Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News ARCHIVE

* Report News


Today in Great Lakes History - January 30

ELMDALE was launched January 30, 1909

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Algonova on the Move

01/29:
The Algonova has made two recent trips up the river to Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario with petroleum products from Sarnia. The most recent trip was on the 27th, when the vessel was assisted by the U.S. Coast Guard's Katmai Bay near Pipe Island, Mich., in the lower St. Marys River.

Reported by: Mike Cleary and Steve Schultz




Last through the Soo Locks Update

01/29:
The last vessel of the season to transit the Soo Locks, US Steel's Edgar B. Speer, actually ended up locking through on Friday, January 15. After entering the St. Mary's River at DeTour early Thursday morning the Speer took until early Friday morning to get through the locks.

The vessel then experienced engine problems and sat on the upper pier until daylight. She was then assisted by the Katmai Bay and Biscayne Bay up the river to Gros Cap.

Reported by: Mike Cleary




Gillham to Speak

01/29:
Historian and Author Skip Gillham will make a presentation on Great Lakes Shipping tomorrow, Saturday, January 30th at 3:00 pm at the Chapters Bookstore Fairvew Mall St. Catharines, ON. Presentation is free. (Fairview mall is just off the Queen Eliz. Highway)




Wisconsin Maritime Museum has new director

01/29:
The board of trustees of the Wisconsin Maritime Museum is pleased to announce the promotion of Dr. Jay C. Martin to the Directorship of the Museum. Dr. Martin joined the Museum staff as curator in January 1997. Since then he has spearheaded the restoration of the USS COBIA, a World War II submarine and National Historic Landmark; has developed the Museum’s current special exhibit, Wisconsin Shipbuilders: 150 Years; has initiated the overnight program aboard the USS COBIA; and serves as editor of the Museum‘s quarterly journal Anchor News.

"I came to Manitowoc to be part of the best maritime museum in the Great Lakes region, stated Martin. "The Wisconsin Maritime Museum’s board of trustees, staff, members, and volunteers already are developing new programs, activities, and facilities that will rank the Museum as the best of its type in North America."

During Dr. Martin s 16 year career, he worked as a Great Lakes mariner, served in several maritime museums and archives, and participated in many in many underwater archaeological projects. Dr. Martin is also a member of the International Ship Masters Association.

In 1995 he earned a Ph.D. in History with an emphasis on Great Lakes History and Culture from Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio. Dr. Martin, a native of Jonesville Michigan, received his masters degree in American Studies from Bowling Green State University and his bachelors degree in Public History from Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan. Dr. Martin previous position as curator consisted of responsibilities that many times took place behind the scenes. Martin says it is important for him as director to be aware of the needs of the community and ways the Museum is able to assist and continue to educate people about the area’s rich maritime heritage.

"The board of trustees is anxious to work with Dr. Martin to grow the Museum to its great expectation," stated Harry Philippsen, board president.

"The Museum has many exciting and innovative projects planned for 1999 and we look forward to the participation of the community," said Martin.

The board of trustees of the Wisconsin Maritime Museum wishes Isacco Valli, previous museum director, success in his future endeavors.

The Wisconsin Maritime Museum is Wisconsin’s largest private nonprofit professional museum dedicated to preserving the rich maritime heritage of Wisconsin and the Great Lakes.

For more information contact: Lisa Hurley (920) 684-0218




Today in Great Lakes History - January 29

BUCKEYE (2) Lake Crane Ship was launched January 29, 1910 as the straight decker a) LEONARD B. MILLER

BENSON FORD (2) was launched January 29, 1953 as a) RICHARD M. MARSHALL

JOHN P. REISS was launched January 29, 1910

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




It was a Very Good Year for Escanaba

01/28:
The l998-99 season ended this past Sunday with a total of 259 vessels loaded compared to 193 vessels during the 1997-98 season.

As luck would have it the MV Joseph L. Block opened the season on March 13, and also closed the season on Sunday, January 24. Mr. Jamie Rogers, Wisconsin Central Division Manager cited overall operation at the ore dock and more consumption as a whole, as two factors for the big increase in business.

Ore shipped was about 7.1 million tons, compared to 5.5 million tons last season. Rogers stated a big boast to business was provided this summer when Wisconsin Central signed a 20 year contrtact to form a partnership with Inland Steel.

Six companies currently ship through Escanaba, with Inland Steel being their top customer.

Reported by: Jim Grill




Ice breaking Update

01/28:
Operation Taconite:
On 26 Jan., the lead vessel of the U.S. Coast Guard's U.S.C.G.C. Katmai Bay (WTGB 101)-class Icebreaking Seagoing Tug assisted the J.A.W. Iglehart near Michigan's Mackinac Bridge.

Operation Coal Shovel:
The Katmai Bay-class U.S.C.G.C. Neah Bay (WTGB 105) assisted the tug Evans B. McKeil with the tug James A. Hannah on 26 Jan. from the Monroe Harbor to the Detroit River Light, where the Canadian Coast Guard's lead vessel of the Samuel Risley-class Navigational Aids Tender took over.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Modification to Hold

01/27:
The barge Pathfinder is under going work on her cargo hold while at lay up in Menominee, MI at K&K Warehousing.

Work consists of installing tapered hoppers in the hold. Last season the hold was unloaded by gravity, with the cargo falling onto the unloading belt. The cargo would reach a low point in the hold and front-end and side-loaders would be used to lift the remaining cargo onto the belt. This process proved to be inefficient.

The new internal hoppers reduce the cargo volume but speed unloading time, with all cargo unloading by gravity. A local company, Weldall, is completing the installation.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




New Look For Presque Isle

01/27:
USSGLF's Presque Isle appears to be getting a new paint job at her lay-up berth in Duluth. She could soon look like all her other fleetmates when completed.

Although now owned by USS, she still does not wear the company colors. This could change by this season's opener.

Reported by: David French




Fitzgerald Program

01/27:
This Thursday (in the U.S.)at 9:00 p.m. the Discovery Channel will be featuring "Shipwreck the Mystery of the Edmund Fitzgerald." The running time is one hour and repeats again at Midnight.

Also in the video is a feature on the ceremony after the original bell of the Edmund Fitzgerald was raised.

Another special feature in the film is a rare look at Captain Jesse (Bernie) Cooper who was the Captain of the Arthur M. Anderson the ship that had the final radio contact with the Fitzgerald minutes before her fateful end on Lake Superior. Captain Cooper passed away from Cancer in the Spring of 1993 from his home in Florida.

Reported by: Denny Dushane




Escanaba Closes

01/26:
With the departure of the M/V Joseph L. Block, the l998/l999 ore shipping season has ended for Escanaba. The M/V Adam E. Cornelius has laid up for the winter, as will the MV Joesph L. Block upon completion of this trip.

The port could open the l999/2000 ore shipping season around March l8th, and it is very possible the Block will be that vessel.

Till then, make our reps in Washington, DC, aware of the fact that we OPPOSE unjust dumping of foreign steel. There is an old saying that goes like this: "SO GOES STEEL - SO GOES THE NATION"!
Think about this awhile.

Reported by: Jim Grill




Activity around Montreal

01/26:
In the Port of Montreal yesterday morning were only three salties, this slower traffic is normal in the winter. Two of the vessels are Seaway visitors, Stolt Aspiration and Broompark. In Sorel yesterday morning were two salties, the IOLCOS GARNET loading grain and NATASHA III loading steel products.

To take photos of Natasha III, I had to go aboard Enerchem Refiner wintering there. There is no external signs yet she has been sold to Algoma. Of course, the sale is still very recent.

The Groupe Ocean which was to take delivery of the new tug OCEAN JUPITER in December for service in Montreal sold her instead to Eastern Canada Towing of Halifax who renamed her POINT VALIANT (ii). Another tug of the same type, known as Z Drive, is being built by Industries Ocean at the Ile aux Coudres shipyard. The construction of two others is planned later on this years.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Ice breaking Update

01/26:
Operation Taconite:
On 24 Jan., the lead vessel of the U.S. Coast Guard's U.S.C.G.C. Katmai Bay (WTGB 101)-class Icebreaking Seagoing Tug conducted track maintenance in the St. Marys River in Michigan and assisted the Algonova. The Katmai Bay-class U.S.C.G.C. Biscayne Bay (WTGB 104) also did track maintenance and assisted the tug Michigan westbound through the Straits of Mackinac.

Operation Oil Can:
The Katmai Bay-class U.S.C.G.C. Mobile Bay (WTGB 103) assisted the Joseph L. Block on 23 Jan. near Portage Point, Wis., and on 24 Jan., assisted the Joseph L. Block again when outbound from Escanaba, Mich.

Operation Coal Shovel:
The Katmai Bay-class U.S.C.G.C. Neah Bay (WTGB 105) conducted flood relief operations in western Lake Erie on 23 Jan. as well as track maintenance in the lower Detroit River. On 24 Jan., the vessel assisted the tugs Barbara Andrie, Karen Andrie and Mary E. Hannah eastbound to Cleveland, then escorted the tugs Evans B. McKiel and James A. Hannah into Monroe, Mich. Also on 24 Jan., the Canadian Coast Guard's lead vessel of the Samuel Risley-class Navigational Aids Tender did flood relief operations and track maintenance in the Detroit and St. Clair rivers. It also worked with the Evans B. McKiel downbound in the lower Detroit River until the U.S.C.G.C. Neah Bay took over.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




A Breakwall or a Fishing Pier

01/26:
The controversy between the local fishermen and the Washington Island Ferry Line continues. An administrative judge has ruled that the ferry line must pay for fishing platforms on the surface of any new groins (breakwall) which are constructed.

The Ferry Line has resisted this proposal since it contends it will contribute considerable to the cost of the groin construction. The additional breakwall work is needed at the Ferry Lines Northport facility to alleviate the need for dredging to keep its mainland docking facility at a proper depth. Local fishermen have received backing from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for their demands to be permitted to use the facility for fishing.

The Ferry Line has asked that the matter be appealed for administrative review within the DNR.

Reported by: Lewis D. Clarke




Lakes Coal Trade Reaches Highest Level In 14 Years

01/26:
Shipments of coal on the Great Lakes topped 41.6 million net tons during the 1998 navigation season, the highest total since 1984. (The 1984 coal float, 43.1 milion tons, was somewhat the result of stockpiling in anticipation of a strike at the nation's coal mines.) The 1998 coal tally also represents an increase of 2.7 percent over 1997.

