Great Lakes NEWS & RUMOR Archive

* Report News


John Sherwin Possible conversion

01/31:
The current issue of the Interlake Log, Interlake Steamships' news letter says the John Sherwin is under serious consideration to be converted to a self-unloader for service in 1999. The article did not say whether the Sherwin would be reduced to a barge or operated as a steamer. Laid up at Superior since 1981, she has been cannibalized over the years for parts for other Interlake vessels. Her bowthruster engine was installed in the Herbert C. Jackson and the unit from the HCJ was repaired and placed in the Sherwin's hold.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




Port of Toledo update

01/31:
The BUFFALO is now off the Shipyard drydock. She is now moored at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock just North of the Shipyard astern of the tanker SATURN. The AMERICAN REPUBLIC is presently in drydock undergoing repairs.

Reported by: J.R. Hoffman




JACKMAN still sailing

01/31:
A call to Algoma's fleet tape revealed that CAPT. HENRY JACKMAN is still moving salt from Goderich. She is due on January 30 to load for Chicago. She was unloading in Milwaukee on January 28th.
The Sauniere laid up at Sorel on 27th January

Reported by: Rod Burdick and Andy LaBorde




Barge INTEGRITY Ups Record Cement Cargo

01/31:
Yet another U.S.-Flag cargo record was established during the recently-completed 1997 navigation season. The cement-carrying barge INTEGRITY (owned by Lafarge, operated by Andrie, Inc.) pushed the benchmark for the Jones Act cement trade to 17,740 net tons. The cargo, a "split load," was loaded in Alpena, Michigan, on July 16 and delivered to Milwaukee and Muskegon, Michigan. The previous record for the domestic cement trade was 17,149, also carried by the INTEGRITY.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Park service grant available

01/31:
The U.S. National Park Service has announced that applications for its National Maritime Heritage Grants Program are now available. The program is a competitive matching grants project which provides funds for Maritime Heritage Education Projects and Maritime Heritage Preservation Projects. Such projects are designed to reach a broad audience to enhance public awareness and appreciation of U.S. maritime heritage. The program is authorized by the U.S. National Maritime Heritage Act (Public Law 103-451). Awards will range from U.S.$2,500 to U.S.$50,000. Requirements include the need for matching the requested grant on a one-to-one basis with non-federal contributions and the requirement that recipients be part of state or local government or a private non-profit organization. Applications are due by 17 April. For information, contact:
The National Park Service
National Maritime Initiative (2280)
1849 C Street N.W., Washington, D.C., 20240
Attention: Hallie Brooker.
Or telephone 202-343-8170, fax 202-343-1244, e-mail hallie_brooker@nps.gov or see www.cr.nps.gov/history/maritime.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Lakes Coal Trade Up Nearly 17 Percent In 1997

01/30:
The 1997 coal trade on the Great Lakes closed on January 29 with a final cargo for Canada loaded at Ashtabula, Ohio. Preliminary totals show that the Lakes coal trade totaled 40.6 million net tons in 1997, an increase of 16.7 percent compared to 1996 and the highest level achieved since 1984 when the coal float topped 43 million tons.

Shipments of low-sulfur coal from Superior, Wisconsin, reached an all-time high: 14.7 million tons. Montana and Wyoming coal has been shipped from Superior to Great Lakes power plants since 1976. Due to increased demand from a major Canadian utility, coal shipments from Lake Erie ports increased 22 percent or nearly 4 million tons.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Correction

01/30:
Correction to a report from 11/18
The Steamer Philip R. Clarke did not have engine parts for the M/V Myron C. Taylor on 11/18/97. The Clarke has a steam turbine while the Taylor is Diesel powered. The Clarke stood by her sister ship until it was clear that the minor repairs were completed at which time the Clarke and Taylor continued their trip.

Reported by: Matt




Today in Great Lakes History - January 30

ELMDALE was launched January 30, 1909

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




What carried 1/2 ton of cargo for every man, woman and child in the U.S. between 3/3/97 and 1/25/98?

01/29:
Answer: The Jones Act Fleet!
CLEVELAND--When the cement-carrying barge MEDUSA CONQUEST arrived at her winter lay-up berth in Chicago on January 25, it capped the most successful navigation season on the Great Lakes since the boom economy of the 1970s. Preliminary totals for cargo movement in U.S.-Flag lakers show the 66 vessels that saw service during the 1997 shipping season moved more than 125 million tons of dry- and liquid-bulk cargo. That total represents an 8-million ton increase over 1996 and easily qualifies as a new post-recession peak for the Lakes Jones Act trades.

In addition to total cargo movement, several individual U.S.-Flag and Great Lakes records were established in 1997. The 1,000-foot-long BURNS HARBOR, operated by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, upped the record iron ore cargo in the Head-of-the-Lakes trade to 72,300 net tons. That one cargo represents enough iron ore to feed the steelmaker's blast furnaces for 4.5 days.

The U.S.-Flag supercarrier COLUMBIA STAR, one of 12 ships in the Oglebay Norton fleet, pushed the record coal cargo for the long haul trades to 70,903 net tons. The 770-foot-long ST. CLAIR (American Steamship Company) delivered the largest coal cargo to a Canadian Great Lakes port west of the Welland Canal when she carried 45,411 tons to Nanticoke.

The U.S.-Flag laker PHILIP R. CLARKE, one of three sister ships in the 11-vessel fleet operated by USS Great Lakes Fleet, Inc., set a new benchmark for the Jones Act Lakes salt trade when she delivered 27,621 tons to Buffalo. Interlake Steamship's ELTON HOYT 2ND became the longest vessel (698 feet) to ever navigate the entire Federal channel in Cleveland's twisting Cuyahoga River. Only two skyscrapers in Cleveland are taller than the HOYT is long.

Iron ore cargos in U.S. bottoms totaled 63.4 million tons, the highest level since 1981, the last pre-recession season on the Great Lakes. Loadings of western coal totaled 13.9 million tons, the highest level since that trade was initiated in 1976. Eastern coal cargos in U.S. bottoms neared 9.5 million tons, an increase of 17.9 percent over 1996.

The 29.8 million tons of limestone and gypsum loaded into U.S.-Flag lakers last year easily constitute a new post-recession record and possibly represent an all-time high for U.S.-Flag participation in that trade.

Only two commodities decreased in 1997. Salt loadings into U.S. bottoms slipped to 1 million tons, but that total reflects that a major salt producer did not resume shipping until June. The movement of liquid bulk products in U.S.-Flag tankers and integrated tug/barges decreased 10 percent to 2.5 million tons.

During the 1997 navigation season, 66 of the 69 Jones Act lakers were in service. One of the idle vessels, the J. L. MAUTHE, underwent conversion to a self-unloading barge at a Great Lakes shipyard. The vessel has been renamed the PATHFINDER and will return to service in 1998. Other ships not activated in 1997 were a small cement carrier and a straight-decker best suited for the grain trade.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association

Visit the LCA's home page for complete details





Today in Great Lakes History - January 29

BUCKEYE (2) Lake Crane Ship was launched January 29, 1910 as the straight decker a) LEONARD B. MILLER

BENSON FORD (2) was launched January 29, 1953 as a) RICHARD M. MARSHALL

JOHN P. REISS was launched January 29, 1910

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Finished With Engines

01/28:
The 1997 dry-bulk shipping season ended for U.S.-Flag lakers when the MEDUSA CONQUEST arrived at her winter berth in Chicago on January 25. The record-breaking season began 328 days earlier on March 3, 1997 with the sailing of the DAVID Z. NORTON. Come back in the next couple days for details on what proved a new benchmark season for the Jones Act trades on the Great Lakes.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Olympic enters lay-up

01/28:
The Canadian Olympic is now laid up in the Sarnia North Slip.

More updates on the Lay-up list.

