Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

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USCG Katmai Bay medevacs Mackinac Island resident

1/31 - Tuesday night, the Coast Guard Cutter Katmai Bay responded to a medevac request for a resident on Mackinac Island who needed immediate medical attention. Unable to utilize an aircraft due to harsh weather conditions, Sector Sault Sainte Marie Command Center contacted the Katmai Bay, who immediately diverted to assist the island resident. The Katmai Bay broke ice into the harbor, where she met local emergency service crews, who escorted the resident onboard the Cutter. The crew of the Katmai Bay then ensured her safety while they transited to St. Ignace for further transfer to medical services.

“This was a great team effort by all, including Mackinac Island EMS and Fire Department, Straits Area EMS, Mackinac Marine Rescue, Mackinac Island Medical Center, and Sector Sault Ste. Marie,” said LT Steele Johnson, Commanding Officer of CGC Katmai Bay. “The crew responded admirably in adverse conditions to answer the call. We’re happy to have done our part in getting her the advanced medical treatment she needed.” The Coast Guard breaks ice for search and rescue, to facilitate navigation, and in this case-to respond to exigent circumstances for communities including remote island residents. U.S. Coast Guard

 

Port Reports -  January 31

St. Marys River
The Purvis tugs Avenger IV and Wilfred M. Cohen are at their home dock at the Canadian Soo. AIS on Wednesday night showed Anglian Lady (with barge Ironmaster) at anchor in heavy ice in Lake Munuscong south of Neebish Island. It is unknown if they will make another attempt to get to the dock or if the barge will be left in the ice for the winter.

Lake Michigan
The tugs Bradshaw McKee and Barbara Andrie were in the lee of Beaver Island Wednesday night due to high winds. The McKee departed Charlevoix on Sunday and has the cement barge Commander with her. The tugs have been operating in the area between Charlevoix and Beaver Island since Sunday, it is unknown why they have been spending so much time in this area.

Port Huron
The anchorage above Port Huron filled up on Wednesday with the downbound Algoma Sault, Algoma Niagara and Algocanada all arriving. The Algonova departed Sarnia and joined the others Wednesday afternoon. The Canadian Coast Guard Ship Samuel Risley spent the day breaking ice in the lower St. Clair River, likely in an effort to prevent flooding by ice jams. Low temperatures in the -10F range have caused ice to rapidly build in the area.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 31

MANZZUTTI was launched January 31, 1903, as a.) J S KEEFE (Hull#203) at Buffalo, New York by the Buffalo Dry Dock Co.

January 31, 1930 - While the Grand Trunk carferry MADISON was leading the way across Lake Michigan to Grand Haven, she was struck from behind by her sister ship GRAND RAPIDS.

1917: DUNDEE, which left the Great Lakes in 1915 after service in several fleets including Canada Steamship Lines, was torpedoed and sunk by U-55. The vessel was 10 miles north and west of Ives Head, Cornwall, England, while enroute, in ballast, from London to Swansea. One life was lost.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway shipping the highest in more than a decade

1/30 - All the clamor about tariffs and trade wars did not slow down international trade on the Great Lakes last year.

International shipping through the Saint Lawrence Seaway into the Great Lakes had its best year in more than a decade. The Great Lakes Seaway Partnership reported that international ships on the Great Lakes, known as salties, shipped 40.9 tons during the 2018 shipping season, a 7 percent year-over-year increase and the most since 2007.

Vessels shipped 12.1 million tons of grain, a 20 percent year-over-year increase, 10.7 million tons of dry bulk, a 3 percent year-over-year increase, and 4.5 million tons of liquid bulk, a 22 percent year-over-year increase.

“Total tonnage on the St. Lawrence Seaway exceeded the 5-, 10-, and 15-year averages, making 2018 an exceptionally strong shipping season, the best in over a decade,” said Craig Middlebrook, deputy administrator of the U.S. Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation.

“In particular, we were pleased to see heightened activity on the seaway in December. Overall gains in year-over-year commodity increases were widespread, most notably in U.S. grain export trade. The investments in seaway infrastructure and technology are achieving greater efficiencies for our customers and enhancing the binational waterway’s global competitiveness.”

Total vessel transits were up nearly 6 percent as compared to 2017. Despite tariffs of 25 percent of all foreign-made steel, cargoes of steel slabs rose 53 percent to 750,000 tons.

Great Lakes ports like the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor in Porter County and the Port of Chicago on the South Side typically receive high-value finished products like steel, beer tanks and wind turbines from abroad, and ship out grains and other crops to international markets.

“The 2018 navigation season was an exceptional year for the Illinois International Port District,” Executive Director Clayton Harris III, said. “This is attributed to our diversification of cargo, which was enabled by empowering our maritime and logistics operator, North American Stevedoring Company, and maximizing the potential of Federal Trade Zone #22. These strategies encouraged more shippers to call on our port and bring more specialized cargo such as copper and aluminum than previous years.”

NW Indiana Times

 

Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding delivers barge Commander after major conversion

1/30 - Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding has recently completed and delivered an articulated tug barge unit to Port City Marine Services, Muskegon, Mich.

The Commander is a 495-foot by 72-foot freight barge that underwent extensive conversion, including the installation of new cargo holds, trunk deck and bow, and a new cargo unloading system. Combined with its tug, the vessel operates as an articulated tug barge unit, according to Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding.

The conversion of the Commander was a complex 21-month project, said Todd Thayse, Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding vice president and general manager.

“This conversion was quite unique and challenging as it utilized the full breath of our skilled shipbuilders and the trades they represent along with our engineering and program management team,” Thayse said. “It’s always gratifying to do business with a repeat customer, and the Commander is reflective of the quality those customers have come to expect."

Port City Marine Services is experienced in the management, conversion and operation of a variety of vessels including bulk freight ships and articulated tug barge units across the Great Lakes in the United States and Canada.

“Our history with Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding, and knowledge of their well-proven skill set, gave our customer, lender and board of directors the comfort to approach such a major conversion project," said Chuck Canestraight, president of Muskegon-based Sand Products Corporation, the owner of Port City Marine Services. "Our thanks to the dedicated workforce at the Sturgeon Bay yard and all of those associated with this project.”

View a photo at this link

 

Port Reports -  January 30

St. Marys River
The Purvis tugs Avenger IV and Wilfred M. Cohen with barge Ironmaster have been making slow progress in thick ice and were north of Neebish Island late Tuesday.

Lake Huron
Tuesday, St Ignace: 7:43 USCG Katmai Bay departed for ice operations. USCG Biscayne Bay arrived. Straits of Mackinaw: USCG Katmai Bay escorted Frontenac bound for Chicago and has been icebreaking north of Bois Blanc Island to Round Island. At 20:39 she arrived at Mackinac Island. USCG Mackinaw was escorting AlgoCanada bound for Nanticoke and Algoma Niagara bound for Sarnia. St Marys River: Southern Lake Huron: Algoma Sault, still showing Goderich as her destination, was met by CCGS Samuel Risley off of Lambton Shores, Ont., and both continued sailing south west to Point Edward.

 

Marquette power plant on track for April or May retirement

1/30 - Marquette, Mich. – Upper Michigan Energy Resources Corporation says the Presque Isle Power Plant is on track for retirement sometime in April or May, but no specific date has been set.

Two natural gas-fueled generating stations will replace the coal-fueled power plant, which receives coal deliveries by lake freighter. Construction activities are essentially complete at the A.J. Mihm Generating Station in Baraga Township and F.D. Kuester Generating Station in Negaunee Township, and now the stations are being tested.

At the end of 2018, UMERC had 93 employees at the Presque Isle Power Plant. The company says human resource and benefits representatives are working closely with employees to prepare them for when the plant is no longer operational.

UMERC says it has no current plans for the Presque Isle site beyond decommissioning and other actions typical with retirement of a power plant.

WLUC

 

More new names for saltwater vessels

1/30 - The following saltwater vessels have been renamed with each having made visits to the Great Lakes/Seaway system during their careers.

The Fairchem Yuka IMO 9477505 a tanker which first came inland as such in 2014 on its only visit with that name is now the Chem Taurus of Liberian registry and flag.

BBC Haren IMO 9511636 which first came inland as such in 2016 on its only visit with that name is now the Onego Haren of Antigua and Barbuda registry. This vessel had three previous names as it was known as the Beluga Loyalty from 2008 to 2011, BBC Haren from 2011 to 2012 and the Haren from 2012 to 2015.

The Greta C IMO 9528720 which first came inland in 2015 and last visited as such in 2017 has been renamed Sider Guyana of Malta registry and flag.

Michelle C IMO 9452218 which first came inland on its only visit with that name in 2015 is now Sider Michelle of Portugal registry and flag. This vessel also had two previous names, Michelle C from 2010 to 2010 and the Nirint Pioneer from 2010 to 2011.

Jasmine C IMO 9463542 which first came inland on its only visit with that name in 2015 has been renamed Sider Jasmine of Portugal registry and flag.

Sally Ann C IMO 9338151 which first came inland in 2017 on its only visit with that name is now Sider Bilbao of United Kingdom registry.

Sichem Defiance IMO 9244374 a tanker which first came inland in 2007 and last visited as such in 2017 has been renamed the Chem Swedish of Singapore registry and flag. This vessel was also known as the North Defiance, a name it held from 2001 to 2006 and first visited as such in 2001. It was also known as the

Songa Defiance from 2006 to 2007 and first came inland as such in 2006 on its only visit with that name.

Travestern IMO 9053206 a tanker which first came inland in 1998 and last visited as such in 2017 has been renamed the Ostrov Sakhalin of Russian registry and flag.

Silda IMO 9515280 which first came inland in 2017 on its only visit with that name has been renamed Adamar of Liberian registry and flag. This vessel was also known as the Alaya from 2009 to 2016 yet it did not come inland as such.

HHL Mississippi IMO 9435765 which first came inland in 2014 and last visited as such in 2016 has been renamed Houtmangracht of the Netherlands. This vessel had two former names among them was the Beluga Fantasy from 2006 to 2011 and the OXL Fantasy from 2011 to 2011.

HHL Rhine IMO 9467017 which first came inland in 2016 and last visited as such in 2017 is now the Sophia of Liberian registry and flag. This vessel was known previously as the Beluga Feasibility a name it held briefly in 2011 before it was renamed. It did not come inland as such.

HHL Tyne IMO 9433274 which first came inland in 2015 on its only visit with that name has been renamed Humbergracht of the Netherlands registry and flag. This vessel was known previously as the Beluga Family, a name it held from 2007 to 2011. It also came inland as such in 2010 on its only visit with that name. Njord Cloud IMO 9291066 which first came inland in 2016 on its only visit with that name is now Hai Xing of Liberian registry and flag. This vessel was known as the Fase D from 2001 to 2004 and the Fase from 2004 to 2009. It did not come inland with either names. In 2009 the ship became the Harbour Cloud and it carried that name from 2009 to 2015 also visiting as such for the first time in 2009 and last visiting as such in 2011.

Princimar Equinox IMO 9486245 a tanker which first came inland in 2015 and last visited as such in 2016 has been renamed the Equinox of Tuvalu flag and registry. This vessel had three former names with them being the Chem Vela from 2012 to 2012, Xinle No. 25 from 2012 to 2012 and the Angel No. 12 from 2012 to 2014. It did not come inland with any of its previous names.

Denny Dushane

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 30

ELMDALE was launched in 1909 as a.) CLIFFORD F. MOLL (Hull#56) at Ecorse, Michigan, by the Great Lakes Engineering Works.

CHIEF WAWATAM was held up in the ice for a period of three weeks. On January 30, 1927, she went aground at North Graham Shoal in the Straits. She was later dry-docked at Great Lakes Engineering Works in Detroit where her forward propeller and after port wheel were replaced.

January 30, 1911 - The second PERE MARQUETTE 18 arrived Ludington, Michigan, on her maiden voyage.

On 30 January 1881, ST. ALBANS (wooden propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 135 foot, 435 tons, built in 1869, at Cleveland, Ohio) was carrying general merchandise, flour, cattle and 22 passengers in Lake Michigan. She rammed a cake of ice that filled the hole it made in her hull. She rushed for shore, but as the ice melted, the vessel filled with water. She sank 8 miles from Milwaukee. The crew and passengers made it to safety in the lifeboats. Her loss was valued at $35,000.

On 30 January 2000, crews began the removal of the four Hulett ore unloaders on Whiskey Island in Cleveland.

1990: IMPERIAL ACADIA received major damage at the island of Miquelon due to a storm and had to be transported to Halifax aboard the semi-submersible MIGHT SERVANT for repairs. The vessel arrived at Chittagong, Bangladesh, for scrapping as e) RALPH TUCKER on October 26, 2004.

1999: The SD 14 freighter LITSA first came through the Seaway in 1977 as a) SANTA THERESA and was the last saltwater ship of the year downbound through that waterway in 1981. It was sailing as e) LITSA when fire broke out in the engine room off Senegal on this date. The blaze spread through the accommodation area and the crew got off safely. The hull was first towed to Dakar, Senegal, and then, after a sale to Turkish shipbreakers, it arrived at Aliaga on August 6, 2001.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  January 29

St. Marys River
The tugs Avenger IV and the Wilfred M. Cohen are assisting the tug Anglian Lady in getting the barge Ironmaster up the St. Marys River. Katmai Bay is in the river as well after conducting ice operations at the Straits of Mackinac.

Lake Huron
Monday January 28th, Frontenac was upbound for Chicago. Algoma Sault was down bound for Goderich.

St. Clair River
Ice convoys in the St. Clair River continued Monday morning with the CCGS Samuel Risley escorting the tanker Iver Bright downbound from Sarnia. The CCGS Griffon was upbound from Detroit after escorting the tanker Algonova into the Belle Isle Anchorage off Detroit. Griffon continued upbound to assist the downbound convoy through the lower St. Clair River.

Algoma Hansa departed Sarnia later in the morning, following the track the Risley had left in the ice. The Hansa became stopped in ice above Marine City, so the Risley turned upbound, leaving the Iver Bright to wait in the ice above Algonac. Risley worked with the Hansa to free her and join the Iver Bright in a downbound convoy. The convoy joined the Griffon for a uninterrupted trip through the lower river and into Lake St. Clair. By Monday night, Iver Bright was at the Mistersky fuel dock in Detroit and the Risley and Algonova in Sarnia. Griffon escorted the Algonova to South East Shoal where the Griffon turned upbound leaving the Algoma Hansa to continue on for Nanticoke.

Detroit River – Raymond H.
The tanker Iver Bright arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to load/unload Monday evening.

 

Extraordinary fleet of 12 tall ships to arrive in Buffalo on July 4

1/29 - Buffalo, NY. – A fleet of 12 historic and majestic tall ships from harbors across the United States, Canada, Spain and the South Pacific will grace Canalside, Riverwalk and Erie Basin Marina for Buffalo’s inauguration as a host port of the Tall Ships ChallengeGreat Lakes 2019 race from Toronto to Buffalo on July 4-7.

In conjunction with the arrival of the tall ships, Basil Port of Call: Buffalo, a four-day, family-friendly celebration of the city’s maritime heritage, will take place along the downtown waterfront. Offering an opportunity for adults and children to view, board and explore the vessels, the festivities will feature family activities, live entertainment, historic exhibits, artisan food and beverages, and a Parade of Sail of the tall ship fleet.

Included in the flotilla are four three-masted tall ships: Barque Picton Castle, originating from the Cook Islands in the South Pacific and circumnavigating the world; Denis Sullivan, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and the world’s only replica of a Great Lakes schooner; Toronto-based Empire Sandy, serving as Canada’s largest schooner; and Nao Santa Maria, a replica of the flagship of Christopher Columbus’ exploration fleet, built and based in Punta Umbria, Spain.

Eight two-masted tall ships also will be in attendance: Bluenose II, a Canadian national symbol and goodwill ambassador for the province of Nova Scotia; US Brig Niagara, replicating Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry’s flagship in the Battle of Lake Erie during the War of 1812 and home-ported in Erie, Pennsylvania; HMCS Oriole, the oldest commissioned vessel in the Royal Canadian Navy and based in Halifax, Nova Scotia; Pride of Baltimore, a reconstruction of a Baltimore Clipper from the War of 1812 era representing the people of Maryland; and STV St. Lawrence II, a Kingston, Ontario sail training brigantine operated by a crew of teenagers.

In addition to berthing on the waterfront, three of the two-masted tall ships will be available to leave port for either day or evening excursions: Appledore IV, a gaff schooner from Bay City, Michigan emphasizing environmental stewardship of the Great Lakes ecosystem; Appledore V, a companion schooner from Bay City also offering environmental science programs; and Spirit of Buffalo, the home port vessel host of this spectacular Buffalo waterfront event.

Basil Port of Call: Buffalo is free and open to the public. To tour any or all of the tall ships, Passport Vouchers can be purchased at all participating Wegmans locations throughout WNY and online at www.PortOfCallBuffalo.org. Additional information is also available on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PortOfCallBuffalo.

 

New names for saltwater visitors

1/29 - The following saltwater vessels have been renamed with each having made visits to the Great Lakes/Seaway system in their careers. Listed below are the following saltwater vessels that have been renamed.

CFL Prospect IMO 9376440 which first came inland in 2007 on its only visit as such has been renamed Prospect of the Netherlands registry and flag.

Chemtrans Elbe IMO 9439345 a tanker built in 2008 first came inland as such in 2010 and last visited as such in 2016 has been renamed with the new name now being the Gulf Petroleum 4 of Liberian registry and flag.

Crystal Diamond IMO 9327059 another tanker built in 2006 and first came inland as such in 2007 on its only visit with that name has been renamed with the new name now being the Annette Essberger of the Netherlands registry and flag.

CT Cork IMO 9393060 a tanker which first came inland as such in 2008 on its only visit with that name is now the Derg of Malta registry and flag.

The tanker Jo Spirit IMO 9140841 a very common visitor and trader which first came inland as such in 1998 and last visited as such in 2016 has been renamed the Gunede of Turkey registry and flag. This tanker was a common and regular visitor to Hamilton often bringing in cargoes of rum from overseas.

Kom IMO 9132480 built in 1997 but first came inland as such in 1998 and last visited as such in 2015 has been renamed and is now known as the Serdika of Belize registry and flag.

The tanker Kristin Knutsen IMO 9141405 built in 1998 but first came inland as such in 2013 on its only visit with that name has been renamed and is now known as the Golden Tulip of Liberian registry and flag.

Palembang IMO 9501887 first came inland as such in 2010 on its only visit with that name is now the Anna of Antigua and Barbuda registry and flag.

Mistral IMO 9415143 better known to some as the Jan S which first came inland as such in 2013 on its only visit with that name is now the Eider of Antigua and Barbuda registry. This is the second vessel to have this name.

Denny Dushane

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 29

BUCKEYE was launched January 29, 1910, as the straight decker a.) LEONARD B MILLER (Hull # 447) at Cleveland, Ohio by the American Ship Building Co.

JOHN P. REISS (Hull # 377) was also launched this date in 1910, at Lorain, Ohio, by American Ship Building Co.

January 29, 1987 - BADGER almost capsized at her dock due to a broken water intake pipe.

In 1953, RICHARD M. MARSHALL (steel propeller freighter, 643 foot, 10,606 gross tons) was launched in Bay City, Michigan, at Defoe's shipyard (Hull # 424). Later she was named JOSEPH S. WOOD in 1957, JOHN DYKSTRA in 1966, and BENSON FORD in 1983. She was scrapped in 1987 at Recife, Brazil.

1975: RATTRAY HEAD, a Seaway trader first in 1971, ran aground on Black Rock Shoal, Galway Bay, while inbound with a cargo of coal. The ship was a total loss.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Madeline Island ferry ends season due to ice

1/28 - Bayfield, Wis. – The Madeline Island Ferry line shut down service between Bayfield and La Pointe at the end of the day Friday, a few weeks later than normal.

"There's about six inches of solid ice and it's getting more difficult to get through,'' said Gary Russell, vice president of the ferry line. "And it's just brutal for our people to have to be out there, on the docks or the boats, in this cold." At 9 a.m. Friday it was 13 below zero in Bayfield with a 31 below zero wind chill. The forecast calls for continued brutally cold temperatures through next week.

Russell said the shutdown may leave island residents briefly without a water option to get to the mainland as service by air-powered "windsleds'' might not start until Monday. Neither a recorded message at Windsleds Inc. on Friday nor the company's website were clear on when the sleds may be up and running.

Until ferry service resumes, usually about April 1 after a normal winter, island residents and visitors will count on the windsleds and then, once ice thickens enough, a plowed ice road that enables driving back and forth to the mainland. Island regulars like the ice road best because it's free, and they can come and go on their own schedule.

The long-term average for a last day of ferry service is near Jan. 1 but has been moving later in recent decades as average air and water temperatures have risen. "We haven't had a December closing since I don't know when,'' Russell said. "For the last 25 years it's been later and later."

In the winters of 2012 and again in 2016 and 2017 the ferry ran all year, without stopping. That's hard on the boats and the crews, Russell noted. More than 150 years of ferry records the ferry ran all winter only in 1998, 2012, 2016 and 2017. A review of records over the year showed the ferry operating season has been growing steadily, with shorter ice-bound closures.

From March 28, 2015 to Jan. 5, 2018 the ferries logged 1,019 days of service, by far a record for the ferry line. About 300 people live on the island year-round.

Duluth News Tribune

 

Port Reports -  January 28

Green Bay, Wis.
USCG Mackinaw was busy on Sunday with ice escort in and out of Green Bay. Algoma Sault was outbound shortly before noon after unloading road Salt. The Mackinaw then escorted the Algocanada inbound.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – Daniel Lindner
Wilfred Sykes arrived in Sturgeon Bay via the ship canal mid-afternoon Sunday, becoming the eleventh and final ship to arrive for the winter. The other ten vessels tied up at Bay Shipbuilding are American Courage, John G. Munson, Joseph L. Block, the barge A-397, Roger Blough, James R. Barker, Cason J. Callaway, and the barge Huron Spirit. Paul R. Tregurtha is in drydock, and has had both her rudders and propellers removed for work.

Lake Huron
Sunday, Goderich: 8:38 Algoma Innovator departed for Milwaukee. Tug Anglian Lady and barge Ironmaster are up bound for Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. St Marys River: Katmai Bay spent Sunday conducting ice operations and then went to anchor north of Detour. Wilfred M Cohen and Avenger IV were downbound, probably to assist Anglian Lady and Ironmaster up river to the Sault.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Innovator cleared Goderich Sunday morning, upbound for Milwaukee Wis. Algoma Sault is expected to return to Goderich for another load of salt.

St. Clair River
Frontenac was upbound Sunday through heavy ice in the lower river, assisted by CCGS Samuel Risley. Sunday evening they had reached Sarnia with the Frontenac docking at the Sidney E. Smith Dock.

Detroit River – Raymond H.
On Sunday, the tug Madison R was inbound on the Rouge River, tying up at Fordson Island.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 28

SELKIRK SETTLER (Hull #256) was launched January 28, 1983, at Govan, Scotland, by Govan Shipbuilding Ltd. She sails today as SPRUCEGLEN for Canada Steamship Lines.

At 4 a.m. on 28 January 1879, the ferry SARNIA was discovered on fire while lying at Fitzgerald's yard in Port Huron. All of the cabins were destroyed although the fire department had the fire out within an hour. About $3,000 damage was done. She was in the shipyard to be remodeled and to have a stern wheel installed. Arson was suspected.

On 28 January 1889, The Port Huron Times announced that the Toledo & Saginaw Transportation Company went out of business and sold all of its vessel and its shipyard. The shipyard went to Curtis & Brainard along with the PAWNEE and MIAMI. The BUFFALO, TEMPEST, BRAINARD and ORTON went to Thomas Lester. The C.F. CURTIS, FASSET, REED and HOLLAND went to R. C. Holland. The DAYTON went to J. A. Ward and M. P. Lester. The TROY and EDWARDS were sold, but the new owners were not listed.

1965: TRANSWARREN, a T-2 tanker, made three trips through the Seaway in 1960. The vessel began flooding on the Atlantic and sent out a distress call enroute from Bahamas to Ijmuiden, Holland. The ship made it to Ponta Delgada, Azores, for repairs but these were only temporary. On arrival at drydock in Marseilles, France, the vessel was declared a total loss and sold to Spanish shipbreakers at Castellon.

1966: The passenger ship STELLA MARIS came to the Great Lakes in 1959. It caught fire while bunkering at Sarroch Roads, Italy, as e) WESTAR after being refitted for the Alaska trade. Two died, another three were injured and the ship was declared a total loss. It arrived at La Spezia, Italy, for scrapping on April 30, 1966.

1975: CHRISTIAN SARTORI was the closest ship to the CARL D. BRADLEY when it sank in Lake Michigan on November 18, 1958, and helped in the search for survivors. The West German freighter continued to travel to the Great Lakes through 1967 and returned as b) CHRISTIAN in 1968. It ran aground at Puerto Isabel, Nicaragua, on this date after breaking its moorings as e) ROMEO BERNARD. The vessel had to be abandoned as a total loss.

1983: JALAJAYA went aground at the Los Angeles breakwater after the anchors dragged in bad weather. The ship was released and operated until tying up at Bombay, India, on October 3, 1987. It was subsequently scrapped there in 1988. The vessel had not been in service long when it first came through the Seaway in 1967.

1986: ADEL WEERT WIARDS, caught fire as c) EBN MAGID enroute from northern Europe to Libya. The vessel docked at Portland, U.K., on the English Channel, the next day but, following two explosions and additional fire on January 30, it was towed away and beached. The vessel was a total loss and scrapped at Bruges, Belgium, later in the year.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

 

American Queen CEO talks plans for Victory Cruise Lines

1/27 - At a recent event in New York, American Queen Steamboat Company Chairman and CEO John Waggoner shared the company’s latest plans for the Victory I and Victory II, two passenger ships the company acquired along with Victory Cruise Lines. The acquisition officially closed earlier this month.

Waggoner said that the company plans to keep the Victory brand name, although it will add “operated by American Queen Steamboat Company” language. “They already have a good, recognizable brand,” he said.

As for destinations: “We don’t plan on going to Cuba,” Waggoner said, in reference to the Cuba cruises Victory launched early last year. The Victory ships will maintain their focus on the Great Lakes, as well as coastal cruises along the Eastern Seaboard.

The two ships are set to re-enter service in May. Through October, Victory I will sail between Montreal and Detroit visiting Quebec City, Kingston, Toronto/Welland Canal, Port Colborne/Niagara Falls and Cleveland. Victory II will sail between Toronto and Chicago calling on Port Colborne/Niagara Falls/Welland Canal, Cleveland, Detroit, in addition to sailing scenic Lake Huron, Little Current and visiting Soo Locks/Sault Ste. Marie, Mackinac Island and ending on Lake Michigan. A previously announced cruise to Thunder Bay and Duluth no longer appear on the company’s website and may have been dropped.

Waggoner also said the line would like to continue Victory’s recently launched itinerary along Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, although plans in that regard are still not final. “We think the Yucatan is great, from the cuisine¬¬ to the Mexican history and culture,” he said. The line still needs to send a “fact-finding” team to the area to work out the details for potential itineraries.

In terms of onboard product, the two Victory ships are currently undergoing a top-to-bottom renovation at Gulf Island shipyard in Houma, La., before they re-enter service this May.

The company plans to change the overall look of the ship’s interiors to be more reminiscent of American Queen Steamboat Company’s other ships, too, particularly the American Duchess and American Empress. The ships’ lounge and tavern spaces will receive a redesign in the vein of the Engine Room bar, while the accommodations will get upgraded carpets and drapes, as well as the same amenities -- such as sheets, robes and slippers -- as the river ships.

Other changes will include enclosing the stern on the Victory II, to make it usable in a wider variety of weather, as well as adding shades to the sun deck on the Victory I. Each ship will have two dining venues, a main restaurant and an alternative space. The Victory I will have the open-air Cliff Rock Grill, while the Victory II will have the enclosed Lighthouse Grill. The ships will also serve high teas with an international flair.

Travel Agent Central

 

Port Reports -  January 27

Lake Michigan
Wilfred Sykes departed the Meekoff dock in Grand Haven Saturday afternoon, outbound for the lake with assistance from the tug Candice Elise. She is headed for Sturgeon Bay and winter layup, where she should arrive sometime Sunday.

Lake Huron
Saturday: After loading salt in Windsor, Algoma Niagara departed for Milwaukee. Algocanada is bound for Green Bay. By Saturday night, both vessels had made it though the Straits. USCG Alder was in the area to assist. Goderich: 5:51 Algoma Innovator arrived to load salt.

St. Clair River
CCGS Samuel Risley and tug Madison R were assisting the tug Anglian Lady and barge PML Ironmaster in heavy ice on the St. Clair River at Marine City on Saturday. By late evening the vessels were past Port Huron.

 

National Museum seeks stewards, cooks to tell their stories

1/27 - Toledo, Ohio – The National Museum of the Great Lakes is looking for cooks, second cooks and or stewards to help tell the story of life in the galley on the Great Lakes at a chili cook-off on March 2, 2019 in Toledo.

Please contact Chris at glhs1@inlandseas.org if you are a cook, second cook or steward retired or active or if you know someone that is.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 27

In 1912, the Great Lakes Engineering Works' Ecorse yard launched the steel bulk freighter WILLIAM P. SNYDER JR (Hull #83), for the Shenango Furnace Co.

LEON FALK JR. closed the 1974 season at Superior by loading 17,542 tons of ore bound for Detroit.

January 27, 1985 - CITY OF MIDLAND 41 had to return to port (Ludington) after heavy seas caused a 30-ton crane to fall off a truck on her car deck.

On 27 January 1978, ALLEGHENY, the training vessel of the Great Lakes Maritime Academy (built in 1944, at Orange, Texas as a sea-going naval tug) capsized at her winter dock at Traverse City, Michigan, from the weight of accumulated ice. She was recovered but required an expensive rebuild, was sold and renamed MALCOLM in 1979.

On 27 January 1893, Charles Lonsby and Louis Wolf purchased the 161- foot wooden steam barge THOMAS D. STIMSON for $28,000. The vessel was built in 1881, by W. J. Daley & Sons at Mt. Clemens, Michigan, as a schooner and was originally named VIRGINIUS. She was converted to a steamship in 1887.

1972: The Canadian coastal freighter VOYAGEUR D. hit a shoal off Pointe au Pic, Quebec, and was holed. It was able to make the wharf at St. Irenee but sank at the dock. The cargo of aluminum ingots was removed before the wreck was blow up with explosives on November 8, 1972.

1978: A major winter storm caught the American tanker SATURN on Lake Michigan and the ship was reported to be unable to make any headway in 20-foot waves. It left the Seaway for Caribbean service in 2003 and was renamed b) CENTENARIO TRADER at Sorel on the way south.

2002: SJARD first came through the Seaway in 2000. It was lost in a raging snowstorm 350 miles east of St. John's Newfoundland with a cargo of oil pipes while inbound from Kalinigrad, Russia. The crew of 14 took to the lifeboat and were picked up by the BEIRAMAR TRES.

2006: PINTAIL received extensive damage in a collision off Callao, Peru, with the TWIN STAR. The latter broke in two and sank. PINTAIL began Seaway service in 1996 and had been a regular Great Lakes trader as a) PUNICA beginning in 1983. The ship arrived at Chittagong, Bangladesh, for scrapping as c) ANATHASIOS G. CALLITSIS and was beached on September 19. 2012. It had also traded inland under the final name in 2008 and 2009.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swa yze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

 

Ice jams finally cleared from St. Lawrence River after paralyzing maritime traffic

1/26 - The Canadian Coast Guard said it succeeded Thursday morning in clearing an ice jam in the St. Lawrence River that had stalled maritime traffic for several days.

The jam was located near Trois-Rivières, about 140 kilometres northeast of Montreal. As many as 16 ships had been stuck in ports around the province since Tuesday, including nine in Montreal.