Visit the Lake Carriers' Association Home page for complete details




Iglehart Continues

01/25:
The J.A.W. Iglehart made a Sunday morning visit to the Lafarge cement dock in Muskegon. It seemed to have no trouble with the ice in Muskegon Lake. The Andrie tug, Mari Beth Andrie, had the ice around the dock broken up. The tug stood by while the ship entered the slip.

Reported by: Don Geske




ISMA Convention Starts Thursday

01/25:
The Annual meeting of ship's officers concerned with the safe navigation of vessels on the Great Lakes will be held January 27th through January 30 in Traverse City. This meeting for members offers delgates from each of the 15 member lodges meet to discuss issues of concern to the safe navigation of comercial shipping on the Great Lakes. Speakers address issues of concern to professional mariners during seminars, luncheons, dinners, a grand ball, and concluding the three day event with a dinner party saturday night. If you are involved in the Great Lakes Maritime Industry and would like more information please contact: Dean Hobbs




Great Lakes Maritime Academy Announces Open Houses

01/25:
In a continuing effort to attract new cadets, The Great Lakes Maritime Academy of Traverse City, Michigan has announced the following dates and locations of open houses it will be hosting. Anyone interested in learning more about how a career in the marine transportation field could be right for you is invited to attend one of the following no-cost seminars.

TOLEDO Monday, January 25, 6-9pm at the AMO Building, One Maritime Plaza, Downtown
GREEN BAY Tuesday, February 2, 6-9pm Days Inn Downtown City Centre
MILWAUKEE Thursday, February 4, 6-9pm Best Western Inn, 251 N. Mayfair Rd.
CHICAGO Saturday, February 6, 10am-2pm Budgetel Inn, 1625 Milwaukee Ave., Glenview, Illinois
Call the Academy at 1 800 748 0566, extension 1200, for more information.




Port of Milwaukee presentation

01/25:
Kenneth Szallai, the director of the Port of Milwaukee, will present "Milwaukee Harbor: Gateway to Our City's History" from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. on 27 Jan. at the port's building, 2323 S. Lincoln Memorial Drive. The program, sponsored by the Friends of the Milwaukee County Historical Society, will cost $5 for members and $7 for nonmembers. Seating is limited to 35.

Szallai will speak about Milwaukee's competition with Chicago for maritime trade, his vision of the Port of Milwaukee's future and the port building itself, among other topics.
For information, call 414-273-8288.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Buckeye in Toledo

01/24:
While at lay-up in the Toledo Shipyard, the BUCKEYE will be receiving her five year inspection. The vessel is currently in drydock with her shaft pulled for an unspecified repair, although most likely it was due to ice damage.

Reported by: John A. Harris




Lakes Stone Again Reaches New Plateau

01/23:
Even preliminary totals for the Great Lakes stone trade confirm that the 1998 season again represents a new modern-day record. U.S. and Canadian stone ports shipped 41 million net tons during the 1998 season, an increase of 4.8 percent over 1997 and the fifth consecutive year in which the stone trade has reached a new post-recession high. The all-time record for stone shipments dates back to 1974 when the "float" totaled 43.1 million tons.

While fluxstone for the steel industry (used as a purifying agent) is a major market for Lakes stone quarries, a booming construction industry in the region also contributed significantly to the new record.

For the first time in many, many years, the stone total includes overseas exports from a U.S. quarry. Global Stone Port Inland, Inc., (a unit of LCA-member Oglebay Norton Company) shipped 5 boatloads to Venezuela (roughly 125,000 tons).

Visit the Lake Carriers' Association Home page for complete details




Icebreaking update

01/23:
Operation Taconite:
On 21 Jan., the U.S. Coast Guard's Katmai Bay-class Icebreaking Seagoing Tug U.S.C.G.C. Biscayne Bay (WTGB 104) assisted the J.A.W. Iglegart westbound through the Straits of Mackinac while the U.S.C.G.C. Katmai Bay (WTGB 101) did track maintenance in the St. Marys River.

Operation Coal Shovel:
The Katmai Bay-class U.S.C.G.C. Neah Bay (WTGB 105) assisted the integrated tug/barge Jacklyn M./Integrity and the tugs Barbara Andrie, Karen Andrie and Mary E. Hannah in western Lake Erie and the Detroit River on 21 Jan. The Canadian Coast Guard's lead vessel of the C.C.G.S. Samuel Risley-class Navigational Aids Tender assisted the tug Jacklin D. from Toledo, Ohio, to Lake Huron and conducted a flushing operation for flood relief.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Dennis Hale to Speak Tonight

01/23:
Dennis Hale, sole survivor of the 1966 sinking of the steamer Daniel J. Morrell, will be the featured speaker at the Lake Superior Marine Museum Association's annual dinner meeting Jan. 23 in Superior, Wis.

Hale is scheduled to speak at 7:30 p.m. The event will be held at the Barkers Island Inn Conference Center. Admission is $10 at the door. For advance tickets, call (218) 727-2497. (The access road to Barkers Island is located at the intersection of U.S. Highway 2 and Belknap Street in Superior).

Visit the Duluth Shipping News for complete details.





Acacia Released from Search

01/22:
The U.S. Coast Guard's Balsam-class Seagoing Buoy Tender U.S.C.G.C. Acacia (WLB 406) has been released from further searching and is returning to its homeport of Charlevoix, Mich. Two Coast Guard investigators remain assigned to search for the Linda E, one at Coast Guard Group/Station Milwaukee and one at Coast Guard Station Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

While searching for the missing fishing vessel Linda E in Lake Michigan on 20 Jan., the U.S.C.G.C. Acacia discovered a previously uncharted wooden shipwreck. A remotely operated vehicle came upon the wreck, believed to be the remains of a 19th century sailing ship, in 90 feet/300 feet of water southeast of Port Washington, Wis. Video images displayed a section of hull and part of a mast.

Also, the Wisconsin Commercial Fisheries Association has established a fund for the children of Scott Matta, 32, one of the three missing, and hopes to raise enough money to assist funds for families of anyone who has died or gone missing on the North American Great Lakes. Donations to the Survivors Fund can be sent to any Baylake Bank or M&I Bank, or to 1597 Birch Road, Baileys Harbor, Wis., 54202.

Matta has two daughters, Meagan, 7, and Shellby, 3. The other two crewmembers missing since 11 Dec. are master Leif Weborg, 61, and Warren Olson, 44.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Port of Quebec figures

01/22:
The Port of Quebec handled just over 15 million metric tons of cargo last year, roughly equal to 1997. The figure was achieved despite a drop of more than 500,000 tons of grain exports from the previous year. General cargo through November was down 50,897 tons from 222,171 tons in 1997 and other dry bulk cargo totaled 418,459 tons.

The port has also announced it will spend Canadian $17 million this spring in restoring three wharves for cargo operations.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




More on the Townsend

01/22:
The Paul H Townsend is still at the dock in Alpena with no etd due to ice damage occured in the Straits of Mackinac.

The ILM vessels are running an unusually late season this year, prompted by a demand for concrete production. Running this late in the season, with heavy ice will normally cause some type of hull plating damage.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Icebreaking update

01/22:
Operation Coal Shovel:
The U.S. Coast Guard's Katmai Bay-class Seagoing Icegoing Tug U.S.C.G.C. Neah Bay (WTGB 105) assisted three tugs into Toledo, Ohio, on 20 Jan.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Ice Breaking in Buffalo

01/22:
The Buffalo fireboat Edward M. Cotter went on another ice breaking mission on the Buffalo River at 10 AM on the 21st. She moved slowly as she spent time breaking out the turning basins on the trip up. The Cotter made it as far as ConRail's "River Bridge" when the lack of a bridge tender forced her to turn around and head back to the dock around 12 Noon. She made the trip down river in less than 10 minutes as she was cruising at quite a fast pace through the open ice.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Dominion Bridge gets extension

01/22:
Dominion Bridge Corp. and its subsidiaries (Cedar Group of Canada and Davie Industries Inc.) have been granted an extension until 10 Feb. to file their proposal to creditors under notice of intention filed 11 Aug. under Canada's Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




U.S. Coast Guard to form fishing vessel task force

01/22:
The U.S. Coast Guard announced 21 Jan. that it will establish a Fishing Vessel Casualty Task Force. The task force will include fishing vessel experts from the Coast Guard, other federal agencies and members of the commercial fishing industry. For its report, due in March, the task force will seek to determine common factors in recent casualties and examine issues of crew qualifications, training and safety equipment performance.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




New Build for Lakes Service

01/21:
The Great Lakes will see yet another self-unloading barge enter service with the recent announcement that the Halter Marine Group of Gulfport, Miss. will be building a new 740' X 78' self-unloading barge for Great Lakes Marine Leasing, with the barge to be operated by VanEnkevort Tug and Barge of Escanaba.

The new self-unloading barge will be named GREAT LAKES TRADER and is scheduled to be completed during the Spring of 2000. GREAT LAKES TRADER is expected to be mated with VanEnkevort's tug JOYCE L. VAN ENKEVORT. The JOYCE L. VAN ENKEVORT spent the 1998 season pushing the barge PATHFINDER. Interlake Transportation's new tug DORTHY ANN will take over the PATHFINDER once the tug's construction is completed later is year.

The GREAT LAKES TRADER will be constructed in two halves at Halter Marine's yard in Pearlington, Miss. and then towed to the Halter's Gulf Marine yard in New Orleans to be joined together and outfitted. The completed barge will come to the Great Lakes thru the Seaway system.

Reported by: Terry Sechen




Wreck on Bottom of Lake Michigan not the Linda E.

01/21:
The Coast Guard has announced that the much speculated target off Port Washington in Lake Michigan is not the wreck of the Linda E.

Crews have been searching on and off for the 42-foot fishing vessel since the vessel and her three man crew went missing on December 11th.

In late December searchers using sonar equipment had picked up an image about 300 feet below the surface that was thought to be the wreckage of a fishing boat. This turned out to be a virgin wreck, Great Lakes shipwreck researcher Brendon Baillod reports that the lake bottom is littered with over 50 wrecks in the area that remain to be discovered.




Cement and Ice Damage

01/21:
The J.A.W. Iglehart and Paul H. Townsend are tied up in Alpena with the silos empty. The Townsend is reported to have damage that is preventing her departure and it may be serious enough that she will need to enter a shipyard for repair work.

The J.A.W. Iglehart is there to load, arriving after the six days she spent in the Toledo Shipyard undergoing repairs to ice damage.




