to be in Whitefish Bay". Indeed it was...after the storm we too needed several hatch clamps repaired because that was the initial reaction as to why the Fitz went down...but as the chatter went on for days and weeks after and then the hearings there is no doubt in my mind that she bottomed out...whether the captain knew or not..he probably did not..he was making for Whitefish Bay...taking on water as he went...as to the reported list perhaps either water in his tanks or shifted cargo...most possible with a load of pellets and a trailing sea. Then in that area of Superior it is as if with a North West gale that there is a triple sea working the hull. The trailing wave and the return from the CDN and Mich shores...all combined with one last wave over the stern and she didn't have the ability to fight her way back to the surface. A terrible loss of a ship and crew that to most who sailed at that time..if the Fitz were goin by all would stop and watch her go by.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: JC Wills
Location: Chicago, IL
Email: wide_out@yahoo.com
Date: 11/10/99
Remote Name: 216.214.203.75

Comments

Rest in Peace Big FITZ and Crew!!

29 second of silence


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Tom Bradley
Location: Grand Rapids, Mich
Email: calypso @dnx.net
Date: 11/10/99
Remote Name: 207.142.171.116

Comments

After living 10 years in Marquette by the ore docks and seeing these beauties come and go,it is my opinion that the mighty Fitz struck 6 fathom shoal because they were using out of date charts.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Leo Ames
Location:
Email: newyorkcentral@mailexcite.com
Date: 11/10/99
Remote Name: 205.232.174.70

Comments

What ever happened to the Fitz's sister ship Arthur B. Hormer. Is it still in service or scrapped?


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: BigFitz
Location: S. Illinois
Email: jkomjathy@hotmail.comm
Date: 11/10/99
Remote Name: 198.31.112.7

Comments

Just to say I have been thinking of the Fitz and her crew. It's 6:00 your time God bless the crew. Rest in peace Fitz.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: barry bertram malysiak
Location: chicago
Email: barryrexb@prodigy.net
Date: 11/10/99
Remote Name: 209.254.80.129

Comments

I always have a somber feeling on this date. It's interesting that the Fitz carries so much more emotional cargo than more recent wrecks of larger ships such as Derbyshire or the Estonia. Perhaps it's because of the song or maybe just because she was such a beautiful boat. My theory is along those of the majority: she bottomed out and began taking on water. I was not aware, however, of the keelson damage. Finally, I do not suspect Capt. McSorley was aware of the severity of the problem until it was past hope of recovery. Moreover, given the conditions and locations, there's not much else he could have done otherwise than to make a run for Whitefish Bay. So, I respectfully disagree with comment below regarding his pride. In any event, may God watch over the Fitz' crew and all sailors and travelors everywhere.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Norm
Location: Neebish Island
Email: scottn@inet.elps.k12.mi.us
Date: 11/10/99
Remote Name: 207.73.200.76

Comments

Can't help but think of you and your great crew on this sad day old Fitz. Thanks for all the full salutes as you slowly passed our shore...you continue to be sorely missed.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Mike
Location: GA
Email: mluly@bellsouth.net
Date: 11/10/99
Remote Name: 216.78.42.51

Comments

Apologize for computer glitch. Also to be included below was:

Frederick J. Beetcher- Porter Nolan F. Church- Porter

Rest in Peace Gentleman


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Mike
Location: GA
Email: mluly@bellsouth.net
Date: 11/10/99
Remote Name: 216.78.42.51

Comments

Ernest M. McSorley- Captain John H. McCarthy- 1st Mate James A. Pratt- 2nd Mate Michael E. Armagost- 3rd Mate George Holl- Chief Engineer Edward F. Bindon- 1st Asst. Engineer Thomas E. Edwards- 2nd Asst. Engineer Russell G. Haskell- 2nd Asst. Engineer Oliver J. Champeau- 3rd Asst. Engineer Robert C. rafferty- Steward Allen G. Kalmon- 2nd Cook John D. Simmons- Wheelsman Eugene W. O'Brien- Wheelsman John J. Poviach- Wheelsman Ransom E. Cundy- Watchman William J. Spengler- Watchman Karl A. Peckol- Watchman Thomas D. Borgeson- Maintenance Man Mark A. Thomas- Deckhand Paul M. Riippa- Deckhand Bruce L. Hudson- Deckhand David E. Weiss- Cadet Blaine H. Wilhelm- Oiler Ralph G. Walton- Oiler Thomas Bentsen- Oiler Joseph W. Mazes- Special Maintenence Man Gordon F. MacLellan- Wiper

May these sailors rest in eternal peace--- 11/10/75


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: John E McCarthy
Location: Westlake, Ohio
Email: daricemc@msn.com
Date: 11/10/99
Remote Name: 4.20.74.62

