Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

Copyright N. Schultheiss. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

* Report News


Mailboat on Dock

10/31
The J.W. Westcott II was lifted from the water at Nicholson's terminal at 9:00 a.m. Tuesday morning by Nicholson’s large crane No. 9. The task of removing all the water from the hull and fuel tanks is first on the agenda and the hull is in sound condition.

While the Westcott II was under going a survey dive crews returned to the Detroit River to continue the search for missing crew member Dave Lewis.

During the salvage efforts a few small holes where cut into the hull and they are now being welded. The engine and gearbox are being drained of water and fogged with oil. One tie up bitt had been damaged during salvage and is being repaired. An oil clean up company is cleaning the bilge and removing any oily water from the fuel tanks and bilge. The Westcott II will need new windows, starting batteries and fuel in the tank and can return to service.

Safety investigators were still trying to determine a cause for the accident.

Stern rises above the surface Tuesday.
Starboard side rises above the water.
Another view.
Water is pumped from the Westcott II.
View from the barge
Investigators onboard
Westcott II is towed to Nicholson's Terminal.
Ariel view of the recovery operation Don Coles
Cathy Nasiatka at the controls of the Westcott II in August. N. Schultheiss
Dave Lewis (left) at fit out in April. N. Schultheiss
Transportation Safety Board of Canada Marine Investigation Report involving the sinking of a pilot boat in 1997.




Virginiaborg unloads in Marinette

10/31
Tuesday the Virginiaborg arrived in Marinette to unload wood pulp. It tied up along the crane ship William H Donner. The wood pulp is being put on truck and taken to the K&K Warehouse in Menominee.

Virginaborg is one of Wagenborg's newest ship and the second Wagenborg ship to visit Marinette this year. The Vlieborg was the other.

Virginiaborg along side the Donner.
Close up.
Bow view.
Pulp is loaded onto a waiting truck along side the Donner.
Truck taking pulp across bridge with Virginiaborg in background.

Reported by: Scott Best




Lia Resumes Trip

10/31
The saltie LIA transited the St. Lambert Lock upbound Monday before midnight for Duluth. The small bulker had lost power on Monday afternoon. She is loaded with a partial cargo of bleached wood pulp.

Other Seaway news, the CEC Future that had transited the Seaway for the first time on May 5 has been renamed Arktis Future.

Expected downbound in the Seaway Tuesday for the first time was the CSL Tadoussac heading for Pointe Noire, QC.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Twin Port Report

10/31
As expected, the Arthur M. Anderson laid up Oct. 30 at Fraser Shipyards in Superior. The steamer spent about a day unloading at the Hallett dock in Duluth before departing about 7 a.m. Tuesday morning for the short trip across the harbor to its lay-up berth.

The grain trade perked up a bit Tuesday, with Canadian Provider loading at Peavey and Orsula arriving midday and going directly into the AGP berth. Rubin Lark and Ziemia Chelminska were at anchor waiting to load.

The heavy-lift vessel Scan Oceanic was in the port terminal's steel berth unloading a large transformer onto a special low-boy railcar.

Reported by: Al Miller




Alpena News

10/31
The Alpena, tug Jacklyn M and barge Integrity and the J.A.W Iglehart were all due into Lafarge Tuesday to load cement. The Paul H. Townsend is in Muskegon.

The Philip R. Clarke was loading at Stoneport on Tuesday, taking its cargo to an Ohio port. The Great Lakes Trader was at anchor waiting to load after the Clarke. Also due on Tuesday evening was the Maumee.

Reported by: Ben and Chanda McClain




Toledo Update

10/31
The CSL Laurentien was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard. The Canadian Progress, John B. Aird, and Algomarine were expected to arrive at the CSX Coal Docks on Tuesday evening.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the H. Lee White, and John G. Munson this evening, followed by the John J. Boland on Thursday.

The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Middletown on today. followed by the Reserve on Thursday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Slow day in Hamilton

10/31
Tuesday afternoon in Hamilton saw only two salties present in the harbor. The Yarmouth was at Pier 12 and the Federal Oshima was moored at Pier 23. No unloading activity was seen at either vessel.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Updates

10/31
I have returned from the Boatnerd Gathering East and am behind in the updates. I hope to be caught up tonight or Thursday. Sorry for the delay.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 31

CANADIAN EXPLORER's sea trials were conducted on October 31, 1983 on Lake Erie where a service speed of 13.8 m.p.h. was recorded.

The EDWIN H. GOTT was christened October 31, 1978.

On October 31, 1973, the H.M. Griffith entered service.

J.W. McGIFFIN cleared Midland, Ont. on her maiden voyage October 31, 1973 bound for Thunder Bay, Ont. to load iron ore for Hamilton, Ont.

The CADILLAC (4) was launched October 31, 1942 as a) LAKE ANGELINA.

ELMGLEN (2) cleared Owen Sound, Ont. on October 31, 1984 on her first trip in P. & H. colors.

On October 31, 1966 while downbound in the St. Marys River loaded with 11,143 tons of potash for Oswego, NY, the HALLFAX ran aground on a rocky reef and settled to the bottom with her hold full of water. She had grounded on Pipe Island Twins Reef just north of DeTour, MI.

The CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON (3) struck a reef the night of October 31, 1925 three miles south of Manitou Island, off the Keweenaw Peninsula, on Lake Superior.

On October 31, 1983 the SYLVANIA was towed out of the Frog Pond by the harbor tugs ARKANSAS and WYOMING. She was handed over to the tug OHIO for delivery to the Triad Salvage Co. at Ashtabula, OH arriving there on November 1st. Dismantling was completed there in 1984. Thus ended 78 years of service. Ironically the SYLVANIA, the first built of the 504 foot class bulkers, was the last survivor of that class. During her career with Columbia Transportation, the SYLVANIA had carried over 20 million tons and netted over $35 million.

On 31 October 1883, CITY OF TORONTO (wooden passenger-package freight sidewheeler, 207', 898 GC, built in 1864 at Niagara, Ontario) caught fire at the Muir Brothers shipyard at Port Dalhousie, Ontario and was totally destroyed. She previously had her paddle boxes removed so she could pass through the Welland Canal, and she was in the shipyard to have them reassembled that winter.

On 31 October 1874, the tug FAVORITE was towing the schooner WILLIE NEELER on Lake Erie. At about 10:30 PM, near Bar Point, the schooner suddenly sheered and before the tow line could be cast off, the FAVORITE capsized and sank. One life was lost. The rest of the crew clung to the upper works which had become dislodged from the vessel and they were rescued by the schooner's lifeboats.

On 31 October 1821, WALK-IN-THE-WATER (wooden side-wheeler, 135', 339 t, built in 1818 at Black Rock [Buffalo], NY) was wrecked on Point Abino, on the Canadian shore of Lake Erie during a storm. She was the first steam-powered vessel above Niagara and her frequent comings and goings during her career were very much in the newspapers in Detroit but her loss was not mentioned not at all since this steamer was virtually the only source of news from the east. Her engine was installed by Robert Fulton himself. After the wreck, it went into the steamer SUPERIOR and later ran a lumber mill in Saginaw, MI.

On 31 October 1880, TRANCHEMONTAGNE (wooden schooner, 108', 130 t, built in 1864 at Sorel, P. Q.) was loaded with rye and sailing in a storm on Lake Ontario. She struck the breakwater at Oswego, New York head-on at about 3:00 AM. She stove in her bow and quickly sank. The crew took to the rigging, except for one who was washed overboard and rode a provision box from her deck to shore. The Lifesaving Service rescued the rest from the breakwater. The schooner broke up quickly in the storm.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Westcott II Raised

10/30
The J.W. Westcott II was raised from the Detroit River Monday afternoon. Earlier in the day divers located the body of Capt. Cathy Nasiatka inside the Westcott II but they were unable to locate deck hand Dave Lewis.

Divers working with a crane positioned over the wrecked on a barge were able to lift the mail boat after weather had hampered earlier salvage attempts. The Westcott II was towed to Nicholson's floating dry dock in Ecorse. The boat will be inspected to see if it can be repaired, early reports state that the damage is not as bad as originally thought.

Salvage crews turned the boat upright Sunday afternoon, it had been upside down under the water since the boat sank Oct. 23.

The Port Huron based pilot boat Huron Maid is now working from the Westcott Co. station with the Joseph J. Hogan.

Stern rises above the surface
Starboard side rises above the water.
Another view.
Water is pumped from the Westcott II.
View from the barge
Investigators onboard
Westcott II is towed to Nicholson's dry dock.
Ariel view of the recovery operation Don Coles
Cathy Nasiatka at the controls of the Westcott II in August. N. Schultheiss
Dave Lewis (left) at fit out in April. N. Schultheiss
Transportation Safety Board of Canada Marine Investigation Report involving the sinking of a pilot boat in 1997.




Vessel Adrift

10/30
Monday afternoon the small bulker LIA (built 1983, Japan) lost power below St. Lambert lock while proceeding along the lower wall to enter the lock. She started to go adrift towards the bank across and the pilot made an emergency call for tugs. One of the tugs owned by Groupe Ocean arrived on scene and secured the vessel at the very end of the wall.

Seaway inspectors went aboard as crews worked to repair the vessel. LIA is on her first trip to the lakes under that name. Her previous transit occurred last year when she went to Toronto in May and was then named Demi Green. Monday, she was heading for Duluth and is in ballast.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Early Lay-up

10/30
As the 2001 shipping season draws to an end many vessel appear to be heading for early lay-up.

One such vessel is the Arthur M. Anderson. The Anderson was expected to enter lay-up in the Twin Ports after unloading its stone cargo Oct. 29. Although scheduled for the DMIR ore dock's stone hopper, the vessel spent the day at the adjacent Hallett dock with its boom swung out. The vessel has been removed from USS Great Lakes Fleet's recorded vessel message, a sure sign that it's being taken out of service.

Reported by: Al Miller




Scrapping

10/30
Below is a listing of salties that have transited the Great Lakes or Seaway and were scrapped this year. The information comes from the September edition of Marine News published by the World Ship Society.

In brackets next to the name of the ship is the year the ship transited the Seaway for the first time.

Advance arrived at Alang, India on April 4. She was in the Seaway for the first time as Ursula C. (76) and Inge (77). Anna Maria 1 arrived at Alang on June 12. In the Seaway as STAMON (92). The Fortune type Athinais P arr. Alang on May 11. In the Seaway as Arion (75) Carl Metz (94) , following casualties, left Valletta in tow on June 27 for Turkish breakers. The Freedom type City of Houston arr. Alang on June 16. In the Seaway as ELPIS (78). Darine arr. Alang on June 20. In the Seaway as Donetskiy Komsomolets (70). Hydra (89) arr. Alang on June 25. She was in the Seaway also as John Alexakis (76) and Waterprint (86). Majestic arr. at an Indian ship breaking yard on June 26. In the Seaway as Naumburg (91). Saaba arr. at Mumbai, India on May 19. In the Seaway as Freedom A.S. (80) and Baybridge (82). The SD 14 type Socrates arr. Alang on June 11. In the Seaway as London Cavalier (76). The Freedom type Zulfikar arr. Alang on June 20. In the Seaway as Evnia (71).

Also reported sold to ship breakers is a container ship which was on regular service to Europe from Montreal as Canmar Venture and from Quebec City as CP Discoverer. She arrived at Alang on June 20. This vessel never transited the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Toledo News

10/30
The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator Monday. She finished loading and departed around 11:30 a.m. under tow of the "G" tugs Illinois and Louisiana. The Federal Rhine was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The Buckeye was at the Torco Dock unloading ore.

The Calumet was at the CSX Coal Docks loading coal, she departed around 2:30 p.m. The Lee A. Tregurtha arrived at the Coal Docks a short time later and began loading coal. Canadian Transfer was at the CSX stone dock unloading stone. The Saturn went into lay-up at the Lakefront Docks. The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Canadian Progress, John B. Aird, and Algomarine on today followed by the H. Lee White, and John G. Munson on Wednesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Docks will be the Middletown Wednesday followed by the Reserve on Thursday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Updates/Outage

10/30
Parts of the web site were down on Monday due to a service outage. I have returned from the Boatnerd Gathering East and am behind in the updates. I hope to be caught up tonight or Wednesday. Sorry for the delay.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 30

The tugs GLENADA and MOUNT McKAY towed AMOCO ILLINOIS from Essexville on October 30, 1985 and arrived at the M&M slip on November 1st. where she was to be scrapped.

The CADILLAC (4) and her former fleetmate CHAMPLAIN (3) arrived under tow by the Dutch tug/supply ship THOMAS DE GAUWDIEF on October 30, 1987 at Aliaga, Turkey to be scrapped there.

The ISLE ROYALE (2) (Canal Bulk Freighter) was launched October 30, 1947 as a) SOUTHCLIFFE HALL for the Hall Corporation of Canada Ltd. (which in 1969 became Hall Corporation (Shipping) 1969 Ltd.), Montreal.

On 30 October 1874, LOTTA BERNARD (wooden sidewheel "rabbit", 125', 147 T, built in 1869 at Port Clinton, OH) was carrying general merchandise from Silver Islet to Duluth when she foundered in a terrific gale off Encampment Island in Lake Superior. Three lives were lost. She was capable of only 4 miles per hour and was at the mercy of any fast rising storm.

During a storm, the schooner ANNABELLA CHAMBERS was wrecked on the islands off Toronto, Ontario on 30 October 1873. One sailor was washed overboard and lost. The skipper was rescued, but he had the dead body of his small son in his arms.

October 30, 1971 - The PERE MARQUETTE 21 was laid up due to coal strike. She never sailed again as a carferry.

On 30 October 1877, CITY OF TAWAS (3-mast wooden schooner, 135', 291 t, built in 1864 at Vicksburgh [now Marysville], MI as a sloop-barge) was carrying 500 tons of iron ore when she struck a bar outside the harbor at St. Joseph, Michigan while attempting to enter during a storm. She drifted ashore with a hole in her bottom and was pounded to pieces. One brave crewman swam ashore with a line and the rest came in on it.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Westcott II Recovery

10/29
4:00 p.m. update
The J.W. Westcott II was raised this afternoon between 3:00 and 4:00 p.m. The body of one of its two missing crew was found inside. The body of Cathy Nasiatka was found by divers inside the Westcott II but they were unable to locate Dave Lewis.

Divers working with a crane positioned over the wrecked on a barge were able to lift the mail boat after weather had hampered salvage attempts. The Westcott II was towed to Nicholson's floating dry dock in Ecorse. The boat will be inspected to see if it can be repaired, early reports state that the damage is not as bad as originally thought.

Original Report
Crews returned to the Detroit River Sunday as family and friends held a mass for missing crew member Cathy Nasiatka. The river was closed as a diver went down to the sunken Westcott II and worked with a crane to try to raise the mail boat.

The tug Carolyn Hoey was on scene and a small flotilla of local boats include the Detroit Fire Boat Curtis Randolph and Mail Boat Joseph J. Hogan with company officials on board.

Crews worked through out the day and were able to turn the Westcott II upright but not raise it from the bottom. High winds and waves prevented crews from lifting the Westcott II onto the barge. At one point the stern was above the surface but a sling would not hold on the bow.

Salvage crews will resume efforts early this morning weather permitting.

The Port Huron based pilot boat Huron Maid is now working from the Westcott Co. station with the Joseph J. Hogan.

The Detroit River was opened to one-way traffic about 6:00 p.m. Sunday evening. A number of vessels had anchored in the river or local docks to await the opening.


Stern rises above the surface
Starboard side rises above the water.
Another view.
Water is pumped from the Westcott II.
View from the barge
Investigators onboard
Westcott II is towed to Nicholson's dry dock.
Ariel view of the recovery operation Don Coles
Cathy Nasiatka at the controls of the Westcott II in August.
Dave Lewis (left) at fit out in April.
Transportation Safety Board of Canada Marine Investigation Report involving the sinking of a pilot boat in 1997.




Twin Ports Report

10/29
Arthur M. Anderson was due at the DMIR dock in Duluth late Sunday to discharge stone. From there it will reportedly go into lay-up.

At just 353 feet, the lights of the salty Buccaneer presented an interesting sight Saturday night as it motored toward Duluth. This seems to be the week of short vessels in the Twin Ports, with the 501-foot J.A.W. Iglehart scheduled to make a rare visit late Sunday and the 330-foot heavy-lift salty Scan Oceanic due at the Duluth port terminal on Monday with transformers.

Reported by: Al Miller




Mackinaw Island Ferries

10/29
The tourist season at Mackinac Island is finally winding down, below is a summary of the three ferry companies. Arnold Transit: The catamarans are still on the move, the Mackinac Express and Island Express will lay-up November 5. The Straits Express will continue running out of St. Ignace until mid-November. Next year, the cats will be taken out of the water in St. Ignace. A new lift is in place, but the track has yet to be built. In the meantime, they will head up to the Soo as in years past.

The steel hull ferry Huron will then be the sole boat on the run. Huron underwent a major refit this summer. Steel plating on the main and upper deck was replaced due to the stress of running in winter. The pilot house was gutted and all new controls and navigation aids were installed. Ferries Ottawa and Straits of Mackinac II have both been laid up already. Chippewa is awaiting her trip to the Soo for repairs. Her steering system and rudder was damaged when she hit bottom backing out of the Mackinaw City dock in a strong east wind.

Algomah continues to shuttle the horses and empty pop cans until Huron returns to service. Mackinac Islander and Corsair continue to make occasional trips unloading what freight they can. The smallest boat Beaver has laid up as well.

Shepler's: November 4 will be the Shepler boats last day. Two boats, Felicity and The Welcome have been removed from service and are awaiting storage. The boats are pulled out of the water in Mackinaw City and stored within Shepler facilities. The freight boat Sacre Bleu will continue to operate out of St. Ignace as long as weather permits.

Star Line: The last boat for the 2001 season departed Mackinac Island for St Ignace at 5:00 p.m. Sunday. Joliet was saluted by Sheplers' Capt. Shepler and Arnolds' Island Express. Star Line's flagship, Radisson has been undergoing maintenance at the Shepler's facility in Mackinaw City. The Star boats will now head to Cheboygan where they spend the winter in the river.

Reported by: Sean Whelan




Oshawa Harbor Update

10/29
Sunday the Kapitan Nazarev was unloading steel rebar at the east side of the port. A tug and barge was also in port. It was likely the tug James A Hannah & the Barge Hannah 5101.

Kapitan Nazarev unloading.
Rebar is unloaded.
Wide view.
Saltie, tug and barge.
Hannah tug and barge.

Reported by: Jim Gallacher




Gathering East

10/29
The Boatnerd Gathering East came to an end with lots of traffic trough the Welland Canal. I am back home and will continue the updates later today including the News Page and Weekly Updates. I have many images and reports to edit and upload that are still on my lap top.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 29

ALGOLAKE was launched October 29, 1976

On October 29, 1986 the JAMES R. BARKER, who had suffered an engine room fire, was lashed side-by-side to the thousand-foot WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY and towed this way to Sturgeon Bay, Wis. for repairs.

The b) CANADIAN EXPLORER was christened on October 29, 1983 at the Port Weller Dry Docks.

The National Transportation Safety Board ruled on October 29, 1991 that Total Petroleum was responsible for the fire that destroyed the tanker JUPITER because of faulty moorings and exonerated the BUFFALO from primary responsibility.