Reported by: Jim Luke




New Officers and New Members For The Great Lakes Maritime Task Force

01/28:
The Great Lakes Maritime Task Force has new officers in 1998. Also, the Task Force welcomes three new members: Interlakes Pilots Local 1921; International Longshoremen's Association Local 1317; and St. Lawrence Seaway Pilot's Assn.

The Great Lakes Maritime Task Force was founded in 1992 to foster a healthy U.S.-Flag fleet on the Great Lakes and promote international trade via the St. Lawrence Seaway. The Task Force's Policy Statement outlines the coalition's major positions.
Click here for more information

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Saginaw Report

01/26:
On Saturday the U.S.Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw was breaking a channel into the Saginaw River to Essexville's Triple Clean Oil Dock. The channel was used by the Donald C Hannah with a barge carrying 850,000 gallons of #6 oil. On Sunday the tanker GEMINI arrived at 1200 to load fuel at Total Oil.

Reported by: Lon Morgan and Dan Maus




Port of Quebec strike information

01/26:
The Port of Quebec has been idled by a strike since 23 Dec. General cargo has been diverted to other ports nearby while non-labor union executives and other businesses are handling the few arriving bulk cargoes. The 107 members of the Canadian Union of Public Employees, who have been without a contract since 1995, broke off talks with Quebec Stevedoring Co. Ltd. The company reportedly wants to reduce the hours worked by dockworkers and the number of personnal assigned to teams working ships. A wage freeze for 1998 was proposed along with increases of 1 percent next year and 2 percent in both 2000 and 2001. Early retirement was offered for 49 workers. Following the offer, the workers went on strike.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Work Progressing on the Conversion of the City of Midland

01/26:
The drive shafts and rudder have been removed from the former Pere Marquette carferry City of Midland 41. Work has been progressing on the conversion, although behind schedule because of the greater than expected amount of asbestos that had to be removed. The former carferry is now expected to be in Muskegon until sometime in April, when she will be towed to Sturgeon Bay for the remainder of the conversion.
Visit the Carferries of Ludington for more information and pictures


Reported by: Max . Hanley




St. Lawrence Co-ordinated Service change

01/26:
The St. Lawrence Co-ordinated Service, operated by Canada Maritime Services Ltd. and Orient Overseas Container Line, is switching its English port of call from Felixstowe to Thamesport next month. The service involves three routes between Montreal and nothern Europe and the port change is on Route 1, which also calls at Antwerp, Belgium, and Le Havre, France. The first call at Thamesport will be by the Canmar Fortune (Bermudan-registry 34,330-dwt, 2,200-TEU containership built in 1995, operated by Canada Maritime Services) on 15 Feb.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Great Lakes Cruise & Freighter/Passenger Services

01/26:
With the successful inaugural season of Hapag-Lloyd's 420-passenger cruise ship COLUMBUS in 1997, it is now possible again to book passage on the Great Lakes. The COLUMBUS is offering two cruises this September and October to North American passengers and Clipper's NANTUCKET CLIPPER will be back as usual. In 1999, the COLUMBUS will do a full Great Lakes season (May to October) and two new visitors to the lakes will be the 212-passenger SEABOURN PRIDE, New York to Toronto and back, and the 95-passenger LE LEVANT, Toronto to Chicago and back. It is also possible to book passage between the Great Lakes and Europe on the "salties" (cargo ships) HELENA OLDENDORFF, REGINA OLDENDORFF and RIXTA OLDENDORFF.

Reported by: Kevin Griffin




Escanaba Loads Last Cargo/New Tug

01/20:
Escanaba loaded its last cargo of 1997-98 in the OGLEBAY NORTON. She departed early Saturday afternoon. Also from Escanaba, a new tug is being built in Escanaba to push the barge MCKEE SONS. It is docked behind MCKEE SONS at the north Reiss dock. MCKEE SONS regular tug, OLIVE L. MOORE, is also at the dock.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Former owner of the Ludington carferries died January 10, 1998

01/20:
Former carferry co-owner and Ludington businessman Glen Bowden died on Saturday, January 10th after an extended illness. Mr. Bowden and his friend George Towns, formed the Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Company in 1983 and purchased the Badger, Spartan, and City of Midland 41 from the Chessie System, which was working to abandon the carferry operation. Mr. Bowden operated the carferries until 1991 when he sold his interests to Charles Conrad, who founded Lake Michigan Carferry.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Load in Alabaster

01/20:
Interlake's Kaye E. Barker took a load out of Alabaster on Friday. I believe the Kaye is the largest vessel to load there. Also, it was the latest (mid-January) Alabaster has ever loaded a cargo. I am interested to see if my facts are correct?

Reported by: Neil Schultheiss




Soo locks

01/20:
A call to the USCG station at the Soo confirms the the Joseph L. BLock was the last vessel downbound through the locks. The last upbounder was the queen of the lakes, Paul R. Tregurtha.

Reported by: Neil Schultheiss




Oglebay Norton on last run

01/19:
As of Sunday January 18, 1998 at 0800 The Oglebay Norton was due Indiana Harbor 1100 1/18/1998 . After unloading (approximately 8 Hrs) she will head to Sturgeon Bay for Layup.

Reported by: Jeff P.




Buffalo update

01/19:
The Black Rock Canal is now closed to navigation. The lock handled a total of 321,033 tons of asphalt, coal , and gas all bound for the docks on the upper Niagara River this past season.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Toledo-Windsor Hovercraft Ferry Nears Approval

01/19:
The start-up of a Toledo-Windsor, Ont. ferry service that would lead to construction of a marine passenger terminal near downtown Toledo is one step away from U.S.Coast Guard approval. The technical aspects of operating Hovercraft ferries have been approved by the coast guard's marine Safety Center. All that remains is for the agency to inspect the three vessels that the ferry's operator plans to buy, said Lt. Cmdr. David Bird of the Marine Safety Office, Toledo.

"They're just about finished with it, and looks like they're going to go for it", said Jim Pearcy, president of Houston-based Overseas carriers, Inc. which has agreed to purchase three Hovercraft now being refurbished in England. Although Hovercraft ferries have operated for years on certain European routes, the Toledo-Windsor service would be the first of its kind in the United States. Overseas Carriers is proposing the Hovercraft service because winter ice would not impede the vessels which skim along the surface.

The prospect of adding the Hovercraft ferry service comes at the same time Toledo is battling to stay on the list of call ports for a Great Lakes cruise ship that stopped here last fall. Port Director John Loftus is working to persuade officials of Hapag-Lloyd, the German owners of the m.v. C. Columbus to reverse a decision that would eliminate Toledo as a starting point for a cruise next fall. Company officials have decided to launch the cruise from Detroit instead. To use a $1.3 milllion federal grant to the marine terminal, the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority needs the Toledo-Windsor ferry to become reality. The grant is from a fund dedicated to ferry facilities. While the ferry is justification for the marine terminal's federal funding, port officials want the terminal more to serve cruise ship passengers because they will need more amenities. The proposed terminal may be located behind the Sports Arena, adjacent to the M. L. King Bridge.

After decades without Great Lakes passenger cruises, an American ship the Nantucket Clipper introduced several trips three years ago, followed by the German-owned C. Columbus last year. Making its maiden voyage last year, the 400-passenger Columbus made three cruises of the Great Lakes that were sold to German tourists. The third cruise originated October 11 in Toledo and sailed to various ports, ending in Montreal. The night before the cruise began, the ship made an overnight trip from Port Colborne to Toledo that was marketed locally.
The Columbus is returning to the Great Lakes this year for five cruises, the fifth of which will begin October 3 and was originally scheduled to sail from Toledo for an 11-day voyage to Montreal. The switch to Detroit was suggested by the Columbus's captain as a way to eliminate an empty trip to Toledo after a previous cruise ends in Windsor. Christopher Wright, a spokesman for the Mariport Group, Hapag-Lloyd's North American agent based in Cambridge, Ont., said he too is recommending that Toledo be reinstated for the cruise ship's call. "My comment was, 'You don't have a place to put it in Detroit,' Mr. Wright said. "Toledo has a dock, facilities, and the experience of handling a ship".