Icebreaking update

01/21:
Operation Coal Shovel:
The U.S. Coast Guard's Katmai Bay-class Seagoing Icegoing Tug U.S.C.G.C. Bristol Bay (WTGB 102) assisted the J.A.W. Iglehart from Toledo, Ohio, to Lake St. Clair on 19 Jan.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Lay-up List Updated


Click here to view the latest updates to the lay-up list





Today in Great Lakes History - January 21

On this day on 1959 the Michael K. Tewksbury, followed by the McGilvary Shiras destroyed the Michigan Ave. Lift Bridge on the Buffalo River. It all started that night around 6PM. Ice had been building in the upper Buffalo River for the past few weeks. A quick thaw and re-freeze caused ice jams to let loose on the evening of the disaster. The Shiras was moored at the Concrete Central Grain Elvevator with about 170 feet of her bow sticking out into the channel above the dock. As the ice flows pushed on the bow section the bollards began to up root from the dock allowing her to break loose around 11:00 PM. She drifted alone all the way down river until she hit the Tewksbury at the Standard Elevator about 20 minutes later. The two ships , with the Tewksbury in the lead, sailed un-aided through the 90 degree bend at the Ohio St. Bridge and continued down the channel until striking the Michigan Ave. Bridge dead center on the draw span. The East tower fell down and took out the building next door. The draw fell in the water and trapped the two ships. The West tower fell down a few days later and added to the wreckage in the water. This accident caused millions in damages, took years to fight in court, and cut Michigan St. in half until the new bridge was built some years later.

Data from: Brian Wroblewski




Escanaba winding down

01/20:
The Steamer Wilfred Sykes has gone into winter layup. The M/V Adam E. Cornelius was loading yesterday. Upon completion of her delivery of ore pellets to the steel mills, she will go into winter layup. Today will see the M/V Joseph L. Block loading and then returning on Sunday, January 24th for another load. The Block will probably go into winter layup after this trip to the steel mills.

Reported by: Jim Grill




Iglehart Sails

01/20:
The J.A.W. Iglehart departed the Toledo Shipyard sometime yesterday. The vessel entered the yard on the 13th to undergo unknown repairs to damage caused by ice.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak and Rick Logan




Meeting to be held on securing cargo

01/20:
The U.S. Coast Guard will hold a public meeting on 3 Feb. to discuss new standards for securing general cargo on vessels. The meeting, from 1200 to 1600, will be at the U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters Transpoint Building, Room 2415, 2100 Second St. SW, Washington, D.C., 20593-0001. The telephone number for information is 202-267-1181.

Persons that wish to submit comments should include their names and addresses, identify the notice (USCG 1998-4951) and give the reason for each comment. Comments for discussion are due 29 Jan. and the rest by 28 Feb. Send comments to Docket Management Facility (USCG-1998-4951), U.S. Department of Transportation, Room PL-401, 400 Seventh St. SW, Washington, D.C., 20590-0001. The telephone number is 202-366-9329.

For other questions, contact Bob Gauvin, project manager, Vessel and Facility Operating Standards Division (G-MSO-2), at 202-267-1053.

Reported by: : Steve Schultz




Wisconsin museum gets award

01/20:
Wisconsin's State Historical Society has awarded a Local History Certificate of Commendation to the Wisconsin Maritime Museum in Manitowoc.

Reported by: : Steve Schultz




Mayday Program

01/20:
In the event readers missed the "Mayday" series presented by the TLC channel during the past week-end, there is another chance to view three (of four) segments on Saturday, January 23.

5:00 PM
Dangerous Playground: Focuses on a series of significant marine disasters in America and Europe provoking major safety re-think.
6:00 PM
The Investigators: Investigations of major ship sinkings (including the EDMUND FITZGERALD) with a focus on searching for clues as to the cause of the accidents.
7:00 PM
The Fatal Flaw: Examination how the design of a ship can have devastating consequences Plenty of computer simulations and underwater video. One of the previous segments featured the FLARE sinking and rescue of crewmembers. Notice the cruise (ship) advertisements during and after the program.

Reported by: John Meyland




Fitzgerald Pictures need your help

01/20:
I am searching for detail images of the Edmund Fitzgerald in these areas:
The aft deckhouse Roof and lifeboat area. Also, the pilothouse roof.

If you do have an image please e-mail moderator@boatnerd.net




Lay-up List Updated


Click here to view the latest updates to the lay-up list





Linda E. Update

01/19:
The U.S. Coast Guard's Balsam-class Seagoing Buoy Tender U.S.C.G.C. Acacia (WLB 406) spent more than 12 hours in Lake Michigan on 17 Jan. in an attempt to examine the lake bottom for traces of the missing fishing vessel Linda E. However, weather conditions and a three-hour power failure at Coast Guard Group/Station Milwaukee ended the day's work. Changing wind conditions made keeping the ship on station difficult. Also, the U.S.C.G.C. Acacia was using an antenna on shore as part of its global positioning system equipment and when the power failed, it shifted to an antenna at Coast Guard Station Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

The vessel arrived in Milwaukee 16 Jan. and took aboard underwater search equipment, including sonar and a remote-controlled vehicle provided by Superior Special Services Inc. in Fond du Lac, Wis. The company is also providing crew to operate the gear.

Reported by: : Steve Schultz and Lois Haglund




Lake Erie Coal Finishes Season Up By 500,000 Tons

01/19:
The last coal cargo of the 1998 season was loaded at Conneaut, Ohio, on January 15, 1999. The preliminary total for shipments from Lake Erie coal docks is 22,508,517 net tons, an increase of 500,000 tons compared to the 1997 season. A total by ports will be issued following verfication of season reports.

Visit the Lake Carriers' Association Home page for complete details




Shiny New Propeller

01/19:
The barge Pere Marquette 41 and tug Undaunted have been idle in Ludington since shortly before Christmas. Planned are a few trips in the ice, the tug currently uses a bronze propeller which can not handle working in ice.

Spotted near the marine shop where the vessel is laid-up was a new propeller that looked like it was made of stainless steel. This propeller will be used on the tug.

Reported by: Max Hanley




International Joint Commission Decides Not To Adopt Plan 1998

01/19:
The International Joint Commission (IJC) yesterday announced that it has decided not to adopt Plan 1998 for the regulation of Lake Ontario outflows at this time. After full consideration of issues raised during public comment, the IJC determined that it does not have sufficient information on the environmental impacts associated with the proposed plan and that the plan would not constitute sufficient improvement over the existing situation.

The International St. Lawrence River Board of Control (ISLRBC) will continue to manage the waters of the Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River system according to Plan 1958-D with deviations, as is presently the case.

Plan 1998 was developed by the ISLRBC following studies ending in 1993 that examined issues related to water levels fluctuations in the Great Lakes, including possible improvements to Plan 1958-D with deviations. The ISLRBC developed two alternative regulation plans and assessed their respective performances with historical water supplies and current water supplies over a three-year period. In 1997, the ISLRBC recommended that the IJC implement one of the alternatives beginning in 1998 and, therefore, named it Plan 1998. In turn, the IJC and ISLRBC held six public meetings in the fall of 1997 to give any interested parties an opportunity to gather information about and have an opportunity to be heard on Plan 1998.

The IJC will continue to pursue support and funding for the development and execution of the more comprehensive studies outlined in a "Scope of Work" prepared by the ISLRBC in 1996. The Scope of Work was developed through a public consultation process that included five public meetings. The purpose of these studies is to provide sufficient information for the Commission to determine whether or not changes are warranted to the regulation of Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River levels and flows. As a first step it will constitute a binational work group to translate the Scope of Work into a Plan of Study. To date the Governments of the United States and Canada have not made funds for the needed studies available.

The International Joint Commission was created under the Boundary Waters Treaty of 1909 to help prevent and resolve disputes over the use of waters along the Canada-United States boundary. Its responsibilities include approving certain projects that would alter water levels on the other side of the boundary, such as the international hydropower facility at Massena, New-York and Cornwall, Ontario. The Commission's Order of Approval requires that the facility meet certain conditions to protect the interests in both countries. For more information, please consult the Commission's Web site at www.ijc.org.

The IJC established the International St. Lawrence River Board of Control (ISLRBC) to ensure that outflows from Lake Ontario meet the requirements of the Commission's Orders of Approval. The Board also develops regulation plans and conducts special studies as requested by the Commission. For more information, please consult the Board Web site at www.islrbc.org.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Ranger III Delayed

01/18:
Isle Royale National Park's M/V RANGER III will spend the winter at Bay Ship Inc. of Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin following completion of her main engine replacement.

It was planned to have the repowering job completed in time for the ship to clear the Soo Locks by the end of the season but unforseen delays in parts deliveries have delayed the project.

Sea trials will take place in the spring with delivery to her home port of Houghton, Michigan as soon as weather and ice conditions allow.

Reported by: WBH




Argo Sinks

01/18:
The research ship Argo took on water and partially sank in Dunkirk, NY. Harbor on the 16th.

A Hazardous Materials team was called out to place containment booms around the vessel when it was feared that she may have been leaking fuel.

Ironically she is owned by the Department of Environmental Conservation. The DEC was to try to right the ship by pumping her out on the 17th.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Wintering Ships

01/18:
The Ferbec arrived in Montreal at Shed 25 on Saturday for Winter lay-up.

The Catherine Desgagnes arrived at Quebec City on January 13th at section 107 also for winter lay-up.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Twin Ports Report

01/17:
The Twin Ports shipping season ended January 16 when the Edgar B. Speer arrived at the Duluth port terminal for winter layup.

Reported by: Al Miller




Lay-up List Updated


Click here to view the latest updates to the lay-up list





Soo Locks end season

01/16:
The Soo Locks ended the 1998-99 shipping season when they closed at midnight January 15. The last vessels to lock through were the Edgar B. Speer upbound on the 15th and the Edwin H. Gott downbound on the 11th. Winter maintenance will be performed on the locks before they are opened for the 1999/00 shipping season on or about March 25.

Reported by: Mike Cleary




Port of Escanaba Still Active

01/16:
The Wisconsin Central Railroad/Sault Ste. Marie Bridge Company ore loading facility in Escanaba remains active, having loaded 5 vessels since January 12. The following are due this weekend: the MV Adam E. Cornelius on Saturday, the MV Joseph L. Block and Str. Wilfred Sykes are due on Sunday. The three vessels are due to return again next week.