On the afternoon of October 29, 1987 while upbound with coal from Sandusky, OH, the ROGER M. KYES ( b) ADAM E. CORNELIUS) went aground on Gull Island Shoal in Lake Erie's Middle Passage and began taking on water. About 3,000 tons of coal was transferred to the AMERICAN REPUBLIC after which the KYES freed herself the next morning. Damage from the grounding required extensive repairs.

The tug portion of the PRESQUE ISLE (2) departed New Orleans on October 29, 1973.

The H.C. HEIMBECKER's last trip started at Thunder Bay, Ont. with a load of grain bound for Owen Sound, Ont. where, on October 29, 1981, it was discovered that one of her boilers was cracked. When unloading was completed on October 30th, the HEIMBECKER proceeded under her own power to Ashtabula, OH for scrapping.

On 29 October 1892, ZACH CHANDLER (3 mast wooden schooner-barge, 194', 727 GT, built in 1867 at Detroit) was carrying lumber from Ashland, WI in tow of the steamer JOHN MITCHELL when the two became separated in a northerly gale in Lake Superior. The CHANDLER was overwhelmed and broke up on shore about three miles east of Deer Park, MI. Five of the crew made it to shore in the lifeboat and the Lifesaving Service saved two others, but one perished. Three years earlier, the CHANDLER stranded at almost the same spot and sustained heavy damage.

On 29 October 1879, AMAZON (wooden propeller freighter, 245', 1406 t, built in 1873 at Trenton, MI) was carrying "provisions" - 900 tons of freight plus 7000 barrels of flour - from Milwaukee to Grand Haven, Michigan. She struck the notorious bar off of Grand Haven in a gale and broke up. All 68 aboard survived. Her engine was later recovered.

On 29 October 1880, THOMAS A. SCOTT (4-mast wooden schooner-barge, 207', 1159 t, built in 1869 at Buffalo as a propeller) was riding out a storm at anchor one mile off Milwaukee when she was struck by the big steamer AVON (wooden propeller, 251', 1702 gt, built in 1877 at Buffalo, NY). The SCOTT sank quickly. She had been bound from Chicago for Erie, PA with 44,000 bushels of corn. Three of her crew scrambled onto the AVON while the seven others took to the yawl and were towed in by the Lifesaving Service.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Westcott II Recovery

10/28
Efforts to recover the mail boat that sank Tuesday in the Detroit River are expected to resume today or Monday. Heavy weather has delayed efforts.




Capt. Cathy Nasiatka

10/28
A mass held will be held today in the honor of Capt. Cathy Nasiatka at 11:00 a.m. in Detroit. It will be held at the Most Holy Trinity Church 1050 porter street, Detroit. The church is located on the corner of 6th & Porter St. just off the Lodge Freeway at the Howard Street exit. There will be an open house immediately following.

Reported by: The Nasiatka Family




New Cutter Launched

10/28
Saturday morning the new U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Cypress was launched at Marinette Marine in Marinette, WI. Despite a biting wind and cold temps a large crowd was on had to watch the launch. Cypress is the tenth Juniper class WLB "B" class seagoing buoy tender built by Marinette Marine for the US Coast Guard.

The tug Erica Kobasic came down from Escanaba to assist docking the Cypress after it was launched, normally the small tug Escort 2 comes down with the Kobasic but it was too rough on the bay for the Escort 2 to make the trip. Selvick Marine's William C Selvick came over from Sturgeon Bay to assist with the Kobasic.

Sister ship Sycamore out in Green Bay on a windy and rough day. Scott Best
Deck house of the Oak, the next Juniper Class to be built. Scott Best
Bow section of the Oak. Scott Best
Video of the launch. 2.3 meg Eric and Sandy Chapman


Reported by: Scott Best and Eric and Sandy Chapman




Fire at Grain Terminal

10/28
A riverside grain terminal caught fire in Thunder Bay on Friday. The terminal is part of the old Saskatchewan Pool 8 on the bank of the Kaministiqua River, this terminal is located immediately north of the Jacknife Bridge. About 4:00 p.m. smoke was spotted billowing out of the structure. As the first fire crew arrived on scene, it was immediately realized that this was a serious fire. Several more alarms went out and soon there was almost every on duty fire fighter on the site. Driven by high winds from the tail end of the storm, the fire raged from one end of the building to the other in one hour, felling the entire building in the process.

The fire department could do nothing to stop the wind driven fire's rampage along the structure. Huge tanks located on the north end of the building, tumbled to the ground as the fire burned out the support members. Explosions inside the structure, could be heard as the building burned. Pilings at the base of the Jacknife Bridge caught fire from the burning debris that was being blown across the river. This was quickly put out and concern mounted over the Petro-Can Terminal across the river that contains fuel in large tanks.

About two hours later the second building caught fire and concern turned to the adjacent grain silos that posed the danger of a grain explosion. The crowd of hundreds that had gathered to watch the spectacle, were pushed back by the police about a thousand feet from the structure and families in the nearby house were put on evacuation alert.

The fire eventually started to burn itself down before it could reach the grain silos and the fire department gained the upper hand on the situation. Riverside had been used most recently for the manufacturing of starch and gluten that is used in food processing. It was shut down in 2000 and the building had been the target of thieves and vandalism for the past year. Long gone is the hay day of the many grain boats that visited this Fort William landmark, up the Kaministiqua River.

Pictures by Rob Farrow
100-foot flames.
Fire ball rolling off the building.
A wall collapses.


Reported by: Rob Farrow and Ron Konkol




Cliffs reports drop in pellet production, but continues efforts to buy mines

10/28
Production of taconite pellets by Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. fell by 4.2 million tons in the third quarter of 2001 compared to the same period a year ago, according to company officials.

Pellet production in the third quarter at Cliffs-managed mines was 6.4 million tons while 2000 production during the same quarter was 10.6 million tons. Ominously, pellet sales in the fourth quarter are only expected to be between 3.3 million and 3.5 million tons, a sign that the financial health of the domestic steel and taconite industries likely won't improve much in early 2002.

Cliffs reported a net third-quarter loss of $1.7 million compared with net income of $6.3 million in the third quarter of 2000. Through the first nine months of 2001, Cleveland-Cliffs had a net loss of $26.4 million compared with a net income of $13.8 million in 2000.

"The results we have reported thus far in 2001 and expect to report in the fourth quarter are unacceptable and require major changes in the way Cliffs operates its iron business,'' said John S. Brinzo, Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. chairman and chief executive officer. "While we expect business conditions will continue to be extremely difficult in 2002, we are committed to improving our financial results.''

In Minnesota, Cliffs owns and manages the Northshore Mining Co. in Silver Bay and Babbitt and owns 15 percent and manages Hibbing Taconite Co. Cliffs also manages and holds interest in the Empire and Tilden mines in Michigan and manages the Wabush mine in Newfoundland.

Despite a downturn in the domestic steel industry, Cliffs officials say the company intends to grow and be a leader in reshaping the domestic iron ore business. The company recently completed the purchase of mining assets of the former LTV Steel Mining Co. in Hoyt Lakes, Minn., and it’s trying to buy Bethlehem Steel’s 70.3 percent share of Hibbing Taconite Co.

Reported by: Ryan Kennedy




Goderich salt mine sold

10/28
IMC Global, which owns the Sifto salt mine in Goderich, Ontario, has sold its salt business for about $640 million to Apollo Management of New York.

Sifto is one of Goderich’s major shipping businesses, handling numerous lakers each season. The sale of the salt division likely won’t have much impact on the way Sifto operates, mine manager Rowland Howe told the Goderich Signal-Star.

Howe called the purchase "a vote of confidence" by Apollo in the way the salt business is run.

"This company invests in thriving businesses," he told the newspaper. "Their track record is good at picking good businesses that are going to continue (to produce good results)."

IMC Global spokesman David Prichard said the company will maintain minority ownership in the salt company.

IMC's salt business is the world's third-largest producer of salt, with annual capacity of 15 million tons.

The sale is subject to regulatory approval from governments in affected countries.

Reported by: Philip Nash




Alpena Update

10/28
Many vessels were anchored in Thunder Bay seeking refuge from the high winds effecting the area since Thursday. The J.A.W Iglehart came into Lafarge late Friday evening to load cement for Superior. The tug Jacklyn M and barge Integrity arrived Saturday morning to load, followed by the Paul H. Townsend in the afternoon. The Alpena was heading for South Chicago.

The David Z. Norton and the Reserve finally pulled up their anchors Saturday afternoon and proceeded slowly into Alpena to unload their cargos of coal. The David Z. Norton headed into Lafarge while the Reserve went into the Thunder Bay River to unload at the Louisiana Pacific plant. The Joseph H. Frantz is at anchor and will unload coal after the departure of the David Z. Norton from Lafarge.

Reported by: Ben and Chanda McClain




Thunder Bay News

10/28
Thunder Bay has not yet seen the much-anticipated "Fall Grain Rush". With the arrivals of several salties and only a few lakers, the port is not seeing a major increase that might be expected at this time of the year. With an anticipated early closure to the season and several boats already laid up or talking of lay-up, the port may not see such an event.

One new visitor was in port last week, the Algonorth visited the port on her first trip of the season. She had been laid up all season in Quebec. She arrived and docked at Cargill to begin loading grain. She moved over to Mission Terminals to continue and was scheduled to finish loading at a Port Arthur Grain Terminal but due to a saltie waiting out the weather there, she had to move back over to Cargill to complete her loading. She departed at 12:45 p.m. on Saturday. Also departing on Saturday was the saltie Sevilla Wave. She had loaded at Western Elevator 10 and then loaded Lintels at Thunder Bay Terminals.

The storm that swept the Great Lakes this past week had three boats anchoring in Thunder Bay waiting for the weather to calm. The first to anchor was the John B. Aird, arriving from Duluth after changing course from her original destination of the Soo. She decided to wait out the oncoming weather in port. The second to go to anchor here was the Oakglen, who had finished loading grain and decided to wait for the storm to pass. The third to arrive at anchor was the Montrealais, it arrived the next morning after leaving Duluth downbound.

She changed her course and proceeded into Thunder Bay. As she rounded Angus Island, she could be seen hitting the huge waves head on. Her black bow would disappear into the white furry as she slammed into every wave that sent spray to the level of the pilothouse. By late afternoon on Friday, all vessels had departed down the lake.

Other visitors last week included the salties Lake Michigan, Buccaneer, Tecam Sea, Yarmouth, Agean Sea, Rio Glory, Goviken and Toro. Lakers visiting were Halifax, Canadian Leader, Mantadoc and Oakglen. Two tankers also stopped in Port to unload their cargo, the Algonova and Diamond Star.

Work still continues around the harbor on various projects. The Tobermory Ferry Chi-Cheemaun continues her stay in the Pascol Dry Dock for her 5-year survey.

Also last week eight grain filled rail cars derailed as they were being moved along the waterfront tracks. The accident happened under the Central Avenue Bridge and saw one car end up leaning on the structure's support. Within a few days the area was cleared and an inspection on the bridge did not find any damage.

Check back Monday for pictures

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Gathering East

10/28
The Boatnerd Gathering East is winding down and traffic trough the Welland Canal remains steady. I am having a problem with large file downloads and will update the News with pictures tomorrow.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 28

The CANADIAN PIONEER's maiden voyage was on October 28, 1981 to Conneaut, OH to take on coal for Nanticoke, Ont.

The CANADIAN TRANSPORT (2) was launched October 28, 1978 for Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd., Toronto, Ont.

GEMINI was christened October 28, 1978 at Huron, OH.

The GEORGE M. CARL (2) was launched October 28, 1922 as a) FRED G. HARTWELL (2)

D.M. CLEMSON (2) was launched October 28, 1916

CHARLES M. WHITE was launched October 28, 1945 as a C4-S-A4 cargo ship a) MOUNT MANSFIELD for the U.S. Maritime Commission (U.S.M.C. Hull #2369).

On 28 October 1887, BESSIE BARWICK, a 135' wooden schooner built in 1866 at St. Catherine's, Ontario as a bark, left Port Arthur for Kingston, Ontario with a load of lumber during a storm. For more than ten days, her whereabouts were unknown. In fact, a westerly gale drove her into the shallows of Michipicoten Island and she was pounded to pieces. Her crew was sheltered by local fishermen and then made it to the Soo in a small open boat.

On 28 October 1882, RUDOLPH WETZEL (wooden propeller tug, 23 t, built in 1870 at Buffalo, NY) was racing for a tow with the tug HENRY S. SILL when her boiler exploded 12 miles north of Racine, Wisconsin. She quickly sank. All three on board were killed and none of the bodies were ever found.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Westcott II Recovery

10/27
Heavy winds sweeping across the region on Friday have again postponed the recovery of a mail boat that sank Tuesday in the Detroit River. Salvage crews will return to the scene as soon as the weather permits.




Capt. Cathy Nasiatka

10/27
There will be a mass held in the honor of Capt. Cathy Nasiatka on Sunday Oct 28 at 11:00 a.m. at the Most Holy Trinity Church 1050 porter street, Detroit. The church is located on the corner of 6th & Porter St. just off the Lodge Freeway at the Howard Street exit. There will be an open house immediately following.

Reported by: The Nasiatka Family




Traffic Begins to Move

10/27
As the high winds begin to diminish across the region shipping traffic is beginning to move. Low water levels and gales force winds will continue to cause delays in some areas.

On Thursday and Friday many vessels waited out the storms at safe anchorage. In the St. Clair River the Joseph H. Frantz was at Marine City; Petrolia Desgagnes and Peter R. Cresswell (former Algowest) at Shell Oil Corunna; John J. Boland and Hannah barge 3601 with tug Mary E. Hannah at Marysville; Algocatalyst and Sidsel Knutsen at Sunoco at Sarnia; Algoway at Imperial Oil at Sarnia; barge Ocean Hauler and tug Evans McKeil, barge St. Marys Cement and tug Petite Forte at Sarnia.

In southern Lake Huron off of Sarnia/Port Huron: Indiana Harbor, Paul R. Tregurtha, Barge Joseph H. Thompson and tug Joseph H. Thompson Jr., Adam E. Cornelius, Algolake, Cason J. Callaway, Canadian Navigator, Calumet, Millennium Falcon, Mantadoc, Jean Parisien, Kapitonas Domeikas, barge Great Lakes Trader and tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort, Cuyahoga, Aegean Sea, Diamond Star, Isadora, and Rio Glory.

Reported by: Barry Hiscocks




Pathfinder Arrives

10/27
Shipping traffic resumed on the Saginaw River Friday as water levels returned to normal.

The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder passed the front range at 12:30 p.m. and arrived shortly after 3 p.m. at the Sargent Dock near the I-75 Bridge.

Very strong southerly winds on Thursday had lowered the water level in the river to more than 32 inches below datum, virtually closing the river to navigation. Winds remained strong on Friday, but have shifted to the west, permitting the water level to rise. The level at Essexville was reported to be 9 inches above datum at 5:42 p.m. on Friday.

Reported by: Stephen Hause and Dan McNeil




Toledo Update

10/27
Friday the Saginaw was at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator waiting to load grain. The Atlantic Erie was at the T.W.I. Dock loading bug dust. The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard.

There are no other vessels in port at the time of this report. The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Armco on Sunday, followed by the Lee A. Tregurtha, Canadian Progress, and Calumet on Monday.

The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco on Sunday, followed by the Buckeye on Monday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Boatnerd Gathering East

10/27:
Saturday, October 27
Boatwatching and museum tour at the Lock 3 Visitors Center - All Day
Visitors center and viewing platform are free to enter. *There is a small charge to tour the museum.

We follow the same format as Friday with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
The "Open Slide Show" begins at 7:00 p.m. and a possible guest speaker.
Bring your favorite tray to show or just sit back and enjoy the program. The "Swap Meet" and "Open Slide Show" are open to anyone wishing to attend even if not registered. At the Canadian Corps Hall in Thorold.

For updates, details, maps and links visit www.boatnerd.com/gathering.htm

Pictures from the Gathering will be posted Sunday or Monday.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 27

The PAUL THAYER (b) EARL W. OGLEBAY) was christened on October 27, 1973 at Lorain.

While the JAMES R. BARKER was up bound October 27, 1986 on Lake Huron above buoys 11 & 12, a high pressure fuel line on the starboard engine failed causing an engine room fire, which was extinguished by on-board fire fighting equipment. Fortunately no one was injured. On October 29th the BARKER was lashed side-by-side to the thousand-foot WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY (b) Paul R. Tregurtha) and taken to Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

On her maiden voyage the HOCHELAGA (2) departed Collingwood on October 27, 1949 for Fort William, Ont. to load grain for Port Colborne, Ont.

The FRANCIS E. HOUSE was laid up at Duluth, MN on October 27, 1960 and remained idle there until April, 1966 when she was sold to the Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland and was renamed c) KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1).

On October 27, 1973 the HENRY LALIBERTÉ struck an embankment while backing from the Frontier Dock Slip at Buffalo, NY and damaged her steering gear beyond repair. As a consequence she was laid up there.

The RED WING (2) and the FRANK A. SHERMAN departed Lauzon, Que. on October 27, 1986 in tandem tow by the Vancouver based deep-sea tug CANADIAN VIKING bound for scrapping in Taiwan.

On 27 October 1869, ALFRED ALLEN (wooden schooner, 160 T, built in 1853 at Pultneyville, NJ as J. J. MORLEY) was bound for Toledo, OH with 500 barrels of salt when she went on the Mohawk Reef near Port Colborne, Ontario in a blizzard. She washed free and drifted to the mainland beach where she was pounded to pieces. No lives were lost.

During a snow storm on the night of 27 October 1878, the propeller QUEBEC of the Beatty Line ran aground on Magnetic Shoals near Cockburn Island on Lake Huron. She was four miles from shore and one of her arches was broken in the accident.

October 27, 1854 - Well-known Pere Marquette carferry captain Joseph "Joe" Russell was born in Greenfield, Wisconsin.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Westcott II Recovery

10/26
Heavy winds sweeping across the region on Thursday postponed the recovery of a mail boat that sank Tuesday in the Detroit River. The strong winds created 3-5 foot waves on the Detroit River with white caps running upriver against the current.

Two crew members remain missing, as the boat is under 18 feet of water off the Old Rouge River. The spot is marked by a flashing buoy and a barge that will be used to lift the Westcott II.

A short distance up river at the Westcott Company somber crews continue working. The Mail Boat Joseph J. Hogan has taken over delivery duties to passing ships. With rough weather affecting the region traffic had all but stopped moving.

Salvage crews will return to the scene as soon as the weather permits.

More information on the J.W. Westcott Company
J.W. Westcott II on a typical mid river delivery. Mike Nicholls
View from the deck of the Southdown Challenger. Andy LaBorde
The Westcott II along side the Sidsel Knutsen in September. Mike Nicholls
Cathy Nasiatka at the controls of the Westcott II in August.
Dave Lewis (left) at fit out in April.
Capt. Dave Knowles of the tug Stormont who rescued the pilots. Windsor Star
Pilot Alain Gindroz. Windsor Star
Pilot Tom Roesslein. Windsor Star





Wind and Low Water

10/26
Storm force winds and low water levels have stopped most shipping across the Great Lakes as vessels wait out the storm in safe anchorage.

Lake Superior and Lake Michigan were forecast to receive winds to 50 knots and waves 15 to 20 feet. Lakes Huron and Erie would also receive winds to 50 knots. Waves on Lake Huron were forecast to reach 10 - 15 feet and Erie 12 - 16 feet. Gale warnings were posted for Lake Ontario with winds reaching 45 knots and waves building 9 - 12 feet. The winds were expected to diminish today.