Coast Guard icebreakers escorted two large ships from Montreal to the ice formation on Thursday. The goal was to use their size to dislodge the ice blocking the river.

The same maneuver was tried on Wednesday but failed. A spokesperson for the Coast Guard said maritime will resume, but under close supervision. They remain concerned another ice jam could form.

The stalled maritime traffic frustrated the St. Lawrence economic development corporation. Nicole Trépanier, who heads the corporation, blamed the federal government for not deploying enough Coast Guard ships to keep the river open to traffic throughout the winter.

"What worries us is the river's international reputation," Trépanier told Radio-Canada. "Maritime companies want to know if the river will be open year-round and whether Coast Guard services are adequate to supply services."

CBC

 

Icebreaking to start in Green Bay Saturday with 3 vessels on the way

1/26 - Topping up your fuel tanks and getting better traction on roads is being made possible by icebreaking operations that start on Saturday. That's when the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Mackinaw will be accompanying the carrier Algoma Sault and its cargo of rock salt to the Fox River Terminal in Green Bay. That will be followed up on Sunday and Monday with the carriers Algocanada and Algonova bringing gasoline and diesel fuel to the U.S. Oil terminal. Mark Gill, Director of Vessel Services for the U.S. Coast Guard, says these transports are the only way currently to get these products to consumers. Gill also recommends those who want to ice fish, snowmobile or venture out on the ice during these operations should be prepared. Once these operations are finished shipping on the Port of Green Bay will be closed for at least the next six weeks.

Door County Daily News

 

Port Reports -  January 26

Lake Michigan
Wilfred Sykes was at Indiana Harbor Friday night.

Musekgon/Grand Haven, Mich. – Ashton Marine
Ashton Marine will be breaking ice from their dock in Muskegon through the channel Saturday starting around 6 a.m. They’ll be heading to Grand Haven to break ice for the Wilfred Sykes.

Lake Huron
Friday, January 25th Mackinaw City: 15:18 USCG Mackinaw departed for Green Bay to conduct ice operations. Goderich: 3:56 Algoma Sault departed and was upbound with salt on Lake Huron. Sarnia: 16:54 After refueling, Algoma Niagara departed for Goderich.

St. Clair River
CCG Samuel Risley was assisting tug Anglian Lady at buoy 36 at Algonac Friday. Also upbound were Iver Bright, Algocanada and Algoma Niagara.

 

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence shipping sets 2019 priorities

1/26 - Chamber of Marine Commerce President Bruce Burrows has unveiled a 2019 wish list for legislative and policymakers designed to make Great Lakes-St. Lawrence and coastal shipping more competitive and build on the remarkable growth of the 2018 season.

St. Lawrence Seaway cargo volumes increased almost 7 per cent in 2018, reaching 40.9 million metric tons for the first time since 2007.

“Despite an unpredictable business environment of tariff wars and trade negotiations, many of our Canadian and U.S. port members reported increased volumes in grain exports, road salt, construction materials and petroleum products underlining the importance of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence waterway as a domestic and international trade gateway,” says Bruce Burrows, President of the Chamber of Marine Commerce. “There is great opportunity in 2019 to build on this economic momentum and work with legislators and policymakers to make significant progress on shipping’s most enduring challenges.”

Legislative and policy priorities for 2019 • CMC will press for the adoption of the Pilotage Review recommendations and support the Government’s commitment to introduce legislative change to the Pilotage Act before the 2019 Canadian federal election.

• New legislation (Vessel Incidental Discharge Act) recently passed in the United States will provide a platform for CMC and its industry partners to move closer to their goal to have a common ballast water management standard for the region. CMC will be working hard with policymakers to ensure that the new regime is harmonious with Canadian rules under development – and most importantly operationally and economically achievable.

• CMC will be advocating for marine-related investments as Canadian/U.S. governments advance their infrastructure plans and supporting creative solutions for additional ice-breaking capacity, e-navigation and ports’ needs.

• CMC will collaborate with partners to inform policymakers of capabilities and constraints around environmental concerns related to Canada’s Oceans Protection Plan, including underwater noise and whale protection.

• The CMC will continue to encourage governments to recognize that ships are the most fuel-efficient and carbon-friendly way to move goods and an important part of the solution to address climate change. As the shipping industry works hard to further reduce its carbon footprint, CMC will advocate for regulatory, policy and program measures that encourage increasing the use of inland shipping, incentivize technology development and reflect the operational realities of our members.

Chamber of Marine Commerce

 

Michigan island residents warned to stockpile supplies ahead of deep freeze

1/26 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. – The deep freeze forecast for the Great Lakes late this week and into next week could cause problems for people who live on some of Michigan’s islands.

The Coast Guard this week put out a cautionary notice to islanders living along the St. Marys River - including residents of Sugar and Neebish islands - that ice issues on the waterway could mean reduced, even interrupted ferry service. For these islands, the ferries are the primary way to reach the eastern Upper Peninsula mainland.

The National Weather Service has said the temperatures enveloping Michigan in the next week will be the coldest air to hit the state in many years. Data is showing next Wednesday may not even warm to zero degrees at some locations across Michigan. The Coast Guard Cutter Katmai Bay has been working the St. Marys River this week, flushing ice away from the Sugar Island ferry crossing. But more ice is expected to build up during the coming stretch of below-zero temps. And cargo ships and other vessels traveling through that area could break up and send ice drifting toward the ferry crossing. With that in mind, residents would be wise to plan ahead, the military said.

“The Coast Guard is working to avert impact to scheduled ferry service, as we are cognizant of the hardship affecting island residents' daily schedules caused by ferry service disruptions," said LTJG Sean V. Murphy of USCG Sector Sault Ste Marie. “Unfortunately, in extreme weather it is possible for conditions or unforeseen circumstances to impact the ability for vessels to transit the waterway.

"As a precaution, during this period of ice instability and wildly fluctuating temperatures, it is recommended that all island residents in the Northern Great Lakes region prepare for the possibility that ferry schedules may be reduced or possibly interrupted in the coming days and weeks.

“Recommended preparations include packing for overnight contingencies, stocking pantries, topping off propane and fuel oil for heating, preparing for medical needs and the inability to transport children to and from islands to attend school. Please prepare contingency plans on the mainland in the event school children cannot get back to the island after the beginning of the school day.”

The Coast Guard has drawn up contingency plans to get people off Neebish Island in case of an emergency. Late last spring, residents on Neebish Island were stranded for a couple weeks when ice buildup prevented the ferry from taking people to school and jobs on the mainland.

Islanders said they typically stockpile groceries, fuel and other items in case hard winters make it impossible to reach the mainland for short windows. But when they are cut off from the mainland for a week or more, the situation can get dicey.

For up-to-date information on ferry operations, call the Eastern Upper Peninsula Transportation Authority (EUPTA) delays, cancellations, and updates hotline at (906) 632-1516, check the local ferry Facebook pages, or the EUPTA website at EUPTA.net.

 

Waters between Mackinaw Island and St Ignace to close

1/26 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. – The Coast Guard will close the waters between Mackinaw Island and St Ignace on Monday at Noon. This action will steer commercial shipping and Coast Guard ice breaking activity away from the waterway to allow the development of ice. The Coast Guard reminds all recreational ice users to plan their activities carefully, use caution on the ice, and stay away from ice breaking areas.

USCG

 

Obituary: McCormick "Mac" Elroy Hooper

1/26 - McCormick "Mac" Elroy Hooper, 95, of Pelee Island, passed away January 24, 2019. Mac lived his life on the Great Lakes. His childhood summers were spent on Old Hen Island where his parents were caretakers of the Quinnenbog Club. His first job was stoking coal on the Pelee boat. Then he signed on to sail with Great Lakes freighters and over time earned his third, second and first mate's papers and finally his Master of Inland Waters Certificate. For many years he and his family ran a ferry service between Leamington and Pelee, first with their boat the Avon and later with the M/V Leamington. At Mac's request, there will be no funeral service but cremation and interment in Pelee Island Cemetery.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 26

In 1994 THALASSA DESGAGNES (steel propeller tanker, 131.43 meters, 5,746 gross tons, built in 1976, in Norway, as the a.) JOASLA, renamed b.) ORINOCO in 1979, c.) RIO ORINOCO in 1982) entered service for Groupe Desgagnes.

The keel for CLIFFS VICTORY, a). NOTRE DAME VICTORY (Hull#1229) was laid on January 26, 1945, at Portland, Oregon, by Oregon Shipbuilding Corp.

THOMAS F. COLE (Hull #27) was launched January 26, 1907, by the Great Lakes Engineering Works, Ecorse, Michigan, for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.

J. F. SCHOELLKOPF JR. was launched January 26, 1907, as a.) HUGH KENNEDY (Hull#349) at Lorain, Ohio, by the American Ship Building Co.

ST. LAWRENCE NAVIGATOR was launched in 1967, as a.) DEMETERTON (Hull#619) at South Shields, United Kingdom, by John Readhead & Sons, Ltd.

On 26 January 1898, the CITY OF DULUTH (wooden passenger/package freight vessel, 202 foot, 1,310 gross tons, built in 1874, at Marine City, Michigan, as a passenger vessel) was carrying passengers, corn, flour and general merchandise from Chicago to St. Joseph, Michigan, during a late season run when she struck an uncharted bar in a storm inbound to St. Joseph. She was heavily damaged and driven ashore 350 feet west of the north pier where she broke up. The Lifesaving Service rescued all 24 passengers and 17 crew members using breeches' buoy.

1986: The saltwater ship f) MARIKA L. was sold at auction to Scrap Hellas Ltd. on this date The vessel had arrived at Eleusis, Greece, under tow, on April 25, 1981, after an engine room fire on the Mediterranean. The ship had been arrested and partially sunk prior to being sold. It made one trip through the Seaway as a) DONATELLA PARODI in 1965 and was ultimately resold for scrapping at Aliaga, Turkey.

Data from: Skip Gilham, Joe Barr, Steve Haverty, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Tune-up time for U.S.-flag Great Lakes fleet

1/25 - Cleveland, Ohio – After moving nearly 84 million tons of cargo in 2018, U.S.-flag lakers are now undergoing more than $70 million in maintenance and modernization at Great Lakes shipyards. The work ranges from engine overhauls to installation of state-of-the-art radars and other navigation equipment.

While winter’s freezing, often subzero, temperatures pose real challenges for shipyards and their workers, it is the one time each year the fleet can undergo maintenance and modernization. In order to meet the needs of commerce during the late-March/mid-January sailing season, vessels must operate 24/7 and stop only long enough to load and discharge cargo.

Engine work is a large portion of the winter work program. Some vessels have power plants capable of generating nearly 20,000 horsepower and over the course of the season, a vessel can travel more than 70,000 miles. Engine parts need to be remachined and reinstalled so that the vessel can again operate nearly continuously in 2019.

Since the Great Lakes are freshwater, corrosion is not a major issue; hulls can last almost indefinitely. Still, with some vessels now having been in service since the 1950s, some steel, generally in cargo holds, will be replaced.

Four vessels will be drydocked this winter so they can undergo an out-of-water hull inspection as required by U.S. law. The vessels enter the drydock and are positioned such that when the drydock is drained, they rest on blocks. U.S. Coast Guard and American Bureau of Shipping inspectors then team with company representatives to sound the hull.

Lakers are more than freight-hauling vessels, they are the crew’s home for 10 months each year, so safety systems are also checked and serviced as necessary. In addition, upgrades to living quarters and galley equipment are scheduled on some vessels.

There are four major shipyards on the Great Lakes. They are located in Sturgeon Bay and Superior, Wisconsin; Erie, Pennsylvania; and Toledo, Ohio. During the winter employment at these yards swells to nearly 1,100.

Vessels also winter in other Great Lakes port cities such as Cleveland and Detroit and are serviced by local providers.

The pace can be challenging at Great Lakes shipyards during the winter. Two months from today many of the vessels will have “gotten up steam” and be heading to their first port-of-call. The March 25 opening of the locks at Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., will officially signal that another shipping season is underway.

Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Wisconsin governor commits $31M in budget plan for Marinette Marine

1/25 - Marinette, Wis. – Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers plans to commit $31 million in his budget plan to help Marinette Marine.

Evers went to Marinette on Thursday to announce his proposal to help the shipbuilder expand its shipyard and infrastructure. He says the expansion will help Marinette Marine compete for a $10 billion federal shipbuilding contract.

Evers says the shipyard expansion will help Marinette Marine keep its workforce of 1,500 employees and also add an additional 400 full time positions.

Marinette Marine has been one of two companies building Littoral Combat Ships since 2005. But the U.S. Navy is discontinuing the LCS in favor of a larger frigate class ship. Reports say Marinette Marine is in the running for design and construction of the new ship.

 

Green Bay ice breaking starting Saturday

1/25 - Green Bay, Wis. – Brown County Port officials are warning anyone who participates in water recreational activities that ice breaking will start this weekend. Starting Saturday the Coast Guard will be breaking the ice to keep the channels open for navigation. Crews will also establish and maintain tracks through the ice from Rock Island Passage to the Fox River.

“The Port’s ability to handle products throughout the winter months is a key piece in the current supply chain as well as an important factor in keeping the Northeast Wisconsin’s economy strong,” explained director of Brown County Port and Rescue Recovery, Dean Haen, in a press release. “Each year, there is a possibility that ice breaking will need to occur so that we can keep moving these important products where they need to go.”

The ice breaking will wrap up this upcoming Tuesday, January 29.

 

Port Reports -  January 25

Lake Michigan
Wilfred Sykes was at Indiana Harbor Thursday night.

Lake Huron
Thursday January 24th, 9:41 USCG Mackinaw departed Cheboygan for ice operations at the Straits of Mackinaw. After escorting Algoma Innovator from Lake Michigan to Lake Huron, Mackinaw departed for Mackinaw City, arriving there at 18:18. Algoma Innovator is bound for Sarnia.

Northern Lake Huron
Tuesday, McGregor Bay: USCG Mackinaw broke a channel from Manitoulin Island north to Fisher Harbour and escorted Frontenac to the dock to unload road salt. McGregor Bay: 8:15 USCG Mackinaw began ice operations. 10:55 Frontenac departed for Windsor.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Sault was loading salt on Thursday.

Detroit River – Raymond H
The tug Anglian Lady and barge Ironmaster departed Nicholson's Detroit Terminal and headed upbound for Soo, Ont., with the assistance of the USCG Bristol Bay and Morro Bay.  Bristol Bay turned downbound for their base late afternoon, Morrow Bay and Anglian Lady continued on. They made it as far as Harsens's Island before stopping for the night.

 

S.S. Norisle may be saved from scuttling

1/25 - Manitowaning, Ont. – The January 15 Assiginack council agenda package included an extensive report titled ‘S.S. Norisle refit project reinstatement’ and was listed as an information item, but was not dealt with by members of council during the meeting. Both Mayor Dave Ham and Councillor Rob Maguire were members of the S.S. Norisle Steamship Society, which hasn’t met in a number of years.

The report, penned by John Coulter, a member of the Steamship Society when it used to meet, begins, “As a result of the S.S. Norisle Steamship Society being able to regain access to Norisle, John Coulter and Wayne Fischer travelled from Toronto and Puslinch during December 27, 28, 29 to attend meetings with Mayor Dave Ham and Councillor Rob Maguire and perform an overview inspection of Norisle.”

“The primary purpose of the inspection was to determine the overall physical condition of Norisle that has evolved during the unfortunate and totally unnecessary lock out of the society since late 2015 and to allow re-engagement of formal relations between the Township of Assiginack and the S.S. Norisle Steamship Society,” the report continued.

“The past three lost years has resulted in a considerable loss of project traction that the society had gained,” the report noted. “It is therefore now incumbent upon the society to regain its strength and commitment in support of its faith in Norisle’s future for the benefit of Manitowaning, Ontario, Canada and future generations.”

As has been previously reported, the Society had sued Assiginack over rights to the aging passenger vessel after plans were made known to scuttle the Norisle as a dive site in Tobermory, which is set to take place as early as fall 2019. Assiginack settled with the Society last year, dropping its counter-claims and offering a cash reimbursement, which the Society agreed to. The amount spent on township lawyers was a hot topic of debate last year, especially during election time.

“There’s not a whole lot to talk about,” said Mayor Ham when contacted for comment. “They spent a couple of days going through the vessel from stem to stern and found the boat in reasonably good condition. We did have a meeting and they were impressed with the shape it was in.”

“What happens next is yet to be determined,” the mayor added. “(The society) would like to explore other avenues such as a total rebuild and may have a conversation with Purvis Shipyard (in Sault Ste. Marie). I feel it’s their ambition to revitalize the Friends (Steamship Society) again.”

When asked if he thought the Norisle would appear on Assiginack council’s agenda in the coming months, Mayor Ham said he thought it would.

The Expositor also reached out to Councillor Rob Maguire who said, “The Norisle, like all other municipal assets, is something we have to look at. Council needs to know what shape she’s in. This report lets us do that.”

The Expositor also contacted Mr. Coulter for comment. “A decision will be made by council as to next steps,” he said, “as to where we go from here.”

Manitoulin Expositor

 

Port Authority welcomes new Director of Communications and Marketing

1/25 - Duluth, Minn. – The Duluth Seaway Port Authority has announced that Grand Rapids native Jayson Hron has been named Director of Communications and Marketing. He returns to Minnesota to join the leadership team effective February 1.

Hron (pronounced ‘RŌHN’) brings an extensive background to the position, having served in a variety of public relations, copywriting, media relations, brand management and marketing capacities. Since 2013, Hron has been a communications manager for USA Hockey in Colorado Springs, Colo. For eight years prior, he led communications efforts as senior public relations specialist in the financial services industry, for the ING Group in St. Cloud, Minn.

After beginning his career as a sportswriter, editor and page designer with Murphy McGinnis Newspapers, he served as communications director for the United States Hockey League and, later, assistant director of public relations in the athletics department at the University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD), earning a pair of awards from the College Sports Information Directors of America.

In addition to his expertise in strategic communications, Hron’s skill sets include graphic design, video production and social media management. Since 1999, he also has been a freelance contributor to a number of media outlets including MinnPost.com, ESPN.com, St. Cloud Times, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and the Arizona Republic. A member of the Society for International Hockey Research board of directors, Hron has a bachelor’s degree in communication from UMD and a master’s in mass communications with a public relations and advertising emphasis from St. Cloud State University.

“My heart never left Duluth,” said Hron in accepting the position. “The Port Authority is uniquely equipped to help drive the economic growth, to define the future of northeastern Minnesota. I am grateful to have the opportunity to be part of an organization that helps the city thrive.”

In accepting the communications and marketing post at the Port Authority, Hron will succeed Adele Yorde, who has served the organization as public relations director since April 2008.

 

Registration now open for the 2019 Great Lakes Day Congressional Breakfast

1/25 - The 2019 Great Lakes Day Congressional Breakfast, sponsored by the Great Lakes Commission and the Northeast-Midwest Institute, will be held Thursday March 7, in Washington, D.C. The breakfast will feature dialogue on Great Lakes priorities by regional leaders and members of Congress who play a critical role in shaping Great Lakes policies.

For registration and additional information, please visit the event website. Online registration closes Friday, March 1, at noon EST.

Please note that the 2019 GLC Semiannual Meeting will be held separately in the Great Lakes Basin. More information about the semiannual meeting will be available soon on www.glc.org.

 

Storied Coast Guard ship can’t be fixed, shipyard says

1/25 - A Quebec shipyard hopeful of getting more federal work has condemned a storied Coast Guard ship as beyond repair, declining to bid on a lucrative contract to overhaul the 56-year-old CCGS Hudson on the grounds that it “presents a serious and real threat to the safety of life at sea.”

In a letter delivered Tuesday to officials with Public Services and Procurement Canada, Davie CEO Jared Newcombe said his company, based in Lévis, Que., would not bid on the contract to upgrade the Hudson as Davie believes the vessel to be beyond repair.

The federal government was trying to squeeze another few years of service out of the Hudson which, having been commissioned in 1963, is the oldest ship in the Coast Guard’s fleet. Bidding on the life-extension contract, expected to be worth about $20 million, ended this week.

It is the latest headache to bedevil a federal shipbuilding process that has been rife with delays. Davie’s remarkable letter — procurement experts cannot recall a bidder ever recommending scrapping a major vessel when offered a chance to upgrade it — underscores the difficulties successive federal governments have had in updating an aging Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Navy fleet.

“The Coast Guard ships are in serious need of replacement now,” said David Perry, a defence procurement expert and senior analyst at the Ottawa-based think tank, the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. The average service of a Coast Guard ship is about 36 years. Canada’s Maritime peers typically replace their Coast Guard vessels within 30 years of service.

The Harper government announced in 2007 that the Hudson was to be replaced by 2012 and the contract to replace her was awarded to Vancouver’s Seaspan shipyard. But that project is mired in delays and it is not clear when there will be a replacement. There is not yet a confirmed date for construction to start while the projected budget of $331 million to build the Hudson’s replacement is under review.

The Hudson did have a $4-million refit in Hamilton, Ont., in 2016, and has had more work done on it since it returned to its East Coast port in Dartmouth, N.S., in 2017.

But Davie told the government that, in its view, the Hudson has now reached the end of the line.

“The level of degradation to the hull, fuel tanks, onboard systems and other structural elements presents a serious and real threat to the safety of life at sea as well as the environment,” Newcombe wrote. Newcombe said his company had to consider its own liability should it have won the current life extension contract, “as well as ethical, repetitional and environmental considerations.”

Global News

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 25

In 1994 THALASSA DESGAGNES (steel propeller tanker, 131.43 meters, 5,746 gross tons, built in 1976, in Norway, as the a.) JOASLA, renamed b.) ORINOCO in 1979, c.) RIO ORINOCO in 1982) entered service for Groupe Desgagnes.

The keel for CLIFFS VICTORY, a). NOTRE DAME VICTORY (Hull#1229) was laid on January 26, 1945, at Portland, Oregon, by Oregon Shipbuilding Corp.

THOMAS F. COLE (Hull #27) was launched January 26, 1907, by the Great Lakes Engineering Works, Ecorse, Michigan, for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.

J. F. SCHOELLKOPF JR. was launched January 26, 1907, as a.) HUGH KENNEDY (Hull#349) at Lorain, Ohio, by the American Ship Building Co.

ST. LAWRENCE NAVIGATOR was launched in 1967, as a.) DEMETERTON (Hull#619) at South Shields, United Kingdom, by John Readhead & Sons, Ltd.

On 26 January 1898, the CITY OF DULUTH (wooden passenger/package freight vessel, 202 foot, 1,310 gross tons, built in 1874, at Marine City, Michigan, as a passenger vessel) was carrying passengers, corn, flour and general merchandise from Chicago to St. Joseph, Michigan, during a late season run when she struck an uncharted bar in a storm inbound to St. Joseph. She was heavily damaged and driven ashore 350 feet west of the north pier where she broke up. The Lifesaving Service rescued all 24 passengers and 17 crew members using breeches' buoy.

1986: The saltwater ship f) MARIKA L. was sold at auction to Scrap Hellas Ltd. on this date The vessel had arrived at Eleusis, Greece, under tow, on April 25, 1981, after an engine room fire on the Mediterranean. The ship had been arrested and partially sunk prior to being sold. It made one trip through the Seaway as a) DONATELLA PARODI in 1965 and was ultimately resold for scrapping at Aliaga, Turkey.

Data from: Skip Gilham, Joe Barr, Steve Haverty, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

U.S.-Flag Great Lakes fleet finishes 2018 on strong note

1/24 - Cleveland, Ohio – U.S.-flag Great Lakes freighters carried 8.5 million tons of cargo in December, an increase of 17.5 percent compared to a year ago. Driving the surge was a 16-percent increase in iron ore cargos. Limestone and coal cargos also registered increases, 31 and 19.5 percent, respectively.

For the year, U.S.-flag lakers carried 83.7 million tons of cargo, a decrease of 2.3 percent compared to 2017. Iron ore cargos totaled 45.8 million tons, a decrease of 0.4 percent. That the iron ore total essentially pulled even with 2017 is noteworthy; the delays that resulted from heavy ice in March and April had the trade 16 percent off 2017’s pace at the end of April. In fact, the U.S. and Canadian Coast Guards continued to break ice in Whitefish Bay at the eastern end of Lake Superior and the St. Marys River that connects Lake Superior to the lower four Great Lakes into May.

Coal cargos totaled 11.8 million tons, a decrease of 11.4 percent. Limestone loadings approached 22 million tons, an increase of 1.9 percent.

Most U.S.-flag lakers have arrived at their winter berth. Two vessels in the ore/stone/coal trade are proceeding to their lay-up docks. Two cement carriers are still in service.

Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Coast Guard provides update on ice conditions in St. Marys River

1/24 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. – The Coast Guard Cutter Katmai Bay was in the St. Marys River Wednesday and has flushed ice away from the Sugar Island ferry crossing, taking advantage of the warmer temperatures which are favorable for flushing operations; ice breakers will periodically visit the various crossings to minimize the impact of ferry services. Vessel Traffic Service St. Marys River also curtailed commercial activity through the river to assist in the effort to establish open water at the ferry crossing.

The current rise in temperature will transition to a blast of sub-zero arctic air later this week. Last weekend a similar blast of frigid air fueled the development of ice in the Sault's lower harbor and the lower St. Marys River. The forecasted temperature variance, occasional movements of commercial vessels carrying safety of life related cargoes, and logistical stops for fuel and supplies by ice breakers, elevates the risk of ice moving from the harbor to the Sugar Island Ferry crossing.

The Coast Guard is working to avert impact to scheduled ferry service, as we are cognizant of the hardship affecting island residents' daily schedules caused by ferry service disruptions. Unfortunately, in extreme weather it is possible for conditions or unforeseen circumstances to impact the ability for vessels to transit the waterway.

As a precaution, during this period of ice instability and wildly fluctuating temperatures, it is recommended that all island residents in the Northern Great Lakes region prepare for the possibility that ferry schedules may be reduced or possibly interrupted in the coming days and weeks. Recommended preparations include packing for overnight contingencies, stocking pantries, topping off propane and fuel oil for heating, preparing for medical needs and the inability to transport children to and from islands to attend school. Please prepare contingency plans on the mainland in the event school children cannot get back to the island after the beginning of the school day. For up-to-date information on ferry operations call the Eastern Upper Peninsula Transportation Authority (EUPTA) delays, cancellations, and updates hotline at (906) 632-1516, check the local ferry Facebook pages, or the EUPTA website at EUPTA.net.

USCG

 

Port Reports -  January 24

Lake Huron
Michigan/Great Lakes was mid-lake Wednesday night headed for Nanticoke. Frontenac was off the tip of the thumb with her AIS showing Windsor.

Lake Michigan
Algoma Innovator was unloading salt at Muskegon on Wednesday. Wilfred Sykes was off Manistee in the late evening headed for Indiana Harbor.

Escanaba, Mich.
Joseph H. Thompson tug/barge arrived Wednesday for layup at the North Shore Marine Terminal.

Goderich, Ont.
Algoma Sault was loading salt Wednesday.

Detroit River – Raymond H
Tugs Nebraska and Illinois assisted the tanker Iver Bright up the Rouge River to the Ajax Asphalt dock just above the NS Bridge Wednesday afternoon.

 

U.S. Great Lakes freighters carry 84 million tons of cargo in 2018

1/24 - Cleveland, Ohio – United States freighters carried 83.7 million tons of cargo throughout the Great Lakes in 2018, a decrease of 2.3 percent compared to 2017.

Iron ore cargos totaled 45.8 million tons, a decrease of 0.4 percent. The total is noteworthy, said Glen Nekvasil of the Lake Carriers' Association, because of heavy ice in March and April. The U.S. and Canadian Coast Guards continued to break ice in Whitefish Bay at the eastern end of Lake Superior and the St. Marys River into May.

Coal cargos totaled 11.8 million tons, a decrease of 11.4 percent. Limestone loadings approached 22 million tons, an increase of 1.9 percent.

In 2017, shipping on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway supported $35 billion in economic activity last year, $3.8 billion of that in Ohio. Most freighters are now docked for the winter.

Read more and view photos at this link: https://www.cleveland.com/news/2019/01/us-great-lakes-freighters-carry-84-million-tons-of-cargo-in-2018.html

 

See the Soo Locks drained of 73 million gallons of water

1/24 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. – After nine months of heavy use raising and lowering ships big and small as they traveled between Lake Huron and the higher Lake Superior, the Soo Locks are now closed for their annual maintenance season.

But before the work could begin, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had to drain the locks so workers can inspect the interior and make needed repairs.

"The winter work season has officially begun for crews at the Soo Locks," the Army Corps said on social media this week. "The last boats passed through the Poe Lock January 15 and the next day workers began dewatering the lock."

Each year, the locks handle more than 4,500 vessels carrying up to 80 million tons of cargo. Iron ore, limestone and coal make up the bulk of what is coming through on the big freighters.

Of the Soo's four locks, only the Poe and the MacArthur locks are in regular use in the St. Marys River during the shipping season. Draining them means pumping out about 73.3 million gallons of water, the Army Corps said. It takes about 22 million gallons of water to raise the level of the Poe Lock by 21 feet when a big ship comes through, the Army Corps said.

While a new lock is being built, the Army Corps has said it's imperative to keep the two frequently used locks in good repair. The Poe Lock, which is 1,200 feet long, handles all the big lake freighters. The smaller MacArthur Lock is 800 feet long.

The Army Corps has shared a dozen photos of how they prepped the Poe Lock for a list of winter maintenance projects. It took workers about 17 hours to pump the water out of the biggest lock. In addition to the photos, they've provided descriptions to go along with the work being shown in each image.

Take a little trip through the Soo Locks, from a perspective few people get to see at this link: https://www.mlive.com/expo/life-and-culture/g66l-2019/01/4ca2a212001490/see-the-soo-locks-drained-of-millions-of-gallons-of-water.html

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 24

JOHNSTOWN (Hull#4504) was launched January 24, 1952, at Sparrows Point, Maryland, by Bethlehem Sparrows Point Shipyard.

SPRUCEGLEN was launched January 24, 1924, as a.) WILLIAM K. FIELD (Hull#176) at Toledo, Ohio, by the Toledo Ship Building Co.

The steel barge MADEIRA (Hull#38) was launched on January 24, 1900, at Chicago, Illinois, by the Chicago Ship Building Co.

1964: RUTH ANN, a Liberian freighter that came through the Seaway in 1960, ran aground on the Chinchorro Bank off the Yucatan Peninsula enroute from Tampico to Puerto Barrios, Guatemala, as d) GLENVIEW. It later broke up as a total loss.

1967: DAMMTOR, a West German flag pre-Seaway trader, foundered in heavy weather as b) HASHLOSHA while about 80 miles west of Naples, Italy, enroute from Greece to Marseilles, France. A distress call was sent but the vessel went down with the loss of 21 lives before help could arrive. The ship had also made four Seaway voyages in 1959,

1988: ENDERS M. VOORHEES, under tow on the Mediterranean, broke loose in gale force winds and went aground about 56 miles south of Athens off Kythnos Island and broke up. The hull was salvaged in sections and the bow and stern reached the scrapyard at Aliaga, Turkey, in August 1989.

2009: DIAMOND QUEEN sank at the Gaelic Tugboat Co. dock at River Rouge. It was refloated on January 27, 2009.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Coast Guards clear blockage, moves vessels

1/23 - Coast Guard crews were busy overnight and Tuesday morning cleaning the ice blockage in the lower St. Clair River. The Canadian Coast Guard ships Samuel Risley and Griffon worked all night on clearing the ice blockage by running track maintenance up and down the river, flushing ice into Lake St. Clair.

About 8 a.m. the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Bristol Bay got underway from her base in Detroit escorting the Wilfred Sykes upbound. The Sykes had been waiting to transit upbound and was delayed by the ice. The Sykes is loaded with millscale for Indiana Harbor.