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Have you seen this Buoy?

01/19:
Two buoys being used by the University of Wisconsin in an experiment have been swept away by currents in Lake Michigan. The heat sensor buoys were anchored five kilometers/three miles southeast of Sheboygan, Wis., and three kilometers/two miles east of the nearby Edgewater Power Plant. In the "Lake Ice" experiment, the two buoys measured the temperature at the surface of the lake as part of research into ice formation. They are fiberglass balls slightly larger than a basketball and were attached to a heavy rubberized cable and a small sensor device. One ball was gray with white stripes and the other is orange. Anyone finding the buoys is asked to call 608-263-3373.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Soo Locks end season - CORRECTION

01/19:
In Fridays report I stated that the Mackinaw was the last upbounder, she did not lock through and was on Lake Michigan over the weekend. Mike Cleary explains:
Just to clarify the last vessels through the Soo Locks, the times that the Duluth News-Tribune lists are the times that the vessels call in to Soo Traffic. For upbound vessels this is DeTour Passage, located five hours from the Soo Locks and for downbound vessels it is Isle Parisienne, about 2 1/2 hours from the locks.

I would guess that the last vessel through the locks was the Joseph L. Block, checking in at Isle Parisienne at 13:45 and arriving at the locks around 16:15. I did note that the Mackinaw checked in upbound at 16:17 but I'm doubting that she went any further than the Coast Guard base below the locks.

Reported by: Mike Cleary




Shipco Transport opens Toronto office

01/19:
Shipco Transport, a non-vessel operating common carrier, opened an office in Toronto on 15 Jan.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Pictures of the Delphine

01/19:
It was reported last fall the the former yatch built by Great Lakes Engineering Works for Horace Dodge was still afloat in Europe. Here is a link to pictures of the Delphine as she is today:
http://www.ping.be/urbiehome/

Reported by: Brian Bernard




Barge Sarah Spencer

01/23:
The barge, SARAH SPENCER, was laid-up at Robin Hood Mills, Port Colbourne, Ontario on December 20, 1997. The tug ATLANTIC HICKORY left Port Colbourne for Halifax the same day, clearing the seaway on December 22nd. We expect the tug back in Montreal around April 1-10 for the 1988 season.

Reported by: Allen Stevens




EVTAC to lay off employees

01/23:
Twenty-two workers at the EVTAC taconite plant in Eveleth, Minn., will be laid off next month because the plant is cutting its planned 1998 pellet production by 400,000 tons.

EVTAC had expected to produce 5.4 million tons of pellets this year -- its highest output since 1981. But the plant, owned by Rouge Steel, A-K Steel and Stelco, couldn't find buyers for about 400,000 tons, prompting the production cut to 5 million tons.

Minnesota taconite plants are experiencing their most productive decade ever, following the rugged '80s that saw all plants reduce their work forces. The plants expect to produce 47.2 million tons of pellets this year, up from their 1997 total of 46.6 million tons.

Reported by: Al Miller




Position Available with the Lake Carriers' Association

01/23:
The Lake Carriers' Association has an opening for a part-time clerk/secretary. Please visit their home page for more information.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Grand Lodge Convention

01/23:
The Annual Grand Lodge Convention of the International Ship Master's Association hosted by the Twin Sault Lodge in Sault Ste Marie, MI January 29 - Feb 1. Speakers will address issues concerning shipping on the Great Lakes. Officers will be installed at a formal dinner and dance.

Reported by: Capt. Skip Skuggen




Jackman loading

01/22:
Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 p.m. the Captain Henry Jackman was waiting to load a cargo of salt in Goderich, Ontario.The loading was to commence at 3:00 p.m. for a 12 hour load. Goderich Harbour is completely ice free and the Jackman is expected to return for more loads as long as ice permits.

Reported by: Philip Nash




Great Lakes Maritime Academy acquires new training vessel

01/22:
The Great Lakes Maritime Academy as a acquired a new training vessel. The 55' aluminum hulled former survey vessel "North Central" has been acquired from the Corps of Engineers. The "North Central", built in 1969, is currently located in Detroit at the Corps Fort Wayne facility. A crew from The Academy will fit out the vesel in late April for the delivery trip to Traverse city. The vessel will be used for overnight training cruises. Initial plans call for pilot training cruises on the St. Mary's River and the Straits of Mackinac.

Reported by: Gary Schweitzer




And Then There Was One

01/22:
The cement barge MEDUSA CONQUEST will be the last dry-bulk U.S.-Flag carrier to lay-up for the 1997 navigation season. The barge is expected to conclude its season around January 25. The coal trade from Lake Erie in Canadian vessels should cease next week.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Good year for Escanaba ore docks

01/22:
It has been a good first year for the new owners of the Escanaba ore docks. The docks handled more than 6 million tons of material during the l997/98 shipping season, said James Rogers, Superintendent for the Wisconsin Central Sault Ste. Marie Bridge Co. The ore docks serves about 2l0 vessels a season. It receives iron ore pellets by rail from both the Marquette range and Minnesota range mines. Ships bring limestone to the docks which is then loaded into railroad cars for delivery to the Empire Mine in Ishpeming for use in blending the iron ore mixture G9843.

Reported by: Jim Grill




Today in Great Lakes History - January 21

On this day on 1959 the Michael K. Tewksbury, followed by the McGilvary Shiras destroyed the Michigan Ave. Lift Bridge on the Buffalo River. It all started that night around 6PM. Ice had been building in the upper Buffalo River for the past few weeks. A quick thaw and re-freeze caused ice jams to let loose on the evening of the disaster. The Shiras was moored at the Concrete Central Grain Elvevator with about 170 feet of her bow sticking out into the channel above the dock. As the ice flows pushed on the bow section the bollards began to up root from the dock allowing her to break loose around 11:00 PM. She drifted alone all the way down river until she hit the Tewksbury at the Standard Elevator about 20 minutes later. The two ships , with the Tewksbury in the lead, sailed un-aided through the 90 degree bend at the Ohio St. Bridge and continued down the channel until striking the Michigan Ave. Bridge dead center on the draw span. The East tower fell down and took out the building next door. The draw fell in the water and trapped the two ships. The West tower fell down a few days later and added to the wreckage in the water. This accident caused millions in damages, took years to fight in court, and cut Michigan St. in half until the new bridge was built some years later.

Data from: Brian Wroblewski




Escanaba Loads Last Cargo/New Tug

01/20:
Escanaba loaded its last cargo of 1997-98 in the OGLEBAY NORTON. She departed early Saturday afternoon. Also from Escanaba, a new tug is being built in Escanaba to push the barge MCKEE SONS. It is docked behind MCKEE SONS at the north Reiss dock. MCKEE SONS regular tug, OLIVE L. MOORE, is also at the dock.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Former owner of the Ludington carferries died January 10, 1998

01/20:
Former carferry co-owner and Ludington businessman Glen Bowden died on Saturday, January 10th after an extended illness. Mr. Bowden and his friend George Towns, formed the Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Company in 1983 and purchased the Badger, Spartan, and City of Midland 41 from the Chessie System, which was working to abandon the carferry operation. Mr. Bowden operated the carferries until 1991 when he sold his interests to Charles Conrad, who founded Lake Michigan Carferry.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Load in Alabaster

01/20:
Interlake's Kaye E. Barker took a load out of Alabaster on Friday. I believe the Kaye is the largest vessel to load there. Also, it was the latest (mid-January) Alabaster has ever loaded a cargo. I am interested to see if my facts are correct?

