Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

Copyright N. Schultheiss. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

* Report News


Nindawayma Departs

10/31: 11:00 a.m. update
The Nindawayma tow departed Owen Sound at 6:30 a.m. this morning and is expected to pass under the Blue Water Bridge about Noon Wednesday. Capt. Butler reports good weather and that the tow is making better than expected speed, about 7.5 knots.

The tug Menasha from Sarnia will meet the tow in lower Lake Huron to assist them down the St. Clair and Detroit Rivers as the trailing tug. If they remain on schedule the tow should pass Detroit about 6:00 p.m. Wednesday.

Once clear of the rivers, the Menasha will be released and the Point Carroll will take the Nindawayma across Lake Erie to Port Colborne. Another tug will meet the tow there and assist through the Welland Canal and Seaway.

Original report
The Nindawayma tow remains docked in Owen Sound as crews prepare the carferry for the trip down the Seaway.

Capt. Jeff Butler of the tug Point Carroll expects to depart today or Wednesday depending on the progress made in modifying the Nindawayma to safely transit the Seaway. Special fenders were constructed and are being fitted to the vessel. The tow to Les Mechins, Quebec may take two weeks or more weeks depending on the weather.

Tug Point Carroll at dock in Owen Sound.
Capt. Butler and surveyor inspecting the towing hawser on the stern.
Discussing the tow.
On the stern of the tug looking forward.
The towing winch.
A close up of a fender attached to the Nindawayma to allow her to pass safely through the Seaway locks.
Looking aft, past the stack.
Capt. Jeff Butler in the pilot house.
Looking from the tug's pilot house to the Nindawayma.
Nindawayma and tug at dock.
Bow view with Capt. Butler and Dale Yager.

Reported by: Dave Yager and Barry Hiscocks




Speer takes Tug

10/31:
An unusual passage took place Monday at the Soo Locks. The Edgar B. Speer was assisted by a G tug below the locks. The Speer had spent nearly two days in Duluth for repairs.

The Speer did not need any assistance above the locks but below a tug worked to turn the 1000-footer before it slipped past the waiting Walter J. McCarthy Jr.

Reported by: Kirk Tews




Odd Calls For USS Footers

10/31:
The changing seasons have apparently decided to send the footers of the USS Fleet to some unusual ports. The Edwin H. Gott is due in Conneaut on November 1st to unload. She will then sail for the BNSF Dock 5 In Superior WI to load. This is believed to be a first in many years, if not her career.

Problems are apparently plaguing the Edgar B. Speer's bowthruster, forcing her to return to return to the Duluth Port Terminal on the 3rd of November for more repairs.

Lastly the Presque Isle is making another stone run to Duluth from Calcite.

Reported by: David French




Griffon Update

10/31:
Crews from Shelley Machine & Marine Ltd. are busy completing repairs to the Canadian Coast Guard Cutter Griffon in Sarnia. The Atlantic Huron struck the Griffon on Sept. 25 in Lake Erie.

The half-inch thick steel deck plates were crumpled like an accordion. Damage to the storage area inside was extensive. The Coast Guard hopes to have the ship back in service later this week.

The Griffon at the Government Dock.
Close up of the name.

Pictures taken after the accident by Lane Hautau from Ron and Linda Locke.
At the Government Dock.
Close up of the damaged area.

Report and pictures by: Teresa Parker




Atlantic Huron Locks Through

10/31:
The Atlantic Huron was in the Seaway Monday passing through the Iroquois Lock.

Entering the Lock.
Close up of her bow.

Reported by: Peter Carter




Alpena Visits St. Joseph

10/31:
The cement carrier Alpena visited the Lake Michigan port of St. Joseph, Michigan Monday. She docked at the cement silo to unload.

At dock.
Closer look at the bow.

Reported by: Erdean Kelly




Boatnerds in the News

10/31:
The St. Catharines Standard newspaper ran an article in the Monday, Oct. 30 edition featuring the Boatnerd Gathering East. The 1/3 page article is on page A4 and features a nice picture taken at Port Weller Dry Docks. Click here to read the article.

Reported by: Kathy Thomas




News Reporters Wanted

10/31:
As the Boatnerds head home from the First Annual Gathering at the Welland Canal, our daily reporting and images will end. I would like to invite any boatwatchers in the area to send in news reports or interesting vessel passages. While attending the Gathering we recognized the important part the Welland Canal plays in the Great Lakes and Seaway system. This important area is poorly represented on the News Page and I would like to change that.

News Reporters are given full credit (if desired) for any information submitted. The credit line can also include any links to outside web sites and we can create an "About the Author Page."

For more information please e-mail.




Update Delay

10/31:
The normal updates to the web site (Photo Galleries etc.) that are available every Monday morning will be delayed until Tuesday. Be sure to check back for a special look into the operation of the Welland Canal.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 31

CANADIAN EXPLORER's sea trials were conducted on October 31, 1983 on Lake Erie where a service speed of 13.8 m.p.h. was recorded.

The EDWIN H. GOTT was christened October 31, 1978 .

On October 31, 1973, the H.M. Griffith entered service.

J.W. McGIFFIN cleared Midland, Ont. on her maiden voyage October 31, 1973 bound for Thunder Bay, Ont. to load iron ore for Hamilton, Ont.

The CADILLAC (4) was launched October 31, 1942 as a) LAKE ANGELINA

ELMGLEN (2) cleared Owen Sound, Ont. on October 31, 1984 on her first trip in P. & H. colors.

On October 31, 1966 while downbound in the St. Marys River loaded with 11,143 tons of potash for Oswego, NY, the HALLFAX ran aground on a rocky reef and settled to the bottom with her hold full of water. She had grounded on Pipe Island Twins Reef just north of DeTour, MI.

The CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON (3) struck a reef the night of October 31, 1925 three miles south of Manitou Island, off the Keweenaw Peninsula, on Lake Superior.

On October 31, 1983 the SYLVANIA was towed out of the Frog Pond by the harbor tugs ARKANSAS and WYOMING. She was handed over to the tug OHIO for delivery to the Triad Salvage Co. at Ashtabula, OH arriving there on November 1st. Dismantling was completed there in 1984. Thus ended 78 years of service. Ironically the SYLVANIA, the first built of the 504 foot class bulkers, was the last survivor of that class. During her career with Columbia Transportation, the SYLVANIA had carried over 20 million tons and netted over $35 million.

On 31 October 1883, CITY OF TORONTO (wooden passenger-package freight sidewheeler, 207', 898 GC, built in 1864 at Niagara, Ontario) caught fire at the Muir Brothers shipyard at Port Dalhousie, Ontario and was totally destroyed. She previously had her paddle boxes removed so she could pass through the Welland Canal, and she was in the shipyard to have them reassembled that winter.

On 31 October 1874, the tug FAVORITE was towing the schooner WILLIE NEELER on Lake Erie. At about 10:30 PM, near Bar Point, the schooner suddenly sheered and before the tow line could be cast off, the FAVORITE capsized and sank. One life was lost. The rest of the crew clung to the upper works which had become dislodged from the vessel and they were rescued by the schooner's lifeboats.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




EVTAC to Resume Production

10/30:
EVTAC Mining Co. near Eveleth, Minn., plans to resume pellet production next week, about 21 days after fire damaged two conveyor galleries and forced the mine to cease production.

Temporary conveyors have been erected to carry finished pellets from the processing plant to a bin where they area loaded aboard railcars. Despite the quick recovery, the plant is expected to lose 300,000 to 500,000 tons of pellet production from its target of 4.2 million tons for this year.

EVTAC ships pellets by rail to Duluth, where they are then loaded aboard lakers at the DMIR ore dock.

Reported by: Al Miller




Nindawayma Update

10/30:
The tug Point Carroll arrived in Owen Sound Thursday evening and not Friday as originally reported. Gale warnings delayed the Saturday departure of the Nindawayma tow, they are scheduled to depart today weather permitting.

Reported by: H. Locke




Twin Ports Report

10/30:
After spending nearly two days in Duluth for repairs, the Edgar B. Speer may be making a return trip for another look. The vessel is due in Gary on Oct. 31, then due back at the Duluth port terminal on Nov. 3, according to the GLF recorded vessel message.

The Twin Ports remained busy Saturday even though vessel traffic was light. Edgar B. Speer spent part of the day ballasted down by the stern, apparently so work could be down on its bow. By about 5 p.m. the vessel was cast off from the dock and appeared to be departing for Two Harbors. Also departing in late afternoon was Canadian Mariner, which had spent the past few days loading at Cenex Harvest States #2. Also in port for grain were Peonia at Peavey in Superior, Kroonborg at General Mills in Duluth and Ziemia Chelminska at Cargill B1 in Duluth. This is the second ship to call at Cargill in recent days following a slow fall for that dock.

Reported by: Al Miller




Cleveland Update

10/30:
Saturday the Calcite II arrived at the Ontario 4 dock with stone and then took a load of salt from Cargill to Ontario 2 at West Third. She returned to the Salt Dock to load salt and then departed for Milwaukee.

The Sea Eagle II arrived using two tugs and was expected to depart the next day. The Saginaw came in was in port sailing for Ontario 4. The English River arrived late Friday night and departed just after midnight. The Adam E. Cornelius used a tug to shift for Dock 20 to Cleveland Bulk Terminal Saturday morning because of wind. She departed after unloading. The Isadora use two tugs to dock at 26W at 9:00 a.m. Saturday because of wind. The Gemini arrived Friday and then departed Saturday from Fleet Supply.

Pictures by TZ
Adam E. Cornelius shifts.
Isadora arrives.
Tug working on the bow.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Conneaut and Ashtabula News

10/30:
High winds delayed vessels Saturday afternoon in Conneaut and Ashtabula. The Richard Reiss unloaded at the stone dock in Conneaut that morning, but was unable to shift to the coal dock until early afternoon due to high winds. This delayed loading for the CSL Niagara who waited in Conneaut at the Stone dock while the Reiss loaded coal.

The Roger Blough arrived for the ore dock in Conneaut to unload. Due to the high winds the captain of the Blough decided to enter Conneaut harbor bow first. Then turned the boat 180 degrees inside the breakwall and entered the slip stern first. It was an impressive display of ship handling skills in the high winds.

The docked vessel made for some tight sailing for the Reiss when she departed the coal dock. She had to carefully thread her way between the CSL Niagara and the Roger Blough in order to reach open water. This was also an impressive sight to watch the Reiss move between the two much larger boats in the slip.

In Ashtabula the Nanticoke was loading coal while the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin and the Middletown waited out the high wind at anchor in sight of Ashtabula harbor.

Reported by: Mike Madigan




Hamilton Update

10/30:
Saturday afternoon the Jean Parisien was backing up to the JRI dock at Eastport to take on a load of grain. She had earlier delivered a load of coal to Stelco. The Canadian Navigator, had just begun unloading coal for Dofasco. At the nearby Fednav pier, the Tecam Sea was unloading steel products. Further down the slip, the a tug and barge from Hannah Marine were tied up. At Pier 12, the Federal Saguenay and Federal Fuji were also unloading steel products. At Pier 9, the Algogulf showed no signs that she will sail this season.

Reported by: M. Ouellette




Live From the Welland Canal

10/30:
On our final day at the Welland Canal we were treated to plenty of traffic and sunny skies.

Tecam Sea upbound.
Algocen arrives.
Stern view.
Federal MacKenzie bow view.
Stern view.
Mapleglen upbound for Lock 4.
Mapleglen stern view.
Federal Saguenay below Lock 8 in Port Colborne as the Pilot Boat pulls along side.
Close up of bow.
Close up of the Pilot boat J.W. Cooper.
Atlantic Huron arrives.
Stern view.

Report and pictures by: Jeff Thoreson




News Reporters Wanted

10/30:
As the Boatnerds head home from the First Annual Gathering at the Welland Canal, our daily reporting and images will end. I would like to invite any boatwatchers in the area to send in news reports or interesting vessel passages. While attending the Gathering we recognized the important part the Welland Canal plays in the Great Lakes and Seaway system. This important area is poorly represented on the News Page and I would like to change that.

News Reporters are given full credit (if desired) for any information submitted. The credit line can also include any links to outside web sites and we can create an "About the Author Page."

For more information please e-mail.




Update Delay

10/30:
The normal updates to the web site (Photo Galleries etc.) that are available every Monday morning will be delayed until Monday night. I am returning from the Welland Canal and will upload the new content after work. Be sure to check back for a special look into the operation of the Welland Canal.




Thanks to All

10/30:
My thanks to everyone for making this weekend possible. Thanks to everyone for making the trip to the Welland and participating in the Events.

Thank you to Port Weller Dry Docks for allowing our group to tour the facility. PWDD employees Trish Atwood, Jeff Clarke and Jay Jewett all worked hard so our group could enjoy the tour that was the highlight of the trip.

There were many individuals that help to make the weekend successful. Dave Wobser suggested the gathering after our meeting in the Soo, with out Dave's prodding the Boatnerd Gathering East wouldn't have taken place. Patty & Ed at the Inn at Lock 7 for their trade mark hospitality.

Jeff Cameron for arraging the room at the Canadian Corps. and building the giant screen. Jeff also donated desk flags for the raffle and shared his collections of slides.

Others showing the incredible mix of slides included:
Barry Anderson, Warren Bain, Don Geske, Mike Harting, Jim Hoffman, Richard Jenkins, Ralph Martens, Jimmy Sprunt, Dan Sweeley, Al Sykes, Ron Walsh and everyone else. (The above was taken from the sign up list, if I missed anyone please e-mail). Members from the Welland Canal Ship Society were also out in force.

The vendors for showing their merchandise during the slide nights. Remy Champt; Al Jackman, Great Lakes Memories; Al Hart; Veronica Petron with Force 5 Trading & Promotions; Ron Walsh and all the others.

Captain Anil Soni and the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation, Pilot Tom Roesslein, Captain Pagonis of the Tecam Sea and Captain Richard Samson of the Mapleglen for our looks behind the scenes at the canal.

Name were taken from registration lists, if I missed anyone please e-mail




Today in Great Lakes History - October 30

The tugs GLENADA and MOUNT McKAY towed AMOCO ILLINOIS from Essexville on October 30, 1985 and arrived at the M&M slip on November 1st. where she was to be scrapped.

The CADILLAC (4) and her former fleetmate CHAMPLAIN (3) arrived under tow by the Dutch tug/supply ship THOMAS DE GAUWDIEF on October 30, 1987 at Aliaga, Turkey to be scrapped there.

The ISLE ROYALE (2) (Canal Bulk Freighter) was launched October 30, 1947 as a) SOUTHCLIFFE HALL for the Hall Corporation of Canada Ltd. (which in 1969 became Hall Corporation (Shipping) 1969 Ltd.), Montreal.

On 30 October 1874, LOTTA BERNARD (wooden sidewheel "rabbit", 125', 147 T, built in 1869 at Port Clinton, OH) was carrying general merchandise from Silver Islet to Duluth when she foundered in a terrific gale off Encampment Island in Lake Superior. Three lives were lost. She was capable of only 4 miles per hour and was at the mercy of any fast rising storm.

During a storm, the schooner ANNABELLA CHAMBERS was wrecked on the islands off Toronto, Ontario on 30 October 1873. One sailor was washed overboard and lost. The skipper was rescued, but he had the dead body of his small son in his arms.

October 30, 1971 - The PERE MARQUETTE 21 was laid up due to coal strike. She never sailed again as a carferry.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Nindawayma Update

10/29:
The tug Point Carroll from Halifax arrived in Owen Sound Thursday evening to tow the former Ontario Northland carferry to a drydock near Quebec City. The tow to Quebec is expected to take about 10 or 11 days.

The 102 meter Spanish built (1975) Nindawayma was scheduled to leave Owen Sound's harbor Saturday after an eight year lay-up. The ship has been sold to Verreault Navigation Inc of Quebec, a shipbuilding and repair company "of high repure." Plans for the vessel don't include scrapping or using the ship as a passenger ferry but the exact use was not revealed.

The Nindawayma was purchased by Ontario Northland for $11 million in 1989 but by 1992 was laid up due to a downturn in traffic. In 1996 she was put up for sale but several proposals for her purchase failed.

Reported by: Peter Bowers




Sarah Spencer Update

10/29:
Friday morning the Sarah Spencer was moved from the berth next to the 1000-foot dry dock into the dock. The move involved pulling the Sarah Spencer out into the turning basin and turned so that she could enter the dry dock stern first. This allows easy reach for the overhead gantry crane to service the work to be done on the notch and Bloodworth Tug/Barge connection system. Tugs assisting were the Escort II Carla Anne, William C., Susan L. and the tug Bay Ship.

The tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 came out of the small dry dock late this Friday afternoon.

Moveing away from berth.
Starting turn and view of the notch.
Tug Bay Ship pulling Sarah Spencer into the 1000-foot dry dock.
Sarah Spencer in dry dock under Gantry Crane.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




Mantadoc on Lake Michigan

10/29:
The Mantadoc made a rare visit to South Chicago Friday. The vessel docked the Acme Steel dock and unloaded ore.

Reported by: Gary Clark




Live From the Welland Canal

10/29:
On a brisk Saturday morning those attending the Boatnerd Gathering were treated to a tour of Port Weller Dry Docks (PWDD). PWDD provided an amazing tour, steel is brought in at one end and hull pieces are completed at the other. The pieces are then moved to the dry dock where they are assembled.

Jeff Clarke of Port Weller Dry Docks welcomes the tour.
We begin with a look at the Algowood. PWDD is completing repairs on the Algowood. She was damaged in a loading accident and has been in the dry dock since July. She was expected to depart in the next week.
Bow view.
Stern view in the dry dock.
Rudder and propeller.
The tour moves between the dry docks holding the Algowood and Hull 79.
Hull 79 will be mated with the stern of the Louis R. Desmarais this Winter.
Side view.

At the back of the complex steel is moved into a building for processing.
Once inside the steel is cut down to size.
The pieces are assembled and welded.
Crews finish the assembly before the pieces are moved to the yard.
Like the piece of a giant puzzle, a finished piece of Hull 79 waits next to the dry dock.
The upper portion of Hull 79's bow is assembled next to the dry dock.
Lower portion of the bow in the dry dock.
Construction of the hull from the other end of the dry dock.
Close up.
Group shot.

On behalf of all who attended I would like to thank everyone at Port Weller Dry Docks for allowing us to tour. The tour received rave reviews and was the highlight of our trip.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Today in Great Lakes History - October 29

ALGOLAKE was launched October 29, 1976

On October 29, 1986 the JAMES R. BARKER, who had suffered an engine room fire, was lashed side-by-side to the thousand-foot WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY and towed this way to Sturgeon Bay, Wis. for repairs.

The b) CANADIAN EXPLORER was christened on October 29, 1983 at the Port Weller Dry Docks.

The National Transportation Safety Board ruled on October 29, 1991 that Total Petroleum was responsible for the fire that destroyed the tanker JUPITER because of faulty moorings and exonerated the BUFFALO from primary responsibility.

On the afternoon of October 29, 1987 while upbound with coal from Sandusky, OH, the ROGER M. KYES ( b) ADAM E. CORNELIUS) went aground on Gull Island Shoal in Lake Erie's Middle Passage and began taking on water. About 3,000 tons of coal was transferred to the AMERICAN REPUBLIC after which the KYES freed herself the next morning. Damage from the grounding required extensive repairs.

The tug portion of the PRESQUE ISLE (2) departed New Orleans on October 29, 1973.

The H.C. HEIMBECKER's last trip started at Thunder Bay, Ont. with a load of grain bound for Owen Sound, Ont. where, on October 29, 1981, it was discovered that one of her boilers was cracked. When unloading was completed on October 30th, the HEIMBECKER proceeded under her own power to Ashtabula, OH for scrapping.

On 29 October 1892, ZACH CHANDLER (3 mast wooden schooner-barge, 194', 727 GT, built in 1867 at Detroit) was carrying lumber from Ashland, WI in tow of the steamer JOHN MITCHELL when the two became separated in a northerly gale in Lake Superior. The CHANDLER was overwhelmed and broke up on shore about three miles east of Deer Park, MI. Five of the crew made it to shore in the lifeboat and the Lifesaving Service saved two others, but one perished. Three years earlier, the CHANDLER stranded at almost the same spot and sustained heavy damage.

On 29 October 1879, AMAZON (wooden propeller freighter, 245', 1406 t, built in 1873 at Trenton, MI) was carrying "provisions" - 900 tons of freight plus 7000 barrels of flour - from Milwaukee to Grand Haven, Michigan. She struck the notorious bar off of Grand Haven in a gale and broke up. All 68 aboard survived. Her engine was later recovered.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Gore Cancels Badger Trip

10/28:
Vice President Al Gore and his campaign party cancelled their upcoming trip on the Lake Michigan Carferry Badger. The group were to take the Badge across Lake Michigan on October 30.

The Badger will now sail for Bayship Building in Sturgeon Bay, WI. for repairs and to begin her winter lay-up. After repairs are complete she will be towed back to Ludington For the rest of her lay-up.




Richard Reiss Unloads in Tonawanda

10/28:
The Richard Reiss was in Buffalo's Black Rock Lock Friday heading north up the Niagara River towards the Huntley Power Plant in Tonawanda. Although most of the coal for Huntley arrives by rail, officials tried a pilot program a few years ago where they re-introduced water shipments as a supplement to rail to reduce costs.

Apparently the program worked, because the Richard Reiss has been unloading coal at the station on a regular basis for quite some time now. The Reiss is one of the only large ships to use the Black Lock Rock these days. On rare occasions, the tankers Gemini or Saturn lock through on their way to the Noco refinery in Tonawanda.

In its heyday, the Black Rock Lock was one of the busiest on the Lakes, handling shipments to and from the Erie Canal.

Reported by: Brian White




USS Footers

10/28:
Edgar B. Speer spent Oct. 27 at the Duluth port terminal undergoing unspecified repairs. It was expected to proceed to Two Harbors Oct. 28 to load taconite pellets for Gary.

Edwin H. Gott is scheduled to make another of its rare visits to the BNSF ore dock on Nov. 4.

Reported by: Al Miller




Saginaw River Update

10/28:
The Walter J. Mccarthy Jr. arrived early Friday at the Consumers Energy dock with a load of coal from Duluth. The McCarthy completed unloading at about noon and began backing out into the bay as soon as the Agawa Canyon had passed inbound.

The Agawa Canyon was upbound with a load of salt from Goderich for the Buena Vista Dock near the I-75 bridge. She passed the front range at about 12:30 p.m., just a little more than 24 hours after departing the Saginaw River on her last visit.

The Sam Laud was outbound from the Airport turning basin at Bay City at 5:15 a.m. Thursday. She came into the river late Wednesday afternoon. The dock was not mentioned in her security call but it was probably in Bay City.

The Agawa Canyon was outbound from the turning basin in Saginaw at 7:25 a.m. Thursday. She also entered the river late Wednesday afternoon and went to the Sargent dock near the I-75 bridge. She remained at the dock overnight due to dense fog, and reported to the Coast Guard on Wednesday evening that visibility was zero.

Reported by Stephen Hause




Live From the Welland Canal

10/28:
Friday was a busy day in the Welland Canal. Canada Steamship Lines was particularly well represented.

Gordon C. Leitch in Lock 7. The Inn at Lock 7 is in the back ground.
Close up of the Boatnerd.com Banner provided by Dave Wobser.
Leitch departs the lock upbound.
Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin upbound.
Stern view.
Martin entering the Flight Locks.
Wide angle looking down at the bow. Note how close the SeawayMax vessel is to the lock sill.
Nanticoke approaching Lock 7 upbound.
Looking down the bow.
The colorful saltie Isadora departs Lock 2.
Close up of her bulbous bow.
Passing the Halifax.
Halifax enters Lock 2 downbound.
Jean Parisien downbound for the Flight Locks.
Even the rail line below the Inn at Lock 7 was busy.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Boatnerd Gathering East

10/28:
Today continues the first annual Boatnerd Gathering East. Following the tradition set at the Soo Gathering, the meeting is very informal and all events are optional and free.

Today, October 28
For those who registered, there will be a walking tour of Port Weller Dry Docks. This rare opportunity to tour the Dry Docks has been made possible by the Boatnerd friendly people at Port Weller.

Boatwatching and museum tour at the Lock 3 Visitors Center - All Day
Visitor's center and viewing platform are free to enter. *There is a small charge to tour the museum. The museum is offering a 2 for 1 admission price for those attending the Boatnerd Gathering with coupon at http://www.boatnerd.com/gatheringeast-print.htm

The evening begins with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
Tables will be available at the Canadian Corps Legion Hall, please bring any items you would like to show, sell or swap. Open to all at no charge.

Slide show. 7:00 p.m.
Program featuring Jef Cameron and Jim Hoffman with a wide range of slides from lakers to salties.
At the Canadian Corps Legion Hall in Thorold.

Veronica Petron with Force 5 Trading & Promotions will be on hand all weekend with samples of the latest Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping merchandise. You can place orders and be the first to see the NEW items available as of November first. Some of these include a corduroy shirt, 3/4 length jacket, and a polar fleece full zip jacket. Force 5 accepts Master Card and VISA.

For updates, details, maps and links visit www.boatnerd.com/gathering.htm




Today in Great Lakes History - October 28

The CANADIAN PIONEER's maiden voyage was on October 28, 1981 to Conneaut, OH to take on coal for Nanticoke, Ont.

The CANADIAN TRANSPORT (2) was launched October 28, 1978 for Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd., Toronto, Ont.

GEMINI was christened October 28, 1978 at Huron, OH.