Comments

From all I have read and have heard, the Fitz had taken on a lot of water, (from what source is the mystery, and will remain so ). Captain Cooper reported a rogue wave running through his ship on down toward the Fitgerald. If that was the case, the already injured Fitz, laying low in the water was struck on the stern by the rogue wave, the nose was pushed down, the cargo and accumuated water in the cargo hold shifted forward causing the steep and sudden dive. If she broke up on the surface the parts of the ship would not have been as close to each other on the bottom or in the same relationship to one another as they were found. If she would have struck bottom, you would think you would have found some indications of impact or contact along the exposed aft section....none was found. God Bless all twenty-nine men.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Mike Kotwica
Location: Memphis, Mi
Email: mkotwica@hotmail.com
Date: 11/10/99
Remote Name: 209.187.233.130

Comments

I've read almost every book on the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald and I believe she hit 6 fathom shoal


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Leo Ames
Location: Potsdam, NY
Email: newyorkcentral@mailexcite.com
Date: 11/9/99
Remote Name: 205.232.181.210

Comments

The only logical explanation in my opinion is she bottomed out when she struck 6 fathom shoal. Hard to believe the "Big Fitz" has been gone 24 years now.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Brandon Snyder
Location: L'Anse MI
Email: snyderb@hotmail.com
Date: 11/9/99
Remote Name: 208.33.225.25

Comments

I have read almost all of the books and expert opinions on the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald. It is very clear to me that she hit a shoal and ripped a hole in the hull. I have always wondered what were they thinking? Hatch covers? I think they were trying to cover for having a "bad chart." The evidence is there that she hit a shoal. Captain Cooper said that the "Fitz" was much closer to that shoal than he wanted his ship to be. This testimony is from a seasoned captain who sailed for many years. Why did the review boards disregard this comment? There again to cover thier own. It is obsurd that these men did not take human life before thier own personal inhibitions. I also wonder why captains are so pride oriented. Captain McSorly (God rest his soul) should have realized that 29 people were going to die because his pride would not let him report damage. God bless all who lost thier lives on the lakes.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Lou Giordano
Location: San Diego, Ca
Email: lgio@sprynet.com
Date: 11/9/99
Remote Name: 209.86.202.25

Comments

I've read some interesting ideas and many seem to reach the same conclusion, that the Fitzgerald probably bottomed out on the six fathom shoal. For if the weather conditions alone were of the severity to bring down the Fitzgerald then the Anderson should have went down and perhaps many other vessels that were on the lake that night should have gone down too. As the ship took on water, each wave impacted her that much more. Recovery time becomes less and less and eventually the ship goes in bow first. I don't know much about the hatch covers but I'd lie to know how many wrecks have resulted from loose hatch covers.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Marc Findlay
Location: Joliet IL
Email: msfind@mediaone.net
Date: 11/8/99
Remote Name: 24.29.224.105

Comments

The first mate on the Anderson saw a radar plot that showed the Fitz very close to the shoal. The captain of the Anderson, who was in the same storm, stated that the Fitz was too close to the 6 fathom shoal--case closed!!!


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: J.J. Clarke
Location: Sooke, B.C.
Email: fragman@coastnet.com
Date: 11/8/99
Remote Name: 206.87.35.117

Comments

Had the Fitzgerald been equipped with rapid deployment,free fall lifeboats, backed up with regular "abandon ship"drills for the crew, this and many other shipping tragedies could well be averted.

A ship owner must keep on top of all new safety enhancing technology in order to assure safe passage for the people and cargo in his or her charge. That is prioity ONE!

The installation of free-fall,rapid deployment lifeboats(Like the Norsafe 40 designs used in North Sea oil rigs)would greatly reduce the deaths of crews at sea.

We have a motto in our West Coast shipyards,"Shit flows uphill!" In other words,crews should bone up on safety technology and empress their knowledge on to the captain, who MUST express this vital need to the shipping company. There is no voyage worth dying for, except death itself!


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Linda
Location: Lakeport, MI
Email: stocarcs@advnet.net
Date: 11/8/99
Remote Name: 206.137.188.91

Comments

In answer to the question about the book by Paul Edmund Hainault, the MTU professor: it is titled "All About The Singing of the Sirens that Sank the FITZ" copyright 1979 and 1996. Publisher: Don Hermanson, Keweenaw Productions, P.O. Box 665, Houghton, MI 49931. The Superior Shoal is the indicated grounding location in this book. I believe the professor has the closest to correct theory as to the demise of the Fitzgerald. Sympathies to the families of the 29.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: bobby riddell
Location: edmonton alberta
Email: bobbyriddell@home.com
Date: 11/8/99
Remote Name: 24.64.3.91

Comments

All the speculation in the world will not bring back Big Fitz and her brave crew.Lets concentrate instead on making ships safer for the men and women plying their trade on the great lakes.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Vern Sondak
Location: Ann Arbor MI
Email: vsondak@umich.edu
Date: 11/8/99
Remote Name: 141.214.188.71