Reported by: Neil Schultheiss




Soo locks

01/20:
A call to the USCG station at the Soo confirms the the Joseph L. BLock was the last vessel downbound through the locks. The last upbounder was the queen of the lakes, Paul R. Tregurtha.

Reported by: Neil Schultheiss




Oglebay Norton on last run

01/19:
As of Sunday January 18, 1998 at 0800 The Oglebay Norton was due Indiana Harbor 1100 1/18/1998 . After unloading (approximately 8 Hrs) she will head to Sturgeon Bay for Layup.

Reported by: Jeff P.




Buffalo update

01/19:
The Black Rock Canal is now closed to navigation. The lock handled a total of 321,033 tons of asphalt, coal , and gas all bound for the docks on the upper Niagara River this past season.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Toledo-Windsor Hovercraft Ferry Nears Approval

01/19:
The start-up of a Toledo-Windsor, Ont. ferry service that would lead to construction of a marine passenger terminal near downtown Toledo is one step away from U.S.Coast Guard approval. The technical aspects of operating Hovercraft ferries have been approved by the coast guard's marine Safety Center. All that remains is for the agency to inspect the three vessels that the ferry's operator plans to buy, said Lt. Cmdr. David Bird of the Marine Safety Office, Toledo.

"They're just about finished with it, and looks like they're going to go for it", said Jim Pearcy, president of Houston-based Overseas carriers, Inc. which has agreed to purchase three Hovercraft now being refurbished in England. Although Hovercraft ferries have operated for years on certain European routes, the Toledo-Windsor service would be the first of its kind in the United States. Overseas Carriers is proposing the Hovercraft service because winter ice would not impede the vessels which skim along the surface.

The prospect of adding the Hovercraft ferry service comes at the same time Toledo is battling to stay on the list of call ports for a Great Lakes cruise ship that stopped here last fall. Port Director John Loftus is working to persuade officials of Hapag-Lloyd, the German owners of the m.v. C. Columbus to reverse a decision that would eliminate Toledo as a starting point for a cruise next fall. Company officials have decided to launch the cruise from Detroit instead. To use a $1.3 milllion federal grant to the marine terminal, the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority needs the Toledo-Windsor ferry to become reality. The grant is from a fund dedicated to ferry facilities. While the ferry is justification for the marine terminal's federal funding, port officials want the terminal more to serve cruise ship passengers because they will need more amenities. The proposed terminal may be located behind the Sports Arena, adjacent to the M. L. King Bridge.

After decades without Great Lakes passenger cruises, an American ship the Nantucket Clipper introduced several trips three years ago, followed by the German-owned C. Columbus last year. Making its maiden voyage last year, the 400-passenger Columbus made three cruises of the Great Lakes that were sold to German tourists. The third cruise originated October 11 in Toledo and sailed to various ports, ending in Montreal. The night before the cruise began, the ship made an overnight trip from Port Colborne to Toledo that was marketed locally.
The Columbus is returning to the Great Lakes this year for five cruises, the fifth of which will begin October 3 and was originally scheduled to sail from Toledo for an 11-day voyage to Montreal. The switch to Detroit was suggested by the Columbus's captain as a way to eliminate an empty trip to Toledo after a previous cruise ends in Windsor. Christopher Wright, a spokesman for the Mariport Group, Hapag-Lloyd's North American agent based in Cambridge, Ont., said he too is recommending that Toledo be reinstated for the cruise ship's call. "My comment was, 'You don't have a place to put it in Detroit,' Mr. Wright said. "Toledo has a dock, facilities, and the experience of handling a ship".

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Have you seen this Buoy?

01/19:
Two buoys being used by the University of Wisconsin in an experiment have been swept away by currents in Lake Michigan. The heat sensor buoys were anchored five kilometers/three miles southeast of Sheboygan, Wis., and three kilometers/two miles east of the nearby Edgewater Power Plant. In the "Lake Ice" experiment, the two buoys measured the temperature at the surface of the lake as part of research into ice formation. They are fiberglass balls slightly larger than a basketball and were attached to a heavy rubberized cable and a small sensor device. One ball was gray with white stripes and the other is orange. Anyone finding the buoys is asked to call 608-263-3373.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Soo Locks end season - CORRECTION

01/19:
In Fridays report I stated that the Mackinaw was the last upbounder, she did not lock through and was on Lake Michigan over the weekend. Mike Cleary explains:
Just to clarify the last vessels through the Soo Locks, the times that the Duluth News-Tribune lists are the times that the vessels call in to Soo Traffic. For upbound vessels this is DeTour Passage, located five hours from the Soo Locks and for downbound vessels it is Isle Parisienne, about 2 1/2 hours from the locks.

I would guess that the last vessel through the locks was the Joseph L. Block, checking in at Isle Parisienne at 13:45 and arriving at the locks around 16:15. I did note that the Mackinaw checked in upbound at 16:17 but I'm doubting that she went any further than the Coast Guard base below the locks.

Reported by: Mike Cleary




Shipco Transport opens Toronto office

01/19:
Shipco Transport, a non-vessel operating common carrier, opened an office in Toronto on 15 Jan.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Pictures of the Delphine

01/19:
It was reported last fall the the former yatch built by Great Lakes Engineering Works for Horace Dodge was still afloat in Europe. Here is a link to pictures of the Delphine as she is today:
http://www.ping.be/urbiehome/

Reported by: Brian Bernard




Iglehart refloated

01/17:
After lightening her load into the Alpena, and with the help of the tug Kathy Lynn, the Iglehart was freed about 9:18 P.M. on January 15. The Iglehart ran aground Wednesday about 1.3 miles from the LaFarge plant, in the navigation channel on Thunder Bay in Alpena, MI. A survey and soundings seem to indicate no damage to either the vessel or her cargo. The crew remained aboard and reported no injuries. The Coast Guard is investigating the accident. The Iglehart is due Detroit at 1 P.M. Friday the 16th and the Alpena, which took part of the Iglehart's cargo to lighten the vessel, has since loaded and departed Alpena with an ETA of 4 A.M. Saturday, January 17, in Cleveland, weather permitting.

Reported by: Captain Patrick J. Gallagher




Manning reduction for USS-GLF

01/17:
Manning reduction for USS-GLF has the old Bradley fleet giving into pressure from the company to eliminate 2 porters. One from the Myron C. Taylor and One from the Calcite II. A vote by Local 14913 of United Steelworkers had the old timers caving in under pressure from the company that the Calcite II needs to be more competitive in the stone strade. In their first union meeting of the year the members of Local 14913 voted to eliminate 2 jobs. It is the understanding that these jobs would be brought back if the AMO union does not agree to eliminate 2 Engineering jobs which are also slated for the Taylor and Calcite.

Reported by: Ron B.




Escanaba news

01/17:
Escanaba - January l6, l998 (l430) The barge Joseph H. Thompson/tug Joseph H. Thompson Jr. departed loaded early yesterday morning. The MV Ogelbay Norton docked to take on a load. There is no official word if this will be the last vessel to load for this season.

Reported by: Jim Grill




Early Arrival For McAsphalt 401

01/17:
McAsphalt 401 Barge & Evans McKeil Tug arrived in Port Stanley on Jan. 15 to unload 7000 metric tons of liquid ashphalt. While the load was delayed, waiting on weather the crew said there was no difficulties on the Detroit River or Lake Erie. The Captian said they have four more deliveries booked, but with this weather who knows when the season will end.

Reported by: Ted Coombs




Interlake takes delivery of the PATHFINDER

01/16:
Interlake Steamship Co. took delivery of the barge "Pathfinder" at 1700 EST yesterday. The former bulk carrier was converted to a self unloading barge at the Bay Shipbuilding company in Sturgeon Bay. Interlake is looking forward to operating the vessel in the spring. She will not be moved this winter and is expected to compete in the stone trade once the shpping season begins. For the rest of the winter she will lay abreast of the Presque Isle at the PBI dock, Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.