Reported by: Jim Grill




Foreign Steel Again Batters U.S.-Flag Great Lakes Carriers

01/16:
More proof positive that illegal steel imports are stalling the decade-long revival of Great Lakes shipping came with compilation of the December U.S.-Flag float. An 800,000-plus ton drop in iron ore cargos in December lowered total U.S.-Flag carriage of dry-bulk commodities to 10.4 million net tons, a decrease of 10 percent compared to December 1997. For the season, U.S.-Flag carriage is now a mere 600,000 ahead of 1997's pace, a lead that will surely evaporate when the January totals are known.

While the December fall-off in iron ore loadings was significant, even more telling is that what once was a 2.3 million ton lead over 1997 has dwindled to 140,000 tons by the end of December. Steel demand remains high, but with illegal imports capturing more and more market share, domestic steelmakers have had no choice but to reduce production and hence iron ore shipments on the Lakes.

Given the general strength of the U.S. economy, not all cargo commodities are being negatively impacted by the deluge of dumped steel. Thanks to a booming construction industry, the U.S.-Flag stone trade totaled 31.6 million tons at the end of December, an increase of 6 percent compared to 1997. Only a few stone and gypsum cargos were loaded in January, so that total largely represents the 1998 season for U.S.-Flag lakers.

Cargill's first full year of salt shipments from Cleveland swelled the salt trade in U.S. bottoms to 1.3 million tons, an increase of 30 percent compared to 1997. Again, that trade has largely concluded for U.S.-Flag lakers.

The coal trade in U.S.-Flag vessels ended December at 21.9 million tons, a decrease of 5.7 percent compared to 1997. Again this total should basically represent the season for U.S.-Flag lakers and reflects a general reduction in shipments due to inventory adjustments at some major utilities.

Visit the Lake Carriers' Association Home page for complete details




U.S. Coast Guard icebreaking update

01/16
The lead vessel of the U.S. Coast Guard's U.S.C.G.C. Katmai Bay (WTGB 101)-class Icebreaking Seagoing Tug operated in the St. Marys River in Michigan on 14 Jan. as part of Operation Taconite and assisted the Edgar B. Speer. Due to conditions, the Edgar B. Speer moored at Poe Lock to wait for further assistance from the U.S.C.G.C. Katmai Bay, which was working to clear ice above the lock. After the Edgar B. Speer's passage, the lock was to close for the season.

Operation Coal Shovel continued with the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker U.S.C.G.C. Mackinaw (WAGB 83), the Katmai Bay-class U.S.C.G.C. Bristol Bay (WTGB 102) and the Canadian Coast Guard's Icebreaker/Navigational Aids Tender C.C.G.S. Griffon escorting tug Evans B. McKeil into Sarnia, Ontario.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Algoma Central chief challenges marine audience to take action before it's too late

01/16:
(Toronto, Ont.) - January 15, 199 - The future of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Waterway is in peril, Peter Cresswell, President and Chief Executive Officer of Algoma Central Corporation, told 1,200 shipping and marine industry executives attending the prestigious annual Marine Club Dinner, Friday night.

The President of the largest Canadian fleet on the Great Lakes challenged his marine audience including senior Transport Canada officials to immediately take the actions necessary to ensure the long-tern stability of Canada's inland water transportation system and the competitive advantage that brings to Canadian exports.

"Deregulation in both the rail and trucking industries, and U.S. subsidies favoring the Mississippi marine route, have threatened the economic viability of this transportation wonder," Cresswell said. "In turn, they have threatened the competitive advantage of those industries - particularly steel - which must rely on this marine route for their very survival and competitive position."

Cresswell emphasized that a competitive waterway is not simply a marine issue but crucial to the long-term vitality of Canada's industrial heartland.

Excessive user-fees, over-regulation and duplication were also cited by Cresswell as significant causes of the waterway's competitive frailty. According to Cresswell, regulators instead need to foster a competitive transportation environment where "rail competes with water, and water can compete with rail."

"Given its geographic location in the heartland of North America and its access to the world, and given that marine transportation is by far the safest, most environmentally-friendly mode of transportation available today, the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Waterway can and should be treated as the mainstream of North America's integrated transportation network," Cresswell said. "No policy change - regulatory or legislative - to Canada's overall transportation system should negatively affect the competitive position of the waterway, but rather should enhance it." Particularly concerned about diminishing grain shipments on the Great Lakes during the past decade, and its negative effect on employment and profitability, Cresswell also questioned the recently-released Grain Handling and Transportation Review by Justice Willard Estey, for overemphasizing rail transport of grain, and virtually discounting the waterway as an essential component of the grain transportation system.

As an example of the serious threat to the shipping industry, Cresswell cited statistics for the Port of Thunder Bay, where grain shipments have dropped to 5 million tonnes in 1998 from a high of 19 million tonnes in the 1980's.

Cresswell welcomed The Canada Marine Act (1998), which commercialized Canadian Ports and the St. Lawrence Seaway. He said it was an important first step, but only a first step if the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Waterway is to survive into the next century.

Celebrating its centennial anniversary this year, and with offices in St. Catharines and Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., Algoma Central Corporation (TSE:ALC) owns and operates the largest Canadian fleet on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River. The Algoma fleet includes 14 self-unloaders, nine bulk carriers, and, with the acquisition yesterday of the EnerChem Group, its available tanker fleet had doubled in size to 10.




Goderich Season Totals

01/16:
Goderich shipping season completed with the departure of the Algoway on December 31, 1998. A total of 215 ships arrived at Goderich last year, 176 ships loaded salt, 28 ships arrived to load and unload at the elevators, 5 shipments of liquid calcium chloride delivered by tug and barge. The passenger vessel Nantucket Clipper made 2 visits, along with 4 tall ships for the Marine Heritage Festival.

Reported by: Philip Nash




Ice Breaking in Western Lake Erie

01/16:
The CCGS Samuel Risley was in Nanticoke yesterday waiting for the Canadian Olympic to finish off-loading. The Risley was planning to escort the Olympic to Port Colborne for winter lay up later yesterday evening. From there, the Risley planned on returning up the Lake to Erie,PA. where she will assist the USCG Mackinaw in escorting the James R. Barker into Erie later this weekend. It has been a number of years since this much ice breaking machinery has been in western Lake Erie.

Reported by: Dave Otterman




Algoma Central Corporation purchases EnerChem Group

01/15:
Sault Ste. Marie, ON (Jan. 14). - Algoma Central Corporation today announced it has purchased the main operating companies and certain assets of the EnerChem Group for approximately $19.5 million. The Enerchem Group, privately owned and headquartered in Montreal, specializes in maritime transportation of petroleum products on the Great Lakes, the St. Lawrence River, and the costal waters of Canada and the U.S.

Algoma acquired all of the shares of EnerChem Transportation Inc. Which owns three Canadian registered vessels, one of which is double-hulled, as well as 25 percent of the shares of Cleveland, Ohio based Cleveland Tankers (1991) Inc., which owns and operates two tankers, both double-hulled. This transaction will compliment a transaction completed in February 1998 whereby Algoma purchased a fleet of five tankers from Imperial Oil Limited which are operated by the Corporation's Halifax based subsidiary, Algoma Tankers Limited.

"Acquiring EnerChem enhances the range of services we are able to offer our customers on the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Seaway and in Eastern Canada" said Algoma Central Corporation President and CEO Peter Cresswell.

Established in 1899, and with offices in St. Catharines and Sault Ste. Marie, ON, Algoma Central Corporation (TSE:ALC) owns and operates the largest Canadian fleet on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River. The Algoma Fleet includes 14 self-unloaders and nine bulk carriers, and, with the acquisition of EnerChem, its available tanker fleet will double in size to 10.




U.S. Coast Guard icebreaking update

01/15
The lead vessel of the U.S. Coast Guard's U.S.C.G.C. Katmai Bay (WTGB 101)-class Icebreaking Seagoing Tug was operating in the St. Marys River in Michigan on 13 Jan. as part of Operation Taconite and cleared ice in the Little Rapids cut for the ferry Sugar Islander. The Balsam-class Seagoing Buoy Tender U.S.C.G.C. Sundew (WLB 404) did track maintenance in Duluth, Minn., and took aboard a news crew from Minneapolis.

Meanwhile, the Canadian Coast Guard's lead vessel of the C.C.G.S. Samuel Risley-class Navigational Aids Tender did track maintenance in eastern Lake Erie and assisted the Canadian Olympic and the Canadian Transport as part of Operation Coal Shovel. The U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker U.S.C.G.C. Mackinaw (WAGB 83), the Katmai Bay-class U.S.C.G.C. Bristol Bay (WTGB 102) and the Canadian Coast Guard's Icebreaker/Navigational Aids Tender C.C.G.S. Griffon worked in the Detroit and St. Clair rivers as well as Lake St. Clair and the latter two assisted the tug Evans B. McKeil, which was upbound for Sarnia, Ontario.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Lakes Visitor Experiences Fire

01/15:
According to Lloyd's of London Press. The Greek saltie ANANGEL FIDELITY (14,156 gr.t.) St.Petersburg for Cape Canaveral with aluminium slabs and newsprints rolls, had engine-room fire off St.Catherines Point, Isle of Wight, Jan.6. Her crew extenguished fire with carbon dioxide. This ship, known as a Friendship class completed several trips to Great Lakes ports in past seasons. According to my records, the last time she sailed the inland seas was in Nov. 1993 when she called at Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago and Thunder Bay.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




New Live Cam

01/15:
Detroit's WDIV television station has introduced a live cam shot of Detroit and the Detroit River. This live cam is an exclusive live shot of downtown Detroit from their camera across the Detroit River in Windsor, Canada.

This has great potential for computer boatwatching. Be sure to e-mail WDIV and tell the you enjoy it! Now if only the Soo Locks would go live. Click here to view




Today in Great Lakes History - January 15

FORT YORK was launched January 15, 1958.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

01/14:
Kaye E. Barker arrived in Superior Jan. 13 for layup at Fraser Shipyards. As of 7:30 a.m. yesterday, the vessel was off the entrance to Howard's Pocket, attempting to back into the shipyard. Two tugs from Great Lakes Towing were assisting in breaking ice and helping the vessel maneuver.

After undergoing engine repairs in Conneaut, Edgar B. Speer is due into Duluth about 9:30 a.m. Jan. 15 for layup.

The high level of steel imports to the United States forced Great Lakes fleets to lay up vessels early this year, according to the Jan. 13 Duluth News-Tribune. On Jan. 1 1999, 34 vessels were in operation and most were making their last trips of the season. That is compared to 47 in operation on Jan. 1, 1998, according to the Lake Carriers' Association. An official of Oglebay Norton Co. said the company laid up most of its 12 boats a few weeks early this season. He also said the cuts in domestic steel production could result in an unusually late start to navigation next spring.