The GEORGE M. CARL (2) was launched October 28, 1922 as a) FRED G. HARTWELL (2)

D.M. CLEMSON (2) was launched October 28, 1916

CHARLES M. WHITE was launched October 28, 1945 as a C4-S-A4 cargo ship a) MOUNT MANSFIELD for the U.S. Maritime Commission (U.S.M.C. Hull #2369).

On 28 October 1887, BESSIE BARWICK, a 135' wooden schooner built in 1866 at St. Catherine's, Ontario as a bark, left Port Arthur for Kingston, Ontario with a load of lumber during a storm. For more than ten days, her whereabouts were unknown. In fact, a westerly gale drove her into the shallows of Michipicoten Island and she was pounded to pieces. Her crew was sheltered by local fishermen and then made it to the Soo in a small open boat.

On 28 October 1882, RUDOLPH WETZEL (wooden propeller tug, 23 t, built in 1870 at Buffalo, NY) was racing for a tow with the tug HENRY S. SILL when her boiler exploded 12 miles north of Racine, Wisconsin. She quickly sank. All three on board were killed and none of the bodies were ever found.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Paterson Departs

10/27:
Thursday morning the Paterson departed the Bay Ship Building 1000-foot dry dock. She was assisted by the tugs William C., Carla Anne, Escort II and Susan L. from Selvick Marine and the tug Bay Ship.

With 20 knot winds and fog all of the assistance was welcome. Several tugs stayed with her to the shipping lanes in Green Bay where she headed upbound.

The Canadian registered Paterson entered the dry dock on Oct. 9 for what was report to be repairs to a damaged rudder.

The bow emerges from the dry dock.
With the stern clear the tugs begin to turn the Paterson. The stern of the Sarah Spencer can be seen to the left.
Tugs push on her hull.
Ready to depart.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




Live From the Welland Canal

10/27:
Thursday was a beautiful day in the Welland Canal with plenty of traffic as the Boatnerds began arriving for this weekend's Gathering.

Saginaw approaches Lock 7. T. Parker
View from below Lock 7. N. Schultheiss
Above Lock 7. waiting for the Montrealais to pass. N. Schultheiss
Stern view as the Saginaw heads for the Port Colborne Stone Dock. N. Schultheiss
Cartierdoc in Lock 6. N. Schultheiss
Departing Lock 6. N. Schultheiss
Close up of her unique super structure. N. Schultheiss
The name of her former owners, "Hall Corp. Shipping" is still visible on the bow. N. Schultheiss
Tug Petite Forte and barge St. Mary Cement downbound (stern view). N. Schultheiss
As the sun fades the Algowest sails upbound. N. Schultheiss
Close up of her bow. N. Schultheiss
A wave from the engine room. N. Schultheiss
CSL Niagara heading for Hamilton. N. Schultheiss
English River waits for the Niagara to clear. N. Schultheiss
Niagara passes the English River.N. Schultheiss




Twin Ports Report

10/27:
With rumors and reports that the three oldest boats in USS Great Lakes Fleet will be sold this fall, the three vessels continued their workaday routine on Oct. 26. George A. Sloan was due in Calcite to load cargo bound for Buffalo on the 28th; Myron C. Taylor was scheduled to call in Detroit before heading to Stoneport on the 27th; and Calcite II was scheduled for Cleveland Oct. 27 and then due in Milwaukee on the 30th.

When the fog lifted (barely) in the Twin Ports on Oct. 26, boatwatchers could see a lot of activity. Arthur M. Anderson was departing the DMIR ore dock bound for Two Harbors, American Mariner was backing into the Northland Constructors dock to deliver stone. From there it will load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal destined for Taconite Harbor. Canadian Mariner was unloading at St. Lawrence Cement; Peonia remained at the Peavey elevator and Lady Hamilton was still tucked away at the venerable General Mills elevator in Superior. Midwest Energy Terminal was expecting a busy day, with Columbia Star, Canadian Olympic and the aforementioned American Mariner all scheduled to load. Indiana Harbor was due at the DMIR dock to load taconite pellets.

Reported by: Al Miller




Boatnerd Gathering East

10/27:
Today begins the first annual Boatnerd Gathering East. Following the tradition set at the Soo Gathering, the meeting is very informal and all events are optional and free.

Tonight, October 27
The evening begins with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
Tables will be available at the Canadian Corps Legion Hall, please bring any items you would like to show, sell or swap. Open to all at no charge.

The "Open Slide Show" begins at 7:00 p.m.
Bring your favorite tray to show or just sit back and enjoy the program. The "Swap Meet" and "Open Slide Show" are open to anyone wishing to attend even if not registered.
Held at the Canadian Corps Legion Hall on Clairmont Street at the corner of Ormond beside the 7 - 11, 1 block west from the Inn at Lock 7 in Thorold.

Saturday, October 28
For those who registered, there will be a walking tour of Port Weller Dry Docks. This rare opportunity to tour the Dry Docks has been made possible by the Boatnerd friendly people at Port Weller.

Boatwatching and museum tour at the Lock 3 Visitors Center - All Day
Visitor's center and viewing platform are free to enter. *There is a small charge to tour the museum. The museum is offering a 2 for 1 admission price for those attending the Boatnerd Gathering with coupon at http://www.boatnerd.com/gatheringeast-print.htm

Slide show. 7:00 p.m.
Program featuring presenters with a wide range of slides from lakers to salties.
At the Canadian Corps Legion Hall in Thorold.

Veronica Petron with Force 5 Trading & Promotions will be on hand all weekend with samples of the latest Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping merchandise. You can place orders and be the first to see the NEW items available as of November first. Some of these include a corduroy shirt, 3/4 length jacket, and a polar fleece full zip jacket. Force 5 accepts Master Card and VISA.

For updates, details, maps and links visit www.boatnerd.com/gathering.htm




Gordon P. Bugbee

10/27:
Gordon P. Bugbee, the dean of Detroit’s architectural historians, died on October 25, 2000 at his home in Detroit’s historic Corktown neighborhood. He was sixty-six years old.

Born in Dayton, Ohio, Bugbee was brought to Detroit at an early age when his father, L. Willis Bugbee, became associated with the well-known patent law firm of Barthel and Bugbee. After elementary education in the Grosse Pointe schools, Bugbee attended Philips Academy, Andover, graduating in 1952. He received a Bachelor’s in Architecture cum laude in architecture from Harvard College in 1956, and received the Masters in Architecture from the Harvard School of Design in 1961. During his college years, Bugbee was one of the last employees of Detroit’s George D. Mason Company, the architectural firm famous in the region for fine design in historical styles ranging from the Richardsonian Romanesque of Detroit’s First Presbyterian to the late Neo-Gothic of Kirk-in-the-Hills. He often commented on the irony of studying the latest “International Style” design at Harvard and then coming home on vacation to design full-scale Gothic details for the Kirk.

Bugbee lived and worked for some years for Louis Kingscott & Associates in Kalamazoo, Michigan, where he met and married Margaret (Peggy) Beloof, who predeceased him. After his return to the Detroit area, Bugbee worked for the firm of O’Dell, Hewlett & Luckenbach, where he participated in the design of the Pontiac Silverdome; and later with the architectural firm of Roger Margerum.

In 1978, Bugbee began to teach part-time at Lawrence Technological University, and in 1983 left the full-time practice of architecture to teach full time; he was associate professor at his death. Largely self-taught in the field of architectural history, he nevertheless made it his specialty. A lively lecturer, his enthusiasm for his topic, his brilliant intellect and his limitless depth of knowledge made him a favorite of many students. He was Lawrence’s “Educator of the Year” in 1993. A scholar and a believer in hard work, he was not an advocate of the modern trend to tolerance for non-achievers.

Outside his profession, Bugbee enjoyed a world-wide reputation as a scholar in the field of maritime history. While still at Harvard he published The Lake Erie Sidewheel Steamers of Frank E. Kirby, a monograph devoted to the magnificent steamers that served the overnight routes from Detroit to Cleveland and Buffalo. Over time, he became the leading scholar of those ships and of Frank E. Kirby, the world-famous marine architect who designed them. During the 1960's, he was an issue editor of Steamboat Bill, the journal of the Steamship Historical Society of America, and editor-in-chief of Telescope, the periodical of the Great Lakes Maritime Institute based at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Isle. Throughout his life, he produced articles on the maritime history of the Great Lakes region, some of them distributed as free flyers on excursion boats, but most for publication in scholarly journals.

He was also the author of Domino’s Mansion, published in 1988, which studied the design of the Domino headquarters buildings by the architect Gunnar Birkerts, and the role of those buildings as symbols of the corporation they housed.

An active churchman, Bugbee was Senior Warden of Detroit’s Trinity Episcopal Church at the time of his death, and was also the organizer of the weekly soup kitchen operated at the church; he was also a generous provider of individual assistance to those in need. He was especially devoted to the Trinity Church building, a work commissioned from George D. Mason by James Scripps, which is a nationally important example of the reform of Gothic Revival at the end of the 19th century.

Bugbee was also involved in historic preservation activities in the area and lived in an 1880's house in Detroit’s historic Corktown. From 1985 to 1987 he was the architect of record for the widely-admired renovation of Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church of 1855, not far from his home. For twenty years he has served the City Council as an appointed member of the City of Detroit’s Historic Designation Advisory Board. He also served as President of the Saarinen (Michigan) Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians.

A true eccentric in manner and dress, Gordon P. Bugbee was nonetheless a most loyal and rewarding friend for those who took the time to delve beyond appearances. He was one of Detroit’s most active and avid advocates, and a true contributor. He cannot be replaced.

He leaves his sister, Lorna Simmons; a niece; three nephews; and a multitude of friends.

A memorial service will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church on Sunday, November 5, 2000, at 2:30 p.m. The church is located at the intersection of Trumbull Avenue, Martin Luther King Boulevard, and Grand River Avenue, on Detroit’s near west side. The family suggests contributions to Trinity Episcopal Church.

Reported by: William Hoey Sr.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 27

The PAUL THAYER (b) EARL W. OGLEBAY) was christened on October 27, 1973 at Lorain.

While the JAMES R. BARKER was up bound October 27, 1986 on Lake Huron above buoys 11 & 12, a high pressure fuel line on the starboard engine failed causing an engine room fire, which was extinguished by on-board fire fighting equipment. Fortunately no one was injured. On October 29th the BARKER was lashed side-by-side to the thousand-foot WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY (b) Paul R. Tregurtha) and taken to Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

On her maiden voyage the HOCHELAGA (2) departed Collingwood on October 27, 1949 for Fort William, Ont. to load grain for Port Colborne, Ont.

The FRANCIS E. HOUSE was laid up at Duluth, MN on October 27, 1960 and remained idle there until April, 1966 when she was sold to the Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland and was renamed c) KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1).

On October 27, 1973 the HENRY LALIBERTÉ struck an embankment while backing from the Frontier Dock Slip at Buffalo, NY and damaged her steering gear beyond repair. As a consequence she was laid up there.

The RED WING (2) and the FRANK A. SHERMAN departed Lauzon, Que. on October 27, 1986 in tandem tow by the Vancouver based deep-sea tug CANADIAN VIKING bound for scrapping in Taiwan.

On 27 October 1869, ALFRED ALLEN (wooden schooner, 160 T, built in 1853 at Pultneyville, NJ as J. J. MORLEY) was bound for Toledo, OH with 500 barrels of salt when she went on the Mohawk Reef near Port Colborne, Ontario in a blizzard. She washed free and drifted to the mainland beach where she was pounded to pieces. No lives were lost.

During a snow storm on the night of 27 October 1878, the propeller QUEBEC of the Beatty Line ran aground on Magnetic Shoals near Cockburn Island on Lake Huron. She was four miles from shore and one of her arches was broken in the accident.

October 27, 1854 - Well-known Pere Marquette carferry captain Joseph "Joe" Russell was born in Greenfield, Wisconsin.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Pere Marquette 41 Update

10/26:
The tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 arrived in Sturgeon Bay, WI. some time last week. The pair were placed in the small dry dock at Bay Shipbuilding for replacement of worm shell and Bottom Plates. The tug and barge were damaged on Oct. 8 in heavy weather on Lake Michigan.

The barge is the former City of Midland 41, a Lake Michigan ferry converted in 1998 and paired to the tug Undaunted at Bay Shipbuilding.

The carferry Badger is also expected in the shipyard after ending her season next week.

Also at Bay Ship Building, the Paterson crew is back on board the vessel that was scheduled to depart Sturgeon Bay Wednesday. Her departure was delayed due to heavy fog. She is now scheduled for departure early this morning.

Pere Marquette 41 in dry dock.
Another view.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




Nindawayma Update

10/26:
The Nindawayma is scheduled to depart from her eight year lay-up in Owen Sound on Saturday. The tug Point Carroll is expected to arrive in Owen Sound on Friday to prepare to tow the ferry to Les Mechins, Que. The tow to Quebec is expected to take about 10 or 11 days.

Reported by: Dave Yager and Peter Bowers




Toledo Update

10/26:
Wednesday the Algobay was loading coal at the CSX Dock. The Courtney Burton was unloading ore at the Torco Dock. The saltie Mljet was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The Algonorth was at Anderson's "K" Elevator loading grain. She was expected to depart on Wednesday evening.

The next scheduled coal boats will be the Algomarine and Canadian Navigator due in this morning. They will be followed by the Fred R. White Jr. scheduled to arrive on Saturday evening. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco on Sunday evening followed by the Reserve on Monday afternoon.

The next scheduled grain vessels will be the Algocen going to Andersons "K" Elevator this morning. Other tentative grain boats are the Gordon C. Leitch, Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin and a saltwater vessel due to arrive at Toledo in the next several days.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Boatnerd Gathering Weather

10/26:
Wednesday's weather forecast from Environment Canada for the Gathering East:
Friday - 60% chance of showers, Hi 63F (17C)
Saturday - Sunny, Hi 55F (13C)
Sunday - Sunny, Hi 50F (C)





Boatnerd Gathering East

10/26:
We are just a few days away from first annual Boatnerd Gathering East. Following the tradition set at the Soo Gathering, the meeting is very informal and all events are optional and free.

Friday, October 27
The evening begins with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
Tables will be available at the Canadian Corps Legion Hall, please bring any items you would like to show, sell or swap. Open to all at no charge.

The "Open Slide Show" begins at 7:00 p.m.
Bring your favorite tray to show or just sit back and enjoy the program. The "Swap Meet" and "Open Slide Show" are open to anyone wishing to attend even if not registered.
Held at the Canadian Corps Legion Hall on Clairmont Street at the corner of Ormond beside the 7 - 11, 1 block west from the Inn at Lock 7 in Thorold.

Saturday, October 28
For those who registered, there will be a walking tour of Port Weller Dry Docks. This rare opportunity to tour the Dry Docks has been made possible by the Boatnerd friendly people at Port Weller.

Boatwatching and museum tour at the Lock 3 Visitors Center - All Day
Visitor's center and viewing platform are free to enter. *There is a small charge to tour the museum. The museum is offering a 2 for 1 admission price for those attending the Boatnerd Gathering with coupon at http://www.boatnerd.com/gatheringeast-print.htm

Slide show. 7:00 p.m.
Program featuring presenters with a wide range of slides from lakers to salties.
At the Canadian Corps Legion Hall in Thorold.

Veronica Petron with Force 5 Trading & Promotions will be on hand all weekend with samples of the latest Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping merchandise. You can place orders and be the first to see the NEW items available as of November first. Some of these include a corduroy shirt, 3/4 length jacket, and a polar fleece full zip jacket. Force 5 accepts Master Card and VISA.

For updates, details, maps and links visit www.boatnerd.com/gathering.htm




Today in Great Lakes History - October 26

LOUIS R. DESMARAIS was christened October 26,1977.

On October 26, 1968 the R. BRUCE ANGUS grounded in the St. Lawrence River near Beauharnois, Que. Sixteen hundred tons of iron ore were lightered to free her and she damaged 65 bottom plates.

The HUTCHCLIFFE HALL and OREFAX were sold October 26, 1971 to the Consortium Ile d'Orleans of Montreal made up of Richelieu Dredging Corp., McNamara Construction Ltd. and The J.P. Porter Co. Ltd.

On October 26, 1924 the E.A.S. CLARKE (2), anchored in the Detroit River opposite the Great Lakes Engineering Works because of dense fog was struck by the B.F. JONES (1) near her after deckhouse which caused the CLARKE to sink. No lives were lost.

On October 26, 1977 the MENIHEK LAKE struck a lock in the St. Lawrence Seaway sustaining damage estimated at $400,000.

On October 26, 1971 the ROGERS CITY (2) had her A-frame collapsed while unloading at Carrollton, MI on the Saginaw River. Her unloading boom was cut away and temporary repairs were made at Defoe Shipbuilding Co., Bay City, MI.

The tug ROUILLE was launched on October 26, 1929 as Hull 83 of Collingwood Shipyards Ltd.

The schooner HEMISPHERE, which was being sought by the U.S. Marshals at Detroit and the St. Lawrence River, escaped at the Gallop Rapids and has gone to sea.

On 26 October 1851, ATLAS (wooden propeller, 153’, 375 T, built in 1851 at Buffalo) was carrying flour from Detroit to Buffalo when she was blown to shore near the mouth of the Grand River (Lorain, OH) by a gale, stranded and became a total loss. No lives were lost.

On 26 October 1895, GEORGE W. DAVIS (wooden schooner, 136', 299 gt, built in 1872 at Toledo, Ohio) was carrying coal in a storm on Lake Erie when she stranded near Port Maitland, Ontario. On 26 October 1895, a few days after the stranding, she floated off on her own, drifted two miles up the beach and sank. No lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Fog Closes St. Marys River

10/25:
Heavy fog Tuesday morning closed the St. Marys River from around 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m., sending vessels to anchor or forcing them to wait tied up to the Soo Locks' pier. When the fog lifted, the area was crowded with boats for the next several hours, among them downbounders Courtney Burton, Joseph L. Block, Canadian Transport, Edwin H. Gott, Montrealais and James R. Barker. Upbound was the Frontenac, American Mariner, Roger Blough and Arthur M. Anderson. By 5 p.m., all traffic had cleared, leaving the downbound Walter J. McCarthy Jr. as the only other vessel in the system.

Block and Burton wait below the locks, from the Soo Locks live cam. Sent in by Vern Sondak
Looking north as the Canadian Transport enters.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




Fog Causes Problems for Badger

10/25:
Heavy fog caused the carferry Badger to scraped the rocks near the Ludington Municipal Marina Tuesday morning on its way out of Ludington’s harbor. The Ludington Daily News reports that a Coast Guard inspection reveled that the carferry had “barely scraped” the rocks, causing no damage.




Twin Ports Report

10/25:
Elton Hoyt 2nd is becoming a regular in the Twin Ports grain trade. It was in Superior again Oct. 23-24 loading at Peavey Connors Point elevator. Other grain traffic included Federal Oshima at Cargill in Duluth and Lady Hamilton at General Mills in Superior. Peonia is anchored on the lake waiting for Peavey.

Other traffic on Oct. 24 included Canadian Mariner making an unusual call with cargo for St. Lawrence Cement, St. Clair undergoing unspecified repairs at the Duluth port terminal and Oglebay Norton loading at Midwest Energy Terminal.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

10/25:
Tuesday the Armco was at the Torco Dock unloading ore. The CSL Niagara was expected to arrive later in the evening at the CSX Dock to load coal. The Algonorth was at Anderson's "K" Elevator loading grain. The next coal boats due in at the CSX Dock will be the Algobay this morning followed by the Algomarine and Canadian Navigator on Thursday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Courtney Burton this afternoon followed by the Armco on Sunday evening. The next scheduled grain boat will be the Algocen to follow the Algonorth when she is finished loading at Anderson's "K" Elevator.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - October 25

The ALGOBAY departed on her maiden voyage October 25, 1978 from Collingwood light for Stoneport, Mich. to load stone for Sarnia, Ont.

The STERNECLIFFE HALL entered service on October 25, 1947.

The HURON (4) arrived at Santander, Spain October 25, 1973 in consort with the WYANDOTTE (2) towed by the German tug DOLPHIN X. for scrapping.

October 25, 1895 - Shenago No. 2 (later Pere Marquette 16) was launched in Toledo, Ohio. She was built by the Craig Shipbuilding Company for the United States & Ontario Steam Navigation Company and later became part of the Pere Marquette carferry fleet.

The engines of the propeller WESTMORELAND, which sank in 1854 near Skillagalee Reef in Lake Michigan, were recovered and arrived at Chicago on 25 October 1874.

ARK was built on the burned out hull of the steamer E. K. COLLINS as a sidewheel passenger steamer in 1853 at Newport, MI, but she was later cut down to a barge. On 25 October 1866, she was being towed along with three other barges down bound from Saginaw, MI in a storm.. Her towline parted and she disappeared with her crew of 6. The other three tow-mates survived. There was much speculation about ARK's whereabouts until identifiable wreckage washed ashore 100 miles north of Goderich, Ontario.

On 25 October 1833, JOHN BY (wooden stern-wheeler, 110', built in 1832 at Kingston, Ontario) was on her regular route between York (now Toronto) and Kingston, Ontario when a storm drove her ashore near Port Credit, a few miles from York. Her terrible handling of open Lake water set the precedent that stern-wheelers were not compatible with lake commerce.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




J D Mitchell Update

10/24:
After examining the hull of the J D Mitchell, Transport Canada officials indicated Monday that no damage was found and the ship was authorized to continue her trip. The J D Mitchell departed Quebec City en route to the Port of Cacouna, QC after which it will sail for Halifax and the West Indies.

The 180-meter J D Mitchell of Barbados ran aground at 4:45a.m. Saturday morning after experiencing a major electrical breakdown. The ship had departed from the port of Trois-Rivieres in direction of Cacouna QC when it ran aground off Deschaillons. The J D Mitchell was pulled off at high tide in the afternoon with the assistance of two tugs from Trois-Rivieres after shifting ballast. A tug escorted the ship to Quebec where it docked Saturday evening.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




Lake Michigan Carferry Extends Season

10/24:
The Lake Michigan Carferry Badger will extend her sailing season an extra day this year on October 30th. The Badger is going to host Vice President Al Gore and his campaign party to Wisconsin carrying 12 buses and support vehicles.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Port Weller Dry Docks Update

10/24:
The Algowood is expected to return service the first week of November. The vessel was loading stone in Bruce Mines, Ontario on June 1 when the vessel encountered structural problems resulting in significant damage to the Algowood. It arrived at Port Weller Dry Docks on July 15 for repairs.

The Tadoussac is expected to arrive the first week of December for a winter-long widening and modernization project. The vessel's width will be increased to 78-feet. The cargo holds will be rebuilt to a single belt system, dust control will be rebuilt for the handling of cement clinker and iron ore. Her gates will also be automated.

The Louis R. Desmarais is expected to arrive some time around Dec. 17 to be converted to a SeawayMax laker.




Cuyahoga Unloads

10/24:
The Cuyahoga made an unusual trip to Milwaukee Monday afternoon with a load of salt. The event was dampened somewhat by the fog and rainy weather.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




New Cruise Ships

10/24:
The Waddington Daily Time recently reported that a New Orleans cruise ship company would include stops at Clayton, N.Y. in the Thousand Islands, for two new ships next summer. Eight visits are scheduled on their way to or from Buffalo. Delta Queen Coastal Voyages will name their two 200 passenger ships Cape May Light and Cape Cod Light. The ships are named for historic lighthouses and are designed to resemble classic coastal ships of the late 1800s. The 300-foot ships will have 114 staterooms, a dining room, three bars and a gift shop.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Salties Renamed

10/24:
Renamed a couple of months ago according to Lloyd's register are the following Seaway visitors: Sedoy was renamed Yannis. Munteborg was renamed MSC Baltic and Ghadames was renamed Melia II.

Casualty
The bulk carrier Flame was drifting with main engine failure in mid-Atlantic 04 August. LOF signed . Tug Fotiy Krylov proceeding. Flame visited Great Lakes ports under three of her four previous names, Doric Javelin, Federal Inger and Seaglory.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Twin Ports Report

10/24:
The former Great Northern grain elevator in Superior, now operated by General Mills, handled its first saltie in recent memory when it began loading the 730-foot Lady Hamilton on Oct. 23. The saltie arrived at the elevator on the heels of Canadian Leader, which was loading there Saturday.

Edwin H. Gott paid on of its occasional visits to Duluth overnight of Oct. 22-23. The vessel departed the DMIR ore dock about 7 a.m. Monday with taconite pellets destined for the steel plant in Nanticoke, Ontario.

After unloading in Gary on Oct. 24, Edgar B. Speer is scheduled to proceed to the Duluth port terminal on Oct. 27 for repairs.

Edwin H. Gott proceeds down St. Louis Bay as it departs the DMIR ore dock. It's passing the Walter J. McCarthy Jr., which is loading at Midwest Energy Terminal.
The Gott picks up speed on a gloomy morning departure. .
Video of the Gott passing. (410k)
Stern view of the Gott turning into the Duluth harbor basin.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

10/24:
Monday the Strange Attractor was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator. The Canadian Miner was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The Philip R. Clarke was loading coal at the CSX Dock with the H. Lee White due in later that evening to load. The next scheduled coal boats will be the Reserve, CSL Niagara, and Algobay all scheduled to arrive today. The Algomarine will follow them on Wednesday.

The Reserve was due in at the Torco Dock on Monday evening to unload ore. The next scheduled ore boats will be the Armco this morning followed by the Courtney Burton on Wednesday afternoon.