Thursday the Burns Harbor was at anchor 2 miles off Manitowoc, WI and reported a wind speed of 63 miles per hour. On Lake Erie the Canadian Provider waited as winds reached 51 miles an hour about 7 miles south east of Colchester, Ont.

The high winds have dropped water levels across the region. At 1:40 a.m. the water level in Saginaw Bay was reported to be at minus 24 inches below chart datum, the lower Detroit River at minus 22 inches and the Western Laker Erie Basin at minus 54 inches. These low water levels make it impossible for a vessel to navigate safely through the area.

The low water was evident on shore. The pictures below show Western Lake Erie Thursday afternoon just North of the River Raisin at the mouth of Sandy Creek in Michigan.
Levels dropped Four to five feet.
Another view.

Marine Observations
Great Lakes Ship Locations




Maumee Visits Erie

10/26
The Maumee entered Erie, PA about 3:00 p.m. Thursday in gale force winds to wait weather at the Mounfort Terminal. The Maumee's visit marks the first from a Grand River Navigation or Lower Lakes boat since 1998.

Inbound.
Close up of the bow.
Stern View.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Coast Guard Rescues Jumper

10/26
Wednesday afternoon a 59-year-old man was saved from being swept over Niagara Falls by a Coast Guard helicopter and crew. Coast Guard Group Buffalo was notified by New York State Parks Police of a person in the Niagara River clinging to a rock 100 yards from the edge of the Falls on the American side.

State Parks Police officers received a call about 2 p.m. on one of the park's emergency phone lines, reporting that a man had jumped from a pedestrian bridge.

Due to the individual's location and strong currents, neither the Parks Police jet boats nor the Swift Water Recovery Team could safely perform the rescue. The helicopter was launched and a Rescue Swimmer, Aviation Survival Technician Second Class Eric Mueller, was lowered to the survivor and conducted a direct deployment rescue.

The man was safely recovered and transported to an awaiting ambulance for further transfer to a local hospital. He was treated for mild hypothermia.

The helicopter and crew, stationed out of the Coast Guard Air Station in Detroit, have been temporarily assigned to the area in support of local security operations since the Sept. 11 Attacks.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




September Tonnage

10/26
Strong Canadian coal shipments and increased domestic iron ore shipments in the Port of Duluth-Superior have sustained this year’s modest rise in cargo volume, the Duluth Seaway Port Authority reported Thursday.

All cargo through September totaled 26 million metric tons, a three percent increase from last year’s 25.2 million tons and two percent above the five-year average of 25.5 million tons.

Canadian coal shipments through September from Superior’s Midwest Energy Resources Co. reached 3.7 million tons, 82 percent above last year’s two million tons.

Total coal shipped via the facility reached 10.9 million metric tons through September, a nine percent increase from last year’s 10 million tons. Outbound coal handled through the facility is expected to set a Port record for the eighth consecutive year this season.

The Lake Carriers’ Association (LCA) reported a 23 percent decrease through September of overall Great Lakes iron ore shipments, but Duluth-Superior’s domestic shipments of iron ore rose from 7.4 to 8.1 million tons (a 10 percent increase). The closure of an LTV Co. dock in Taconite Harbor, Minn., and this year’s higher lake levels contributed to the rise.

Total iron ore shipments through September of 10 million tons represented a one percent decrease from last year’s 10.2 million tons. To date, weak demand for iron ore and other steel-related cargoes has resulted in eight U.S.-Flag lakers being idled a total of 501 days, two lakers out of service all year and one laker laying up 150 days early, according to the LCA.

Shipments of bulk grain, the Port’s third leading cargo, reached 2.3 million tons in September, a 15 percent decrease from last year’s 2.6 million tons. A lakes-wide decline in steel imports has meant fewer ocean ships available at competitive outbound rates.

The Port’s three principal cargoes of coal, iron ore and grain combined for 90 percent of total commerce, coal with 42 percent, iron ore at 39 percent and grain with nine percent.

Total international trade was boosted by strong Canadian coal shipments to 8.1 million metric tons, a seven percent increase from the 7.6 million tons reached a year ago.

Increased domestic shipments of iron ore and receipts of limestone, which is used in making iron ore pellets and for agricultural and chemical processes, brought total domestic trade to 17.9 million tons, a two percent increase from last year’s 17.6 million tons.

Vessels visiting the Port through August totaled 733, a decrease of five from last year. There were 441 U.S.-flag, 182 Canadian-flag and 110 overseas vessels making up that total.

For more information on the Port of Duluth visit www.duluthport.com

Reported by: Lisa Marciniak




Twin Ports Report

10/26
The autumn storm that raged across the Great Lakes on Thursday prompted several boats to anchor in or off the Twin Ports and forced delays on the entire USS Great Lakes Fleet.

In Duluth, the coal-laden H. Lee White was tied up at the DMIR ore dock waiting for weather before proceeding to Marquette. The grain-laden Kinsman Independent was tied up at the port terminal. Out on Lake Superior, Montrealais and Darya Ma were both at anchor.

USS Great Lakes Fleet reported all its boats anchored or in port waiting for weather. Edgar B. Speer and Philip R. Clarke were anchored off Gary, Edwin H. Gott was anchored in the St. Marys River, Presque Isle was loading in Two Harbors, but had no plans to depart until the weather moderated, Arthur M. Anderson was at Calcite waiting for the weather to ease before departing for Duluth, Cason J. Callaway was anchored off Port Huron, and John G. Munson was anchored in Whitefish Bay waiting to proceed to Ontonagon, Mich., with coal.

A storm warning was posted Thursday for western Lake Superior. Forecasts called for waves up to 20 feet.

Reported by: Al Miller




Marquette Update

10/26
Marquette harbors may see an improvement in the number of vessel visiting this month compared to the number last year. Marquette could see its first positive month since April if nine more vessels visit. Ships for the most part have been arriving in pairs and in a few cases, three have arrived in the same day. So far, Algosteel has accounted for 9 of the 30 vessel visits to the upper harbor this month. And the lower harbor has already moved into positive numbers with the arrival of the U.S.C.G. Sundew and Adam Cornelius last Friday. So some improvement could be seen this month if all goes well. Since my last report, the following vessels have visited Marquette's harbors

Lower Harbor
Adam Cornelius
H. Lee White
John Boland
U.S.C.G. Sundew

Upper Harbor
Adam Cornelius
Algomarine
Algosteel (x9)
Charles Beeghly (x2)
Great Lakes Trader
H. Lee White
John Boland
Joseph Thompson
Kaye Barker
Lee Tregurtha (X3)
Reserve
U.S.C.G. Sundew

Reported by: Art Pickering




Escanaba Traffic

10/26
Thursday the Wilfred Sykes was at the ore dock fully loaded waiting for winds to subside before departing. The Agawa Canyon was at Reiss Coal Dock 2 empty waiting out the weather.

Sykes waiting.
Agawa Canyon at dock. The debris in the foreground was completely underwater 3 years ago, before the lake levels dropped, the remnants of long-abandoned shipping docks.

Reported by: Eric and Sandy Chapman




Toledo Report

10/26
Thursday the Atlantic Erie was at the T.W.I. Dock loading bug dust, a finely granulated coal that is like sand. The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste Claire remains in dry dock at the Shipyard.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Canadian Progress and Lee A. Tregurtha on Saturday followed by the Algomarine, Calumet, H. Lee White, John B. Aird, and Reserve on Sunday.

The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco late Thursday, followed by the Buckeye on Saturday. However with storm force winds on all of the Great Lakes for the next 24 to 36 hours, all vessels listed for the dock sites will be delayed and there arrival times will most likely be changed.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Benson Ford inbound Maumee Bay bound for the Lakefront Coal Docks to load a coal cargo.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Boatnerd Gathering East

10/26:
The Second annual Boatnerd Gathering East begins today. Following the tradition set at the other Gatherings, the meeting is very informal and all events are optional and free.

Friday, October 26
For those who registered, there will be a walking tour of Port Weller Dry Docks. This rare opportunity to tour the Dry Docks has been made possible by the Boatnerd friendly people at Port Weller.

The evening begins with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
Tables will be available at the Canadian Corps Hall, please bring any items you would like to show, sell or swap. Open to all at no charge.

The "Open Slide Show" begins at 7:00 p.m.
Bring your favorite tray to show or just sit back and enjoy the program. The "Swap Meet" and "Open Slide Show" are open to anyone wishing to attend even if not registered.
Held at the Canadian Corps Hall on Clairmont Street at the corner of Ormond beside the 7 - 11, 1 block west from the Inn at Lock 7 in Thorold.

Saturday, October 27
Boatwatching and museum tour at the Lock 3 Visitors Center - All Day
Visitors center and viewing platform are free to enter. *There is a small charge to tour the museum.

We follow the same format as Friday with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
The "Open Slide Show" begins at 7:00 p.m. and a possible guest speaker.
Bring your favorite tray to show or just sit back and enjoy the program. The "Swap Meet" and "Open Slide Show" are open to anyone wishing to attend even if not registered. At the Canadian Corps Hall in Thorold.

For updates, details, maps and links visit www.boatnerd.com/gathering.htm




Today in Great Lakes History - October 26

LOUIS R. DESMARAIS was christened October 26,1977.

On October 26, 1968 the R. BRUCE ANGUS grounded in the St. Lawrence River near Beauharnois, Que. Sixteen hundred tons of iron ore were lightered to free her and she damaged 65 bottom plates.

The HUTCHCLIFFE HALL and OREFAX were sold October 26, 1971 to the Consortium Ile d'Orleans of Montreal made up of Richelieu Dredging Corp., McNamara Construction Ltd. and The J.P. Porter Co. Ltd.

On October 26, 1924 the E.A.S. CLARKE (2), anchored in the Detroit River opposite the Great Lakes Engineering Works because of dense fog was struck by the B.F. JONES (1) near her after deckhouse which caused the CLARKE to sink. No lives were lost.

On October 26, 1977 the MENIHEK LAKE struck a lock in the St. Lawrence Seaway sustaining damage estimated at $400,000.

On October 26, 1971 the ROGERS CITY (2) had her A-frame collapsed while unloading at Carrollton, MI on the Saginaw River. Her unloading boom was cut away and temporary repairs were made at Defoe Shipbuilding Co., Bay City, MI.

The tug ROUILLE was launched on October 26, 1929 as Hull 83 of Collingwood Shipyards Ltd.

The schooner HEMISPHERE, which was being sought by the U.S. Marshals at Detroit and the St. Lawrence River, escaped at the Gallop Rapids and has gone to sea.

On 26 October 1851, ATLAS (wooden propeller, 153’, 375 T, built in 1851 at Buffalo) was carrying flour from Detroit to Buffalo when she was blown to shore near the mouth of the Grand River (Lorain, OH) by a gale, stranded and became a total loss. No lives were lost.

On 26 October 1895, GEORGE W. DAVIS (wooden schooner, 136', 299 gt, built in 1872 at Toledo, Ohio) was carrying coal in a storm on Lake Erie when she stranded near Port Maitland, Ontario. On 26 October 1895, a few days after the stranding, she floated off on her own, drifted two miles up the beach and sank. No lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Westcott II Recovery

10/25
Dive teams returned to the sunken Westcott II Wednesday morning with hopes of recovering the missing crew members. Using a model of the Westcott II as a guide, teams searched the boat that is lying upside down on the river bottom but were unable to locate the crew.

By 2:00 p.m. salvage crews had a barge in place and were preparing to lift the Westcott II by crane. Divers were working in the river to assist in the efforts to raise the Westcott. On scene is the tug Carolyn Hoey and barge F-103. The barge is owned by Ferriss Marine and is under charter to Faust Corp. The diver working with the salvage crew is Brett Solomon from Monroe.

Salvage efforts were suspended Wednesday about 4:30 p.m. with the Westcott II remaining on the bottom. Heavy weather moving into the area made it necessary to stop the operation. The river was opened to one-way traffic, vessels are asked to hug the U.S. side of the river and proceed past the wreck at a dead slow speed.

The Westcott Company began servicing passing vessels Wednesday afternoon. The downbound Indiana Harbor was the first ship serviced by the mail boat Joseph J. Hogan.

Salvage crews will return to the scene this morning weather permitting.

More information on the J.W. Westcott Company
J.W. Westcott II on a typical mid river delivery. Mike Nicholls
View from the deck of the Southdown Challenger. Andy LaBorde
The Westcott II along side the Sidsel Knutsen in September. Mike Nicholls
Cathy Nasiatka at the controls of the Westcott II in August.
Dave Lewis (left) at fit out in April.
Capt. Dave Knowles of the tug Stormont who rescued the pilots. Windsor Star
Pilot Alain Gindroz. Windsor Star
Pilot Tom Roesslein. Windsor Star





Court approves sale of LTV ore mine

10/25
A federal bankruptcy court in Ohio has approved the sale of LTV Steel Mining Co. property near Hoyt Lakes and along Lake Superior’s North Shore to Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. and Duluth-based Minnesota Power.

A judge signed an order Tuesday approving the $75 million sale. Cliffs will acquire much of the defunct taconite mine, processing plant and shipping facility while Minnesota Power gets the power plant at Taconite Harbor.

Barring problems, the power plant could be operating by January.

Reported by: Mike Cleary




Heavy Weather Expected to Send Ships to Anchor

10/25
A dangerous weather pattern of two merging low pressure systems has brought severe weather to the Great Lakes region area. This deepening storm system is expected to bring gale and storm force winds that will cause many vessels to go to anchor and create delays for numerous dock sites.

Wednesday storm warnings were posted on Lake Michigan and Lake Superior and expected for Lake Huron and Lake Erie as the system moves through the Great Lakes region Thursday.

These winds will build huge waves on the Lakes. The Lake Superior forecast calls for northwest storm force winds to 50 knots building on Thursday with waves 15 to 18 feet. Lake Michigan will see storm force southwest winds to 60 knots becoming west with rain and snow squalls. Waves are expected to be 15 to 20 feet on Thursday.

Lake Huron is forecast to receive southwest gales to 45 knots increasing to 50 knot storm force winds Thursday afternoon with waves 12 to 16 feet. Lake Erie will see west gales Thursday increasing to 45 knots with waves building to 9 to 12 feet. Thursday night the wind is forecast to increase to 50 knot storm force winds with waves building to 10 to 14 feet.

Last night the Canadian Voyager reported a wind speed of 49 miles per hour north of Fairport Harbor in Lake Erie. On Lake Michigan the Mesabi Miner recorded winds of 38 miles per hour. The James R. Barker reported 40 mile an hour winds on Lake Superior Wednesday evening.

The forecasted storms prompted the National Weather Service to issue a low water statement Wednesday afternoon. Water levels in the Western Basin of Lake Erie were expected to fall well below the critical level for safe navigation last tonight as the strong area of low pressure moved across the northern lakes over night and Thursday. As this happens the winds on Lake Erie will switch to the west and rapidly increase to gale force over night. This will cause water levels in the Western Basin of Lake Erie to drop several feet from normal levels. This drop was expected to occur mainly late last night and today. Current projections are for water levels to fall to between 40 and 50 inches below the critical mark that is currently 11 inches below chart datum. Levels should remain below the critical mark through Friday.

Marine Observations
Great Lakes Ship Locations

Reported by: Roger Lelievre and Jim Hoffman




Salties Renamed

10/25
Two bulk carriers expected to make their first trip to the Great Lakes under their current name next week are vessels renamed lately. First to arrive will be the LIA which paid visits to Lake ports under four of her six previous names. She was known to ship watchers firstly as Fjordnes, then Kamtin, Falknes and Demi Green. Built in 1983 in Japan, she went to Toronto last year in May under the name Demi Green delivering a cargo of sugar. LIA will be the second ship of that name to visit the inland seas. The first LIA was a Swedish vessel built in 1947 and had entered the St. Lawrence Seaway for the first time in 1967.

The second one will be TAXIDEFTIS built in 1984. She completed several transits of the Seaway under her only previous name, Trident Mariner. As such, her last visit to the Lakes was in July 1999 when she called at Detroit, Windsor and Duluth.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Duluth will wait until next year for cruise ships

10/25
At the start of the navigation season, Duluth had been expecting its busiest season in decades for passenger vessels. Now, with several arrivals cancelled because of corporate bankruptcies and the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the city is waiting for next year.

The 224-passenger Cape May Light had been scheduled to call in Duluth this fall and next year. Those trips are off, however, since the ship’s owner filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy .

Earlier this year, the 225-passenger Arcadia was to visit the twice, but canceled the trips after being cited for health violations. The operator, Great Lakes Cruises Inc., was later forced into bankruptcy.

The Sept. 16 visit of the Columbus, a German cruise ship, also was canceled because the European passengers who had signed up for the trip were unable to fly to the United States in the wake of terrorist attacks Sept. 11.

The good news is that Duluth is still expecting two visits by the Columbus in 2002. Tourism officials also are trying to attract the French vessel Le Levant.

Ronald Johnson, trade development director for the Duluth Seaway Port Authority, hasn't given up on the Cape May Light yet. "We're hoping that when the dust settles, some company will form and operate the Cape May Light and the Cape Cod Light,'' he told the Duluth News Tribune.

For more information on the Port of Duluth visit www.duluthport.com




Toledo Update

10/25
The Mississagi was loading grain Wednesday at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. The Algoway was at the Kuhlman Dock unloading sand. She departed in the afternoon with the Gaelic tug William Hoey assisting her downriver. The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard. The Canadian Olympic was due in late Wednesday afternoon at the CSX Coal Docks to load.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Canadian Progress and Lee A. Tregurtha on Saturday, followed by the Algomarine, H. Lee White, John B. Aird, and Reserve on Sunday.

The Middletown was at the Torco Dock unloading ore. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco today, followed by the Buckeye on Saturday. There was an unidentified self unloader at the T.W.I. Dock loading coke breeze (finely granulated coal like sand).

Canadian Transfer outbound Maumee Bay on October 7. It had just finished unloading cargo at the Andersons "K" Elevator.
Tug Dorothy Ann with her barge Pathfinder (ex J.L. Mauthe) upbound the Maumee River bound for the Kuhlman Dock where she will unload a salt cargo.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toledo Traffic

10/25
Below are images of the Mississagi in Toledo on Wednesday and the Birmco on the trip home.

Mississagi loading at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator.
Stern view.
Tug Birmco at the Clamdigger Bar in Monroe on the Raisin River.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Cleveland Salties

10/25
On Tuesday the salties ISA and Lake Michigan were unloading in Cleveland.

Pictures by TZ
Lake Michigan unloading.
Stern view.
ISA unloading.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Boatnerd Gathering East

10/25:
We are just a few days away from Second annual Boatnerd Gathering East. Following the tradition set at the other Gatherings, the meeting is very informal and all events are optional and free.

Friday, October 26
For those who registered, there will be a walking tour of Port Weller Dry Docks. This rare opportunity to tour the Dry Docks has been made possible by the Boatnerd friendly people at Port Weller.

The evening begins with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
Tables will be available at the Canadian Corps Hall, please bring any items you would like to show, sell or swap. Open to all at no charge.

The "Open Slide Show" begins at 7:00 p.m.
Bring your favorite tray to show or just sit back and enjoy the program. The "Swap Meet" and "Open Slide Show" are open to anyone wishing to attend even if not registered.
Held at the Canadian Corps Hall on Clairmont Street at the corner of Ormond beside the 7 - 11, 1 block west from the Inn at Lock 7 in Thorold.