Reported by: Al Miller




Snow Blocks Passage

01/14:
The Buffalo fireboat Edward M. Cotter was breaking ice on the Buffalo River on the 13th when the Michigan St. bridge was unable to raise. The large snow load kept the bridge tender from lifting the span to let the Cotter proceed up river. She turned around and concentrated on the lower section of the waterway before docking in her slip that afternoon.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Today in Great Lakes History - January 14

Scrapping began on the CHICAGO TRIBUNE January 14, 1989 by International Marine Salvage in Port Colborne, Ont.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Ice and Icebreaking

01/13:
After a mild start to the winter, ice is finally catching up with the shipping industry in earnest. On its upbound trip to lay up at Duluth, Paul R. Tregurtha was forced to stop at every turn in the St. Marys River because of ice. At Duluth, ice now extends 13 miles off shore. Most of its two inches thick, but it becomes 6 inches thick closer to shore. Ice in Duluth-Superior harbor ranges from about 12 inches thick in the ship canal to as much as 30 inches off Midwest Energy Terminal.

Some observations have been made about the U.S. Coast Guard conducting icebreaking operations only during daylight hours while the Canadian Coast Guard has operated throughout the night. There's been indication that the U.S. policy is a result of concerns over crew fatigue and safety. Some masters have said they'll ask the Lake Carriers Association to raise the icebreaking issue with the Coast Guard this winter.

Reported by: Al Miller




Soo Locks Wind Down

01/13
With the severe winter weather and an an official closing date only a few days away (Jan. 15), traffic at the Soo Locks is winding down for the season.

Edwin H. Gott should be the last downbound commercial vessel. She locked through the morning of January 11 with a cargo of taconite pellets from Two Harbors.

Two more vessels are due upbound, both heading for layup in Duluth / Superior. Charles M. Beeghly was to lock through sometime yesterday and the Edgar B. Speer should be through sometime today.

The weather and heavy steel imports were the cause of a much slower first half of January compared to the same period a year ago.

Reported by: Mike Cleary




Still Sailing

01/13:
Still in service between St. Lawrence River ports yesterday morning was the Jean Parisien unloading at Contrecoeur. She finished unloading and then headed to Montreal section # 56 for winter lay-up.

The Ferbec arrived at the Quebec Cartier Mining dock at Port Cartier late on January 7th to load iron ore for Contrecoeur.

The Sauniere is still in the salt trade. Monday, she left an anchorage off the Magdalen Islands bound for Mulgrave, N.S. She was in Montreal last week.

Still in service for Desgagnés were Cecilia Desgagnes which arrived at the Canadian International Paper dock at Trois-Rivières Monday and Catherine Desgagnés which was passing Cabot Strait bound for Quebec City Monday.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




U.S. Coast Guard icebreaking update

01/13
Operation Taconite continues in the area of operation of U.S. Coast Guard Group Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. The Coast Guard's Balsam-class Seagoing Buoy Tender U.S.C.G.C. Sundew (WLB 404) worked around Duluth, Minn., and Superior, Wis., on 11 Jan. and assisted the Lee A. Tregurtha into Howards Bay. The lead vessel of the Coast Guard's U.S.C.G.C. Katmai Bay (WTGB 101)-class Icebreaking Seagoing Tug worked in the St. Marys River, allowing the Kaye E. Barker and the Edwin H. Gott to proceed.

For Operation Coal Shovel in the area of operation of Coast Guard Group Detroit, the Katmai Bay-class vessels U.S.C.G.C. Brisol Bay (WTGB 102) and U.S.C.G.C. Neah Bay (WTGB 105) worked with the tug Evans B. McKeil and a barge in the Detroit River and western Lake Erie.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Iglehart in for Repairs

01/13
The J.A.W. Iglehart was in the Toledo Shipyard yesterday making ice damage repairs. No word on how severe the damage was, but if unable to make repairs within a few days the vessel will lay-up there.

The vessel passed through heavy ice on western Lake Erie while sailing from Cleveland.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Interim tank barge rule to take effect

01/13
The U.S. Coast Guard has issued an interim rule regarding emergency control measures for tank barges. As a result, equipment to regain control of drifting tank barges, such as anchors and emergency towline retrieval systems, will be needed on the barges or vessels towing them for immediate use. Public comments will be sought before the rule takes effect 30 March, three months after the rule was published in the 30 Dec. Federal Register.

Those submitting comments should include their name(s) and address(es), identify rule USCG 1998-4443 and the specific section of the rule to which each comment applies.

Additional information is available from Robert Spears, project manager in the Coast Guard's Office of Standards Evaluation and Development at 202-267-1099, or Allen Penn, technical advisor in the Ofice of Design and Engineering Standards at 202-267-2997. Written comments can be sent to Penn at the Office of Design and Engineering Standards (G-MSE), 2100 Second St. SW, Washington, D.C., 20593-0001.

There is also a notice at www.access.gpo.gov/su-docs/aces/aces140.html.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Great Lakes Maritime Academy announces Bachelor degree program

01/13
The Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Traverse City, Michigan has recently announced that it will be switching its maritime degree program from the current associate of applied science degree to a bachelors degree in business, with a maritime emphasis. The new degree program is offered in conjuction with Ferris State University, all classes are held in Traverse City.

This change is due to the increasing responsibilty required of Academy graduates. John Tanner, GLMA superintendent, feels that the new program will allow GLMA grads to be better prepared to meet the demands of a changing shipping industry.

Anyone interested in learning more about GLMA and a career as a licensed maritime officer is invited to call 1 800 748 0566 ext. 1200.

GLMA will have a recruiting rep in Roseville, Michigan on Monday January 18th from 6-9pm at the Georgian Inn and in Cleveland, Ohio at Lakewood High School on Wednesday January 20th at 7 pm.

Reported by: Gary Schweitzer




Boland Faces uncertain Future

01/13
The John J. Boland faces an uncertain future. The vessels age and the ravages of carrying salt have led to question whether the vessel will receive her inspection this winter. Many doubt that the vessel can economically be made to pass the 5-year inspection.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Fund for Family Members of Lost Tug's Crew

01/13
Those who wish to contribute to the relief fund for the family members of the Linda E crew, the fishing tug lost on Lake Michigan, can send contributions to:

Scott Matta Memorial Fund
c/o Debbie Kohne
Trans Union
2514 S. 102nd St., Ste. 275
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53227

Funds are being deposited at M & I Bank. Scott's wife worked at Trans Union and they are collecting for the fund to help with the family's bills as the insurance companies can't pay until evidence of the accident is found.

Reported by: Brendon Baillod




Today in Great Lakes History - January 13

On January 13, 1970 the lower engine room and holds of the SEWELL AVERY accidentally flooded sinking her to the bottom of Duluth Harbor causing minimal damage other than an immense cleanup effort.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Crewmember evacuated from tug in Lake Erie - Update

01/12
On the morning of 10 Jan., the tug Evans B. McKeil requested that a 44-year-old crewmember be evacuated after he was struck between his shoulder blade and neck by a snapped cable and went into shock. The tug was in ice at the southern entrance buoy to the Detroit River in Lake Erie and an HH-65A Dolphin helicopter from U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Detroit brought the man aboard and took him to emergency medical services in Windsor, Ontario. He is in stable condition.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Twin Ports Lay-ups

01/12:
The Lee A. Tregurtha arrived at Fraser Shipyards yesterday for winter layup. The Coast Guard Cutter Sundew and at least one tug from Great Lakes Towing assisted the Tregurtha in entering Howard's Pocket, the bay containing the shipyard.

George A. Stinson arrived Duluth about 7 a.m. on the 11th to layup at the Duluth Port Terminal.

The Edwin H. Gott is due at Sturgeon Bay Jan. 14. The Edgar B. Speer is still undergoing unknown repairs at Conneaut.

Reported by: Al Miller




U.S. Coast Guard icebreaking update

01/12
Operation Taconite continues in the area of operation of U.S. Coast Guard Group Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. The Katmai Bay-class Icebreaking Seagoing Tug U.S.C.G.C. Mobile Bay (WTGB 103) has left the operation after working in the western straits, but the U.S.C.G.C. Katmai Bay (WTGB 101) remains around Whitefish Bay, Mich. The U.S.C.G.C. Katmai Bay assisted the Kaye E. Barker, the Roger Blough and the Presque Isle upbound in the St. Marys River and the Edwin H. Gott downbound. The Canadian Coast Guard's lead vessel of the C.C.G.S. Samuel Risley-class Navigationa Aids Tender also worked around Whitefish Bay over the weekend and assisted the Henry Jackman downbound and the Paul R. Tregurtha upbound. The C.C.G.S. Samuel Risley then left the operation on 9 Jan.

For Operation Coal Shovel in the area of operation of U.S. Coast Guard Group Detroit, the Canadian Coast Guard's Icebreaker/Navigational Aids Tender C.C.G.S. Griffon assisted the Algorail and the Kaye E. Barker upbound in the Detroit River while the U.S. Coast Guard's Katmai Bay-class U.S.C.G.C. Neah Bay (WTGB 105) worked with the Buffalo into Toldeo, Ohio. The U.S.C.G.C. Bristol Bay (WTGB 102) and the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker U.S.C.G.C. Mackinaw (WAGB 83) assisted the Canadian Olympic, the Herbert C. Jackson, the Lee A. Tregurtha, the Mesabi Miner, the Paterson and the tug Evans B. McKeil in the Detroit River in western Lake Erie.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Marquette's Season Ends

01/12:
Marquette's 1998-99 season came to a close with the departure of ELTON HOYT 2ND on Saturday, January 9. She loaded taconite for Rouge Steel in Detroit. Fleetmate, HERBERT C. JACKSON, loaded the day before. Both vessels were featured on WLUC TV-6 out of Marquette in a news story about the end of the shipping season.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Zeni to speak about Empress of Ireland in Milwaukee

01/12
David Zeni, author of "Forgotten Empress: The Empress of Ireland Story" (Halsgrove) will speak at Centennial Hall, 733 N. Eighth St. in Milwaukee, at 1300 16 Jan. about the collision and sinking of the Empress of Ireland. The event, in conjunction with the Wisconsin Marine Historical Society, will also include slides and underwater video footage. The cost is $10.