Click here for pictures


Reported by: Interlake Steamship Co.




Soo Locks end season

01/16:
The Soo Locks ended the 1997-98 shipping season when they closed at midnight January 15. The last vessels to lock through were the downbound Joseph L. Block (1:45 P.M.) and the upbound Mackinaw (4:17 P.M.) Winter maintenance will be performed on the locks before they are opened for the 1998/99 shipping season in just a few months.

Reported by: Mike Cleary




Jackson to be fitted with stern thruster

01/16:
According to the fall Interlake Log, the Herbert C. Jackson will have a stern tube fitted this winter at Frasier Shipyard. The 1000' horse power, controlable pitch thruster will be installed on the dry dock.

Reported by: The Marine Historical Society of Detroit




More Than A Pinch of Salt!

01/16:
For the second year in a row, salt cargos carried in U.S-Flag lakers have topped 1 million tons. The preliminary total for the 1997 navigation season is 1,002,934 net tons. This total represents a decrease of roughly 150,000 tons from the 1996 season, but only because a major salt shipper did not resume loadings until June of 1997.

During the 1997 navigation season, the U.S.-Flag laker PHILIP R. CLARKE (USS Great Lakes Fleet, Inc.) pushed the record salt cargo in the Jones Act trades to 27,621 net tons. The cargo was loaded at Fairport Harbor, Ohio, and delivered to Buffalo, New York.

Reported by: The Lake Carriers' Association




Iglehart update 5:00 P.M.

01/15:
As of 5:30 P.M. EST, The SS Alpena is attempting to tie up alongside the Iglehart in the Alpena Channel in an attempt to unload some of the cargo from the Iglehart to the Alpena in order to lighten the Iglehart and perhaps free from being aground. The navigation channel is very narrow but this seems to be the only viable alternative at this time. More updates as they are observed. As a side note--the Alpena was due in here to Alpena earlier today anyway but it is quite fortuitous that this is a possible solution at this time.

Reported by: Captain Patrick J. Gallagher




Valley of the 1,000-footers

01/15:
Ship traffic for this season ended in the Twin Ports on Jan. 14 when the Paul R. Tregurtha arrived to lay up at the Duluth Port Terminal. Because of the extraordinarily mild weather this fall, ice was a factor in navigation only during the last two weeks of the season. Tugs were used in the last week mainly just to help ships making layup docks.

With four 1,000-footers laid up end to end along its dock face, Duluth's port terminal presents an interesting sight. The ships are pumped dry and riding high in the water, so they give the terminal a "Valley of the 1,000-footers" type of effect.

Reported by: Al Miller




Great Lakes Fleet concludes season

01/15:
Great Lakes Fleet concludes its season this week when Presque Isle delivers its last cargo to Conneaut on Jan. 16. It is scheduled to arrive at Sturgeon Bay at 1600 Jan. 18 for layup.

Reported by: Al Miller




More trouble for the Iglehart

01/15:
As of January 14 in the afternoon, the Steamer J.A.W. Iglehart was aground in the channel leaving LaFarge Cement in Alpena, MI. Still aground AM of January 15. Tug Kathy Lynn assisting attempts to get her off but so far no progress. Awaiting other tugs for assistance. No knowledge of possible damages at this time. Will update as developments occur.

Reported by: Captain Patrick J. Gallagher




Today in Great Lakes History - January 15

FORT YORK was launched January 15, 1958.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Iglehart stuck in ice

01/14:
The Iglehart was freed at 9:40am yesterday. She had been stuck in about 8"-10" of ice in the North end of Georgian Bay. Apparently she did need a tug after becoming stuck Monday morning. As of noon yesterday she was still moving, but slow. Most of the buoys that are still out are under the ice. Also in the fleet, the Alpena was making a stop in St.Joesph yesterday on her way up from S.Chicago. The Integrity is heading to S.Chicago and then to Sturgeon Bay for lay up.

Reported by: Mark P.




Barkers on the move

01/14:
The James R. Barker will arrive at the Ashtabula Pinney dock on Saturday January 17, 1998 to unload ore at the A&B slips and then layup at the D slip. The Kaye Barker will arrive to unload at the Pinney dock 1/14/98 and then go over to the coal dock and get loaded for the short haul to the Pinney dock.

Reported by: Jeff. P.




Cuyahoga enters Winter Lay-up

01/14:
The Cuyahoga arrived in Port Stanley on Jan.11 for winter lay up. It is docked on west side of harbour were remaining crew are busy sandblasting cargo holds. Expect to have maintence completed and return to shipping around March 25.

Many new updates on the 4th Annual Winter Lay-up page


Reported by: Ted Coombs




Escanaba news

01/14:
The port of Escanaba may be seeing its last vessels this week for the l997/98 season. Tuesday the MV James R. Barker was due at 2100. Thursday, the Bge. Joseph H. Thompson/Tug Joe Jr. are due to load, while the MV Oglebay Norton is due to load on Friday.

Reported by: Jim Grill




Great Lakes Maritime Academy Open House

01/14:
The Great Lakes Maritime Academy, in Traverse City, Michigan will be having an open house on Saturday, January 17th from 10AM-1PM. Anyone planning on being in the Traverse City area is encouraged to attend. Our bridge simulator will be operating, you can take a "virtual" trip down the St. Mary's River as well as see our engine room simulator and radar lab.Call 616-922-1200 for more information.

Reported by: Gary Schweitzer




Boatnerd computer aground

01/14:
I've been having a lot of problems with my tired old computer.. The H.D. crashed last night. Until I get the machine running updates will be delayed.




Today in Great Lakes History - January 14

Scrapping began on the CHICAGO TRIBUNE January 14, 1989 by International Marine Salvage in Port Colborne, Ont.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Chief Engineer Ted Walker Dies at Age 71

01/13:
Chief Engineer Ted Walker who started his career as a fireman on the S.S. Mathewston in 1949 and retired as Chief Engineer of the S.S. J.N McWatters in 1991 died suddenly on December 28, 1997 at his home in Victoria Harbour, Ontario. Ted spent his entire career with Misener except for the partial season of 1991 after the formation of Great Lake Bulk Carriers. Ted rose from Fireman to Second Engineer on the Mathewston (which was renamed Ralph S. Misener in 1954). Subsequently Ted had long stints on his favourite boat, the S.S. John O. McKellar including 10 years as her Chief Engineer. Ted's first Chief's job was on the S.S. George M. Carl. He was proud to serve as Chief on the J.N. McWatters for the last 8 years before his retirement. Ted was a very well liked and respected sailor who enjoyed and valued the friendship of his many shipmates over the years. He was also a devoted family man and will be missed by both friends and family.

Reported by: Tom Walker




Today in Great Lakes History - January 13

On January 13, 1970 the lower engine room and holds of the SEWELL AVERY accidentally flooded sinking her to the bottom of Duluth Harbor causing minimal damage other than an immense cleanup effort.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Busy day in Duluth

01/12:
Jan. 12 is expected to be a big day for Twin Ports boatwatchers as Edgar B. Speer, Charles M. Beeghly, Elton Hoyt II, Herbert C. Jackson and Middletown are due in to lay up.

The season was winding down this past weekend in Duluth-Superior. The St. Clair took the last load out of the Burlington Northern Santa Fe ore dock in Superior, and the Joseph L. Block and the Presque Isle are scheduled to close the ore docks at Duluth and Two Harbors, respectively, on Monday.