Saturday, October 27
Boatwatching and museum tour at the Lock 3 Visitors Center - All Day
Visitors center and viewing platform are free to enter. *There is a small charge to tour the museum.

We follow the same format as Friday with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
The "Open Slide Show" begins at 7:00 p.m. and a possible guest speaker.
Bring your favorite tray to show or just sit back and enjoy the program. The "Swap Meet" and "Open Slide Show" are open to anyone wishing to attend even if not registered. At the Canadian Corps Hall in Thorold.

For updates, details, maps and links visit www.boatnerd.com/gathering.htm




Today in Great Lakes History - October 25

The ALGOBAY departed on her maiden voyage October 25, 1978 from Collingwood light for Stoneport, Mich. to load stone for Sarnia, Ont.

The STERNECLIFFE HALL entered service on October 25, 1947.

The HURON (4) arrived at Santander, Spain October 25, 1973 in consort with the WYANDOTTE (2) towed by the German tug DOLPHIN X. for scrapping.

October 25, 1895 - Shenago No. 2 (later Pere Marquette 16) was launched in Toledo, Ohio. She was built by the Craig Shipbuilding Company for the United States & Ontario Steam Navigation Company and later became part of the Pere Marquette carferry fleet.

The engines of the propeller WESTMORELAND, which sank in 1854 near Skillagalee Reef in Lake Michigan, were recovered and arrived at Chicago on 25 October 1874.

ARK was built on the burned out hull of the steamer E. K. COLLINS as a sidewheel passenger steamer in 1853 at Newport, MI, but she was later cut down to a barge. On 25 October 1866, she was being towed along with three other barges down bound from Saginaw, MI in a storm.. Her towline parted and she disappeared with her crew of 6. The other three tow-mates survived. There was much speculation about ARK's whereabouts until identifiable wreckage washed ashore 100 miles north of Goderich, Ontario.

On 25 October 1833, JOHN BY (wooden stern-wheeler, 110', built in 1832 at Kingston, Ontario) was on her regular route between York (now Toronto) and Kingston, Ontario when a storm drove her ashore near Port Credit, a few miles from York. Her terrible handling of open Lake water set the precedent that stern-wheelers were not compatible with lake commerce.

On 25 October 1887, VERNON (wooden propeller passenger/package-freight steamer, 158', 560 t, built in 1886 at Chicago, IL) foundered in a gale 6 miles northeast of Two Rivers Point on Lake Michigan. The death toll was estimated at 31 - 36. The sole survivor was picked up on a small raft two days later by the schooner POMEROY. He was on the raft with a dead body. Most casualties died of exposure. There were accusations at the time that the vessel was overloaded causing the cargo doors to be left open which allowed the water to pour in during the storm. This accusation was confirmed in 1969 (82 years after the incident) when divers found the wreck and indeed the cargo doors were open.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Westcott II Sinks

10/24
4:30 p.m. update
Salvage efforts were suspended Wednesday about 4:30 p.m. with the Westcott II remaining on the bottom. Heavy weather moving into the area made it necessary to stop the operation. The river was opened to one-way traffic, vessels are asked to hug the U.S. side of the river and proceed past the wreck at a dead slow speed.

2:30 p.m. update
Dive teams returned to the sunken Westcott II Wednesday morning with hopes of recovering the missing crew members. Using a model of the Westcott II as a guide, teams searched the boat that is lying upside down on the river bottom but were unable to locate the crew.

By 2:00 p.m. salvage crews had a barge in place and were preparing to lift the Westcott II by crane. Divers were working in the river to assist in the efforts to raise the Westcott. The weather is expected to play a major role in the attempt to raise the mail boat, a strong storm system is expected to move into the area Wednesday evening.

The Detroit River is closed to traffic between the Ambassador Bridge and the ADM Dock while salvage operations take place. It is unknown how long the river will be closed, crews are estimating one to four hours as they work to lift the Westcott II.

Original Report
After extensive searching involving all resources on the Detroit River, two Westcott crew members remained missing Tuesday night after the J.W. Westcott II sunk that morning during a pilot change on the Detroit River.

Sometime after 7:00 a.m. the 45-foot mail boat was along side the moving tanker Sidsel Knutsen preparing for a routine exchange of pilots on the tanker. Onboard the Westcott was boat operator Cathy Nasiatka, deck hand David Lewis, pilot Alain Gindroz and pilot Tom Roesslein. One of the pilots was being transported by the Westcott to board the Knutsen to help guide it to Sarnia. The other pilot was being transported to another freighter.

The pilots were able to escape the Westcott II as it began quickly taking on water and appeared to be swamped by the tanker. The tanker then turned in the river to look for survivors. It located the pilots floating in the river who were then picked up by the tug Stormont.

Pilot Alain Gindroz said water rapidly filled the cabin and the Westcott II quickly turned over in about 20 seconds. He said he forced one of the large steel sliding doors open in the dark as the cabin filled with water. The Westcott II's propeller was report to be still turning as it was sinking.

A massive search effort was launched as all available resources responded to the scene. Shortly before 10:00 a.m. the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers survey vessel PAJ located the Westcott II on the river bottom as other vessels continued to search for the missing crew members.

The Mail Boat is lying upside down off the Old Rouge River with the bow pointing to the Ambassador Bridge. A dive team from the Detroit Police department spent the afternoon searching the Westcott II in strong currents and 1-foot visibility.

With only 18-feet of water over the Westcott, authorities closed the Detroit River between Fighting Island North and the Ambassador Bridge. As crews searched, family members of the missing crew and employees gathered at the Westcott Co. station to wait for news.

Crews continued searching until efforts were suspended Tuesday evening. The Westcott II was marked with a temporary buoy and the river was open to one-way traffic in the area. Traffic resume about 6:30 p.m. with vessels passing on the American side 35 feet west of the Westcott II's position. Freighters are blowing salutes to the Westcott station as they pass to show support for the crew and families.

The Westcott Co. remains open but has suspended delivery and pilot service for an unknown length of time. The company's back up mail boat, Joseph J. Hogan, remains at the station ready for service. Salvage efforts to raise the Westcott II are expected to begin this morning.

The accident has devastated the tight-knit maritime community, The Westcott Company has been servicing passing vessel since 1895 and has never lost a boat. Through out the season Westcott Co. boats and their friendly crews make thousands of deliveries to passing vessels in the Detroit River; delivering mail, freight and crew members as vessel slowly pass the station below the Ambassador Bridge.

There has been an outpouring of support for the crews and their families. Our thoughts and prayers are with the Westcott staff, crews and families.

More information on the J.W. Westcott Company
J.W. Westcott II on a typical mid river delivery. Mike Nicholls
View from the deck of the Southdown Challenger. Andy LaBorde
The Westcott II along side the Sidsel Knutsen in September. Mike Nicholls
Cathy Nasiatka at the controls of the Westcott II in August.
Dave Lewis (left) at fit out in April.
Capt. Dave Knowles of the tug Stormont who rescued the pilots. Windsor Star
Pilot Alain Gindroz. Windsor Star
Pilot Tom Roesslein. Windsor Star





Minntac shuts down production line

10/24
North America’s largest taconite plant - has shut down one of its four production lines to reduce taconite pellet inventories.

The production line produces 3.2 million tons of pellets a year. A spokesman for USX said the company hasn’t decided how longer the production line will remain idle.

Much of Minntac’s pellets are shipped by rail to Two Harbors, where they are loaded aboard vessels of USS Great Lakes Fleet.

Minntac can produce about 16.4 million tons of taconite pellets annually. Idling a production line makes it the fourth Minnesota taconite producer this year to reduce pellet production.

Reported by: Steve Jackson




More Bad News For Great Lakes Shipping

10/24
As a slump in the steel industry has reduced demand for raw materials many of the lakes largest vessels have moved to the coal trade. 1000-footers regularly carry low sulfur western coal from the Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, WI to power plants around the region. On of the regular delivery routes is to the coal dock at the St. Clair Edison Power plant on the St. Clair River.

Recent reports state that Detroit Edison has cut their coal order by 100,000 tons each from Interlake, American Steamship Company and Oglebay. The dock at St. Clair is full with coal and they have literally run out of room to store it.

With the reduced tonnage some vessels are expected to enter winter lay-up early. One vessel expected to end the season early is the 1000-foot Walter J. McCarthy Jr. who is expected to enter lay-up in early November. Last year the vessel was in service until January 9.




Tug Renamed

10/24
A tug built by Canadian Vickers shipyard in Montreal in 1938 was renamed El Conquistador recently . From 1938 to 1967, she sailed on the Great Lakes as KAM towing log booms mostly on Lake Superior for Abitibi Power & Paper. Since last year, she has been owned by US interests and will go into service at the resort island of Margarita, Venezuela where she is now registered.

Her Canadian registry had been closed in January 2000. Over the last months, she was rebuilt into an excursion vessel from a tug on the Fraser River near New Westmister, B.C. After leaving the Lakes in 1967, she was renamed Gulf Ivy, then Swiftsure X in 1981, Seaspan Explorer in 1980 and again Gulf Ivy in 1988.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




New Salties on the Seaway

10/24
Two new salties are expected to head up the lakes today. They are the Virginiaborg heading for Milwaukee and Vectis Falcon for Detroit.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Twin Ports Report

10/24
Twin Ports boatwatchers Tuesday got the rare treat of seeing two straightdeckers loading at the Cenex Harvest States grain terminal.

Montrealais was loading in Berth 2 while Kinsman Independent was in Berth 1. They were part of a continuing grain rush that also included Darya Ma at Peavey, Isadora at AGP and Algocen at General Mills in Duluth. Partially obscured in the morning mist was Algoville, anchored out on Lake Superior awaiting a berth.

Other grain vessels due in the next few days are Buccaneer, Rubin Lark and Ziemia Chelminska.

Traffic remains fairly steady at Midwest Energy Terminals, although one- and two-day gaps are showing up in what used to be a solid lineup. On Tuesday the Canadian Enterprise was waiting for a clear berth so it could load coal for Nanticoke. Also due that day was H. Lee White, scheduled to load for the Shiras plant in Marquette.

John B. Aird is due Oct. 24 to load for Nanticoke, to be followed by Indiana Harbor, loading Friday for Nanticoke, and Paul R. Tregurtha, loading Sunday for the WEPCO plant in Presque Isle near Marquette.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Report

10/24
The Mississagi arrived at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock late Monday evening she departed the dock upbound late Tuesday morning for her third trip to Andersons "E" Elevator within the past week. The Canadian Miner was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator.

The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard. Another vessel is docked out side the gate preventing it from being moved. The Ste Claire is not trapped but is using the extra time to continue repairs on the vessel.

The John G. Munson was loading coal at the CSX Docks. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Middletown today.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Photo of Tug and Barge

10/24:
Lower Lake Towing is requesting a photograph of their first tug the Thomas A. Payette and barges C1602 and Tecumseh II.
Please e-mail if you have a photograph




Boatnerd Gathering East

10/24:
We are just a few days away from Second annual Boatnerd Gathering East. Following the tradition set at the other Gatherings, the meeting is very informal and all events are optional and free.

Friday, October 26
For those who registered, there will be a walking tour of Port Weller Dry Docks. This rare opportunity to tour the Dry Docks has been made possible by the Boatnerd friendly people at Port Weller.

The evening begins with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
Tables will be available at the Canadian Corps Legion Hall, please bring any items you would like to show, sell or swap. Open to all at no charge.

The "Open Slide Show" begins at 7:00 p.m.
Bring your favorite tray to show or just sit back and enjoy the program. The "Swap Meet" and "Open Slide Show" are open to anyone wishing to attend even if not registered.
Held at the Canadian Corps Legion Hall on Clairmont Street at the corner of Ormond beside the 7 - 11, 1 block west from the Inn at Lock 7 in Thorold.

Saturday, October 27
Boatwatching and museum tour at the Lock 3 Visitors Center - All Day
Visitors center and viewing platform are free to enter. *There is a small charge to tour the museum.

We follow the same format as Friday with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
The "Open Slide Show" begins at 7:00 p.m. and a possible guest speaker.
Bring your favorite tray to show or just sit back and enjoy the program. The "Swap Meet" and "Open Slide Show" are open to anyone wishing to attend even if not registered. At the Canadian Corps Legion Hall in Thorold.

For updates, details, maps and links visit www.boatnerd.com/gathering.htm




Today in Great Lakes History - October 24

TEXACO WARRIOR (2) was launched October 24, 1969 as a) THUNTANK 6.

The PHILIP D. BLOCK along with the W.W. HOLLOWAY scrap tow arrived Recife, Brazil. October 24, 1986

The THOMAS W.LAMONT and her former fleetmate, ENDERS M. VOORHEES arrived at Alegeciras, Spain on October 24, 1987 on the way to the cutters torch. The LAMONT was one of the last bulkers that retained her telescoping hatch covers to the very end.

The NIPIGON BAY arrived Thunder Bay, Ont. on October 24, 1980 where repairs were made from damage caused by her grounding earlier in the month.

On 24 October 1855, ALLEGHENY (wooden propeller, 178’, 468 T, built in 1849 at Cleveland) was carrying general merchandise and passengers in a storm, when she anchored near the Milwaukee harbor entrance for shelter. She lost her stack and then was unable to get up steam and was helpless. She dragged her anchor and came in close to the beach where she was pounded to pieces. There was no loss of life. Her engine and most of her cargo were removed by the end of the month. Her engine was installed in a new vessel of the same name built to replace her.

On 24 October 1873, just a month after being launched, the scow WAUBONSIE capsized at St. Clair, Michigan and lost her cargo of bricks. She was righted and towed to Port Huron, minus masts, rigging and bowsprit, for repairs.

On 24 October 1886, LADY DUFFERIN (3-mast wooden schooner-barge, 135', 356 gc, built at Port Burwell, Ontario) was lost from the tow of the propeller W. B. HALL and went ashore near Cabot Head on Georgian Bay. No lives were lost, but the vessel was a total loss.

On 24 October 1953, the Yankcanuck Steamship Lines' MANZZUTTI (steel crane ship, 246', 1558 gt, built in 1903 at Buffalo, NY as J. S. KEEFE) ran aground south of the channel into the Saugeen River. The tug RITH HINDMAN from Killarney pulled her free. No damage was reported.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Westcott II Sinks

10/23
7:00 p.m. update
After extensive searching involving all resources on the Detroit River, two crew members remain missing after this morning's sinking of the J.W. Westcott II. Divers searched the area of the sinking but their efforts were hampered by 1-foot visibility.

The Mail Boat is laying upside down off Zug Island with the bow pointing to the Ambassador Bridge. With only 18-feet of water over the Westcott, the Detroit River was closed between Fighting Island North and the Ambassador Bridge.

Coast Guard crews have marked the wreck with a temporary buoy and the river is open to one-way traffic in the area. Traffic resume about 6:30 p.m.

The cause of the sinking remains unclear as Coast Guard and Transport Canada investigators try to determine what happened. The Westcott was reported to have been along side the Sidsel Knutsen when the accident occured.

Efforts to raise the Westcott II are expected to begin Wednesday morning with some type of crane arriving by tug and barge.

1:30 p.m. update
The survey vessel PAJ located the Westcott II on the river bottom shortly before 10:00 a.m. A dive team from the Detroit Police Department is on scene and have entered the Westcott. They are searching for the missing crew. The Mail Boat is laying upside down with the bow pointing to the Ambassador Bridge. The divers are working in strong currents and limited visibility.

The Detroit River is closed between Fighting Island North and the Ambassador Bridge. The Westcott is resting on the bottom mid-channel off the old River Rouge and poses a hazard to navigation.

The missing Westcott crew members were identified as David Lewis, 50, of Eastpointe, and Cathy Nasiatka, 48, of Algonac.

9:00 a.m. update
The Coast Guard is searching the Deroit River for two crew members who are missing after the U.S. Mail Boat J.W. Westcott II capsized and quickly sank while completing a pilot change on the Detroit River. The boat capsized off the Old Rouge River around 7:00 a.m. while servicing the Sidsel Knutsen.

Two pilots were rescued from the water by the tug Stormont and were reportedly wearing life jackets. Both pilots were reported to be in good condition and were being interviewed by the Coast Guard. One of the pilots was being transported by the Westcott to board the Knutsen to help guide it to Sarnia. The other pilot was being transported to another freighter.

The Coast Guard has multiple vessels and a helicopter searching the area. The Corps of Engineers vessel PAJ is on scene, the survey vessel is using its survey equipment to scan the river bottom. A dive team from the Detroit Police Department is standing by.

Commercial traffic in the area is stopped as teams search for the mail boat.

Check back for updates.

More information on the J.W. Westcott II




Seaway workers to vote Wednesday on contract offer

10/23
More than 500 workers on the St. Lawrence Seaway and Welland Canal are scheduled to vote Wednesday on a contract agreement that averted last Saturday’s threatened walkout.

The St. Lawrence Seaway Corp. and the Canadian Auto Workers union reached a tentative contract agreement at 1:40 p.m. Saturday, little more than an hour before workers were expected to strike. The union represents the Seaway’s operational and maintenance employees as well as engineers and supervisors.

Gabe MacNally, national service representative for the union, said his members’ main concerns were safety and staffing concerns. One of the main sticking points was the Seaway’s plan to reduce the size of line handling crews along the waterway from three people to two, a move the union said was unsafe.

The agreement reached Saturday reportedly maintains current staffing levels and provides a 2-percent wage increase in the first year and 3 percent in each of the next two years retroactive to Jan. 1.

Union negotiators also wanted to reduce the amount of work that the Seaway contracts out. Media reports did not include any mention of how the tentative agreement addresses that issue.

Seaway officials estimated 30 to 45 ships were in the Seaway system when traffic was halted at midnight Friday. Traffic resumed moving Saturday afternoon.

Reported by: Bill Bird




Power Failure

10/23
Early Monday morning, the saltie NST Challenger had an engine breakdown while in Snell Lock. She was downbound from the upper lakes for Montreal to take on bunkers. At noon, she was still in the lock while undergoing repairs and shipping traffic was stopped in this area.

The ship struck the arrestor gate, causing extensive damage to the gate and closing the Seaway for approximately 19 hours. A total of three vessels were delayed. There was no reported damage to the NST Challenge.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Century in Green Bay

10/23
The Canadian Century arrived in Green Bay Monday morning at 1:00 a.m. It docked at the Fox River Dock, where she unloaded rock salt until 8:30 a.m. The Great Lakes Towing tug Indiana pulled her from the slip and she departed Green Bay at 8:45 a.m.

Reported by: Jason Leino




Buckeye Returns

10/23
Oglebay Norton's classic steamer arrived at Stoneport early Monday morning to load for Cutler/Magner in Superior, WI. This is the second load this year for the Buckeye at Stoneport.

The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder and the Buffalo were scheduled to load after the Buckeye departed.

Reported by: Ben McClain




Cuyahoga in Owen Sound

10/23
The Mapleglen was leave the Owen Sound Harbor Monday evening. On her way out of port she passed the inbound Cuyahoga. The Cuyahoga quickly docked and began unloading grain at the elevators.

Reported by: Roger Cournoyer




Twin Ports Report

10/23
Five of the Twin Ports' seven grain berths were occupied Monday morning as the fall grain rush hits its stride. Cenex Harvest States had a full house with Montrealais in berth 2 and Millenium Falcon under the annex; Isadora was loading at AGP, Darya Ma was loading at Peavey; and Algocen was loading at General Mills in Duluth. Algoville and Kinsman Independent were both expected to arrive late in the day.