Comments

I saw the book by Michigan Tech professor Hainault on the "engineering" aspects of the wreckage referred to by a previous message. Unfortunately, I didn't buy it on the spot but just read a few chapters while my wife shopped figuring I'd come across it again later, and I never did. It is compelling reading. He states, as other messages have said, that Six Fathoms Shoal was subsequently surveyed and did not appear to be as shallow as feared at the location where the Fitz crossed. Plus, as others have stated, there was evidence of a long accumulation of water. The concept of the Fitzgerald shoaling much earlier than previously thought has a great deal of merit - and would explain all the factors cited by the "leaky hatch cover" proponents as well as all the items favoring the bottom damage theory. Remember that the Fitz did not have a depth finder, so shoaling could theoretically have occurred anywhere along the course. By the way, if anyone has the full name of that book, please put it out there for us! Vern Sondak


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: jrb
Location: u.p.,mi.
Email: bradcrew@cybrz.com
Date: 11/8/99
Remote Name: 207.250.143.150

Comments

Was on the lake that day working aboard the Frantz. Remember all of us thinking it could have been any boat in the fleet more likely than the Fitz. Will always think about them and their families each Nov.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Mark Morphet
Location: Montreal, Canada
Email: morphet1@hotmail.com
Date: 11/7/99
Remote Name: 205.151.225.202

Comments

I think with out question that she bottomed out and took on water til-neurtal bouyancy and then took a dive.....no distress signal..


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Brian  McCune
Location: Lakeside, Ohio
Email: Silverstack@cros.net
Date: 11/7/99
Remote Name: 216.206.238.250

Comments

What about the fact that she was overloaded? How many times did the add a strap here and a stiffner there so they could raise here load lines. Wouldn't being overloaded cause her to loose her natural flex?


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Jim Sutton
Location: Houston,Tx
Email: Sigos@aol.com
Date: 11/7/99
Remote Name: 171.209.54.85

Comments

I too agree with the bottoming out theory. This seems to be verified by the radar observations aboard the ANDERSON by Capt. Cooper and 1/M Clark. In addition the capability of taconite to absorb water may have resulted in a condition whereas the Fitz may have encountered a large enough wave where she had lost so much reserve bouyancy that she simply took the dive rather than ride up onto the crest of the wave as most vessels should. As far as the hatches and the keelson does any one know if any other vessels of the class(ARTHUR B. HOMER coming to mind) had sustained similar damages through out the course of their service life. Please take a moment on the 10th to remember the men on the FITZ,especially those of us who sail,whether on the lakes,inland rivers or deep sea!!!


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: BigFitz
Location: S. Illinios
Email: jkomjathy@hotmail.com
Date: 11/7/99
Remote Name: 198.31.112.7

Comments

It is all about Six Fathom Shoals and a BAD CHART. No one knew that they hit anythnig. The ship was rocking and rolling with waves crashing all over. The legend lives on.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Charles H.Goodspeed
Location: Buffalo NY
Email: capolisale@aol.com
Date: 11/6/99
Remote Name: 152.170.191.8

Comments

I think she bottomed out and her pumps couldnt keep up.This plus the power of the big Superior made for a bad time.May the souls of the 29 rest in peace.Fair weather and following seas.Semper Paratus


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Ted Coombs
Location: St. Thomas
Email: ccoombs@gtn.com
Date: 11/5/99
Remote Name: 209.167.110.67

Comments

There has never been any doubt in my mind that the Edmond Fitzgerald bottomed out. The Coast Guard, Insurance Companys, and Governments could not afford to admit that the maps were wrong.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Steve
Location: IN
Email: captain_gbuster@hotmail.com
Date: 11/5/99
Remote Name: 208.170.70.109

Comments

The Fitz (in my opinion) was stressed by rolling over the waves. Her hull was thereby weakened. She rode to the top of and over a large wave to the point of "looking" straight down at the surface of Superior. The next wave would not allow her to be righted and she dove toward the bottom. The resistive force of the water as she began to submarine snapped the weakened hull as she dove, but did not break completely in two until she hit the bottom. The torque of the propeller rotated the other half. This is my opinion, based upon reading and my knowledge of physics. I do not pretend to KNOW the cause, but the simplest explanation is usually the right one. One thing I do know: 29 men died. Thousands of others have died on the water doing their jobs. Let's remember them all.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Kurt Schwoppe
Location: Woodbridge, VA
Email: schwoppe@erols.com
Date: 11/5/99
Remote Name: 207.172.73.27

Comments

The most compelling evidence in the sinking of the Fitzgerald is the fact that significant hatch and hatch coaming repairs were conducted on the Fitzgerald during the previous winter lay-up, and additional repairs of a similar nature had already been scheduled for the lay-up that was approaching. During a shipping season, the hatch system takes a serious beating (especially in the days of Hulett unloaders), but rather than taking a ship out of commission to repair any damages, it is very clear that hatch work repair at Oglebay was routinely delayed until the winter lay-up. It is important to note that the Coast Guard report blamed this maintenance shortfall on the company, not the crew of the Fitz.