Reported by: Al Miller and Jody Aho




Blough enters Lay up

01/12:
Roger Blough arrived in Duluth on Jan. 10 for winter layup. It docked at the old Cargill C dock, across from the Azcon scrap yard. The old Cargill property was purchased for redevelopment by the Seaway Port Authority of Duluth. This is the first time this berth has been used as a layup dock, probably because one of the usual layup berths at the Duluth port terminal must be kept free while demolition continues on the adjacent Cargill D grain elevator.

Many new updates on the 4th Annual Winter Lay-up page


Reported by: Al Miller




Republic stockpiles LTV

01/12:
Reports from Cleveland on Saturday had the American Republic working on the upper Cuyahoga for at least 36 hours. She was transferring ore from a storage area across the river from the St. Marys cement dock upriver less than a mile to the LTV docks. LTV always fills up at the end of the year, their ore storage areas appear fairly full now and they use this site across from St. Marys cement for late season stockpiling.

The past 2 years Buffalo has done this job and then laid up in Cleveland.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




New Great Lakes Related web site

01/12:
Marine Publishing Co. and the book “Know Your Ships” have a new home port on the Internet at www.knowyourships.com

Posted on the site is the “Know Your Ships” 1998 cover, featuring this year’s Vessel of the Issue, Edward L. Ryerson. (The book is available April 15 ... preorder now and receive priority shipping).

The new website allows visitors to browse the expanded selection of titles now available (including back issues, videos and CD ROMs) and meet the crew of Marine Publishing Co. Visitors may also read what reviewers are saying about recent editions of “Know Your Ships” and see what photographs of Great Lakes vessels are now available. Readers of “Know Your Ships” can also keep up-to-date on vessel and fleet news after the book is printed via an UPDATE button.

In addition to the new “Vessel of the Year” feature, the 1998 “Know Your Ships” adds expanded listings for saltwater visitors to the Great Lakes and Seaway, including a full page of 40 international stack markings (Great Lakes and Seaway stack markings are also updated, the only guide to do so on a yearly basis). Responding to reader suggestions, the book’s design has also been revised, making the 1998 edition even easier to use than its predecessors. Contributions by Great Lakes historians Jody Aho and Rod Burdick also appear this year, and the efforts of marine photographers from Duluth to Montreal continue to document the changing shipping scene.




Medusa Acquires Commonwealth Stone

01/12:
Medusa Corporation announced today that it has acquired Commonwealth Stone, a privately-owned producer of crushed stone in Bowling Green, Kentucky. Terms of the cash transaction were not disclosed.

Commonwealth owns and operates a 200 acre quarry that produces approximately 400,000 tons per year of construction aggregates. The combination of Commonwealth with Medusa's two other quarries in Bowling Green will give Medusa significant added presence in construction aggregates in the area. With this acquisition and two others completed in 1997, Medusa's total annualized output of construction aggregates has been lifted more than 25% to over 7 million tons.

Reported by: James Neumiller




Today in Great Lakes History - January 12

The CHI-CHEEMAUN was launched January 12, 1974.

The GRAND HAVEN was gutted by fire on January 12, 1970 during scrapping operations at the United Steel & Refining Co. Ltd. dock at Hamilton, Ont.

MENIHEK LAKE was launched January 12, 1959

On January 12, 1973, the VENUS (2) had an engine room explosion shortly after unloading at Kipling, MI, (near Gladstone, MI) on Little Bay De Noc causing one loss of life.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - January 11

The steamer ROBERT S. McNAMARA, under tow reached her intended destination of Santander, Spain on January 11, 1974.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - January 10

ONTADOC (2) was launched January 10, 1975 (b MELISSA DESGAGNES)

On January 10, 1977 the CHESTER A. POLLING (b MOBIL ALBANY) broke in two and sank off the coast of Massachusetts.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Jackman makes unexpected visit

01/09:
On Monday the Port of Thunder Bay received a Suprise visitor. The M/V Capt. Henry Jackman made the unexpected visited to discharge a cargo of salt at the Valley Camp salt dock. She was the last vessel due in port for the shipping season. This was also her first trip into Thunder Bay as a self unloader.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Coal Shipments up

01/09:
Coal shipments on the Great Lakes in December totaled 4.3 million tons, an increase of 31 percent compared to the corresponding period in 1996. The strong December float pushed the season-to-date total to 39.8 million tons, an increase of more than 5 million tons compared to the 1996 navigation season.

Several coal docks continued to load in January. An early projection for the final total is 40.5 million tons, the highest level achieved this decade.

Lake Erie Coal:
The Lake Erie ports of Toledo, Sandusky, Ashtabula and Conneaut shipped 2.1 million tons of coal in December. That total brings the Lake Erie coal trade to 21.3 million tons for the season, an increase of 19 percent compared to the 1996 navigation season.

Coal shipments from Lake Erie ports will continue in January, so a final tally for the '97 navigation season is not yet available.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




ULS Marbulk orders bulk carrier

01/09:
ULS Marbulk Inc., a unit of Upper Lakes Group Inc., has ordered a 43,900-dwt bulk carrier with self-unloading equipment from Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co. Ltd.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Algoma to Purchase tankers

01/09:
Note: the original story left out a few details.
Algoma Central Corporation agrees to purchase four tankers from Imperial Oil (St. Catharines, Ont.) Jan. 5, 1998 – Algoma Central Corporation, and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Algoma Tankers Limited, announced today that Algoma Tankers Limited has agreed to purchase four petroleum-product vessels from Imperial Oil Limited for $13 million.

Algoma Tankers Limited will acquire the following ships: M.V. Imperial Acadia, M.V. Imperial Bedford, M.V. Imperial St. Clair, and M.V. Imperial St. Lawrence. Algoma will rename the ships as follows: M.V. Algoscotia, M.V. Algofax, M.V. Algosar, and M.V. Algoeast, respectively.

Algoma Tankers Limited and Imperial Oil also announced today that they have entered into a long-term contract for the marine transportation of Imperial Oil liquid petroleum products. Under this agreement, Algoma Tankers Limited will manage transportation of Imperial Oil products on the Great Lakes, the St. Lawrence Seaway, and the coastal waters of eastern Canada and the eastern United States.

Both Algoma Central Corporation and Imperial Oil are confident that these two transactions, bringing together Canada's largest inland fleet and Canada's largest petroleum producer and distributor, will be mutually beneficial and maintain customer tanker services.

"This acquisition is part of our long-term plan for growth and diversification," said Algoma President and CEO Peter Cresswell. "We look forward to a long and productive relationship with Imperial Oil," added Cresswell.

No jobs will be eliminated under the new arrangement. The approximately 90 Imperial Oil employees who work on or support these vessels will be offered employment by Algoma Tankers Limited.

Established in 1899, and with offices in St. Catharines and Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., Algoma Central Corporation (TSE:ALC) owns and operates the largest Canadian fleet on the Great Lakes. Based in Toronto, Ont., Imperial Oil Limited (TSE:IMO) is Canada's largest producer of crude oil, and largest refiner and marketer of petroleum products.

Contact:
Peter R. Cresswell
Algoma Central Corporation
(705) 946-7200

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Today in Great Lakes History - January 09

BAIE COMEAU II was laid up on January 9, 1983 at Sorel, Que. and was sold the following April to Progress Overseas Co. S.A., Panama.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Pathfinder to Compete in Stone Trade

01/08:
The continuing rebound in demand for stone will soon lead to increased U.S.-Flag vessel capacity on the Great Lakes. The J. L. MAUTHE, inactive since 1993, spent 1997 in a shipyard in Wisconsin undergoing a $13 million conversion to a self-unloading barge. Renamed the PATHFINDER, the barge will be coupled with a tug and compete for stone cargos in 1998. The vessel will have a per-trip capacity of approximately 20,000 and could carry as many as 100 cargos in the short-haul stone trade.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers' Association




Late Season Ore Shipments

01/08:
Several late ore shipments are still scheduled for Lake Superior ports. Burns Harbor and St. Clair are scheduled to load Jan. 9 at Superior's BN ore dock. Taconite Harbor loaded Lee A. Tregurtha on Jan. 6 and is scheduled to load Fred R. White Jr. on Jan. 8 and Oglebay Norton on Jan. 10. Presque Isle is expected to load at Two Harbors on Jan. 12, which may well be that port's last cargo of the season.