Reported by: Al Miller




Saginaw River Update

10/23
Monday was a busy day for the Saginaw River. Five vessels were moving during the day.

Pictures by: Todd Shorkey
Wolverine upbound at Essroc.
Wolverine Close Up.
Wolverine Stern View.
Great Lakes Trader passing Wolverine at Dow Chemical Dock.
Great Lakes Trader - Wolverine clear each other.
Great Lakes Trader and tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort.
Stern View.
Gemini unloading.
Earl W. Oglebay downbound.
Oglebay Passing the Gemini.
Earl W. Oglebay Clear of Gemini.
Earl W. Oglebay close up.
Stern view.
Agawa Canyon upbound at Liberty Bridge.
Agawa Canyon stern view.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Hamilton News

10/23
Monday afternoon, the Millenium Condor was at Pier 23 to unload steel products. The Algowood was moored at Pier 26 loading aggregate.

At about 1:00 p.m. the Burlington Lift Bridge became stuck about eight feet above the normal down position. As a result of this, all vehicular traffic on Eastport Drive was being diverted by the OPP and made to use the Burlington Skyway.

The bridge must have become operational sometime that afternoon, by 7:00 p.m. the Millenium Condor was no longer in Hamilton Harbor and there was an ULS vessel at Dofasco unloading iron ore pellets.

At 7:10 p.m., the Algowood transited the Burlington Ship Canal into Lake Ontario and looked to be headed toward the Welland Canal.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Boatnerd Gathering East

10/23:
We are just a few days away from Second annual Boatnerd Gathering East. Following the tradition set at the other Gatherings, the meeting is very informal and all events are optional and free.

Friday, October 26
For those who registered, there will be a walking tour of Port Weller Dry Docks. This rare opportunity to tour the Dry Docks has been made possible by the Boatnerd friendly people at Port Weller.

The evening begins with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
Tables will be available at the Canadian Corps Legion Hall, please bring any items you would like to show, sell or swap. Open to all at no charge.

The "Open Slide Show" begins at 7:00 p.m.
Bring your favorite tray to show or just sit back and enjoy the program. The "Swap Meet" and "Open Slide Show" are open to anyone wishing to attend even if not registered.
Held at the Canadian Corps Legion Hall on Clairmont Street at the corner of Ormond beside the 7 - 11, 1 block west from the Inn at Lock 7 in Thorold.

Saturday, October 27
Boatwatching and museum tour at the Lock 3 Visitors Center - All Day
Visitors center and viewing platform are free to enter. *There is a small charge to tour the museum.

We follow the same format as Friday with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
The "Open Slide Show" begins at 7:00 p.m. and a possible guest speaker.
Bring your favorite tray to show or just sit back and enjoy the program. The "Swap Meet" and "Open Slide Show" are open to anyone wishing to attend even if not registered. At the Canadian Corps Legion Hall in Thorold.

For updates, details, maps and links visit www.boatnerd.com/gathering.htm




Today in Great Lakes History - October 23

The CECILIA DESGAGNES was launched October 23, 1970 as a) CARL GORTHON, for Rederi A/B Gylfe, Hälsingborg, Sweden.

GRAND RAPIDS Rail Car Ferry was launched October 23, 1926 for the Grand Trunk-Milwaukee Car Ferry Co., Muskegon, MI.

WILLIAM B. SCHILLER was launched October 23, 1909 for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

October 23, 1926 - The Grand Trunk carferry Grand Rapids was launched in Manitowoc. She entered service in December of 1926.

October 23, 1953 - The S.S. SPARTAN arrived Ludington on her maiden voyage. Captain Harold A. Altschwager was in command.

On 23 October 1868, F. T. BARNEY (wooden schooner, 255 T, built in 1856 at Vermilion, OH) collided with the schooner TRACY J. BRONSON and sank below Nine Mile Point, NW of Rogers City in Lake Michigan. The wreck was found in 1987 and sits in deep water, upright in almost perfect condition.

On 23 October 1873, the wooden steam barge GENEVA was loaded with wheat and towing the barge GENOA in a violent storm on Lake Superior. She bent her propeller shaft and the flailing blades cut a large hole in her stern. The water rushed in and she went down quickly 15 miles off Caribou Island. No lives were lost. This was her first season of service. She was one of the first bulk freighters with the classic Great Lakes fore and aft deck houses.

On 23 October 1883, JULIA (2-mast wooden schooner, 89', 115 gt, built in 1875 at Smith's Falls, Ontario) was coming into Oswego harbor with a load of barley when she struck a pier in the dark and sank. No lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Full House at Port Inland

10/22
The Great Lakes Trader and tug Joyce L VanEnkenvort spent Saturday loading stone at Port Inland, they were expected to depart by 11:00 p.m. with the total loading time taking about 15 hours. With the Trader's length of 844 feet she is one of, if not the largest vessel to load at Port Inland and she barely fits at the dock.

The American Mariner arrived at noon and went to anchor until the Trader departs. The Capt. Henry Jackman was expected at Port Inland on Sunday morning while the Wilfred Sykes is due in today and the Joseph L Block on Tuesday. Three Oglebay Norton boats, the Middletown, David Z. Norton and Fred R. White were scheduled to load at Port Inland over the weekend but with so many boats already loading and the delays that would have occurred, their orders were changed.

Stern View at loading dock.
Side view at the dock.
Bow view of Trader loading stone.
In the Distance the American Mariner has arrived and gone to anchor to wait for a clear dock.
The loading rig at Port Inland (about midship).

Reported by: Scott Best




Tug Heads North

10/22
The Tug Mount McKay departed Michigan City, IN on Saturday headed for Duluth. She is going to be privately owned and used for pleasure use. Early Friday morning they were upbound off Ludington planning to stop in Frankfort for supplies. The tug is still powered by here original Kahlenberg C-6 direct reversing Diesel Engine that is quite possibly the last engine of this type in the world. The Mount McKay was one of the tugs that assisted in towing the Amoco Wisconsin and Amoco Illinois from Bay City to the scrap yard in Windsor a number of years ago.

Reported by: Franz VonRiedel




Seaway Update

10/22
The Apollo Tiger remained in Montreal at the anchorage Sunday morning. Instead of going up the Seaway, she was to go to a dock in Montreal. Her orders were changed again and she sailed eastbound for Sorel-Tracy heading to Section 19 at the mouth of the Richelieu River.

In other news, two salties with the same name are tied up at St. Lawrence River ports, one of them being a regular visitor to Great Lakes ports.

Armonikos, Maltese flag, 19 495 gr.t. was taking bunker in Montreal and the much larger Panamanian-flag at 35,774 gr.t. (much too big for the Seaway) was anchored off Port Cartier waiting for a dock to load iron ore.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Twin Ports Report

10/22
After unloading coal in Ashland, Wis., the Courtney Burton headed to Silver Bay on Oct. 22 to load taconite pellets.
In the Twin Ports, the only grain traffic was Millennium Falcon loading at Cenex Harvest States and Algocen at General Millers in Duluth. Once it's done unloading at St. Lawrence Cement, the Montrealais will clean its holds and proceed to Cenex Harvest States to load.
An unusual visitor Oct. 22 was the steamer Middletown, which arrived early in the day to load at DMIR ore dock. About an hour later it was followed by Philip R. Clarke, which arrived at DMIR to unload stone.
Down at the BNSF ore dock, Burns Harbor was loading taconite pellets.

Reported by: Al Miller




Saginaw River News

10/22
The Saginaw River remained busy over the weekend, with visits by eight vessels since Friday.

Arriving on Sunday was the cement carrier Paul H. Townsend, which entered the river shortly after midnight with a load for the Lafarge terminal in Saginaw. The Joyce L. Van Enkevort with the Great Lakes Trader passed the front range inbound late Sunday afternoon, going to the Sargent dock near the I-75 bridge.

The Agawa Canyon arrived with a load of salt on Saturday evening at the Buena Vista dock just above the I-75 Bridge. She was outbound early Sunday morning. This was the vessel's third visit to the river within five days.

The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived Saturday morning with coal for Consumers Energy and departed on Saturday afternoon.

The Maumee was outbound from Saginaw on Saturday morning after delivering salt to Carrollton, and the Wolverine was outbound Saturday afternoon from the Wirt dock in Saginaw. Both vessels had arrived Friday evening. The Wolverine had lightered first at Essexville before moving up to Saginaw during the night.

Also arriving on Friday were the Sam Laud, which delivered a load to the Bay Aggregates, and the tug Mark Hannah, which called with a barge at the Dow dock in Bay City.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Toledo Update

10/22
The Nanticoke adventure at Toledo continued about 7:00 p.m. Saturday evening she arrived at the Andersons "K" Elevator to reload her soybean cargo that was taken off to free her. She departed the "K" Elevator late Saturday evening under tow of two G tugs. As she approached the Norfolk-Southern South railroad bridge (by the elevators) she struck the bridge abutments as she was proceeding through the bridge.

Damage was done to the bridge as well as minor damage to the Nanticoke. It is believed that she went to the T.W.I. Dock for further inspection by the U.S. Coast Guard before she was allowed to sail for Quebec. The Nanticoke was outbound Maumee Bay early Sunday morning.

Sunday the Algomarine was loading coal at the CSX Docks with the Jean Parisien due in later that evening, she will follow the Algomarine to load. The Mississagi was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator and was expected to depart later on Sunday. The Canadian Miner was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator with an expected departure late Monday.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel today, followed by the Reserve and John G. Munson on Tuesday. The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard.

The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Middletown on Wednesday followed by the Armco on Thursday.

Images of Toledo Shipping
Nanticoke upbound from the High Level Bridge on Monday under tow of the "G" Tugs Illinois and Louisiana bound for Andersons "K" Elevator. Several days later she would get into trouble on her outbound trip.
Nanticoke on Wednesday several hours later after she became stuck. The tug Louisiana is on the stern trying to push the vessel away from the shoreline.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Weekly Updates

10/22
The regular weekly updates are now available. Click here to view




Boatnerd Gathering East

10/22:
We are just a few days away from Second annual Boatnerd Gathering East. Following the tradition set at the other Gatherings, the meeting is very informal and all events are optional and free.

Friday, October 26
For those who registered, there will be a walking tour of Port Weller Dry Docks. This rare opportunity to tour the Dry Docks has been made possible by the Boatnerd friendly people at Port Weller.

The evening begins with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
Tables will be available at the Canadian Corps Legion Hall, please bring any items you would like to show, sell or swap. Open to all at no charge.

The "Open Slide Show" begins at 7:00 p.m.
Bring your favorite tray to show or just sit back and enjoy the program. The "Swap Meet" and "Open Slide Show" are open to anyone wishing to attend even if not registered.
Held at the Canadian Corps Legion Hall on Clairmont Street at the corner of Ormond beside the 7 - 11, 1 block west from the Inn at Lock 7 in Thorold.

Saturday, October 27
Boatwatching and museum tour at the Lock 3 Visitors Center - All Day
Visitors center and viewing platform are free to enter. *There is a small charge to tour the museum.

We follow the same format as Friday with an "Impromptu Swap Meet" at 6:00 p.m.
The "Open Slide Show" begins at 7:00 p.m. and a possible guest speaker.
Bring your favorite tray to show or just sit back and enjoy the program. The "Swap Meet" and "Open Slide Show" are open to anyone wishing to attend even if not registered. At the Canadian Corps Legion Hall in Thorold.

For updates, details, maps and links visit www.boatnerd.com/gathering.htm




Today in Great Lakes History - October 22

The PRESQUE ISLE (2)'s tug completed her sea trials on October 22, 1973 in New Orleans.

On October 22, 1986 the ALGOCEN spilled about four barrels of diesel fuel while refueling at the Esso Dock at Sarnia.

The TOM M. GIRDLER departed South Chicago light on her maiden voyage, October 22, 1951, bound for Escanaba, MI where she loaded 13,900 tons of ore for delivery to Cleveland, OH.

The THORNHILL (1) grounded on October 22, 1973 just above the Sugar Island ferry crossing in the St. Marys River.

On 22 October 1887, C.O.D. (wooden schooner-barge, 140', 289 GT, built in 1873 at Grand Haven, MI) was carrying wheat in Lake Erie in a northwest gale. She was beached three miles east of Port Burnell, Ontario and soon broke up. Most of the crew swam to shore, but the woman who was the cook was lashed to the rigging and she perished.

October 22, 1929 - The S.S. Milwaukee (formerly Manistique Marquette and Northern 1) sank in a gale with a loss of all 52 hands. 21 bodies were recovered. Captain Robert McKay in command.

On October 27, 1929, a Coast Guard patrolman near South Haven, Michigan, picked up the ship's message case, containing the following handwritten note:
"S.S. MILWAUKEE, OCTOBER 22/29 8:30 P.M.
The ship is taking water fast. We have turned around and headed for Milwaukee. Pumps are working but sea gate is bent in and can't keep the water out. Flicker is flooded. Seas are tremendous. Things look bad.
Crew roll is about the same as on last payday.
(signed) A.R. Sadon, Purser."

On 22 October 1870, JENNIE BRISCOE (wooden schooner, 85', 82 t, built in 1870 at Detroit, MI) was raised from where she sank off Grosse Isle, Michigan a couple of months earlier. She was in her first season of service when she collided with the propeller FREE STATE and sank there. Her raised wreck was sold Canadian in 1871 and she was rebuilt as the propeller scow HERALD.

In a severe gale on 22 October 1873, the three barges DAVID MORRIS, GLOBE, and SAGINAW from Bay City grounded and sank off Point Pelee on Lake Erie.

On 22 October 1887, DOLPHIN (wooden schooner-barge, 107', 147 t, built in 1855 at Milan, OH) and G. D. NORRIS (2-mast wooden schooner, 128', 262 gt, built in 1856 at Cleveland, OH) were both carrying lumber and were in tow of the steamer OSWEGATCHIE in a storm on Lake Huron. The tow line broke when the vessels were off Harbor Beach, Michigan. The DOLPHIN capsized and foundered. All 6 or 7 onboard perished. The NORRIS sank to her decks and her crew was rescued by the passing steamer BRECK. The NORRIS drifted ashore near Goderich, Ontario.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Nanticoke Free, Sails for Quebec

10/21
After unloading one more barge of soybeans Saturday morning, the assembled tugs began to move Nanticoke at 9:00 am. The G tugs Louisiana and Montana were pulling on the stern, the Gaelic tug Susan Hoey and G tug Illinois were pushing on the bow, and the 'big guys', Gaelic's Roger Stahl, G tug Triton, and Purvis Marine's Atlantic Cedar push on the stern. As the sky filled with diesel smoke, Nanticoke slowly began to move up river against the current. The water was churned into chocolate milk as all the tugs strained against the Maumee River.

As the stern began to move up stream, Nanticoke's bow slid closer to the NS Railroad Bridge, but a quick adjustment in the pushing angle kept her clear. The captain of the Nanticoke orchestrated the move, giving orders to the tugs to "change the angle, or move square". Ever so slowly she came around parallel to the channel and began to move backward and up stream.

As she neared the Anderson's dock on the west side, from where she had departed on Wednesday, she came around. Orders were change to take her to the ADM dock on the east side of the river. Within an hour she was in the channel and another 1/2 hour she was tied up at ADM.

By noon, the tug were released and a tug parade started down stream as the big tugs headed for home. Three G tugs stayed with the Nanticoke and a fourth still had the loaded barge under control. Shortly after the tug parade passed down river, the Frontenac left the ADM dock where she had been trapped since Wednesday and headed out to the lake.

As soon as Frontenac passed the Mississagi, tied at the Toledo shipyard, the LLT boat signed on heading up river. Likewise, when the Frontenac passed the CSX coal dock, Algomarine started her trip up to the elevators.

By 2:00 pm, Nanticoke was moving back to the Anderson dock to reload, Algomarine was at the Cargill dock and Mississagi was tied up ADM.

The Coast Guard inspected the vessel and there was no damage found and the steering tested fine. The Nanticoke finished loading the grain that was taken off of her and departed early Sunday morning for Quebec.

The vessels owners, Canada Steamship Lines, and managers wish to thank all those involved, especially the tugboat crews and the US Coast Guard for their assistance during the event. Their professionalism and cooperation resulted in a serious situation being handled in a timely manner with no injuries and no environmental or physical damage to the surrounding area.

Final barge load of grain is offloaded that morning. Dave Wobser
Lousiana and Montana pull on the stern. Bob Densic
Close up. Bob Densic
Larger tugs pushing on the stern. Bob Densic
Close up. Bob Densic
Close to the bridge. Bob Densic
Bow moves closer to the bridge. Bob Densic
Susan Hoey and Illinois keep the bow a safe distance. Bob Densic
Nanticoke starts to back. Bob Densic
Stern starts to come around. Bob Densic
Tugs turn on the power. Bob Densic
Another view. Ed Brown Jr.
A large crowd was on hand. Bob Densic
Tugs working the bow. Bob Densic
Almost straight. Bob Densic
Another view. Ed Brown Jr.
Backing in the channel. Bob Densic
Panoramic as the Nanticoke is moved upriver. Bob Densic
Preparing to tie up at the ADM dock. Bob Densic
At the dock with fleet mate Frontenac. Ed Brown Jr.

Lousiana moves the loaded barge. N. Schultheiss
Stahl and Susan Hoey hold position. Bob Densic
Another view. N. Schultheiss
Tugs wait to be released. Bob Densic
Another view. Bob Densic
Atlantic Cedar holds off the Andersons dock. Bob Densic
All clear it heads for the Railroad Bridge. N. Schultheiss
Stahl departs for Detroit. Dave Wobser
The Toledo based tug Susan Hoey heads back to its dock. Dave Wobser
Triton sails for Cleveland. Dave Wobser
Atlantic Cedar heads back for the Soo. Dave Wobser

Many in the crowd on hand to watch waited for Frontenac to depart on the museum ship Willis B. Boyer. N. Schultheiss
Frontenac passing through the NS Railroad Bridge. N. Schultheiss
Clearing the bridge. N. Schultheiss
Frontenac passes under the High Bridge. Dave Wobser
View from above. N. Schultheiss
Mississagi heads upriver. N. Schultheiss
Passing under the bridge. Dave Wobser
Crew members on deck. N. Schultheiss
Flags flying. N. Schultheiss
Algomarine follows her upriver. N. Schultheiss
Tug Muskegon and dredge working in the river. N. Schultheiss
Roger Stahl at its dock in Detroit Saturday afternoon. N. Schultheiss
Captain of the Stahl, Capt. William Cline was pleased with the performance of the big tug in the operation. N. Schultheiss
One of the Stahl's 1500 horsepower engines. N. Schultheiss

Chart of the area.
Video of the incident from WTOL-TV.
Live Web Cam image from WTOL-TV. Click on Carpenters' Cam

Reported by: Dave Wobser, Bob Densic, Jim Hoffman, Ed Brown Jr. and Canada Steamship Lines




Strike Settled, Traffic Moving

10/21
The pending strike by Seaway employees was tentatively settled at 2.00 p.m. Saturday. Navigation through the Seaway, both the Montreal-Lake Ontario Section and the Welland Canal resumed about 3:00 p.m. Sources with the Seaway said 19 ships where in line for passage. On the upper Seaway three vessels were waiting at anchorages for a settlement of the labor dispute. Two at Lanoraie Anchorage: Canadian Voyager and Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin and one in Montreal, the Apollo Tiger which is to go up the Seaway for the first time.