While the Bristol Bay and Sykes were upbound, the Samuel Risley was working with the tug Sharon M 1 and her barge to transit downbound. Barges can have great difficulty moving through ice choked channels as their flat bows push the ice eventually causing them to stop. This requires close escort by the icebreakers and frequent stopping to clear the ice around the barge.

About 9:30 a.m. and after a full night of ice breaking the Canadian ice breakers had the Sharon M 1 clear of the river and downbound unescorted on Lake St. Clair. The Samuel Risley turned unbound to escort the downbound tanker Algosea, which was ahead of the Herbert C. Jackson.

About 11:30 a.m. the USCG Bristol Bay had reached the lower St. Clair River with the Wilfred Sykes traveling about an hour behind. By noon all traffic was moving smoothly, with the upbound and downbound vessel passing in the St. Clair Cutoff Channel.

 

Algoma collects refund on four cancelled shipbuilding deals

1/23 - Canadian shipping company Algoma Central Corporation has received full refund of installment payments for the now-cancelled shipbuilding contracts with Croatia’s Uljanik and 3. Maj Shipyard.

The company entered into five shipbuilding contracts with 3. Maj Shipyard, an operating unit of Uljanik.

After considerable delay, the first of the five vessels was delivered in 2018, however, Algoma decided to cancel the remaining four contracts. The decision was made amid the shipyard’s financial difficulties, which led to a much-publicized attempt to refinance the company and shipyard management was unable to put forward a credible plan that would lead to completion of the remaining hulls.

Demands for repayment of the related installments were made in December 2018 and the banks guaranteeing the repayment of the amounts have now remitted a total of CAD 115 million (USD 86.6 million) in full settlement of the claims.

“While we are extremely disappointed in the failure by the shipyard to complete the vessels on time, the shipyard and its banks have been very cooperative in finalizing the cancellations and refunding the installments promptly,” said Peter Winkley, Chief Financial Officer of Algoma.

As a result of contract cancellations, the company has taken steps to extend the expiry dates on three existing option contracts held with Yangzijiang Shipyard in China (YZJ) until later in 2019. The options, which provide Algoma Central Corporation with a choice to build Equinox Class self-unloaders or gearless bulkers, were to expire at the end of December.

“The extensions provide Algoma time to assess which type of ship to build, taking into account our current fleet plan and the needs of our customers,” said Gregg Ruhl, Chief Operating Officer of Algoma.

World Maritime News

 

Port Reports -  January 23

Northern Lake Huron
Algoma Innovator was bound for Muskegon with salt. Algoma Sault was headed south with no destination listed.

Southern Lake Huron
Algoma Niagara was downbound for Windsor Tuesday evening.

Lake Michigan
Joseph H. Thompson tug/barge departed Gary Tuesday afternoon for layup at North Shore Marine Terminal in Escanaba.

Detroit River – Raymond H
The Herbert C Jackson arrived at Nicholson's Ecorse Terminal Tuesday afternoon for lay up.

 

Lake Erie ice quickly expanding

1/23 - Toledo, Ohio – The sudden drop in temperatures has been a shock to Lake Erie with ice now quickly forming. The ice is more quickly forming in the shallowest western portion of the Lake and along the northern lakeshore. There is no official ice data current due to the government shutdown but around 20-25 percent of the lake appears to be covered by at least some ice.

View the ice maps at this link: http://www.wtol.com/2019/01/21/lake-erie-ice-quickly-expanding

 

Cornwall firefighters rescue late night boater on St. Lawrence River

1/23 - Cornwall, Ont. – Cornwall firefighters were called to action on the St. Lawrence River at 7:40 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 19 when a male was reportedly stuck in his boat.

Platoon Chief Jody Dewar explained that the male was crossing the St. Lawrence River from his home on Pilon Island when the wind pushed him off course. The male was unable to walk on the ice safely and became stranded approximately 150 ft. from shore. “Our guys went out and brought him back in,” said Chief Dewar.

A full platoon of firefighters assisted with the water rescue. Police and paramedic personnel were also on the scene. The male was reportedly feeling cold but suffered no health effects. Chief Dewar explained that a rescue event like this has not occurred locally in quite some time. In the past, firefighters have rescued individuals who have fallen in the water in freezing temperatures.

At the time of rescue, Environment Canada reported that the temperature in Cornwall was -23 Celsius with a wind chill of -33 Celsius. An extreme cold warning and winter storm warning have been in effect since Friday, Jan. 18.

Cornwall News

 

Algoma to up stake in CSL pool, acquire Oldendorff’s trio

1/23 - Owner and operator of dry and liquid bulk carriers Algoma Central Corporation have inked a definitive agreement to acquire the interest held by Oldendorff Carriers GMBH & Co. in the CSL International Pool, including the three vessels owned by Oldendorff operating in the pool.

As a result of the transaction, Algoma’s interest in the pool will increase to approximately 40 percent. The company currently owns five vessels operating in the pool.

The pool consists of 18 self-unloading vessels ranging from handy-sized to panamax and provides specialized shipping services to customers along the coasts of the Americas and in the Caribbean.

As a result of this transaction, Algoma will acquire the handy-sized m/v Alice Oldendorff, and the m/v Harmen Oldendorff and the m/v Sophie Oldendorff, both of which are panamax vessels, for USD 100 million. The deal is expected to close late in the second quarter of 2019.

“Increasing our participation in the pool has been a strategic interest for Algoma for some time and the completion of this transaction is aligned with that intent,” said Ken Bloch Soerensen, President and Chief Executive Officer of Algoma.

“During 2018, we assumed technical management of our existing pool ships and opened a new office in Fort Lauderdale with an expanded technical staff. We expect to assume technical management of these three ships seamlessly on closing.”

Algoma expects to fund the transaction principally from the proceeds of the refund guarantees from the cancellation of four Croatian shipbuilding contracts.

“Redeploying the proceeds of the refund guarantees in this manner enables us to put those funds to work quickly in a business we know well with attractive returns,” said Peter Winkley, Chief Financial Officer of Algoma.

“Although a decision is pending on the replacement of the vessels that were to have been built by Uljanik shipyard, we expect to fund any installments required on such replacement contracts from operating cash flows and available credit facilities.”

The company cancelled four ships at Uljanik last year as the struggling Croatian shipyard was making very slow progress on the construction. The first contract for the construction of one Equinox self-unloader was rescinded in September 2018. Three more cancellations of Equinox vessel contracts followed suit in October 2018.

According to Soerensen, the cancellations eliminated CAD 145 million (USD 110 million) of commitments and CAD 112 million of installment refunds was expected.

World Maritime News

 

Great Lakes Maritime Academy Captain's Dinner March 1

1/23 - Traverse City, Mich. – The Great Lakes Maritime Academy’s annual Captain’s Dinner, Ship/Building Tours, and Auction will be held Friday, March 1 at 6 p.m. at the Great Lakes Maritime Academy and Lobdell's, the Great Lakes Culinary Institute’s practice restaurant at Northwest Michigan College’s Great Lakes campus.

The event offers a dinner prepared by Great Lake Culinary Institute chefs, a chance to tour the T/S State of Michigan, take a turn in the Academy’s ship simulators, meet the students, faculty and staff and participate in an auction. Discounted hotel rooms will be available.

Proceeds from the dinner benefit the following cadet organizations: Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME), Women on the Water (WOW) and the Propeller Club, Student Port 150.

Tickets and more information are available here: https://www.nmc.edu/maritime/cadet-life/glma-captains-dinner/index.html

 

Obituary: Owner of Sault’s West Pier West Pier Drive-in dies

1/23 - Patricia (Patte) Trainor, the recently retired owner of West Pier Drive-in in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., died Monday in St. Petersburg, Fla. She was 65. Trainor retired from her business last September.

The restaurant, a favorite of many boatwatchers at the Soo Locks, is located at the West Pier above the Soo Locks. Vessel captains often blow a salute when they are opposite the restaurant and Trainor and her staff return the favor by running out to wave and shout hello. If a vessel is tied up to the pier for any length of time, the restaurant has been known to deliver burgers and fries to the crews.

Trainor was born in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., on May 26, 1953. She led an active life as a registered nurse and caregiver, with a career at Michigan Corrections that spanned more than 30 years. However the West Pier was her pride and joy. She worked tirelessly at the restaurant from sun up to sun down and folks would come from all over to enjoy the best burger in Northern Michigan. She had just hung up her apron in September for the last time to start enjoying retirement and was looking forward to lazy summer days at camp on Lake Superior and the warm winter sunshine in St. Petersburg, Fla.

Trainor is survived by her husband, Fred, and two stepchildren. A celebration of her life is planned for the summer.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 23

January 23 - The CELTIC (wooden schooner-barge, 190 foot, 716 gross tons, built 1890, at W. Bay City, Michigan) broke away from the steamer H.E. RUNNELS during a fierce gale on Lake Huron on 29 November 1902, and was lost with all hands. No wreckage was found until 23 January 1903, when a yawl and the captain’s desk with the ship’s papers were found on Boom Point, southeast of Cockburn Island.

GEORGE A. STINSON struck a wall of the Poe Lock at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan on January 23, 1979. The damage was estimated at $200,000.

The rail car ferry GRAND HAVEN sailed on her first trip as a roll on/roll off carrier from Port Burwell on January 23, 1965, loaded with 125 tons of coiled steel bound for Cleveland and Walton Hills, Ohio.

1983: The Greek freighter CAPTAIN M. LYRAS visited the Seaway in 1960 and 1961 and returned as b) ANGELIKI L. in 1965. It arrived at Gadani Beach on this date as c) ANAMARIA for scrapping.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Coast Guard working to break ice jam in St. Clair River

1/22 - St. Clair, Mich. – Residents near the St. Clair River in southern St. Clair County woke Monday to rising water levels. "That wind just blew the ice and raised the water levels so quickly," said Jeff Friedland, director of St. Clair County Homeland Security/Emergency Management.

An ice jam formed in the St. Clair River near Algonac, resulting in climbing water levels and flooding along the river and in canals.

Water levels near East China increased by about 2 feet, Friedland said Monday afternoon. He said a Canadian vessel started working to clear the jam Monday, with an additional Canadian vessel and a U.S. Coast Guard ice breaker headed to the area.

"One more will be here tonight and another tomorrow morning in an effort to break the ice dam in the Algonac area," Friedland said.

Austin Moran, lieutenant junior grade with the U.S. Coast Guard Sector Detroit, said work was expected to continue throughout Monday evening. He said the Canadian cutter Griffon was the first vessel on the scene, and the U.S. Bristol Bay will assist Tuesday.

Ice jamming in the area and causing flooding at that location isn't unexpected, he said. "We had some issues last year, this is a hot problem area, its just due to the bend in the river," Moran said.

The laker Wilfred Sykes, heading up river, is being held at a Detroit dock until the jam is cleared. The ice build up also resulted in the Harsens Island ferry being shutdown. It had plans to try to reopen at noon Tuesday.

Port Huron Times Herald

 

Tug and barge headed to Escanaba for layup

1/22 -  The Joseph H. Thompson Jr. and barge Joseph H. Thompson will be coming into Escanaba on Tuesday about 1 p.m. They will be laying up at Basic Marine’s dock in Escanaba. It is unknown if a Coast Guard icebreaker will assist with their arrival. The ETA is subject to change due to ice conditions (Monday evening, the pair were still at Gary, according to AIS).

USCG

 

Port Reports -  January 22

Straits of Mackinac – Jon-Paul
On Monday evening, USCGC Alder was hove to just off St Helena Island (west of the Mackinac Bridge) presumably to help vessels transiting the Straits. The Straits are now ice covered for the first time this winter. First up will be the Algoma Niagara heading east Monday night and then the Wilfred Sykes due westbound Tuesday (delayed at Detroit due to ice).

The South Passage has been closed to navigation for the winter and all traffic will need to use Round Island Passage. The Michigan/Great Lakes arrived in Cheboygan at approximately 18:30 to off load a cargo of gasoline.

Northern Lake Huron
Monday, January 21st 2:23 Sharon M1 weighed anchor and departed for Port Maitland.

Southern Lake Huron
Herbert C. Jackson was anchored Monday night, likely due to ice conditions in the St. Clair River.

St. Clair River
The Canadian Coast Guard Ship Griffon was upbound and stopped for the night below Algonac. The CCGS Samuel Risley was downbound in the lower river Monday night. The tug Sharon M1 and barge were docked off Courtright at the Trillium dock.

Detroit River – Raymond H
The Wilfred Sykes stopped to fuel at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal on Monday and was still there overnight due to ice conditions on the St. Clair River.

Lake Michigan
Algoma Sault was off Traverse City Monday night, most likely heading back to Goderich for another salt load.

Muskegon, Mich.
Algoma Sault departed Monday after unloading road salt.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Innovator was loading salt on Monday.

Sandusky, Ohio
Calumet was reported stuck in the ice in Sandusky near the boat ramp/Deepwater Marina. Late Monday night she was stopped off the Erie Sand & Gravel dock where she was expected to unload a cargo of salt from Fairport.

Ashtabula, Ohio
Tug Defiance and barge Ashtabula were in Lake Erie Monday night with an AIS desitination of “Ashtabeautiful.”

Erie, Pa
Tug Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder were expected to arrive late Monday, likely for winter lay-up.

 

65-foot schooner sailed from Florida to Michigan to begin work on the Great Lakes

1/22 - Bay City, Mich. – On a rainy Tuesday in January along the banks of the Saginaw River, a handful of volunteers are busy refurbishing a majestic 65-foot schooner housed under a temporary tent.

When they finish their work, the sailboat named Appledore V will take to the waters of Saginaw Bay and the Great Lakes and will join a tall ships fleet coming this summer to Bay City. The boat is owned by the Bay City-based nonprofit BaySail.

“Well, we’ve owned the Appledore V for a lot of years now,” said Shirley Roberts, executive director of BaySail. “For a period of time, it was actually deployed to Florida where she was generating income that would help support operations back home.”

BaySail uses the Appledore V and its sister ship, the 85-foot Appledore IV based in Bay City, for excursion cruises, environmental education and sail-training programs for youths. The group has owned both sailboats since 1998.

In the winter of 2010, the Appledore V relocated to Ft. Myers, Florida, then Key West, Florida, in 2012. There, paid cruises generated money for BaySail operations back home. In 2016, the ship sailed back to Bay City and made an appearance in the 2016 Tall Ship Celebration.

The Appledore V can have roughly 24 people on a day sail with nine overnight, while it’s larger sibling can hold 48 during the day and 10 overnight. Both were also built in Florida in 1992 and 1989.

Read more and view a photo gallery at this link: https://www.mlive.com/news/saginaw-bay-city/2019/01/this-65-foot-schooner-sailed-from-florida-to-michigan-to-begin-its-new-work-on-the-great-lakes.html

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 22

The c.) WOODLAND, a.) FRENCH RIVER) was sold to International Capital Equipment of Canada and cleared the lakes from Montreal January 22, 1991, under the Bahamian flag with the modified name to d.) WOODLANDS.

GOLDEN HIND was sold on January 22, 1973, to Trico Enterprises Ltd., Hamilton, Bermuda (Quebec & Ontario Transportation Co. Ltd., Thorold, Ontario, mgr.).

January 22, 1913 - SAINTE MARIE (Hull#127) was launched at Toledo, Ohio, by Craig Shipbuilding Co.

1976: INGRID WEIDE first came to the Great Lakes in 1953, and the West German freighter returned on many occasions including 23 trips through the Seaway to the end of 1965. The vessel stranded as c) DENEB B. off Borkum Island, West Germany, while inbound for Emden with a cargo of stone. The hull broke in two and sank but all on board were rescued.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  January 21

Green Bay -
Tug Michigan and Barge Great Lakes departed Green Bay Sunday evening escorted by the tug Barbara Andrie. The USCG Katmai Bay was stopped in the ice off Pestigo Point.

Northern Lake Huron
Saturday, January 19th Straits of Mackinac: 4:35 Algoma Niagara passed through to Lake Michigan for Milwaukee with a load of road salt. 22:21 Algoma Sault passed through to Lake Michigan for Muskegon with a load of road salt. Lake Huron: 21:00 Sharon M1 went to anchor west of Detour passage off of St Vitol Point to wait out weather. Sunday, Straits of Mackinac: 10:14 Herbert C Jackson passed through to Lake Huron for Detroit.

 

Worker injured at Welland Canal

1/21 - Labor officials will investigate after a worker was injured at the Welland Canal early Saturday.

The accident happened during maintenance work at Lock 4 in Thorold when piece of platform fell about 80 feet and struck a man on the head.

No further information was available.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 21

On 21 January 1895, CHICORA (wooden propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 199 foot, 1,123 gross tons, built in 1892, at Detroit, Michigan) was bound from Milwaukee for St. Joseph on a mid-winter run when he foundered with little trace. All 25 on board were lost. The ship's dog was found wandering on the beach by St. Joseph, Michigan, a few days later. A well-organized search for the wreck continued until mid-June. Many small pieces of wreckage were washed ashore in the spring.

On January 21, 1978, the Multifood Elevator #4 at Duluth, Minnesota, caught fire and collapsed onto the deck of the steamer HARRY L. ALLEN, which was laid up beneath the elevator. Her pilothouse was destroyed by fire. Severe warping and cracking of her plating occurred when cold water was poured onto her red-hot deck. Declared a constructive total loss, she was scrapped at Duluth in 1978.

1904: HENDRICK S. HOLDEN was torn loose by flooding on the Black River at Lorain, Ohio, and the vessel smashed a coal dump. It also crushed and sank the tug GULL on its way into Lake Erie. The bulk carrier last sailed as VANDOC (i) in 1965.

1921: G.J. BOYCE had been sold off-lakes in 1916. It was inbound for a Cuban port when it lost its rudder. The wooden schooner stranded near Porto Padre and broke up as a total loss.

1928: The Lake Michigan rail car ferry MADISON struck a sand bar off Grand Haven and went aground with close to $50,000 in damage. High winds and ice were a factor.

1959: High winds at Buffalo tore the MacGILVRAY SHIRAS loose when a heavy current swept the Buffalo River. The wayward vessel struck MICHAEL K. TEWSBURY and MERTON E. FARR and eventually demolished the Michigan Ave. Bridge. The damaged SHIRAS was not repaired and arrived in Hamilton in June 1959 for scrapping.

1978: VESLEFJELL was sailing as e) MARLEN when abandoned by the crew after developing leaks in heavy seas near the Canary Islands. The vessel was enroute to Nigeria with cement when it went down. It had been a Great Lakes trader beginning in 1951 and last called inland in 1962.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Brian Wroblewski, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  January 20

Detroit River – Raymond H and Tom Hynes
On Saturday, the tanker Iver Bright arrived at the Ajax Paving Asphalt Terminal to unload.

 

Government shutdown could delay S.S. Badger season

1/20 - Manitowoc, Wis. – Mayor Justin Nickels says the federal government shutdown could delay the start of the sailing season for the S.S. Badger car ferry, hurting the local tourist economy.

On Thursday, Nickels called for U.S. lawmakers to reopen the government, noting the city of Ludington, Mich., has filed a notice of force majeure for work on the city’s car ferry dock. Ludington cannot continue work on its dock without grant dollars from the federal Department of Transportation, Nickels said, meaning the popular ferry’s season could be on hold until work is completed.

The cities of Manitowoc and Ludington received $5 million federal grants last year for repairs on the docks, where the S.S. Badger loads and unloads people taking the ferry across Lake Michigan.

Manitowoc’s portion of the project is $1.3 million, with a local match of $279,000. Manitowoc also received $2.9 million from the State of Wisconsin through the Harbor Assistance Program for support of the upgrades, Nickels said.

Total cost for repairs on the Manitowoc dock are just more than $5 million, with Lake Michigan car ferry company picking up remaining costs.

Work on Manitowoc’s dock began in fall after the ferry’s season ended, and will continue through spring with plans for completion before the start of the 2019 sailing season. However, Manitowoc and Ludington officials were informed that invoices for the federal grant would not be processed because of the shutdown, even though work continues on the docks and invoices are generated.

Nickels said Manitowoc will continue with the local government funding costs in anticipation of reimbursement from the transportation department once the federal government reopens.

Ludington leaders, however, indicated the city cannot carry costs of the project during the shutdown, so work could be halted on the Michigan side of the ferry route. The Ludington dock has already been removed, Nickels said, so if the work is stopped for a long period of time, the S.S. Badger may not set sail on time — even if the Manitowoc dock is completed.

The mayor said the S.S. Badger has a major economic impact for Manitowoc and any delay in sailing would directly affect the local economy.

Herald Times-Reporter

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 20

20 January 1980 - The E. M. FORD (406 foot, 4,498 gross tons, built in 1898, at Lorain, Ohio as a bulk freighter, converted to self-unloading bulk cement carrier in 1956, at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin) was raised at her dock in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She sank on Christmas Eve of 1979, when gale force winds forced her from her moorings and repeatedly slammed her bow into the dock facing. Crews had to remove a solid three feet of hardened cement and patch her holed bow before she could be re-floated.

NORDIC BLOSSOM was launched January 20, 1981 as the a.) NORDIC SUN.

On January 20, 1917, American Ship Building's Lorain yard launched the steel bulk freighter EUGENE W. PARGNY for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.

January 20, 1911 - The ANN ARBOR NO 5 made her first trip into Kewaunee. On 20 January 1923, CHOCTAW (steel propeller packet, 75 foot, 53 gross tons, built in 1911, at Collingwood) burned at her dock at Port Stanley, Ontario.

On 20 January 1978, HARRY L. ALLEN (formerly JOHN B. COWLE, built in 1910) burned at her winter lay-up berth at Capital 4 grain elevator dock in Duluth. She was declared a total loss.

1907: WILLIAM NOTTINGHAM broke loose in wild winds and flooding at Buffalo. When the storm subsided, the ship had come to rest high and dry about 440 yards from the channel. A total of 12 vessels stranded in the storm but this one was the biggest challenge. A new channel had to be dug to refloat the vessel.

1960: LAKE KYTTLE, under tow as b) JAMES SHERIDAN, foundered in a storm on Long Island Sound. The ship had been built at Manitowoc in 1918 and converted to a barge at River Rouge in 1927 before returning to the sea about 1945.

1962: The Liberty ship FIDES was a Seaway visitor in 1961. It went aground at Grosser Vogelsand, in the Elbe Estuary and broke in two as a total loss.

1975: The tug CATHY McALLISTER sank alongside the dock at Montreal after suffering some grounding damage on the St. Lawrence. The vessel was salvaged on February 13, 1975. It was scrapped at Port Weller as d) DOC MORIN in the fall of 2011.

1979: ZAMOSC first came to the Great Lakes in 1971. It was enroute from Montreal to Antwerp when in a collision with the JINEI MARU off Terneuzen, Holland. The damaged ship was beached but it heeled over in the sand and had to be broken up.

1981: The former SILVER FIR, a Seaway caller in 1977, ran aground and became a total off Libya as d) GALAXY II.

1983: The YDRA sustained an engine room fire and went aground about a mile east of Bizerta, Tunisia, as a total loss. All on board were saved and the hull is still there. The ship first came to the Great Lakes as a) MANCHESTER PORT in 1966 and was back as b) BIOKOVO in 1972.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Barge James L. Kuber renamed Maumee

1/19 - The barge James L. Kuber has a new name. Photos on Facebook Friday morning from the Donjon shipyard in Erie, Pa., showed the name Maumee painted on her bow. This will be second vessel to bear the name in the Lower Lakes/Rand Logistics fleet.

The Kuber was built was built in 1953 at Great Lakes Engineering Works, River Rouge, Mich., as the Reserve. She was converted to a self-unloading articulated barge in 2007 for KK Integrated Logistics.

 

Ice breaking operations scheduled in northern Green Bay

1/19 - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Katmai Bay (WTGB-101) will conduct ice breaking operations in northern Green Bay near Escanaba, Mich., on Sunday January 20.

Katmai Bay will establish a track south of Escanaba Light towards Minneapolis Shoal and then east to Rock Island Passage. This work conducted ahead of the Joseph H. Thompson Jr. arriving Monday to lay-up at the Basic Marine Shipbuilding facility.

The Coast Guard reminds all recreational ice users to plan their activities carefully, use caution on the ice, and stay away from the ice breaking area.

 

Seaway activity bursts past 40 million tonnes in 2018

1/19 - Cornwall, Ont. – The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation (SLSMC) has announced that tonnage on the waterway during the 2018 navigation season totaled 40.9 million tonnes. The highest result since 2007, much of the credit for the increase in tonnage can be given to healthy movements of grain, the best on record since the turn of the century. Marketing efforts under the Highway H2O initiative served as a catalyst to spur increased movements of a broad range of cargoes including grain, road salt, stone, cement, gypsum and refined fuels.

“We are very pleased with the results recorded over the past year” said the SLSMC’s President and CEO, Terence Bowles. “After completing the first year with Hands Free Mooring installed at all of our high-lift locks, it is gratifying to see that our efforts to boost system efficiency and heighten our competitive position are bearing strong results. This new mooring technology eliminates the need for special vessel fittings, enabling the St. Lawrence Seaway to welcome a broader range of ships from the world fleet.”

“Total tonnage on the St. Lawrence Seaway exceeded the 5-, 10-, and 15-year averages, making 2018 an exceptionally strong shipping season, the best in over a decade,” added Craig H. Middlebrook, Deputy Administrator of the U.S. Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation.

“In particular, we were pleased to see heightened activity on the Seaway in December. Overall gains in year-over-year commodity increases were widespread, most notably in U.S. grain export trade. The investments in Seaway infrastructure and technology are achieving greater efficiencies for our customers and enhancing the binational waterway’s global competitiveness.”

The 2018 navigation season concluded on December 31st, with the transit of the Cedarglen through the Welland Canal’s Lock 8 ‎at 12:35, heading for Lake Erie. In the Montreal sector, the M.V. Floragracht was the last ship to transit, clearing the St. Lambert Lock at 19:45 on December 30th as she proceeded on her voyage to Europe.

The St. Lawrence Seaway enables cargo to move within North America and also serves as a vital international gateway, supporting trade with more than 50 countries across the globe. Since its opening in 1959, almost 3 billion tonnes of cargo valued at over $450 billion has moved through the St. Lawrence Seaway’s 15 locks.

The recent completion of the The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation’s modernization program, which includes Hands Free Mooring and remote operation of locks from centralized operation control centres, represents the greatest advancement in Seaway operations since its inception in 1959. As a result, the Seaway has become even more competitive. With the elimination of tie-up lines for most vessels, Seaway employees and vessel crews face fewer safety risks and vessels experience less “wear and tear” as they enter and exit locks.

“The SLSMC continues to take a leadership role in the utilization of technology to better serve our customers. With strong advancements in efficiency, safety and flexibility, the stage has been set for a St. Lawrence Seaway that will effectively serve its stakeholders for decades to come. As we prepare to celebrate the Seaway’s 60th anniversary at our 2019 season opening, and take stock of the progress made, we can truly say that we are ready for the future!” said CEO Bowles.

 

Port Reports -  January 19

St. Marys River – Joy Fett
Tanker Algonova was unloading at the Purvis Marine dock in Soo, Ont., below the Soo Locks on Friday. She was escorted up the river by the Canadian Coast Guard Cutter Samuel Risley.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – Daniel Lindner
The tug Sharon M I arrived Sturgeon Bay via the ship canal at 08:00 Friday, pushing the barge Huron Spirit, and docked at Bay Shipbuilding. Around the same time, the tug Barbara Andrie departed and spent the day escorting the tank barge Great Lakes/tug Michigan to Green Bay. Barbara Andrie had been laid up at the shipyard since early January when she brought in her barge A-397 for the winter. Paul R. Tregurtha spent most of Friday morning struggling in ice after entering the channel from Green Bay, and finally arrived at the shipyard around noon. She was immediately placed in drydock. Later Friday afternoon, the tug Sharon M I left the shipyard, with a destination of Port Maitland listed. In addition to Friday's arrivals, laid up for the winter so far are American Courage, John G. Munson, Joseph L. Block, A-397, Roger Blough, James R. Barker, Burns Harbor, and Cason J. Callaway.

Lake Michigan Traffic
Herbert C. Jackson was at Indiana Harbor Friday night. Algoma Innovator was north of Sheboygan headed for Goderich.

Lake Huron Traffic
Joseph H. Thompson was northbound off the tip of the thumb Friday night headed for layup in Escanaba.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Sault was loading salt Friday for Muskegon, Mich.

Detroit River – Raymond H
The tug Anglian Lady and her barge Ironmaster arrived Friday morning to unload steel coils at Nicholson's Detroit Terminal. The tanker Algoscotia arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to load/unload.

Toledo, Ohio
American Century arrived at the former CSX # 3 Coal Dock (now the Midwest Stone Dock) on Friday morning for winter layup.

Lake Erie
Wilfred Sykes was mid-lake headed for Nanticoke Friday night to load millscale. Algoma Hansa and Algocanada were anchored off Nanticoke.

 

Chamber of Marine Commerce kicks off 60th anniversary celebrations

1/19 - The Chamber of Marine Commerce kicked off its 60th anniversary celebrations at its Annual Marine Club Luncheon in Toronto Thursday, a signature event during a week of industry meetings which attracts a crowd of more than 200 Canadian and U.S. shipping, industrial and agricultural executives along with federal, provincial and local government representatives.

The Chamber was formed in 1959 to provide a voice for the customers and ship operators moving goods on the newly opened St. Lawrence Seaway. Today, 60 years later, this bi-national industry association represents more than 130 members along the entire marine transportation supply chain advocating for policy that recognizes inland and coastal shipping's significant advantages in the broader Great Lakes, St. Lawrence, Coastal and Arctic regions.

“Marine has a great story to tell,” said Bruce Burrows, president of the Chamber of Marine Commerce. “And after 60 years, we remain immensely proud to be able to share the stories of our members — who are always looking for new ways to deliver for their customers, ensure the safety of their people and protect the environment in which they operate.” Fundamentally, this means keeping the $6 trillion economy in eastern North America competitive, with its 329,000 marine-related jobs and CDN$100 billion worth of international and domestic cargo moving by ship every year.

Chamber of Marine Commerce

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 19

On 19 January 1824, the Welland Canal Company was incorporated to build the first Welland Canal.

DAVID M. WHITNEY (steel propeller freighter, 412 foot, 4,626 gross tons) was launched on 19 January 1901, by the Detroit Ship Building Company (Hull #138) in Wyandotte, Michigan, for the Gilchrist Transportation Company of Cleveland, Ohio. Renamed b.) EDWIN L. BOOTH in 1914, c.) G.N. WILSON in 1921, d.) THOMAS BRITT in 1928, and e.) BUCKEYE in 1943. She lasted until 1969, when she was scrapped in Spain.

January 19, 1927 - The Grand Trunk carferry MADISON was christened with a bottle of Wisconsin milk. She entered service in March of 1927.

CLARENCE B. RANDALL, the a.) J.J. SULLIVAN of 1907, was towed to Windsor, Ontario, on January 19, 1987, for scrapping.

1967: The former ELMBAY ran aground near Barra Grande along the coast of northern Brazil as e) SIMANSUR and was abandoned as a total loss. The ship saw Great Lakes service from 1923 until 1942 for several firms including Canada Steamship Lines.

1998: The Cypriot freighter FLARE was south of Newfoundland when it broke in two while inbound in ballast for Montreal. The stern section sank quickly. The bow drifted for several days before it too went down. Four members of the crew clung to an overturned lifeboat and were saved. The ship had been a Seaway trader as a) DORIC FLAME in 1977 and returned as b) FLAME in 1987 and as c) FLARE in 1993.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Behemoth cargo ship arrives at Port of Milwaukee

1/18 - Milwaukee, Wis. – The 1,000-foot Stewart J. Cort has arrived at the Port of Milwaukee, and it will spend the winter in the inner harbor, according to company officials. The company said 1,000-foot cargo ships frequently winter in Milwaukee, but it is extremely rare to have a ship that large call on Milwaukee during the shipping season. The Cort usually carries iron ore from Duluth and Superior to steel mills in Indiana and elsewhere, the company said.