Each hatch cover has over 60 clamps to hold it down. The Naval Architects put those clamps there because they are needed! As each clamp is about a foot apart, damage to a given area would likely effect a number of contiguous clamps. The power of water is such to exploit any weakness, and after hours of continuous solid green water flowing over her deck, a small amount of damage, especially in a corner, could readily have resulted in additional clamp failures and a buckled hatch. We all know that the chain is only as strong as its weakest link.

The possibility of grounding on Six Fathoms Shoals is intriguing, but highly improbable. While the actual course of both the Anderson and Fitz cannot be determined, we do know that both ships had a very accurate fix of no more than 3 miles off the West End of Michipicoten Island. If one were to plot the straight line course from this location to the Whitefish Point buoy (141 degrees), the closest distance anywhere along this course to the recently charted known edge of Six Fathoms Shoal, is over seven miles! If the Fitz had been tracking a course to get within striking distance of Six Fathom, that would mean Cpt. McSorley had set a course for Crisp Point versus Whitefish Point, or 22 miles west of his intended destination.

The Lake Carriers Association overly strong endorsement of the Six Fathoms Shoal Theory was most likely an attempt to avoid costly mid-season repairs or expensive modifications to the hatch system on the Freighters. They were probably very nervous that the Coast Guard would declare any vessel with faulty hatch covers unseaworthy. It was more convenient to put the blame on the navigational error of a dead man rather than an inadequate maintenance program commonly practiced by many of the Lake Carriers at the time of the loss of the Fitzgerald.

May God bless the men of the Fitzgerald. If there is an Internet Link in Heaven, I am sure they all spend a great deal of time on Neal's terrific site.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: sailor
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Email: so what
Date: 11/5/99
Remote Name: 207.142.109.67

Comments

That boat shouldn't have been there in the first place. It's sinking illustrated everything that could've gone wrong that evening and it slipped through every safety net to prove what was wrong with the whole system of sailing on the lakes during a storm in the first place.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Randy Travis
Location: Seattle Wa.
Email: eee@zzz.com
Date: 11/4/99
Remote Name: 208.230.117.44

Comments

He was at the wrong place at the wrong time. Loaded and large swells, left no room for safe navigation. Fence, bulworks down would be a good indicator that his hull had Flexed. I ponder the Anderson's Fence rail? Maybe their Wire Rope (Cable) Fence had more strands, or thier Hull did not Flex to the extent of the Fitzgerald. How long had they been pumping water, at some point they had to draw some sort of conclusion. This incident as others is tragic.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Kimberly
Location: Marquette, MI
Email: AuSable29@aol.com
Date: 11/4/99
Remote Name: 152.163.201.57

Comments

As the future wife of a sailor, I think about my fiancee every time a storm batters the shores of Lake Superior, and I pray to God that he keeps him safe. When I think about the surviving family members and friends of the 29 men who were lost on the Edmund Fitzgerald, I can only imagine the pain they have experienced. For the past 24 years we have kept this mystery alive...what caused this ship to sink? Was it the hatch covers? The sixth famoth shoal?? In the end, all that matters is that 29 men lost their lives. Let these souls and their families at last, rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Ken Boerman
Location: West Michigan
Email: electric@altelco.net
Date: 11/4/99
Remote Name: 206.150.119.178

Comments

I wish that I knew the reason Master McSorely, during his radio transmission, said "Dont let nobody out on deck". No one would even consider going on deck in a storm of that magnitude without a clear and imminent threat to the ship. remember - one fence rail (hand hold) was alredy down. It leads one to speculate that they knew they were in trouble, but did not understand the severity of the situation. It also makes me think if we kne2w why someone was desperate to go on deck, we would know why the Fitz was lost Rest in peace, gentlemen, rest in peace.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Brian Johnson
Location: Kingston  ON
Email: appajohn@kingston.net
Date: 11/4/99
Remote Name: 205.210.52.208

Comments

Considering that the ship was not very old however, on Oct. 31, 1975 she was found to have damaged hatch coamings yet permitted to sail. Capt McSorley reported a list! I believe she was taking on water and the combined weight at these pressure points contributed to structure damage and sudden hull fracture.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Brent Westwood
Location: Martinsville, Virginia
Email: bwes@kimbanet.com
Date: 11/4/99
Remote Name: 208.6.38.96

Comments

As an amature "structural engineer" it is my belief that the "Fitz" was taken down by a massive cracked hull. Her span was such (between two massive waves) that she simply couldn't contain the tremendious concentric loads placed somewhere in the middle to that ship. Judging by the way she was built and the way she is laying at the bottom....cracked in two....it seems to make alot of sense. I wish that I could study the "fractures" alittle more closely, however. I still miss her after all these years....God Bless that brave crew!!