Passage through parts of the Seaway were allowed late Friday to avoid any vessel becoming stuck in a particular area.

The potential strike would have paralyzed the Seaway and caused significant economic impact through out the region.

Click here for a real time map of the Seaway.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson, Roger LeLievre, R Kindree and René Beauchamp




Mariner Delivers

10/21
The American Republic made one of its infrequent visits to Green Bay, WI Friday with a load of coal for the C. Reiss Coal dock.

American Republic unloading.
Close up of the deckhouse.
Unloading.

Reported by: Dick Lund




HMCS Nipigon arrives in Rimouski

10/21
HMCS Nipigon arrived at Rimouski, Quebec Saturday afternoon about 2:00 p.m. The former Canadian Navy Ship is to be stripped over the next year and prepared for scuttling in 70 feet of water off Ste-Luce 10 miles east of Rimouski. The future dive site will divert amateur divers from the wreck of the Empress of Ireland as well as attract a new clientele. The Nipigon was built by Marine Industries of Sorel in 1959. She was decommissioned in Halifax in July 1998. The tug Atlantic Hickory towed her to Rimouski. A large crowd was on hand at the docks to watch the arrival of the ship.

Reported by: Bruno Boissonneault




Twin Ports Report

10/21
Courtney Burton arrived in Duluth on Saturday morning en route to Midwest Energy Terminal to load 12,097 tons of coal for the Xcel Energy generating station in Ashland, Wis. The vessel is scheduled to return on Oct. 27 for another load to Ashland.

In other coal traffic, Columbia Star is due in Superior on Oct. 21 to load 61,000 tons of coal for the Cobb generating station in Muskegon. The dock lists this as the last load of coal to Cobb this season. Two vessels are scheduled to call this week for coal to Marquette. H. Lee White will make a rare call Oct. 23 at the Midwest Energy Terminal to load for Marquette while Paul R. Tregurtha is due on Oct. 27 to load for Presque Isle.

In the ore trade, Oglebay Norton is being a regular at the DMIR dock in Two Harbors. It's due there again Oct. 23. Other Two Harbors traffic includes Edwin H. Gott, Oct. 20; Edgar B. Speer, Oct. 22; Presque Isle, Oct. 25; and John G. Munson, Oct. 26.

At DMIR Duluth, Philip R. Clarke is due Oct. 21; James R. Barker, Oct. 23; and Presque Isle, Oct. 24.

Several vessels of USS Great Lakes Fleet are making some interesting trips. John G. Munson is scheduled to unload in Lorain on Oct. 22, then take a partial load of coal in Sandusky the same day, complete the load at the CSX dock in Toledo on Oct. 23 and then deliver it to Ontonagon, Mich., on the 25th before proceeding to Two Harbors for taconite on Oct. 26. Presque Isle is scheduled to load stone at Port Dolomite on Oct. 21 for delivery to the DMIR dock in Duluth on Oct. 24. It will the proceed to Two Harbors to load taconite for the downbound trip.

Courtney Burton standing into Duluth under dark autumn clouds.
Watchman on the bow.
Entering the piers.
Closeup of ON stack marking.
Burton passing beneath the Duluth Aerial Bridge.

Reported by: Al Miller




Alpena Update

10/21
The Fred R. White Jr. arrived at the Lafarge coal dock Saturday morning to unload. The Paul H. Townsend also came into port Saturday to load cement for Saginaw. The J.A.W Iglehart is expected into Lafarge early this morning to load followed by the Alpena. The tug Jacklyn M and barge Integrity is scheduled into Lafarge sometime on Monday morning.

The Lee A. Tregurtha loaded at Stoneport on Saturday. The Earl W. Oglebay and Wolverine are expected in on Sunday to load.

Reported by: Ben and Chanda McClain




Saginaw River News

10/21
The Sam Laud was inbound the Saginaw River Friday morning with a load of stone for Bay Aggregates in Bay City. After unloading, she backed downriver to the Wirt Turning Basin and was turned and headed out for the lake by late afternoon.

The Agawa Canyon was outbound Friday, passing the unloading Sam Laud early in the afternoon on her way to the lake. The Agawa Canyon unloaded in Saginaw overnight.

The Tug Mark Hannah and her tanker barge arrived at the Dow Chemical Dock late Friday. Her report to the Coast Guard indicated she was carrying a load of Calcium Chloride from Ludington, MI.

The Maumee was inbound shortly after the Mark Hannah. She was upbound for the Carrollton Dock with a load of salt loaded in Cleveland, OH. The Maumee was expected to depart by 7:00 a.m. Saturday and headed to Cedarville.

Following the Maumee was the Wolverine. She was headed to the Bay City Wirt Dock to lighter before heading upriver to Saginaw to finish.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Agawa Canyon downbound at Wheeler's Landing.
Close up.
Stern View at Fletcher Oil.
Sam Laud unloading at Bay Aggregates.
Another view showing the submerged remains of the Davidson Steamer Shanandoah in the foreground.
Picture of the Shanandoah.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Detroit Traffic

10/21
Below are images of traffic passing on the Detroit River Saturday.

H Lee White upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Adam E Cornelius unloading at the Zug Island hopper.
Stern view.
Metacom at the Corps of Engineers Dock in Detroit.
Olympic Mentor (Greece) unloading at the DMT 2 Dock in Detroit.
Stern view.
Diamond Belle, Queen & Jack at Stroh River Place in Detroit.
Tug Norma B in the old Rouge River.
Tug Magnetic in the old Rouge River.
J A W Iglehart upbound off Zug Island.
Stern view.
Tugs Jenny T II and Princess in Ojibway Slip.
Jean Parisien upbound off Nicholson's.
Stern view.
Kinsman Independent upbound off Nicholson's.
Stern view.
Buckeye downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Tug John Spence towing Mc Asphalt 401 upbound off Nicholson's.
Stern view of tug.
Stern view of tow.
Roger Stahl upbound at Fighting Island South Light.
Stern view.
Atlantic Cedar upbound at Fighting Island South Light.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

10/21
The J.A.W. Iglehart finished unloading her cement cargo at the Lafarge Dock and departed early Saturday morning. With the successful completion of the Nanticoke salvage effort ship traffic resumed on the Maumee River. The Frontenac was allowed to leave the ADM/Countrymark Elevator and proceed downbound the river. The Mississagi departed from the old Interlake Iron Company Dock and proceeded upbound for Andersons "E" Elevator to load grain. The Algomarine departed from the CSX#2 Coal Dock and proceeded upbound for the Kuhlman Dock to unload cargo, when finished unloading she will proceed to the CSX Coal Dock to load coal today. The Canadian Miner was upbound the Maumee River by the coal docks at 5:30 p.m. with Gaelic tugs assisting her, she was bound for the ADM/Countrymark Elevator to load grain.

The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard. The Buckeye was at the Torco Dock unloading ore.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algomarine on Sunday, followed by the Algosteel, Jean Parisien, and Reserve on Monday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will now be the Middletown on Wednesday followed by the Armco on Thursday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Report

10/21
It was a slow morning in Cleveland with only the McKee Sons arriving. The tug Invincible pushed the barge McKee Sons into port about 9:00 a.m. to unloaded stone at the Osborne dock The pair later departed with the tug Idaho. On Friday the Earl W. Oglebay was departing LTV.

Pictures by TZ
McKee Sons unloading.
Idaho leads the McKee Sons from the dock.
View of the McKee Sons.
Departing.
View from above.
Another view.
Idaho leading through the turn.
Earl W. Oglebay departing.
Onto Lake Erie.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - October 21

The JOHN B. AIRD arrived at Sarnia, Ont. October 21, 1990 for repairs after suffering a conveyor belt fire a week earlier.

The JAMES A.FARRELL and fleetmate RICHARD TRIMBLE were the first vessels to lock downbound in the newly opened Davis Lock at the Soo on October 21, 1914.

On October 21, 1954 the GEORGE M.HUMPHREY(2) set a record when she took aboard 22,605 gross tons of iron ore at Superior, WI. The record stood for six years until 1960.

The crew on the SAMUEL MATHER (3) was safely removed from the badly exposed steamer on October 21, 1923 by the Eagle Harbor life saving crew. She had run aground on the 19th.

It was announced on October 21, 1986 that Canada Steamship Lines and Upper Lakes Group would merge CSL's Collingwood shipyard and ULS' Port Weller shipyard and create Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering (1986) Ltd.

On 21 October 1941, AMERICA (steel tug, 80', 123 GT, built in 1897 at Buffalo) was on a cable along with the big tug OREGON off Belle Isle in the Detroit River trying to pull the steel bulk freighter B. F. JONES off a bar. The cable tightened, pulling AMERICA out of the water and spinning her upside down. Six of the crew of 13 lost their lives. AMERICA was later recovered.

On 21 October 1916, JAMES B. COLGATE (whaleback bulk freighter, 308', 1713 gt, built in 1892 at W. Superior, WI) was carrying coal off Long Point on Lake Erie in a storm. She struck bottom in a plunge off a huge wave in one of the worst storms ever recorded on Lake Erie -- it's called the "Black Friday Storm". Of the 26 on board, only her skipper survived. The 360' steel freighter MERIDA also perished in this same storm.

October 21, 1954 - Capt. Allen K. Hoxie, skipper of the MILWAUKEE CLIPPER, retired.

On 21 October 1886, W. L. BROWN (wooden propeller freighter, 140', 336 gt, built in 1872 at Oshkosh, WI as NEPTUNE) was carrying iron ore from Escanaba for DePere. A storm struck while she was on Green Bay. She sprang a leak one mile from Peshtigo Reef and went down in 76 feet of water. No lives were lost. All of her outfit and machinery were removed the following summer. This vessel's first enrollment was issued at Milwaukee, WI on 22 April 1873 as NEPTUNE, but this enrollment was surrendered at Milwaukee on 30 September 1880, endorsed "broken up." However she was re-enrolled as a new vessel at Milwaukee on 15 June 1880, having been rebuilt by A. L. Johnson at Green Bay, WI as the W. L. BROWN.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Nanticoke Free

10/20
4:00 p.m. update
The Nanticoke was successfully refloated and moved to the Country Mark dock at approximately 9:30 a.m. this morning. The vessel will undergo inspection by the US Coast Guard and Lloyd's Register surveyors before proceeding to its next port.

The arrival of the tug Atlantic Cedar (5600 horsepower) plus offloading an additional 300 tons of cargo enabled the vessel to be refloated and turned to proceed.

It was moved to the ADM/Countrymark Elevator south dock, it will proceed to Andersons "K" Elevator this evening to re-load the soybean cargo that was removed. Saturday afternoon crews were waiting for a barge with part of the soybean cargo removed from the Nanticoke to be unloaded.

The vessels owners and managers wish to thank all those involved, especially the tugboat crews and the US Coast Guard for their assistance during the event. Their professionalism and cooperation resulted in a serious situation being handled in a timely manner with no injuries and no environmental or physical damage to the surrounding area.

The Frontenac who had been stuck up river departed shotly after the Nanticoke was moved. There was no problem with the Frontenac passing through the area where the Nanticoke was stuck.

Check back Sunday morning for pictures.

8:00 a.m. update
The Nanticoke remained stranded Saturday morning as crews work to lighten the vessel by off loading cargo onto barges. Friday night they had offloaded only 1,200 tons and the vessel was resting on muddy river bottom.

The pace of the salvage efforts will quicken this morning as the tug Atlantic Cedar is now on scene. At 2:15 a.m. the tug was passing the Toledo Harbor Lighthouse. The massive 5,600 horsepower tug has been charted to Canada Steamship Lines for freeing the Nanticoke.

The vessel's position had changed on Friday and the Nanticoke moved closer to the railroad bridge. They can no longer fit a barge between the vessel and the bridge for unloading. It is possible the bank is eroding at her stern and she is swinging as it erodes.

The weather does not look favorable. Southwest winds are forecasted all weekend. These winds will cause the water level to drop. Early this moring the level was plus 13 inches above low water datum.

Equipment on scene with the Nanticoke Friday:
Tugs
Great Lakes Towing -
Montana 1200 Horsepower
Illinois 1200 Horsepower
Louisiana 1200 Horsepower
Triton 4000 Horsepower
Wyoming 1200 Horsepower (en route Friday morning, also in port to provide tug service)

Gaelic Tugboat Co.-
Susan Hoey 1200 Horsepower
Roger Stahl 3000 Horsepower

Barge
Two with 300 ton holding capacity.
One larger barge is en route with the tug Wyoming.

Purvis Marine-
Atlantic Cedar 5,600 Horsepower.

Once the Nanticoke is freed the United States Coast Guard will conduct an on-site inspection following which the ship will proceed with a tug escort to the Toledo World Industries dock for a further Coast Guard inspection and survey.

The Corp of Engineers may be called in to survey the area once the vessel is moved. It is believed that the current forced around the Nanticoke's hull has caused silting and dredging may be required.

The Coast Guard has asked the local community to exercise extreme caution when in the vicinity of the ship and Railroad Bridge. They have established a safety zone between Anthony Wayne and the Interstate 75 bridges. Local police have been called to the scene to control traffic on Miami Street and the shoreline adjacent to the Norfolk Southern South Railroad Bridge. At times Miami Street has been closed. To view the Nanticoke it is necessary to park near the Willis B. Boyer Museum ship and walk to the scene.

Stern of the Nanticoke close to shore. Bob Heibeck
The Nanticoke appears to be listing to port, a change from Wednesday night when it had a slight list to starboard. Dave Wobser
The big tugs Roger Stahl and Triton dwarf the Montana as they push on the Nanticoke. Dave Wobser
Turning up the power. Bob Densic
The barge placed between the bridge pier and Nanticoke waiting to load. Illinois is on the other side of the barge. Dave Wobser
Grain pouring into the barge from the Nanticoke's boom. Dave Wobser
Close up of the boom. Bob Densic
Illinois backing the loaded barge out from the bridge. Dave Wobser
The tug pushed her barge up to the shore just below the bridge and a carload of groceries were put aboard.
The empty barge is returned upriver. Bob Heibeck
Susan Hoey moves a barge. Bob Densic
Tugs working on the starboard side. Bob Heibeck
Crew members onboard the Nanticoke watch. Bob Heibeck
What was thought to be a leak is actually a cooling water overboard discharge for a refrigeration system. Bob Densic

Atlantic Cedar at the Soo. Mike Nicholls
Chart of the area.
Video of the incident from WTOL-TV. Updated
Live Web Cam image from WTOL-TV. Click on Carpenters' Cam

Reported by: Alan Baker, WTOL-TV, Bob Densic, Jim Hoffman, Dave Wobser and Canada Steamship Lines




Strike Settled, Traffic Moving

10/20
4:00 p.m. update

The pending strike by Seaway employees was tentatively settled at 2.00 p.m. Saturday. Navigation through the Seaway, both the Montreal-Lake Ontario Section and the Welland Canaland traffic resumed about 3:00 p.m. Sources with the Seaway said 19 ships where in line for passage.

Original Report
A potential Strike by Seaway Workers at 3:00 p.m. today prompted Seaway officals to stop traffic so no vessels were stranded in the locks.

Friday negotiations between Canadian Auto Workers Union (CAW) and the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation continued. The CAW union groups represent more than 500 employees working for the Seaway from Port Colborne to Montreal.

Because of the notice of intent to strike, the SLSMC stopped accepting vessel transits through Mid Lake Ontario upbound at Calling in Point 2 at midnight Friday and downbound below Prescott anchorage at 8:00 p.m. Friday.

Vessels were not being accepted in the Welland canal (upbound at Calling in Point 15 and downbound at Calling in Point 16) after midnight.

Check back for updates

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Effects of Seaway strike could be felt far away

10/20
If Canadian employees of the St. Lawrence Seaway strike today and shut down the waterway, businesses as far away as Duluth could quickly feel the walkout’s effect.

Ed Ruisi, a ship agent for Guthrie-Hubner Inc. in Duluth, told the newspaper, "If they do go on strike, depending how long it lasts, it could be very bad for business. We've got contracts booked until the end of the year.''

Ruisi also pointed out that only weeks remain in the Seaway shipping season.

"We've got a lot of grain booked to move through here, but much of that requires an operating seaway system,'' Davis Helberg, executive director of the Duluth Seaway Port Authority told the newspaper.

In addition to interrupting export shipments of grain and other agricultural commodities, Helberg said a strike also would affect the transport of cement, forest products, machinery and steel imports.

Shipments of the port's two largest cargoes -- coal and taconite -- could continue because most coal and taconite loaded in the Duluth-Superior port is destined for ports west of the Welland Canal.

In Duluth and Superior on Friday, most elevator berths were empty, with several grain-laden vessels having cleared port in recent days. Only the saltie Sandviken was loading, and the only Seaway arrival scheduled for Saturday was Montrealais, which is scheduled to unload cement before taking on a cargo of grain.

Helberg estimated that 12 to 15 percent of the tonnage loaded annually onto boats in Duluth-Superior travels through waterways that could be shut down by the threatened strike. But that cargo produces a disproportionately large amount of revenue for the port.

"Every ship has its own small universe of service providers,'' Helberg said. "There could be a lot of ripples.''

A lengthy strike could produce nasty effects even after its resolution. Helberg recalled prior labor disruptions caused some people to question the reliability of the Great Lakes Seaway system. Two interruptions in the 1980s -- caused by the collapse of a lock wall and a ship that ran into a bridge -- heightened those concerns.

"We spent a lot of time reassuring shippers and carriers that the odds were against that sort of thing happening again,'' Helberg said. And for the past 15 years, there have been no significant disruptions other than those resulting from nature.




Sylvia Arrives

10/20
The disabled salty Sylvia arrived under tow at Port Weller Dry Docks Friday. While transiting the Seaway on October 9 the mooring chain of a buoy wrapped around the shaft and possibly bent the shaft. At the time the vessel docked at the wall near the Eisenhower Lock.

Reported by: Roger Tottman and Jimmy Sprunt




National Steel to idle Ecorse blast furnace

10/20
National Steel Corp., responding to bloated steel stockpiles, slumping steel prices, and weakening U.S. economic conditions, said Thursday it will idle indefinitely a blast furnace at its Great Lakes operations in Ecorse. National Steel said most of the more than 100 workers affected by the move will be transferred to other operations within its Great Lakes division. The steel maker employs more than 3,200 workers in Ecorse. The company also will curtail output at its National Steel Pellet unit in Keewatin, Minn., from Oct. 28 to Dec. 9.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre and John Sarns




American Classic Voyages Files for Chapter 11 Reorganization

10/20
American Classic Voyages Inc., the largest U.S.-flag cruise company, announced Friday that it has filed a voluntary petition for reorganization under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code in Wilmington, Del. The company will cease operations for its Hawaii vessels, the ms Patriot and the ss Independence, tomorrow at the completion of their current cruises.

Four of the company's five Delta Queen vessels, including the American Queen, the Mississippi Queen, the Columbia Queen and the new Cape May Light, also will cease operations at the completion of each vessel¹s current cruise over the next three days.

The Delta Queen steamboat, the company's National Historic Landmark flagship, will continue to operate its scheduled future voyages. In addition, AMCV said it intends to work with Northrop Grumman Corporation and the U.S. Maritime Administration with the goal to maintain construction on the two 1,900-passenger Project America ships, the largest cruise ships to be built in America in nearly 50 years.