Reported by: Al Miller




Armco visits Escanaba for Ore

01/08:
Oglebay Norton's, ARMCO, made a rare visit to Escanaba's ore dock on New Year's Day and loaded taconite for Indiana Harbor. Her normal visits to Escanaba are only to deliver coal. Fleetmates, RESERVE and COURTNEY BURTON, have also loaded in Escanaba this season. Loadings are scheduled in Escanaba well into January.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




New Stone Record

01/08:
Shipments of limestone and gypsum on the Great Lakes totaled 39,017,818 net tons in 1997 — a new post-recession record for the trade. The previous peak, 35.1 million tons, was set in 1996.

1997’s benchmark total also represents the fourth consecutive year in which the Lakes’ stone trade has established a modern-day record.

Shipments from U.S. stone docks totaled 33.7 million tons — an increase of nearly 10 percent over 1996. Stone loadings at Canadian Great Lakes ports topped 5.3 million tons, an increase of 20 percent.

The all-time high for stone shipments on the Lakes is 43.1 million tons in 1974, but that level was achieved at a time when the American steel industry had an annual capacity of approximately 160 million tons. Fluxstone, a grade of limestone, is used as a purifying agent in the steelmaking process. During the recession of the early- and mid-1980s, the American steel industry closed nearly 40 million tons of capacity, so there was a corresponding reduction in demand for stone cargos on the Lakes. Stone cargos have rebounded with the regeneration of the American steel industry in the 1990s, but then further benefited from strong demand from the construction industry in the Great Lakes basin.

"When one considers the massive restructuring that took place in the Great Lakes region, it is truly quite an accomplishment for Great Lakes shipping to come within striking distance of ‘the good old days,’" said George J. Ryan, President of Lake Carriers’ Association. "The rebirth of the Great Lakes stone trade is proof positive that a region once characterized as the rust belt again rules as the industrial heartland of America."

There are eight U.S. stone ports on the Great Lakes. Michigan is the stone capital, hosting seven of these ports: Calcite, Stoneport, Cedarville, Port Inland, Drummond Island, Port Gypsum, and Alabaster. Marblehead, the eighth U.S. stone port, is located in Ohio. The four Canadian stone-shipping ports are Meldrum Bay, Port Colborne, Thessalon, and Bruce Mines, all in Ontario.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers' Association




Twin Ports lay ups

01/07:
Duluth and Superior are now scheduled to host at least 13 ships this winter. H. Lee White and John G. Munson arrived in port Jan. 6 to lay up. They'll be joined Jan. 7 or 8 by Roger Blough.

Vessel due in Jan. 10 includes Edwin H. Gott and Edgar B. Speer, going to the Duluth port terminal; Walter J. McCarthy Jr. going to Midwest Energy terminal; and Middletown, likely going to Fraser Shipyards.

Due in Jan. 11 are Charles M. Beeghly and Elton Hoyt II, followed by Herbert C. Jackson on Jan. 12. These vessels generally winter in Fraser Shipyards. Finally, Paul R. Tregurtha is due into port Jan. 13, likely going to the port terminal. Already in port for layup are George A. Sloan and John J. Boland, both at Fraser.

Reported by: Al Miller




On thin ice

01/07:
The unseasonably thin ice in Duluth harbor has prompted two rescues in recent days. Last week the crew of St. Clair spotted a man go through the ice as he was crossing Superior Bay. The Coast Guard Cutter Sundew rescued the man, although a small boat and rescue swimmers had to be used to actually pull the man off the ice flow on which he was trapped. The victim said he was "walking to Texas" when he went through the ice.

On Jan. 5, the Sundew rescued two people who were stuck in the ice in a 16-foot boat. The pair were trying to retrieve a foundering ice boat when they ran into trouble.

Reported by: Al Miller




Algoma Central Corporation agrees to purchase four tankers

01/06:
(St. Catharines, Ont.) Jan. 5, 1998 - Algoma Central Corporation, and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Algoma Tankers Limited, announced today that Algoma Tankers Limited has agreed to purchase four petroleum-product vessels from Imperial Oil Limited for $13 million. Algoma Tankers Limited will acquire the following ships: M.V. Imperial Acadia, M.V. Imperial Bedford, M.V. Imperial St. Clair, and M.V. Imperial St. Lawrence. Algoma will rename the ships as follows: M.V. Algoscotia, M.V. Algofax, M.V. Algosar, and M.V. Algoeast, espectively. Algoma Tankers Limited and Imperial Oil also announced today that they have entered into a long-term contract for the marine transportation of Imperial Oil liquid petroleum products. Under this agreement, Algoma Tankers Limited will manage transportation of Imperial Oil products on the Great Lakes, the St. Lawrence Seaway, and the coastal waters of eastern Canada and the eastern United States. Both Algoma Central Corporation and Imperial Oil are confident that these two transactions, bringing together Canada's largest inland fleet and Canada's largest petroleum producer and distributor, will be mutually beneficial and maintain customer tanker services.

"This acquisition is part of our long-term plan for growth and diversification," said Algoma President and CEO Peter Cresswell. "We look forward to a long and productive relationship with Imperial Oil," added Cresswell.

No jobs will be eliminated under the new arrangement. The approximately 90 Imperial Oil employees who work on or support these vessels will be offered employment by Algoma Tankers Limited.

Established in 1899, and with offices in St. Catharines and Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., Algoma Central Corporation

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Samuel Risley aids in Rescue

01/06:
The Canadian Coast Guard vessel SAMUEL RISLEY rescued two stranded fisherman over the weekend. The boats motor has stopped working and the small boat drifted to Pie Island. The fisherman waited a few hours before being rescued, there were no reports of injuries.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Frebec enters lay-up

01/06:
The Ferbec Layed up at shed 4 on January 1 1998. She had finished running record cargo to Quebec Iron and Titaninum. The Ferbec services the run from Havre Ste Pierre Quebec to Sorel Quebec carrying Illminite ore. This year she totaled 44 trips - 2,043,000 M/T.

Reported by: Stephen Zawacki




Atlantic Erie to head through Panama Canal

01/06:
Canada Steamship Lines' Atlantic Erie has been fitted to proceed thru the Panama Canal to serve on the West coast for a short period. After which she will drydock in Veracrus Mexico.

Reported by: Stephen Zawacki




Ansary sentenced

01/06:
Hassan Ansary, the former vice president of the Canadian government agency that has authority over the country's ports, has been sentenced to nine months in prison after he pleaded guilty to fraud and theft.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





News from the Twin Ports

01/05:
The season is winding down in Duluth well before the closing of the Soo Locks.

Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived at Midwest Energy Terminal Jan. 4 to begin loading that dock's last cargo of the season. The McCarthy is due back Jan. 11 to layup at the coal dock. The DMIR ore dock is still going, with Reserve and Adam E. Cornelius due in Jan. 5 and possibly Columbia Star Jan. 6 Vessels due to layup in the Twin Ports in the coming week include H. Lee White at Hallett 6; John G. Munson at Fraser Shipyards; Indiana Harbor at the port terminal; Roger Blough at the port terminal; and Walter J. McCarthy Jr. at Midwest Energy Terminal next week. Algomarine Apparently is going to take one more load than expected from Silver Bay. The boat is scheduled to load at there Jan. 6.

Reported by: Al Miller




Seaway Cargo totals

01/05:
The Seaway inaugurated its navigation season on April 2 and remained open for 269 days. Estimated combined cargo passing through the Welland Canal and the Montreal/Lake Ontario sections of the system was approximately 47,600,000 metric tonnes, 2,300,000 tonnes less than in 1996.