Tentative grain vessels scheduled to arrive in Toledo are the Algonorth, Algocen, Gordon C. Leitch, and Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin all are expected to arrive later this week.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Update

10/24:
Shipping on the Cuyahoga began at 7:30 a.m. with the Saginaw heading up to West Third. The American Republic was also upbound following closely behind. The Saginaw finished unloading at West Third and headed out. She turned in the outer harbor and sailed back into the Salt Dock. It was like a parade on the river with the Saginaw leading with the Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys Cement II a few hundred yards behind and the American Republic behind the tug and barge. Most of the bridges stayed up for all three to get through the were that close together. The Mljet was expected to depart Monday night and the Myron C. Taylor was scheduled to arrive for Ontario 2.

Pictures by TZ
On the Saginaw's stern.
The American Republic out bound.
Stern view.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




New Muskoka Lakes Cruise Ship

10/24:
The Muskoka Steamship and Historical Society of Gravenhurst, Ontario is pleased to announce the signing of a contract with McNally Construction Inc. of Hamilton, Ontario for the construction of a new passenger ship. This vessel will be named Wenonah II and will supplement the present R.M.S. Segwun in providing heritage-style cruising on the Muskoka Lakes in Ontario.

Wenonah II will be 127 feet long, 28 feet wide with a draft of 6 feet. She will have a service speed of about 11 knots and will be licensed to carry 200 passengers. The main deck will feature an elegant dining room seating 86 and a second dining room, seating 24. The ship will have twin propellers and rudders, a bow-thruster and will be powered by twin 385hp diesel engines. Her hull will be built in nine sections at the McNally yard near Belleville, Ontario and assembled in Gravenhurst. Since the contract provides for her completion by late September 2001, the ship may be able to help Segwun with the 2001 Thanksgiving cruises.

Wenonah II will be attractive and both its exterior and interior appearance will preserve the memories of the former steamers. In addition, she will serve the group and charter passenger demands, which have developed with Segwun in recent years. Also, with Segwun, she will permit regularly scheduled cruises on each of Lakes Joseph, Muskoka and Rosseau.

Wenonah II is named after Muskoka’s very first steamer. The name, meaning “first-born daughter” in the Ojibwa language, was suitable for this first vessel in 1866 and is also suitable this new vessel of 2001. Both ships will be seen as starting a new era on the Muskoka Lakes. Wenonah II will sail with Segwun, whose Ojibwa name means “Springtime," to ensure that the best days on these lakes are yet to come.

Reported by: Gordon C. Shaw




Oglebay Norton Announces 3rd Quarter Results

10/24:
Monday Oglebay Norton reported that third-quarter earnings rose 19 percent to $7.6 million or $1.52 a diluted share. This compared with $6.4 million or $1.32 a share in he year earlier period. Revenues rose 21 percent to $85.4 million.

The company said net income for the first nine months totaled $11.3 million or $2.26 a share, up 22 percent from $9.3 million or $1.92 a share. Revenues reached $250.1 million from $217.1 million in the first nine months of 1999.

The Marine Services fleet continues to be fully booked for the remainder of the season. Revenues for the third quarter and nine-month period improved by 5% and 4%, respectively, compared with last year's results. However, primarily as a result of low water levels and higher fuel and labor costs, operating income, as expected, declined 22% and 36%, respectively, from the prior-year results.

Shares of Oglebay Norton closed at 26 1/2 Monday, up 3/4.

Visit www.oglebaynorton.com for more information




Today in Great Lakes History - October 24

TEXACO WARRIOR (2) was launched October 24, 1969 as a) THUNTANK 6.

The PHILIP D. BLOCK along with the W.W. HOLLOWAY scrap tow arrived Recife, Brazil. October 24, 1986

The THOMAS W.LAMONT and her former fleetmate, ENDERS M. VOORHEES arrived at Alegeciras, Spain on October 24, 1987 on the way to the cutters torch. The LAMONT was one of the last bulkers that retained her telescoping hatch covers to the very end.

The NIPIGON BAY arrived Thunder Bay, Ont. on October 24, 1980 where repairs were made from damage caused by her grounding earlier in the month.

On 24 October 1855, ALLEGHENY (wooden propeller, 178’, 468 T, built in 1849 at Cleveland) was carrying general merchandise and passengers in a storm, when she anchored near the Milwaukee harbor entrance for shelter. She lost her stack and then was unable to get up steam and was helpless. She dragged her anchor and came in close to the beach where she was pounded to pieces. There was no loss of life. Her engine and most of her cargo were removed by the end of the month. Her engine was installed in a new vessel of the same name built to replace her.

On 24 October 1873, just a month after being launched, the scow WAUBONSIE capsized at St. Clair, Michigan and lost her cargo of bricks. She was righted and towed to Port Huron, minus masts, rigging and bowsprit, for repairs.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Calcite II, Sloan and Taylor Sold

10/23:
A story in the Presque Isle Advance newspaper reports that the sale of the Calcite II, George A. Sloan and Myron C. Taylor has been finalized with Grand River Transportation. The new company is expected to take over operation of the vessels Jan. 1, 2001. Grand River Transportation is the U.S. affiliate of the Canadian shipping company Lower Lakes Towing. All vessels will remain under the U.S. Flag.

The Taylor is scheduled for lay-up in Sarnia around Nov. 1, with the Calcite II following within the next few days. The Sloan is scheduled to lay-up around Nov. 15. All three boats will be docked side by side.




US Gypsum to Close Ship Loading Facility in Alabaster

10/23:
The Iosco News Herald reported last week that of US Gypsum has announced that it would close its mill and shiploading operations in Alabaster, MI. Last summer the aerial tramway which loaded ships was put out of operation when the cable system transporting hoppers out to the dock located a half mile off shore collapsed.

US Gypsum officials underwent a cost study of replacing the aging system and decided to close the mill that processed the gypsum. Of the 87 workers at the facility 48 will lose jobs as of January 12, 2001. After the shipping season closes, the workers will undergo the final closure of the mill.

The company is exploring other ways to transport the rock as US Gypsum officials estimate that another ten years of gypsum exists in the mine. Gypsum has been mined in Alabaster since 1902 and the aging equipment has become more expensive to operate and replace.

Reported by: Dave Gawlik




Toledo Update

10/23:
The Canadian Miner arrived early Sunday morning at Anderson's "K" Elevator to load grain. She was towed upriver by the Gaelic tugs Susan and William Hoey. The Strange Attractor was loading grain at Anderson's "E" Elevator. The Mapleglen was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. She was expected to depart later that evening. The Algosteel arrived at the A.R.M.S. Dock on Saturday to unload grain at this facility, once finished she headed over to the CSX Coal Dock to load coal on Sunday afternoon. The barge McKee Sons arrived at the CSX Dock around 2:30 p.m. and was waiting to follow the Algosteel to load coal.

The tug and barge Michigan/Great Lakes departed from the B-P Oil Company Dock around 4:30 p.m. The next scheduled coal boats will be the Philip R. Clarke, and H. Lee White due in on today. The next scheduled ore boats will be the Reserve due in this evening. The Armco is scheduled to arrive Tuesday followed by the Courtney Burton on Wednesday afternoon.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Update

10/23:
The Algorail was inbound for West Third at 1:00 p.m. with the tugs Idaho and Washington. She departed with the same two tugs at 8:00 p.m. The saltie Mljet was inbound at 10:00 p.m. for 24 W. The tug Rebecca Lynn and barge departed Sunday afternoon and the American Republic was on her usual shuttle from Lorain to the LTV steel mill.

Pictures by TZ
Algorail arrives.
Close up.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Erie Update

10/23:
American Steamship has had a regular run this year, unloading at Erie and then loading at Conneaut. The John J. Boland was no exception, she unloaded at the Mounfort Terminal in Erie Saturday night and then arrived in Conneaut around 8:10 Sunday morning. She tied up at the Ore Dock to wait for the George A. Sloan to finish loading.

Boland at the Conneaut Ore Dock.
George A. Sloan.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Aerial Views

10/23:
Pilot and photographer Don Coles was flying over Lake St. Clair Friday and sent in the pictures below. All photographs are available for purchase. Don's company, Great Lakes Aerial Photos, is available for hire for any aerial photography need.

Pathfinder and tug Dorothy Ann
Ira.
Algomarine.

For more new aerial views click here




Boatnerd Gathering East

10/23:
We are just a few days away from first annual Boatnerd Gathering East. Following the tradition set at the Soo Gathering, the meeting is very informal and all events are optional and free.

Friday, October 27
The evening begins with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
Tables will be available at the Canadian Corps Legion Hall, please bring any items you would like to show, sell or swap. Open to all at no charge.

The "Open Slide Show" begins at 7:00 p.m.
Bring your favorite tray to show or just sit back and enjoy the program. The "Swap Meet" and "Open Slide Show" are open to anyone wishing to attend even if not registered.
Held at the Canadian Corps Legion Hall on Clairmont Street at the corner of Ormond beside the 7 - 11, 1 block west from the Inn at Lock 7 in Thorold.

Saturday, October 28
For those who registered, there will be a walking tour of Port Weller Dry Docks. This rare opportunity to tour the Dry Docks has been made possible by the Boatnerd friendly people at Port Weller.

Boatwatching and museum tour at the Lock 3 Visitors Center - All Day
Visitors center and viewing platform are free to enter. *There is a small charge to tour the museum. The museum is offering a 2 for 1 admission price for those attending the Boatnerd Gathering with coupon at http://www.boatnerd.com/gatheringeast-print.htm

Slide show. 7:00 p.m.
Program featuring presenters with a wide range of slides from lakers to salties.
At the Canadian Corps Legion Hall in Thorold.

Veronica Petron with Force 5 Trading & Promotions will be on hand all weekend with samples of the latest Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping merchandise. You can place orders and be the first to see the NEW items available as of November first. Some of these include a corduroy shirt, 3/4 length jacket, and a polar fleece full zip jacket. Force 5 accepts Master Card and VISA.

For updates, details, maps and links visit www.boatnerd.com/gathering.htm




Today in Great Lakes History - October 23

The CECILIA DESGAGNES was launched October 23, 1970 as a) CARL GORTHON, for Rederi A/B Gylfe, Hälsingborg, Sweden.

GRAND RAPIDS Rail Car Ferry was launched October 23, 1926 for the Grand Trunk-Milwaukee Car Ferry Co., Muskegon, MI.

WILLIAM B. SCHILLER was launched October 23, 1909 for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

October 23, 1926 - The Grand Trunk carferry Grand Rapids was launched in Manitowoc. She entered service in December of 1926.

October 23, 1953 - The S.S. SPARTAN arrived Ludington on her maiden voyage. Captain Harold A. Altschwager was in command.

On 23 October 1868, F. T. BARNEY (wooden schooner, 255 T, built in 1856 at Vermilion, OH) collided with the schooner TRACY J. BRONSON and sank below Nine Mile Point, NW of Rogers City in Lake Michigan. The wreck was found in 1987 and sits in deep water, upright in almost perfect condition.

On 23 October 1873, the wooden steam barge GENEVA was loaded with wheat and towing the barge GENOA in a violent storm on Lake Superior. She bent her propeller shaft and the flailing blades cut a large hole in her stern. The water rushed in and she went down quickly 15 miles off Caribou Island. No lives were lost. This was her first season of service. She was one of the first bulk freighters with the classic Great Lakes fore and aft deck houses.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Daviken Refloated

10/22:
Shortly after 10:00 p.m. Saturday night the Daviken was pulled off the muddy channel bank it had been stuck on for about a day and a half. The Gaelic tugs Roger Stahl, Shannon, Patricia Hoey and the GLT tug Wyoming pulled the ship free in one big pull. The Roger Stahl and Shannon were escorting the Daviken up the St. Clair River into Lake Huron where divers will inspect the bottom of the vessel.

The back up Mail Boat Joseph J. Hogan, departed her Detroit dock about 10:30 a.m. Saturday taking a surveyor from the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) to the vessel. The Coast Guard required the ABS inspection before any attempt could be made to refloat the vessel.

The vessel suffered an electrical failure that caused her to lose steering on Friday afternoon. She is sailing upbound with a cargo of structural steel for Milwaukee and Chicago.

Daviken upbound in the Detroit River on Friday a few hours before running aground. Pat Pavlat

Pilot and photographer Don Coles flew over the stricken vessel Saturday morning.
Image showing the vessel out of the channel. The St. Clair Flats are seen at the top of the image.
Tugs tied to the vessel as the Hogan circles.
Another view.
A view from 2000-feet.

Joseph J. Hogan departs the J.W. Westcott Co. Dock that morning.
Away from the dock Capt. Don Carns brings the Hogan up to speed.
Heading up river for Lake St. Clair.




Another Saltie Grounds

10/22:
Transport Canada reported Saturday that the J D Mitchell of Barbados registry ran aground early Saturday morning at Deschaillons approximately 70 Km west of Quebec City following engine trouble. The ship was loaded with grain. The vessel was refloated that afternoon at high tide with the assistance of tugs from Trois-Rivieres. The ship was proceeding on its own to Quebec City for further inspection. The JD Mitchell is expected to dock at Anse aux Foulons by evening. Transport Canada will have the hull surveyed to determine the extent of damage.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




Sarah Spencer Arrives

10/21:
The tug Jane Ann IV arrived in Sturgeon Bay, WI. Saturday morning towing the Sarah Spencer. With the assistance of tugs, the Spencer was slid into a berth at Bay Shipbuilding across from the Paterson, another Canadian vessel. The tug and barge will undergo modifications to fit together as one unit. Bay Ship will install a new Bloodworth tug/barge connection system and the tug is reported to have new rudders installed.

Tugs assist the Spencer into the dry dock.
Moving into the dock.
View across the yard.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




More Bay Shipbuilding News

10/21:
An article in Saturday's Door County Advocate provided the details for a Marine Travelift project unfolding at Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay. Construction of the world's largest boat hoist at 882 metric tons is nearing completion. Unable to construct the heavy lifter at its own facility on the west side of Sturgeon Bay, Marine Travelift moved this operation to Bayship, alongside the slip where the Edward L. Ryerson remains in lay-up.

The blue structure, standing on tandem 12-foot diameter Goodyear tires on each of the four legs, towers over the superstructure of the Ryerson. The hoist measures 67 feet tall, 106 feet long and 92 feet wide. Four close-circuit television cameras send pictures to the cab, allowing the operator to check on the alignment of the wheels.

Though staggering in size, the hoist is self-propelled, driving itself with a 6 cylinder, 500 horsepower, Caterpillar diesel engine. Travel speed is snail-like at a pace of one-half mile an hour. Upon completion of construction and testing procedures, the unit will be disassembled and shipped to a Singapore customer that is replacing its 500 metric ton hoist, also built at Marine Travelift. The 35 year old company has delivered more than 3,000 mobile hoists and marine forklifts to companies around the globe.

Also at Bay Ship, the Patterson continues in the graving dock undergoing repairs while the Lake Guardian is dockside following its five year inspection. Local boat watchers are now awaiting Bay Ship's announcement of this season's listing of ships that will be in for winter lay-up.

Reported by: Paul A. Graf




Twin Ports Report

10/22:
Grain shipments through Duluth-Superior have slowed somewhat compared to recent weeks, but four vessels were at elevators on Saturday, and several were loading. Canadian Leader was at the General Mills elevator in Superior (formerly Great Northern); Ziemia Gnieznienska was at AGP, Federal Oshima was at Cargill and Adimon was at Peavey Connors Point.

Edwin H. Gott is due to make another run with pellets from DMIR in Duluth to Nanticoke, Ontario. Its due at the ore dock on Oct. 22. After staying away most of the season, Presque Isle is due back at DMIR in Duluth on Oct. 25 to unload stone.

Federal Oshima at Cargill. Al Miller
Canadian Leader at General Mills. Al Miller
Close up. Al Miller
Wide view. Kent Rengo

Reported by: Al Miller




Detroit River News

10/22:
Saturday was a busy day on the Detroit River.

The Cuyahoga loading salt at Morton in Windsor.
Sandviken & Yankcanuck unloading at Windsor.
USCG Bristol Bay in a plastic cocoon to keep sandblasted paint contained.
Yankcanuck upbound after unloading.
The Marine Historical Society of Detroit's Advisory Council meets outside the offices of the J.W. Westcott Co.
Another view.

Reported by: Pat Pavlat




Toledo Update

10/22:
Friday evening was busy one for ship traffic on the Maumee River. The Quebecois departed Anderson's "K" Elevator under tow of the Gaelic tugs Susan and William Hoey heading downbound. The Philip R. Clarke was upbound heading for the City Dock to unload salt and following the Clarke upriver was the saltie Strange Attractor under tow of the "G" tugs Illinois and Louisiana headed for Anderson's "E" Elevator. These vessel movements were happening at the same time which kept all of the bridge tenders along the river busy for several hours.

On Saturday the Calcite II was loading coal with the Algomarine, and Earl W. Oglebay waiting to load coal. The tug Michigan with her barge Great Lakes was at the B-P Oil Dock unloading cargo.

The Philip R. Clarke finished unloading salt at the City Dock then proceeded upriver to the Kuhlman Dock to finish unloading her cargo. She departed Toledo late in the afternoon.

The saltie Strange Attractor was at Anderson's "E" Elevator loading grain. The Mapleglen made a return visit to the ADM/Countrymark Elevator to load grain the tug Susan Hoey assisted her on her voyage upriver. The next tentative coal boats are due in on Sunday. The American Mariner, Algosteel, Philip R. Clarke and the barge McKee Sons are all expected. The next Ore boats will be the Reserve due in on Monday followed by the Armco on Tuesday.

Tug Michigan and barge Great Lakes passing Detroit on Thursday heading for Toledo. Pat Pavlat
Receiving a mail delivery. Pat Pavlat

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Update

10/22:
Saturday was a busy day in Cleveland. The George A. Sloan was unloading at Ontario 1. The tug Rebecca Lynn, pushing a barge, arrived sailing for the Amoco Dock. The tug Washington assisted the tug Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys Cement II into Blue Circle at 4:00 p.m. Richard Reiss came in at 5:00 p.m. heading for the Osborne Dock. The American Republic followed close behind the Reiss heading for LTV. The tug Frank Palladino Jr. and barge were unloading at the River Dock. The American Mariner arrived at 7:00 p.m. for the Cleveland Bulk Terminal Dock.

The Algorail is expected to arrive this afternoon for CBS (west third). In Ashtabula the saltie Alam Sejamtera departed at 2:30 p.m. sailing upbound.

Pictures by TZ
George A. Sloan unloading.
Close up of Sloan.
The tug Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys Cement II arrive.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - October 22

The PRESQUE ISLE (2)'s tug completed her sea trials on October 22, 1973 in New Orleans.

On October 22, 1986 the ALGOCEN spilled about four barrels of diesel fuel while refueling at the Esso Dock at Sarnia.

The TOM M. GIRDLER departed South Chicago light on her maiden voyage, October 22, 1951, bound for Escanaba, MI where she loaded 13,900 tons of ore for delivery to Cleveland, OH.

The THORNHILL (1) grounded on October 22, 1973 just above the Sugar Island ferry crossing in the St. Marys River.

On 22 October 1887, C.O.D. (wooden schooner-barge, 140', 289 GT, built in 1873 at Grand Haven, MI) was carrying wheat in Lake Erie in a northwest gale. She was beached three miles east of Port Burnell, Ontario and soon broke up. Most of the crew swam to shore, but the woman who was the cook was lashed to the rigging and she perished.

October 22, 1929 - The S.S. Milwaukee (formerly Manistique Marquette and Northern 1) sank in a gale with a loss of all 52 hands. 21 bodies were recovered. Captain Robert McKay in command.

On October 27, 1929, a Coast Guard patrolman near South Haven, Michigan, picked up the ship's message case, containing the following handwritten note:
"S.S. MILWAUKEE, OCTOBER 22/29 8:30 P.M.
The ship is taking water fast. We have turned around and headed for Milwaukee. Pumps are working but sea gate is bent in and can't keep the water out. Flicker is flooded. Seas are tremendous. Things look bad.
Crew roll is about the same as on last payday.
(signed) A.R. Sadon, Purser."

On 22 October 1870, JENNIE BRISCOE (wooden schooner, 85', 82 t, built in 1870 at Detroit, MI) was raised from where she sank off Grosse Isle, Michigan a couple of months earlier. She was in her first season of service when she collided with the propeller FREE STATE and sank there. Her raised wreck was sold Canadian in 1871 and she was rebuilt as the propeller scow HERALD.

In a severe gale on 22 October 1873, the three barges DAVID MORRIS, GLOBE, and SAGINAW from Bay City grounded and sank off Point Pelee on Lake Erie.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Saltie Aground in Lake St. Clair

10/21:
The Fednav chartered salt water ship Daviken is aground at Buoy 25 in Lake St. Clair. The vessel suffered an electrical failure that caused her to lose steering about noon on Friday. She was sailing upbound with a cargo of structural steel for Milwaukee and Chicago.

Gaelic Tugboat Company's 3,000 horsepower tug Roger Stahl was dispatched to the scene about 2:00 p.m. The ship has been ordered by the U.S. Coast Guard to be inspected by a surveyor from the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) prior to beginning salvage operations.

The back up Mail Boat Joseph J. Hogan, owned by the J.W. Westcott Co., was preparing to take the ABS surveyor out to the vessel. They were expected to depart the Westcott dock on the Detroit River about 10:00 a.m. today.

Friday night the Roger Stahl was standing by the stricken ship which is completely out of the channel and showing about 3 feet more freeboard than when she was afloat. Traffic in the area is limited to one way with only one vessel passing at a time on the red side. It is expected that lightering of part of the steel cargo will be required which could be quite complex.

Reported by: Linda Stoetzer and Sam Buchanan




Fossnes Update

10/21:
A spokesperson from Transport-Canada announced Friday that the Norwegian bulkcarrier Fossnes would be repaired before proceeding to unload its cargo of fertilizer at the Port of Sarnia, Ontario.

The Fossnes will be dry docked at Davis Industries shipyard on Tuesday, Oct. 24. The repairs are expected to take five days and the ship will retain its full cargo during these repairs. As a result of the grounding, ballast tanks were found flooded and the draft of the ship dropped to about 26 feet 11 inches making it impossible to sail into the seaway where the require draft must not exceed 26 feet 3 inches.

The Fossnes ran aground on Wednesday off Cape Martin on the St-Lawrence River following a failure in its steering gear.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




The Manitowoc Company Acquires Marinette Marine Corporation

10/21:
On Friday the Manitowoc Company, a diversified manufacturing company with market-leading operations in foodservice equipment, lattice-boom cranes, and marine services, announced today that it has signed an agreement to purchase the stock of Marinette Marine Corporation. Located in Marinette, Wisconsin, just across Green Bay from Manitowoc's Bay Shipbuilding facility, Marinette Marine operates one of the largest shipyards on the U.S. Great Lakes. Marinette was acquired for approximately $48.0 million as part of an all-cash transaction, with the final price subject to certain closing balance sheet adjustments. The transaction, which is expected to close within 30 days pending regulatory approvals, will be financed using Manitowoc's existing credit facility.

"Marinette Marine is one of the most efficient builders of mid-sized commercial, research, and military vessels in the country and will be a key strategic fit with the industry-leading inspection, maintenance, repair, and new-construction facilities that comprise Manitowoc Marine Group," stated Terry D. Growcock, Manitowoc's president and chief executive officer. "Together, the combined organization forms a combination that will not only have a significant presence on the Great Lakes, but will be one of the most cost-effective shipbuilding and repair organizations in the entire United States.

"The acquisition, which we expect will be accretive to our 2001 outlook, should not only give us the leading position in building mid-sized vessels for the U.S. Government, it will enhance our ability to serve the Great Lakes ship-repair market as well as providing the engineering strength, operational depth, and critical mass to pursue additional projects," added Growcock.

"For more than 50 years, our two organizations have set the standard for quality and service on the Great Lakes and in shipbuilding for the U.S. Government," said Dan Gulling, president and chief executive officer of Marinette Marine. "This historic combination allows us to offer our existing customers unparalleled capabilities and opens potential avenues for new shipbuilding opportunities, as well."

A privately held corporation, Marinette has revenues of approximately $100 million with EBITDA margins approaching 10 percent. The company is currently under contract to build six ocean-going buoy tenders for the United States Coast Guard, as well as two 269-foot APL barracks barges for the U.S. Navy. Marinette Marine presently employs more than 800 individuals and features complete in-house capabilities for all shipbuilding disciplines.

"This acquisition is a great addition to our present operations," explained Tom Byrne, the recently appointed president and general manager of Manitowoc's Marine Group. "Marinette's close proximity to our Sturgeon Bay yard should allow us to easily balance work across the two facilities. In addition, Marinette, which is well known for its highly efficient production line approach to shipbuilding, will enable us to serve a broader range of customers with the best array of facilities, capabilities, and expertise of any Great Lakes shipyard."

The Manitowoc Company, Inc. is a leading manufacturer of ice-cube machines, ice/beverage dispensers, and commercial refrigeration equipment for the foodservice industry. It is also a leading producer of lattice-boom cranes, boom trucks, and related products for the construction industry, and specializes in ship repair, conversion, and new-construction services for the Great Lakes maritime industry.

Visit www.manitowoc.com for more information

Reported by: Scott Best




Nindawayma Update

10/21:
The Nindawayma is scheduled to leave Owen Sound's Harbor after an eight year lay-up. The ship has been tentatively sold to Verreault Navigation, Inc. of Quebec, a shipbuilding and repair company "of high repure" states today's Owen Sound Sun Times. Plans for the vessel don't include scrapping or using the ship as a passenger ferry but the exact use was not revealed.

The Nindawayma was purchased by Ontario Northland for $11 million in 1989 but by 1992 was laid up due to a downturn in traffic. In 1996 she was put up for sale but several proposals for her purchase failed. The sale to Verrault is expected to close within the next few days. The tow to Quebec is expected to take about 10 or 11 days.