The Empress of Ireland sank in the St. Lawrence Seaway near Sainte-Luce-Sur-Mer, Quebec, on 29 May, 1914, after colliding with the Storstad while sailing from Quebec to Liverpool, England. Of the 1,477 aboard, 1,012 were killed.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Today in Great Lakes History - January 12

The CHI-CHEEMAUN was launched January 12, 1974.

The GRAND HAVEN was gutted by fire on January 12, 1970 during scrapping operations at the United Steel & Refining Co. Ltd. dock at Hamilton, Ont.

MENIHEK LAKE was launched January 12, 1959

On January 12, 1973, the VENUS (2) had an engine room explosion shortly after unloading at Kipling, MI, (near Gladstone, MI) on Little Bay De Noc causing one loss of life.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Lay-ups

01/11:
The Presque Isle arrived at Duluth's port terminal Jan. 10 for winter layup.

Today, Lee A. Tregurtha is expected to arrive Fraser Shipyards in Superior while George A. Stinson is expected to layup at the port terminal and Paul R. Tregurtha is expected to arrive at the Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior.

On Jan. 13, Charles M. Beeghly and Kaye E. Barker are tentatively scheduled to arrive Fraser Shipyards and Edgar B. Speer is due at the Duluth port terminal.

Reported by: Al Miller




ILM Round up

01/11:
The tug Jacklyn M and barge Integrity are due back in Alpena today. She will following the PAUL H TOWNSEND who is due in at 0500 to load. The J.A.W. Iglehart was unloading in Cleveland yesterday, departure time is uncertain and there is the possibilty she may lay up there.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Ice Boom in Place

01/11:
The New York State Power Authority tug barges have completed work on the Niagara River Ice Boom in Buffalo Harbor.

The sections of the boom were towed from the Seaway Piers on the Buffalo Outer Harbor to the opening of the Upper Niagara River. All vessels must use the Black Rock Canal until the boom is removed in the spring.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Today in Great Lakes History - January 11

The steamer ROBERT S. McNAMARA, under tow reached her intended destination of Santander, Spain on January 11, 1974.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Crewmember Airlifted from Evans McKeil

01/10
This morning at 1115 hrs a crewmember was airlifted from the 110' tug Evans McKeil in Western Lake Erie. A helicopter from Coast Guard Group Detroit was dispatched to remove the person from the tug. The crewmember suffered unknown injuries when he was struck by a cable that broke. The heilcopter then took the crewmember to Winsdor Airport for transport to a local hospital.

Reported by: Neil Schultheiss and Christopher Dunn




Townsend Sails

01/10:
With the ice breaking assistance of the G-tug California, the Paul H. Townsend finally departed Milwaukee Saturday for Alpena, MI. Ice in the inner harbor was up to 9" thick.

Also in the harbor was the ice encrusted tug Jacklyn M/barge Integrity. The Burns Harbor is expected Sunday for winter lay up along side the Stewart J. Cort.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




USS Fleet Update

01/10:
Roger Blough arrived at Duluth's port terminal about 9 a.m. Jan. 9 for layup.

Edgar B. Speer was undergoing unspecified repairs in Conneaut and wasn't due to depart until Jan. 10. Its expected in Duluth for layup on Jan. 13.

Dock workers in Two Harbors were battling with frozen ore as they loaded Edwin H. Gott on Jan. 9. The vessel is expected late in the day bound for Gary.

Presque Isle was scheduled to arrive in Two Harbors on Jan. 9 to load a partial cargo, then go into layup in Duluth on Jan. 10.

Reported by: Al Miller




Cuyahoga Arrives for Lay-up

01/10:
Cuyahoga entered Port Stanley friday morning, with the harbor being ice congested it took a couple hour for her to dock.That will be the Cuyahoga's winter lay-up for 1999.

Reported by: Richard Hill




Pig Iron in Silver Bay

01/10:
Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. took another step toward building a pig iron plant in Silver Bay, Minn., when the company applied for an air quality permit Jan. 8 in Duluth. At the same time it submitted documentation to prepare an environmental worksheet for the project. Officials of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency termed the steps "significant."

A Cliffs spokesman said the filing was part of an ongoing process and does not signal that the company will go ahead with the $150 to $200 million project.

If built, the plant would produce about 700,000 metric tons of premium pig iron each year. The iron would feed electric steelmaking furnaces and foundries. Cliffs would continue to produce taconite pellets in Silver Bay at its Northshore Mining facility.10.

Reported by: Al Miller




Ice Hazard bulletin

01/10
Note: this report is offered for entertainment and should not be relied on for navigation. Please consult Canadian Ice Service for current conditions (subscription necessary)

Ice Hazard Bulletin for the Great Lakes issued by environment Canada from Canadian Ice Service in Ottawa at 1700 UTC Saturday 9 January 1999

No ice warning in effect for the next 36 hours.

Lake Ontario... open water. Fast ice in Bay of Quinte. Some new ice forming along the north short east of Oshawa.

Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair... Greater than 9 tenths mostly medium lake ice over Lake St. Clair. Greater than 9 tenths medium to think Lake Ice over the northern portion of the western basin and medium lake ice over the southern portion with 8 tenths thin lake ice eastward to near just west of Cleveland and just east of Erieau. Fast ice in inner Long Point Bay. Otherwise mostly open water east of Cleveland.

Lake Huron and Georgian Bay...patchy new ice along the shores with open water over most of the lake. Greater than 9 tenths medium lake ice in Saginaw Bay with fast ice in shallow bays and inlets. Greater than 9 tenths medium and thin lake ice over the north channel. Georgian Bay has 9 tenths of new and thin lake ice along the northeast shore with some shorefast ice in some shallow bays and inlets. There is 10 tenths shorefast ice in some shallow bays and inlets. There is 10 tenths shorefast medium to thick lake ice in Severn Sound and in St. Mary's River.

Lake Superior... Mostly open water. In Thunder Bay there is greater than 9 tenths thin and medium lake ice except for shore fast ice in the southwestern and northeastern ends. Fast ice in Nipigon and Black Bays. Patchy new ice forming along the southern shores of the lake.

The following comes from the Canadian Ice Service (current forecast is available online to subscribers)

Area coverage is expressed in tenths
1-3/10's---very open drift ice
4-6/10's---open drift ice
7-8/10's---close pack ice
9-9+/10's--very close pack
10/10's---compact
10/10's---frozen together - consolidated

When ice reaches 6/10's or greater, ships can no longer traverse between floes.

Fast ice--ice fastened to the shore (frozen all the way across)

New Lake Ice----recently formed less than 5 centimeters thick.
Thin Lake Ice---5 - 15 centimeters thick.
Medium Lake Ice-15 - 30 centimeters thick.
Thick Lake Ice--30-70 centimeters thick.
Very Thick Ice--greater than 70 centimeters thick.

Reported by: Neil Schultheiss

Report from the Canadian Coast Guard's Continuous Marine Broadcast
visit the Canadian Ice Service's home page for subscription information




Today in Great Lakes History - January 10

ONTADOC (2) was launched January 10, 1975 (b MELISSA DESGAGNES)

On January 10, 1977 the CHESTER A. POLLING (b MOBIL ALBANY) broke in two and sank off the coast of Massachusetts.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




U.S. Coast Guard icebreaking update

01/09
The Canadian Coast Guard and U.S. Coast Guard assisted vessels around Detroit and in western Lake Erie on 7 Jan. as part of Operation Coal Shovel. The icebreaker U.S.C.G.C. Mackinaw (WAGB 83), working in the Detroit River and Lake St. Clair, assisted the tug Karen while the Katmai Bay-class Icebreaking Seagoing Tug U.S.C.G.C. Bristol Bay (WTGB 102) assisted the James R. Barker and the George A. Stinson and the tugs Karen Andre and Stormont in the Detroit River. The Katmai Bay-class U.S.C.G.C. Neah Bay (WTGB 105) assisted the Columbia Star and the Oglebay Norton into Toledo, Ohio, the tug Stormont near Sarnia, Ontario, and the tug Karen Andre at the entrance to the Rouge River. The Canadian Coast Guard's Icebreaker/Navigational Aids Tender C.C.G.S. Griffon assisted the Canadian Olympic in Lake Erie and the Detroit River.

Also, the U.S. Coast Guard's Katmai Bay-class U.S.C.G.C. Biscayne Bay (WTGB 104) assisted the Edwin H. Gott in the St. Marys River as part of Operation Taconite.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Presque Isle will be laid up with cargo

01/09
The Presque Isle is due in Two Harbors today to load a partial cargo, she will then proceed with the cargo into lay-up at Duluth. The cargo is said to be needed for ballast reasons.

Reported by: David French




Still time to Enter

01/09
There is still time to purchase tickets for the Chance to win a trip on the Courtney Burton.

Any entries that are receive at our Detroit address by February 10th will be entered in the drawing.

Click here for more details




1853 Chicago layups

01/09
Detroit Free Press, Wed. December 14, 1853
MARINE INTELLIGENCE
VESSELS IN PORT. - The following is a complete list of the vessels in port yesterday. Two or three of them have not taken down their sails, and their captains are talking of trying a short trip for a load of lumber, the others are all laid up for the winter, or are at the dry docks undergoing repairs, except the propeller Westmoreland, which is loading with corn for Buffalo:

STEAMERS
E.K. Collins, Traveler , Pacific, Fashion

PROPELLERS
Wisconsin, Buffalo, Pocahontas, Milwaukee, Nile, Lady of the Lake Pacific, Westmoreland

BARQUES
Norman, E.B. Morgan, Water Witch, Trade Wind, Mary Stockton, Utica

BRIGS
A. Mitchell, Fanny Gardner, Mechanic, Sandusky, Rob't Hollister, Susan A. Clark, Orleans, Buffalo, Ontario, C.I. Hutchinson, Cumberland, Minnesota Enterprise, Ellen Parker, Caroline, Belle, Odd Fellow, F. C. Clark, St. Louis, Champlain, J. Y. Scammon, D. Smart, Wabash, Cherokee, S. C. Walbridge, L. A. Blossom, Mary, Northampton

SCHOONERS
Reindeer, Seventy-Six, Henry Norton, J. E. Sutherland, D. R. Holt, Lavance, Merchant, Rocky Mountain, Henry Attrill, Temperance, Geo. F. Foster, M. Hilliard, S. Robinson, President, St. Clair, Honest John, Ashtabula, Forrester, St. Mary, Philena MIlls, Active, Oconto, E. Rayden, Elbe, Henry Clay, C. Walker, G. R. Roberts, Telegraph, John Lillie, J. W. Brown, Hero, Muskegon, Alnwick, Dexter, Amelia, Palmetto, J. S. Wright, Tempest, Merchant, No. 2, C. Y. Richmond, Pioneer, Black Petrel, Pilot, Denmark, Wyoming, Falcon, E. Henderson, Flying Cloud, Melzor, Col. Shepherd, Lady Jane, Mary Margaret, Crescent, Juliana, Speed, Dan Marble, Robt B Campbell, Main, Warren, Charlotte, Current, Pilgrim, L. P. Hilliard, Ranger, Roanoke, Fashion, Ocean Wave, Gem, Arctic, Petrel, Andromeda, Astor

RECAPITULATION
Steamers - - - - - - - - - - 4
Propellers - - - - - - - - - - 8
Barques - - - - - - - - - - 6
Brigs - - - - - - - - - - - 28
Schooners - - - - - - - - - 82
Total - - - - - - - - - 118

The total number of all kinds of crafts wintering here last season was 81, being 37 less than the number now in port. There may be a few arrivals and departures subsequent to this date, as the fine weather is very tempting. The steamers FASHION, PACIFIC and TRAVELER continue to run upon their route as regularly as the weather permits. - Chi. Dem. Press.
Detroit Free Press, December 21, 1853 (next issue)

The Milwaukee Sentinel says that the propeller WESTMORELAND has hauled alongside the wharf in the river where she will lay up for the winter. The damage to her machinery is supposed to be $1000 to $1500.