This year's best performing commodity was Canadian grain (reaching 9,163,000 tonnes), up by 38% over 1996. Iron ore, coal and other bulk cargo have maintained the levels of the last three years. General cargo including slabs and other steel products was down by 14% mostly due to the decrease in demand for imported steel slabs. U.S. grain movements declined by an estimated 24% due to depleted stocks at the beginning of the navigation season.

Estimated cargo traffic was 39,980,000 tonnes on the Welland Canal and 36,330,000 tonnes on the Montreal/Lake Ontario section of the system.

The number of vessels that passed through the system's locks in 1997 was 4,042 compared to 3,953 in 1996. Vessels transitting the system were, on average, carrying less cargo.

Reported by: the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority




More on the Jean Parisien

01/05:
Details are now available on the Jean Parisien losing her rudder. Originally reported on 12/12, the Jean Parisien was in the St. Lawrence River, below Escoumins pilot station heading east-bound for Sept Iles to unload a load of coal when the Kort nozzles' rudder stock broke, dropping the nozzle right onto the screw. Of course this completely destroyed the nozzle and caused serious damage to the blades of the prop.

Although she had no steering capabilities, she continued to her destination with the aid of tugs, and unloaded her cargo. Taking her back up river was tricky and required the use of six pilots - two on the bridge and two on each of the two tugs. It would of only been three but Quebec Pilotage requires two pilots per vessel in the winter.

This explains why she laid-up in Quebec instead of Erie, PA. No word on who will take her spot there.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




01/05:
New updates on the 4th Annual Winter Lay-up page





Today in Great Lakes History - January 05

The keel was laid January 5, 1972 for the ALGOWAY (2).

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes History




Great Lakes Fleet news

01/04:
Arthur M. Anderson was scheduled to lay up Jan. 3 after unloading its final cargo of the season in Conneaut. John G. Munson is due to lay up in Superior on Jan. 6

Middletown paid a rare call to Duluth on Jan. 1-2 to load at DMIR. St. Clair was scheduled to load at Superior's BN ore dock. Instead, it spent Jan. 1-2 tied up at the Duluth port terminal. Several trucks from Fraser Shipyards were parked near the gangway, making it appear the vessel is undergoing repairs.

The Oglebay Norton fleet plans to continue its parade of ships to the DMIR ore dock in Duluth. Wolverine, Buckeye and Courtney Burton are due there Jan. 3, Reserve is due Jan. 4 and Armco and Columbia Star are scheduled for Jan. 5.

More updates on the 4th Annual Winter Lay-up page


Reported by: Al Miller




Archie Hodge dies at 82

01/04:
Archie Hodge died of pneumonia on 29 Dec. at Dundas, Ontario. He was 82. He was born in London and served as an officer in the British Royal Navy, the Canadian Royal Navy and the Canadian Coast Guard before serving more than 20 years as a master on the North American Great Lakes. He later joined with Dan A. Nelson, a dentist from St. Catharines, Ontario, to search for shipwrecks using the Coast Guard's former 347-ton research vessel Porte Dauphine.

After researching British Admiralty records for the War of 1812, a search was started in an 83-square-kilometer/33-square-mile area of Lake Ontario for two ships lost in the war, the Hamilton and the Scourge. Hodge was the master of the Porte Dauphine. As the weather worsened 13 Oct., 1973, the vessel sailed for Hamilton, Ontario, and as it did so, used its sonar a final time. In the process, Hodge and Nelson found the two nearly intact ships, 10 kilometers/six miles off Port Dalhousie, Ontario.

On 8 Aug., 1813, the two schooners were with 11 other ships of Commodore Isaac Chauncey's American Squadron, waiting for light to attack British Royal Navy Commodore James Lucas Yeo's British-Canadian Squadron of six ships. Hamilton was formerly the Diana, a commercial schooner built in 1809 and homeported at Oswego, N.Y., where it was built. The Scourge was formerly the Lord Nelson, built in 1811 at Niagara, Upper Canada. About 0600, a sudden squal capsized the Hamilton and the Scourge, killing 53 people and sinking the vessels in 90 meters/300 feet of water. There were 13 survivors in the largest loss of life on the Great Lakes during the war.

The two ships are said to be the most complete and undisturbed shipwrecks from that time period anywhere in the world and Hodge was later named a fellow of the Royal Geographic Society of Great Britain for his contributions to their discovery. The story of the loss and discovery of the Hamilton and Scourge are recounted in "Ghost Ships, Hamilton & Scourge: Historical Treasures from the War of 1812" (Windsor, England: Fountain Press Ltd., 1984) by Emily Cain.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Algoway in Port Stanley

01/02:
On Saturday December 27 at 21:00 hours the self unloader Algoway delivered shy of 8,000 tonnes of potash for the Lakes Terminals & Warehousing. It was unloading into the middle dome West side of the harbour. It was with record time the she finished unloading and headed out at 24:00 hours.

Reported by: Richard Hill




01/02:
New updates on the 4th Annual Winter Lay-up page





News on the Pathfinder

01/01:
Reports are that the new tug/barge Pathfinder will make many runs into Manistee next year for the Seng Dock. Seng's also reports that they wish to make Manistee the newly deconstructed City Of Midland barge's home port.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




American Mariner ready to end season

01/01:
According to a radio conversation yesterday 12/31 the AMERICAN MARINER has one more trip to Marquette. She then will call it a season

Reported by: Andrew Severson




More U.S. boats head to the barn

01/01:
Many of the US flag boats are finally starting to lay up.

Arthur M. Anderson is due Sturgeon Bay January 3rd. for lay-up
Phillip R. Clarke is due Sturgeon Bay January 2nd for lay-up
Cason J. Callaway is due Sturgeon Bay January 1st. for lay-up
John G. Munson is due Superior January 5th for lay-up
Earl W. Oglebay is due Cleveland Ontario Stone #4 dock January 1st. for lay-up
David Z. Norton is due Cleveland Ontario Stone #4 dock January 1sr. for lay-up

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Northshore Mining ends season

01/01:
Northshore Mining Co. ended its shipping season Dec. 31 when Algomarine became the last vessel of the year to load at Silver Bay, Minn.

More updates on the 4th Annual Winter Lay-up page


Reported by: Al Miller




Appointments at Quebec Port

01/01:
Canadian Transport Minister David Collenette said 30 Dec. that Michel Berube of Charlesbourg, Quebec, has been appointed as chairman and Jean-Paul Morency of Quebec has been reappointed as vice chairman of the board of directors of Quebec Port Corp. Anne Carrier of Quebec and Clement Gaudreau of Montmagny, Quebec, were also named as members of the board.

Berube, an engineer, has served as vice president of corporate affairs and director of Ciment Quebec Inc. since 1993. He was first appointed to the Quebec Port as a part-time director in January.

Morency served as vice chairman of Quebec's executive committee between 1980 and 1989 and as president of Quincaillerie Morency Inc. from 1956 to 1986. He was first appointed to Quebec Port in April 1994.

Carrier began her architecture career in 1978 and in 1992 formed her own business, which has won several awards. The firm works on structure designs throughout the province of Quebec.

Gaudreau retired from the Canadian Militia in 1994 after 40 years of service. He has worked at the Port of Montmagny since then, was an alderman for La Ville de Montmagny between 1988 and 1994 and was also a supervisor for the Quebec Ministry of Transportation between 1955 and 1987.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - January 01

On January 1, 1973, the Paul H. Carnahan became the last vessel of the 1972 shipping season to load at the Burlington Northern (now Burlington Northern Santa Fe) ore docks in Superior. Interestingly, the Carnahan also opened the Superior docks for the season in the spring of 1972.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes History





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