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Ned Gang
Location: Elyria , Oh
Email: mnfish@eriecoast.com
Date: 11/3/99
Remote Name: 209.115.126.65

Comments

According to Ret Coast Guard Capt. Chas. Millret they checked all of shoals near the Fitz coarse and camera showed no marks or damage done. Also Capt. Mc Thorley told Capt.Cooper on the Anderson that he had been taking on water all the way across Superior.He told Capt. Cooper in their last communication that he had a list. The logical answer is that he was taking 25to50 footers all day and the night before.Was a known fact that the type hatch she had if damage was done to the combing It would allow water to wash into cargo hold until fixed. The cameras used to observe the wreck show the combing damage on several hatches. She was listing and down by the nose. Three large waves hit her from astern and her nose went down and by the third wave she was like a submarine diving. Her nose hit bottom and with load in her belly it twisted and broke up with load scattering and stern landing upside down. Th forward end settled down right side up.The pictures taken show the damage to the pilothouse and smashed steering pole as it drove into the bottom.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Richard Jenkins
Location: Boston, MA
Email: rjenkins24@hotmail.com
Date: 11/3/99
Remote Name: 152.206.131.193

Comments

Back when I was a tourguide on the William A. Irvin in Duluth, the question I was asked most often was "How does this ship compare to the Edmund Fitzgerald". The answer was that the Fitz was around 120 feet longer, 15 feet wider, could hold almost twice the cargo, and was 20 years younger... and the Irvin still floats. Usually at this point we were standing amidships on the Irvin's spar deck, and people would look around in awe trying to picture the size of the Fitz and how a ship that big could be taken down by Lake Superior's fury. Then the inevitable question would follow: "Why did the Fitzgerald sink?"

I personally believe that she hit bottom on Six Fathom Shoal. I don't think that she simply broke up on the surface, because as somebody else pointed out here, the Anderson was out there too, and she was longer, narrower, had a lower freeboard, and was a few years older. She had only recently been lengthened, making her 120 feet longer than her designers intended. If either ship was going to break up in that storm, it would most likely have been the Anderson. That pretty much narrows it down to the hatch theory or the shoal theory.

Basically we have two sides here, each backing their own theory, and each with something to lose if you belive the other. If the Fitzgerald's hatches were in bad shape, then stricter regulations would prevent a similar disaster in the future... and cost the members of the Lake Carriers Association a lot of money. On the other hand, bottoming out on Six Fathom Shoal would have been a result of inaccurate charts (at that time, Six Fathom Shoal had not been mapped since 1919) or inadequate aids to navigation, which places at least some of the blame on the Coast Guard. Who to believe is pretty much a matter of opinion, but from what I gather, most of the people who were out there that night (including Capt. Cooper of the Anderson) believed that she went over the shoal.

With her bottom damaged, the Fitzgerald gradually flooded and lost freeboard, until she finally nosed into a larger-than-usual wave and never recovered. Still being diven on by her 7,000 horsepower engine, her bow plowed into the bottom with such force that her midsection disintegrated, and the torque from her propeller flipped the stern section over before it came to rest on the bottom.

While we discuss the Fitzgerald, let's keep in mind that some other big anniversaries are coming up this month, too. The Big Storm of 1913, the Armistice Day Storm, the Carl D. Bradley, the Daniel J. Morrell, just to name a few. But it's always the Big Fitz that seems to capture the imagination. In that way it is a lot like Titanic, a disaster which still remains very much in the public consciousness to this day while ships like the Empress of Ireland (which actually lost more passengers than Titanic) or the Estonia (900+ victims less than 5 years ago) are largely forgotten. I think it's important while we remember the 29 men who perished on the Fitzgerald that night, that we not forget the countless others who have lost their lives on our Inland Seas.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Rick Hulme
Location: Asheville, NC
Email: rickhulme@msn.com
Date: 11/3/99
Remote Name: 63.25.62.147

Comments

I was stationed in the Coast Guard Duluth station when the Fitzgerald went down and was part of a rescue attempted from there. We could not even get out of the Duluth entry that noght due to the heavy seas. I had toured the Fitzgerald on a couple of occasions and had met some of the crew. I think the tremendous stresses caused by the quartering sea may have broken her up or run her bow under and caused her to breakup as she drove down. I think some damage may have preexisted from grounding, but alone don't believe that to have been sufficient to cause her to sink. We will probably never know the full story, but I gained a new respect for the Lake that night and never felt totally invulnerable aboard ship or boat again. Rest in peace gentlemen.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Ryan Kenny
Location: Saginaw, MI
Email: Spud402@aol.com
Date: 11/3/99
Remote Name: 205.188.193.33

Comments

I think that the Fitz broke in two and that is what caused her to sink because she went down quick. She probably was caught between two waves and the weight of her midsection caused so much stess on her, she broke and sunk. The other possibilites are could sink a ship but in less time. I also strongly disagree against the theory that her hatches leaked becaused the hatches weigh so much that even if there were no clamps on, little if any water would leak through them.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Phil Hill
Location: DeWitt, MI
Email: tisbeeboy@aol.com
Date: 11/3/99
Remote Name: 140.171.37.193

Comments

Anyone seriously interested in this subject would probably be interested in speaking with a retired professor from Michigan Tech. Paul Hainault wrote a book on the "engineering" aspects of the wreckage and has another scenario which may have been possible. He believes that the Fitzgerald bottomed somewhere near Isle Royal and sustained what may have been minimal damage. But after the long hours and heavy seas the hull finally "fatigued" enough that it broke. Some or all of the other conditions could have aggrivated and accelerated this condition. Unfortunately we will never really know but if we did it would eliminate the opportnity to talk about it....