Reported by: David Swayze




Today in Great Lakes History - January 09

BAIE COMEAU II was laid up on January 9, 1983 at Sorel, Que. and was sold the following April to Progress Overseas Co. S.A., Panama.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




U.S. Coast Guard icebreaking update

01/08
The U.S. Coast Guard's lead vessel of the U.S.C.G.C. Katmai Bay (WTGB 101)-class Icebreaking Seagoing Tug assisted the Elton Hoyt II and the Paul R. Tregurtha in the St. Mary's River on 6 Jan.

The icebreaker U.S.C.G.C. Mackinaw (WAGB 83) transferred to Operation Coal Shovel (Lake Erie icebreaking) on 6 Jan.

Many vessels have become stranded in the heavy ice on Western Lake Erie. As the Mackinaw passed downbound through the Detroit River yesterday, she was called by a number of vessels asking her to pass close by the dock where each vessel was tied up. This opens the water making it easier to move away from the dock.

At 1530 hrs. yesterday, the J.A.W. Iglehart was beset in ice about 9.7 miles West of PeLee Island. She was haeding upbound after unloading in Cleveland.

Reported by: Steve Schultz and N. Schultheiss




Townsend Still in Milwaukee

01/08:
The Paul H. Townsend was scheduled to depart on the Wednesday for the first of 2 trips to St. Joe. As of yesterday the vessel was still tied up at her dock in Milwaukee.

There are reports of mechanical problems preventing the vessel from sailing and the bow thruster was said to be frozen solid.

Chris Franckowiak reports that the barge Integrity and the J.A.W. Iglehart provide enough tonnage and the St. Joseph facility does not have the storage space for 2 boat loads of cement at this time.

Reported by: Sharyl Williams and Chris Franckowiak




Gott's Trips to Duluth

01/08
USSGLF's Edwin H. Gott made 14 trips to Duluth this season breaking the previous year's total of 5. All were loaded at the D.M.I.R. ore dock and destined for Nanticoke. It is safe to say that her re-configured unloading system is working well for her owners. Let's see what the up-coming season holds.

Reported by: David French




Jacquez appointed to Seaway corporation

01/08
U.S. Secretary of Transportation Rodney Slater swore in Albert Jacquez on 4 Jan. as administrator of St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. President Clinton, using the authority to appoint officials while the U.S. Congress is in recess, installed Jacquez, 45. He took up the appointment immediately afterwards, but still must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate.

In October, U.S. Sen. Spencer Abraham, R-Mich., blocked Jacquez's appointment by stopping what he called a "hastily scheduled" meeting of the Senate's Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee that was to approve the nomination. Spencer questioned whether Jacquez was qualified.

Jacquez has more than 15 years of management, finance and transportation policy experience. Starting in 1993, he was chief of staff to U.S. Rep. Esteban E. Torres, D-Calif.

An acting administrator has been in charge of the corporation since April 1997.



Reported by: Steve Schultz




BNSF Ore Dock Ends Season Early

01/07:
The Burlington Northern Santa Fe's ore dock in Superior shut down for the season on Jan. 06, almost a week earlier than planned, after the four remaining vessel cargoes scheduled to be loaded were cancelled.

The BURNS HARBOR closed the BNSF ore dock on Jan. 06 at 0210 hours when she finished loading 57,237 gross tons of pellets, bound for Bethlehem's Burns Harbor Plant.

The four cancelled carges were two loads for the STEWART J. CORT and one load for the GEORGE A. STINSON and an additional load for the BURNS HARBOR.

As a result of the cancelled cargoes, the CORT is bound for Milwaukee for lay-up. The BURNS HARBOR will also lay-up in Milwaukee, after unloading in Burns Harbor. The STINSON continues upbound and will arrive the Duluth Port Terminal for lay-up on Jan 09 or 10th, depending on the weather.

Reported by: Terry Sechen




Progress on the Dorothy Ann

01/07:
Work continues at the North Reiss Dock in Escanaba on the new Interlake tug, Dorothy Ann. As of New Year's Eve day, three pilothouse decks and a stack casing were visible above deck.

The new tug will push the barge Pathfinder in the coming season.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




USS Fleet Update

01/07:
The final four vessels sailing for USS Great Lakes Fleet are handling their final cargoes this week and expected to lay up by the end of the week.

Edgar B. Speer was due into Conneaut Jan. 6 and then set for Duluth on Jan. 9 to lay up.
Edwin H. Gott will arrive in Two Harbors Jan. 8 to load the final cargo for Gary, arriving there Jan. 11 and then proceeding to Sturgeon Bay Jan. 12.
Presque Isle will arrive Gary Jan. 7 and proceed to Duluth Jan. 10 for layup.
Roger Blough is scheduled to arrive Gary Jan. 6 and arrive Duluth Jan. 9 to lay up.

Reported by: Al Miller




SMET Smashes Record Again

01/07:
When the U.S.-Flag 1,000-footer M/V COLUMBIA STAR pulled away from the Superior Midwest Energy Resource dock with 63,911 tons of coal in her holds on January 1, the cargo capped yet another record-breaking season for the facility.

Shipments of western coal from SMET during the 1998 navigation season totaled 15,606,895 net tons, a new all-time high for the operation. Additionally, 1998 loadings represent an increase of 5.9 percent over 1997.

Visit the Lake Carriers' Association Home page for complete details




First fit out of 1999

01/06:
The MV Paul H. Townsend is scheduled to depart Milwaukee today for the first of two trips to St. Joe. MI. following these two trips they will return to Milwaukee with a winter storage load. Ice in the inner harbor is currently 6-8" thick and the Townsend will require a tug to leave.

The Townsend was the first vessel to lay-up for the winter, she tied up in Milwaukee on November 17th.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Operation Taconite update

01/06
On 4 Jan., the U.S. Coast Guard's Balsam-class Seagoing Buoy Tender U.S.C.G.C. Sundew (WLB 404) was operating near Duluth, Minn., as part of Operation Taconite while the Katmai Bay-class icebreaking seagoing tugs U.S.C.G.C. Katmai Bay (WTGB 101) and U.S.C.G.C. Biscayne Bay (WTGB 104) continued to operate in the St. Marys River. The icebreaker U.S.C.G.C. Mackinaw (WAGB 83) has now been assigned to Operation Taconite and will operate in the Straits of Mackinac in Michigan.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Ships Wintering in Montreal

01/06:
Cartierdoc is at section M-2, Montrealais at s. M-4, Algowood at s. 10 W., Canadian Venture at shed No.3, Enerchem Trader at shed No.5, Comeaudoc and Algosound at jetty No.l North, Gordon C.Leitch at jetty No.l South, Mantadoc, Algoville, Algogulf and Algocen at section 56. There are also several other large ships wintering other than the lakers. They are Arctic Viking, Lady Franklin, Lucien Paquin, Aivik, D.C.Everest, Ville Marie II, P.S.Barge No.l and Cavalier Maxim. Also Fednav's Arctic since Dec.11. However, she is going back into service later on this week according to the pilotage office. Still running on the St.Lawrence River are three CSL ships, namely Ferbec, Jean Parisien and Atlantic Huron.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Twin Ports Update

01/06:
The Coast Guard Cutter Sundew was moving about the Twin Ports on Jan. 4 performing track maintenance.

The Middletown arrived at Fraser Shipyards at 6 p.m. Jan. 5 for layup.

Ore docks in Two Harbors and Superior remain active. BNSF in Superior is scheduled to load Burns Harbor on Jan. 5 and Stewart J. Cort on Jan. 7. DMIR in Two Harbors is scheduled to laod Edwin H. Gott on Jan. 7, Roger Blough on Jan. 8 and Edgar B. Speer and Presque Isle on Jan. 9.

Reported by: Al Miller




Salt in Milwaukee

01/06:
The Algoway was waiting off Milwaukee Monday night for the Algorail to clear. Both vessels were adding to our already record levels of salt on the docks. Milwaukee is a major distribution point for road salt with three different companies located here. The port also receives large quanities of food grade salt use in various industrial applications like paper making.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Ice in the Detroit River System and Lake Erie

01/06:
Ice in the Detroit River System and Lake Erie is causing delays for many vessel from Lake St. Clair into Lake Erie.

On Tuesday, the Canadian Coast Guard vessel Griffon worked to free the Edgar B. Speer in the lower Detroit River. Once clear of the river she became stuck in "blue ice" (very heavy ice) around 12:00am this morning while passing through Lake Erie's Pelee Passage.

Earlier on Tuesday, while passing downbound through Lake St. Clair, the Speer ran into ice slowing the vessel to 2.5 miles per hour.




Today in Great Lakes History - January 06

While undertow heading for scrap, the HARRY R. JONES went aground at Androsan, Scotland on January 6, 1961 and it wasn't until February 15, that she arrived at her final port of Troon, Scotland.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes History




U.S. Coast Guard starts icebreaking

01/05
The U.S. Coast Guard has started its annual icebreaking operations, all of which have so far involved Katmai Bay-class icebreaking seagoing tugs. Operation Taconite in northern Lake Huron, Lake Michigan and Lake Superior, includes the U.S.C.G.C. Katmai Bay (WTGB 101) and the U.S.C.G.C. Biscayne Bay (WTGB 104). Both were operating this weekend in the St. Marys River, the former assisting the Kaye E. Barker and the latter assisting the Joseph L. Block and the Paterson.