Reported by: Peter Bowers




Drugs Found on Saltie

10/21:
The saltie Lyke Leader is docked at Section B-3 in the Port of Montreal after a large amount of hashish was found hidden in one of the vessel's containers. Early estimates report that up to five thousand kilos of the illegal substance may have been onboard. Officials continue to investigate and it is unknown if any arrests were made in the seizure.

Reported by: David Bowie




Southdown Challenger

10/21:
The Southdown Challenger arrived in Grand Haven on Thursday to unload at Southdown Cement. She departed sailing for Milwaukee and then onto Chicago.

Photo Steve Vanden Bosch
Challenger arriving.

Reported by: Steve Vanden Bosch and Bob Vande Vusse




Lake Erie Update

10/21:
Friday the Earl Oglebay arrived at LTV about 5:00 p.m. to unload ore from Lorain. The J.A.W. Iglehart was berthed at the Lafarge terminal that afternoon. The American republic was inbound to Lorain from Cleveland at 4:00 p.m.

In Ashtabula the Courtney Burton was at the Pinney Dock Thursday night and was followed in by the Canadian Century that unloaded right across from it at the A & B dock. The Middletown came in right behind it and went to the coal dock. The saltie Alam Sejamtera arrived to unload and was expected to depart sometime on Saturday.

Pictures by TZ
Canadian Century unloading.
Close up of her bow.
Same view after dark.
Courtney Burton unloading.
Alam Sejamtera at dock.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Toledo Update

10/21:
Friday the Quebecois was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The Gemini departed from the B-P Oil Dock around 11:00 a.m. The tug Michigan and barge Great Lakes shifted from the T.W.I. Dock to the B-P Oil dock about an hour after the Gemini departed. It is rare to see this tug and barge in Toledo. She usually operates on Lake Michigan and northern Lake Huron.

The next coal vessels to load will be the Algomarine, Calcite II, and Earl W. Oglebay expected to arrive today. The next scheduled ore boats will be the Reserve on Monday afternoon followed by the Armco on Tuesday.

Other vessels expected to arrive will be the Philip R. Clarke bringing another load of salt to the City Docks. The salties M L Jet and Sandviken due in at the T.W.I. Dock. The Algosteel is also expected to arrive with a cargo loaded at Thunder Bay, Ontario for one of the docks.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Scrap Breakers in India Sign Deal

10/21:
Owners of a Major shipbreakers in India have successful negotiated exclusive 5 year deal with Great Lakes based McCaughrin Maritime Marine Systems., Inc., of Wayne, MI. for demolition tonnages in the first quarter of 2001.

Owners of J.M. Industries Limited of Alang, India has been in negotiations with Owner, Brian R. McCaughrin of McCaughrin Maritime since September. J.M. Industries has also opened new facilities in Calcutta, and Mumbai, and last year scraped 300 ships at 200,000 tons. This year, with addittional facilities, J.M. Industries has scrap to date over 350 ships.

McCaughrin Maritime has been dividing its company directions since last fall, and into new divisions beside container movement, vessel agency, and now demolition tonnages. McCaughrin Maritime had developed independent agencies in over 30 countries in 12 months.

Mr. McCaughrin first step in demolition tonnages was when McCaughrin Maritime signed Sukhpal Maritime Transport of Singapore which deal primary with demolition vessels in that region of the world.

In June of this year, Shiva Export & Imports Limited of Bangalore, India signed long term agreement with McCaughrin Maritime which had developed yard in Mumbai for smaller vessel of 5-10,000 tons. McCaughrin Maritime is also developing such plan in Middle East, and now plans to expand his plans into Great Lakes / Seaway region.

Reported by: Brian McCaughrin




Today in Great Lakes History - October 21

The JOHN B. AIRD arrived at Sarnia, Ont. October 21, 1990 for repairs after suffering a conveyor belt fire a week earlier.

The JAMES A.FARRELL and fleetmate RICHARD TRIMBLE were the first vessels to lock downbound in the newly opened Davis Lock at the Soo on October 21, 1914.

On October 21, 1954 the GEORGE M.HUMPHREY(2) set a record when she took aboard 22,605 gross tons of iron ore at Superior, WI. The record stood for six years until 1960.

The crew on the SAMUEL MATHER (3) was safely removed from the badly exposed steamer on October 21, 1923 by the Eagle Harbor life saving crew. She had run aground on the 19th.

It was announced on October 21, 1986 that Canada Steamship Lines and Upper Lakes Group would merge CSL's Collingwood shipyard and ULS' Port Weller shipyard and create Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering (1986) Ltd.

On 21 October 1941, AMERICA (steel tug, 80', 123 GT, built in 1897 at Buffalo) was on a cable along with the big tug OREGON off Belle Isle in the Detroit River trying to pull the steel bulk freighter B. F. JONES off a bar. The cable tightened, pulling AMERICA out of the water and spinning her upside down. Six of the crew of 13 lost their lives. AMERICA was later recovered.

On 21 October 1916, JAMES B. COLGATE (whaleback bulk freighter, 308', 1713 gt, built in 1892 at W. Superior, WI) was carrying coal off Long Point on Lake Erie in a storm. She struck bottom in a plunge off a huge wave in one of the worst storms ever recorded on Lake Erie -- it's called the "Black Friday Storm". Of the 26 on board, only her skipper survived. The 360' steel freighter MERIDA also perished in this same storm.

October 21, 1954 - Capt. Allen K. Hoxie, skipper of the MILWAUKEE CLIPPER, retired.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Fossnes Update

10/20:
The Fossnes reached Quebec Harbor early Thursday morning under its own power escorted by a Groupe Ocean tug and immediately docked at Pier 27 in the St. Charles River. An inspection performed by divers indicated two large holes on her bottom amidships on the starboard side measuring approimatley 17-inches by 5 feet. There was no pollution resulting from the grounding. A spokesperson from the Canadian Coast Guard indicated that ship inspectors would first attempt to identify the cause of the ship’s steering failure. A decision will be made to either complete temporary repairs so the ship can proceed to Sarnia or unload the cargo of fertilizer and dry dock the ship for repairs.

The Fossnes, registered in Bergen, Norway grounded on the St. Lawrence River about a 1/4 mile off shore near Cape Martin at noon on October 18 following a steering gear failure. The ship was en route from Spain to Sarnia with a cargo of 14,000 tons of fertilizer. The Captain is Norwegian and the crew is mainly Polish.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




Nindawayma Sold

10/20:
Local news reported Thursday that the auto and passenger ferry Nindawayma of the Ontario Northland (Owen Sound Transportation) fleet has been sold to Quebec interests. The ship has been in the Owen Sound harbour since its last season of use in 1992.

In other news, the Chi-Cheemaun completed its last trip of the season on Oct 15th and made its way back to Owen Sound for her winter lay-up with a full load of passengers on Oct 16th.

The year 2000 was a record year for passengers into and out of Owen Sound with three trips of the C. Columbus, the annual trip north of the Chi-Cheemaun in the spring and its return in the fall. As well, several dinner cruises and day cruises were offered in the spring prior to the ship heading north.

Reported by: Peter Bowers




Twin Ports Report

10/20:
Crews in Duluth finished unloading oil refinery equipment from the heavy-lift saltie Stellanova, and the vessel departed about 5:30 p.m. Thursday.

Kinsman Independent, which had loaded at Cenex Harvest States, departed Duluth about 4:45 p.m. Thursday. Canadian Voyager was loading at the Peavey elevator in Superior while Federal Oshima began loading at Cargill B1 -- the first vessel there in several weeks.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

10/20:
The St. Clair was unloading ore at the Torco Dock on Thursday. The John G. Munson was due in at the CSX Dock later that evening to load coal. The tanker Gemini was at the B-P Oil Dock loading cargo. The Quebecois was loading grain at Anderson's "K" Elevator. The next scheduled coal boat will be the Algomarine due in late Friday. The Calcite II and Earl W. Oglebay are scheduled in early Saturday morning. The next scheduled ore boats for the Torco Dock will be the Reserve on Monday morning followed by the Armco early on Tuesday morning.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Update

10/20:
The Saginaw was in port Thursday evening unloading stone at Ontario #4 on the old river. The American Republic was completing a shuttle run at LTV. The Earl W. Oglebay was berthed at the East end of the Whiskey Island dock for engine repairs. She is expected depart some time today.

Pictures by TZ
Saginaw arrives about 2:00 p.m.
Closer view.
Heading to the dock.
Bow view.
Another view.
American Republic arrives.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Toronto Update

10/20:
Four salties were in Toronto Harbor Thursday afternoon. Federal Schelde and Black Swan were at Pier 51 and the Sandviken at Pier 52. The McKeil tugs Atomic and Lac Como assisted Strange Attractor out of the Redpath slip in mid-afternoon.

Last Friday, Empress of Canada came off the Toronto Drydock and she was followed on by the brigantine Playfair, which was still on the drydock Thursday undergoing overhaul and inspection.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 20

The SCOTT MISENER (3) proceeded to the Port Arthur shipyard for dry docking and repairs on October 20th, After striking bottom October 15, 1973 near Whaleback Shoal on the St. Lawrence River.

OTTO M. REISS (2) was launched October 20, 1906 as a) JAMES S. DUNHAM for the Chicago Navigation Co. (D. Sullivan & Co., mgr.) Duluth, MN.

PETER A.B. WIDENER was launched October 20, 1906 as a) PETER A.B. WIDENER for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. (later the U.S. Steel Corp. in 1952), Cleveland, OH.

The tug RESCUE was sent from Port Huron to Tawas, MI to release the 246' barge OCEAN that was grounded. After pulling the barge free, Capt. Fitch of RESCUE began towing her down Lake Huron, but the storm got so bad that he was about to turn back and run for Tawas. However, the captain of OCEAN yelled that they were all right and to go ahead down the lake. Soon the seas got the better of the barge. The tug kept with her until she was about to sink. Then the line was cut, the tug turned about, ran under her lee, and rescued her crew of 9 from the lifeboat. The barge then sank. On the way down Lake Huron, opposite Port Sanilac, the RESCUE picked up 6 men and 1 woman from the wrecked barge JOHN F. RUST. In this one trip, the RESCUE earned her name by rescuing 16 persons!

October 20, 1898 - The SHENANGO NO. 2 (later PERE MARQUETTE 16) was arriving Milwaukee when her steering gear failed, causing her to crash into a grain elevator which was under construction.

October 20, 1926 - The Keel was laid for the WABASH.

On 20 October 1863, E. S. ADAMS (3 mast wooden bark, 135', 341 GC, built in 1857 at Port Robinson, Ont.) was carrying 18,500 bushels of wheat on a clear night when she collided with the American bark CONSTITUTION resulting in the loss of the ADAMS. One life was lost. Neither vessel was blamed for the accident.

On 20 October 1854, JOHN J. AUDUBON (wooden brig, 370 t, built in 1854 at Black River, Ohio) was carrying railroad iron from Buffalo to Chicago when she was struck amidships by the schooner DEFIANCE on a dark night, halfway between Thunder Bay and Presque Isle, MI. AUDUBON was cut almost in half. Both vessels sank quickly. No lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Saltie Grounds on the St. Lawrence River

10/19:
The Norwegian bulkcarrier Fossnes ran aground at noon Wednesday on the St. Lawrence River off Cape Martin about 62 miles east of Quebec City in the vicinity of Iles aux Coudres. The 488- foot ship is enroute to Sarnia, Ont. with a cargo of fertilizer. Shortly after grounding, the ship’s crew reported that the vessel’s steering gear had failed and they would require the assistance of a tug. The crew indicated that there was no apparent pollution caused either by loss of fuel or cargo. A Coast-Guard helicopter later flew over the grounded ship and confirmed there was no pollution.

The Fossnes ran aground during an ebb tide and it was decided that an attempt to refloat the ship would take place at high tide about 8:30 p.m. Wednesday night. A Groupe Ocean Tug was dispatched to assist and the vessel was successfully refloated at high tide. The vessel proceeded to Quebec City where it was expected to arrive at 1:00 a.m. this morning. Divers will examine the hull to assess any possible damage.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




Sarah Spencer Departs

10/19:
The barge Sarah Spencer departed her temporary dock on the Detroit River Thursday night about 9:00 p.m. under tow of her new tug, the Jane Ann IV. They headed upbound with the Jane Ann IV pulling from the bow and Gaelic Tugboat Company's tug Shannon on the stern. The Jane Ann IV is a Canadian tug (C.814339)IMO#7802809 and was previously the Tignish Sea, Bomare and Ouro Fino.

The tow is expected to pass under the Blue Water Bridges at Port Huron about 6:00 a.m. this morning. The Shannon will be released after clearing the buoys above the bridge, then return to her Detroit dock light tug.

The pair are headed Sturgeon Bay, WI. where they will undergo modifications to fit together as one unit. Bay Ship will install a new Bloodworth tug/barge connection system and the tug is reported to have new rudders installed.

Sarah Spencer at dock on Saturday.
Stern view.
A look inside the notch.
The J. W. Westcott II tries the notch on for size.

Reported by: William Hoey Sr., Gaelic Tug Boat Company




Stellanova Unloads

10/19:
Stellanova remained in the steel berth at Duluth's port terminal on late Wednesday afternoon, unloading another large steel cylinder destined for a refinery in western Canada. At least two other large steel vessels were on the dock. Several 12-axle flatcars were in the nearby BNSF railyard bearing additional cylinders and equipment. Some pieces were so large there were affixed to two cars. This movement of big equipment includes a real railroad relic -- a caboose.

Pictures by Kent Rengo
The cylinder is lifted from the Stellanova.
The crane swings the cylinder over the side to a waiting rail car.

Reported by: Al Miller




Buffalo Backs Out

10/19:
The Buffalo delivered a cargo of sand to St. Joe, MI. Wednesday. At 7:00 p.m. she backed the half mile through the highway lift bridge and the swinging railroad bridge, then up the narrow channel past the lighthouse into Lake Michigan. This impressive ship handling is common on the lakes when a vessel does not have enough room or it will take too long to reach a spot where it can turn.

The Buffalo turned once out on the lake and sailed north to her next port of call, expected to be Grand Haven, MI. with more sand.

Reported by: Glenn McCormick




Saginaw River Update

10/19:
The Fred R. White Jr. departed the GM dock at Saginaw about midnight and was outbound early morning Wednesday.

The Joseph H. Frantz departed the Saginaw Wirt stone dock at 1:20 a.m. Wednesday. Her transit out the river was apparently delayed during the night, possibly by fog, as she did not pass through Bay City until 9:00 a.m.

Both vessels arrived at Saginaw early Tuesday evening. While outbound, they reported to the Saginaw River Coast Guard station that a channel marker was out of position near the I-75 Bridge. A Coast Guard boat was moving the marker back into position on Wednesday afternoon.

Reported by Stephen Hause




Sarnia Update

10/19:
The Canadian Venture departed the grain elevators in Sarnia shortly after 10:00 p.m. on Oct. 17 with a full cargo of soybeans bound for Baie Comeau. She headed upbound into Lake Huron where she turned to sail downbound.

Reported by: Doug Schilz




Toledo Update

10/19:
Wednesday morning the John J. Boland finished loading coal and departed the Maumee River. The Armco was unloading ore at the Torco dock. The ALGOWAY was at the Kuhlman Dock unloading sand, she was assisted upriver and downriver by the Gaelic tugs Susan Hoey and William Hoey.

The Quebecois was headed upriver about 10:00 a.m. bound for Andersons "K" Elevator under tow of the Gaelic tugs Susan Hoey (bow) And William Hoey (stern). The Philip R. Clarke brought in a load of salt for the City of Toledo. It was unloading at the City Docks just South of the Craig Bridge (I-280).

The tanker Saturn was loading cargo at the Sun Oil Dock. The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge was tied up at the Hocking Valley Dock directly across from the Sun Oil Dock. She will most likely follow the Saturn when she departs this dock site.

The next scheduled coal boat will be the John G. Munson on expected to arrive today. The Algomarine and Calcite II will follow on Friday evening. The next scheduled ore boats for the Torco Dock will be the St.Clair on Thursday morning followed by the Reserve on Monday.

The McKee Sons has been delayed arriving at the CSX Docks. She is now scheduled for early Sunday morning at 5:30 a.m. The weather forecast is calling for dense fog and may delay her arrival even more.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Aerial Views

10/19:
Pilot and photographer Don Coles was flying over the Port Huron area Wednesday and sent in the pictures below. All photographs are available for purchase. Don's company, Great Lakes Aerial Photos, is available for hire for any aerial photography need.

Walter J. McCarthy Jr.
Sidsel Knutsen sailing for Sarnia.
Tanker Gemini.

For more new aerial views click here




Today in Great Lakes History - October 19

GEORGE A. SLOAN ran aground off Bob-Lo Island in the Amherstburg Channel on October 19, 1987. She was released when she unloaded part of her cargo to the CALCITE II. SLOAN was repaired in Toledo.

ALGOSEA was christened on October 19, 1976 at Port Colborne.

The BUFFALO was able to leave the Saginaw River once it opened on October 19, 1990. The river was closed after the tanker Jupiter exploded as the Buffalo passed.

The KINSMAN VOYAGER was launched October 19, 1907 as a) H.P. BOPE for the Standard Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

The WILLIAM LIVINGSTONE (c CRISPIN OGLEBAY (1) had the honor on October 19, 1912 of being the first vessel to navigate the opening of the Livingstone Channel named after the man who helped conceive the idea of a separate down bound channel on the east side of Bob-Lo Island in the lower Detroit River. Mr. Livingstone, President of the Lake Carriers Association at the time, piloted his namesake vessel in the channel on that historic trip.

The crew on the stranded WILLIAM C. MORELAND was removed in gale force winds on October 19, 1910 by the Portage life saving crew.

On October 19, 1923 the SAMUEL MATHER (3) was driven onto Gull Rock on Lake Superior near Keweenaw Point during a snow storm and gale winds. The crew was safely removed from the badly exposed steamer on October 21st by the Eagle Harbor life saving crew.

The B.H. TAYLOR (b) ROGERS CITY (2) sailed from Lorain on her maiden voyage on October 19, 1923

On 19 October 1868, PARAGON (wooden schooner, 212 T, built in 1852 at Oshawa, Ont. as a brig) was being towed up the St. Clair River by the tug WILLIAM A. MOORE with a load of lumber in the company of four other barges. During a gale, the tow was broken up. While the tug MOORE was trying to regain the tows, she collided with PARAGON causing severe damage. 4 were drowned, but two were rescued by the Canadian gunboat/tug PRINCE ALFRED. PARAGON was then towed into Sarnia, but she sank there and was abandoned in place.

October 19, 1919 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 4, while on the Grand Haven to Milwaukee run, got caught in a gale stretching the normal 6-hour crossing to 27 hours.

On 19 October 1876, MASSILON (3-mast wooden schooner with foretop and topgallant sails, 130', 298 gt, built in 1857 at Cleveland as a bark) was sailing from Kelley's Island for Chicago with limestone when she sprang a leak 20 miles above Pointe aux barques at the mouth of Saginaw Bay. She was abandoned at about 2:00 AM and then sank. The crew was in an open boat until 7:00 AM when they were rescued by the tug VULCAN.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Dredging Begins In Port Stanley

10/18:
Dean Construction arrived in Port Stanley on Monday began dredging Tuesday morning. While it is late in the season to begin, all involved believe later is better than never. If the weather remains good, progress should move quickly. There is some hope of winter traffic and dockage.

In recent years the Lake Erie port has suffered from silting that has drastically reduced the depth of the harbor. With out the dredging shipping in the port could have stop all together. Transport Canada was expected to pay about $2.9-million (C) for the work because of the commercial impact on the port.

Reported by Ted Coombs




Busy Day in the Saginaw River

10/18:
Tuesday was another busy day for shipping at Saginaw, with visits by four vessels to area docks.

The Paul H. Townsend had arrived late Monday evening and spent the day alongside the E.M. Ford at the LaFarge cement terminal, unloading her cargo. The Adam E. Cornelius arrived Tuesday morning at the Sargent dock just north of the I-75 Bridge. The Cornelius had made her upbound transit as the rising sun was burning off an early morning fog shrouding the river.

During the late afternoon, Oglebay Norton fleetmates Fred R. White Jr. and Joseph H. Frantz made the transit up the river. The White preceded the Frantz by about 30 minutes, docking early in the evening at the GM dock in Saginaw. The Frantz arrived soon afterwards at the Wirt stone dock near the I-75 bridge.

Minutes before the Oglebay Norton vessels arrived, the Cornelius departed the Sargent dock and began her outbound trip after turning. The Townsend followed her almost immediately. For a brief period of time around 7 p.m. on Tuesday, all four vessels were within the short stretch of the river above the I-75 bridge at Zilwaukee.
The Adam E. Cornelius upbound through the fading haze.

Reported by Stephen Hause




Toledo Update

10/18:
The CSL Niagara was loading coal at the CSX Dock with the John J. Boland scheduled to follow late Tuesday evening. The Tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge was tied up at the Hocking Valley Dock directly across from the Sun Oil Dock. The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin finished loading and departed Andersons "K" Elevator very early Tuesday morning.

The next scheduled coal boat will be the John G. Munson scheduled to arrive on Thursday. The next scheduled ore boats will be the Armco due in this afternoon. The St. Clair will follow the Armco on Thursday morning.

Future vessel arrivals expected to arrive in Toledo will be the Algoway and Philip R. Clarke, both scheduled to arrive within the next two days.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Ship Breakers Set to Strike

10/18:
In Alang India, where many Great Lakes vessels ended their careers, ship breakers are set to begin a strike today according to reports by the Fairplay Daily News. The planned strike is in protest of strict new safety standards imposed on the ship breakers.

In response to pressure by environmental groups, the Indian government implemented the new standards that allow for the seizure of a yard if there are three fatal accidents in a year.

Environmental groups have often criticized the ship breakers at Alang for what they say are poor safety and environmental practices. Vessels are run aground on the open beach and then cut down to scrap metal using mainly manual labor.

The ship breakers hope that the strike will force down the price of vessels on the scrap steel market. Fairplay reports that the beaches of Alang handle about 70% of the worlds discarded tonnage.

Click here for a recent article from the Atlantic Monthly on ship scrapping in India.

Reported by John Stark




Monthly Water Levels

10/18:
Precipitation for September was above average for all of the Great Lakes basins with the exception of Lake Superior basin. For the last 12 months, precipitation over the Lake Superior basin was below average while the remaining lakes and entire Great Lakes basin was above average.

Even with the increase in precipitation, the net supply of water for all of the Great Lakes was below average in September.

Comparisons of September monthly mean water levels to long-term (1918-1999) averages are shown below:
Superior 11 inches below average
Michigan and Huron 19 inches below average
St. Clair 7 inches below average
Erie 3 inches below average.
Lake Ontario was the only lake above average, reaching 3 inches above average.

Visit www.lre.usace.army.mil for more information.




Passing of Captain Harold R. Marshall

10/18:
Just three days after his 92nd birthday, Captain Harold R. Marshall, retired captain with United States Steel Corporation, passed away at Kingston on Monday, October 16.

Former master of the Irving S. Olds, Captain Marshall sailed the Great Lakes for a remarkable career which spanned over 43 years. At the height of his career, Captain Marshall was part of Great Lakes shipping's largest fleet of cargo carriers on both sides of the border.

Beloved husband of 64 years to Nellie (nee Woods) of Kingston. Dear father of William Marshall and his wife Avis of Ypsilanti, Michigan. Dear brother of Helen Caughey and her husband Bruce of Amherst Island and brother-in-law of Rod Barr of St. Catharines Ontario.

May his spirit continue to guide his shipmates through the Lakes, Rivers and Canals he knew so well.

Reported by Brian Johnson




Today in Great Lakes History - October 18

The ALVA C. DINKEY departed Quebec City, October 18, 1980, in tandem with her former fleetmate GOVERNOR MILLER towed by the FedNav tug CATHY B.

Tragedy struck on the WILLIAM C. MORELAND's fifth trip October 18, 1910 loaded with 10,700 tons of iron ore from Superior for Ashtabula, OH when she stranded on Sawtooth Reef off Eagle Harbor, MI on Lake Superior. Visibility had been very limited due to forest fires raging on the Keweenaw Peninsula and the Lake was blanketed with smoke as far as one mile off shore. The MORELAND hit so hard and at such speed that she bounced over the first reef and came to rest on a second set of rocks.

On 18 October 1896, AUSTRALASIA (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 282', 1829 GT, built in 1884 at W. Bay City) was carrying 2,200 tons of soft coal when she caught fire, burned to the waterline and sank 3 miles east of Cana Island in Lake Michigan. The Bailey's Harbor Lifesavers saved her crew.

At 8:00 PM on 18 October 1844, the steamer ROCHESTER left Rochester, New York for Toronto. She encountered a severe gale about halfway there. Captain H. N. Throop had the vessel put about and return to Rochester. The gale was so severe that all thought they were lost. When they finally arrived in Rochester, the passengers were so grateful that they had survived that they published a note of gratitude to Almighty God and Captain Throop in the Rochester Daily Democrat on 19 October 1844 -- it was signed by all 18 passengers.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Sandviken Investigated

10/17:
The Bahamas registered saltie Sandviken was boarded by Transport Canada officers Friday after it arrived in the St. Lawrence off of New Brunswick trailing a seven and a half-mile long oil slick.

The officers were investigating how the vessel released the oily bilge water. Early reports blamed a faulty machine used to separate the oil from bilge water kept in the ballast tanks. Depending on the amount released, the discharge could pose a threat to migratory birds.

Transport Canada officers were expected to remain onboard as the vessel sailed on to Montreal carrying a load of steel.