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Ron Black
Location: Shelby Township
Email: rblack@123.net
Date: 11/3/99
Remote Name: 209.69.199.88

Comments

I agree with the theory that she touched bottom on Six Fathom Shoal. Her course line went directly over this area. I believe the "Fitz" was having radar problems by this time, combined with the weather caused navigation problems. The 30 foot waves, with troughs, combined with a lack of bottom at the shoals, set her down as she passed.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: William Poland
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Email: hotrod31@aol.com
Date: 11/2/99
Remote Name: 152.163.205.26

Comments

The 'Fitz is the Titanic of the Lakes. They both will forever lie in mystery on the bottom, provoking controversy and supposion as to what caused their tragadies. We discuss the sinkings and try to learn the lessons each teaches and the answers to the questions each asks. Throughout the controversey and mystery of both ships, let us not forget the crews and passengers who are buried with the ships. They are the real story. Their lose is the tragady. Forget neither ship. As long as they live in our hearts, the lives of the those who perished with them are not lost.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Noel Weaver
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, MI
Email: nphillipw
Date: 11/2/99
Remote Name: 208.171.136.104

Comments

With reguards to the Fitzgerald sinking, the course that took them too close to Six Fathom shoal was the telling factor. The Anderson was worried that the captain of the Fitzgerald set his course too far to the south, and too near the shoal. The Anderson captain changed her course appropriately and had no problems. That must of caused some underwater damage that allowed water to enter the hull. Then while under way to the Soo, with out knowing the trouble she had, she meet up with a wave, of series of waves, that pushed her bow down,from which she never recovered. All the water inside the ship came forward and sent the boat to the bottom were she hit and broke in two. It's too bad it is just speculation on our parts, and the real reason(s) can't be found to help other who sail the waters of the Great Lakes.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Grant Miner
Location: Chicago, IL
Email: grant.miner@exec-offices.com
Date: 11/2/99
Remote Name: 209.224.239.76

Comments

I believe the Fitz was hit be a rogue wave from the stern. This wave, or series of waves, drove the bow of the ship into the bottom of the lake which subsequently caused the ship to break apart. This would explain the suddeness of the accident and the lack of any communication. I feel if the ship had mearly taken on water or broke in two, there would have been enough time to issue at least a brief SOS. Your thoughts???


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: J.P Rico
Location: Toronto
Email: jprico@idierect.com
Date: 11/2/99
Remote Name: 216.154.36.90

Comments

In my 6 years of sailing on the great lakes I have given this some thought. I believe the evidence on the lake bottom of the "Fitz's" hatch covers being off is insignificant and mis-leading. If she capsized the ore pellets would have forced the hatches off regardless if all the clamps were on or not. If she did not capsize the force of her slaming into the bottom when she did sink would have popped the clamps off the covers that were still intact. During the storm the amount of water that would enter the cargo hold because of waves washing over her deck could be measured in buckets. For these reasons the hatch cover theory does not hold water(please excuse the pun. I believe the combination of outdated charts and poor navigation led her to ground on the shoal off of Caribou Island. This damage is the mostly likely cause of her sinking in combination with the other stresses put on the "Fitz" during the storm. Shame on the U.S. Coast Guard for not trying to find the real reason.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Jeffrey Birch
Location: Honolulu, HI
Email: neutron@cchono.com
Date: 11/2/99
Remote Name: 209.84.91.200

Comments

I am no naval expert, but ANDERSON was longer and narrower, so any longitudinal hull stresses placed on both vessels during the storm would have affected her more than the FITZGERALD, which was shorter and wider. All things being equal, the ANDERSON was more at risk. Additionally, I believe ANDERSON had less freeboard at winter draft marks than FITZGERALD, again making here more at risk. Finally, FITZGERALD reported a vent covers lost, fence rail down, and a list. Leakage into the cargo hold would not result in a list, since the leaked water would move from side to side as the ship rolled. Only water leaked off the transverse centerline would cause a list, and such list, leading to conclusion that leakage was into the ballast tanks, and not the hold. Finally, for FITZGERALD to report such a list so soon after passing Caribou, it must have been a rapid filling of a ballast tank, a casualty that she would be able to sustain. My conclusion is that with the additional stresses placed on the ship by a flooded ballast tank, the damage that must have been suffered that led to it, and the incredible bending forces that were being placed on the hull in a quartering sea, all conspired to rip the hull open, ultimately flooding the hold and casuing the sinking.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Tim
Location: Lexington
Email: x
Date: 11/2/99
Remote Name: 152.163.204.181