Operation Oil Can, lead by the U.S.C.G.C. Mobile Bay (WTGB 103) is active in Lake Michigan. It spent the weekend working Green Bay, Wis.

Operation Coal Shovel, led by the U.S.C.G.C. Neah Bay (WTGB 105), is active in Lake Erie, Lake Huron and Lake St. Clair. The vessel assisted the tug Rubin Lynn near Toledo, Ohio, on 2 Jan.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Dennis Hale to Speak in Duluth

01/05:
Dennis Hale, sole survivor of the 1966 sinking of the steamer Daniel J. Morrell, will be the featured speaker at the Lake Superior Marine Museum Association's annual dinner meeting Jan. 23 in Superior, Wis.

Hale is scheduled to speak at 7:30 p.m. The event will be held at the Barkers Island Inn Conference Center. Admission is $10 at the door. For advance tickets, call (218) 727-2497. (The access road to Barkers Island is located at the intersection of U.S. Highway 2 and Belknap Street in Superior).

Reported by: Al Miller




Mapleglen Opens and Closes Port

01/05:
New Years Eve at 10:30 p.m., the "Mapleglen" arrived in Owen Sound for the final ship of the calender year.

Ironically, the Mapleglen also opened the Owen Sound Shipping Season by being the first ship of the year into port.

The Mapleglen was fully loaded with Grain and first went to Goderich to unload half of it's cargo, then to Owen Sound to complete the other three cargo holds.

Sunday January 3rd 1999, the Mapleglen was completed and it then was moved to the Eastern Docks for it's winter Mooring just in front of the "Oakglen" which finished unloading a few days before.

It was a relatively moderate season for shipping in Owen Sound.

We are all looking forward to increased water traffic in 1999.

Reported by: Peter Myatt




Today in Great Lakes History - January 05

The keel was laid January 5, 1972 for the ALGOWAY (2).

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes History




Two Vessels seek shelter in Muskegon

01/04:
With heavy winds and blinding snow effecting the Lakes region, the Algoma self-unloader Algorail entered Muskegon mid-afternoon on the 2nd and anchored on the western end of Muskegon Lake.

The Oglebay Norton vessel Fred R. White entered early morning on the 3rd and anchored within 100 yards of Algorail. Both ships stayed put all day on the 3rd and both are expected to depart when the weather clears up today.

Reported by: Scott Golin




Twin Ports Report

01/04:
Strong winds on the upper lakes have pushed back vessel schedules in the closing days of the season. Middletown is now due at Duluth for layup on Jan. 5. Columbia Star won't get to Taconite Harbor until Jan. 6. Edwin H. Gott went to anchor on the night of Jan. 2 and resumed is voyage to Gary on Jan. 3.

Reported by: Al Miller




Tregurtha Continues to Run

01/04:
Reports from the Lee A. Tregurtha Saturday, had the vessel loading in Superior Wisconsin. Plans were to make the run from Superior to Ashtabula Ohio, back to Marquette, down to the Rouge and then back to superior, weather permitting.

The ice is reported to be building up in the St. Marys River, and the vessel encountered pan ice off the Apostle Islands upbound.

The Tregurtha left Superior at 4:30 am, planning on ducking behind Isle Royale and running the North Shore.

The boat is said to have a coat of ice and no deck walking yesterday.

Reported by: Bob Gilreath




Today in Great Lakes History - January 04

On January 4, 1978, the IRVING S. OLDS was involved in a collision with the steamer ARMCO while convoying in heavy ice in the Livingston Channel of the lower Detroit River. The OLDS hit a flow of heavy ice, came to a complete stop and the ARMCO, unable to stop, hit the OLDS' stern.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes History




Twin Ports Report

01/03:
Several vessels are continuing to haul taconite pellets out of Superior and Lake Superior's North Shore ports in the final days of the season.

On Jan. 2, the BNSF ore dock was scheduled to load Lee A. Tregurtha and George A. Stinson. Roger Blough was due to depart Two Harbors with a load for Gary. Presque Isle had been due to lay up in Duluth on Jan. 3, but instead it's making one more trip with pellets from Two Harbors to Gary.

On Jan. 3, Paul R. Tregurtha is due into Taconite Harbor; Joe Block is scheduled to load in Two Harbors on Jan. 4; and on Jan. 5, Columbia Star is scheduled to load at Taconite Harbor while Edwin H. Gott is due into Two Harbors.

Middletown, which has seen little of the Twin Ports in recent years, is due to arrive for lay up either late Jan. 3 or early Jan. 4.

Reported by: Al Miller




New Mailing List

01/03:
The new gt-lakes-shipsnports mailing list.

A place to discuss US and Canadian Great Lakes shipping: past, current and future; the ports and their infrastructure used in servicing the ships (i.e. Loading and unloading equipment, drydocks, fueling facilities etc).

Click here to sign up




Today in Great Lakes History - January 03

On January 3, 1939, the CHIEF WAWATAM went aground again on North Graham Shoal. She was freed on January 9th with assistance from the tugs JOHN ROEN, FAVORITE and the cutters OSSIPEE and ESCANABA, and proceeded directly to Manitowoc, Wisconsin. There the CHIEF was dry-docked and her bow propeller replaced.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes History




Montreal Update

01/02:
As expected, the first ship of the new year to arrive in Montreal was the container ship OOCL BELGIUM arriving from Antwerp, Belgium this morning, New Year`s Day.

Her captain will receive the golden cane on Monday at a ceremony to be held at the Port of Montreal building. The golden cane is the reward given at the beginning of the year to the captain of the first ship to arrive in Montreal harbour. It is a tradition which started in 1840.

Arriving in Montreal a few hours later was the ALGOFAX, ex Imperial Bedford. To my knowledge, this is only her second call in Montreal since her renaming at Halifax in March 1998. Other activity included the Gordon C. Leitch arriving for lay-up on Thursday.
Wishing you all the Very Best for 1999.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Suprise Trip to Duluth

01/02
The suprise arrival of the Halifax in Duluth yesterday caught some of the port's boat watchers off guard. The vessel docked at the at the General Mills Grain Elevator to load. This is the latest a boat has arrived in Duluth for a grain dock in many years.

Reported by: Glenn Blaszkiewicz




Manitoulin Arrives in Thunder Bay

01/02:
On Friday Afternoon the Manitoulin arrived in Thunder Bay at the Cargill Elevator to load grain for storage to Huron, Ohio. She was expected to depart on the Sunday and arrive in Huron on the 6th for winter lay-up.




New and Improved

01/02
As promised I have created a new search page that allows readers of the site to exchange information where all can see the replies to questions.

This is an improvement over the old page where only the person requesting the information could receive an answer.

Think of it as a private news group dedicated to Great Lakes Information with no porn or spam.

Feel free to post your own requests or follow up to others if you know the answer.

I have uploaded the last few posts from the old search page, there were over 1000 since it started in '96 or '97.

Click here to visit





Today in Great Lakes History - January 02

While on the North Atlantic under tow for scrapping, the ASHLAND parted her towline but was tracked by U.S. Coast Guard aircraft and was retrieved by her tug on January 2nd, 1988 some 300 miles off course.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes History




Seaway statistics for 1998

01/01
The Canadian section of the St. Lawrence Seaway collected Canadian$80 million in tolls during the 1998 navigation season, which lasted 277 days. It was the second-longest season ever and the amount is the highest ever collected.

Preliminary statistics indicate that the only commodity passing through the seaway that decreased in 1998 was Canadian grain, down 28 percent. But U.S. grain rose 30 percent to 6.1 million metric tons, the highest since 1984.

Iron and steel totaled 7.2 million metric tons up 67 percent.

In total figures, the Montreal-Lake Ontario section carried 38.849 million metric tons, the highest level in 10 years and 5.7 percent higher than 1997. The Welland Canal section had 40.4 million metric tons, roughly the same as 1997.

In all, U.S. international trade in the seaway totaled 8.3 million metric tons, up 7 percent.

For the seaway as a whole, 4,138 vessels transited the system, compared to 4,042 in 1997. Some 1,476 were ocean-going, up 33 percent.

Also, for the first time, the 1,215 loaded "salty" transits exceed the number of loader "laker" transits.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Last Vessels of the Season

01/01:
The Joseph L. Block arrived Duluth at 0802 on December 31, it will be the last vessel of the season to load at the DM&IR dock. Columbia Star will be arriving Duluth about 0100 on New Years day and will be the last vessel to load at the Midwest Energy terminal.

Oglebay Norton will be the last vessel to load at Silver Bay, it is due there about 1700 on December 31. Columbia Star will also have the honor of closing out the season at Taconite Harbor, it is expected there to load on January 5.

Reported by: Mike Cleary




Shipbuilding organizations merge

01/01
The Shipbuilders Council of America and the National Shipyard Association in the United States have merged, taking the name of the former group. In announcing their merger, the two cited the need to meet the requirements of small- and medium-size members. The new organization has more than 50 companies that operate more than 100 shipyards in 20 states with some 30,000 employees. They have U.S.$1 billion in contracts for more than 90 new ships and specialty barges and several hundred hopper and tank barges. They also have contracts to build 50 government vessels.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Tregurtha's last coal run this season

01/01:
Yesterday the M/V Paul R. Tregurtha completed her last coal run of the season when she arrived at Detroit Edison's St. Clair power plant. The "Queen of the Lakes" is scheduled to make an ore run from Escanaba to Indiana Harbor and head for winter lay-up at the coal dock in Superior, WI.

Reported by: Scott Tomlinson




Milwaukee Offers Shelter

01/01:
Both the Kaye E. Barker and McKee Sons spent Tuesday in Milwaukee, taking shelter from high winds. After arriving early Tuesday morning, both left early Wednesday after winds had subsided.

Reported by: Robert Strauss




Happy New Year!





Today in Great Lakes History - January 01

On January 1, 1973, the Paul H. Carnahan became the last vessel of the 1972 shipping season to load at the Burlington Northern (now Burlington Northern Santa Fe) ore docks in Superior. Interestingly, the Carnahan also opened the Superior docks for the season in the spring of 1972.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes History





Return to the News Archive

Return to Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping

Comments, news, and suggestions to: moderator@boatnerd.net