Reported by: David Bowie




Toledo Update

10/17:
The Algomarine was loading coal at the CSX Dock with the Fred R. White Jr, and Jean Parisien waiting to follow. The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge was loading cargo at the Sun Oil Dock. The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was loading grain at the Anderson's "K" Elevator. The next Scheduled coal boats will be the CSL Niagara and John J. Boland due in today. The next scheduled ore boats due to load at the Torco dock will be the St. Clair and Armco on Wednesday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Update

10/17:
The Cuyahoga was docked at Ontario 4 Sunday night and departed shortly after midnight. The Fred R. White Jr. was in making a visit to LTV. The Agawa Canyon arrived at 4:00 a.m. but waited at Dock 20 for the American Republic to clear and then proceeded up to west third with the tug Washington at 5:30 a.m. The Earl W. Oglebay was outbound at 8:00 a.m. with the tug Idaho. The George A. Sloan was inbound for Ontario 4 at 8:30 a.m. The tug Frank Palladino Jr. and barge were also docked in the river. The tug Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys Cement II arrived for Blue Circle cement at 11:30 a.m. The Sloan was expected to depart about 2:00 p.m. with the Agawa Canyon following.

Pictures by TZ
Agawa Canyon at dock.
The George A. Sloan underway.
Another view.
Sloan moves through the bridge.
Sloan continues on.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - October 17

The CANADIAN PROSPECTOR was launched October 17, 1963 as a) CARLTON (2)

The MONTCLIFFE HALL was launched October 17,1959 for Transatlantic Bulk Carriers, Monrovia, Liberia as a) EMS ORE

With an inexperienced Taiwanese crew, boiler problems and the collapse of Lock 7's west wall in the Welland Canal on October 17th, SAVIC's (CLIFFS VICTORY) departure was delayed until December 17, 1985 when she departed Chicago under her own power.

The carferry PERE MARQUETTE 19 was launched October 17, 1903.

In 1893 the FLINT & PERE MARQUETTE NO. 1 was damaged by fire while in Ludington.

In 1988 the Society for the Preservation of the S.S. City of Milwaukee purchased CITY OF MILWAUKEE from the City of Frankfort for $2.

On 17 October 1871, CASCADEN (2 mast wood schooner, 138 T, built in 1866 at Saugeen, Ontario) was carrying much needed supplies for the Cove Island Lighthouse keeper and his family who were in desperate straits. But she went ashore 3 miles below Cape Hurd near Tobermory, Ontario in a storm and was wrecked.

On 17 October 1843, the wooden schooner ALABAMA collided with a pier during a storm at the mouth of the Grand River at Fairport, Ohio and was a total loss.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Tug and Barge Blamed in Linda E. Sinking

10/16:
On Saturday the U.S. Coast Guard confirmed that the 42-foot fishing tug Linda E. was hit and sunk by the barge Great Lakes pushed by the tug Michigan Dec. 11, 1998 off of Port Washington WI. All crew members of the fishing tug were lost. The report stated that the Linda E. was hit by the barge and tug which tilted it sharply and caused lake water to flood and sink the vessel in 260-feet of water. Coast Guard Officials say the fishing tug sank in a matter of seconds.

According to the report, it appears neither crew had a proper lookout posted, when the collision happened around 11:40 a.m. on a clear day in 1998. The Coast Guard is investigating if any of the crew members on board the Michigan/Great Lakes should have their licenses revoked or suspended.

Official Coast Guard Report

Reported by: Andy LaBorde, Vic Delarwelle, Dick Lund




Dobrush Runs into Trouble

10/16:
As the salt water vessel Dobrush was departing from the elevator in Sarnia on Sunday loaded with wheat, when what should have been a simple task turned into an hour and a half ordeal as the ship had become stuck in the mud. The tug Menasha was assisting her departure as the Dobrush shifted ballast to free her stern from the bottom with no damage.

The Limnos found herself in trouble as the Dobrush's prop wash pulled her from her moorings. Several members of the Griffin's crew came to the aid of the Limnos, helping to secure her to the dock.

Also on Sunday the tug Petite Forte and barge St. Mary's Cement and tug Sea Eagle II with barge St. Mary's Cement II were in Sarnia's North Slip. The St. Mary's Cement II was unloading into the St. Mary's Cement.

The Canadian Venture arrived shortly before 10:00 p.m. to load cargo at the grain elevator. She is expected to remain in Sarnia until Tuesday.

Reported by: Andrew Severson and Doug Schilz




Lakeview to Remain Coal Fired

10/16:
Ontario Power Generation's Lakeview Generating Station will continue to be a port of call for Canadian self unloaders for another two or three years. The plant that has been in operation since 1962 is located in Mississauga Ontario just west of Toronto. There were plans in place to convert to natural gas but these have been postponed until a new operator is found. Ships from CSL, Upper Lakes and Algoma Marine have all brought coal from Ohio to Lakeview this season.

Reported by: Robert Archer




Toledo Update

10/16:
The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin arrived very early Sunday morning at Andersons "K" Elevator to load grain. The Algosteel was loading coal at the CSX Dock with the Melissa Desgagnes waiting to follow. The Algomarine was scheduled in late Sunday night to follow the Desgagnes.

The next scheduled coal boats were the Fred R. White Jr., Jean Parisien, and CSL Niagara all due today. The John J. Boland is scheduled to arrive on Tuesday.

The next scheduled ore boats will be the St. Clair and Armco due in on Wednesday, followed by the Courtney Burton on Thursday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Buffalo and Welland Canal Update

10/16:
Sunday was a busy day in the Welland Canal and Buffalo. The CSL Niagara unloaded grain at Robin Hood Elevators, while the Algoriver passed downbound. The Elton Hoyt 2nd was also delivering grain in Buffalo. She departed the ADM elevator at about 5:00 p.m. in tow of the tug New Jersey.

The CSL Niagara unloading.
Algoriver passes the CSL Niagara.
The Elton Hoyt 2nd and New Jersey at dock.
The Tow comes under the bridge.
Bow shot.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Saginaw Update

10/16:
The Saginaw River saw more traffic Sunday then it has in almost a week. The Barge Pathfinder with the tug Dorothy Ann was out bound in the early afternoon, followed shortly after by the Adam E. Cornelius. The Algoway was outbound through Bay City later in the day. At 5:30 p.m. the Buffalo was unloading at the Saginaw Rock products dock on 2nd street and departed about a half-hour later. All ships had to contend with the dredging project on their final exit from the system.

Reported by: Stephen Hause and Brian Ferguson




Today in Great Lakes History - October 16

On October 16, 1990 the JOHN B. AIRD's loop belt caught fire while loading mill scale at Inland Steel Mill, East Chicago, Ill. Fueled by coal dust left over after unloading coal at the mill, 1,400 feet of the rubber conveyor belt burned causing nearly $500,000 in damages.

ALGOWEST set a cargo record for a 27,517 tonne load of grain down the Seaway October 16, 1982 to Port Cartier, Que.

The RIO ORINOCO grounded off Anticosti Island, Que. on October 16, 1990 and was abandoned. Later she was salvaged by Le Groupe Desgagnes (1981) Inc., refloated, repaired and renamed d) THALASSA DESGAGNES.

Sea trials of the MERTON E. FARR were successfully completed October 16, 1920.

On October 16, 1954 the SCOTT MISENER (3) became the first laker to load a record 800,000 bushels of grain on the Great Lakes when she was loaded with barley at Fort William, Ont. for delivery to Port Colborne.

The WILLIAM G. MATHER (2) was towed from her Cuyahoga River berth on October 16, 1990 by the GLT tugs IDAHO and DELAWARE, she was placed at her permanent station next to the 9th Street Pier of Cleveland's North Coast Harbor.

On 16 October 1912, JAMES BUCKLEY (2 mast wood schooner-barge, 161’, 442 GC, built in 1884 at Quebec City) was carrying coal and being towed by the tug WILLIAM PROCTOR in consort with the barges H.B. and MENOMINEE in Lake Ontario. The BUCKLEY separated from this group in a storm and was driven into the shallows off the coast of Jefferson County, NY. The tug PROCTOR delivered MENOMINEE to Cape Vincent, then returned in time to take BUCKLEY’s crew out of the rigging - hand over hand on a heaving line - before BUCKLEY finally sank.

On 16 October 1855, the brig TUSCARORA was carrying coal from Buffalo to Chicago. She anchored off Chicago's Harrison Street, but a sto9rm dragged her in. Volunteers from shore were unable to get to the stricken vessel. A group of 9 ship captains and 4 seamen then organized a rescue party and took two new "Francis" metal lifeboats out and rescued the entire crew of eleven. By 21 October, TUSCARORA was pounded to pieces.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Fire halts pellet production at EVTAC

10/15:
A major fire broke out early Friday in a conveyor belt gallery at the EVTAC taconite processing plant in Forbes, Minn., severely damaging two conveyor belts and parts of two galleries, and indefinitely halting production at the plant.

EVTAC supplies pellets to Rouge Steel, Stelco and AK Steel. It ships pellets through the DMIR ore dock in Duluth aboard vessels from several Great Lakes fleets.

The plant was resuming production following a routine nine-day maintenance shutdown when fire broke out along a 700-foot-long conveyor belt that moves baked pellets to a loading area. Heat from the blaze apparently caused a fire in an adjoining belt gallery.

The damaged belts normally move about 12,000 tons of taconite pellets each day from the plant to a loading area. Because the damaged galleries hang over a rail line that brings raw taconite into the plant, the company also cannot process crude ore.

Some of the plant's 485 employees were beginning cleanup operations Friday. Plant officials could give no estimates on when production might resume. They were considering installing a temporary conveyor belt but did not know whether such a move would be feasible.

Just 30 months ago a similar fire at EVTAC caused several million dollars in damage and stopped production for several weeks. Ironically, part of a new $5 million sprinkler system designed to protect the belt galleries from another fire was to have gone into operation Friday.

Once one of Minnesota's more troubled taconite plants, EVTAC has gone to great lengths in recent years to upgrade its plant and improve efficiency. According to the Duluth News Tribune, the plant has trimmed its pellet cost in recent years to about $30 a ton, putting it in the middle of the pack of Minnesota's seven taconite producers.

Reported by: Al Miller




Sarah Spencer Update

10/15:
The barge Sarah Spencer remains docked on the Detroit River at the DBI Truck Ferry Dock. The barge will remain at the Truck Ferry Dock until her new tug arrives some time on Thursday.

Sarah Spencer at dock on Saturday.
Stern view.
A look inside the notch.
The J. W. Westcott II tries the notch on for size.
The Kinsman Independent was upbound in the river, the Spencer can be seen in the back ground.
Stern view.
Canadian Ranger passed upbound later that afternoon.




Twin Ports Report

10/15:
The 314-foot heavy-lift saltie Stellanova arrived at the Duluth port terminal Friday to begin unloading components for an oil-sands processing plant in northern Alberta. Some of the chrome alloy pieces are up to 75 feet long and must be shipped to Alberta on special 12-axle railcars.

Saginaw departed the DMIR ore dock on Saturday afternoon amid rain and fog. By the time it was four miles from the Duluth ship canal, it was only a vague shape in the fog.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

10/15:
Saturday the Canadian Olympic finished loading coal at the CSX Dock and departed in the afternoon. Algoville finished loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator and departed in the afternoon with the Gaelic tugs Susan Hoey and William Hoey handling her tow down river. The next scheduled coal boats will be the Algosteel and Mellissa Desgagnes due in this afternoon. The next scheduled ore boat will be the Reserve due in Monday evening.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - October 15

On her maiden voyage the LEON SIMARD (b) L'ORME NO.1. ) was spotted traveling eastward on the St. Lawrence River October 15, 1974.

The WOLVERINE (4) departed in Columbia Transportation Division colors October 15, 1974 on her maiden voyage from Lorain light to load stone at Stoneport, MI for delivery to Huron, OH.

HERBERT C. JACKSON cleared Fraser Shipyard on October 15, 1988 after having the 1000 h.p. bow thruster motor installed from the JOHN SHERWIN. The motor from the Jackson was later repaired and placed in the Sherwin's cargo hold for future use.

The PAUL H. CARNAHAN came out on her maiden voyage October 15, 1961.

On October 15, 1984 the a) JOHN O. McKELLAR (2) was sold to P.& H. Shipping of Parrish & Heimbecker Ltd., Mississauga, Ont. and renamed b) ELMGLEN (2).

Scrapping began on October 15, 1988 of the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON at Kaohsiung, Taiwan by Li Chong Steel & Iron Works Co. Ltd.

The C.H. McCULLOUGH, JR. was laid up on October 15, 1969 at Manitowoc, WI.

The MELDRUM BAY was launched October 15, 1949 as a) COVERDALE for Canada Steamship Lines, Montreal, Que.

The SCOTT MISENER (3) struck bottom October 15, 1973 near Whaleback Shoal on the St. Lawrence River reportedly damaging sixty of her bottom plates. She proceeded to the Port Arthur shipyard for dry docking and repairs from October 20th through the 28th.

On October 15, 1980 the NIPIGON BAY, loaded with ore for Hamilton, Ont., grounded at the "crossover" near Brockville, Ont. on the St. Lawrence River and sustained a 100-foot rip in her bottom plates. She proceeded to Thunder Bay, Ont. arriving there on October 24th where repairs were made at an estimated cost of $500,000.

The R. P. MASON (3 mast wooden schooner, 115’, 155 GT, built in 1867 at Grand Haven, MI) was bound from Chicago for Detroit when she struck a rocky reef near Waugoshance Point in the Straits of Mackinac on 8 October 1871. Water gushed in an 8-foot hole. However, she was temporarily patched and her cargo of grain, flour and meat was taken off over the next few days. The tug LEVIATHAN took her in tow, going to Little Traverse Bay, when, on 15 October, they encountered a gale near Cross Village, MI. The MASON broke free and capsized. 5 died and 4 were rescued. The MASON drifted ashore upside down. She was eventually salvaged and sailed for another 46 years. She ended her days when she burned in Lake Michigan in 1917.

The tug DOUGLAS caught fire near Wyandotte while going down the Detroit River and sank. The crew all jumped overboard and were saved by the steam yacht JOSEPHINE, except for John Cassidy, one of the firemen, who drowned. A few days later, plans were made to raise and rebuild the DOUGLAS.

On 15 October 1871, R. G. COBURN (wooden propeller passenger/package freight steamer, 193', 867 t, built in 1870 at Marine City, MI) was carrying 15,000 bushels of wheat, 3,500 barrels of flour and 30 barrels of silver ore from Lake Superior to Detroit. As she came down Lake Huron, she encountered a terrific gale which had driven most vessels to seek shelter. The COBURN fought the wind at Saginaw Bay throughout the night until she lost her rudder and turned broadside to the waves. Her large stack fell and smashed the cabin area and then the cargo came loose and started smashing holes in the bulwarks. About 70 passengers were aboard and almost all were terribly seasick. As the ship began her final plunge beneath the waves, only a few lifeboats were getting ready to be launched and those were floated right from the deck as the ship sank. 32 people perished, including Capt. Gilbert Demont. No women or children were saved.

On 15 October 1900, one hundred years ago, the wooden 186’ freighter F. E. SPINNER was sunk in a collision with the steamer H. D. COFFINBERRY in the St. Mary’s River. She was raised from 125 feet of water, one of the deepest successful salvage operations to that time. She was later renamed HELEN C and lasted until 1922.

October 15, 1910 - After the sinking of the PERE MARQUETTE 18 the previous September, the PERE MARQUETTE 18 (II) was ordered by the Pere Marquette Railway.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, James Neumiller, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Great Lakes Trader Hits Break Wall

10/14:
Friday the 13th proved unlucky for the tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort and its barge Great Lakes Trader. With brisk winds out of the west, the tug nudged the breakwall in downtown Grand Haven just before 9:00 a.m. as it maneuvered up the Grand River. Fortunately, no structural damage was reported.

This is the third vessel in the past five years to hit the Grand Haven breakwall.

Reported by: David Swain




Sarah Spencer on the Move

10/14:
The barge Sarah Spencer was moved a short distance down the Detroit River Friday by tugs from the Gaelic Tugboat Company. The Gaelic crews took time out of their busy ship assist schedule manning the tugs Shannon and Carolyn Hoey to move the barge from the Walkerville dock in Windsor, Ont. to the DBI Truck Ferry Dock in Detroit.

The barge has spent the past several days docked at Walkerville above Windsor. Another vessel was scheduled to unload at the dock forcing the Spencer to move. The barge will remain at the Truck Ferry Dock until her new tug arrives some time on Thursday. The barge's former tug, the Atlantic Hickory, sailed off the lakes to start a new career. The new tug is rumored to be the Jane Ann IV.

Sarah Spencer's empty notch while waiting in Walkerville.
Tug Shannon departing Walkerville with the Spencer.
The Buckeye slides by the tow as it departs Walkerville.
Tug Carolyn Hoey pushes the stern around to head the tow down river.
Tug Shannon leading the way past downtown Detroit.
The Spencer's pilot house from the bow.
The local NBC station captured the action on their live cam.

Reported by: William Hoey Sr.




Blade Runner Unloads

10/14:
Friday crews were busy unloading a cargo of pig iron from the saltie Blade Runner in Marinette, WI. She is expected to depart over the weekend.

The Blade Runner docked at the crane vessel William H. Donner.
Close up of the Blade Runner.
A magnet on the Donner's crane carries a load of pig iron to the dock.
The Donner's crane swings back to take another load.

Reported by: Scott Best




Paterson Update

10/14:
Paterson remains in the Dry Dock at Bay Ship Building. The reason for docking is reported to be a damaged rudder. It is unknown how long she will remain in for repairs but part of the crew were sent home on Tuesday.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




Sandviken Arrives

10/14:
The Bahamas registered saltie Sandviken was reported to be at the Pointe-Aux-Trembles anchorage Friday. The Ottawa Citizen Newspaper reported that the vessel arrived in the St. Lawrence off of New Brunswick trailing a seven and a half-mile long oil slick. The Canadian Coast Guard is investigating the reported incident.

Reported by: David Bowie




Busy Day for Ashland

10/14:
The port of Ashland, Wis., may have experienced its busiest day in many years when Arthur M. Anderson and Philip R. Clarke both arrived Oct. 12 with coal. Once a busy ore port, its ore dock has been closed since the last Gogebic Range mines closed in the mid-1960s. Today it receives occasional coal cargoes for the small power plant there.

Reported by: Al Miller




Cruise ships in Quebec Harbor

10/14:
Four cruise ships were docked in Quebec City harbour on Thursday as a result of the annual fall foliage cruises. The P&O Crown Princess from Halifax (capacity 1900 passengers) the C Columbus from Montreal (capacity 420 passengers)the Le Levant from Perce Qc. (capacity 90 passengers)the Holland American Maasdam from Montreal (capacity 1266 passengers). The Le Levant and Crown Princess were later westbound for Montreal and the C. Columbus and Maasdam later eastbound for Halifax and Charlottetown respectively.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




Possible Sale

10/14
There has been no official announcement from USS Great Lakes Fleet or Lower Lakes Towing (LLT) about the possible sale of the Calcite II, Myron C. Taylor and George A. Sloan.

Rumors say that the vessels have been sold to the LLT, a Canadian company and the three boats will enter lay-up in the early fall. If sold the vessel are expected to remain under the U.S. Flag operated by the American subsidiary of LLT that operates the McKee Sons. If true this means that current crew members sailing on the boats will return to work as usual in the spring, with no jobs lost.




Twin Ports Report

10/14:
Duluth and Superior had an interesting handful of vessels working early on Oct. 13. The small saltie Zeus was loading at AGP elevator in Duluth, Federal Oshima was unloading at the Duluth port terminal, Royal Pescadores was loading at the Peavey elevator in Superior, and occasional visitor Herbert C. Jackson was under the gravity chutes at "East of 6 Missabe." The Jackson was busy in port: It fueled at the Murphy Oil depot, unloaded at the Cutler dock and then proceeded to the DMIR ore dock to load.

Reported by: Al Miller




Sarnia Update

10/14:
The Nanticoke departed Sarnia's grain elevator late on Oct. 12 and was quickly replaced by the saltie Dobrush. The Dobrush had arrived earlier in the evening and gone to anchor in lower Lake Huron. Once the Naticoke cleared the dock the Dobrush pulled up anchor and made the short trip down. She used tug assistance to back into the dock where she was loading Friday.

Reported by: Doug Schilz




Toledo Update

10/14:
Friday the Jean Parisien was at the CSX Coal Dock loading coal with the Canadian Olympic due in later this evening to follow. The Algoville was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The Mapleglen was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. She was scheduled to depart that evening depending on how the loading process goes. The next scheduled ore boat will be the Fred R. White Jr. due in Saturday afternoon 14 Oct. Once finished unloading ore she will shift over to the CSX Dock to load coal later on in the evening.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto Update

10/14:
C & C Marine Salvage and Recovery have purchased the former police boat MTP 11. The excursion vessel Jaguar II is out at the Atlas crane. Empress of Canada is still on the Toronto Drydock. She is to be followed by one of the local brigantines. The tug Torville has been fitted with a Detoit Diesel 4 - 71 and was on trials Wednesday. The tug J. G. Fleck has been renamed b] Iroquois.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Boatnerd Gathering

10/14:
Final details are being prepared for the Gathering Oct. 27-28 at the Welland Canal. If you wish to attend please be sure that you have filled out the registration form at www.boatnerd.com/gathering.htm. All events are free to attend and optional. See you in the Welland.




Final Boatnerd Clearance Sale

10/14:
The first run of merchandise was so popular, we are preparing for our new Fall line of Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping merchandise. Force 5 Trading and Promotions must make room in their warehouse. Below is a list of all items at reduced prices. Once these items are gone the new merchandise will return to normal prices. First come first buy.

All items feature the popular Edward L. Ryerson logo embroidered on high quality clothing.

T-shirts Sale price $10.00
White
L- 1

Ash/gray
L- 4
XL- 3

Black
XL- 1

Green
XL- 3

Hooded Jacket reg. 50.00 sale 38.00
Green with Grey sweatshirt lining-
1 - Large

1/4 zip fleece shirts off white. reg. 50.00 sale. 32.00
1 - XL
1 - large

POLO shirts reg. $ 26.00 - $34.00
Sale price: M-XLARGE $ 20.00 plus shipping
XXL $ 22.00 plus shipping

Yellow:
Med- 2
XL- 1

Black-
Large- 1
XL- 4
XXL- 2

White:
large- 2
XLARGE- 3
XXL- 2

Grey:
M- 1
L- 1
XL- 1

Demin Shirts
XL- 2

Now available from Force 5, Official Interlake Steamship Company T-shirts
Regularly $ 22.00 M-XL
XXL: $ 24.00
3XL: $ 26.00
4XL: $ 28.00
SALE PRICES: M-XL $ 16.00
XXL-4XL $ 18.00 plus delivery.

Click here to view merchandise or send you order by e-mail




Today in Great Lakes History - October 14

The keel to the JAMES R. BARKER was laid on October 14, 1974. She was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flagship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.).

On October 14, 1983 the CHI-CHEEMAUN encountered 48-knot winds after departing Tobermory with 113 passengers bound for South Baymouth. Due to high wind and waves the captain decided to find shelter rather than to continue on or return to port. The ferry made her way around the Bruce Peninsula southeast to Dyer Bay where she dropped anchor for the night, however she had no overnight accommodations. Complimentary meals were served and activities were organized by the crew. The anchor was lifted the next morning and the ferry returned to Tobermory.

The GEORGE A. STINSON departed Detroit on her maiden voyage October 14, 1978 light for Superior, WI to load iron ore pellets for delivery to the Great Lakes Steel Division of the National Steel Corp. at Zug Island in River Rouge, MI.

On October 14, 1966, loaded with potash bound for Oswego, NY, the STONEFAX collided with the Norwegian salty ARTHUR STOVE and sank in the Welland Canal between Locks 7 and 8.

On 14 October 1875, it was discovered that thieves had completely stripped the canvass and rigging from the schooner FORWARDER owned by Little & Brown. The schooner was lying about three miles below Port Huron.

On 14 October 1822, APPELONA (wooden schooner, 45’, 37 T, built in 1814 at Henderson, NY) was bound from Oswego for Genessee, NY when she was struck by lightning in Lake Ontario and sank about 15 minutes. All hands were injured but abandoned her for shore and all survived.

The tug NELSON burned at Chicago on Saturday, 14 October 1876. She was one of the smaller class of tugs and the damage was so great that she was not considered to be worth repairing.

October 14, 1911 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 4 ran aground while enroute to Manistique at full speed, damaging several plates. The ANN ARBOR NO. 3 pulled her off.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Pere Marquette Update

10/13:
Temporary repairs continued on the tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 in Calumet Harbor after the pair were damaged in heavy weather Sunday. Below are images of the tug and barge.

Tug and barge during their first season together.
Looking forward from the tug.
The Undaunted from the barge.
Damage to the tug.
From the stern of the tug .
Close up of the barge's deck.
Close up of damage to the hull.

Reported by: Jonathan Kelly




Paterson Update

10/13:
Thursday the Paterson remained in the Dry Dock at Bay Ship Building. She is in the 1000-foot graving dock but the water has not been drained from it.
In the dock on Thursday.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




Twin Ports Report

10/13:
Tadoussac may be the most versatile laker to call in the Twin Ports. The vessel has loaded and unloaded grain, taconite pellets and, this season, coal. It was back in Superior on Oct. 12 to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal.