View a video at this link: https://www.tmj4.com/news/local-news/behemoth-cargo-ship-arrives-at-port-of-milwaukee

 

Port Reports -  January 18

St. Marys River – Joy Fett
Algonova was upbound on Lake Huron Thursday heading for Soo, Ont., to unload petroleum products at a dock in the lower St. Marys River. She should be in the river during the day Friday.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – Daniel Lindner
Cason J. Callaway arrived in Sturgeon Bay via the ship canal Thursday morning for winter layup at Bay Shipbuilding.

Lake Michigan Traffic
Algoma Innovator was in the northern part of the lake headed for Milwaukee with salt. Herbert C. Jackson was nearby headed for Indiana Harbor, while Paul R. Tregurtha was headed for Sturgeon Bay. Just ahead of them was the tug/barge Michigan/Great Lakes, bound for Green Bay. Tug Sharon M 1 was off Milwaukee headed for Sturgeon Bay.

Lake Huron Traffic
Tanker Algonova was upbound for Soo, Ont., Thursday night. Wilfred Sykes and Frontenac were downbound. The Sykes is heading to Nanticoke, the Frontenac for Windsor.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Sault was loading salt Thursday evening.

Detroit, Mich. – Raymond H
The tug Capt. Keith, pushing a barge, arrived at Nicholson's Ecorse Terminal Thursday morning to unload.

Toledo, Ohio
12:45 pm update for Thursday 17 January: Thursday morning the Indiana Harbor arrived at the Midwest Overseas Dock for winter layup. The American Century has left Ashtabula, Ohio and is now bound for Toledo. She has an eta for Saturday morning and will be going to the Midwest Overseas Dock for winter layup. The Joseph H. Thompson remains at Conneaut, Ohio. Unknown what her status is and if she will eventually arrive at Toledo for layup.

 

First blue ice of 2019 is stacking up in Michigan, but not where you’d expect

1/18 - Munising, Mich. – Outdoor enthusiasts who love to seek out the seasonal changes that make Michigan so special have been fascinated in recent years by the appearance of blue ice.

In 2016, it became a social media phenomenon when people shared pictures of it stacking up near the Mackinac Bridge. When it returned in 2018 - and stayed for weeks - it became a tourism draw near the Straits of Mackinac.

This winter, it appears to be piling up again, just not in a place where you’d typically expect to see it.

Patrick Hugener, owner of Head in the Clouds Photography, was getting some shots along Lake Superior’s Munising Bay on Tuesday when the flat, irregular-shaped hues of blue caught his eye. “I was kind of shocked when I saw it,” said Hugener, who has been focused on building his landscape and aerial photography business for the last four years.

Munising Bay is just staring to freeze over, and Hugener said a good size chunk of ice out by Sand Point broke up, and gusty winds pushed it to shore.

The scooped-out bay is located southwest of Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore.

Read more and view photos at this link: https://www.mlive.com/news/2019/01/first-blue-ice-of-2019-is-stacking-up-in-michigan-but-not-where-youd-expect.html

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 18

On 18 January 2004, the Great Lakes Fleet’s 1000 footer EDGAR B. SPEER became stuck in the ice in the Rock Cut in the St. Mary’s River. Over the next two days, the U.S.C.G.C. MACKINAW tried to free her, but unsuccessfully. On 21 January, the tugs RELIANCE, MISSOURI, JOSEPH H. THOMPSON JR and JOYCE L. VAN ENKEVORT all coordinated their efforts under the direction of Wellington Maritime’s Captain John Wellington and got the SPEER free.

The CABOT was refloated on January 18, 1967. On December 16, 1966, while loading at Montreal, the CABOT rolled over on her side and sank. The CABOT's stern section, used in the interim as the stern section of the b.) CANADIAN EXPLORER, is now the stern section of c.) ALGOMA TRANSFER.

The MONDOC had her Canadian registry closed on January 18, 1979. The vessel had been renamed b) CORAH ANN and sold to Jamaican company. CORAH ANN was scrapped in 2003.

The National Steamship Co. was incorporated January 18, 1906.

L. P. Mason and Company of E. Saginaw, Michigan sold the steam barge PORTER CHAMBERLAIN (wooden steam barge, 134 foot, 257 gross tons, built in 1874, at Marine City, Michigan) on 18 January 1888, to Comstock Brothers and L. & H. D. Churchill of Alpena, Michigan.

1925: JOHN RUGEE, a wooden steamer in the George Hall Coal Co. fleet, was destroyed by a fire while spending the winter at Ogdensburg.

1938: The passenger ship WAUBIC was damaged by a fire at Kingsville, Ontario, while at winter quarters. It was rebuilt at Port Dover later in the year as b) ERIE ISLE.

1942: LAKE FLAMBEAU was built at Duluth in 1919. It was sailing as c) FRANCES SALMAN when it was sunk by U-552 off the coast of Newfoundland with the loss of 28 lives.

1983: The Greek freighter KIMOLIAKI PISTIS came through the Seaway in 1981. It caught fire on this date in 1983 and was abandoned enroute from Recife, Brazil, to a Black Sea port. The hull was towed into Piraeus, Greece, January 27 and declared a total loss. It first traveled to the Great Lakes as a) MINAS CONJURO in 1969 and then as b) EUGENIO in 1979. The vessel arrived at Split, Yugoslavia, for scrapping on February 21, 1984.

1998: The second MAPLEGLEN caught fire in the engine room while in lay-up at Owen Sound and sustained about $40,000 in damage.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Great Lakes iron ore trade down slightly in 2018

1/17 - Cleveland, Ohio - A 14-percent increase in iron ore shipments on the Great Lakes in December pushed the year-end total to 55.6 million tons, a decrease of just 0.3 percent, or three cargos in a 1,000-foot-long laker, compared to 2017. Early in the season, the trade was down nearly 14 percent, largely because of delays caused by heavy ice, but the gap narrowed steadily as the year progressed.

Four of the eight active iron ore shipping ports registered increases over 2017 that ranged from 1.1 to 19.6 percent. For the first time since 1852 no iron ore was shipped from Escanaba, Michigan. The port loaded its last iron ore cargo in April 2017.

Compared to the trade’s 5-year average, 2018 iron ore loadings were up 7.8 percent.

Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Soo Locks close to undergo planned repairs and maintenance

1/17 - Detroit, Mich. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, has announced the Soo Locks in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., are closed to navigation until March 25. The Corps will use this time to perform critical maintenance on the lock structures.

“The Soo Locks are critical to the Great Lakes Navigation System and we have a tremendous team that operates and maintains them throughout the year,” said Lt. Col. Greg Turner, district engineer. “While we've begun work on building the new lock, it is as important as ever that we keep the existing infrastructure in good working order -- this is our highest priority.”

With the annual closure, vessel traffic ceases through the Soo Locks for the season. While closed to navigation, both the MacArthur and Poe locks are dewatered and crews are busy with a variety of maintenance projects in preparation to reopen in March.

In addition to the MacArthur Lock undergoing a formal periodic inspection and routine minor maintenance, several key actions will be completed by the Soo Locks staff, including repairs to the empty/fill valve bulkhead slots, replacement of miter gate anchorage links for Gate 6, and replacement of the miter gate bevel gears on Gate 5. For the Poe Lock, once dewatered, winter maintenance will include miter gate weld inspections/repairs on Gate 1, replacement of miter gate anchorage links for Gate 4, and minor repairs and re-stressing of miter gate diagonals on Gates 2 and 3.

The last vessel to traverse through the locks for the 2018-2019 shipping season was Manitoulin. The ship was up bound from Sarnia, Ontario, bound for Algoma Steel in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. The ship completed locking through January 15 at 9:32 p.m.

More than 4,500 vessels carrying up to 80 million tons of cargo maneuver through the locks annually. Iron ore, coal, wheat and limestone are among the most frequently carried commodities. Opened in 1969, the Poe Lock is 1,200 feet long. The MacArthur Lock was opened in 1943 and is 800 feet long.

View a video of the last upbound vessel at this link: https://www.9and10news.com/2019/01/15/last-ship-sails-through-soo-locks-before-10-week-maintenance-closure

 

Port Reports -  January 17

Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – Daniel Lindner
Burns Harbor arrived in Sturgeon Bay late Wednesday morning for the winter, becoming the seventh vessel to lay up at the shipyard. She had originally been scheduled to winter in Duluth, but her last trip prevented her from making it back to the Soo Locks before they closed for the season.

Milwaukee, Wis. – Paul Erspamer
Stewart J. Cort arrived for lay-up at the Heavy Lift Dock on Jones Island Wednesday morning.

Lake Michigan Traffic
Frontenac was Northbound mid-lake Wednesday night for Windsor. Cason J. Callaway was headed to Sturgeon Bay. Wilfred Sykes departed Muskegon in the late afternoon for Nanticoke to load fines.

Lake Huron Traffic
Algoma Innovator was upbound for Milwaukee with salt from Goderich Wednesday night. Indiana Harbor was above Port Huron in the evening headed for lay up at Toledo.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Sault was loading salt on Wednesday.

Toledo, Ohio
7:15 pm update for Wednesday 16 January. The Indiana Harbor should be arriving at Toledo on Thursday for winter layup. The American Century is at Ashtabula, Ohio. When finished unloading ore she will proceed to Toledo for layup. It is unknown when she will arrive. The tug/barge combo Joseph H. Thompson is at Conneaut, Ohio unloading cargo. It is possible that she may be coming to Toledo for layup when she has finished unloading. Wednesday morning the Edwin H. Gott headed in bow first to the CXS#2 Dock. She went all the way up to the end of the dock. Shortly afterwards the Edgar B. Speer arrived at the CSX#2 Dock and then backed in stern first where she is behind the Gott. They are stern to stern to each other at the #2 Dock. Correction to CSX Dock layup fleet: The Philip R. Clarke is at the former C&O Ore Dock near the CSX#4 coal machine. The American Integrity is at the former C&O#1 coal dock, which is directly across from the Clarke.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 17

NORTHERN VENTURE closed the Welland Canal for the season as she passed downbound for Hamilton with coal in 1975.

In 1978, the CLIFFS VICTORY, JOSEPH H. FRANTZ, WILLIAM G. MATHER, ROBERT C. NORTON, CRISPIN OGLEBAY and J. BURTON AYERS formed a convoy in the Detroit River bound for Cleveland.

PHILIP D. BLOCK (Hull#789) was launched at Lorain, Ohio, by the American Ship Building in 1925.

The tanker GREAT LAKES was launched in 1963, as the a.) SINCLAIR GREAT LAKES (Hull#1577) at Decatur, Alabama, by Ingalls Iron Works Co.

JOHN E. F. MISENER was float launched in 1951, as a.) SCOTT MISENER (Hull#11) at St. Catharines, Ontario, by Port Weller Drydocks, Ltd.

January 17, 1902 - PERE MARQUETTE 2 ran aground at Ludington.

PERE MARQUETTE 19 grounded in limited visibility on January 17, 1916, two miles south of Big Point Sable, Michigan, 600 feet off shore. The captain made three unsuccessful attempts to find the Ludington Harbor entrance and on the turn around for the fourth attempt she grounded.

On 17 January 1899, the GERMANIA (wooden propeller freighter, 136 foot, 237 gross tons, built in 1875, at Marine City, Michigan) caught fire and burned to the water's edge at Ecorse, Michigan. The previous day, Norman Reno of Ecorse did some painting inside the cabin and it was presumed that the stove used to heat the cabin may have caused the blaze. The vessel was in winter lay-up at the rear of the home of Mr. W. G. Smith, her owner.

2000: FEDERAL VIBEKE got stuck in the ice on the St. Lawrence and was almost carried into the bridge at Quebec City. The vessel was bound for Sorel with steel. It first came to the Great Lakes in 1993 after previous visits as a) NOSIRA LIN beginning in 1981, b) DAN BAUTA in 1989, and c) KRISTIANIAFJORD in 1991. It was back as e) KALISTI in 2000 and f) NOBILITY in 2004. This bulk carrier arrived at Alang, India, for scrapping as h) OPAL II and was beached on November 14, 2012.

Data from: Max Hanley, Brian Bernard, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Shipping season closes at the Soo

1/16 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. – Tug Anglian Lady / barge Ironmaster passed downbound about 8:30 p.m. from Algoma Steel with a cargo of steel coils. Manitoulin locked up at 9:30, bound for Algoma Steel and winter lay up after treating a handful of Boatnerds at Mission Point to a season-ending salute. They were the last vessels of the season. CCSG Samuel Risely was on hand to assist. The locks will reopen March 25.

 

Duluth shipping season ends, 6 lakers in port for winter

1/16 - Duluth, Minn. – The folks who love to watch the big boats sail under the lift bridge will have to wait until March for that to happen again. According to the Duluth Seaway Port Authority, the final vessel to arrive for winter layup was the Kaye E. Barker, around 2:30am on Tuesday.

She and three others are spending layup at Fraser Shipyards. There is also one at Midwest Energy, and another at Elevator M in Superior. That means a total of six will be here for the winter months. Crews will work on maintenance and repair, to get the vessels ready for their next journeys.

Tonnage is expected to come in around 32 million tons, with iron ore and grain seeing good numbers. Coal was down a bit, according to the port authority.

Adele Yorde, Director of Public Relations for the port, explained, "It was a nice strong year, a great year for iron ore. Iron ore is running well over 25% over the 5 year average, which shows a strong demand for steel."

In fact, the last cargo that left was pellets on Sunday morning.

As for other notable events for the year, Yorde added that they saw their first shipment of soybeans in a decade. As for when you can watch those lakers and salties arrive again? The Soo Locks open again on March 25th.

Watch WDIO’s full report here

 

Great Lakes limestone trade up 1.3 percent in 2018

1/16 - Cleveland, Ohio – Shipments of limestone on the Great Lakes totaled 28.4 million tons in 2018, an increase of 1.3 percent compared to 2017. 2018’s loadings were also 2.8 percent above the trade’s 5-year average.

Loadings from U.S. quarries totaled 23.45 million tons, an increase of 1.2 percent compared to 2017. Shipments from U.S. quarries also topped their 5-year average by a like percent.

Shipments from Canadian quarries totaled 4.9 million tons, an increase of 1.7 percent from 2017, and 10.8 percent better than their 5-year average.

Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Port Reports -  January 16

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Kaye E. Barker, the last vessel to arrive Duluth for the 2018-19 season, passed under the lift bridge at 02:29 Tuesday morning and was tucked into Fraser Shipyards astern of the Lee A. Tregurtha. There are a total of six active vessels laid up in the Twin Ports this winter. Mesabi Miner is moored at Midwest Energy; ASC fleetmates H. Lee White and American Spirit are laid up at Elevator M and Lakehead Pipeline, respectively; and Tim S. Dool, Lee A. Tregurtha, and Kaye E. Barker are all wintering at Fraser. Also at the shipyard is William A. Irvin, which will be drydocked after the Dool's work is complete. The Irvin will receive hull maintenance and repairs as well as a new coat of paint before being returned to the Minnesota Slip in the spring, where she will be reopened for tours. In long-term layup in the Twin Ports are Arthur M. Anderson, tied at CN, and Edward L. Ryerson, at the Barko dock near the CHS elevators. Unlike recent rumors have indicated, there are no plans to scrap either vessel, and they may return to service at any time as economic conditions warrant.

Northern Lake Michigan
Burns Harbor was north of Two Rivers, Wis., headed for layup in Sturgeon Bay Tuesday night. Indiana Harbor was off the Door Peninsula, headed for Toledo. Tug Bradshaw McKee and the new cement barge Commander were loading at Charlevoix.

Southern Lake Michigan
Cason J. Callaway was unloading at Gary Tuesday night. Wilfred Sykes was loading slag at Indiana Harbor. Frontenac was unloading salt at S. Chicago. Stewart J. Cort was upbound for Milwaukee and layup.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Innovator was loading salt on Tuesday night.

Detroit, Mich. – Raymond H
Clyde S VanEnkevort/Erie Trader arrived Tuesday morning to unload ore at Zug Island. This will be Zug's last ore cargo of the season. Inbound in the afternoon was the Algoma Sault, calling on the Motor City Materials dock to unload salt.

Toledo, Ohio
Tuesday 15 January update: Winter layup report. The Philip R. Clarke arrived Tuesday morning at Midwest Stone Dock. She is directly across from the American Integrity. The tug Leonard M. and her barge arrived at the former Interlake Iron Dock area by the shipyard. The tug/barge combo Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader arrived at the Torco Dock during Tuesday afternoon. The Edgar B. Speer remained anchored off Avon Lake, Ohio. She should be arriving at Toledo during the day on Wednesday. There will be more boats arriving for layup during the week ahead. Check the various AIS sites daily for vessels arriving at Toledo. The tug/barge combo Michigan/Great Lakes was at the B-P Dock.

 

Coast Guard channel closure

1/16 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. The Coast Guard will close the waters between Cheboygan, Michigan and Bois Blanc Island, Michigan known as South Channel at 1 p.m. Thursday.

Grays Reef Passage will also be closed at the same time.

 

Lake Michigan beach ownership issue resolved, Indiana tells U.S. Supreme Court

1/16 - Indianapolis, Ind. – There is no need for the U.S. Supreme Court to wade into a dispute over who owns the Lake Michigan shoreline, since the Indiana Supreme Court already has clearly resolved the question in favor of the state.

That's the argument recently forwarded by the Indiana attorney general's office to the nation's highest court, in response to a final effort by Bobbie and Don Gunderson, of Long Beach, to claim ownership and exclusive control of the beach to the water's edge.

As a preliminary matter, the state urges the Supreme Court not even to consider the Gunderson petition for review, because the Gundersons sold their lake-adjacent Long Beach property in 2015 and no longer have a direct interest in the outcome of the case.

Solicitor General Thomas Fisher, who represents Indiana at the Supreme Court, pointed out that under federal court precedents, "An actual controversy must be extant at all stages of review, not merely at the time the complaint is filed."

The Gundersons' sale of their property, its subdivision into two lots and the second sale of the two properties to individuals living in Chicago and England, means there is no reason for the Supreme Court to look at the Gundersons' appeal, Fisher said.

"The current owners of (the parcels) are not wholly owned subsidiaries, insurers or even friends of the Gundersons (so far as is known to the state)," he said.

"Instead, the Gundersons wish to litigate the property rights of wholly unrelated persons, and to do so with no evidence in the record suggesting that the current owners even desire this litigation of their rights."

The Indiana Supreme Court acknowledged the Gundersons' lack of standing in its Feb. 14, 2018 decision, but nevertheless heard arguments and reached a ruling under a state mootness exception for questions of "great public interest."

Fisher explained there is no similar exception for federal court cases, which he said makes the Gundersons' appeal an "exceedingly poor candidate" for a high court decision that could affect property owners in every Great Lakes state.

Read more at this link

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 16

COLONEL JAMES PICKANDS (Hull#791) was launched in 1926, at Lorain, Ohio, by the American Ship Building Co.

In 1987, DETROIT EDISON, at Brownsville, Texas, for scrapping, was raised after being scuttled by vandals.

On 16 January 1909, TECUMSEH (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 200 foot, 839 gross tons, built in 1873, at Chatham, Ontario) burned to a total loss at her winter berth at Goderich, Ontario.

In 1978, CANADIAN CENTURY and NORTHERN VENTURE departed Toronto for Hamilton with coal after laying up at that port due to the bridge tender’s strike, which closed the Burlington Lift Bridge to navigation.

On 16 January 1875, The Port Huron Times printed the following list of vessels that were total losses in 1874: Tug IDA H. LEE by collision in Milwaukee, Tug TAWAS by explosion off Sand Beach, Steamer W H BARNUM by collision in the Pelee Passage, Steamer TOLEDO by partially burning at Manistee, Tug WAVE by burning on Saginaw Bay, Tug DOUGLAS by burning on the Detroit River, Steamer BROOKLYN by explosion on the Detroit River, Steamer LOTTA BERNARD by foundering on Lake Superior.

1926: The wooden steamer PALM BAY caught fire while laid up at Portsmouth, Ontario, and was scuttled in Lake Ontario the next year. It had previously sailed as a) PUEBLO and b) RICHARD W.

1988: ASHLAND, enroute to scrapping in Taiwan, dragged anchor off Bermuda and ran aground on the rocks in severe winds. It was pulled free 4 days later with heavy bottom damage and barely made Mamonal, Colombia, for scrapping on February 5.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Brian Bernard, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

 

Donjon Shipbuilding prepares for another busy winter maintenance, repair season

1/15 - Erie, Pa. – At least eight vessels are scheduled for repairs or maintenance at the east bayfront shipbuilding facility. On a recent blustery morning, heavy lake-effect snow squalls kicked up and blew across Donjon Shipbuilding & Repair’s 1,250-foot long, 130-foot-wide dry dock.

Bone-chilling northwesterly winds blowing in from Lake Erie didn’t seem to faze shipfitters and welders working on the barge James L. Kuber inside the 44-acre shipbuilding facility at 220 E. Bayfront Parkway in Erie.

From late December through late March, employment swells to 220 to 250 as legions of welders, shipfitters, electricians, pipe welders and pipe fitters gear up for winter repair and maintenance season — typically the shipyard’s busiest time of the year.

At least eight vessels, and possibly more, are scheduled for repairs or maintenance at the Erie shipyard this winter.

“This year we have more steel work than last year and less boats,” Donjon Assistant General Manager Rick Hammer said. “The scope of work on the vessels is quite lengthy. I would say we will be replacing roughly 650,000 pounds of steel this year. The number of vessels we service could grow from there or reduce.”

Hammer estimates shipyard winter employment at about 220, including 77 full-time company workers. The bulk of winter crews are subcontracted personnel, he said.

“It’s a tremendous amount of work for about three months,” he said.

New Jersey-based marine services provider Donjon Marine Co Inc. expanded and diversified its operation with the creation of its Erie shipbuilding and repair services division in 2009. Donjon moved into the Erie shipyard in 2010.

Vessels scheduled for service at Donjon this winter are: • U.S.-flagged barge James L. Kuber and its tug, Victory. Work on the Victory includes an engine rebuild, pulling equipment off and fixing floors and paneling. The Kuber will receive its five-year regulatory hull survey.

• U.S.-flagged barge Pathfinder and its tug, Dorothy Ann. Minor repair work will be done on the tug. Two cargo bulkheads will be replaced on the Pathfinder.

• U.S.-flagged integrated barge Presque Isle and its tug, Presque Isle. Mostly steelwork.

• U.S.-flagged Michipicoten, a self-unloading freighter. Steelwork is scheduled.

GoErie.com

 

Hamilton Port Authority records a banner year

1/15 - Hamilton. Ont. – Last year was a banner year for the Hamilton Port Authority. In 2018, the HPA says it recorded the highest volume of cargo in more than a decade.

More than 11.6-million metric tonnes of cargo was imported or exported through the Port of Hamilton during the 2018 shipping season, an 18 per cent increase over 2017.

“Many Hamiltonians remarked that the harbour looked especially busy with ships this year,” said Hamilton Port Authority president & CEO Ian Hamilton. “And they were right. We welcomed 647 vessels to port this season, 43 more than in 2017.”

“This season really shows how Canada can diversify and develop new markets if it has the right infrastructure in place,” said Hamilton. “In 2018, exports through the Port of Hamilton were up by 63.6 per cent over 2017.”

Hamilton credits increased exports of Ontario-grown grain, helped along by new terminal capacity at the port, a solid crop year, and expanded European market access as a result of the CETA agreement.

In November, Transport Minister Marc Garneau was in Hamilton to announce a $17.7-million investment in the Port of Hamilton through the National Trade Corridor Fund.

The HPA will match the funds to provide for new and upgraded transportation infrastructure, and reconfigure port lands to create new development-ready employment lands.

“In the past decade, we’ve attracted more than $300 million in private-sector investment to Hamilton, and we have grown our on-port employment to more than 2,100 jobs,” notes Hamilton. “We’re focused on using this latest investment to continue our positive impact on the regional economy.”

The Port of Hamilton is the seventh largest port in Canada by volume, and the largest in Ontario.

Annual totals (metric tonnes) of cargo volume in the Port of Hamilton

2009 – 8,358,123
2010 – 11,472,831
2011 – 10,040,213
2012 – 10,303,190
2013 – 10,024,418
2014 – 10,526,732
2015 – 9,238,203
2016 – 9,277,282
2017 – 9,870,212
2018 – 11,628,319

 

Port Reports -  January 15

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Two additional vessels arrived in the Twin Ports on Monday for winter layup. American Spirit came in via the Superior entry at 09:35 and tied up at Lakehead Pipeline, and Lee A. Tregurtha arrived through Duluth at 11:09 and docked at Fraser Shipyards astern of the William A. Irvin. Kaye E. Barker will round out the Twin Ports' winter layup fleet, and is due around 03:00 Tuesday morning. She will spend the off-season at Fraser.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Sunday January 13th, the 2018 shipping season closed with Kaministiqua departing at 13:01 with a load of grain for Windsor. 13:25 CCGS Samuel Risley departed for Sault Ste. Marie to conduct ice operations.

St. Marys River
Downbounders Monday consisted of Cason J. Callaway, Kaministiqua and American Century (last downbound vessel and possibly the last passage for the year.) Icebreakers CCGS Samuel Risley and USCG Mackinaw were conducting ice ops in the St. Marys River.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – Wendell Wilkie, Daniel Lindner
After spending Sunday night on the hook in Green Bay, James R. Barker arrived late Monday morning for layup. Around noon the tug/barge Bradshaw McKee/Commander departed the yard up through the bay headed for Charlevoix to load her first load for Chicago. Both departure and arrival were assisted by Selvick tugs William C. Gaynor and Susan L. The Barker is the sixth vessel to lay up in Sturgeon Bay, joining American Courage, John G. Munson, Joseph L. Block, A-397/tug Barbara Andrie, and Roger Blough at the shipyard.

Muskegon, Mich.
Algoma Niagara was unloading salt on Monday. Northern Lake Michigan
Frontenac was southbound Monday with salt for Chicago. Cason J. Callaway was right behind her, headed for Gary.

Southern Lake Michigan
Burns Harbor was unloading at her namesake port Monday night. Indiana Harbor was at Indiana Harbor as was Wilfred Sykes.

Northern Lake Huron
Monday, January 14 Alpena: 2:14 Manitou arrived to conduct icebreaking operations. 2:43 G L Ostrander proceeded to the Lafarge dock to load cement products. 8:09 Manitou began icebreaking operations. 9:02 G L Ostrander departed for Milwaukee. Manitou departed and was up bound on Lake Huron.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Sault was loading salt on Monday for Detroit.

Toledo, Ohio
2:35 pm update for Monday 14 January: The following vessels arrived for winter layup Monday. The St. Clair arrived at the former Lakefront Ore Dock. She is directly across from the John J. Boland, Great Republic. The tug/barge combo Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader arrived at the Torco Ore Dock. She is on the other side of the dock across from where they unload ore. American Mariner went to the Ironville Dock. Vessels on the way to Toledo for winter layup: Edgar B. Speer is anchored off Avon Lake, Ohio. Philip R. Clarke is around the Fairport Harbor, Ohio, area. Unknown when they will arrive and to what docks they are going. There will be several more vessels arriving for layup later on this week. The tug/barge combo Defiance/Ashtabula was unloading ore at the Torco Ore Dock. She will most likely be the last ore boat of the season. The tug/barge combo Michigan/Great Lakes was at the B-P Dock. Keep checking the various AIS sites daily to see which boats are headed for Toledo.

 

Fundraiser raises more than $30,000 for Marshal Bundren’s new van

1/15 - The following is from Reed Wilson, a mate for The American Steamship Co., who recently set up a GoFundMe page to help Marshal Bundren, who comes to the boats at Burns Harbor, Indiana Harbor, Buffington Harbor, Burns Harbor or anywhere else he is asked to go to give sailors a much needed ride to a store, the doctor's office, the airport or a hospital. The funds raised will be used to replace Bundren’s old van, which is rusting away and has 400,000 miles on it.

“Well folks, no one is happier than I am that we reached our goal in 3 short weeks! Well, maybe Marshal is!!In fact, we surpassed the goal by an additional $5,000 thanks to a late donation.

“The shipping companies, unions and shipping agents, as well as many other companies and scores upon scores of individuals and sailors stepped up and donated and offered their kind words of care and support. … We hope to pick the new van up around the 19th or 20th. We're traveling to a dealership in Ohio as that is where we found the best vehicle for the best price.

“Marshal is very happy and can't wait to get behind the wheel and continue his work of helping others. I'm am also very happy that I was able to be a part of this, and everyone who donated should be very proud of themselves as well.”

Reed Wilson, 2nd Mate M/V Burns Harbor

 

Coast Guard warns retirees about government shutdown

1/15 - The U.S. Coast Guard has sent a message to retirees regarding the partial federal government shutdown. They wrote there is a strong possibility retiree pay and survivor benefits would be delayed if the shutdown continues.

This is even while working on solutions with Homeland Security, the White House and Congress. The Coast Guard has updated their website’s frequently asked questions section. The Vice Commandant of the U.S.C.G. (Admiral Charles W. Ray) believes some of the answers there will be able to help families.

9&10 News

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 15

In 1978, the upbound McKEE SONS, LEON FALK JR, WILLIAM P. SNYDER JR, A.H. FERBERT and CHAMPLAIN became stuck in heavy ice outside Cleveland Harbor. Eventually they were freed with the help of the U.S.C.G. icebreaker NORTHWIND and the U.S.C.G. MARIPOSA.

FORT YORK (Hull#160) was launched January 15, 1958, at Collingwood, Ontario, by Collingwood Shipyards, Ltd.

In 1917, the ANN ARBOR NO 6 left Ecorse for Frankfort on her maiden voyage.

On 15 January 1873, A. Muir began building a wooden 3-mast schooner ("full sized canaller") at his shipyard in Port Huron. Fourteen men were employed to work on her, including master builder James Perry. The schooner was to be the exact counterpart of the GROTON, the first vessel built at that yard. The vessel's dimensions were 138-foot keel, 145 foot overall, 26 foot 2 inches beam and 11 foot 6 inch depth.

On 15 January 1886, the tug KITTIE HAIGHT was sold to Mr. Fisken of Toronto for $3,900.

1986: The former Greek freighter PAULINA C., a Seaway trader beginning in 1976, ran aground off the Dutch coast near Rotterdam as c) RIO GRANDE. It was refloated January 23 and became d) NEPTUNIA later in 1986. It arrived at Bombay, India, for scrapping on December 3, 1986.

1990: The tanker MAYA FARBER came through the Seaway in 1981. It was anchored off Port Sudan as e) RAAD AL-BAKRY VIII when there was an explosion in a cargo tank. Fire broke out and the vessel was gutted. The hull later broke in two and the after end sank. The forebody was sold for scrap and arrived at Alang, India, for dismantling on March 28, 1990.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Brian Bernard, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

More ships join the Great Lakes winter fleet arriving in Sturgeon Bay

1/14 - Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – Two additional ships will be arriving in Sturgeon Bay soon for winter maintenance and repairs at Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding. The Roger Blough is scheduled to arrive Sunday, with the Burns Harbor planned for Jan. 18.

The Great Lakes ships arrival schedule also has been updated:

Tentative arrival dates:
Roger Blough - Jan.13
James R. Barker - Jan. 13
Paul R. Tregurtha - Jan. 14
Tug Leonard M. - Jan. 15
Barge Huron Spirit - Jan. 17
Cason J. Callaway - Jan. 16
Burns Harbor - Jan. 18
Wilfred Sykes - Jan. 31

The ships in port are:
American Courage - drydock Dec. 22
John G. Munson - arrived Dec. 28
Joseph L. Block - arrived Jan. 1
Barge A397 - arrived Jan. 3
Tug Barbara Andrie arrived Jan. 3

The tentative departure dates:
Joseph L. Block - March 22
Wilfred Sykes - March 22

Green Bay Press-Gazette

 

U.S., Canadian coast guards break ice on shared waters

1/14 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. – When you’re traveling on the Great Lakes in the winter, it’s not just the cold temperatures that cause problems with ice. The wind, too, wreaks havoc.