"The tragic events of September 11 dealt a devastating blow to our business that has made it impossible to continue our full operations," said Phil Calian, CEO of American Classic Voyages. "We will continue to operate on a much reduced scale to focus on our Mississippi River cruises, which have been the historic core of our company."

In August, the company had reported increasing per diems and occupancy on its Hawaii ships, profitable performance on its Delta Queen vessels and that it had successfully reached an agreement with Northrop Grumman on the continuation of construction of the Project America cruise ships. In the four weeks subsequent to the September 11 terrorist attacks in New York and Washington D.C., the company said its gross bookings declined 50%, its cancellations increased 30% and it faced a weakened cash position with no prospects for additional capital at this time.

"As a result of the September 11 attacks, the Chapter 11 filing became the only alternative to us to preserve our present cash supply, improve our balance sheet and minimize the impact, as much as we are able, on affected passengers and other stakeholders," Calian said. "We are grateful to our customers for their support and we are doing the best we can to assist those affected by this decision."

The company has established a customer information hotline (800-856-9904) and additional information is available on the company¹s Web site at www.amcv.com. Individuals with reservations on future American Classic cruises other than the Delta Queen steamboat should contact their travel agent, their travel insurance company or their credit card company for information about obtaining a refund.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre and John Sarns




Toledo Update

10/20
The Armco finished loading coal at the CSX Dock Friday and departed in the mid afternoon. The Algomarine was tied up at the CSX #2 Dock. The salt water vessels Darya Ma, Ziemia Chelminska, and Olympic Mentor were at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The Mississagi was at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock waiting to go upriver to load grain at Andersons "E" Elevator. The former Boblo passenger boat Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algomarine followed by the Algosteel, and Jean Parisien on Sunday.

The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Docks will be the Buckeye on Saturday followed by the Armco on Thursday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - October 20

The SCOTT MISENER (3) proceeded to the Port Arthur shipyard for dry docking and repairs on October 20th, After striking bottom October 15, 1973 near Whaleback Shoal on the St. Lawrence River.

OTTO M. REISS (2) was launched October 20, 1906 as a) JAMES S. DUNHAM for the Chicago Navigation Co. (D. Sullivan & Co., mgr.) Duluth, MN.

PETER A.B. WIDENER was launched October 20, 1906 as a) PETER A.B. WIDENER for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. (later the U.S. Steel Corp. in 1952), Cleveland, OH.

The tug RESCUE was sent from Port Huron to Tawas, MI to release the 246' barge OCEAN that was grounded. After pulling the barge free, Capt. Fitch of RESCUE began towing her down Lake Huron, but the storm got so bad that he was about to turn back and run for Tawas. However, the captain of OCEAN yelled that they were all right and to go ahead down the lake. Soon the seas got the better of the barge. The tug kept with her until she was about to sink. Then the line was cut, the tug turned about, ran under her lee, and rescued her crew of 9 from the lifeboat. The barge then sank. On the way down Lake Huron, opposite Port Sanilac, the RESCUE picked up 6 men and 1 woman from the wrecked barge JOHN F. RUST. In this one trip, the RESCUE earned her name by rescuing 16 persons!

October 20, 1898 - The SHENANGO NO. 2 (later PERE MARQUETTE 16) was arriving Milwaukee when her steering gear failed, causing her to crash into a grain elevator which was under construction.

October 20, 1926 - The Keel was laid for the WABASH.

On 20 October 1863, E. S. ADAMS (3 mast wooden bark, 135', 341 GC, built in 1857 at Port Robinson, Ont.) was carrying 18,500 bushels of wheat on a clear night when she collided with the American bark CONSTITUTION resulting in the loss of the ADAMS. One life was lost. Neither vessel was blamed for the accident.

On 20 October 1854, JOHN J. AUDUBON (wooden brig, 370 t, built in 1854 at Black River, Ohio) was carrying railroad iron from Buffalo to Chicago when she was struck amidships by the schooner DEFIANCE on a dark night, halfway between Thunder Bay and Presque Isle, MI. AUDUBON was cut almost in half. Both vessels sank quickly. No lives were lost.

On 20 October 1844, DAYTON (2-mast wooden schooner, 69', 85 t, built in 1835 at Grand Island, NY) capsized and sank in Lake Erie off Dunkirk, New York in a terrific gale. All onboard were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Nanticoke Stuck in River

10/19
7:00 p.m. update
The Nanticoke remains stranded Friday night as crews work to lighten the vessel by off loading cargo onto barges.

The pace of the salvage efforts will quicken as the tug Atlantic Cedar arrives on scene tonight. The massive 5,600 horsepower tug has been charted to Canada Steamship Lines for freeing the Nanticoke.

Reports indicate that the river currents have diminished slightly and with the arrival of the Atlantic Cedar may help in removing the Nanticoke from her present position. As soon as the Nanticoke is freed it will be posted to this page, check back for updates.

2:00 p.m. update
At 2:00 p.m. the Nanticoke remained stuck in the Maumee River. Her stern draft marks are showing 23'-6". That is up about two-feet from early Wednesday morning but could be because she is sitting on the bottom.

Her position has changed and the Nanticoke has moved closer to the railroad bridge. They can no longer fit a barge between the vessel and the bridge for unloading. It is possible the bank is eroding at her stern and she is swinging as it erodes.

The weather does not look favorable. Southwest winds are forecasted all weekend. These winds will caused the water level to drop.

Equipment on scene with the Nanticoke:
Tugs
Great Lakes Towing -
Montana 1200 Horsepower
Illinois 1200 Horsepower
Louisiana 1200 Horsepower
Triton 4000 Horsepower
Wyoming 1200 Horsepower (en route)

Gaelic Tugboat Co.-
Susan Hoey 1200 Horsepower
Roger Stahl 3000 Horsepower

Barge
Two with 300 ton holding capacity.
One larger barge is en route with the tug Wyoming.

Purvis Marine-
Atlantic Cedar (enroute from the Soo) 5600 Horsepower.

11:00 a.m. update
After working through the night approximately 1100 tons of cargo have been removed from the vessel to three barges which are being off loaded downstream. Efforts have been concentrating on lightening the stern of the vessel which now appears to be floating. Off loading will now focus on lightening the bow. Commander David Scott of the US Coast Guard told WTOL that "according to our calculations, we believe another 720 tons of soybeans have to come off in order to float her up and the tugs to knock her around and orient her to go back out." Crews expected to have the cargo off loaded tonight.

A seventh large tug, the 5,600 horsepower Canadian tug Atlantic Cedar is en route from the Soo. Off loading will continue with the barges shuttling to the off loading berth, a process which is slowed because the barges have to maneuver through the bridge, and every care is being taken to protect the personnel involved, the environment and surrounding facilities.

Once the Nanticoke is freed the United States Coast Guard will conduct an on-site inspection following which the ship will proceed with a tug escort to the Toledo World Industries dock for a further Coast Guard inspection and survey.

Once the ship is determined fit she will continue her voyage to Quebec.

Canada Steamship Lines, owner of the ship, has set up a Unified Command with the Coast Guard to coordinate the plan to safely free the vessel. CSL has also sent several senior officers to the scene to work with the Coast Guard. CSL Captain Tim Poste talked to reporters today, saying the stuck ship is costing thousands of dollars in salvage costs, and lost productivity. Poste says CSL is paying the entire cost.

Original report
The Nanticoke remains stuck in the Maumee River as tugs have been working to free the vessel since it became stuck Wednesday morning. The ship left Anderson's grain elevator about 9:00 a.m. when wind and a strong current from heavy rains pushed the vessel off course as it waited for the railroad bridge to open. Despite the best efforts of her crew, the vessel became stuck in the mud at the edge of the river with its stern against the east bank and bow near the bridge.

Thursday six tugs were on scene and unable to move the Nanticoke. That afternoon two small barges were brought along side so the Nanticoke could off load some of its grain cargo. The Nanticoke is using its self-unloading boom to drop the cargo into the barges. The two barges have a capacity of only 300 tons and unloading is a slow process. It takes about 30 minutes to fill the barges that must then be taken down river to the TWI (Port Authority) terminal to unload. The tug Illinois was working with one barge and the Susan Hoey with the other.

Thursday evening a third barge was en route and the Detroit based tug Wyoming departed its dock at 10:30 to assist with the Nanticoke operation.

A Southerly wind was gradually increasing Thursday as the next storm system was moving in over night and through out today. This new storm system is not as powerful as the last system that caused the grounding, but it will be a nuisance to the tug crews trying to free the Nanticoke. At 11:00 p.m. Thursday night the water level in the river was at plus 18 inches above chart datum.

Once the Nanticoke is freed the United States Coast Guard will conduct an on-site inspection following which the ship will proceed with a tug escort to the Toledo World Industries dock for a further Coast Guard inspection and survey.

The Coast Guard has asked the local community to exercise extreme caution when in the vicinity of the ship and railroad bridge. They have established a safety zone between Anthony Wayne and the Interstate 75 bridges. Local police have been called to the scene to control traffic on Miami Street and the shoreline adjacent to the Norfolk Southern South Railroad Bridge.

Algomarine was docked at CSX #2 Thursday waiting to go up to the elevators and the Mississagi was docked near the shipyard waiting for the Nanticoke to clear. Wednesday the Courtney Burton was delayed departing from the Torco Dock, no tugs were available to assist in the high winds. The wind later calmed and the Burton safely departed.

This was the second such incident involving the Nanticoke in 2 1/2 years. On May 6, 1999, high winds were blamed for a nearly identical incident at the same location. The bridge is notorious among Great Lakes mariners as a difficult bridge to navigate because of its narrow passageway, the opening is only 109 feet wide. The bridge is just downstream from a sharp bend in the Maumee that creates extremely tricky river currents. Eight times between 1986 and 2000 ships have struck the bridge, closing it for as long as 24 hours. In this incident the crew's efforts kept the vessel from striking the bridge.

Stern of the Nanticoke close to shore. Bob Heibeck
The Nanticoke appears to be listing to port, a change from Wednesday night when it had a slight list to starboard. Dave Wobser
The big tugs Roger Stahl and Triton dwarf the Montana as they push on the Nanticoke. Dave Wobser
Turning up the power. Bob Densic
The barge placed between the bridge pier and Nanticoke waiting to load. Illinois is on the other side of the barge. Dave Wobser
Grain pouring into the barge from the Nanticoke's boom. Dave Wobser
Close up of the boom. Bob Densic
Illinois backing the loaded barge out from the bridge. Dave Wobser
The tug pushed her barge up to the shore just below the bridge and a carload of groceries were put aboard.
The empty barge is returned upriver. Bob Heibeck
Susan Hoey moves a barge. Bob Densic
Director of the Willis B. Boyer museum ship, located a short distance up river, is interviewed by local TV. Dave Wobser
Tugs working on the starboard side. Bob Heibeck
Crew members onboard the Nanticoke watch. Bob Heibeck

Chart of the area.
Video of the incident from WTOL-TV. Updated
Live Web Cam image from WTOL-TV. Click on Carpenters' Cam

Reported by: Alan Baker, WTOL-TV, Bob Densic, Jim Hoffman, Dave Wobser and Canada Steamship Lines




Barker in Escanaba

10/19
The James Barker arrived in Escanaba Thursday to load. The ship was skillfully guided into port as they battled heavy wind gusts approaching the dock. The Barker also snagged their starboard bow anchor on a piece of cable beneath the water's surface.

Barker at the dock.
Close up of the anchor.

Reported by: Eric and Sandy Chapman




South Chicago Activity

10/19
Thursday was an unusual afternoon in South Chicago. The Saginaw was loading at the Beemsterboer dock. The Canadian Venture was loading at the Cargill elevator. The Cuyahoga was anchored near the entrance to the Calumet River waiting for the Venture to finish so they can load at Cargill next.

Reported by: Gary Clark




Detroit Traffic

10/19
Below are images of traffic passing on the Detroit River Thursday evening.

Atlantic Huron loading at the ADM Elevator.
Stern view.
American Mariner unloading in the Rouge Short Cut Canal.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Report

10/19
As the Nanticoke remains blocking the upper Maumee River her fleetmate Frontenac is stuck at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. She is now loaded with grain and will depart when the U.S. Coast Guard re-opens the River to navigation.

The former Boblo passenger boat Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard. The salt water vessel Darya Ma is at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The Canadian Progress was due in late Thursday night to load a coal cargo.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Armco and Algomarine today, followed by the Jean Parisien and Algosteel on Sunday. The Armco was expected on Thursday evening at the Torco Dock to unload ore, once unloaded she will proceed over to the CSX Docks to load a coal cargo some time today. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Docks will be the Buckeye on Saturday.

Classic Toledo Shipping
Martha Hindman loading a grain cargo at the Midstates Elevator.
The J.F. Schoelkopf Jr. in the black hull color scheme for the Erie Sand Steamship fleet. When this picture was taken she had recently purchased from the American Steamship Company Fleet. She and finished unloading a salt cargo at the City Docks and was proceeding down river photographed from the Cherry Street Bridge.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Update

10/19
Thursday was a busy afternoon in Cleveland. The Maumee departed the Salt dock with out a tug. The Richard Reiss departed Ontario 4 with the tug Delaware. Then Barbara Andrie arrived next followed by the Earl W. Oglebay outbound from LTV with the tug Idaho. Two salties were on the lakefront. Ziemia Chelminska and Olympic Mentor.

Pictures by TZ
Maumee departs.
Richard Reiss is assisted from port.
Delaware leads the Andrie into port.
Close up of the Barbara Andrie.
Close up of Delaware.
Heading up river.
Salties unloading.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Hamilton News

10/19
Early Thursday afternoon, Fed Nav's Lake Michigan was anchored out in Hamilton Harbor after leaving Pier 14. Shortly after 1:00 p.m., the vessel moved to the east end of the harbor. The vessel was joined by two of McKeil Marine's tugs - Lac Como and Atomic and maneuvered into Pier 23 at about 2:25 p.m.

A barge with a crane was moored next to the fuel storage vessel Provmar Terminal that afternoon. The crane was hoisting some sort of large metal cylinder onto the deck of the Provmar Terminal.

The Algoville was unloading iron ore pellets at Dofasco.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Scrapping of Salties

10/19
Included below is a listing of salties that transited the St. Lawrence Seaway and scrapped this year according to the August edition of Marine News published by the World Ship Society .

The Fortune type Anna S arrived at Chittagong, Bangladesh on May 27. She was in the Seaway as Sea Tiger. Aeropolis arrived at Chittagong on June 11. She transited as Penmen, Beau Songe and Capricorn I Artaki arrived at Alang, India on May 9. She also transited as Nikaia. Asean Success arrived at Alang on May 25. She transited as Ocean Hero. Danah arrived at Alang on May 9. Delfshaven arrived at Alang on May 22. She transited as Ivan Derbenev. Spelling of the name of this vessel is reported also as Ivan Derbenyov.

Futuro arrived at Alang on June 7. She transited as Drava. The 36L type Harmony Dove arrived at Alang on May 26. She transited as Slevik. J.Truster arrived at Xinhui, China on Dec.7 last year. She transited as Sunstinnes. The Fortune type Joy Sky arrived at Chittagong on April 25. She transited as Areti. Kyklades K arrived at Chittagong on May 22. She transited as Antenor and Sideris. Logan arrived at Alang on May 12. She transited as Pine Loyal. The Freedom type Pericles arrived at Alang on June 2. She transited as Leonis Halcoussis (II). Pioneer Sky arrived at Alang on May 25. She transited as Irenes Diamond. The Friendship type Prince arrived at Alang on May 31. She transited as Falcon. White Stone arrived at Alang on May 10. Winco Trader arrived at Alang on June 2. She transited as Grand Carrier and Animar.

Also reported broken up was the Marindus type Velos which was built by Marine Industries at Sorel in 1978 as Marindus Rimouski. She arrived at Alang on April 24. This vessel never transited the Seaway. Only two Marindus type vessels are believed to have ever transited the St. Lawrence Seaway, the Algerian-flag Babor and Biban. A postcard of Marindus Rimouski was published and was still available for sale a few years ago at some of the Sorel shops.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Today in Great Lakes History - October 19

GEORGE A. SLOAN ran aground off Bob-Lo Island in the Amherstburg Channel on October 19, 1987. She was released when she unloaded part of her cargo to the CALCITE II. SLOAN was repaired in Toledo.

ALGOSEA was christened on October 19, 1976 at Port Colborne.

The BUFFALO was able to leave the Saginaw River once it opened on October 19, 1990. The river was closed after the tanker Jupiter exploded as the Buffalo passed.

The KINSMAN VOYAGER was launched October 19, 1907 as a) H.P. BOPE for the Standard Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

The WILLIAM LIVINGSTONE (c CRISPIN OGLEBAY (1) had the honor on October 19, 1912 of being the first vessel to navigate the opening of the Livingstone Channel named after the man who helped conceive the idea of a separate down bound channel on the east side of Bob-Lo Island in the lower Detroit River. Mr. Livingstone, President of the Lake Carriers Association at the time, piloted his namesake vessel in the channel on that historic trip.

The crew on the stranded WILLIAM C. MORELAND was removed in gale force winds on October 19, 1910 by the Portage life saving crew.

On October 19, 1923 the SAMUEL MATHER (3) was driven onto Gull Rock on Lake Superior near Keweenaw Point during a snowstorm and gale winds. The crew was safely removed from the badly exposed steamer on October 21st by the Eagle Harbor life saving crew.

The B.H. TAYLOR (b) ROGERS CITY (2) sailed from Lorain on her maiden voyage on October 19, 1923

On 19 October 1868, PARAGON (wooden schooner, 212 T, built in 1852 at Oshawa, Ont. as a brig) was being towed up the St. Clair River by the tug WILLIAM A. MOORE with a load of lumber in the company of four other barges. During a gale, the tow was broken up. While the tug MOORE was trying to regain the tows, she collided with PARAGON causing severe damage. 4 were drowned, but two were rescued by the Canadian gunboat/tug PRINCE ALFRED. PARAGON was then towed into Sarnia, but she sank there and was abandoned in place.

October 19, 1919 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 4, while on the Grand Haven to Milwaukee run, got caught in a gale stretching the normal 6-hour crossing to 27 hours.

On 19 October 1876, MASSILON (3-mast wooden schooner with foretop and topgallant sails, 130', 298 gt, built in 1857 at Cleveland as a bark) was sailing from Kelley's Island for Chicago with limestone when she sprang a leak 20 miles above Pointe aux barques at the mouth of Saginaw Bay. She was abandoned at about 2:00 AM and then sank. The crew was in an open boat until 7:00 AM when they were rescued by the tug VULCAN.

On 19 October 1873, JOHN F. RUST (wooden schooner-barge, 161', 347 gt, built in 1869 at E. Saginaw, MI) was carrying lumber in tow of the steamer BAY CITY in a storm when she broke her tow line and went ashore a few miles north of Lakeport, Michigan.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Nanticoke Stuck in River

10/18
5:30 p.m. update
According to Coast Guard officials approximately 400 tons of cargo have been removed from the vessel to two barges which will be off loaded downstream. A third barge is enroute. This amount has been insufficient to permit the on-site tugs to shift the vessel. Off loading will continue when the barges return, a process which is slowed because the barges have to maneuver through the bridge, and every care is being taken to protect the personnel involved, the environment and surrounding facilities.