The heavy-lift saltie Stellanova is expected to arrive at the Duluth port terminal Oct. 13 to unload the first of two project cargoes slated for the terminal this month. Nine special 12-axle flatcars are spotted in the BNSF railyard near the terminal to handle the items destined for the oil sands region of western Canada.
Stellanova sailing in Lake Huron Wednesday. Don Coles

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

10/13:
Thursday the Armco was unloading ore at the Torco Dock with the John J. Boland waiting to follow. The saltie Lake Erie was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading steel products. The Algocen finished loading grain at the Andersons "K" Elevator and departed in the early afternoon with the Gaelic tugs Susan Hoey on her bow and the William Hoey on the stern assisting her downriver.

The Algoville was moored at the Andersons Layby Dock and moved over to Andersons "K" Elevator once the Algocen departed. The Mapleglen was upbound the Maumee River at 4:00 p.m. with the tug Susan Hoey assisting her, she is headed for the ADM/Countrymark Elevator to load grain.

The passenger vessel Goodtime II departed the shipyard drydock and was headed for her dock in Sandusky, Ohio.

The next scheduled coal boats are the Jean Parisien and the Canadian Olympic scheduled to arrive today. The next scheduled ore boats will be the Fred R. White Jr. due in on Saturday followed by the Reserve due in Monday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Update

10/13:
Thursday was a busy day in Cleveland. The Cuyahoga departed the salt dock at noon passing the Richard Reiss at Ontario 4. The McKee Sons took the Cuyahoga's place at the dock shortly after she cleared. The Earl W. Oglebay departed the LTV steel mill at 3:30 p.m. with the tug California assisting. The tug Karen Andrie and barge A 397 arrive shortly after. The parade continued as the Reiss departed about 5:00 p.m. with the Earl W. Oglebay following, behind the Earl W. was the tug Frank Palladino Jr. and barge. An hour later the J.A.W. Iglehart arrived with the tug Idaho.

Pictures by TZ
Cuyahoga at the Salt Dock.
Close up of her bow.
Richard Reiss unloading.
The McKee Sons passes the Reiss.
Another view.
Cuyahoga passes the McKee Sons.
Karen Andrie and barge arrive.
Close up of the tug Karen Andrie.
Earl W. Oglebay departs.
Frank Palladino Jr. and barge
Earl W. takes the lead on Lake Erie with the Frank Jr. following.
J.A.W. Iglehart arrives.
The Iglehart's stern passes the Cleveland Break Water Lighthouse.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Brockville Traffic

10/13:
Below are images of vessels passing through the Seaway at Brockville Thursday.

Canadian Century.
Algosound.

Reported by: Peter Carter




Today in Great Lakes History - October 13

The SASKATCHEWAN PIONEER made her first trip out of Thunder Bay, Ont. with grain on October 13, 1983.

The tug GLENADA towed the BROOKDALE (2) from Port Colborne to Newman's scrap yard at Port Maitland, Ont. the week of October 13, 1980.

On October 13, 1902 the MAUNALOA collided with her whaleback consort BARGE 129 on Lake Superior and sank it 30 miles northwest of Vermilion Point, which is between Upper Michigan's Crisp and Whitefish Points. The MAUNALOA had been towing the BARGE 129, both vessels loaded with iron ore, when the towline parted in heavy seas. While trying to regain control of the barge, they came together and the steamer's port anchor raked the side of the barge which started taking on water. The crew was taken off the barge before it sank.

On 13 October 1875, off Alpena, Michigan, the tug E. H. MILLER had her boiler explode while racing with the tug CITY OF ALPENA -- both in quest of a tow. The ALPENA, who was ahead of the MILLER when she blew up, immediately turned around to pick up survivors. The ALPENA sunk in minutes. The engineer, fireman and a boy were rescued, but the captain and cook were lost. The fireman was in such poor shape that it was thought that he would not live.

On 13 October 1877, the Port Huron Times reported that the tug PRINDIVILLE and the 2-mast schooner PORTLAND had both gone ashore at the Straits of Mackinac and been pounded to pieces.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Twin Ports Report

10/12:
Windoc departed Fraser Shipyards in Superior sometime during the night of Oct. 10-11.

Elton Hoyt 2nd was at the Cenex Harvest States elevator on the morning of Oct. 11 ready to load grain for Buffalo. On the other side of the terminal was straightdecker Canadian Provider.

Reported by: Al Miller




Blade Runner Arrives

10/12:
Wednesday the saltie Blade Runner arrived with a cargo of pig iron for Marinette Fuel and Dock. It was assisted into port by two Selvick tugs. It will be docked in Marinette for several days to unload.

The Marinette is scheduled to arrive after it unloading in Cleveland. The barge Pere Marquette 41 that was damaged on Sunday was headed to Marinette with a cargo of pig iron. It is unknown what vessel will carry the cargoes normally brought in by the barge.

Reported by: Scott Best




Sarnia Update

10/12:
Stefania I which departed on Oct. 8 loaded 18,032.106 metric tonnes of soya beans for delivery to Belgium.

The Nanticoke is loading a combination of soya beans and wheat and is expected to depart late Thursday or early Friday.

Reported by: Doug Schilz




Toledo Update

10/12:
The Algocen was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator and was expected to depart Wednesday evening. The Algoville was upbound the Maumee River at 5:30 p.m. headed for the Andersons grain complexes she will follow the Algocen at Andersons "K" Elevator. The Mapleglen is the next scheduled grain boat for the ADM/Countrymark Elevator she has been delayed for several days because of the low water conditions at the Soo recently.

The Reserve is due in at the Torco Dock Wednesday evening. The next scheduled ore boats will be the Armco and John J. Boland due in the early this morning. The next scheduled coal boats are the Jean Parisien and Canadian Olympic due in on Friday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Update

10/12:
The Sam Laud arrived early Wednesday morning with a load of stone for LTV and then shifted to the Osborne dock to load mill scale. The Richard Reiss departed West Third at 10:30 a.m. with the tug Washington. The Earl W. Oglebay passed going upbound to LTV for the first of 5 or 6 shuttles. The tug Rebecca Lynn and barge followed the Reiss out.

The Cuyahoga came in at 4:00 p.m. for Ontario 4 and was expected to shift to the Salt Dock at 10:00 p.m. The saltie Lake Erie left the lakefront at about 4:00 p.m.

The Earl W. Oglebay departed LTV at 4:30 p.m. with the tug Washington. The barge McKee Sons was scheduled to arrive at the Salt Dock but will have to wait for the Cuyahoga to clear in the morning.

Pictures by TZ
Sam Laud loading.
Richard Reiss unloading.
Reiss departing.
Earl W. Oglebay passing the Laud.
Passing the Reiss.
Earl W. Oglebay departs.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Erie Update

10/12:
The Adam E. Cornelius made her first visit of the 2000 season late Wednesday, with a load for the Mounfort Terminal. From the time she gave a security call at 5:30 until she got turned around and ready to tie up at the Mounfort Terminal, it was about two hours. She slowed outside the buoys to let the J.S. St John pass heading outbound.

Bow view of the Cornelius.
Stern View.
The J.S. St John.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Aerial Views

10/12:
Pilot and photographer Don Coles was flying over the Port Huron area Wednesday and sent in the pictures below. All photographs are available for purchase. Don's company, Great Lakes Aerial Photos, is available for hire for any aerial photography need.

Nanticoke loading in Sarnia Wednesday.
Heavy lift saltie Stellanova sailing for Duluth.
Port Huron pilot boat heads out for a pilot change.

For more new aerial views click here




Today in Great Lakes History - October 12

The JEAN PARISIEN suffered considerable bottom damage when she ran aground near Comfort Island about a mile west of Alexandria Bay, NY. She was released October 12, 1981 and returned to service after repairs were completed at the Vickers Montreal yard.

The CLIFF S VICTORY was sold October 12, 1985 to Hai International Corp. of New York for scrapping in the orient and transferred to Panamanian registry. Her name was changed to c) SAVIC, utilizing the "S" from CLIFFS, the "VIC" from VICTORY and inserting an "A". All the other letters were painted out.

The JOHN A. KLING sailed on her maiden voyage October 12, 1922 light from Manitowoc to load stone at Rockport, MI.

The Keel was laid October 12, 1925 for the COLONEL JAMES PICKANDS.

The SYLVANIA returned to service on October 12, 1967. She sank at the Peerless Cement Co. dock at Port Huron, MI in June of that year after being struck by the Canada Steamship Lines package freight steamer RENVOYLE.

The tug EDNA G. remained at Two Harbors until October 12, 1993 when she was towed to the Fraser Shipyard at Superior, WI by the GLT tug KANSAS. She is now on display as a floating exhibit for the city.

On October 12, 1967, the Canadian Leader entered service as the last new steam-powered vessel on the Great Lakes. The vessel, originally named Feux Follets by her first owners, Papachristidis Company Limited, was given her present name when it was sold to Upper Lakes Shipping in 1972.

At 3:00 a.m., 12 October 1870, the 76 ton tug ONTARIO caught fire and burned to the waterline while lying at Harrow's dock in Algonac, MI.

On 12 October 1901, ALVINA (wooden schooner-rigged scow-barge, 89’, 95 GT, built in 1871 at Fair Haven, MI) was being towed by the steamer WESTON and had a load of 700 barrels of lubricating oil. They were bound from Cleveland for Manistique. The ALVINA was overwhelmed in a storm and sank near Thunder Bay Island in Lake Huron. Her entire crew made it to shore in her yawl. Her cargo was salvaged five days later.

On 12 October 1880, TRADER (wooden propeller, 115', 169 gt, built in 1865 at Marine City, MI) was carrying lumber in a storm on Lake Michigan. She was battered severely and became waterlogged. Her crew abandoned her with water up to her decks. They were saved by the schooner GUIDE in a daring rescue. A few days later, in the "Alpena Storm", her wreckage washed ashore near Holland, Michigan and she was erroneously reported as another "all-hands" victim of that storm.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Pere Marquette Update

10/11:
The tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 remained in Calumet Harbor after the pair were damaged in heavy weather on southern Lake Michigan early Sunday. Once temporary repairs are completed the tug and barge will sail for permanent repairs at a ship yard. Until surveys are completed, it will not be know when the Undaunted and Pere Marquette will return to service.

The Ludington Daily news reports that the pair departed Calumet Harbor loaded with pig iron for Marinette, WI. under favorable conditions and were later caught by the heavy weather. During the storm the 5,000 tons of pig iron and the barge's four pieces of heavy loading equipment were washed into Lake Michigan. Both the tug and barge suffered damage in the incident.

One of the 11 people aboard rescued by the U.S. Coast guard was boatwatcher Jim Gallant sailing as a passenger. The newspaper quoted Jim commenting on the incident as saying “Everyone was professional and did the job they had to do in a very bad situation..”

The vessels are operated by of Ludington, Mi. The 400-foot Pere Marquette 41 is the former cross-Lake Michigan carferry City of Midland 41, which was cut down to a barge in 1997.

Reported by: Charlie Lampman




Windoc Floated

10/11:
Windoc was floated out of the drydock on Tuesday afternoon but remained in Fraser Shipyard. She entered the shipyard on Sept. 20 for unspecified repairs. Unconfirmed reports say the boat may have damaged its bottom in the St. Marys River.




Paterson Enters Dry Dock

10/11:
Another Canadian vessel entering a U.S. shipyard was the Paterson arrived at Bay Ship Building on Monday. She was placed in the 1000-foot graving dock also for unspecified repairs. Pictures by Vic D.
At Bay Ship.
Close up of her name.




Sarnia Update

10/11:
Arriving in Sarnia Tuesday was the Nanticoke. The vessel docked at the elevator and began loading.

Reported by: Doug Schilz




Toledo Update

10/11:
On Tuesday the Philip R. Clarke, and Algomarine were at the CSX Coal Docks. The Catherine Desgagnes was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading pig iron. The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge were loading cargo at the B-P Oil Company Dock. The Alpena was unloading cement at the Lafarge Dock.

The Algocen was loading grain at Andersons "K" Dock. The next scheduled grain boats will be the Algoville going to Andersons "K" Elevator when the Algocen departs. The Mapleglen is due in at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator.

The next scheduled coal boats will be the Jean Parisien and Canadian Olympic due in Friday afternoon. The next scheduled ore boats will be the Reserve due in on Wednesday evening followed by the Armco and John J. Boland on Thursday morning.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto Update

10/11:
The salty Capricorn was being loaded at Pier 35 Tuesday. The Strange Attractor remained at Redpath Sugar being unloaded.

It was a sight to see two passenger vessels in the Eastern Gap at the same time Sunday. The C. Columbus entered port as Le Levant was departing.

The tour boat season is winding down quickly. Tuesday the winter tarps were put up on the ferries Sam McBride and Thomas Rennie The winter sailing schedule started that morning. Empress of Canada is still on Toronto Dry Dock.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 11

The BAIE COMEAU II cleared Sorel October 11, 1983 as c) AGIA TRIAS, Panamanian registry #1355. Her Canadian registry was closed on October 12, 1983. Her mission was to carry grain from New Orleans, La. to Mexican and Caribbean Island ports and sailed at least into the 1987 season. Subsequently she was renamed d) OCEAN VIEW, e) SEA DIAMOND, f) GOLDEN CREST and g) ATLANTIC WOOD in 1991 for Nexus Maritime Co. S.A., St. Vincent. Disposition unknown.

The MERCURY (2) scraped the South Grand Island Bridge in the Niagara River in heavy fog on October 11, 1974. Her forward mast snapped off, the midship mast was tilted and her smoke stack was toppled. She proceeded after the mishap to G&W Welding at Cleveland under her own power for repairs.

WHEAT KING, under tow arrived at Chittagong, Bangladesh on October 11, 1989 to be broken up.

In 1911 the Chief Wawatam arrived at St. Ignace and began service shortly thereafter.

On 11 October 1913, THOMAS H. CAHOON (3 mast wooden schooner-barge, 166’, 431 GT, built in 1881 at E. Saginaw) was carrying lumber in tow of the steamer C. W. CHAMBERLAIN. They were bound from Sault Ste. Marie to Byng Inlet. However during a storm, the CAHOON stranded and went to pieces on “Kenny Shoal” by the southwest corner of Innes Island in Georgian Bay. No lives were lost.

On 11 October 1839, DEWITT CLINTON (wooden passenger/package freight side-wheeler, 147', 413 t, built in 1836 at Huron, Ohio) foundered off Milwaukee with the loss of 5 lives. She was recovered the following year and lasted until 1851. She and her near-twin ROBERT FULTON were reportedly the first Lake steamers built primarily as freighters with relatively few passenger accommodations.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Twin Ports Report

10/10:
Presque Isle is scheduled to unload stone at the DMIR ore dock in Duluth on Oct. 11. Although a frequent caller at that dock last season, the vessel has hardly been seen at all in the Twin Ports this season.

Rough seas and low water delayed several GLF vessels on Sunday. Roger Blough and John G. Munson both had to anchor near the Soo because of low water. Philip R. Clarke went to anchor off Huron, Ohio, to wait for weather, and Arthur M. Anderson dropped anchor of Gary to wait for the seas to subside before entering port to unload.

By late Monday, the situation hadn't improved much. The Anderson was proceeding into South Chicago's KCBX dock to load coal for delivery to Ashland, Wis., on Oct. 12, but the Blough, Munson and Clarke remained at anchor.

The grain trade in Duluth-Superior on Oct. 10 was limited to a pair of Canadian straightdeckers. Canadian Provider was loading at Cenex Harvest States #2 and Gordon C. Leitch was loading at General Mills in Duluth.

Reported by: Al Miller




Marquette News

10/10:
On Sunday the Canadian Transfer and the Joseph H. Thompson both made visits to Marquette's upper harbor. Local media reported the August shipping tonnage out of Escanaba and Marquette rose significantly over shipping levels in August 1999. Escanaba had the biggest gain while Marquette data showed a slight gain.

Reported by: Art Pickering




Cleveland Update

10/10:
The Myron C. Taylor was unloading at Ontario 1 Monday morning. The Algorail arrive later in the day sailing for West Third. The tug Idaho and Washington assisted her in.

The J.A.W. Iglehart arrived on Sunday morning heading to the cement terminal. The Tug Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys Cement II followed her that afternoon.

Pictures by TZ
Taylor unloading.
Close up.
Algorail arrives.
Algorail passing the lighthouse.
Tug Washington assisting the Algorail into her dock.
J.A.W. Iglehart arrives. Tug Frank Palladino Jr. passes the Sea Eagle II.
The Sea Eagle II under tow.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Saginaw in the Welland Canal

10/10:
Sunday was a busy day in the Welland Canal. The Saginaw was heading downbound for Thorold where she unloaded a cargo of coke. They departed late Sunday night sailing to load in Marblehead, Ohio.

Saginaw at Lock 8.
Stern view of the Saginaw entering the lock.
First Mate Brandon working on deck.
Irma, the Saginaw's cook took time out to wave.
Algoville is raised.
Algoville departs the lock.
Canadian Century waits for a clear lock.
The Canadian Mariner enters the lock.
Prepares to lock down.
The Greek registered Morias sailing downbound.
The Saginaw underway. video (376k)
A closer look. video (464k)

Reported by: Teresa Parker




Seaway Update

10/10:
Entering the Seaway on Oct. 7 was the Maltese-flag bulk carrier Blade Runner that had departed Quebec City the previous day for the Great Lakes. She is the former Greek-flag AKMI that was a fairly regular visitor to the inland seas over the years. As AKMI, her first trip occurred in 1982 and the last one in 1998 when she went to Thunder Bay in November of that year for the grain rush.

Another vessel renamed recently is expected in Montreal on Oct. 11 before proceeding for the Seaway. She is the Sandviken, ex Petka, a bulk carrier of Croatian registry and now flying the flag of Bahamas. Just as before, she is on charter by Fednav. Petka was a very common visitor to the lakes. Her first voyage was in 1986 and her last one under that name in 1999, her last port of call being Duluth.

According to a recent Lloyd's report, the Maltese-flag general cargo ship OBOD, Masan, South Korea for Miami, was reported to be drifting about 1,000 miles east of the Hawaiian Islands on Oct. 6 The tug Master Codt was proceeding to assist. The vessel was expected to be towed to Balboa. OBOD completed one single trip in the St. Lawrence Seaway. That was two years ago when she went to Oshawa at the end of May to unload steel.

Reported by: René Beauchamp and Matt Miner




Today in Great Lakes History - October 10

While downbound with coal in the St. Lawrence River on October 10,1981, the JEAN PARISIEN suffered considerable bottom damage when she ran aground near Comfort Island about a mile west of Alexandria Bay, NY.

The BROOKDALE (2) was towed out of Toronto on October 10, 1980 by the tug GLENADA, assisted by the tug TERRY S. She was one her way to the cutters torch.

The CHAMPLAIN (3), with her former fleetmate CADILLAC (4) was towed past Gibraltar October 10, 1987 heading for Aliaga, Turkey for dismantling by Cukurova Celik Endustrisi A.S.

The SAVIC (CLIFFS VICTORY) cleared New York on October 10, 1986.

The HULL NO.1, ex KINSMAN ENTERPRISE(1), being towed by the Polish tug JANTAR arrived in Aliaga, Turkey on October 10, 1989 to be scrapped there.

October 10, 1906 - The PERE MARQUETTE 5 was sold to The Barry Transportation Co. for $75,000. The PERE MARQUETTE 5 was the last of the "break-bulk" boats operated by the Pere Marquette Railway Co.

On 10 October 1905, CHARLES H. BURTON (3 mast wooden schooner, 158’, 514 GT, built in 1873 at Bangor, MI) was carrying coal in a storm in Lake Erie when she was driven ashore 4 1/2 miles east of Barcelona, NY and broke up. No lives were lost. She had been built on the hull of the bark GLENBULAH that had burned in the Chicago fire of 1871.

On 10 October 1877, ELIZA R. TURNER (wooden schooner, 156', 409 gt, built in 1867 at Trenton, MI) was carrying wheat from Detroit to Buffalo when a storm drove her aground nine miles west of Long Point on Lake Erie where she was wrecked. The skipper and cook drowned, but the remaining 8 were saved.

The tug CRUSADER of Oswego burned and sank in the middle of the Straits of Mackinac about 9:00 PM on 10 October 1878.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Barge Pere Marquette Set Adrift

10/09:
All crewmembers are safe after shifting cargo in heavy weather caused the tug Undaunted to release the 400-foot barge Pere Marquette 41 early Sunday morning in southern Lake Michigan.

Shortly after mid-night, the barge's load of 5000 tons of pig iron, and four pieces of heavy equipment shifted in 15 foot seas. The tug's crew was forced to execute emergency breakaway procedures, releasing the barge from the tug. As the barge was released it ripped a 2-foot by 1-foot hole in the tug at the waterline. The tug was forced to head for shore where it ran aground 400 yards northeast of Wilmette Harbor.

The U.S. Coast Guard Station at Wilmette Harbor, responding to a Mayday call from Undaunted, removed four crewmen using their small 21-foot rigid hull inflatable boat. Seven other crewmen were rescued by a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter.

As the barge Pere Marquette 41 drifted south at 4 knots, a Coast Guard search and rescue helicopter from Muskegon, MI. located the barge and directed efforts to regain its control. After initial efforts from a second tug failed, the Coast Guard helicopter hoisted a crewmember from the Undaunted and transported him to the drifting barge.

At 7:30 a.m., the crewmember dropped the barge's anchor. The anchor held and stopped the barge 3.5 miles northeast of Calumet Harbor, 24 miles south of the position where it was released. At 8:23 a.m. the tug Donald C. Hannah took the barge in tow. The barge was taken to Calumet Harbor where it is docked at the Trans Oceanic Dock.

The tug Undaunted was freed on Sunday afternoon and towed to Calumet Harbor, Illinois.

The vessels are operated by Pere Marquette Shipping of Ludington, Mi. The 400-foot Pere Marquette 41 is the former cross-Lake Michigan carferry City of Midland 41, which was cut down to a barge in 1997.

At 4:00 a.m. Sunday a weather buoy in Southern Lake Michigan reported northerly winds at 23 knots with waves at 12-feet. The water temperature was 58 degrees.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre and Charlie Lampman




Low Water Continues at the Soo

10/09:
Low water in the lower St. Marys River continues to delay shipping through the Soo Locks as vessels anchor awaiting the water to rise. At noon the water level was 16 inches below datum.

Waiting above the locks is the John G. Munson, Kapitonis Savcenko, Oglebay Norton, Frontenac, Earl W. Oglebay, Canadian Transport, Canadian Miner, Armco, St. Clair, Burns Harbor Arriving later on Sunday was the Roger Blough and the Salties Lake Ontario and Konigsborg. Below the Locks the Jade Star is awaiting to go to the Government Dock in Soo Canada and the Charles M. Beeghley is downbound.

When the water level returns there will be a parade of vessels heading through the Soo Locks, be sure to check the live cams to catch all the action.

Reported by: Art Pickering and Mike Flint




Columbus Departs Welland Canal

10/09:
After spending most of the summer on the Great Lakes, the cruise ship cColumbus is headed back to the sea. The Nassau-registered liner departed the Welland Canal Sunday afternoon with plenty of well wishers on hand. Hundreds of cars were seen along the canal and the cColumbus had done wonders for the Niagara tourist industry. The vessel cleared Port Weller piers at 3:40 p.m. with a rainbow in evidence off her port bow.

Reported by: Bill Bird




Twin Ports Report

10/09:
In sharp contrast to the past few weeks, the morning of Oct. 8 was quiet in Duluth and Superior. At 8 a.m., the only boat action involved Courtney Burton unloading stone at CLM in Superior and Algonorth loading grain at General Mills in Duluth. As the season's end approaches, Algonorth chose to load on Saturday and Sunday.

Traffic picked up later in the day, with John J. Boland arriving with stone for Reiss Inland dock, Joe Block arriving for taconite pellets at DMIR and Cason J. Callaway arriving to unload stone at DMIR.

Reported by: Al Miller




Sarnia Update

10/09:
While awaiting the CSL Niagara to clear upbound, followed by the downbound Federal Agno, the Stefania I cast off her lines and departed the grain elevator in Sarnia at 7:45 a.m. Sunday morning. She was assisted by the tug Menasha who was able to help swing her bow while still out of the channel. This enabled her to clear downbound instead of making the trip out into the lake and turning around. This is a common practice (going upbound) considering there is the strong current at the end of the slip and the fact that most of the salt-water ships do not have a bow thruster.

She was completely swung and heading downbound by 8:05 a.m. This cut a considerable amount of time off her passage downbound to the Detroit pilot change. The only time she seemed to slow was when passing over a shallow area at the end of the slip. This slowed her but didn't stop her. The Stefania I was the Cargill's first salt-water visitor of the year. The only other scheduled salt-water ship, is to bring in fertilizer later in the year.

Reported by: Doug Schilz




Iroquois Lock Traffic

10/09:
Below are images of the saltie Blade Runner passing through the Seaway at Brockville Sunday.

Blade Runner passing Brockville.
Close up of the super structure.

Reported by: Peter Carter




Today in Great Lakes History - October 09

The CHIMO (b) CANADIAN RANGER) was moved onto the Port Weller Dry Dock on October 9, 1983 where work began to cut her apart forward of her aft located pilot house and engine room.

The GULF MACKENZIE (b) L. ROCHETTE) was launched October 9, 1976

The SASKATCHEWAN PIONEER arrived in the Welland Canal on her delivery trip October 9, 1983 en route for her formal christening at Thunder Bay.

The JAMES DAVIDSON was launched October 9, 1920 for the Globe Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH (G.A. Tomlinson, mgr.)

On October 9, 1984 the PATERSON (1) was sold to Shearmet Recycling, a Thunder Bay ship breaker, and was broken up at their Mission River dock.