“In 2014, I was on an icebreaker on Lake Superior in March and the ice was very thick,” said George Leshkevich, a physical scientist with the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory in Ann Arbor. “We were opening up the ship track for the opening of the shipping season and it took us a day just to get through Whitefish Bay.

“We started making our way from Whitefish Point over to the Keweenaw,” he said. “We didn’t make very much headway because when the icebreaker opened a track up, the winds would close it up behind us.”

Challenges like that keep the U.S. and Canadian Coast Guards busy on the Great Lakes in the winter. “It’s really an area where there’s a huge amount of collaboration between the U.S. and Canadian Coast Guards,” said Carol Launderville, communications officer for the Canadian Coast Guard on the Great Lakes.

The two services renewed their decades long icebreaking partnership last January with a new memorandum of understanding

The waters of lakes Superior, Huron, Erie and Ontario that are closest to Ontario are Canadian. Those closest to Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York are U.S. waters, said U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Blake Bonifas. Lake Michigan is wholly in the U.S.

And just like the water they share, the two countries share icebreaking duties, Launderville said. Sometimes Canadian ships clear routes in American waters and vice versa. And they swap personnel so that the two Coast Guards become familiar with each other’s procedures.

Icebreaking is critical for Great Lakes shipping. “This last winter, the estimated economic value of the cargo that we were able to help move was valued at $875 million, Bonifas said. “That’s economic activity that wouldn’t exist had we not been able to provide some kind of icebreaking service.”

While there are fewer ships on the Great Lakes in the winter, shipping continues year-round, so it’s important to keep the routes clear, Launderville said.

Members of the Lake Carriers’ Association, based in Cleveland, stop only when the Soo Locks close in mid-January. They resume when the locks reopen at the end of March. “We ship full bore right up until the locks close and then again when they open,” said Thomas Rayburn, director of environmental and regulatory affairs for the Lake Carriers’ Association.

This means they operate during the ice season, which typically begins in mid-December and continues through April. “Icebreaking resources are absolutely critical for us to keep moving,” Rayburn said.

Ice cover in 2016 only reached 33.8 percent, and in 2017 it dropped to 19.4 percent, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In 2018, maximum ice coverage went back up, reaching almost 70 percent.

Air temperature is one the biggest factors that dictates ice cover, because it affects the water temperature, he said.

Wind is another important factor, he said. If it’s windy and the water is roughened up, it’s less likely that ice will form. Once ice has formed on the lakes, wind can move it and cause shipping problems.

The Canadian Coast Guard has two icebreakers on the Great Lakes, but if needed, it can bring in additional ships, Launderville said. The U.S. Coast Guard has nine. The number is adequate, but the fleet is aging, Bonifas said.

“A lot of our icebreakers have exceeded their service life,” he said. “Many of them were built in the 70s, so they are getting towards their 50th birthday. We see a lot of missed cutter days due to maintenance issues and repairs to keep these older ships running,” he said.

There are no immediate plans to modernize the Great Lakes fleet. Priorities are elsewhere. “We only have two functioning polar ice breakers that operate in Antarctica and the Arctic, so the focus is going towards building another one of those,” he said.

During the most severe winters, the U.S. Coast Guard’s partnership with the Canadian Coast Guard is not only extremely beneficial, it’s necessary, Bonifas said.

Icebreaking on the Great Lakes is a truly binational effort, Launderville said. “The two Coast Guards really work as one.”

Sault News

 

Port Reports -  January 14

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
American Century departed Duluth from Canadian National at 06:43 Sunday morning, carrying the Twin Ports' last outbound cargo of the season in her holds. Three vessels have laid up for the season in the Twin Ports so far - Tim S. Dool is in drydock at Fraser Shipyards, H. Lee White is tied at Elevator M, and Mesabi Miner is wintering at SMET. American Spirit and Lee A. Tregurtha are both due Monday morning, and Kaye E. Barker will arrive either Tuesday or Wednesday for layup. All three vessels will winter at Fraser, however the Spirit may change docks as she likely won't fit under the Blatnik Bridge to enter the shipyard.

Two Harbors – Gary A. Putney
Cason J. Callaway departed Two Harbors on Jan. 13th at 05:23 for Gary. The Callaway was the last boat to load in Two Harbors for the 2018-19 shipping season.

St. Marys River
Stewart J. Cort was downbound early on Sunday, followed by Edwin H. Gott and Paul R. Tregurtha and, late, Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader, Michipicoten and Hon. James L. Oberstar. The only upbound vessels in the river were Lee A. Tregurtha in the early morning Sunday and Kaye E. Barker, due early Monday morning.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis
Roger Blough arrived in Sturgeon Bay mid-day Sunday for winter layup, and joined the four vessels already tied up for the season at the shipyard. James R. Barker dropped anchor in the bay of Green Bay just outside of the channel Sunday night, and will wait until Monday to arrive. Also moored at the shipyard is the barge Commander and tug Bradshaw McKee, which are expected to depart in the coming days. Unless schedules change, the pair will head to Charlevoix immediately for the new barge to load her first cargo of powdered cement.

Muskegon, Mich.
Algoma Innovator was unloading salt on Sunday.

Northern Lake Huron
Saturday, Stoneport: Saginaw departed for Sombra. Sunday, Alpena: 10:01 G L Ostrander arrived and went to anchor.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Sault was loading salt on Sunday.

Detroit River – Raymond H.
The tug Leonard M and her barge arrived Sunday morning to unload steel coils at Nicholson's Ecorse Terminal.

Amherstburg, Ont.
The CCGS Griffon docked at the Amherstburg Coast Guard Base late Saturday afternoon. Several buoys were unloaded from her deck Sunday morning. As of noon, she remained at the base. To date there is no sign of ice in the lower Detroit River.

Toledo, Ohio
11:20 am update for Sunday 13 January: The tug/barge combo Olive L. Moore/Menominee arrived at the Ironville Dock to unload cargo. The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived at the Midwest Overseas Dock for winter layup. The Great Lakes Trader was anchored on the west side of Point Pelee. The St Clair was anchored just off the Toledo Ship Channel and the American Mariner was sailing on western Lake Erie. All three vessels are preparing for winter layup and will be headed for Toledo when this process is done. Unknown when they will arrive and what docks they are going to. There will be several more boats arriving during the week ahead. American Integrity arrived at the CSX # 2 dock complex on Saturday morning. The current winter layup fleet in port is the John J. Boland, Great Republic, American Integrity, Walter J. McCarthy Jr., Cedarglen, American Valor, and Manistee. The barge Delaware is in dry dock at the shipyard. Check the various AIS sites daily to see what vessels will be arriving at Toledo.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 14

On this day in 1970, IRVING S. OLDS entered winter layup at Lorain to close the longest season in Great Lakes shipping history.

On 14 January 1945, the W. Butler Shipyard built C1-M-AV1 ship LEBANON (Hull#40) was the last vessel through the Soo Locks. Ice was a serious problem. The newly-commissioned icebreaker U.S.C.G.C. MACKINAW escorted the LEBANON to Lake Huron. The locks had never before been open this late in January. They were kept open to allow newly-built cargo vessels to sail from Superior, Wisconsin, to the Atlantic Ocean where they were needed for the war effort.

Scrapping began on CHICAGO TRIBUNE in 1989, by International Marine Salvage in Port Colborne, Ontario. January 14, 1920 - The Grand Trunk carferry GRAND HAVEN was fast in the ice three miles out of Grand Haven.

In 1977, CANADIAN MARINER laid up at the Consol Fuel dock in Windsor after her attempt to reach Port Colborne was thwarted by heavy ice off Long Point.

On Jan 14, 1978, JAMES R. BARKER departed the Soo Line ore dock in Ashland, Wisconsin, where she had been laid-up since August 7, 1977, due to the iron ore miner’s strike.

1946: The BADGER STATE, a former Great Lakes canal ship as a) FORDONIAN, b) YUKONDOC and c) GEORGIAN, foundered off the mouth of the Grijalva River in the Gulf of Mexico.

1969: SAGAMO, retired former flagship of the Lake Muskoka passenger ships in Central Ontario, burned at the dock in Gravenhurst as a total loss.

1981: The former Lake Erie rail car ferry and later barge MAITLAND NO. 1 rolled over between Yarmouth, NS and Rockland, ME. An attempt to tow the vessel upside down failed and it sank. The ship was under tow of IRVING MAPLE and bound for Port Everglades, FL with a load of scrap. It may have been renamed b) TRIO TRADO at Quebec City on the way south.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Brian Bernard, Russ Plumb, Ahoy & Farewell II, Father Dowling Collection and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Winter work starts on Soo Locks

1/13 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. - The Soo Locks are set to take their annual 10-week winter hibernation as per the federal order that pauses shipping season in the Great Lakes beginning midnight Tuesday and lasting until March 25.

Workers from the US Army Corps of Engineers conduct preventative maintenance, replace worn components and inspect the system during the closure. As an agency under the Department of Defense the Corps is unaffected by the current federal government shutdown.

“This year our schedule for every day of the 10 week shutdown is accounted for,” said Kevin Sprague, area engineer for the Soo Locks. “It’s a full schedule of work.”

As with previous years, the two main locks in use will be drained of water. It’s a process that can take anywhere from 24 to 48 hours. “Quite a bit goes into it,” said Sprague. “We try to minimize the actual pump time to keep still water from the cold air.”

Currently, the MacArthur Lock has already been dewatered and is out of use for the shipping season. Sprague said the plan is to rebuild bulkhead slots in all four valves in the MacArthur Lock. Anchorage link replacement and bezel gear replacement are also expected in the 800 ft. long lock among other work.

The larger Poe Lock will begin its dewatering process once shipping season closes. A three year plan is in place on the Poe that will include inspection and weld repairs this year, major rehabilitation to girders next year, and more blast welding to the girders in 2020.

This year, the derrick barge Nicolet and crane barge Harvey will be dewatered into the MacArthur and Poe Locks respectively. “We’ll have inspections on the rigs,” added Sprague. “When you pump the water out of the locks, the barges will come to rest on big timbers.”

Throughout the 10-week process routine and internal maintenance will be performed on the locks, too. Sprague said the Corps will maintain an extremely busy schedule over the next several years with other major rehabilitation projects and the construction of a new Soo Lock.

Soo Evening News

 

Port Reports -  January 13

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Paul R. Tregurtha departed Duluth at 04:47 Saturday morning with a load of iron ore pellets for Ashtabula. Cason J. Callaway was inbound at 08:11, fueled at Husky Energy, and departed at 10:22 for Two Harbors to load. Mesabi Miner came in at 10:55, and moored at Midwest Energy for winter layup. American Century spent the day Saturday loading ore at Canadian National, and is expected to depart mid-morning Sunday with what will be the final cargo taken out of the Twin Ports for the season. Three more vessels, American Spirit, Lee A. Tregurtha, and Kaye E. Barker, are due in the next few days for winter layup. In Superior, Michipicoten arrived at 00:01 Saturday to load at Burlington Northern, and was expected to depart late Saturday night.

Two Harbors – Gary A. Putney
Edwin H. Gott departed Two Harbors on Jan. 12th at 06:10 for Conneaut. Shortly after the Gott's departure the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader shifted from North of #2 to South of #2. The Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader departed Two Harbors on Jan. 12th at 16:26 for Detroit. When she departed, the Clyde S. backed out to the lake, turned, then headed down the lake. Arriving Two Harbors on Jan. 12th at 12:58 was the Cason J. Callaway. She arrived from Duluth after fueling there. She went to North of #2 for lay-by. The Callaway shifted from North of #2 to South of #2 between 16:26 and 16:50. As of 19:30 on Jan. 12th she is loading. The Callaway will be the last boat of the season for Two Harbors.

Muskegon, Mich.
Algoma Innovator is due with salt from Goderich between 0800 to 1000 Sunday.

Lake Michigan
Wilfred Sykes was in Burns Harbor Saturday loading slag. Roger Blough was midway up the lake Saturday evening headed for layup at Sturgeon Bay. Algoma Sault was headed back to Goderich to load more salt. Burns Harbor was in the northern part of the lake headed for her namesake port to unload.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Niagara continued loading salt for Muskegon on Saturday.

Detroit River – Raymond H.
The Everlast/Norman McLeod arrived early Saturday morning to load at the Marathon Asphalt Terminal. The tugs Meredith Ashton and Defiance tied up at Fordson Island, probably to stage more dredging equipment. The Samuel De Champlain/Innovation arrived at Lafarge to unload cement. Right behind the Champlain/Innovation was the American Mariner, calling on Zug Island to unload ore.

Toledo, Ohio
American Integrity arrived for winter layup on Saturday. The tug/barge combo Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader brought in an ore cargo and unloaded at the Torco Dock on Friday. She left Friday evening and anchored off the Toledo Ship Channel preparing for winter layup. It is unknown at this time when she will return to Toledo or to which dock. Walter J. McCarthy Jr. is was underway on Lake Erie Saturday night bound for Toledo for winter layup. She should be arriving during the day Sunday. There will be other boats arriving at Toledo for winter layup during the week ahead. Check the various AIS sites daily to see the vessels arriving at Toledo.

 

More Seaway salties renamed

1/13 - The following saltwater vessels have been renamed, with each having made visits to the Great Lakes/Seaway system during their careers.

Sichem Peace IMO 9311268, a tanker built in 2005, first came inland as such on its only visit with that name in 2006. As Sichem Peace it held this name from 2005 to 2012 when it was renamed Pacific Ocean and held that name from 2012 until 2018. It did not return inland as such and now the vessel has been renamed Harmony of Panamanian registry.

SCL Bern IMO 9304461, built in 2005, has been renamed Gala of Liberian registry and flag. This vessel was known as the SCL Bern briefly in 2005 before it was renamed that year to the SITC Bern and it carried that name from 2005 to 2006 but it did not come inland as such. In 2006 it reverted back to its original name of SCL Bern and it held that name from 2006 until 2017. It first came inland as such in 2006 and last visited as such in 2014. The ship was renamed in 2017 to Angelo Maria and it held this name from 2017 until 2018 before it was renamed. It did not return inland as such.

America IMO 9504114, built in 2010, has been renamed Arklow Dusk of Ireland registration. This vessel was previously known as the Flinter America, a name it carried from 2010 until 2017. As Flinter America this ship first came inland as such on its only visit with that name in 2010. In 2017 the ship was renamed America and it held this name from 2017 until 2018. It returned inland as such on its only visit with that name in 2017.

Arctic IMO 9504126, built in 2010 and a sistership and fleetmate to the America, has also been renamed to Arklow Dale of Ireland registration. This vessel was previously known as the Flinter Arctic, a name it held from 2010 until 2017. It first came inland as such on its only visit with that name in 2014. In 2017 it was renamed Arctic and it held this name from 2017 until 2018. It returned inland as such on its only visit with that name in 2017.

Xenia IMO 9217163, built in 2002, first came inland as such in 2005 and last visited as such in 2008 has been renamed Marmuna of Antigua and Barbuda registry. This vessel carried the name of Xenia from 2002 until 2013 when it was renamed Thorco Cassiopeia and it held this name from 2013 until 2018. It did not return inland as such.

Denny Dushane

 

Editorial: States must help Illinois keep Asian carp out of Great Lakes

1/13 - An effort to prevent Asian carp from entering the Great Lakes is being held up by the need for long-range planning and political changes in two states.

In November, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released its proposal to install measures at the Brandon Road Lock and Dam near Joliet, Ill., designed to thwart the advance of Asian carp into Lake Michigan. The invasive species would threaten the survival of fish that are native to the Great Lakes. And the Army Corps’s plan has been endorsed by water conservation groups, including one in the north country.

“As adept filter-feeders, Asian carp can outcompete juvenile native fish species like bass and catfish for food like microplankton and zooplankton,” according to a story published Dec. 23 by the Watertown Daily Times. “Environmentalists have concerned themselves primarily with the Bighead and Silver variations of Asian carp because they have spread the farthest. Silver carp, which have sensitive hearing, also threaten boaters because they jump in the air when startled by loud noises and can strike someone in the head.”

The Great Lakes Basin Partnership to Block Asian Carp is advocating the Army Corps’s plan. The Save the River group in Clayton is part of this coalition, and Executive Director John M. Peach said the organization supports this measure.

The Army Corps said its project will cost about $780 million. The federal government would fund 65 percent of the costs, and states along Great Lakes would be expected to fund the remaining 35 percent.

While they were both still in office last month, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder said his state would provide $8 million to Illinois for operations and maintenance expenses associated with the Brandon Road project. While grateful for the generous offer, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner said this money wouldn’t be used for another decade. Mr. Rauner was defeated in his re-election bid last year, and Mr. Snyder had to leave office due to term limits.

“While we respect your offer to provide $8 million toward operation and maintenance, this approach does not reflect the sense of urgency stressed in your letter,” Mr. Rauner wrote in a response to Mr. Snyder. “According to the Army Corps of Engineers, even under an accelerated timeline, the earliest possible date for the first dollar to be allocated toward operation and maintenance is 2028. In fact, the final project design is still four years away and will be required before any substantial fair share funding agreement could ever be responsibly discussed by Great Lakes states. We do not believe it is appropriate — especially given our lame duck status — for us to accept funds and bind Illinois to a project that is not final and whose true costs are years from being calculated.”

Asian carp could make their way to the Great Lakes through the Chicago area’s waterway system. The fish were imported to eat algae in catfish ponds, but they entered the Mississippi River as a result of flooding and accidental releases. They have also been found in the Illinois River, which connects to the Mississippi.

The Illinois River connects to the Des Plaines River south of Joliet. The Des Plaines River feeds into the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, which connects to the South Branch of the Chicago River. If the fish make it this far north, they can easily find their way to Lake Michigan — and then into the remaining Great Lakes.

Mr. Rauner suggested that Michigan provide the $8 million to Illinois immediately for enhanced fish strategies that have been successful in capturing the Asian carp. Neither of the new governors — J.B. Pritzker in Illinois and Gretchen Whitmer in Michigan — has so far addressed this issue since taking office.

The Army Corps’s plan appears to be the best way to handle the problem in the long run. But steps must be taken immediately to prevent the potential spread of this invasive species, and the Great Lake states should provide money to help Illinois maintain control. The project timeline should be dramatically accelerated and prioritized.

Mr. Peach said that New York has been silent on any plans to offer funding. It’s time for Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo to step up and thwart a crisis waiting to happen.

Watertown Daily Times

 

Lay-Up List

1/13 - The winter lay-up list has been updated. Please send reports of vessel lay-ups to news@boatnerd.net. Please include vessel name, date, port and lay-up dock name.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 13

13 January 2005 - GENESIS EXPLORER (steel propeller tanker, 435 foot, built in 1974, at Port Weller, Ontario, formerly a.) IMPERIAL ST. CLAIR & b.) ALGOSAR) sailed from Halifax for Quebec City. She was registered in the Comoros Islands. She was carrying a few members of her former crew for training purposes, but her new crew was African.

On 13 January 1918, the Goodrich Line’s ALABAMA and the Grand Trunk ferries MILWAUKEE and GRAND HAVEN all became stuck in the ice off Grand Haven, Michigan. The vessels remained imprisoned in the ice for the next two weeks. When the wind changed, they were freed but Grand Haven’s harbor was still inaccessible. The ALABAMA sailed for Muskegon and stalled in the 18-inch thick ice on Muskegon Lake.

After lightering 3,000 tons of coal, the a.) BENSON FORD was refloated in 1974 and proceeded to the Toledo Overseas Terminal to be reloaded.

In 1979, the U.S.C.G. tug ARUNDEL was beset by windrowed ice at Minneapolis Shoal in Green Bay. Strong winds piled the ice on her stern and soon she had a 25-degree list. The crew feared that she may sink and abandoned the tug, walking across the ice with the help of a spotlight onboard the ACACIA, which also became beset by the heavy ice. The MACKINAW, SUNDEW and a Coast Guard helicopter were dispatched to the scene, but northwest winds relieved the ice pressure and the crew was able to re-board the ARUNDEL. The ARUNDEL sails today as the tug c.) ERIKA KOBASIC.

On January 13, 1970, the lower engine room and holds of the SEWELL AVERY accidentally flooded, sinking her to the bottom of Duluth Harbor causing minimal damage, other than an immense cleanup effort.

January 13, 1909 - The PERE MARQUETTE 17 was freed after her grounding the previous December.

Data from: Joe Barr, Max Hanley, Brian Bernard, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Shipping season reaching an end

1/12 - Duluth, Minn. – The Soo Locks at Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., will close Tuesday, ending the vast majority of Great Lakes maritime traffic for the 2018-2019 season.

Eight freighters are scheduled for winter layup in the Port of Duluth-Superior. Algoma’s Tim S. Dool arrived on New Year’s Day and is already in dry dock at Fraser Shipyards in Superior. The remaining seven will arrive this weekend or early next week. The vessels and their winter berths are:

H. Lee White – Fraser Shipyards
American Century – Enbridge Dock
American Spirit – Fraser Shipyards
Mesabi Miner – Midwest Energy
Kaye E. Barker – Fraser Shipyards
Lee A. Tregurtha – Fraser Shipyards
Burns Harbor – Elevator “M” Dock

“The Port of Duluth-Superior is ending the shipping season on a strong note,” Deb DeLuca, Duluth Seaway Port Authority executive director, said in a news release. “Through November, grain volume was up 22 percent over last year, and shipments of Minnesota iron ore were outpacing the five-year average by over 25 percent.

“While coal loadings have dropped significantly in recent years, iron ore shipments have picked up pace – already at 18.4 million short tons through November. With Great Lakes traffic continuing well into January, we anticipate the port’s overall tonnage tally will top 32 million tons to close out the 2018 shipping season.”

The last oceangoing vessel of the 2018 season, the Federal Rhine, departed the Twin Ports on Dec. 15 to make her way through the Great Lakes-Seaway system before the St. Lawrence Seaway locks closed for the season at the end of December.

Business North

 

Cheboygan community lending a hand to the Coast Guard

1/12 - Cheboygan, Mich. – Like other federal workers, Coast Guard members don't know when they will get paid again. That is why the Cheboygan community is leading a helping hand. On Friday, many businesses contributed to a "Dressdown for the Shutdown" event.

For five dollars, employees could wear casual attire to work. All proceeds will go to the Coast Guard families in need. With everyone trying to help, the Cheboygan Chamber of Commerce has been in the middle trying to lead people to where they can help.

“There were several individuals around the community that just started to ask the question “what if and how can we help?” then from the very grassroots a group started to come together," Said Scott Herceg, Executive Director at Cheboygan Chamber of Commerce. "The Chamber of Commerce started hosting them here under our roof, but it was the community calibration from several different entities.

Other businesses are doing a little extra to help. Awakon Federal Credit Union is one of them. Awakon is allowing all military members a no interest payroll replacement loan.

“We don’t really know when our government will be up and running at this point and how that effects our local government employees and contract workers really puts a question mark on when they are going to be paid," said Jessica Richards, Vice President of Lending at Awakon Federal Credit Union. "When they will be financially stable again and that is when Awakon Federal Union can come in to pay and work as a partner with our members.”

With all this happening, the families of the Coast Guard are taking notice.

“As a family and as a coast guard community, it is so humbling and so touching just to have the community to come around us and support us at certain times and we are all away from home. Said Sarah Campbell, wife of Coast Guard member. "Nobody is originally from Cheboygan so to be away from home and have the community come around you is really touching.”

If you are interested in helping, you can contact the Cheboygan Chamber of Commerce by calling (231) 627-7183. WPBN

 

Canadian government lending Algoma Steel $150 million

1/12 - Queen’s Park is lending Algoma Steel $60 million to help the company remain competitive in the face of U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum.

That’s on top of some $90 million in federal money for the Sault Ste. Marie firm. Coils of steel are seen at at Essar Steel Algoma in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., on March 14, 2018. The provincial and federal governments have announced money to help the steel firm weather U.S. tariffs.

“The investment announced today secures thousands of jobs and pensions and signals northern Ontario is open for business,” provincial Minister of Energy, Northern Development and Mines Greg Rickford said Thursday.

“Our government is committed to ensuring Algoma Steel remains competitive and sustainable in a tough market,” said Rickford.

Kalyan Ghosh, Algoma Steel’s chief executive officer, said the loans are part of the purchase and restructuring of the company, which is investing $600 million in the steelmaking facility. “This support will enable us to make important investments in new technology that will enhance our reliability, extend asset life and reduce our environmental footprint,” said Ghosh.

“We greatly appreciate the province’s investment in Algoma Steel’s long-term sustainability,” he said, noting the company has committed to protect jobs and fund its three defined benefit pension plans. Those benefit about 2,100 current and 6,300 past employees or retirees.

Rickford said as part of the agreement, the company’s new owners will be tackling past environmental contamination at the Sault Ste. Marie mill. Algoma Steel has committed to spend $3.8 million annually over 21 years on cleaning up the site.

The Star

 

Port Reports -  January 12

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Philip R. Clarke departed Duluth at 02:05 Friday morning after loading iron ore pellets at CN, and American Century arrived at 07:19. She tied up at Husky Energy to fuel, and was waiting to load at Canadian National. She was initially expected to lay up in the Twin Ports, however she likely won't make it back to Lake Superior before the Soo Locks close on the 15th and will spend the winter elsewhere. Paul R. Tregurtha spent the day at Canadian National loading her last cargo of the season, and is tentatively expected to depart mid-morning Saturday. At the Superior entry, Burns Harbor departed at 01:30 Friday with a load of ore from BN, and Stewart J. Cort was inbound a few minutes later to load. She was still at the dock Friday night with no departure time listed. Michipicoten was on the hook outside the harbor waiting to load. Also arriving in Superior on Friday was H. Lee White, which came in at 09:13 and tied up at Elevator M for winter layup.

Two Harbors – Gary A. Putney
Indiana Harbor departed Two Harbors on Jan. 11th at 06:24 for Indiana Harbor. Arriving Two Harbors on Jan. 11th after being anchored off Duluth was the Edwin H. Gott at 07:48. As of 19:45 on Jan. 11th she was still at South of #2. Arriving Two Harbors on Jan. 11th at 17:29 for North of #2 lay-by was the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader. She is possibly the final pellet load of the season from Two Harbors.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – Jim Conlon
On Friday morning the American Courage and the new build cement barage Commander were pulled out of the graving dock at Bayship by Selvick Marine tugs.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Algoma Sault was due late Friday or early Saturday with salt from Goderich.

S. Lake Michigan
Lee A. Tregurtha was upbound Friday night with a destination of Superior for winter layup. Roger Blough was unloading at Gary and Wilfred Sykes was due at Indiana Harbor early Saturday.

Northern Lake Huron
hursday, Alpena: 18:51 Algoma Sault weighed anchor and departed for Milwaukee. Owen Sound: Saginaw departed for Stoneport. Friday, Alpena: 6:27 Manitowoc arrived to unload and at 12:27 departed. She is down bound on Lake Huron. 13:00 Samuel De Champlain arrived to load cement products. Stoneport: 3:50 Saginaw arrived and went to anchor. 18:17 Olive L Moore departed and is down bound on Lake Huron. Saginaw weighed anchor and proceeded to the loading dock. Cheboygan: 12:24 The tug Nancy Anne arrived from St Ignace.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Niagara was loading salt for Muskegon Friday night.

Toledo, Ohio
The American Integrity was anchored near Point Pelee Friday night, is preparing for winter layup. Her AIS says “Tony Packos,” Toledo’s famous Hungarian eatery. The Integrity will most likely be arriving at Toledo for winter layup sometime on Saturday. You can follow her progress by using the various AIS sites. John J. Boland is docked in Toledo with an AIS message that says “Margaritaville.” Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader is also in port.

Erie, Pa. – Jeff Benson
Presque Isle arrived in Erie at the Mountfort Terminal for layup on Friday.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 12

CHI-CHEEMAUN (Hull#205) was launched January 12, 1974, at Collingwood, Ontario, by Collingwood Shipyards, Ltd.

GRAND HAVEN was gutted by fire on January 12, 1970, during scrapping operations at the United Steel & Refining Co. Ltd. dock at Hamilton, Ontario.

MENIHEK LAKE (Hull#163) was launched January 12, 1959, at Collingwood, Ontario, by Collingwood Shipyards, Ltd. She was used in a unique experiment with shunters in the Welland Canal in 1980. She was scrapped at Gijon, Spain in 1985.

On January 12, 1973, the VENUS had an engine room explosion shortly after unloading at Kipling, Michigan, near Gladstone on Little Bay De Noc, causing one loss of life.

On 12 January 1956, ANABEL II (probably a fish tug, 62 tons, built in 1928) was destroyed by fire at her winter lay-up at the Roen Steamship Co. dock at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.

January 12, 1911 - ANN ARBOR NO 5 hit the rocks close to the south breakwater when entering Manistique harbor, tearing off her starboard shaft and wheel.

The wooden steam barge O.O. CARPENTER (127.5 foot, 364 gross tons) was sold by the Jenks Shipbuilding Company on 12 January 1892, to Mr. H. E. Runnels and Capt. Sinclair for $26,000. The vessel had been launched at Jenks yard on 13 May 1891.

The new EDWIN H GOTT departed Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, in 1979, for final fitout at Milwaukee. 1970: BARON BERWICK made one trip inland in 1959 and returned as b) FILTRIC in 1967. The latter was abandoned 5 miles south of Cape Finistere on the northwest coast of Spain after the cargo shifted. The vessel was enroute from Copenhagen, Denmark, to Alexandria, Egypt, and it drifted aground the next day as a total loss.

1971: The West German freighter BRANDENBURG sank in the Straits of Dover, 7 miles south of Folkestone, England, after apparently hitting the wreck of TEXACO CARIBBEAN which had gone down the previous day following a collision. The former had been through the Seaway in 1969.

1979: A propane explosion aboard the tug WESTERN ENGINEER at Thunder Bay resulted in extensive damage. Two were injured. The ship was never repaired and noted as broken up in 1980.

1985: ATLANTIC HOPE first came inland when it was fresh from the shipyard in 1965. It was gutted by a fire in the accommodation area in position 9.22 N / 60.37 W as b) ALIVERI HOPE. The ship was abandoned but towed to Barbados and eventually into Mamonal, Colombia, on October 14, 1985, for dismantling.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Brian Bernard, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Fish tug sinks in Duluth-Superior harbor

1/11 - Duluth-Superior – There was some unusual activity going on underneath the Blatnik Bridge on Thursday. The U.S. Coast Guard launched a pollution mitigation effort because a trawling vessel, the A.E. Clifford, was sinking in the ice.

The 45-foot Clifford was built as an icebreaker in 1947 but was later converted to a fishing tug.

Coast Guard Petty Officer Matt Stixrud says they put out protective harbor lining to make sure any leaked oil or gas won't escape into the harbor. "We also put some absorbent boom on the outside so when they lift the vessel up, it will help to collect any of the oil that comes off of it," he told WDIO News.

The Coast Guard sent divers down but they have not yet determined why the vessel was sinking or who presently owns the boat. They hope to have the recovery and pollution mitigation efforts completed by Friday.

View a photo at this link

 

Port Reports -  January 11

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
American Mariner departed Duluth at 06:07 Thursday morning with a load of iron ore pellets from CN. Paul R. Tregurtha was inbound at 19:33, and tied up at Husky Energy to fuel and wait her turn to load at Canadian National. Philip R. Clarke spent the day loading at CN, and had been expected to depart at some point Thursday night. Both H. Lee White and American Century are due in the Twin Ports on Friday for winter layup. In Superior, Burns Harbor arrived at 12:16 to load iron ore at Burlington Northern, and is expected to depart early Friday morning. Stewart J. Cort was on the hook outside the Superior entry waiting her turn to load.