Comments

When looking at the pictures and video of the wreckage, how can anyone determine that she capsized or broke in two on the surface? It seems painfully obvious that she did break up after she hit bottom. The debris field is contained in a relatively small area. If she capsized or broke in two, with as rough as the lake was that night, debris would have been spread over miles of area not just yards of area.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Randy  L. Shereda
Location: Las Vegas,  Nevada
Email: TimeRanger@lvcm.com
Date: 11/2/99
Remote Name: 24.234.34.108

Comments

As a former AB Seaman who was aboard a "Laker" (SS T.W. Robinson - US Steel) during that storm, I feel that one possible cause of the Fitz's demise has often been overlooked. She may have lost her steering, gotten caught in the trough between the waves, capsized and sank. Although both video footage and still pictures show that her rudder is still intact, absolutely nothing is known about the condition of her steering gear. The steering gear is the mechanism which actually operates the rudder. *IF* the Fitz had lost the ability to manipulate her rudder in the type of seas she was running in, she would have been turned broadside to the seas in a matter of seconds, and may have capsized. A ship of this type is designed to carry it's cargo in the belly. If capsized, the cargo would have been placed on the underside of her deck - where the weight stresses would have exceeded structural design causing her to break in half. Personally, I believe that the "findings" (theory) that faulty hatch closings was the cause, is BULLS*** (sorry). At that time of year, the hatches, if nothing else, are well secured. Captains tend to have a fetish of sorts about hatch clamps - If they ain't tight, there is hell to pay, and the last thing Anyone wants to do, is piss off the Ol'Man. Rest in Peace guys.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: stewart oldford
Location: fenton mi us
Email: oldford@ismi.net
Date: 11/2/99
Remote Name: 205.216.96.28

Comments

i was present at the launching of this ship,a most impressive event.who would ever imagine a structure so massive could ever breakup and sink.she must have hit the shoals near caribou which places the ultimate blame on the captain.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Reynolds
Location:
Email: corolla27524@yahoo.com
Date: 11/1/99
Remote Name: 165.87.13.200

Comments

Although its possible that reduced freeboard made her hatch covers more vulnerable to water and waves, I don't think that water leaking through the hatches caused the Fitzgerald's initial flooding.

I'm basing this opinion on the fact that the Anderson, a boat 6 years older (and thus exposed to more wear and tear) than the Fitz, trailed her by no more than about 20 miles throughout the storm. Because of this fact, the Anderson experienced the same winds and seas as the Fitz. Consequently, if, by the time she passed north of Caribou Island, enough water had leaked through the Fitz's hatches to cause a list, then the same thing should've happened to the Anderson. In my opinion, the fact that it didn't invalidates the Coast Guard's theory since the Anderson's hatches were older than the Fitz's and therefore should've been in worse condition.

Instead of leaking hatches, I think the Fitz's flooding was caused by either shoaling or a stress crack.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: fred norton
Location: conneaut ohio
Email: fredbon@suite224.net
Date: 11/1/99
Remote Name: 208.131.247.63

Comments

My opinion she hit the shoal. I sailed 5 seasons with U U steel and the last 3 years on the A M Anderson. I also sailed with Capt. Copper when he was a second mate. That was his belife and I go along with him. He was a good mate and a good Capt..


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Derek Tuoriniemi
Location: Calumet MI
Email: crash04
Date: 11/1/99
Remote Name: 207.75.48.143

Comments

I believe the sinking was caused by the fact that the Fitz had weak keelson plates. The Fitz was overloaded which put great stress on the plates. When it hit the shoal (which I believe it did) it would have weakened the plates enough for it just to break and sink.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Wayne Folsom
Location: Woodstock,New Brunswick
Email: waynef@nb.sympatico.ca
Date: 11/1/99
Remote Name: 207.179.164.23

Comments

The sinking of the Fitzgerald is a 50/50 split being broken in two and running on to the shoal.I think that it did hit a shoal hard enough to weaken the hull and to cause the ship to break in two within hours before sinking.The wind and waves in combination with the weight of the cargo made the hull flex up and down enough to break it in two.Then when the big wave hit she nose- dived and broke in two when the bow of the ship hit the bottom of the Lake.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Rickard Anderson
Location: Bowie, Maryland
Email: indymimi@erols.com
Date: 11/1/99
Remote Name: 209.122.252.188

Comments

My father, who is a retired great lakes master, believes the vessel grounded and sustained damage. I respect my father's opinion, and he may well be right. Regardless of what actually happened, it is a substantiated fact that the vessel started taking on water, and as a result of this, eventually foundered. Before I digress further, let me mention another similar marine disaster: The disappearance of the DERBYSHIRE, the largest British ship to ever sink (yes, much bigger than TITANIC and bigger than the 1,000 footers sailing the lakes today). The DERBYSHIRE was a 220,000 ton dwt Oil/Bulk/Ore (OBO) that disappeared in the mid-eighties with all hands (including two wives) in a typhoon south of Japan. Like the much publicized search for the TITANIC, the British hired a U.S. firm to find the wreck. It was found in approx 11 or 12,000 feet of water (I don't remember exactly), and on two separate occasions a remote operated vehicle (ROV) was sent down to survey/photograph the wreck. Here is a brief explanation from the Admiralty Report of what caused this huge OBO to rapidly founder without a trace at that time:

1. The ship unfortunately found itself on the upper front side (where winds and waves are higher for counterclockwise storms in the northern hemispere) of a very strong typhoon (Typhoon Orchid). Waves were later estimated by oceanographers to be in excess of 30 meters (100 ft!) high. 2. Water started entering through a small, foredeck hatch leading to the bos'n store and eventually into a forward fuel oil deep tank via broken vents. The underwater survey showed the entire bow section forward of the first hold to be intact indicating hydrostatic balance. If these compartments were empty (or partially full), they would have been imploded during the ship's plunge. 3. With continued loss of buoyancy forward, the ship's freeboard was slowly reduced, putting the fore deck and hatches closer to the water and waves. 4. The hatch covers were designed to take approximately 9 meters (30 ft) of hydrostaic water head. 5. Computerized seakeeping calculations were conducted that indicated that the first hatch cover, in conjunction with several feet of lost freeboard, was exposed to wave induced water heads in excess of 11-12 meters, enough to cause it to collapse (buckle). 6. With the first hold now open to the sea and susceptible to rapid flooding, the ship lost more freeboard, and the second hatch cover then collapsed. The underwater survey verified this. 7. The ship could not sustain two flooded holds, and plunged so rapidly to the bottom that not even a distress signal was given.

Now to "Big EDNA." Something caused the ship to take on water and eventually lose freeboard, or reserve buoyancy to be more technical. Whatever that was, still seems to be a point of conjecture to this day. With reduced freeboard, the (spar) deck and hatch covers became more vulnerable to water and waves. I do not know to what hydrostatic head the covers were designed to, but like DERBYSHIRE, it is plausible that enough freeboard was lost that could have caused a hatch cover to collapse, followed by another, etc. This would explain the rapid sinking. The ship probably broke in two at or near the surface as it started its plunge due to overstressing the hull girder assuming the forward hold was all or nearly flooded and two after holds still intact (i.e. not flooded).

By the way, my uncle Roy Anderson, was the 2nd mate on the ARTHUR M. ANDERSON, that fateful night. He was off watch when the sinking occured, but while on the 00:00-0400 watch, he spotted the overturned lifeboat.

Respectfully,

Rickard Anderson Naval Architect


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: john Ruehle
Location: reno, Nevada
Email: john@eurosec.reno.nv.us
Date: 11/1/99
Remote Name: 207.228.2.216

Comments

First, of all, thank you for an excellent website for those of us who enjoy the Boats. My opinion, and belief is that after reading about the history of the Edmund Fitzgerald on the website. I noticed one thing that stood out that may have contributed to the sinking of the vessel. I noticed that in 1974, she had damage to her keelson plates, and cracking due to high stress on her Keelson plates about midships. The Keelson plates are very critical on any vessel. These plates form the spine of the keel, and the ship. thus giving the vessel the structural strength to withstand the punishment water exerts on a moving hull form. If there is any defects, damage, improper repairs, misloadings, grounding damage of any kind, these plates can be weaken in such a way, that the storm she encountered would put tremendous stress on her repaired plates. It is possible, that if she suffered grounding damage during the storm, it is possible that the damage may have ripped open the repaired affected part of the hull and severly compromised her watertight integrity. I believe that this may have led, or been a contribution to her sinking.


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Michael W Fikes
Location: Granite city ill
Email: fikes@fikesart.com
Date: 11/1/99
Remote Name: 209.96.6.12

Comments

The loss of the edmund fitzgerald causes us me to examine several moral questions. 1) was the crew of the edmund fitzgerald worth risking for the profit that one load of ore would bring? No. Or was the captain afraid of having to winter in another port? still not worth it. 2) Was the money saved by cutting corners on the maintenance program worth the risk to the crew(and yes there were corners cut, just look at her maintenance schedule for you selves)? No. Ladies and Gentlemen, there has never been any amount of money, printed in any country, at any time that could equal the life of one human. May the memory of those 29 Gallant men never fade, and may their spirits forevermore rest in the arms of the lord. Michael Fikes


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Michael W Fikes
Location: Granite city ill
Email: fikes
Date: 11/1/99
Remote Name: 209.96.6.12

Comments


Subject: The Loss of the Fitzgerald?
From: Larry Leverenz Jr.
Location: Casco,  MI
Email: wizardwas@voyager.net
Date: 11/1/99
Remote Name: 216.93.41.100

Comments

Even a few clamps would have held the hatch covers down. The shoal could have come into play and weakened the ship at a stress point. With gusts as bad as they were and the high seas, the Fitz was in the wrong place at the wrong time.


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