The a) COL. JAMES M. SCHOONMAKER (b) WILLIS B. BOYER) sailed from the shipyard on her maiden voyage on October 9, 1911 to Toledo, OH where she loaded coal bound for Sheboygan, WI. The SCHOONMAKER was the largest vessel on the Great Lakes when she came out. For much of the decade this vessel either broke or held many bulk cargo records.

On 9 October 1820, ASP (wooden schooner, 57 T, built in 1808 at Mississauga, Ontario) was carrying lumber and staves when she sprang a leak near Long Point in Lake Ontario. She waterlogged, then capsized. The upturned vessel was driven across the lake and finally went ashore off the Salmon River at Mexico Bay, NY and broke up quickly. 9 of the 11 onboard lost their lives. She was originally built as the British armed schooner ELIZABETH.

On 9 October 1931, CHARLES H. BRADLEY (wooden propeller, 201', 804 gt, built in 1890 at W. Bay City, MI) was carrying pulpwood and towing the barge GRAMPIAN. She was traversing the Portage Canal in the Keweenaw Peninsula when she ran onto a bar and stranded. The barge kept coming and ploughed into her stern. The Bradley caught fire and burned to the waterline. The wreck still lies in 6' - 17' of water just off the mouth of the Sturgeon River.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Low Water at the Soo

10/08:
Weather has once again contributed to the stoppage of ship traffic through the Soo Locks. The water level in the Lower St. Marys River had dropped to 10 inches below Chart Datum Saturday, leaving vessels at anchor awaiting the water to rise. Some of the vessels affected include the Oglebay Norton, John G. Munson and the Kapitonis Sevcenko.

On Lake Superior waves were 8-10 feet or higher with high winds. The Upper Peninsula and Northern Lower Peninsula had the first snow of the season Saturday. Some parts of the Upper Peninsula received 12-14 inches of snow.

Reported by: Art Pickering and Mike Flint




C. Columbus Departs

10/08:
The cruise ship C. Columbus departed Windsor Saturday afternoon. She passed downbound on her final voyage off the lakes for this season. She will spend the winter cruising in warmer waters.

The Columbus departs Windsor and heads down river.
Passing under the Ambassador Bridge.




Northern Lake Huron Marine Sanctuary

10/08:
The State of Michigan and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration were expected to dedicate the new 448-square- mile Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary on northern Lake Huron. The Detroit News reported Saturday that the area holds the wreckage 116 ships or maybe more. Thunder Bay is located near Alpena and contains one of the densest concentrations of shipwrecks in North America.

Each year more than 2,000 divers visit the bottom of the bay. Plans for the new sanctuary include the construction of an interpretive center near Alpena.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 08

The Keel was laid October 8,1976 for the 660 ft. forward section of the a) LEWIS WILSON FOY (b) OGLEBAY NORTON ) for the Bethlehem Steel Co., Cleveland, Ohio.

The MATHEWSTON (b RALPH S. MISENER (2) entered service on October 8, 1922. On her maiden voyage she sailed from Port Arthur with 11,634 tons of barley and wheat.

The Canadian registry for MENIHEK LAKE was officially closed on October 8, 1985 with the notation "sold Spain."

The WILLIAM G. MATHER arrived on October 8, 1988 in tow of the GLT tugs WYOMING and ALABAMA at the G&W Shipyard at Collision Bend in the Cuyahoga River to be refurbished.

On 8 October 1906, PASADENA (wooden barge, 250’, 1761 GT, built in 1889 at Cleveland as a propeller bulk freighter) was carrying coal, in tow of the steamer GLADSTONE, bound for Superior, WI. The PASADENA went out of control in a gale and her skipper had the tow line cut. She was thrown against a pier near the upper entry to the Keweenaw Waterway and pounded to pieces in a few hours. Two lives were lost, but 8 made it to shore on the floating wreckage.

On 8 October 1854, E. K. COLLINS (Wooden passenger/package freight side-wheeler, 256', 1095 gt, built in 1853 at Newport, MI) caught fire and beached near the mouth of the Detroit River where she burned to the waterline. About 23 lives were lost. About 43 persons were rescued in small boats and by the steamers FINTRY and GLOBE. There was some speculation that arson was the cause. The hull was recovered in 1857 and rebuilt as the barge ARK.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




USS and DM&IR Ownership Re-Organized

10/07:
After 99 years, USX Corp. will no longer have an ownership stake in USS Great Lakes Fleet, according to a story in the Oct. 6 Duluth News Tribune.

Transtar Inc., which owns a majority stake in numerous USX transportation companies, announced Thursday that it will exchange ownership shares in the companies with USX. As part of the exchange, Transtar will become the sole owner of USS Great Lakes Fleet, the Duluth Missabe & Iron Range Railway, the Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad Co., and the Pittsburgh & Conneaut Dock Co.

"The USX ownership of these properties will no longer be in the picture," Robert Gentile, vice president of Transtar, said. "There will be no significant impact on employees and no relocations."

United States Steel Corp. acquired the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. in 1901. Over the years, the fleet eventually became known as USS Great Lakes Fleet while U.S. Steel became part of USX Corp. In 1988, USX sold a 51-percent share of its transportation companies -- including the fleet -- to Transtar Inc., a New York Investment firm.

The reorganization, which was announced following several months of discussion, will allow Transtar and USX Corp. to operate independently. USS Great Lakes Fleet and the DMIR will continue to serve their taconite customers, the newspaper reported.

In return for surrendering its share of the properties closely related to the Great Lakes, USX becomes sole owner of the Birmingham Southern Railroad Co., The Warrior & Gulf Navigation Co., the Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Railway, the Lake Terminal Railroad Co. and the McKeesport Co.

The newspaper reported that no reason was given for the exchange, which requires federal approval. "It was strictly a shareholder-to-shareholder decision," Gentile said.

Reported by: Al Miller and David French




Griffon Update

10/07:
Workers from Shelley Machine & Marine Ltd. are busy cutting away the buckled steel on the Canadian Coast Guard Cutter Griffon in Sarnia. The Griffon was involved in a collision with the Atlantic Huron on Sept. 25 in Lake Erie.

The half-inch thick steel deck plates were crumpled like an accordion. Damage to the storage area inside was extensive. The Coast Guard hopes to have the ship back in service by November 1.

Pictures by Lane Hautau from Ron and Linda Locke
The Griffon at the Government Dock.
Close up of the damaged area.

Reported by: George Lee




Seaway Update

10/07:
Former Canadian tanker renamed.
Getting her fifth name since she was built in 1964, the tanker Nowrat Al Khalees was renamed NADA earlier this year. She now flies the flag of convenience of Bolivia, a land locked country in South America. Built by Saint John S.B. & D.D. at Saint John, N.B. for Irving Oil, she was named Irving Ours Polaire until 1993 when becoming the Rexton Kent. Two years later, she hoisted the Honduras flag and her name was shortened to Rexton, a name she kept until 1998 when Nowrat Al Khalees was painted on her hull.

Former tug renamed.
A tug used as a private yacht since 1997 was sold to another party a few months ago. Heritage 1932 was renamed Théodore by the new owner. She had many previous names and one of the former owners was Branch Lines of Sorel when she sailed as their Rosanne Simard. Built by Canadian Vickers Ltd. in Montreal in 1932, her first name was Vigilant and was owned by Mont Louis Seignory Ltd. on the Gaspé coast.

Lay up.
Arriving at section 16 at Sorel on the Richelieu River was the tanker Algocatalyst on Sept. 15. A very recent lay-up is the general cargo ship Arctic Viking that arrived in Montreal on Oct.4 from the St. Lawrence Seaway. She was used lately to bring supplies to the northern regions.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Twin Ports Report

10/07:
The BNSF ore dock has been busy the past few days. Stewart J. Cort, Louis R. Desmarais and Frontenac called there Oct. 5. Burns Harbor, another BNSF regular, was due in Oct. 6.

One of Duluth's biggest heavy-lift cargoes in recent years is due to arrive on two specialized ships later in October.

A total of 36 pieces of oil refining equipment will be unloaded at the Duluth port terminal and reloaded aboard special heavy-duty railcars or aboard trucks for shipment to a site near Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta. There they will be used in the Athabasca Oil Sands Project, which is separating sand from oil drawn from a reserve estimated to be larger than the oil reserves remaining in Saudi Arabia.

Twelve of the pieces weigh more than 500 tons each, and some are as long as 75 feet and as big around as 14 feet. These big pieces will be shipped aboard special 12-axle flatcars while smaller pieces are shipped by truck.

The refinery equipment was made in Japan and is being shipped through the Panama Canal and into the St. Lawrence Seaway. Duluth was chosen to handle the cargo because rail lines between the port and western Canada are among the few with all the necessary clearances on bridges and curves to handle extra-large loads. Rail lines from the West Coast have too many tunnels that cannot handle the heavy-lift cargoes.

Reported by: Al Miller




Sarnia Report

10/07:
Friday was a busy day for Sarnia. The Stefania I continues to load at the Cargill Elevator. A short distance down the St. Clair River, the Algonova was at the Sunoco north dock, and at Shell, Adam E. Cornelius was departing the fuel dock shortly after 9:30 a.m. after fuelling. The middle dock was occupied by the Fairchem Vanguard, a chemical tanker built in 1999. The lower dock had the Jade Star. The Fairchem Vanguard unloaded at the Bayer dock, where she arrived on Thursday. She was apparently loaded with caustic soda.

Reported by: Doug Schilz




Toledo Update

10/07:
The Quebecois departed Andersons "K" Elevator Wednesday afternoon. Friday the Montrealais was at Andersons "K" Elevator loading grain, when finished the Algocen will be the next boat in at this elevator. The Manitoulin and the saltie TORO are both at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. When both vessels are finished loading grain the Mapleglen will be the next boat due in at this Elevator. The Cuyahoga was headed upbound the Maumee River at 6:00 p.m. headed for Andersons "E" Elevator. This will be the first time in quite a few years that there are four grain boats in at the same time at all three grain elevators at this port.

At the CSX Coal Docks the JEAN PARISIEN was loading coal with the Canadian Century, Kaye E. Barker, and American Mariner were all expected to arrive Friday to load coal. After these vessels are finished loading the next scheduled coal boat will be the Algosteel due in this morning. The Algosteel will be followed by the Philip R. Clarke and Algolake due in on Sunday afternoon. The next scheduled ore boat will be the Armco due in on Monday afternoon followed by the Reserve on Tuesday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




New Web Cam

10/07:
New web cams are now on line featuring the Duluth Harbor. The Web Cams are positioned facing the Arial Lift Bridge and the Canal entrance to the inner harbor from atop the newly opened Great Lakes Aquarium next to the Duluth Entertainment and Convention Center. The Web cams are sponsored by the Duluth News Tribune.
Visit the Live Web Cam from the Great Lakes Aquarium

Reported by: Steve Haverty and Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - October 07

The ALGOWOOD was launched October 7, 1980 for Algoma Central Marine, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

PAUL THAYER (b) EARL W. OGLEBAY) was launched October 7, 1973 for the Union Commerce Bank Trustee, Cleveland, OH and managed by Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland. She was built under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970 for $12.6 million.

BIRCHGLEN was launched October 7, 1926 as a) WILLIAM McLAUCHLAN, US.226176, for the Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

BLACK RIVER, Lake Bulk Freighter. Built as a Steel Barge in 1897 by the F.W. Wheeler & Co., she was Launched October 7, 1896 as a) SIR ISAAC LOTHIAN BELL

The HUTCHCLIFFE HALL was raised October 7, 1962 and taken to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs. She had sunk after a collision a few days earlier.

October 7, 1923 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 4 went back into service after being overhauled and having new cabins built on her main deck.

The MADISON suffered a fire on October 7, 1987 while lying idle at Muskegon and was badly damaged.

In 1903, ADVENTURE (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 108’, 142 GT, built in 1875 at Detroit as a schooner) caught fire while tied to the Kelly’s Island Line & Transport Co. dock. The blaze spread so quickly that those on board barely escaped. She was towed from Kelly’s Island out into Lake Erie by the tug SMITH to save the dock and the adjacent schooner ANDERSON.

In a severe gale and rain/hail storm on 7 October 1858, the 247 ton schooner OSPREY approached Oswego, New York. As she was about to enter the harbor, the vessel struck the east pier broadside. Her masts and rigging were carried away and she started to sink. Capt. John Parsons got his wife and child out of the cabin to try to escape to the pier. His wife was washed overboard and drowned. Capt. Parsons held on to his child, but another wave struck the wreck and swept the child into the water. George Crine, the mate, was also swept overboard. Those three were lost, but the next wave swung the wreck about with her bowsprit over the pier and the captain and the six remaining crewmen scrambled to safety. The entire town and harbor mourned those deaths and held a dockside service two days later with many prayers and all flags at half mast. Donations were accepted for the surviving sailors since they escaped with only the clothes on their backs.

On 7 October 1873, the PULASKI was launched at the Archibald Muir yard on the Black River in Port Huron. Her dimensions were 136' x 26' x 11', 349 gt. She was a three mast "full canaler", painted white and her private signal was a red M on a white ground bordered with blue. Her sails were made by Mr. D. Robeson of Port Huron.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Anderson Departs

10/06:
Arthur M. Anderson's visit to Fraser Shipyards was brief. After spending just a few hours in the yard, the vessel cleared sometime during the night of Oct. 4-5. It may have needed the services of a crawler crane and found it easier to enter the yard than to wait for one to be moved dockside. The Anderson is due to arrive at Gary, IN. on Oct. 7 to unload.

Reported by: Al Miller




Water Level Forces Gott to Anchor

10/06:
The Edwin H. Gott tied up Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. to wait out low water in the lower pool. She departed the Carbide Dock in Soo, Michigan shortly after 9:00 a.m. Thursday morning.

An unusual sight Thursday evening was the Earl W. Oglebay upbound at the Soo Locks. The Earl W. spends most of the season operating in the stone trade on the lower lakes. The Algonorth following her through the locks.

The Tanker Rathrowan was at the Algoma Steel Mill being loaded with Coal Tar bound for overseas. This being her second trip into Algoma this year.




Unusual Loading for the Menominee

10/06:
The saltie Menominee returned to the port of Marinette/Menominee for her fifth trip this year. Instead of loading its usual dock at the K & K Warehouse (in Menominee) it docked at Marinette Fuel & Dock alongside the crane ship, William H. Donner. Normally the ship would load using its on-board cranes.

This trip the pulp was put on flat bed truck and taken across the river to the Fuel Dock and then lifted onto the Menominee using the Donner's cranes fitted with a hooked apparatus for loading the baled paper. The Donner is primary used to unload pig iron with electro-magnets on the cranes.

Last year the Marinette loaded in a similar way. There was no explanation why the vessels occasionally load this way but could be related to low water levels.

Pictures by Dick Lund
Employees attach a bale of paper to the lift apparatus.
The bale is hoisted by the Donner's cranes aboard the Menominee.

Reported by: Scott Bestand Dick Lund




Shipping Action in Oswego

10/06:
The pace at the port of Oswego, NY. is starting to pick up with the salt carriers coming in to stock pile road salt for the long, snowy Upstate New York winters.

Traffic is often slow during the season at the port with only the Saturn, English River, and Stephen B. Roman making regular visits. An occasional salty will arrive carrying Aluminum ingots.

In the fall many boats come in with rock salt. The next boat due at the Port Authority East Side Terminal will be the Algowest. She will have approximately 12,000 MT of rock salt to deliver from Goderich, Ontario. She will be loading at Goderich on October 11 and should arrive late on Oct. 14 or early Oct. 15.

Access for boatwatchers is great and many photo opportunities around the harbor.

Reported by: Tom Moriarty




Twin Ports Report

10/06:
Most Twin Ports grain-loading berths were occupied on the morning of Oct. 5 and, for the time being at least, no vessels were anchored on the lake waiting for elevators. Kinsman Independent and Koznitsa remained at Cenex Harvest States; Canadian Miner was loading at General Mills in Superior (formerly Great Northern); Federal Agno was loading at Peavey and may be replaced later in the day by Royal Pescadores; and Vaasaborg was loading at General Mills in Duluth. Cargill's modern terminal continues to handle few vessels this fall. By the end of the afternoon, however, two salties were again at anchor on the lake off Duluth.

Reported by: Al Miller




Cleveland Update

10/06:
Wednesday the 1000 footer Columbia Star made a rare appearance in Cleveland. She arrived about 6:00 p.m. and waited for the George A. Sloan to clear port before proceeding to the Whiskey Island terminal to unload. This is believed to be the first visit to Cleveland by a 1000 footer this season.

Following closely behind the Star was the American Republic bound for LTV. In addition there was two FedNav ships berthed at the Lakefront Docks.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Toronto Update

10/06:
English River arrived about 9:00 a.m. Wednesday morning with a load of cement for Lafarge. She docked opposite the Canadian Provider, which departed two hours later after her lengthy lay-up in Toronto.

This leaves only the Seaway Queen and Canadian Trader in lay-up. Those vessels have had their radars and spotlights removed, so it is not likely that either will be fitting out this year.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Steady As She Goes At SMET

10/06:
Shipments of low-sulfur coal from Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in September were virtually unchanged from a year earlier - 1,788,594 n.t compared to 1,787,316 n.t. in September 1999. For the season, shipments from SMET stand at11.1 million net tons, a decrease of 3.3 percent compared to the same point in the 1999 navigation season.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers' Association




Today in Great Lakes History - October 06

Herb Fraser & Associates completed repairs on the Algosoo at the Welland Dock on October 6 1986. She had suffered a serious fire at her winter mooring on the west wall above Lock 8 at Port Colborne, Ont. on March 7, 1986.

The bow section of the PRESQUE ISLE (2) arrived Erie October 6, 1972. The section was towed from Defoe Shipbuilding at Bay City, MI by the tugs MARYLAND and LAURENCE C. TURNER. The total cost to construct the tug/barge thousand footer was approximately $35 million.

October 6, 1981 the ERINDALE's bow was damaged when she hit the Allanburg Bridge abutment running downbound in the Welland Canal

In 1980 the LAC DES ILES grounded in the Detroit River just below Grassy Island, the result of a faulty steering mechanism. She freed herself a few hours later. The damage caused by the grounding ended her career.

This day in 1870, the schooner E. FITZGERALD was launched at the Fitzgerald & Leighton yard at Port Huron, MI. Her dimensions were 135' x 26' x 11'.

In 1875, the MERCHANT (iron propeller passenger/package freight steamer, 200', 750 t, built in 1862 at Buffalo) was carrying lumber on Lake Michigan when she stranded on Racine Reef near Racine, Wisconsin. Then she caught fire and was gutted before she could be refloated. She had stranded on that same reef twice previously. She was the first iron cargo ship built on the Lakes and the first one lost.

On 6 October 1873, JOHN A. McDOUGALL (wooden schooner-barge, 151’, 415 GT) was launched at Wenona, MI. She was built at the Ballentine yard in only five weeks.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Anderson Enters Shipyard

10/05:
Instead of departing Duluth's DMIR ore dock in late afternoon Wednesday as expected, Arthur M. Anderson entered Fraser Shipyards in Superior. The vessel appeared to have unloaded all or part of its limestone cargo. There was no indication of the nature of the repairs needed.

After sitting empty all summer, the shipyard now hosts the Anderson as well as Windoc, which remains in drydock.

In other news, Wednesday was a good day for straightdeckers in the Twin Ports, with Alpena, Kinsman Independent and Canadian Mariner all in port.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toronto News

10/05:
The salties Lake Superior and Thorslake departed Tuesday night. Hamilton Energy was in port bunkering the Canadian Provider Tuesday afternoon.

Wayward Princess returned early Wednesday morning from Port Dalhousie, where she had gone for a charter last night.

The tug Patricia D. was ferrying film crew and actors for the movie "Sanctuary" to the island today. Melissa Gilbert, of "Little House on the Prairie" fame stars. She returned to the city in a motor home aboard the ferry Ongiara.

The Toronto Star reports that the two sunken 1812 warships, the Hamilton and Scourge have almost certainly been colonized by quagga mussels, an invasion which threatens their archeological value and chances of recovery.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Iroquois Lock Traffic

10/05:
Below are recent pictures of traffic passing through the Seaway near the Iroquois Lock.

Melissa Desgagnes below Iroquois.
Fulness passing Brockville.
Lok Prakash at Iroquois.
A Moonlit John W. Brown departing the lakes in August.

Reported by: Peter Carter




More Rumors

10/05:
Rumors continue that the USS Great Lakes Fleet (USS) is planning to sell some of the older vessels in the fleet. Unconfirmed reports say that the Calcite II, Myron C. Taylor and George A. Sloan are to be sold to the Canadian shipping company, Lower Lakes Towing (LLT). The Calcite II and Myron C. Taylor are rumored to be heading for lay-up in Sarnia at the end of this month.

USS and LLT have not released an official statement regarding a possible sale.




Gales of November Seminar

10/05:
Anyone interested in the Edmund Fitzgerald and other Great Lakes topics may want to consider spending the weekend of Nov. 10-12 in Duluth for the annual Gales of November seminar and ship tours, and other events.

Gales of November is a daylong event featuring speakers on a wide range of topics. It is sponsored by the Lake Superior Marine Museum Association and held this year in the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center, located right off Interstate 35 in downtown Duluth.

Speakers scheduled to appear include Capt. Dudley Paquette, retired master of Wilfred Sykes, who will talk about "The Night the Fitz Went Down"; Gerry Dawson, Thunder Bay tug captain, talking about rescuing two people from the cruise boat Grampa Woo adrift on Lake Superior; author Fred Stonehouse talking about "Haunted Ships"; Neil Howk with the National Park Service in the Apostle Islands, talking about "Lighthouses in the Movies"; and many more.

Featured dinner speaker is Capt. Jimmie Hobaugh, USCG ret., talking about "25 Years Ago: The Edmund Fitzgerald Remembered."

Weather permitting, participants also will be able to tour the Coast Guard Cutter Sundew and the Coast Guard's newest 47-foot lifeboat.

Cost of the day events is $15 per person for LSMMA members and $18 for non-members. Tickets for the Dinner Program are $25/$29.

To register or for information, call 218-727-2497 or see the LSMMA website at www.lsmma.com

Other events that weekend on the same subject include:
Nov. 10, 4-6 p.m. - Fitzgerald Commemoration and Lighting of the Beacon at Split Rock Lighthouse (about 35 miles north of Duluth on Minnesota Hwy. 61 - very easy to reach)
Nov. 10, 6:30-8:30 p.m. - Authors' book-signing party at the Great Lakes Aquarium in Duluth.
Nov. 12, singer Gordon Lightfoot performs at the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center. Tickets on sale by calling 218-722-5573. (Yes, he always sings "Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" in Duluth).

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - October 05

On Saturday afternoon, Oct. 5 1997, while passing White Shoal Light on their way to Charlevoix, the Medusa Challenger was hit by a waterspout. The only damage reported was a spotlight on the pilothouse bridge wing lifted out of its support and crews bikes stored on deck rose vertically. The 1906 built boat was also reported to have been vibrating in an unusual manner. Another boat in the area reported wind gusts of almost 100 mph in the brief storm. That same day the eastern UP was hit with a violent storm that blew down trees a foot in diameter.

The ARTHUR B. HOMER, loaded with ore, was in a head-on collision, October 5, 1972, with the unloaded Greek salty NAVISHIPPER at Buoy 83 in the Detroit River's Fighting Island Channel. NAVISHIPPER reportedly had no licensed pilot aboard at the time, a violation of Maritime law. There were no injuries, but the HOMER suffered extensive bow damage up to and including part of her pilothouse.

The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2) was christened on October 5, 1954 for the National Steel Corp. (M.A. Hanna Co., mgr.), Cleveland, OH.

HUTCHCLIFFE HALL was in collision with steamer RICHARD V. LINDABURY on a foggy October 5, 1962 off Grosse Pointe Farms in Lake St. Clair. The canaller suffered a 12-foot gash on her port side forward of her after cabins and sank. She was raised October 7th and taken to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs.

On October 5, 1967 while outbound on the Saginaw River after discharging a load of limestone at Saginaw, MI, the J.F. SCHOELLKOPF, JR.'s steering failed which caused her to hit the west side of the I-75 Zilwaukee Bridge. The SCHOELLKOPF, JR. incurred little damage but the south bound lanes of the bridge were out of service for several days until repairs were completed.

The ARTHUR H. HAWGOOD was launched October 5, 1907 for the Neptune Steamship Co. (Hawgood, mgr.), Cleveland, OH.

On 5 October 1889, BESSEMER (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 178’, 436 GT, built in 1875 at St. Clair, MI) was carrying iron ore along with her consort SCHUYLKILL (wooden schooner, 152’, 472 GT, built in 1873 at Buffalo) in Lake Superior. They were struck by a rapidly rising gale and ran for the Portage Ship Canal. It became obvious that BESSEMER was sinking. The two collided and went onto a reef at the mouth of the canal and they both broke up quickly. The crews were able to jump onto the breakwater. The wrecks partly blocked the canal until they were dynamited the next September.

On 5 October 1877, TIOGA (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 549 t, built in 1862 at Cleveland) was towing two barges in a storm on Lake Erie when she caught fire. The high winds fanned the flames. Her crew escaped to the barges and were later picked up by the steamer BADGER STATE. The burned out hulk of TIOGA sank the next day in 30 feet of water off Point Pelee. This was her first year of service as a bulk freighter; she had been built as a passenger steamer and was converted in 1877.

On 5 October 1900, one hundred years ago, the lumber hooker SWALLOW was involved in a collision in the early morning hours and ended up ashore near Cherry Beach. A week later, she was lightered and freed, then taken to Detroit for repairs. She foundered in a storm one year later (18 October 1901).