Two Harbors – Gary A. Putney
Edgar B. Speer departed Two Harbors on Jan. 9th at 20:25 for Conneaut. Arriving Two Harbors on Jan. 9th at 21:03 was the Indiana Harbor with an assist from the "G" tug North Carolina. As of 19:30 on Jan. 10th the Indiana Harbor was still at South of #2. Still anchored off Duluth awaiting the Two Harbors dock is the Edwin H. Gott. The Paul R. Tregurtha that had originally been scheduled to load in Two Harbors is now going to Duluth. She was inbound Duluth on Jan. 10th at 19:30. Due Two Harbors on Jan. 11th is the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader.

St. Marys River
Wilfred Sykes was downbound in the locks at noon, followed by Ojibway, Kaye E. Barker and, late, Edgar B. Speer. Upbounders included Clyde S VanEnkevort/Erie Trader, Herbert C. Jackson and late, Kaministiqua.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Frontenac arrived Thursday morning with salt.

Northern Lake Huron
Thursday, Alpena: 11:51 Algoma Sault arrived and went to anchor. She was waiting in the calm waters of Thunder Bay for Frontenac to finish unloading at the Milwaukee salt dock and depart. Frontenac was delayed due to weather earlier this week. 15:37 Defiance weighed anchor was is upbound on Lake Huron. Stoneport: Olive L Moore was expected to arrive at 21:00 to load limestone.

Owen Sound, Ont. – Paul Martin
Saginaw arrived Wednesday afternoon, unloading grain at the elevator on the west harbor wall. Unloading finished, she departed early Thursday afternoon.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H.
The tugs Manitou and Capt. Keith arrived at Nicholson's Ecorse Terminal Thursday morning. Later, the tug Andrew J was inbound on the Rouge, tying up near Fordson Island. She may be staging equipment for the upcoming dredging project. The American Integrity arrived at Zug Island to unload ore. Mississagi was back, calling on the Motor City Materials dock again to unload salt.

Toledo, Ohio
Update for Thursday: The Robert S. Pierson is making a return visit to Toledo with another grain cargo that was loaded at Sarnia, Ont. She is most likely bound for the Mondelez (Kraft) Elevator to unload the grain cargo. As of Wednesday, the Cedarglen was not in dry dock and remains tied up at the riverfront dock area of the shipyard. The tug/barge combo Albert and Margaret arrived at the B-P Dock Thursday morning. The Samuel De Champlain with her barge were at the Lafarge Cement dock unloading cement. The Great Lakes Trader is bound for the Torco Ore Dock however there is no eta at this time due to the windy weather around the Great Lakes. More vessels are scheduled to arrive at Toledo for winter layup during the next week or two. Check the various AIS sites daily to see what vessels are bound for Toledo. Currently Cedarglen, Great Republic and John J. Boland have arrived for winter layup.

 

Toledo receives $1.9M to expand dredge facility

1/11 - Toledo, Ohio – Nearly $10 million more in state funds are being released to help keep dredged material out of Lake Erie, including $1.9 million to the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority to expand the capacity of its confined disposal facility near Oregon, known as Facility 3.

The latest round of grants was announced Tuesday at a news conference at One Maritime Plaza in Toledo. Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Director Craig Butler and Ohio Department of Natural Resources Director Jim Zehringer credited state Sen. Randy Gardner (R., Bowling Green) for his continued support. They said the grants will help Ohio come closer to meeting its goal of phasing out open-lake disposal of dredged shipping channel material from all of Lake Erie starting in 2020.

The Facility 3 money will be used to add storage capacity. The site should be able to take dredged material from the Maumee River shipping channel for eight to 10 more years once the expansion is finished. Without it, the cell would be filled to capacity in three to five years, said Paul Toth, Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority president and chief executive officer.

The extra five or six years “gives us a longer runway,” or window of time, for area engineers to come up with a long-term solution for open-lake disposal of dredged material, Mr. Toth said.

The local port authority spent about $1.2 million building up Facility 3’s dike walls in 2018 to fortify the structure. That allowed it to use up the remainder of a soil-like product called NuSoil that was still on site. Made in past years by a company called S & L Fertilizer Co., NuSoil was made of 88 percent soil dredged from the Toledo shipping channel, 10 percent sewage sludge, and 2 percent spent lime sludge from Toledo’s water treatment plant. S & L stopped making it about four years ago.

One of the possible solutions could be pumping Facility 3 dredged material out as a slurry on eastern Lucas County farms within a few years. That depends on the outcome of continued work being done at a North Toledo waterfront research park, where officials are studying the viability of growing crops with soil that has dredged material mixed in.

Scudder Mackay, Ohio DNR coastal management chief, said the projects are important to Lake Erie’s overall health because the federal government oversees eight commercial harbors along the shoreline that need to be dredged constantly to keep shipping viable.

An average of 35 million tons of cargo move through the government’s eight Lake Erie ports in Ohio, generating $25 billion in revenue and supporting 130,000 jobs, he said.

Two-thirds of the dredging — about 1 million of the 1.5 million cubic yards dredged annually from Ohio’s Lake Erie shipping channels — is done in the Toledo area. That’s because Toledo is by far the shallowest of all Great Lakes ports.

“We’re going to be dredging for years and are looking for long-term solutions,” Mr. Mackay said.

About another year or two of research is necessary at the Great Lakes Dredged Material Center for Innovation at Riverside Park in North Toledo. Funding for that research was announced a month before Toledo’s 2014 water crisis, when an algal toxin fouled the metro region’s tap water for almost three days.

“We’ve gotten a little farther along than we expected a couple of years ago. I would call it a success story to date,” Mr. Mackay said. “But we still have a long way to go.”

The cities of Lorain and Conneaut each received $4 million to build sediment processing facilities similar to one in Cleveland. Such a facility might eventually be considered in Toledo, but the technology would be more difficult because of the amount of fine silt in this part of the lake, he said.

Toledo Blade

 

Salties scrapped

1/11 - The following saltwater vessels have been scrapped with each having made visits to the Great Lakes/Seaway system in their careers. Turid Knutsen (IMO 9039884), a long time visitor to the system, has been scrapped. The vessel held the name Turid Knutsen from 1993 until 2013 and first came inland as such in 1993 and last visited as such in 2009. It was renamed the Princess Oge and it carried this name from 2013 to 2018, but did return inland as such before finally being renamed Princess of Palau registry. It did not return inland with this name either. The ship arrived at the Chittagong Anchorage on October 26, 2018 and was finally beached at Chittagong on October 30, 2018.

Odra (IMO 8901597), a former Polish Steamship vessel built in 1992, has been scraped. This vessel briefly carried the name Odra from the time it was built thus being renamed in 1992 to Odranes. It held the name Odranes from 1992 to 1999 and first came inland as such in 1994. In 1999 the ship reverted back to its original name Odra and it held that name from 1999 to 2012 and returned inland as such in 2002 and last visited in 2007. In 2012 the ship was renamed Hekmeh and it carried that name from 2012 until 2018 when it was sold and scrapped. It did not return inland as such and the ship arrived in Alang, India, on June 12, 2018 and was finally beached on June 15, 2018.

 

Algoma Steel ponders public port at Sault Ste. Marie

1/11 - Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. – The new owners of Algoma Steel Inc. are interested in examining opportunities that could see a public port developed on their property, says the city’s mayor.

Mayor Christian Provenzano said his goal this year to get the parties together to start from the drawing board and determine how a public access port can be developed that will be beneficial to the community. He wants to establish a committee between Algoma, the city and Economic Development Corp., to look at potential models that will work for stakeholders and benefit the community as a whole.

Provenzano said he reached out to Algoma Steel Inc. CEO Kalyan Ghosh to gauge interest in developing a new public port.

“The port is still a project the city is interested in. We recognized that the most important thing was to have Algoma come out of the (CCAA) process as a healthy company but we’ve always believed in the port access,” Provenzano told The Sault Star.

The mayor said he had always made it clear in discussions with creditors, now the new owners of the company, that the city was interested in pursuing a public port project.

“Algoma is completely open to working with us on developing a port project,” Provenzano said. “It’s not going to look like Algoma Ports did. Algoma Ports had all the water access and Algoma (Steel) is not going to put itself in that position again.”

He anticipates that the committee will examine how a public access port can exist on Algoma’s property and serve the community. Any recommendations will need to be returned to city council and Algoma’s board of directors for approval.

“We’ve started talking about it and that’s an important first step,” Provenzano said.

Sault Star

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 11

The steamer ROBERT S. McNAMARA, under tow, reached her intended destination of Santander, Spain on January 11, 1974, for scrapping.

In 1970, IRVING S. OLDS was the last ship of the season at the Soo Locks as she followed the PHILIP R. CLARKE downbound.

In 1973, ROGER BLOUGH collided with PHILIP R. CLARKE after the CLARKE encountered an ice pressure ridge and came to a stop in the Straits of Mackinac.

January 11, 1911 - ANN ARBOR NO 5 arrived in Frankfort, Michigan, on her maiden voyage.

On 11 January 1883, The Port Huron Times reported that a citizens' committee met to help Port Huron businesses. "A. N. Moffat decried the taxation of vessel property. High taxation of vessel property had driven much of it away from Port Huron. He cited the case of Capt. David Lester of Marine City who came to Port Huron a few years ago to live and would have brought here one of the largest fleets on the Great Lakes, but when he found what taxes would be, returned to Marine City."

1919: The laker CASTALIA left the lakes in two pieces and was rejoined at Lauzon, Quebec, for a new career on the Atlantic in 1918. The ship broke in two 65 miles off Sable Island, Nova Scotia, and the crew was rescued by the BERGENFJORD.

1962: The retired Interlake Steamship Company bulk carrier ARCTURUS, formerly JAMES B. WOOD, was under tow of the Portuguese tug PRAIA GRANDE on the way to Norway to be scrapped when she foundered off the Azores at position 46.10N x 8.50W.

1965: CELIA B. made 15 trips through the Seaway in 1959-1962 under Liberian registry. The vessel arrived at Willemstad, Netherlands Antilles, as f) SEA MAID with engine damage and having lost its propeller. The ship was ultimately deemed not worth repairing and arrived at Rotterdam, Netherlands, under tow for scrapping on June 22, 1966.

1974: The first FEDERAL HUDSON to visit the Great Lakes was sailing as d) GOLDEN KING when it struck the wreck of the THETIS off Chittagong, Bangladesh, while inbound from Singapore Roads. It was beached in sinking condition and sustained water damage at high tide. The vessel was refloated on February 13, 1974, and taken to Chittagong to unload and get repaired. It was scrapped at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, as d) CHAR HSIUNG in 1980.

1981: ARNA began Seaway trading in 1965. It stranded off Shimonoseki, Japan, as b) IQBALBAKSH and was declared a total loss. The vessel was sold to South Korean shipbreakers and arrived at Busan, under tow on August 2, 1981.

1993: EUROJOY was anchored off Cadiz, Spain, when a spontaneous combustion fire broke out in the cargo of coal that had been bound for Turkey. The ship was listed as a total loss and sold for scrap but was repaired. It sailed additional years until scrapping at Alang, India, as g) LENA II in 1998. It first visited the Seaway as a) ATLANTIC CHALLENGE in 1971 and returned as b) ANGEBALTIC in 1981, c) ASTURIAS in 1986 and e) EUROJOY in 1990.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Brian Bernard, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

End is in sight for shipping season

1/10 - Duluth, Minn. - – Although the Great Lakes shipping season ends next week, work at shipyards is ramping up.

When the Soo Locks, which link Lake Superior to the other Great Lakes, close at midnight Jan. 15 until late March, ships on the Great Lakes will dock for seasonal maintenance and modernization, with eight freighters scheduled for winter layups in the Port of Duluth-Superior, the Duluth Seaway Port Authority announced Tuesday.

"For the shipyards, this is the busiest time of the year," Lake Carriers' Association Glen Nekvasil said.

At Fraser Shipyards in Superior, on-site staff has jumped from its usual level of 100 workers to about 175 workers, Fraser Industries President and Chief Operating Officer James Farkas said.

Across the Great Lakes, Nekvasil predicts the 45 U.S.-flag vessels represented by the Lake Carriers' Association will spend about $60 million on work during winter layup. Much of that work is on the ship's engines, but "This is a very capital-intensive industry," Nekvasil said.

Although seven other ships are expected to arrive by early next week, the Tim S. Dool, which arrived on New Year's Day, is already dry docked at Fraser.

Four other ships are slated to dock at Fraser, the Port Authority said, but only the Tim S. Dool is expected to be dry docked, Farkas said. "Dry docking is normally reserved for more extensive work," Farkas said.

The three ships not scheduled for Fraser will winter at Enbridge Dock, Elevator "M" Dock and Midwest Energy, the Port Authority said.

The St. Lawrence Seaway System, which connects the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean, closed Dec. 31. The last saltie, or oceangoing vessel, of the year left Duluth on Dec. 15.

With the 2018 shipping season winding down, Duluth Seaway Port Authority officials are celebrating the season's high marks. "The Port of Duluth-Superior is ending the shipping season on a strong note," Deb DeLuca, Duluth Seaway Port Authority executive director said in a news release Tuesday.

DeLuca noted grain cargoes out of Duluth-Superior is up 22 percent through November compared to last year and iron ore shipments are 25 percent above its five-year average. Coal shipments were down, however.

DeLuca said she expects the 2018 shipping season will surpass 32 million tons of total cargo.

View photos and a dock map at this link

Duluth News Tribune 

 

‘Happy to do my job:’ Coast Guard rescues man from freighter on Lake Michigan

1/10 - Port Washington, Wis. – Members of the U.S. Coast Guard worked without pay Tuesday, Jan. 8, amid the partial government shutdown, rescuing a man from a ship in Lake Michigan. The man suffered a serious head injury, and the freighter was just off the coast of Port Washington throughout the day, as Coast Guard members worked to help the man after an accident on the job.

"Just happy to do my job today," said Connor Barelli, U.S. Coast Guard. "Obviously we were like, 'hey, we need urgency,' trying to get out there."

A man aboard the Stewart J. Cort struck his head and needed treatment at the hospital.

The mission involved getting the man off the 1,000-foot freighter and into a waiting ambulance. "I guess he was working down in the engine room and he happened to hit his head on a valve. Freak accident. Maybe the way the boat was rocking," said Barelli.

After traveling 40 minutes through choppy waves, the tricky part was getting the man down from the freighter. "He basically had to climb down, so we were fortunate enough where he was in somewhat good spirits, even with the head injury, to be able to do that," said Barelli.

Thirty minutes later, the man was on his way to the hospital. "We were able to get him there safely, so it was a good mission on our end," said Barelli.

The wound was stapled, and the man was expected to be OK. "It felt really good. It's a rewarding job at times, and it was an awesome experience for our crew," said Barelli.

Members of the Coast Guard were not commenting on the partial government shutdown, but can expect back pay, whenever it does come to an end.

Fox 6

 

Port Reports -  January 10

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Philip R. Clarke arrived Duluth at 09:01 Wednesday morning to load iron ore at CN, however she tied up at Husky Energy to wait for American Mariner to finish loading. The Mariner is tentatively expected to depart in the early morning hours on Thursday. There was no traffic through the Superior entry on Wednesday, however both Stewart J. Cort and Burns Harbor are expected early Thursday afternoon to load at Burlington Northern. Burns Harbor spent most of Wednesday anchored south of the Keweenaw Peninsula waiting on weather, and was just getting underway at 20:00 Wednesday night. Also anchored nearby was H. Lee White, which is on her way to Duluth to lay up for the winter. If weather conditions improve, she should arrive on Thursday and join the Tim S. Dool at Fraser Shipyards.

Two Harbors – Gary A. Putney
Wilfred Sykes departed Two Harbors on Jan. 9th at 06:37 for Indiana Harbor. Arriving Two Harbors on Jan. 9th at 07:35 was the Edgar B. Speer after being anchored off Duluth. As of 19:45 on Jan. 9th the Speer was close to departing Two Harbors for Conneaut. Off Two Harbors on Jan. 9th at 19:45 was the Indiana Harbor that had been anchored off Duluth. Arriving Two Harbors on Jan. 9th at approx. 15:37 was the "G" tug North Carolina that will assist the Indiana Harbor to the dock. Anchored off Duluth awaiting Two Harbors is the Edwin H. Gott. Anchored Jan. 9th in Bete Grise Bay was the Paul R. Tregurtha. She was anchored the entire day of Jan. 9th in that location. The PRT is also to load in Two Harbors. Upbound in Lake Huron showing a Two Harbors destination is the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Wednesday January 9th: 8:33 CCGS Samuel Risley departed the Coast Guard base. She performed ice-breaking duties on the Mission River near G3 and Superior elevators. 12:22 Ojibway departed G3 downbound.

Keweenaw Peninsula
The H. Lee White, Burns Harbor, Paul Tregurtha and Kaye E. Barker were taking refuge in Bete Grise Bay on Wednesday until the windy weather diminishes. Burns Harbor departed in the mid-evening for Superior. At 10 p.m. Wednesday, Wilfred Sykes was passing the tip of the Keweenaw Peninsula with a noon Thursday ETA at the Soo Locks.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic Wednesday included Stewart J. Cort and American Century, both for Superior. Downbounders included American Integrity early, followed by Great Lakes Trader/Joyce L. VanEnkevort. USCG Mackinaw was at Lime Island for ice assistance if needed. Michipicoten was at Algoma Steel, as were the tugs Sharon M 1 and Leonard M, along with their barges. CSL Assiniboine remained at anchor at Nine Mile. She shows a Nanticoke destination.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – Daniel Lindner
The tug Bradshaw McKee arrived in Sturgeon Bay on Wednesday morning and tied up at Bay Shipbuilding. She will be departing with Port City Marine's barge Commander (formerly known as Cleveland Rocks), which has spent the past two seasons at the yard being converted to a self-unloading cement carrier.

Northern Lake Huron
Alpena: 9:27 Defiance departed the Lafarge dock and went to anchor. Mackinaw City: 12:42 Frontenac weighed anchor and departed for Milwaukee. Owen Sound: Saginaw is expected to arrive and unload wheat at the P&H Elevator.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Sault was loading salt for Milwaukee on Wednesday. She departed in the late afternoon.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H.
The tug Albert and her tank barge Margaret arrived at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to load/unload Wednesday afternoon. The Mesabi Miner stopped to fuel at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal after the Albert and Margaret shifted to Nicholson's Detroit Terminal. The Mississagi ended the day, calling on the Motor City Materials dock to unload salt.

Toledo, Ohio
Algoma Niagara arrived at the Hans Mueller Dock around 10 am Wednesday to unload a grain cargo from Thunder Bay. They were assisted by the tug Colorado. This dock is located just north of the salt pile by the Craig Bridge. Mesabi Miner was at the Torco Dock unloading ore. The next ore boat due in will be the Great Lakes Trader. It is unknown when she will arrive due to the wind conditions around the Great Lakes.

 

Lakes Pilots Association seeking new pilot

1/10 - Lakes Pilots Association, based in Port Huron, Mich., is seeking applications from those interested in employment as a U.S. Registered Pilot on foreign vessels in District 2 of the Great Lakes. Lakes Pilots provides pilotage service in all the waters and ports from Port Huron, MI to Buffalo, NY, excluding the Welland Canal. Applicants must hold a U.S. Master, Mate or Pilot license with at least 24 months licensed service or comparable experience on vessels of 4,000 gross tons or over, operating on the Great Lakes or Oceans. Those applicants qualifying with ocean service must have obtained at least six months of licensed service or comparable experience on the Great Lakes. A complete list of requirements may be found in CFR Title 46, Shipping, Part 401, Subpart B. Anyone interested must first apply to the Director of Great Lakes Pilotage in Washington, D.C. to determine eligibility. Please contact Lakes Pilots for more information at (810) 984-2541

Applications and Information can be obtained from the US Coast Guard Director of Great Lakes Pilotage at:

https://www.dco.uscg.mil/Our-Organization/Assistant-Commandant-for-Prevention-Policy-CG-5P/Marine-Transportation-Systems-CG-5PW/Office-of-Waterways-and-Ocean-Policy/Office-of-Waterways-and-Ocean-Policy-Great-Lakes-Pilotage-Div/

Send Resume to:

Lakes Pilots Association
P.O. Box 610902
Port Huron, MI 48061
(810) 984-2541
www.lakespilots.com

 

Salties renamed – Corrections

1/10 - It was reported on Tuesday’s News Page that the Beluga Fanfare was renamed a second time to the Louis Auerbach of Liberian registry and flag. The correct name is the Louise Auerbach of Liberian registry. Also reported incorrectly was the new name for the former Yucatan as Islan. Further information on this vessel is that this was the former saltwater vessel Golden Laker, which carried that name from 1996 until 2003 and first came inland as such in 1997, before it was renamed the Yucatan. As the Yucatan, this vessel held this name from 2003 until 2009 and first came inland as such in 2004 and last visited as such in 2008. In 2009 the Yucatan was then renamed Free Neptune, a name it held from 2009 until 2018. It did not return inland as such and the ship was renamed again to the Islander S of Palau registration in 2018. Also noted was the Beluga Finesse, which first came inland on its only visit what that name. The ship first came inland as such in 2010 on its only visit with that name.

Denny Dushane

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 10

On this day in 1952, EDWARD B. GREENE was launched at the American Shipbuilding yard at Toledo, Ohio. The 647-foot vessel joined the Cleveland Cliffs fleet. After lengthening over the winter of 1975-1976 and conversion to a self-unloader in 1981, the GREENE sailed briefly as the b.) BENSON FORD for Rouge Steel. She sails today as the c.) KAYE E BARKER of the Interlake fleet.

ONTADOC (Hull#207) was launched January 10, 1975, at Collingwood, Ontario, by Collingwood Shipyards, Ltd. For N.M. Paterson & Sons. Renamed b.) MELISSA DESGAGNES in 1990.

On January 10, 1977, the CHESTER A. POLING, b.) MOBIL ALBANY) broke in two and sank off the coast of Massachusetts.

January 10, 1998 - Glen Bowden, former co-owner of the Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Company (MWT) died.

In 1974, the W.C. RICHARDSON was towed from her winter berth in Toledo to assist in lightering the grounded a.) BENSON FORD.

On Jan 10, 1978, the tanker JUPITER became stuck in 3 to 5-foot ridged ice off Erie, Pennsylvania. The U.S.C.G. tug OJIBWA was sent from Buffalo, New York, to free her, but she too became beset in the ice 3 miles from the JUPITER's position. The JUPITER was lost after an explosion at Bay City in 1990. The OJIBWA is now the tug GEN OGLETHORPE in Savannah, Georgia.

On 10 January 1898, Alexander Anderson of Marine City was awarded a contract to build a wooden steamer for A. F. Price of Freemont, Ohio, Isaac Lincoln of Dakota, and Capt. Peter Ekhert of Port Huron, Michigan. The vessel was to be named ISAAC LINCOLN and was to be 130 feet long and capable of carrying 400,000 feet of lumber. The contract price was $28,000. Her engine and boiler were to be built by Samuel F. Hodge of Detroit. The vessel was launched on 10 May 1898, and her cost had increased to $40,000. She lasted until 1931 when she was abandoned.

1967: PRINDOC (iii) was laid up for the winter at Cardinal, Ontario, when it broke its moorings in a storm and drifted down the St. Lawrence. The shipkeeper was able to get the anchor down and they held just above the Iroquois power dam, averting a major problem.

1970: IOANNA stranded near Sete, France, in a gale while inbound from Barcelona, Spain and had to be sold for scrap. The ship had been a Seaway trader as a) A.J. FALKLAND in 1959 and returned as b) PETER in 1960 and 1961.

1971: CATTARO came through the Seaway in 1959 for the Ellerman's Wilson Line. It caught fire in the engine room at Galatz, Romania, as b) VRACHOS and had to be beached. It was subsequently broken up for scrap.

1977: The tanker CHESTER A. POLING broke in two and sank off the coast of Massachusetts in a storm after an explosion in the forward pump room. Two members of the crew were lost. The ship had been a Great Lakes trader as a) PLATTSBURG SOCONY and as b) MOBIL ALBANY.

1981: SOL RIVER came to the Great Lakes in 1968. It ran aground as f) LIZA near Combi, Lemnos Island, Greece. The hull broke in two and sank January 15. The ship was carrying phosphate enroute from Sfax, Tunisia, to Kavalla, Greece, when it went down on the Aegean Sea with the loss of 5 lives.

2001: The Cypriot freighter ARETHUSA first came through the Seaway in 1987. Fire broke out in the engine room and spread to the bridge and accommodation area while the ship was in the northern Great Belt. The vessel, enroute from Casablanca, Morocco, to Gdansk, Poland, with phosphate, was towed to Gydnia, Poland, after the blaze was extinguished. Repairs to the 28-year-old vessel were not worthwhile and it arrived at the scrapyard at Aliaga, Turkey, for dismantling on March 26, 2001.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Brian Bernard, Russ Plumb, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Here to serve the safety of mariners:’ On board the icebreaker Samuel Risley

1/9 - Thunder Bay, Ont. – It's a sure sign of winter in Thunder Bay when icebreakers when the Canadian and U.S. Coast Guards visit the northwestern Ontario city's harbor.

This year, the Samuel Risley was in port in early January, helping the last of the shipping season's commercial vessels. The warmer-than-average temperatures in the Thunder Bay area, however, have meant there isn't nearly as much ice in the harbor as usual.

Definitely not as much as last winter, said Darryl Clow, the Samuel Risley's commanding officer while the ship was in Thunder Bay in January 2019. "The former captains described (the 2017-2018 winter) as the heaviest they'd seen," Clow said. "And they've both been here for 10 to 15 years."

Ice conditions can vary widely from year to year he said. The Risley is one of two Canadian Coast Guard icebreakers assigned to the Great Lakes, with the Griffon being the other. "I've broke 48 inches of ice ... in the past, a friend of mine was captain on here, he broke close to 50 inches," Clow said.

"It's an easy job some years; I've [also] been on for very heavy years and you're working 18, 20 hours a day."

Read more and view images at this link

 

Congressman speaks on new Soo Lock construction timeline

1/9 - Washington, D.C. – At the swearing in of the House in Washington, Republican Congressman Jack Bergman spoke about the Soo Locks and a potential timeline for the project to begin. More money has been requested for the new lock in President Trump’s 2020 budget.

The Detroit Army Corps of Engineers already has money in the work plan to finish the design and to get everything ready for the bid process.

There are still several steps that need to be taken before construction can begin but Congressman Bergman is hopeful that it will be in less than 2 years.

"When will they see shovels in ground? It's probably going to be 18 months. Somewhere in that area because the design phase now is what has already been authorized by the latest funding," said Bergman.

In December, Michigan and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers signed a memorandum of agreement officially committing Michigan’s contribution of up to $52 million for the new lock.

WLUC

 

Update of vessel layups at Sturgeon Bay

Joseph L. Block 1/1/19
Wilfred Sykes 1/31/19
Burns Harbor 12/7/18
American Courage Drydock 12/22/18
John G. Munson 12/28/18
Cason J. Callaway 1/15/19
James R. Barker 1/17/19
Paul R. Tregurtha 1/14/19
Barge Huron Spirit 1/15/19
Tug Leonard M 1/15/19
Barge A397 1/3/19

Door County Marine Museum

 

Port Reports -  January 9

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. finally departed Duluth at 16:01 Tuesday afternoon after spending nearly two days taking on iron ore pellets at CN. American Mariner, which had been at anchor outside the harbor waiting to load in Two Harbors, was inbound at 16:28 after a change in orders and tied up at Canadian National to load. She is expected to depart mid-morning Wednesday. There are currently three more vessels scheduled for ore loads at Duluth's CN dock before the shipping season ends, while the remainder of arrivals will be for winter layup. There was no traffic through the Superior entry on Tuesday, however Burns Harbor is due around noon Wednesday to load at Burlington Northern.

Two Harbors – Gary A. Putney
American Integrity departed Two Harbors on Jan. 8th at 03:13 for Zug Island. Shortly thereafter the Roger Blough shifted from North of #2 to South of #2. The Blough departed Two Harbors on Jan. 8th at 15:57 for Gary. Arriving Two Harbors on Jan. 8th was the Wilfred Sykes at 16:43 for South of #2. The Sykes departed anchorage off Duluth at approx. 11:20 on the 8th. Edgar B. Speer was joined off Duluth by the Indiana Harbor on the evening of Jan. 8th. As of 17:45 on Jan. 8th the Edwin H. Gott is running checked down on the North Shore NE of Two Harbors. American Mariner, that had been scheduled to load in Two Harbors, went to the CN ore dock in Duluth after the departure of the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. Tentatively due Two Harbors on Jan. 9th is the Paul R. Tregurtha. The PRT is the last boat showing a Two Harbors destination.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Monday January 7: Saginaw departed Viterra A for Owen Sound. Tuesday January 8: 15:19 Ojibway arrived at G3 to load grain.

Northern Lake Huron
Tuesday, Alpena: 9:14 Defiance arrived at the Lafarge plant to unload. Cheboygan: 9:48 The tug Albert, the former Craig Eric Reinauer, and petroleum barge Margaret departed for Detroit. 11:11 USCG Mackinaw departed for the St Marys River to conduct ice operations. McGregor Bay: 6:58 CCGS Griffon conducted ice operations and provided escort for Algoma Sault which departed for Goderich. CCGS Griffon departed for Windsor. With the gales slaking the following boats weighed anchor and continued their voyages. 0:45 Michigan departed for Nanticoke. St Clair departed for Burns Harbor. Mesabi Miner departed for Toledo. 7:45 G L Ostrander departed for Milwaukee. H Lee White departed for Duluth Superior.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H.
The Clyde S VanEnkevort/Erie Trader arrived Tuesday night to unload ore at Zug Island.

 

Coast Guard makes dog it rescued from island an honorary crew member

1/9 - Lime Island, Mich. – Last week, we told you the happy-ending story about how the crew of the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Mackinaw rescued a dog they'd spotted struggling on the ice near the uninhabited Lime Island in the St. Marys River.

The dog, a husky mix named Logan, had been missing since Christmas Day from nearby St. Joseph Island, just across the border from Michigan's Upper Peninsula in Ontario, Canada. The dog's owners had been visiting relatives there when it ran away.

Nine days after he disappeared, the Coast Guard called Logan's owners to say the Mackinaw's crew had found the dog and was bringing him into their home base of Cheboygan, in the northern Lower Peninsula. When the big ice breaker pulled into port, there was a sweet reunion between Logan and his owners.

But what we didn't know then were some of the details about how the crew found Logan, built enough trust to get him onto the 240-foot ship -- and how they did a few special things to make the pup an honorary crew member.

The U.S. Coast Guard is now sharing these details with readers, and pictures of Logan's time on board the ship.

Read more and view photos at this link

 

Saltwater visitors renamed

1/9 - The following saltwater vessels have been renamed. Each made visits to the Great Lakes/Seaway system during their careers.

• Beluga Fanfare, which first came inland as such on its only visit with that name in 2010 is now the Louis Auerbach of Liberia. As Beluga Fanfare, the ship held this name from 2007 until 2011 when it was sold and renamed Fanfare from 2011 to 2018. It did not return inland as the Fanfare.

• A fleetmate and sistership to the Beluga Fanfare has also been renamed. The Beluga Finesse, which first came inland as such on its only visit with that name is now the Lisa Auerbach of the Liberian flag. As the Beluga Finesse, the vessel carried and held that name from 2008 until 2011 when it was sold and later renamed to the Finesse, a name it carried from 2011 to 2018. It did not return inland as Finesse.

• Persenk, built in 1998, first came inland as such in 1999 and last visited as such in 2009, has been renamed a second time. Its new name is the Yunes Emre of Panamanian registration. As the Persenk it carried this name from 1998 to 2013 before being renamed Osman Gazi and it held this name from 2013 until 2018. It never came inland as Osman Gazi.

• Uta first visited as such in 2007 on its only visit with that name. It carried this name from 2007 until 2013 when it was renamed Marmakira but never returned as such. In 2018 it was renamed Onego Bayou of Antigua and Barbuda registry.

• Another familiar visitor, the tanker Turid Knutsen, which first came inland as such in 1993 and last visited as such in 2009, has been renamed for a second time, with its new name being the Princess of Palau registry. As the Turid Knutsen it carried this name from 1993 until 2013 when it was sold and renamed Princess Oge and it carried this name from 2013 until 2018 but never returned inland as such.

• Yucatan, which first came inland as such in 2004 and last visited as such in 2008, has been renamed Islan.

Denny Dushane

 

Crews still battling fire aboard Halifax-bound container ship Yantian Express

1/9 - Halifax, N.S. – Crews working to extinguish a fire that's been burning for four days aboard a large container ship off Canada's east coast are facing some big challenges, an expert in offshore safety says.

Faisal Khan, an engineering professor at Memorial University, made the observation Monday after a second offshore support vessel arrived to help fight a cargo fire aboard the 320-metre Yantian Express, which first reported the blaze on Thursday.

Several containers on the Halifax-bound ship were still burning by Monday afternoon.

While the ship's crew may have been trained to deal with fires in the engine room and living quarters, burning cargo is another matter, said Khan, the Canada Research Chair in Offshore Safety and Risk Engineering at the St. John's, N.L., university. Fires fuelled by the polymers in plastic goods, for example, can produce toxic fumes that could prove deadly.

Tim Seifert, a spokesman for the international shipping company Hapag-Lloyd, said Monday "the focus is on containing the fire."

Seifert confirmed in an email that the 95-metre support ship Maersk Mobiliser, based in Newfoundland, had reached the container ship about 1,500 kilometres east of Halifax. He said the Maersk Mobiliser had joined the 71-metre Smit Nicobar, an offshore support ship from Belgium that arrived on Friday night.

The Smit Nicobar is equipped with fixed fire monitors -- a type of water cannon that can pump large volumes of water to extinguish fires.

All 23 crew members from the Yantian Express have been moved onto the Smit Nicobar. There were no reports of injuries, and the extent of damage to the larger vessel remains unclear.

A spokesman for the U.S. Coast Guard said the plan is to have the Maersk Mobiliser tow the container ship to Halifax, though it was unclear when that would happen.

Khan said towing a burning vessel would present further risks.

"Towing cargo that is on fire would be too much of a risk to take for both the cargo vessel and the towing vessel," he said, adding that towing a burning ship into port would be even riskier.

"Unless I'm 100 per cent sure of what my cargo contains and what the impact would be of the fire, I would be extremely cautious about bringing it onshore," he said.

Seifert said it was unclear when the container ship would reach Halifax, and he declined to say what the Yantian Express is carrying or what may have caused the fire.

The container ship was travelling from Colombo, Sri Lanka, to Halifax last Thursday when a fire started inside a container on the ship's forward deck, then spread to other containers -- prompting a call for help to the U.S. Coast Guard in Boston.

When the wind picked up to more than 20 kilometres per hour on Friday, the crew stopped fighting the fire and retreated to safety inside the ship's superstructure.

There were eight officers and 15 seafarers aboard the German-flagged ship, which was built in 2002 and is capable of carrying 7,510 standard 20-foot containers.

It implemented new guidelines for the stowage of dangerous cargo aboard its 750 vessels.

Canadian Press

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 9

On this day in 1973, the CHARLES M. BEEGHLY was the latest running Interlake vessel when she entered winter layup at Toledo, Ohio.

BAIE COMEAU II was laid up on January 9, 1983, at Sorel, Quebec, and was sold the following April to Progress Overseas Co. S.A., Panama renamed c.) AGIA TRIAS.

January 9, 1977 - The last survivor of the PERE MARQUETTE 18 disaster, Mike Bucholtz, died.

In 1974, a combination of wind and ice forced the beset BENSON FORD, of 1924, from the shipping channel in Western Lake Erie, running aground.

1974: MARDINA REEFER ran aground at the breakwall at Stephenville, Newfoundland, while inbound in stormy weather. The ship was scheduled to load pickled herring for Europe but became a total loss. Salvage efforts failed and the hull was pounded on the rocks and eventually split in two. The crew was rescued. The vessel had been through the Seaway in 1973.

1974: LUCIE SCHULTE had been a Pre-Seaway and Seaway visitor to the Great Lakes. It sank in bad weather as b) TEVEGA in the Bay of Biscay while enroute from Antwerp, Belgium, to Casablanca, Morocco, with a cargo of barley. Only one member of the crew survived.

1979: MARIGO M.F. had been a Seaway trader in 1973 and earlier as a) NEGO ANNE in 1971. The ship went aground off Alexandria, Egypt, and sustained hull and water damage. The bulk carrier was not worth repairing and sold to Brodospas of Split, Yugoslavia, for scrap. It arrived August 13, 1979, for dismantling.

1980: BILL CROSBIE was carrying steel when it got into trouble on the Atlantic on January 4, 1980. The vessel, a Seaway trader in 1974, was listing badly when it was brought into St. John's, Newfoundland, only to roll over and sink at the wharf on this date. The hull was towed out to sea, bottom up, on November 3, 1980, and scuttled 12 miles off shore.

1983: SANTONA stranded in the Red Sea off Sudan at North Jumna Shoal. The hull was refloated but sold for scrap. It arrived at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, on April 4, 1983, for dismantling. It was a busy Seaway trader and had made 36 trips to the Great Lakes from 1959 to 1967.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Russ Plumb, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Coast Guard begins icebreaking ops in the Western Great Lakes

1/8 - U.S. Coast Guard Sector Sault Sainte Marie commenced Operation Taconite, the Coast Guard’s largest domestic icebreaking operation, Monday, in response to expanded ice growth in the commercial ports of Western Lake Superior and the St. Marys River.

Operation Taconite encompasses Lake Superior, St. Marys River, Straits of Mackinac, Georgian Bay, Green Bay, northern Lake Huron, and Lake Michigan. Ice breaking operations are based on the following order of priorities: search and rescue, urgent response to vessels in deteriorating weather conditions, exigent community services for flood control and remote communities in immediate need of food, fuel for heat, energy, or and medical assistance, and facilitation of navigation.

In the coming weeks, various commercial waterways may close after due consideration is given to the protection of the marine environment and the safety of island residents who, in the course of their daily business, use naturally formed ice bridges for transportation to and from the mainland.

The authority for Coast Guard domestic ice breaking was created in 1936, by a signed Executive Order 7521 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt directing the U.S. Coast Guard “to assist in keeping open to navigation by means of ice breaking operations, in so far as practicable, and as the exigencies may require, channels and harbors in accordance with the reasonable demands of commerce.”

USCG

 

Port Reports -  January 8

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
There was no traffic through the Duluth entry during the day Monday. Walter J. McCarthy Jr. spent the day at Canadian National loading iron ore pellets and was expected to depart at some point Monday night. Edgar B. Speer, American Mariner, and Wilfred Sykes were all on the hook outside the harbor waiting to load in Two Harbors. In Superior, Lee A. Tregurtha was outbound at 04:47 after loading ore at BN, and Manitoulin arrived at 05:15 to load. She was still at the dock Monday night with no departure time listed. Also of note, the majority of Duluth's winter layup fleet is tentatively expected to arrive later this week. Tim S. Dool already tied up for the season at Fraser Shipyards, and will be joined by H. Lee White, Lee A. Tregurtha, Kaye E. Barker, American Spirit, American Century, Burns Harbor and Mesabi Miner in the coming days.

Two Harbors – Gary A. Putney
Roger Blough arrived Two Harbors on Jan. 7th at 03:25 for North of #2 lay-by. Departing Two Harbors on Jan. 7th at 04:46 was the American Spirit for Indiana Harbor. Arriving Two Harbors after being anchored off Duluth on Jan. 7th was the American Integrity at 05:41. As of 19:30 on Jan. 7th she was still at the loading dock. Anchored off Duluth awaiting South of #2 in Two Harbors the Wilfred Sykes, American Mariner and the Edgar B. Speer. Due Two Harbors or anchorage off Duluth on Jan. 8th are Indiana Harbor and the Edwin H. Gott.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Sunday January 6th: Saginaw arrived at Viterra A to load grain. Monday January 7th: 13:01 Tecumseh weighed anchor and departed for Windsor. She had been waiting on weather since Sunday evening.

Northern Lake Huron
Sunday, McGregor Bay: 21:54 Algoma Sault arrived at the Fischer Harbour dock to unload salt. The CCGS Griffon is anchored north of Manitoulin Island. Mackinaw City: 22:42 Due to severe weather G L Ostrander went to anchor and on the Lake Michigan side of the peninsula, off of Trails End Bay the St Clair and tug Michigan went to anchor. 18:56 Michigan weighed anchor and proceeded through the straits and went to anchor off of Mackinaw City. St Marys River: Down bound Mesabi Miner went to anchor south of Lime Island. 13:58 Upbound H Lee White also went to anchor.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H.
The Samuel De Champlain/Innovation arrived Monday morning to unload cement at Lafarge.

 

Manitowoc pier light washed into Lake Michigan by storm

1/8 - Manitowoc, Wis. – High winds and waves washed a lighthouse into Lake Michigan at Manitowoc on Monday. The U.S. Coast Guard says the South Pier Light's 20-foot-tall fiberglass tower, on the south side of the Manitowoc Breakwater, fell into the lake around 8:30 a.m. All that is left is the concrete base. No injuries were reported, the Coast Guard says.

https://nbc25news.com/news/nation-world/manitowoc-lighthouse-washed-into-lake-michigan?fbclid

 

Government shutdown threatens wolf and moose winter survey on Isle Royale

1/8 - Isle Royale, Mich. – Just months after the National Park Service started a relocation program to trap and transport new wolves to Michigan’s remote Isle Royale in hopes of boosting the dwindling pack, a winter survey that will give researchers their first peek at how the new wolves are fitting into their new home might be called off because of the ongoing federal government shutdown.

Staff from the research project posted a message Sunday night on the Wolves and Moose of Isle Royale Facebook page, alerting their followers that the winter survey, typically done by plane, might be grounded this year.

An effort to catch and relocate wolves to Michigan's Isle Royale National Park began last week.

“It is our present understanding that the 61st Winter Study of Wolves and Moose in Isle Royale National Park will not be allowed during the partial shutdown of the Federal government,” read the brief note.

Based at Michigan Technological University, it is the longest running predator-prey study of its kind. For decades, researchers have been tracking the number and pack structure of the island’s wolves and its moose. For the last few years, only two wolves have survived on the island in Lake Superior, located about 56 miles from the Upper Peninsula mainland. Meanwhile, the moose population has ballooned to more than 1,500, researchers have said.

Read more and view photos at this MLive link: https://www.mlive.com/news/2019/01/government-shutdown-threatens-wolf-and-moose-winter-survey-on-michigans-isle-royale.html

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 8

On 08 January 2004, McKeil Marine’s CAPT. RALPH TUCKER was the first vessel of 2004 to arrive at the port of Manistee, Michigan. Once docked at the General Chemical facilities, Captain Bill Sullivan and Chief Engineer Otto Cooper were each presented with hand-carved Hackberry canes. This was a notable way for the vessel to start her last year of operation. Later that year she was sold for scrap.

JOHN HULST (Hull#286) was launched in 1938, at River Rouge, Michigan, by Great Lakes Engineering Works for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.

On 8 January 1877, the tug KATE FELCHER burned at East Saginaw, Michigan. Her loss was valued at $3,000, but she was insured for only $2,000. She was named after the wife of her owner, the well-known Capt. James Felcher of East Saginaw.

In 1939, several tugs helped release the CHIEF WAWATAM, which had been aground since January 3. In 1974, BENSON FORD, of 1924, became beset by ice in Western Lake Erie.

January 8, 1976, LEON FALK JR. closed the season at Superior, Wisconsin, after she departed the Burlington-Northern ore docks.

1996: The research ship CALYPSO, a converted wooden minesweeper, served noted deep-sea diver Jacques Cousteau for many years. It came to the Great Lakes in 1980 and explored several wrecks including the EDMUND FITZGERALD and GUNILDA. It sank at Singapore following a collision on this date. The hull was refloated but never repaired. Subsequently, there were disputes over ownership, with a later report saying the vessel would be displayed at the Bahamas as a tourist attraction.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Brian Bernard, Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

New pig iron plant set to bring hundreds of jobs to Ashtabula

1/7 - Ashtabula, Ohio – Nearly 800 new jobs are coming to Ashtabula County thanks to a new pig iron plant. The Environmental Protection Agency had its first public hearing earlier in December about the $474 million plant a South African company is looking to build.

Ashtabula City Manager Jim Timonere said construction will bring in close to 650 new jobs, and the plant will bring in 100 permanent high-paying jobs. Petmin USA would build the plant at the Kinder Morgan Pinney Dock facility, and it is expected to produce about 425,000 tons of pig iron every year.

Pig iron is used in a multitude of things, like trains, toys, hydrants and medical equipment.

Timonere said the city was selected based on its location. “We’re right at the end of a major state route. We have all the major resources here with the water they’re going to need, and now getting this pipeline, it’s just an ideal situation," she said.

A pipeline, Timonere said, was the key to making the stars align. The Risberg Pipeline, an $86 million dollar project extends an existing pipeline from Pennsylvania to Conneaut, making more natural gas available. That's a component Timonere said was missing, delaying the plant from getting the formal "okay.”

Timonere is hoping the plant brings in a younger crowd. “All of our manufacturing jobs are hiring. It’s just about the levels and what it’s going to take to get those people back," Timonere said.

The city is still waiting on the go-ahead from the EPA, but said construction should start by summer of 2019. The final product should be complete by 2022.

News 5 Cleveland

 

Port Reports -  January 7

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Cuyahoga arrived Duluth at 07:06 Sunday, loaded iron ore pellets at CN, and departed at 14:41. Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was inbound at 17:48 to load at Canadian National. In Superior, CSL Assiniboine departed at 03:10 with a load of ore from Burlington Northern, and dropped anchor outside the harbor to wait for weather conditions to improve. Lee A. Tregurtha arrived at 08:03 to load, and was still tied up at the dock Sunday night with no departure time listed. Manitoulin was on the hook waiting for her turn at the dock.

Two Harbors- Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader departed Two Harbors on Jan. 6th at 02:21 for Detroit. Shortly after her departure, the American Spirit shifted from North of #2 to South of #2. As of 19:50 on Jan. 6th she was still at the loading dock. Also as of 19:50 on Jan. 6th, American Integrity remained anchored off Duluth waiting on Two Harbors. Also as of 19:50 on Jan. 6th the Wilfred Sykes, Roger Blough, Edgar B. Speer and American Mariner are all on western Lake Superior for Two Harbors. There is a major winter storm forecast for Duluth/Superior and the North Shore for late Jan. 6th thru mid-day on Jan. 7th, so boat traffic will be tentative at best. As of 19:50 on Jan. 6th the Indiana Harbor was in eastern Lake Superior for Two Harbors. Also, tentatively, there is no more traffic scheduled for Northshore Mining in Silver Bay this shipping season.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Sunday January 6th: 9:18 CCGS Samuel Risley departed the Coast Guard base. She performed ice-breaking duties on the Mission River near G3 and Superior elevators. 11:10 CCGS Samuel Risley returned to the Coast Guard base. 12:50 Tecumseh departed Viterra A and shifted over to G3 to load grain. 15:59 Algoma Niagara departed Keefer Terminal for Toledo. 19:58 Tecumseh departed G3 and went to anchor west of the Welcome Islands. Expected late Sunday: Saginaw. Expected Monday: Ojibway.

Limestone Ports
Brevort: Saturday 1:38 Calumet arrived and went to anchor. At 10:35 she weighed anchor and proceeded to the Sand Products dock to load. She departed at 1:10 Sunday for Cleveland.

Northern Lake Huron
Saturday, Alpena: 18:35 G L Ostrander arrived. 21:17 Samuel De Champlain arrived to load cement products. Sunday, Alpena: 4:29 Samuel De Champlain departed and downbound on Lake Huron. 4:52 G L Ostrander proceeded to the loading dock and at 12:57 departed for Milwaukee. Cheboygan: 8:28 Craig Eric Reinauer arrived to unload petroleum product from Sarnia. McGregor Bay: CCGS Griffon arrived to conduct ice operations. Algoma Sault is expected Monday at the Fisher Harbour dock to unload road salt. Mackinaw City: 12:54 Frontenac went to anchor to wait out weather.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Sault departed Sunday evening for Fisher Harbour.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H.
H Lee White arrived Sunday morning to unload ore at Zug Island. Arriving later was the Olive L Moore/Menominee, calling on Zug Island to load coke.

Toledo, Ohio
8:30 p.m. update for Sunday Jan. 6: Mississagi was sailing on Lake St. Clair. She loaded cargo at Thunder Bay and is bound for Toledo, arriving very early Monday morning. Unknown which dock she is bound for to unload cargo. Algoma Niagara was on Lake Superior. She loaded cargo at Thunder Bay and is bound for Toledo, arriving very late Tuesday evening or early Wednesday morning. Unknown which dock she is bound for to unload cargo. One to watch: Robert S. Pierson was loading grain at Sarnia, Ont., Sunday night and may be bound for Toledo to unload. Various ships will be arriving at Toledo during the next week or two for winter layup at the various docks. It is also possible we may see another cement vessel for the Lafarge Dock. Keep checking the various AIS sites daily for the vessels arriving at Toledo.

 

Former Seaway saltie scrapped

1/7 - Vessels with Great Lakes / Seaway connection - reported as a casualty or sold for demolition. taken from January 2019 issue of Marine News – Journal of the World Ship Society:

Casualties: None reported

Demolitions: Pontica (8114041; St. Vincent & the Grenadines) (Sea Power-04, Express Power-03, Magic One-00, Magic-98, Clipper Magic-92, Andros Island-89 - 1st trip into the Seaway 1983) 10,322 / 1983 - general cargo (Freedom Mk. II type). By Brave Shipping Co. Inc., (Brook Ocean Shipping LLC), Panama, to Kamdar & Associates, India and arrived Alang 13.04.2018 - commenced demolition 19.04.2018

Report compiled by Barry Andersen and René Beauchamp

 

A kayak trip turns deadly in Montreal

1/7 - Montreal, Que. – The outing of a group of kayakers turned deadly on Saturday when a 56-year-old participant drowned in the icy waters of the St. Lawrence River.

For some unknown reason, the victim's kayak overturned. The man, from Carignan, was wearing a life jacket and the necessary equipment to keep warm, just like the rest of the group. The body of the man was carried by the current, quite strong at this time of the year.

"Unfortunately, the victim was caught between a cargo ship and the wharf at the Port of Montreal," said Benoît Martel, chief of operations at the Montreal Fire Department.

After more than an hour in the water, the man’s body was recovered. A coroner will shed light on the death, since there is no criminal element.

TVA Nouvelles.

 

Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence cod could be extinct by mid-century: report

1/7 - There is a high probability that Atlantic cod will be locally extinct in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence by mid-century — even with no commercial fishing, according to a new report. The paper, published in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, says the death rate now stands at 50 per cent for adult Gulf cod five years and older.

The likely culprit? Grey seals. "That high a natural mortality is not sustainable," says Doug Swain, a federal Fisheries Department scientist who co-authored the study. Why recovery has failed for cod

Swain says this stock is particularly vulnerable because it tends to gather in the same places every year.

That includes predictable patterns of migration, spawning and overwintering in dense congregations off Cape Breton in numbers still large enough to attract grey seals that eat them.

Samples showed adult cod made up a large part of the grey seal diet in the overwintering area off St. Paul's Island, Cape Breton.

Swain and other researchers used models to predict what that could mean for the future of this cod population.

"In these projections, if we assume natural mortality were to stay where it is now and there was no fishing, then cod would be gone by middle of the century," he says.

"There is nothing to say it will stay where it is but if it is due to predation by grey seals and they continue to prey on cod like they are now, then there is no way this population recovers and it may decline to negligible levels."

Read more at this link: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/southern-gulf-of-st-lawrence-cod-could-be-extinct-by-mid-century-report-1.4966889

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 7

07 January 1974 - EDMUND FITZGERALD (steel propeller bulk freighter, 711 foot, 13,632 gross tons, built in 1958, at River Rouge, Michigan) lost her anchor in the Detroit River when it snagged on ice. It was raised in July 1992. The anchor weighs 12,000 pounds and now resides outside the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Isle in Detroit, Michigan.

On January 7, 1970, the e.) ONG, a.) REDHEAD of 1930, had her Canadian registry closed. The tanker had been sold for use as a water tender at Antigua in the Lesser Antilles and had departed Toronto on December 1, 1969.

1924: The rail car ferry ONTARIO NO. 1 had a rough overnight crossing of Lake Ontario. The ship was diverted to Toronto with three feet of ice on the deck and anchored off Port Credit. With no seagate, it had to sail into the wind and could not make its docking at Cobourg as scheduled.

1943: ORNEFJELL came to the Great Lakes beginning in 1933 and returned as b) AKABAHRA after being sold in 1937. It was torpedoed and sunk on the Mediterranean in position 37.07 N / 4.38 E.

1977: BARFONN had visited the Seaway beginning in 1959 and returned as b) ORIENT EXPLORER in 1967 and as c) AEGEAN in 1971. It caught fire at Colombo, Sri Lanka, as d) TONG THAY and became a total loss. The vessel was taken to Singapore Roads, laid up, sold for scrap and arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, for dismantling on March 24, 1978.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Dog rescued from U.P. island by Coast Guard cutter Mackinaw’s crew

1/6 - Chippewa County, Mich. – After more than a week in the cold, a dog was reunited with his owners Friday evening. Logan, a white husky mix, went missing from St. Joseph Island in Ontario on Christmas day while he and his owners were visiting family.

Thursday Logan's owners, Lydia Selin and Kailaan Walker, got a call from the crew aboard the US Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw. While patrolling the Michigan waterways, the crew saw a dog fall through the ice and struggle onto the shore of Lime Island.

A 20-person landing party went out to the island to search for the dog but couldn't get him to come to their calls. The crew set a fire on the shore of the island and left a bowl of macaroni before leaving the island.

Thursday, the crew passed the island again and found the dog along with an empty bowl of pasta.

The Mackinaw docked in Cheboygan Friday evening where Logan was reunited with Lydia and Kailaan. The crew told the family a vet was aboard the ship and was able to help Logan with his wounds.

9&10 News

 

Port Reports -  January 6

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Duluth on Saturday, Mesabi Miner departed before sunrise with a load of ore from Canadian National, and Cason J. Callaway arrived and tied up at CN to load. She was expected to depart around 23:00 Saturday night. In Superior, St. Clair left port early Saturday after loading iron ore pellets at BN, and CSL Assiniboine arrived and spent the day loading. She had been expected to depart at 18:00, but was still at the dock as of 20:00 Saturday evening. Manitoulin and Lee A. Tregurtha were both at anchor outside the harbor waiting to load.

Two Harbors- Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
James R. Barker departed Two Harbors on Jan. 5th at 11:27 for Nanticoke. The Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader shifted from North of #2 to South of #2 between 11:33 and 11:55. The Barker made a circle out in the lake and came back to anchor off the Two Harbors piers. Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader departed at 14:38 and went out to the Barker and the Barker discharged some of her cargo into the Erie Trader, probably because she was overdraft. The Clyde S. then returned to Two Harbors at 16:58 and went back to South of #2. Arriving Two Harbors on Jan. 5th at 17:23 and going to North of #2 lay-by was the American Spirit. Roughly at the same time the Barker got underway and headed down the lake. Also due Two Harbors on Jan. 5th were the Lee A. Tregurtha and American Integrity. The Tregurtha's AIS changed to Superior late in the afternoon on Jan. 5th and at 18:45 she went to anchor off Superior. At 18:55 the American Integrity went to anchor off Duluth to wait on Two Harbors. Tentatively due Two Harbors on Jan. 6th are the Wilfred Sykes, American Mariner that was on Jan. 5th anchored in Whitefish Bay, and the Edgar B. Speer and Roger Blough, both upbound in the St. Marys River. It will be Jan. 7th at the earliest before some of them get to the dock.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Friday January 4th: 22:10 Mississagi departed Thunder Bay Terminals for Toledo. Saturday January 5th: 7:21 Tecumseh arrived at Richardson Current River Terminal to load grain. 8:18 CSL Niagara arrived at Keefer Terminal for winter lay-up. 17:13 Tecumseh departed Richardson Current River Terminal and shifted over to Viterra A to load grain.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic Saturday included Walter J. McCarthy Jr., Wilfred Sykes, Roger Blough and late, Edgar B. Speer. Downbounders included Paul R. Tregurtha, American Century, Stewart J, Cort and Mississagi. American Mariner was upbound but went to anchor behind Whitefish Point. Saginaw was at Algoma Steel.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Sault was at the elevators on Friday.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H.
There was no vessel activity at the Port of Detroit on Saturday.

Toledo, Ohio
Cedarglen arrived at Ironhead Shipyard Saturday evening.

 

Saginaw River Shipping Season Report – 2018

1/6 - For the second consecutive year, commercial shipping numbers have continued to climb on the Saginaw River, rebounding in 2018 to the highest number of vessel passages since the 2010 season. After recording record low numbers during the 2014 & 2016 seasons, increases in the past two years have now led to an optimistic outlook that the worst could now hopefully be behind us. The companies doing business along the banks of the Saginaw River are always looking for ways to diversify and introduce new cargo to be moved by boat, as well as continually working for improvements to the system, be it dredging to a deeper channel depth or making improvements at their docks. Hopefully the hard work being done now, will pay off in the years to come. The following is a look back at what took place along the banks of the Saginaw River during the 2018 shipping season:

The 2018 shipping season officially started on March 29th, with the arrival of the tug Spartan and her tank barge, Spartan II. The pair called on the Port Fisher Dock in Bay City to start the season one day earlier than the 2017 season opener. Spartan/Spartan II also opened the season in 2017. The 2018 season came to a close on a very foggy, but mild January 5th, when the tug Sharon M I and her barge, called on the Port Fisher/Bay Aggregates Dock, in Bay City, with the last inbound cargo of the season. This was 13 days later than the 2017 close, for a season lasting 283 days, 15 days longer than last year. For 2018, there were a total of 143 commercial vessel passages. That is 10 more than the previous season. These passages were made by 30 different vessels, representing 14 different companies. This is a decrease of one unique vessel, but an increase of one more company, as compared to the 2017 numbers.

Looking at some of the other statistics from the 2018 season, cargos were delivered to 17 individual docks this season. This number is an increase from last year. One of the increases was the Bit-Mat liquid asphalt dock in Bay City. They received product by tank barge this season for the first time since 2014. The dock seeing the most traffic in 2018 was the Port Fisher/Bay Aggregates Dock in Bay City, seeing 38 vessel deliveries. This was four more deliveries than during the 2017 season. Coming in second was the Lafarge Cement Dock in Essexville, with 24 cargo deliveries. This was a huge increase of 11 trips, almost double that of the previous season. In third place was the Wirt Stone Dock in Saginaw, with 21 cargo deliveries, and closely followed by the Consumers Energy Dock in Essexville, with 20 cargos delivered. These four docks accounted for 62% of all vessel deliveries to the Saginaw River in 2018. The “big two” companies, which own multiple docks along the Saginaw River, Fisher Companies and Wirt, accounted for 54% of all cargo delivered this season. In all, accounting for split cargos by some vessels, which unloaded at two or more different docks on the same visit, there were 167 deliveries to the various docks along the Saginaw River. This is eight more actual dock deliveries than during the 2017 season.

For the first time in twelve seasons, there is a new queen of the Saginaw River. For the past 11 years, the tug Olive L. Moore, paired with the self-unloading barge Menominee, have made the most trips to the Saginaw River each season. This year however, logging 25 visits, the Interlake Steamship Company tug Dorothy Ann and her self-unloading barge, Pathfinder, took the crown, beating the Olive L. Moore/Menominee by five trips. The vessels following these two workhorse tug/barge combos, rounding out the top five with the most trips to the Saginaw River were two more tug/barge combos from Andrie/Lafarge: Samuel de Champlain/Innovation with nine and G.L. Ostrander/Integrity with eight. The traditional self-unloading laker from American Steamship Company, John J. Boland, came in next, also with eight visits.

There was another change at the top this season. The company leading the way with the most cargo deliveries to the Saginaw River in 2018 was the American Steamship Company with 35 trips, accounting for 24% of all deliveries. Lower Lakes Towing/Grand River Navigation, leaders for the past 11 years, logged the second most visits, with 34, just missing out on the top spot. The changes were very small as American Steamship logged the same number of cargos to the Saginaw River as in 2017, but Lower Lakes dropped by two. The third busiest fleet in 2018 was the Interlake Steamship Company with 28 passages, representing an increase of two trips over last season. These three companies accounted for 68% of all deliveries on the Saginaw River in 2018.

There were a number of vessels that were visitors to the Saginaw River in 2017, that did not make a delivery in 2018, with those vessels being Algoway, Great Republic, Manitoulin, Michipicoton, HR Constellation, and the BBC vessels Alberta, Campana, Elbe, and Volga. The list of boats that were not visitors in 2017, but visited the Saginaw River in 2018 were Algoma Innovator, Algoma Buffalo, Mississagi, Saginaw, Joseph H. Thompson, Jr./Joseph H. Thompson, BBC Europe, Florijngracht and the tug Rebecca Lynn/A397. Algoma Innovator made her first ever trips to the Saginaw River. One of Algoma Central’s new “Equinox” class vessels, the Innovator replaced the retired Algoway on trips here. Buffalo, a Saginaw River fixture for many years, made her first trip under her new name, Algoma Buffalo, and new owners. It was good to see Saginaw back on her namesake river. The BBC Europe and Florijngracht also made their first ever visits to the Saginaw River.

There were a few other notable stories during the 2018 season. After no dredging being done during the 2017 season, maintenance dredging resumed on the Saginaw River, beginning in the late spring. Ryba Marine Construction, out of Cheboygan Michigan won the contract for the dredging, bringing its tug, Thomas R. Morrish, and numerous pieces of dredging equipment to the river. The workhorse Malcolm Marine tug Manitou, also made numerous trips from her St. Clair, Michigan home to the Saginaw River arriving to assist the BBC Europe at the Port Fisher dock and towing dredging equipment for Ryba Marine to and from the Saginaw River. The Port Fisher Dock in Bay City again received wind turbine components at its facility, but this season, the majority was delivered by truck. The presence of foreign-flagged cargo ships continued on the Saginaw River however, as the BBC Europe and Florijngracht did deliver cargo to Port Fisher in 2018. Sadly, this was the first season in many decades that one of the familiar Collingwood Shipyard-built Algoma Central boats Algorail, Algoway, and Agawa Canyon did not visit the Saginaw River, with all now being retired from service.

Todd Shorkey

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 6

While under tow heading for scrap, the HARRY R. JONES went aground at Androsan, Scotland, on January 6, 1961, and it wasn't until February 15 that she arrived at her final port of Troon, Scotland.

January 6, 1999 - The Dow Chemical plant in Ludington, Michigan, announced a plan to close its lime plant, eliminating the need for Great Lakes freighters to deliver limestone.

In 1973, the JOSEPH H. THOMPSON ran aground at Escanaba, Michigan, after departing that port.

1976: The former GLADYS BOWATER was sailing as c) AGINOR when it caught fire and had to be abandoned off southwest Sicily. The hull was towed to Palermo, Italy, with serious damage and then to Piraeus, Greece, where it was laid up unrepaired. But the ship was resold, rebuilt and returned to service as d) ALEXANDRA in 1977. It was scrapped at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, as e) LAMYAA in 1985.