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Twin Ports Report

10/04:
The fall grain rush continues in the Twin Ports, with vessels working at most elevators on Oct. 3. Cenex Harvest States had a full house. Koznitsa was loading in berth #2 and Aegean Sea was loading in berth #1, with Kinsman Independent docked ahead of it in the layby berth. The Aegean Sea was scheduled to clear the elevator late in the day so its berth could be taken by KI. Canadian Mariner was loading at General Mills and Federal Agno was loading at Peavey Connors Point. AGP remains busy, clearing Lake Champlain on Oct. 2, clearing Kasteelborg on Oct. 3 and starting to load wheat into Morias the same afternoon. Lake Ontario remains at anchor on the lake waiting for AGP.

John G. Munson is scheduled to load coal in Toledo for delivery to Ontonagon, Mich., on Oct. 5. From there it will proceed to Two Harbors to load ore for the downbound trip.

The DMIR ore dock in Duluth has a number of interesting vessels due in the coming 10 days. Mesabi Miner was loading Oct. 3 and Arthur M. Anderson was due with stone late in the day; Indiana Harbor is due Oct. 4; Philip R. Clarke is due Oct. 7 to unload stone and load taconite pellets; Joe Block and Edwin H. Gott are due Oct. 8; Indiana Harbor is due back Oct. 11; and Elton Hoyt II, Saginaw and James R. Barker are scheduled for Oct. 13.

Traffic remains steady at Midwest Energy Terminal. Canadian Enterprise and Algolake were due Oct. 3; Paul R. Tregurtha, Oct. 4; Oglebay Norton, Oct. 5; Algobay, Oct. 6; and Canadian Transport, Oct. 7.

Reported by: Al Miller




Marquette Update

10/04:
With the arrival of the Elton Hoyt 2nd Sunday evening night, shipping figures for the month of September showed a slight 2 % increase compared to the month of August figures. The upper harbor remained on unchanged from August with 43 visits while the lower harbor had a slight increase with 6 visits (20% increase) compared to 5 in August.

Leading the way with visits to the lower harbor this season is the H. Lee White with 10 visits followed closely by the American Mariner with 9 visits. The John Boland and the Adam Cornelius each have 7 visits. The U.S.C.G. Sundew has four visits followed by 9 other vessels with one visit each including the Cruise Ship Columbus that visited this month. All vessels except the Columbus have been U.S. carriers with the American Steamship Co leading the way with 33 visits.

As for the upper harbor, the Canadian Transfer is leading all vessels into Marquette for the season with 63 visits followed by the Elton Hoyt with 33 visits. Other vessels include the Lee Tregurtha with 23, Charles Beeghly with 22, the Kaye Barker with 15, the John Boland and the American Mariner with 14 visits each, the Algomarine and H. Lee White each have 11 visits, the Algosteel has 10 visits, the Herbert Jackson has 8 visits, the Adam Cornelius has 7 visits, the Paul Tregurtha has 6, the Mesabi Miner and the Great Lakes Traders each has 5 visits, the James Norris, Courtney Burton and James Barker is has 4 visits, the Joseph Thompson has 3 visits, the Fred White has 2 visits, while each of the following has one visit each, Middletown, Buckeye, Armco, U.S.C.G. Sundew, and the CPT Henry Jackman. Vessels yet to be seen this season here in Marquette include Agawa Canyon, Algobay, Algolake, Algorail, Algosoo, Algowest, Canadian Century, Earl Oglebay, John Aird, Reserve, and Sam Laud.

So far this year, Interlake and Lakes Shipping Company combine have 43 % of the visits to the ore dock here in Marquette followed by Upper Lakes with 25%, American Steamship with 17%, Algoma with 8%, Oglebay Shipping with 3%, Upper Lakes Barge with 2% and Upper Lakes Towing with 1% while the U.S.C.G has less then 1% of the visits to the harbor. U.S. Flag ship continue to lead with 67% of the visits compare to the Canadians with 33% of the visits.

Finally in other shipping news, Marquette recently learned that as many as six cruise vessels will visit the city next year.

Reported by: Art Pickering




Toledo Update

10/04:
Tuesday the John G. Munson finished loading coal and departed by early morning. The Adam E. Cornelius was unloading stone at the T.W.I. Dock. The Quebecois was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The grain trade will be busy at this port through out October. After the Quebecois finishes loading grain, there are 15 more grain boats scheduled to arrive in port. The primary loading dock will be Andersons "K" Elevator and soybeans will be the main grain product loaded into these vessels.

Several vessels tentatively scheduled to arrive in the next few days are the saltie Toro, The lakers Manitoulin, Montrealais, Cuyahoga, Algocen, Gordon C. Leitch, Algoville, Mapleglen, and RT. Hon Paul J. Martin. However if there are any gale force winds around the Lakes during the next week there will be delays and possible changes in vessels scheduled to arrive.

The next scheduled coal boat due in will be the Lee A. Tregurtha due in on Wednesday evening. The Armco was the next ore boat scheduled to arrive Tuesday evening.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Spotted in Vancouver

10/04:
The former Lake Ontario passenger ferry Lake runner was spotted in Vancouver on the drydock at Arrows Shipyard. The name and port of registry are still the same. The Lake runner was sold last year after Shaker Cruise Lines went bankrupt.

The former McKeil tug Ocean Wrestler is now operating on this West Coast engaged in towing aggregate barges from British Columbia to California. The tug had worked years towing warehouse barges of paper, that was before she ended up in Singapore where McKeil bought her.

Reported by: Garth McKeil




Badger Sailing

10/04:
As the operating season heads to an end, the Lake Michigan Cary ferry Badger remains busy shuttling passengers, cars and freight from Ludington, MI. to Manitowoc, WI.

Badger departing her Ludington dock.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Today in Great Lakes History - October 04

On October 4, 1979 the ST. LAWRENCE NAVIGATOR arrived at the Port Weller Dry Docks, St. Catharines, Ont. where she was lengthened to the Seaway maximum length of 730' overall. A new bow and cargo section was installed including a bow thruster and was assigned Hull #66. New tonnage; 18,788 GRT, 12,830 NRT, 32,279 dwt. The ST. LAWRENCE NAVIGATOR was renamed c) CANADIAN NAVIGATOR in 1980 and now sails for ULS Corp.

The TEXACO BRAVE (2) was launched today in 1976 by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Shimonoseki, Japan for Texaco Canada Ltd., Don Mills, Ont.

On October 4, 1980 the ARTHUR B. HOMER was laid up for the last time at Erie, PA.

As a result of the collision between the PARKER EVANS and the SIDNEY E. SMITH, JR. 4 months earlier alternate one-way traffic between the Black River Buoy and Buoys One and Two in Lake Huron was agreed upon by the shipping companies. This happened on October 4, 1972

The JAMES E. FERRIS' last trip before scrapping was from Duluth, MN with a split load of 261,000 bushels of wheat for Buffalo, NY arriving there October 4, 1974.

The JIIMAAN, Twin Screw RoRo Cargo/Passenger Ferry built to Ice Class 1D standards had its Keel laid October 4, 1991

On October 4, 1982, the Benjamin F. Fairless laid up for the last time in Duluth. She was towed out of Duluth on her way to an overseas scrapyard on June 17, 1988.

October 4, 1940 - The Ludington Daily News reported "The Pere Marquette carferries handled approximately 95,000 freight cars last year." (1939)

On 4 October 1877, BRITISH LION (3 mast wooden bark, 128', 293 T, built in 1862 at Kingston, Ontario) was carrying coal from Black River, OH to Brockville, Ont. She was driven ashore at Long Point in Lake Erie by a storm and wrecked. She was the first bark on the Lakes to be wire rigged and she was built for the Great Lakes - Liverpool trade.

The barges BELLE CASH and GEO. W. HANNAFORD, owned by Capt. Cash of East China Township, Michigan, were driven ashore on Long Point in Lake Erie on 3 October 1875.

On 3 October 1900, one hundred years ago, The steel freighter CAPTAIN THOMAS WILSON left Port Huron on her maiden voyage for Marquette, Michigan where she loaded 6,200 tons of iron ore for Cleveland, Ohio.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Southdown Bought by Cemex

10/03:
CEMEX and Southdown announced last week that the companies have entered into a definitive merger agreement under which CEMEX will acquire all of the outstanding stock of Southdown for approximately $2.8 billion. The transaction has been approved by the boards of both companies. Southdown operates two vessel sailing on the Great Lakes carrying cement from the plant in Charlevoix, MI. to terminals around the lakes.

“Southdown is an excellent fit for CEMEX,” said Lorenzo H. Zambrano, Chairman and CEO of CEMEX. “The company’s management and facilities are world class and, I believe, will mesh well with our global network. This combination will not only expand our presence in the United States, but help us compete more effectively in all our markets. Integrating Southdown into a company with the scale and resources to prosper in a rapidly consolidating, global industry will create value for our shareholders,” he added.

After the merger with Southdown, CEMEX will have annualized combined sales in excess of US$6.3 billion pro forma as of June 30th 2000.

CEMEX, based in Monterrey, Mexico, is one of the three largest cement companies in the world with approximately 65 million metric tons of production capacity. CEMEX is engaged in the production, distribution, marketing and sale of cement, ready-mix concrete, aggregates and clinker through operating subsidiaries in four continents. For more information, visit www.cemex.com. Southdown, headquartered in Houston, has a network of 12 cement-manufacturing plants and 45 cement distribution terminals serving 27 states throughout the United States. Southdown also mines, processes, and sells construction aggregates and specialty mineral products in the eastern half of the U.S. and in California. In addition, the company produces and distributes ready-mixed concrete products in California and Florida. For more information, visit www.southdown.com.

Reported by: Dave Kohls




Saginaw Report

10/03:
Monday was a busy day on the Saginaw River. The Frontenac arrived just after 4:00 p.m. and docked at the Essroc Cement Dock in Essexville.

The Earl W. Oglebay departed the Wirt dock in Bay City on Monday afternoon and proceeded up to the Wirt dock at Saginaw to finish discharging cargo. The vessel departed the Saginaw Dock during the evening at was outbound from the First Street turning basin at 9:50 p.m. She then tied up the Burroughs dock near the I-75 Bridge to allow upbound traffic to clear.

The Canadian Transfer was upbound to Saginaw during the evening, passing the Airport turning basin at 9:50 p.m. She is believed to be going to the GM dock. The vessel had remained tied up in Essexville during the day, waiting for winds to subside and higher water levels.

The Algorail was upbound at the Liberty Bridge in Bay City at 10:25 p.m. The vessel is believed to be going to the Buena Vista dock near the I-75 Bridge. The Algorail tied up at Bay Aggregates to allow the Earl W. Oglebay to pass outbound.

The Earl W. Oglebay was heard calling the Paul H. Townsend on the radio at 11:05 p.m. The Townsend is apparently waiting out on Saginaw Bay, inbound for the LaFarge dock near Saginaw.

Reported by: Lon Morgan and Stephen Hause




Sarnia Update

10/03:
Sarnia's Grain Elevator remains busy loading ships. The Stefania I arrived at Cargill Monday morning and was tied up by 8:30. She is there to load soybeans.

Algocen departed on Saturday with a cargo of #2 White Wheat. She loaded 25,402.527 metric tonnes and was bound for Prescott.

Reported by: Doug Schilz




Toledo Update

10/03:
Monday the John B. Aird was finishing up loading coal at the CSX Dock with the Jean Parisien, and John G. Munson waiting to follow. The Buckeye was unloading ore at the Torco Dock. The Ziemia Zamojska finished loading grain and departed in the early afternoon. The Quebecois took her place and was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The next scheduled coal boat will be the Lee A. Tregurtha due in on Wednesday evening. The next scheduled ore boat will be the Armco due in the Tuesday evening.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto News

10/03:
After the Thomas Rennie came off the Toronto Drydock, the Parks & Recreation barge went on to have her hull cleaned and painted. She came off Monday and was returned to the ferry docks. The barge was followed onto the drydock by the excursion vessel Empress of Canada.

The Saltie Thorslake came in to Pier 51 on Sunday and was still there Monday afternoon. The salty at anchor in Humber Bay is reported to be Strange Attractor.

As expected, Solta went into Redpath following Finikas' departure.

The tug Rosebud was in port Saturday and Sunday. The venerable steam sidewheeler Trillium took Toronto's Waterfront Commission members for a harbor tour Sunday. It was Trillium's final charter of the season and the first time in over 20 years that Trillium passed under the Cherry Street Bridge and into the Turning Basin.

The sail training vessel Picton Castle was in port overnight last Thursday.

The Royal Canadian Yacht Club's tender Hiawatha, which was sunk by vandals July 26, is now in Hamilton undergoing repairs. Originally taken to Bristol Marine in Port Credit, she was subsequently moved to Hamilton, where refurbishment will be completed this winter. Hiawatha will not see service again this season.

Reconstruction of the former tug Glenmont continues. The new stern addition has been completed and the tarps covering it have been removed.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Duluth Rescue

10/03:
Friday evening, U.S. Coast Guard Station Duluth received a call from Duluth 911 of two persons in the water. Both persons were pulled from the water by a Station Duluth rescue boat crew within ten minutes of notification. The first person had consumed a large quantity of pills and was attempting suicide. Second person was a bridge tender who jumped in to attempt a rescue. Both were treated for mild hypothermia. The water temperature was 55 degrees F.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 03

The E.G. GRACE was delivered to the Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland on October 3, 1943. The E.G. GRACE was part of a government program designed to upgrade and increase the capacity of the U.S. Great Lakes fleet during World War II. In order to help finance the building of new ships, the U.S.M.C. authorized a program that would allow existing fleets to obtain new boats by trading in their older boats to the Government for credit. As partial payment for each new vessel, a fleet owner surrendered the equivalent tonnage of their existing and/or obsolete vessels, along with some cash, to the Maritime Commission.

October 3, 1941 - The CITY OF FLINT 32, eastbound from Milwaukee collided with the PERE MARQUETTE 22 westbound. The PERE MARQUETTE 22 headed directly for Manitowoc for repairs while the CITY OF FLINT 32 continued to Ludington where she discharged her cargo, then headed for the shipyard in Manitowoc.

On 3 October 1887, ALBION (wooden propeller steam barge, 134’, 297 GT, built in 1862 at Brockville, Ont.) was carrying lumber and towing the schooner ARK in a foggy night during a gale. She stranded on the rocks near Grindstone City, MI in Lake Huron. The U. S. Lifesaving Service rescued her crew and some of her gear and cargo, but she was totally wrecked the next day. The schooner ARK survived.

The barges BELLE CASH and GEO. W. HANNAFORD, owned by Capt. Cash of East China Township, Michigan, were driven ashore on Long Point in Lake Erie on 3 October 1875.

On 3 October 1900, one hundred years ago, The steel freighter CAPTAIN THOMAS WILSON left Port Huron on her maiden voyage for Marquette, Michigan where she loaded 6,200 tons of iron ore for Cleveland, Ohio.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Heads Home

10/02:
The tug Roger Stahl was released at 10:40 a.m. Sunday morning heading back up the seaway. Her tow of the two U.S. Navy barges from Marinette, WI. was a complete success. The tug should return to the Gaelic Tugboat Co. yard in Detroit on Wednesday night or Thursday morning.

The Gaelic Tugboat Company would like to thank everyone who followed the tow. The crew said that everyone that came to visit them along the way were kind and courteous. We would also like to thank Neil Schultheiss for keeping all the visitors of this web site informed of the progress of the tow. I would like to personally thank the Captain John Wellington and the crew of the Roger Stahl for all their hard work and professionalism to make such a difficult tow look easy.

An added thank you should be given to Holly Marine, Selvick Marine, Marinette Marine, The Welland canal, The Seaway Authority, Port of Ogdensburg, The Seaway Pilots, and Capt. Doug with the crew of Caribe Challenger, all of whom help make this tow a success.
Thanks to everyone,
William A. Hoey IV

Reported by: the Gaelic Tug Boat Company




Thank you Gaelic

10/02:
Thank you William A. Hoey IV and the Gaelic Tugboat Company for once again sharing with the users of this site another Roger Stahl adventure. My thanks also to all the viewers for providing updates and pictures.




Griffon Update

10/02:
The Canadian Coast Guard ship Griffon remains at the Government Dock in Sarnia waiting for repairs to begin after her collision with the Atlantic Huron last week.

Pictures by Lane Hautau
The Griffon at the Government Dock.
Close up of the damaged area.

Reported by: Ron and Linda Locke




Busy Day at the Soo Locks

10/02:
Traffic through the Soo Locks on Saturday September 30th was extremely heavy, due in part to the fall grain rush. Downbound vessels included the tug Avenger IV and barge Chief Wawatam, Indiana Harbor, the Algobay, R/V Laurentian, James R. Barker, Catherine Desgagnes, Admiral Ushakov, Paul R. Tregurtha, the Sjard who was unusually in ballast for Montreal, Stewart J. Cort, Hon. Paul J. Martin, and the Canadian Leader.

Upbound traffic included the Edgar B. Speer, the Salties Millenium Harmony, Lake Carling, Vassaborg and Morias. Others included the Elton Hoyt II, Walter J. McCarthy Jr., R/V Limnos and the Lee A. Tregurtha who exchanged locks with fleetmate the Paul R. Tregurtha.

Also upbound from the Algoma Steel Mill was the Algoport heading for Duluth. Also at the Steel Mill Docks was the Federal Asahi unloading Steel Tube Billets.

A close call also occurred, delaying traffic, when the Catherine Desgagnes was in the upper approaches to the Locks, she was dispatched to the Poe and could not make the Poe wall and subsequently landed on the Mac approaches at right angles. There was no damage to either the vessel or the pier, but traffic was backed up waiting until the area was inspected.




Tug Work in Toledo

10/02:
Saturday was a busy day for the Gaelic Tugboat Co. fleet in Toledo. The tug Susan Hoey assisted the Agawa Canyon into Kulmans about 3:00 p.m. The Mantadoc expected to depart Andersons "E" with assistance from the Susan Hoey at 5:30 p.m. The Agawa Canyon was scheduled to depart with the William Hoey at 7:00 p.m. The Quebecois waited at anchor outside Toledo and was expected to go to Andersons "K" at 4:00 a.m. this morning with 2 tugs. Wednesday the Algocen is due.




Twin Ports Report

10/02:
Eight salties and two Canadian lakers were either berthed at Twin Ports docks or anchored on the lake Oct. 1. Kasteelborg remained under the bridge crane at CLM in Superior while Vaasaborg was berthed at the Duluth port terminal to unload wood pulp on Monday. Both vessels are due to load grain for their outbound trip. At the elevators were Canadian Prospector at General Mills in Duluth; Federal Agno at Peavey Connors Point in Superior; and Aegean Sea at Cenex Harvest States #1; and Lake Champlain was loading at AGP in Duluth. It's not unusual to see grain ships loading on a Sunday late in the season, but it seems especially urgent to clear the Lake Champlain because Lake Ontario, Morias and Canadian Mariner are all anchored on the lake and listed as bound for the AGP terminal. Also anchored out was Koznitsa, due at Cenex Harvest States #2.

An unusual set of railcars is being gathered in Duluth to handle a heavy-lift cargo due late in October. So far, seven 12-axle flatcars and one large heavy-cargo flatcar have been spotted in the BNSF railyard near the port terminal. These cars and others like them will carry a number of heavy steel vessels that are expected to arrive at the terminal for transshipment to an oil-field project in western Canada.

Reported by: Al Miller




Unusual Boats Due on Southern Lake Michigan

10/02:
The Saginaw is due into South Chicago at 1:00 a.m. on Tuesday morning to load coal. Her destination after loading is not known. The Algoriver is due to arrive at Inland Steel in Indiana Harbor on Friday morning at 5:00 a.m. to unload ore.




Toledo Update

10/02:
Sunday the Ziemia Zamojska was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. She was expected to depart that day. The Quebecois is due to arrive at Andersons "K" Elevator early this morning to load grain.

The CSX Coal Docks were very busy. The CSL Niagara was loading coal with the John J. Boland, and John B. Aird waiting to follow. The Jean Parisien and John G. Munson were due to arrive later in the day.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Report

10/02:
The American Republic was unloading ore at LTV this morning and left for Lorain at 11:30 a.m. She was expected back late Sunday night. The Southdown Challenger was unloading on the river that morning. She departed later in the day heading for Charlevoix, MI. to load. The David Z. Norton was upbound on the Cuyahoga at West 3rd at 8:00 a.m. sailing for LTV. She departed Sunday evening after finishing her last of five shuttles. The Richard Reiss was inbound Cleveland from the West at 3:00 p.m. and passed the out bound Norton at Collision Bend.

Pictures by TZ
Tug Delaware waits with the Reiss at Collision Bend.
Wide view
Stern view as the Norton passes the Reiss.
Stern view of the Norton.
Crew members onboard the Norton enjoy a warm fall evening.
The David Z. Norton's bow as she departs.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Ship Shiners Asked to Stop

10/02:
On September 22 The Evening News, Sault Ste. Marie reported that a Coast Guard official said an outbreak of nighttime ship shinnings around three critical turns in St. Mary's River channels are more a case of ignorance than criminal intent. Complaints of high-powered shore lights directed at passing ships have come from ships near Barbeau, Mission Point and the Sawmill Point area of Neebish Island. The Coast Guard suspects that boatwatchers are wielding hand-held spotlights to look over passing ships, unaware of the hazard the lights pose to ships and crew. Very dangerous at any point in night passage, the strong spotlights are especially hazardous in close-quarters channels like the lower St. Mary's. At the moment, the Coast Guard is only interested in seeking cooperation by keeping the lights off the ships, and not interested in filing charges and prosecuting.

Reported by: Jim Grill and Andrew Severson




Today in Great Lakes History - October 02

CANADIAN OLYMPIC was christened on October 2, 1976 at St. Catharines. Her name honors the Olympic Games that were held at Montreal that year.

The TADOUSSAC (2) departed Collingwood on her maiden voyage October 2, 1969 to load iron ore at Fort William, Ont.

The AMERICAN last operated in 1956 and then was laid up at Manitowoc, WI. On October 2, 1972

The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON and CONSUMERS POWER (3) arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan October 2, 1988 where dismantling began on October 14th by Li Chong Steel & Iron Works Co. Ltd.

On her maiden voyage October 2, 1943, the E.G. GRACE cleared Lorain bound for Superior, WI to load iron ore.

The HOCHELAGA (2) departed Toronto October 2, 1993 in tow of the McKeil tugs GLENBROOK and KAY COLE for Montreal, Que and then to the cutters torch.

On October 2, 1969, the Tadoussac entered service.

October 2, 1954 - The PERE MARQUETTE 21 sailed into Ludington on her second maiden voyage of her career.

On 2 October 1888, OLIVER CROMWELL (wooden schooner-barge, 138', 291 T, built in 1853 at Buffalo) was being towed by the steamer LOWELL in a storm in Lake Huron when she broke her towline. She rode out most of the storm at anchor, but then she snapped her anchor chains and she was driven ashore at Harbor Beach, MI where she broke up.

The 183', 3-mast wooden schooner QUEEN CITY was launched at W. Bay City, Michigan on 2 October 1873.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Update

10/01:
The tug Caribe Challenger and Gaelic tug Roger Stahl with two U.S. Navy barges continue on the final leg of their journey out of the Seaway. The tug Roger Stahl is expected to be released today. She will return to the Gaelic Tugboat Company's yard in Detroit as the Caribe Challenger takes the barges into the Atlantic Ocean.

Marinette Marine in Marinette, WI built the floating Navy barracks barges. They are en route to Norfolk, VA. and San Diego, CA. The barges are called APLs (auxiliary personnel living) and are complete temporary living quarters for Navy crews of ships that are being repaired.

The tow began with the tug Roger Stahl departing the Gaelic Yard on Sept. 13 bound for Marinette, Wisconsin to take the barges in tow.

Reported by: the Gaelic Tug Boat Company




Toledo Update

10/01:
Saturday the Mantadoc was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator and was expected to leave later that afternoon with the tug Susan Hoey assisting her down river. The Ziemia Zamojska was at Andersons "K" Elevator loading grain she is expected to depart late Sunday sometime depending on how the loading process goes. The next scheduled grain vessels for Andersons "K" Elevator will be the Quebecois due in Monday morning followed by the Algocen several days later. The saltie Toro is due in at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator to load grain during the next week sometime.

The Agawa Canyon was at the Kuhlman Dock unloading cargo. The Reserve was in at the Torco Dock unloading ore. The Buffalo was loading coal with the CSL Niagara to follow. The next scheduled ore boat due in at Torco will be the Buckeye on Monday morning. At the CSX Coal Docks Sunday was scheduled to be a busy day with four vessels due in. The John J. Boland, John B. Aird, Jean Parisien, and John G. Munson are all expected.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - October 01

The CHICAGO TRADER was laid up on October 1, 1976 at the Frog Pond in Toledo.

Dismantling commenced October 1, 1974 on the KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1) at Santander, Spain.

October 1, 1997 - The CITY OF MIDLAND 41 was towed out of Ludington to be converted to a barge.

On 1 October 1843, ALBANY (wooden brig, 110T, built in 1835 at Oswego, NY) was carrying merchandise and passengers when she went aground in a storm and was wrecked just a few miles from Mackinaw City, MI.

The steam barge C. H. GREEN was launched at E. Saginaw, Michigan for Mason, Green & Corning of Saginaw on 1 October 1881. She was schooner rigged and spent her first year as a tow barge. The following winter her engine and boiler were installed. Her dimensions were 197' x 33' x 13', 920 tons. She cost $70,000.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




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