1979: OTTO NUBEL first came to the Great Lakes in 1953 and returned regularly until the final four trips in 1959. The ship was sailing as b) MARIA III when there was an explosion in the engine room on January 6, 1979, near Tamomago Island, Spain. A fire followed and the vessel went aground where it was abandoned as a total loss.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Brian Bernard, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Lake Superior's December decline a little less than usual

1/5 - Lake Superior declined about 3 inches in December, a little less than it usually does for the month.

The International Lake Superior Board of Control reported Thursday that the big lake now sits 11 inches above its Jan. 1 long-term average but 2 inches below the level at this time last year.

Lakes Michigan-Huron dropped an inch over December, less than the normal 2-inch drop. The lakes now sit 20 inches above average and 3 inches above the level at Jan. 1, 2018.

The board of control says the above-average water levels, coupled with strong winds and waves, continue to result in shoreline erosion and coastal damages across the upper Great Lakes system, noting more shoreline erosion and coastal damages may occur this winter should active weather continue.

Duluth News Tribune

 

Port Reports -  January 5

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Paul R. Tregurtha departed Duluth at 05:20 Friday morning after loading coal at Midwest Energy, and her fleetmate Mesabi Miner arrived at 12:04 to load ore at Canadian National. Saginaw, which had arrived late Thursday night, departed at 13:50 with a load of ore for Sault Ste. Marie. At the Superior entry, Stewart J. Cort departed at 09:56 Friday from Burlington Northern, and St. Clair was inbound at 13:32 to load ore. She is expected to depart Saturday morning.

Two Harbors- Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
American Century departed Two Harbors on Jan. 4th at 11:05 for Gary. Arriving Two Harbors on Jan. 4th at 11:49 was the James R. Barker. She is loading for Nanticoke. Also arriving Two Harbors on Jan. 4th was the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader at 16:44 for North of #2 lay-by. Due Two Harbors on Jan. 5th are the American Spirit, American Integrity, and the Lee A. Tregurtha. There is no traffic scheduled for Northshore Mining in Silver Bay on Jan. 5th.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Friday January 4th: 0:40 Kaministiqua departed G3 for Windsor. 7:05 Mississagi arrived at Richardson Main Terminal to load grain. 12:37 CCGS Samuel Risley arrived in Thunder Bay. She performed ice-breaking duties on both the Mission River and harbor. However, there is very little ice cover due to above average temperatures this week. 16:08 CCGS Samuel Risley returned to the Coast Guard base. 17:19 Mississagi departed Richardson Main Terminal and shifted over to Thunder Bay Terminals. Expected for Saturday: Tecumseh and CSL Niagara.

Northern Lake Huron
Thursday, Stoneport: 23:00 Olive L Moore departed for Cleveland. Friday, Alpena: 0:30 The cement carrier Alpena departed for Cleveland. Cheboygan: 17:13 USCG Mackinaw returned to base after conducting ice operations in the St. Marys River. The tug Champion arrived from Mackinac Island.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Sault was at the elevators on Friday.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H.
Manitowoc arrived to load coke at Zug Island Friday morning. The downbound Roger Blough stopped at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel. The Indiana Harbor arrived at Zug Island to unload ore. Ending the day was the Kaye E Barker, calling on AK Steel to unload ore.

Toledo, Ohio
Presque Isle had some type of mechanical issue as she was running at reduced speed on Lake Huron. She was supposed to go to Erie for winter layup but is now docked at Toledo. Algoma Niagara should be arriving at Toledo from Thunder Bay late Monday or Tuesday next week.

Cleveland, Ohio
Steamer Alpena was down bound on the Detroit River Friday evening, headed for Cleveland with cement.

 

Updates

The saltie gallery has been updated with the following images: Arsland, Barnacle, BBC Carolina, BBC Georgia, BBC Utah, BBC Zarate, Celsius Mumbai, Grande Caribe, Grande Mariner, Greenwing, Iver Bright, Kivalliq W., MTM Antwerp, NACC Quebec, Qikiqtaaluk W., Taiga Desgagnes, Vikingbank, Wigeon and YM Jupiter.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 5

The keel was laid January 5, 1972, for ALGOWAY (Hull#200) at Collingwood, Ontario, by Collingwood Shipyards, Ltd.

The wooden tug A. J. WRIGHT caught fire on 5 January 1893, while laid up at Grand Haven, Michigan. She burned to the water's edge. Her loss was valued at $20,000. She was owned by C. D. Thompson.

In 1970, PETER REISS broke her tail shaft while backing in heavy ice at the mouth of the Detroit River.

On January 5, 1976, Halco's tanker CHEMICAL TRANSPORT cleared Thunder Bay, Ontario, closing that port for the season.

1976: A.S. GLOSSBRENNER struck bottom entering Port McNicoll and had to be unloaded immediately due to the extensive hull damage. The ship was repaired at Port Weller Dry Docks in the spring. The vessel became b) ALGOGULF (ii) in 1987 and c) ALGOSTEEL (ii) in 1990.

1982: The Norwegian freighter NORHOLT first came through the Seaway in 1962 and made a total of 15 inland voyages. It was renamed b) SALVADOR in 1966 and returned once in 1967. The ship went aground as c) SAN JUAN off Shadwan Island enroute to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, on this date. It was refloated January 22, 1982, towed to Suez Bay and laid up. Fire broke out on August 26, 1982, and the ship was abandoned and later beached. It was taken over by the Suez Canal Authority in 1983 and scrapped.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Brian Bernard, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Icebreaker Samuel Risley ready to work in Thunder Bay

1/4 - Thunder Bay, Ont. – The Canadian Coast Guard has dispatched its icebreaker Samuel Risley to Thunder Bay to conduct icebreaking operations in the harbor this week or as soon as it proves necessary.

According to a statement issued by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans on Thursday, the Risley "may be required to work in the Thunder Bay port on or after Jan. 4...to assist commercial shipping." Thunder Bay harbormaster Guy Jarvis expects the ship to arrive by Friday evening.

Smaller US Coast Guard icebreaking cutters have been visiting the port since the end of November to help keep shipping lanes clear.

Jarvis said that there is currently ice within the breakwall but "not too much" outside it, but with five ships still due to come in to load cargo before the shipping season ends, it's good to have the Risley available.

"It all depends on how much it freezes overnight. You've got to look at where the vessels are going. On the Mission River, the Kam River, you get a couple of days of cold weather, yeah, you'll need some icebreaking assistance."

The last ship to leave port before the Soo Locks close is expected to do so about Jan. 11. Two vessels will spend the winter in Thunder Bay. Bulk carriers Algoma Strongfield and CSL Niagara will be docked at Keefer Terminal until navigation resumes in the spring.

TBNewswatch

 

Port Reports -  January 4

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Philip R. Clarke departed Duluth at 06:22 Thursday morning with a load of iron ore pellets from CN, however she dropped anchor outside the harbor for unknown reasons. Michipicoten came in at 06:39 to load at Canadian National, and Paul R. Tregurtha arrived at 14:11 for a cargo of coal from Midwest Energy. Michipicoten was expected to depart at some point Thursday evening. Also in Duluth on Thursday, Tim S. Dool was placed in drydock at Fraser Shipyards, where she will receive her five-year inspection and a new coat of paint. On the south side of the harbor, Burns Harbor finally departed at 03:30 Thursday morning after experiencing delays loading at BN, and Thunder Bay arrived from anchor shortly thereafter and began loading ore. American Century also arrived early Thursday morning to take a delay at Lakehead Pipeline, and was outbound at 10:52 for Two Harbors. Thunder Bay was expected to depart Thursday evening, and Stewart J. Cort was due next at the dock.

Two Harbors- Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Edwin H. Gott departed Two Harbors on Jan. 3rd at 01:37 for Gary. Arriving Two Harbors on Jan. 3rd at 02:01 after being anchored off Duluth was the H. Lee White. She then departed Two Harbors on Jan. 3rd at 15:33 with the assistance of Heritage Marine's tug Nels J. She is headed for Zug Island. Arriving Two Harbors after taking a delay at the Lakehead dock in Superior was the American Century at 16:35. Delayed on Lake Superior for Two Harbors were the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader that had been anchored most of Jan. 3rd in Big Bay about 22 miles NW of Marquette. The James R. Barker looks like, as of 19:45 on Jan. 3rd, was going to anchor in Bark Bay near Cornucopia, Wis. There is no other traffic scheduled for Two Harbors on Jan. 4th. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on Jan. 3rd and none scheduled for Jan. 4th.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Monday December 31st: There were no ship movements at the port on Monday. Tuesday January 1st: 17:32 Ojibway departed G3 for Windsor. 20:55 Algoma Sault departed Superior Elevator for Goderich. 21:41 Kaministiqua weighed anchor and proceeded to Superior Elevator to load grain. Wednesday January 2nd: 15:15 Kaministiqua departed Superior Elevator and shifted over to G3 to load grain. Thursday January 3rd: 15:18 Algoma Niagara departed Viterra B and shifted over to Keefer Terminal for repairs. Expected for Friday: Mississagi and CCGS Samuel Risley.

Green Bay, Wis.
On Thursday, the Manitoulin arrived with cargo of salt from Windsor to the Fox River Terminal.

Northern Lake Huron
Thursday, Alpena: 16:49 The cement carrier Alpena arrived to load. Stoneport: 7:30 Dorothy Ann departed for Marine City. Olive L Moore weighed anchor and proceeded to the loading dock.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H.
A trio of vessels called on the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel throughout the day Thursday. They were Americans Spirit, Lee A Tregurtha and Cuyahoga.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 4

On January 4, 1978, IRVING S. OLDS was involved in a collision with the steamer ARMCO while convoying in heavy ice in the Livingstone Channel of the lower Detroit River. The OLDS hit a floe of heavy ice, came to a complete stop and the ARMCO, unable to stop, hit the OLDS' stern.

In 1952, the car ferry SPARTAN (Hull#369) was launched at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin by Christy Corp.

1966: FARO, a Liberty ship that had visited the Seaway in 1965, ran aground in heavy weather off Nojima, Japan, enroute from Muroran, Japan, to Keelung, Taiwan, in ballast. It had to be abandoned as a total loss. It was sold to Japanese shipbreakers in 1967 and broken up.

2012: FEDERAL MIRAMICHI was disabled by a mechanical problem during stormy weather on the English Channel, 12.8 miles northwest of Guernsey enroute from St. Petersburg, Russia, to Paranagua, Brazil, with 22,900 tons of urea. French authorities, fearing the ship could blow ashore, dispatched a tug and the vessel was towed into Cherbourg for repairs. It has been a frequent Seaway trader since 2006.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port of Montreal welcomes the first ocean-going vessel of 2019

1/3 - Montreal, Que. – The Virginiaborg became the first ocean-going vessel to reach the Port of Montreal without a stopover in 2019, by crossing the downstream limits of the Port at Sorel on January 2, at 3:50 a.m.

The Virginiaborg, under the command of Captain Volodymyr Yurchenko, is a bulk carrier operated by Wagenborg Shipping and represented in Montreal by the Lower St-Lawrence Ocean Agencies Ltd. The Virginiaborg left the Port of Porsgrunn, Norway, on December 20. It docked early this morning at Berth 42 at the terminal operated by Logistec.

Captain Yurchenko will receive, as part of an official ceremony, the Gold-Headed Cane, a trophy awarded each year to the master of the first ocean-going vessel to reach the Port of Montreal without a stopover. This ceremony will mark the 180th anniversary of this great tradition in the shipping community.

Montreal Times

 

Port Reports -  January 3

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Philip R. Clarke arrived Duluth at 04:33 Wednesday morning to load iron ore pellets at Canadian National. She was still at the loading dock Wednesday night with no departure time listed. Michipicoten was on the hook outside the harbor waiting to load at CN. In Superior, Burns Harbor spent Wednesday loading ore at BN, and was expected to depart at 20:00. Thunder Bay and Stewart J. Cort were at anchor off the Superior entry waiting for the dock.

Two Harbors- Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Indiana Harbor departed Two Harbors on Jan. 2nd at 04:49 for Zug Island. The Edwin H. Gott arrived Two Harbors on Jan. 2nd at 05:45 with the assistance of Heritage Marine's tug Nels J. As of 19:30 on the 2nd the Speer was still at the loading dock. Due Two Harbors is the H. Lee White. She anchored off Duluth on the 2nd at approx. 16:00 after running checked down on the North Shore all day on the 2nd. Also due Two Harbors is the American Century that had been running checked down all day on the 2nd along the Wisconsin shore. Due Two Harbors on Jan. 3rd are the James R. Barker and the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader. Arriving Northshore Mining in Silver Bay on Jan. 2nd at 03:18 and departed on the 2nd at 18:07. She wasn’t showing an updated AIS, but she probably loaded for Cleveland. Silver Bay has no scheduled traffic on Jan. 3rd.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – Jim Conlon
Late Sunday evening the Joseph L Block arrived at Bayship and backed into a different slip than she has used other winter layups.

Northern Lake Huron
Wednesday, Midland: 8:20 Escorted by CCGS Samuel Risley, Baie Comeau arrived to unload wheat. 11:56 CCGS Simon Risley departed to resume ice operations. Alpena: 4:11 Mississagi arrived to unload road salt and at 9:02 departed for Thunder Bay Ont. Stoneport: 3:42 Dorothy Ann arrived to load limestone. 8:00 Olive L Moore arrived and went to anchor.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H.
Joseph H Thompson Jr./Joseph H Thompson arrived to fuel at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal Wednesday morning. Next up was the tug Anglian Lady, pushing a barge. They tied up along the riverfront. The upbound Herbert C Jackson called on the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to fuel.

Welland Canal – Barry Andersen
Last upbounds for the canal: Dec 30, Cedarglen for Detroit and CCGS Griffin servicing winter markers before clearing canal for Amherstburg. Last downbound: Algoma Buffalo, headed to Hamilton for lay-up.

Erie, Pa – Jeff Benson
Cuyahoga arrived at Mountfort Terminal Wednesday and was loading coke. James L. Kuber has arrived at Don Jon for lay up and winter work.

 

St. Marys River channel closures

1/3 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. – The Pipe Island Passage, East of Pipe Island Shoal and North of Pipe Island Twins from Watson Reef Light to Sweets Point, will close at 8 p.m. on Saturday.

The Pipe Island Course will become a two-way route.

 

Obituary: Captain John Szczerowski

1/3 - Captain John Szczerowski, known to many as “Captain Scissors,” 89, of Rogers City, passed away December 15, 2018 at Medilodge in Rogers City.

He was born May 14, 1929 in Rogers City to Stanley and Anna (Hincka) Szczerowski. Captain John retired from the Great Lakes Fleet after 43 years of service. He was a member of the Rogers City Knights of Columbus-3rd Degree, as well as the Rogers City Servicemen’s Club and Great Lakes Lore Maritime Museum. John married Ida Micketti May 29, 1950 at St. Ignatius Catholic Church.

Friends may visit at St. Ignatius Catholic Church Friday, January 11, from 9 a.m. until time of his memorial Mass at 10 a.m. with the Rev. Rolando Silva officiating. Inurnment will take place in the spring at Mt. Calvary Catholic Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to Presque Isle Council on Aging and St. Ignatius Catholic School. Online condolences may be addressed through www.beckfuneralhome.org.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 3

For the second year in a row the tanker GEMINI (steel propeller tanker, 420 foot, 5,853 gross tons, built in 1978, at Orange, Texas) was the first vessel of the year in Manistee, Michigan. She headed to the General Chemical dock to load 8,000 tons of brine for Amherstburg, Ontario. The vessel arrived at Manistee in 2002, on January first, and Captain Riley Messer was presented a hackberry cane, crafted by local resident Ken Jilbert. A similar cane was presented to the vessel Saturday morning. Sold Canadian in 2005, renamed b.) ALGOSAR (i).

In 1939, the CHIEF WAWATAM ran aground on the shoals of the north shore near St. Ignace, Michigan.

On Jan 3, 1971, BEN W. CALVIN ran aground at the mouth of the Detroit River after becoming caught in a moving ice field.

In 1972, TADOUSSAC cleared Thunder Bay, Ontario, for Hamilton with 24,085 tons of iron ore, closing that port for the season.

1979: KOIKU MARU first visited the Seaway in 1967. It ran aground near Tartous, Syria, in stormy weather overnight and had to be abandoned as a total loss.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Brian Bernard , Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Mike Nicholls, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Invincible to be towed to Erie this week

1/2 - The tug Invincible is scheduled to be towed from Ashtabula to Erie this week by the tug Cheyenne. The invincible most likely will go to drydock with the James L Kuber, where it will undergo major changes. Sponsons are to be added to the hull for increased buoyancy in order that a Hydracon pin system can be installed. The Bludworth ATB system will be removed. Also the upper wheelhouse will be raised about 9 feet. All of these upgrades are so that the Invincible take the place of the Olive L Moore in pushing the Menominee next season.

 

Port Reports -  January 2

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
After spending the night at anchor outside the harbor, Tim S. Dool arrived Duluth at 08:09 on the morning of New Year's Day for winter layup. With the assistance of G-tugs, she tied up at Fraser Shipyards astern of the William A. Irvin, where she will remain until she is placed in drydock. Mesabi Miner left port at 10:13 with a load of coal from Midwest Energy. At the Superior entry, Burns Harbor arrived early Tuesday morning to load iron ore pellets at BN, and is expected to depart at 01:00 Wednesday. Thunder Bay was due at 21:00 Tuesday night, however she will likely anchor outside the harbor to wait for Burns Harbor to finish loading.

Two Harbors- Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Edgar B. Speer departed Two Harbors on Jan. 1st at 10:57 for Gary. Arriving Two Harbors on Jan. 1st at 11:22 was the Indiana Harbor. As of 19:30 on Jan. 1st she was still at the loading dock. Possibly due Two Harbors late on Jan. 1st is the Edwin H. Gott. As of 19:30 on the 1st she was just SW of Silver Bay. Due Two Harbors on Jan. 2nd are the H. Lee White and the American Century. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on Jan. 1st. Due Silver Bay on Jan. 2nd is the John J. Boland.

Northern Lake Huron
Tuesday, January 1st Midland: 17:23 CCGS Samuel Risley departed on ice operations. Baie Comeau is expected to arrive Wednesday with a load of wheat for ADM.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H.
On New Year's Day, the tug Leonard M and her barge arrived at Nicholson's Detroit Terminal to unload steel coils. The upbound Clyde S VanEnkevort/Erie Trader stopped to fuel at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  January 2

While on the North Atlantic under tow for scrapping, ASHLAND parted her towline but was tracked by U.S. Coast Guard aircraft and was retrieved by her tug on January 2nd, 1988, some 300 miles off course.

The 3-masted wooden schooner M. J. CUMMINGS was launched at the shipyard of Goble & MacFarlane in Oswego, New York. Her owners were Mrs. Goble & MacFarlane, Daniel Lyons and E. Caulfield. Her dimensions were 142 foot 6 inches X 25 foot 2 inches X 11 foot 6 inches, 325 tons and she cost $28,000.

January 2, 1925 - The ANN ARBOR NO 7 (Hull#214) was launched at Manitowoc, Wisconsin, by Manitowoc Shipbuilding Corp. She was sponsored by Jane Reynolds, daughter of R. H. Reynolds, marine superintendent of the railroad. Renamed b.) VIKING in 1983.

1967: The small Norwegian freighter RAAGAN dated from 1919 and had been a Pre-Seaway visitor to the Great Lakes as a) ERICH LINDOE, b) GRENLAND and c) HILDUR I. It sank in the North Sea about 60 miles north of the Dutch coast after developing leaks on a voyage from Egersund, Denmark, to Dordrecht, Netherlands, with a cargo of titanium. The crew was rescued.

1976: The XENY, which was towed into Cadiz Roads on January 1, capsized and sank on her side. The ship had caught fire on December 2 and was abandoned by the crew. It had first visited the Great Lakes as a) PRINS WILLEM II in 1955 and had been back as d) XENY in 1971.

1981: The heavy lift vessel MAMMOTH SCAN had heeled over while unloading at Abu Dhabi on October 15, 1980. The ship was righted and under tow when the towline parted off Algeria on December 28, 1980. The listing vessel was brought to Malaga Roads, Spain, on this date, healed over and sank as a total loss.

1987: A fire in the cargo hold of REMADA at Barcelona, Spain, resulted in heavy damage and the ship had to be sold for scrap. It had made one trip through the Seaway in November 1973 as b) ONTARIO.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Happy New Year from the Boatnerd News Page

1/1 - Boatnerd wishes all our readers a very happy and successful 2019. Thank you for your support.

A big three long and two short goes out to all who send news to this page or contribute to the Port Reports, among them Daniel Lindner, Gary A. Putney, Gordy Garris, Todd Shorkey, Denny Dushane, Rene Beauchamp, Ron Beaupre, Rod Burdick, Ned Goebricher, Bruce Douglas, Barry Andersen, Ron Walsh, Capt. Mike Nicholls, Gene Polaski, Jim Hoffman, Ken Cyrette, Marc Dease, Aaron Border, Tom Brewer, Paul Erspamer, Logan Vasicek, Sam Hankinson, Jeff Benson, Paul Martin, Matt Miner, Dave Wobser, Ben & Chanda McClain, Joy Fett, Ken Borg, Luke Johnson, Phil Nash, Bill Bird, Raymond H., Al Miller, Frank Hood, Sam Hankinson, Tom Hynes, Jenson Wetenkamp and anyone else we’ve inadvertently left off this list. It is the contributions of all these volunteers, and many others that make Boatnerd possible.

We are always seeking contributions to this page from readers around the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway. If you see news in your area, or want to offer your observations of vessel arrivals and departures, please send to news@boatnerd.net. If you spot an interesting shipping-related story in your local news, please take a moment to forward a link so that we may share it with our audience.

Thank you!

 

Port Reports -  January 1

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived Duluth at 00:42 Monday morning to load coal at Midwest Energy. Vessel traffic during the day was delayed due to the stormy weather on western Lake Superior, but conditions had calmed enough by evening to allow the McCarthy to depart at 20:13. Mesabi Miner was expected around 20:30 to load at SMET. Also in port was CSL Tadoussac, loading iron ore pellets at CN. Her departure time was unknown. In Superior, Roger Blough spent Monday loading ore at Burlington Northern before departing at 20:00. Tim S. Dool arrived off the Twin Ports mid-afternoon Monday and dropped anchor. She may arrive through either the Duluth or Superior entries, and will head to Fraser Shipyards for winter layup where she will be drydocked to receive her five-year survey and a new coat of paint.

Two Harbors, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader departed Two Harbors on Dec. 31st at approx. 00:50. As of 19:45 on the 31st she wasn’t showing an updated AIS. Shortly after the Joyce L. departed the Great Republic shifted to South of #2. She then departed Two Harbors on Dec. 31st at 10:40 for Conneaut. The Great Republic had been in Two Harbors since last Thursday. Arriving Two Harbors on Dec. 31st at 11:07 was the Edgar B. Speer after being anchored off Duluth. As of 19:45 on Dec. 31st she was still loading. Due Two Harbors on January 1st are the Indiana Harbor and the Edwin H. Gott.

Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Hon. James L. Oberstar on Dec. 30th at 21:23 for Cleveland. Silver Bay had no traffic on the 31st and nothing scheduled for Jan. 1st.

Northern Lake Huron
Monday, December 31st Alpena: 11:56 G L Ostrander departed for Milwaukee.

Detroit-Rouge River – Raymond H.
Saginaw arrived early Monday morning to load coke at Zug Island. Arriving next was the CSL Assiniboine, calling on Zug Island to unload coal. The tug Sarah Andrie and her tank barge stopped at the Waterfront Petroleum Terminal to load/unload.

Welland Canal and regional report - Monday Dec 31 - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrivals - Dec 29 - Algosea at 1111 - Jan 1 - Algoscotia, CSL Niagara, tug Albert & barge Margaret, and Cuyahoga - Departed dock - Dec 31 - Algosea at 1723 for the anchorage

Long Point Bay anchorage:
Anchored - Dec 31 - Algosea at 1752 and tug Michigan & barge Great Lakes eta 2020,

Welland Canal:
Upbound - Dec 30 - CCGS Griffon at 0902 (stopped wharf 1 at 0917) - Dec 31 - Cedarglen at 0202 (last commercial vessel of the season) and CCGS Griffon departed wharf 1 at 0815 approx. upbound doing some buoy work - headed to Port Colborne

Downbound - Jan 1 - Algoma Spirit eta 2250 approx headed for lay-up in Hamilton - will be last downbound commercial vessel of the season

Welland Canal docks:
Docked - Dec 27 - Algoma Enterprise stopped wharf 17 at 0043 approx (after going out onto Lake Erie and turning around to dock downbound - winter lay-up) and Dec 28 - John D Leitch at 1855 at Port Weller dry dock facility - Dec 30 - tug Leo A McArthur & barge John J Carrick - stopped wharf 16 at 0534

Hamilton:
Arrivals - Dec 31 - Algoma Buffalo departed at 0645 to do clean-up before returning to 26M - G3 Canada dock for lay-up at approx 1550 - Jan 1 - Algoma Spirit eta mid-day for winter lay-up - Docked - Dec 22 - Algoma Compass at 1611 - 26N - GLS dock - Dec 27 - Algoma Transport at 1120 - 11W Bunge dock and Florence Spirit at 1636 - 12N dock - Dec 29 - G3 Marquis at 2141 - 21 AMD dock - Dec 30 - Dec 30 Algoma Equinox at 1214 - to 25N Agrico dock, tug Sea Eagle II & barge St Marys Cement II at 1812 - to 14W FMT dock, tug Petite Forte & barge St Marys Cement 1906 - to 12E FMT dock and Algoma Buffalo eta 2115 - to 21 AMD dock -

Toronto:
Arrival - Dec 30 - light tug Seahound at 1834 - Docked - Dec 23 - Oakglen at 1151 (winter lay-up) - Dec 26 - Whitefish Bay at 0203 (winter lay-up) - Dec 28 - Algoma Discovery at 0746 and McKeil Spirit at 1438 (winter lay-up)

 

Cargo diversity up across docks at Port of Monroe

1/1 - Monroe, Mich. – Port of Monroe is celebrating another milestone year. This time it comes in the form of cargo diversity. “The port is as vibrant as it ever has been despite rapid changes in cargo transportation,” Port Director Paul C. LaMarre III said. “Cargo diversity across our docks is up.”

Despite some challenges early in 2018, the port continues to thrive. This shipping season saw the opening of the riverfront intermodal dock. The dock, a $3.6 million investment, saw its first ship in April. The Huron Spirit brought a load of steel coils for the automotive industry.

“We had an agreement to handle loads of steel coils, but only got that one shipment because of the steel tariffs,” LaMarre explained. “Effectively that business evaporated overnight.” But LaMarre did not get discouraged. “We are a nimble organization,” he said. “We adapt to change.”

The Port of Monroe welcomed a new face to its team this month. Mark Rohn has been hired as assistant port director, said LaMarre. Rohn began his maritime career in 1978 as a vessel agent with N. M. Paterson & Sons. He worked in a variety of vessel operations with M.A. Hanna Company.

In 1992, Rohn was named director of operations for The Great Lakes Towing Company. A few years later, he joined the Oglebay Norton Company eventually serving as Vice President of Terminal Operations and Director of Human Resources until 2001. That year, he joined the Grand River Navigation Company serving as president for several years.

In the last 18 months, Rohn has worked with DRM, the Port of Monroe’s terminal operator. He is a member of the Great Lakes Marine Hall of Fame.

“Mark is one of the most respected people in the Great Lakes maritime industry,” LaMarre said. After 40 years in the shipping industry, Rohn said he is grateful to work at the port. “I’m glad I am getting an opportunity,” he said.

LaMarre forged a deal with the Great Lakes Towing Co. and Great Lakes Shipyard to establish towing and shipyard services at the port.

As part of the partnership, Great Lakes Towing relocated the tug Wisconsin to the port to help with ship assistance. The tug is the oldest commercially operating tug boat in the world. It was built in 1897 in Buffalo, N.Y., by the Union Dry Dock Co.

International shipping returned to the port after a nearly two-year battle. International cargo was not able to call upon the port based on labor issues not related to the port. Earlier this year, the U.S. government intervened and reopened international shipping to the Port of Monroe and the Port of Toledo.

During the 2014 shipping season, the port set tonnage records and nearly set another one the following season. LaMarre said this year the tonnage figures will be down, but the port’s diversification of cargo is up. “We continue to move a wide variety of cargo through the port,” he said. “We are moving more gypsum on the dock and by rail.”

The port also is handling all the bottom ash from DTE Energy’s Monroe Power Plant, along with components for wind towers and natural gas pipeline sections.

LaMarre said this year the port’s season will continue through the winter due to a new development related to liquid asphalt. The M/V Iver Bright, owned by Varoon, a company in the Netherlands, began calling on the port recently. The Iver Bright is an asphalt tanker that recently made its first voyage from Montreal to Monroe.

“The single voyage qualified the port for its fourth Seaway Pacesetter Award in six years,” LaMarre said.

The vessel is unique, LaMarre said, because it was built in 2012 and is an ice class vessel, meaning it can operate year-long. “It will likely call upon the port all year, primarily between Sarnia, Ontario and Monroe,” LaMarre said. “It can also call upon Detroit and Toledo.”

The director anticipates this new aspect to the business will drive up the port’s tonnage in the coming year. “It’s a significant boost during what is typically the slowest time of the year for the port,” LaMarre said.

Read more and view photos at this link: https://www.monroenews.com/news/20181231/cargo-diversity-up-across-docks-at-port-of-monroe

 

Port Reports -  January 1

On this day in 1958, 76-year-old Rangvald Gunderson retired as wheelsman from the ELTON HOYT 2ND. Mr. Gunderson sailed on the lakes for 60 years.

On January 1, 1973, the PAUL H. CARNAHAN became the last vessel of the 1972 shipping season to load at the Burlington Northern (now Burlington Northern Santa Fe) ore docks in Superior, Wisconsin. Interestingly, the CARNAHAN also opened the Superior docks for the season in the spring of 1972.

On 1 January 1930, HELEN TAYLOR (wooden propeller steam barge, 56 foot, 43 gross tons, built in 1894, at Grand Haven, Michigan) foundered eight miles off Michigan City, Indiana. She was nicknamed "Pumpkin Seed," due to her odd shape.

January 1, 1900 - The Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad merged with the Chicago & West Michigan and the Detroit, Grand Rapids and Western Railroads to form the Pere Marquette Railway Co.

On 1 January 1937, MAROLD II (steel propeller, 129 foot, 165 gross tons, built in 1911, at Camden, New Jersey, as a yacht) was siphoning gasoline off the stranded tanker J OSWALD BOYD (244 foot, 1,806 gross tons, built in 1913, in Scotland) which was loaded with 900,000 gallons of gasoline and was stranded on Simmons Reef on the north side of Beaver Island. A tremendous explosion occurred which totally destroyed MAROLD II and all five of her crew. Only pieces of MAROLD II were found. Her captain's body washed ashore in Green Bay the next year.

At time of loss, she was the local Beaver Island boat. The remains of the BOYD were removed to Sault Ste. Marie in June 1937.

1943: HAMILDOC (i) went south during World War Two to assist in the bauxite trade. The N.M. Paterson & Sons bulk canaller sank in the Caribbean after a three-day gale. The vessel, enroute from Georgetown, British Guiana, to Trinidad, was at anchor when the hull broke in two. All on board were saved.

2000: WISTERIA was built at Imabari, Japan, in 1976 and came through the Seaway that year. It was taking water in #1 hold as c) AIS MAMAS while enroute from West Africa to India with a cargo of logs. The crew was removed but the ship was taken in tow and reached Capetown, South Africa, on January 5. It was subsequently sold for scrap and arrived at Alang, India, for dismantling on April 23, 2000 and was beached the next day.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 



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