3:30 p.m. update
The barge used to lighter the Nanticoke was loaded with about 300 tons of her cargo and all tugs went to full power with no effect on the stranded vessel. The Susan Hoey pulled the barge free and was proceeding down river with it. The Illinois left the scene to fuel and pick up engine oil for her fleet mate the Montana. The Illinois will also retrieve another barge.

The water level was plus 8 inches above chart datum, this is down from plus 15 inches this morning. A Southerly wind has been gradually increasing as the next storm system moves in tonight through tomorrow. This new storm system is not as powerful as the last system that caused the grounding, but it will be a nuisance to contend with by the tug crews.

2:00 p.m. update
The barge 717 with a holding capacity of 300 tons is currently alongside the Nanticoke, brought there by the Gaelic tug Susan Hoey. The Nanticoke is transfering a portion of its cargo of soy beans to the barge using its self-unloading gear. The cargo transfer will take approximately thirty minutes.

Following the cargo transfer the tugs will once again work to free the ship.

A second barge is continuing through a preparation process and should the tug effort not produce results the second barge will be brought to the vessel.

Once the Nanticoke is freed the United States Coast Guard will conduct an on-site inspection following which the ship will proceed with a tug escort to the Toldeo World Industries dock for a further Coast Guard inspection and survey.

Once the ship is determined fit she will continue her voyage to Quebec.

Safety Note: The Coast Guard has asked the local community to exercise extreme caution when in the vicinity of the ship and railroad bridge. They have established a safety zone between Anthony Wayne and the Interstate 75 bridges. Local police have been called to the scene to control traffic on Miami Street and the shoreline adjacent to the Norfolk Southern South Railroad Bridge.

Equipment on scene with the Nanticoke:
Tugs
Great Lakes Tugs -
Montana 1200 Horsepower
Illinois 1200 Horsepower
Louisiana 1200 Horsepower
Triton 4000 Horsepower

Gaelic-
Suzanne 1200 Horsepower
Roger Stahl 3000 Horsepower

Barge
Barge 717 300 ton holding capacity

1:00 p.m. update
Thursday afternoon the Nanticoke remains sideways in the Maumee River ship channel in Toledo. By midnight on Thursday, a total of six tugboats were brought in to try to move the Nanticoke. They were not successful. Crews on scene are waiting for two barges to be brought in to lighten the Nanticoke's load of soybeans. The barges will be loaded and moved down river to off load the cargo. How many trips will be needed to free the Nanticoke remains to be seen. Once enough cargo has been off loaded they expect to move the ship with tugboats.

The water level had risen Thursday morning to plus 15-inches above chart datum.

Check back through out the day for updates

Original Report
The Nanticoke was caught Wednesday morning by a combination of current, wind and low water levels while departing Anderson's "K" elevator in Toledo and became sideways to the river channel despite the best efforts of her crew.

At the time one tug was standing by the vessel and a second tug responded immediately to the Captain's request. Thursday morning it was still blocking the channel, with both anchors down. The Coast Guard reports the ship is not aground, just sideways in the channel. The 730-foot ship fills most of the river that is about 800-feet wide at this spot. Loaded to a 24-foot draft, the Nanticoke is effectively a dam in the river.

The Coast Guard reported current speed readings of between 8 and 10 knots at the railroad bridge, more than triple the normal river speed. "Two inches of rain causes the river to move a lot quicker than it usually does," said CWO Rick Minnich, a spokesman for the Coast Guard’s Marine Safety Office in Toledo.

The Nanticoke's stern was near the east bank of the river and her bow was near the Anderson's grain dock. She had apparently dropped her stern anchor in an attempt to stop swinging, it was lying close to shore approximately 30 feet upriver.

The Great lakes Towing tugs Illinois and Louisiana were first on scene to help the Nanticoke. The Gaelic tug Susan Hoey joined the effort later that morning followed by the Montana shortly after noon. With four tugs pushing they were unable to move the Nanticoke due to the strong current and low water levels.

Wednesday afternoon the tug Louisiana moved around the bow of the Nanticoke to the south side of the river to a position where it could pull on the vessel. This move was made all the more dangerous because the raging current of the river was now forced into a 50-foot opening between the bow of the Nanticoke and the shore. After securing a line, the Louisiana in concert with the other tugs tried to free the Nanticoke with no effect on the stranded vessel.

All tugs remained at station-keeping power in an effort to keep the CSL vessel from moving further down river and into the railroad bridge. Shortly after 8:00 p.m. Gaelic's big 3,000 horsepower tug Roger Stahl arrived from Detroit. The Stahl moved into position near the stern of the Nanticoke and began working with the other tugs. The combined horsepower of the tugs on scene now topped 10,000 but they were still unable to move the Nanticoke.

The Montana moved to take up position on the South side of the Nanticoke where the tug Louisiana was pulling from. This move would take the tug through the raging current across the Nanticoke's bow in the choked-off channel. As soon as the bow of the Montana hit the current, she was spun sideways and tossed hard into the stone bridge abutment. The current carried her out of the channel and into the shallow waters north of the bridge. She was able to free herself but quickly went to moor downriver to check for damage. An inspection revealed no hull damage to the tug just a lost radar dome above the pilothouse where it scraped the underside of the railroad bridge’s deck. The Montana then returned to the Nanticoke effort.

During this time, the Louisiana, which was upriver was disabled by a large tree that became jammed between her propeller and her rudder. At the request of the Nanticoke's captain, all vessels went to station-keeping to wait for the arrival of Great Lakes Towing's big 4,000 horsepower tug Triton.

The Louisiana pulled along side the Nanticoke, attached a line from the Nanticoke to the tree, and the tree was then pulled loose with a winch.

Gale force winds on Tuesday and Wednesday led to a 41” drop in the water level adding to the normal current. The water level at 2:00 p.m. Wednesday was at minus 7 inches below datum. The winds were expected to die down last night, when that happens the water levels will begin to rise to normal levels.

Through out the day the Nanticoke's managers were in constant contact with Coast Guard and Port of Toledo officials. The Nanticoke stopped about 20 yards from the vital CSX Railroad Bridge. Train traffic was able to continue with no delays.

Once the Nanticoke is freed it will proceed to a near by dock to be inspected by the U.S. Coast Guard and then sail to its next port. The river bottom in this area is mud but there is concern that there may be damage to the rudder after being stuck in the mud. Local boaters say there is only 13 feet of water where her stern is, the Nanticoke is drawing about 24 feet.

There was one other ship in port that was blocked by the Nanticoke. Fleet mate Frontenac was tied up at the Cargill dock, loading grain. It will have to stay there until the channel is clear. The Coast Guard has closed the portion of the Maumee River affected by the Nanticoke and this will delay other vessels heading to load at Toledo's grain elevators.

This was the second such incident involving the Nanticoke in 2 1/2 years. On May 6, 1999, high winds were blamed for a nearly identical incident at the same location. The bridge is notorious among Great Lakes mariners as a difficult bridge to navigate because of its narrow passageway. The bridge is just downstream from a sharp bend in the Maumee that creates extremely tricky river currents. Eight times between 1986 and 2000 ships have struck the bridge, closing it for as long as 24 hours.

Nanticoke blocking the Maumee very near the Norfolk & Southern upriver bridge at Toledo. Pat Pavlat
Closeup of the Louisiana at work. Pat Pavlat
The first tugs on scene Wednesday morning. Bob Densic
Tug Montana arrives. Bob Densic
Tugs Susan Hoey, Illinois and Montana push against the strong current. Pat Pavlat
Closeup of the tugs at work. Pat Pavlat
Another view. Pat Pavlat
Close up. Bob Densic
Another view showing proximity to the N. & S. bridge pier. Pat Pavlat
Stern anchor deployed, the Nanticoke is very close to the shore. Pat Pavlat
Smoke from the tugs drifts past the Nanticoke's stern. Bob Densic
Stern is very close to shore. Bob Densic
Close up of the rudder post. Bob Densic
Crewman aboard the Nanticoke observes the work. Pat Pavlat
Fontenac loading upstream. Pat Pavlat
Tug Triton departs Cleveland for Toledo. TZ
Stern view. TZ

Video clip of the tugs working. Bob Densic
Video showing the swift current passing her stern. Bob Densic

Chart of the area.
Video of the incident from WTOL-TV. Updated
Live Web Cam image from WTOL-TV. Click on Carpenters' Cam

Reported by: Alan Baker, WTOL-TV, Nathan Boyle, Bob Densic, Jim Hoffman, Rex Cassidy, Dave Wobser and Canada Steamship Lines




Strike Notice

10/18
The Canadian Autoworkers Union (CAW) announced Wednesday that its members working for the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation (SLSMC) have given a 72 hour notice of intent to strike. It is anticipated the very earliest that the SLSMC's employees may strike is at 3:00 p.m. Saturday.

Members of CAW local include operational and maintenance employees working on the Welland Canal and Seaway offices at St. Lambert, Cornwall and St. Catharines.




Steel Maker Closes Its Doors

10/18
Acme Steel Company announced Wednesday that it has begun a phased shut-down of the operating facilities as it permanently ends steel manufacturing operations. Primary steel making operations will continue for approximately one week so existing stocks of raw materials can be converted into steel coils. The company plans to continue steel finishing operations until all coils have been converted into finished products.

The decision to shutdown was necessary as a result of severely depressed conditions within the American steel industry, coupled with the company's inability to borrow working capital. The operation, located near Chicago, has been for sale for over two years.

The impact will be felt by Canadian vessels that carried most of the company's raw materials. Canadian iron ore was the main product carried to the facility, no figures were available as to how much product the company used.




Chi-Cheemaun Arrives for Survey

10/18
On Tuesday the Tobermory ferry Chi-Cheemaun arrived in Thunder Bay. She in port to have a 5-year survey done in Pascol Engineering's dry dock. The Chi-Cheemaun was inbound Thunder Bay and passing the downbound Algolake just off Thunder Cape at 2:00 p.m. One hour later the Chi-Cheemaun entered the North Breakwall Entrance and pulled up to Pascol's Dry Dock where lines where thrown to dock tenders and she slowly moved into the Dry Dock.

Chi-Cheemaun arrives off Thunder Bay.
Close up.
Entering the dry dock.
Close up.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Ziemia Chelminska in Cleveland

10/18
The saltie Ziemia Chelminska arrived in Cleveland on Wednesday afternoon with the tugs Idaho and Delaware. The tug crews skillfully guided the big freighter in as high winds made maneuvering difficult. The Chelminska is carrying a cargo of steel products from Spain.

After unloading in Cleveland is completed the Ziemia Chelminska will sail upbound to load in Duluth.

Pictures by TZ
Ziemia Chelminska arrives.
Pushing against the wind.
Tug Delaware assisting the Chelminska to dock as the ship's agent Hugh Goldie looks on.
Tugs push the ship against the dock.
Close up.
Tug Delaware returning to the G tug dock.
Stern view.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Wind and Water

10/18
High winds and low water continued to cause delays on Wednesday from Lake Huron to Lake Erie. The Cartierdoc was anchored east of 43 North in Lake Huron for most of the day Wednesday.

Shorelines are littered with tree trunks and smaller limbs. Floating debris caused the Coast Guard to issue warns on Wednesday as the debris is washed down river and could foul a ship's propeller.

Reported by: Linda Stoetzer




Ships Built by Marine Industries in the News

10/18
Two vessels built by Marine Industries Ltd. at Sorel are in the news. Tradewind Ocean was renamed Amara, Nigerian-flag on July 9 and is now owned by Offshore Energy Resources (Integrated Oil & Gas, mgrs) She was built in 1974 and was originally named Leon Simard.

The other vessel built by MIL is the HMCS Nipigon. Decommissioned several months ago, she was stripped, placed on the sale list and lately bought by a consortium at Rimouski , Québec. She will be towed from Halifax to Rimouski later on this Fall and sometime, next year, will be sunk as an artificial reef for fish and divers off Sainte Flavie, QC near Rimouski.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Thunder Bay Update

10/18
Traffic in the Thunder Bay included a flurry of well-timed Algoma boats. First to arrive was the Algolake, around 2:00 a.m. she tied up at Thunder Bay Terminals to take on a load of coal. Next to arrive was the Algosteel, who docked at Keefer Terminal to refuel. 2nd Engineer and Boatnerd Dana Andrews was involved in the refueling of the Algosteel. As she was finishing refueling, the Algolake pulled out into the lake and was downbound. The Algosteel then turned around and headed out the South Entrance and then backed into the Kam River Entrance, docking at Thunder Bay Terminals. At 9:00 p.m., after taking on a load of almost 20,000mt of coal, she was heading down the lake for the Soo. The last to arrive was the Algowood at 8:30 p.m. in ballast from Lambton, Ontario. She waited just outside the break wall until the Algosteel had cleared and then proceeded into the vacated slip at Thunder Bay Terminals. She departed Wednesday morning with Coal for Hamilton, Ontario.

Thunder Bay Terminals has seen an increased volume of traffic lately to load coal, while grain boat loading continue to be few and mostly made up of salties.

The Oakglen backed out from Agricore as the Algosteel was refueling at Keefer. She went across the inner Harbor to the Main Entrance and went out onto the bay. She then entered in through the North Entrance and docked at United Grain Growers "a" to finish her load. She departed downbound early Wednesday morning.

The saltie Crio moved over to Saskatchewan Pool 7a on Tuesday to finish her load of wheat. She departed Port at 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday for Haiti. This left two salties at anchor out in the bay, the Federal Hunter and the Toro. Neither has loaded yet after arriving at anchor.

The Radium Yellowknife and her barges returned to port Wednesday morning after dropping off lumber in Superior, Wisconsin. The Sandra Mary towed her Crane Barge over to Keefer and tied up Tuesday as the Algosteel was docking there. The Bagotville continues to be tied up at Keefer and the dredge John Holden continues to work at the Mission River dump site. No activity has been noticed at any of the ships in long-term lay-up in port.

Algosteeel arrives.
Fuel was brought to Thunder Bay by truck from Superior, Wisconsin.
2nd Engineer Dana Andrews (wearing hard hat) supervises the fueling.
Oakglen.
A rainbow guides the Point Valour.
Tug Glenda working in the harbor.
Armonikos loading.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Detroit Traffic

10/18
Below are images of traffic passing on the Detroit River Wednesday evening.

Atlantic Huron unloading at the ADM Elevator.
Stern.
Calumet upbound at Grassy Island.
The hatches are all covered in tarps.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

10/18
The Nanticoke grounding closed down the river to all navigation to the grain elevators. The Frontenac was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. Vessels that were scheduled in to the Elevators may be delayed by this grounding are the Mississagi on a return visit to Andersons "E" Elevator, CSL Laurentien to Andersons "K" Elevator, and Canadian Miner to the ADM/Countrymark Elevator.

The Mississagi stopped to wait at the Lafarge Dock on the Detroit River after leaving Sterling Fuels late Wednesday night.

The Courtney Burton remained at the Torco Docks Wednesday due to strong winds and low water conditions on Lake Erie. She was expected to depart later that afternoon. The salt water vessel Darya Ma was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard. The American Mariner was at anchor in western Lake Erie when the winds calm down and water levels start to rise she will proceed in to the CSX Coal Docks to load a coal cargo.

The next scheduled coal boat due in at the CSX Docks will be the Canadian Progress today. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco also today.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - October 18

The ALVA C. DINKEY departed Quebec City, October 18, 1980, in tandem with her former fleet mate GOVERNOR MILLER towed by the FedNav tug CATHY B.

Tragedy struck on the WILLIAM C. MORELAND's fifth trip October 18, 1910 loaded with 10,700 tons of iron ore from Superior for Ashtabula, OH when she stranded on Sawtooth Reef off Eagle Harbor, MI on Lake Superior. Visibility had been very limited due to forest fires raging on the Keweenaw Peninsula and the Lake was blanketed with smoke as far as one mile off shore. The MORELAND hit so hard and at such speed that she bounced over the first reef and came to rest on a second set of rocks.

On 18 October 1896, AUSTRALASIA (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 282', 1829 GT, built in 1884 at W. Bay City) was carrying 2,200 tons of soft coal when she caught fire, burned to the waterline and sank 3 miles east of Cana Island in Lake Michigan. The Bailey's Harbor Lifesavers saved her crew.

At 8:00 PM on 18 October 1844, the steamer ROCHESTER left Rochester, New York for Toronto. She encountered a severe gale about halfway there. Captain H. N. Throop had the vessel put about and return to Rochester. The gale was so severe that all thought they were lost. When they finally arrived in Rochester, the passengers were so grateful that they had survived that they published a note of gratitude to Almighty God and Captain Throop in the Rochester Daily Democrat on 19 October 1844 -- it was signed by all 18 passengers.

On 18 October 1876, the schooner R. D. CAMPBELL filled with water and capsized on Lake Michigan about 10 miles from Muskegon, Michigan. The crew clung to the vessel's rigging until rescued by the tug JAMES McGORDAN. The schooner drifted to the beach some hours later.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Nanticoke Stuck in River

10/17 2:20 p.m. Update
The upper Maumee River was closed this morning by a ship blocking the channel. The Nanticoke departed Anderson's "K" elevator around 9:00 a.m. with a load of grain and got caught in the wind and current as she positioned herself to pass through the Norfolk-Southern South Railroad Bridge.

At the time one tug was standing by the vessel and a second tug responded immediately to the Captain's request. Wednesday afternoon it was still sideways in the channel, with both anchors down. The Coast Guard says the ship is not aground, just sideways in the channel.

The Nanticoke's stern was up against the east bank of the river and her bow was near the Anderson's grain dock. She had apparently dropped her stern anchor in an attempt to stop swinging, it was laying close to shore approximately 30 feet upriver.

Two tugs from Great Lakes Towing tried to move the vessel but were unsuccessful. A third G tug tug arrive shortly before noon and together the Montana, Louisiana and Illinois all worked to free the Nanticoke. Gaelic's Toledo based tug Susan Hoey joined the efforts about 1:00 p.m., with four tugs working they were unable to move the Nanticoke due primarily to the strong current and low water levels.

The gale of the past two days has led to a 41” drop in the water level adding to the normal current. The water level at 2:00 p.m. was at minus 7 inches. If the level rises by a 12 inches the tugs should be able to move the Nanticoke from her present position. Once that happens she will have to go to a docksite to be inspected by the U.S. Coast Guard before she can sail. The winds are expected to die down later on this evening, when that happens the water levels will begin to rise to normal levels.

The vessels managers have been in constant contact with Coast Guard and Port of Toledo officials and have mobilized two additional larger tugs to proceed from Cleveland and Detroit to Toledo. The larger tugs are expected to take between four and nine hours to reach the Nanticoke. Heading from Detroit is Gaelic's big 3,000 horsepower tug Roger Stahl. Great Lakes Towing sent their big 4,000 horsepower tug Triton from Cleveland. It departed about 4:00 p.m. onto a choppy Lake Erie.

The Nanticoke stopped about 20 yards from the vital CSX Railroad Bridge. Trains are still running smoothly.

There is one other ship in port that is blocked by the Nanticoke. Fleetmate Frontenac is tied up at the Cargill dock, loading grain. It will have to stay there until the channel is clear.

Video of the incident from WTOL-TV.
Live Web Cam image from WTOL-TV. Click on Carpenters' Cam

Reported by: Alan Baker, WTOL-TV, Nathan Boyle, Bob Densic, Jim Hoffman and Canada Steamship Lines




High Winds Drop Water Levels

10/17
Gale force winds on Tuesday dropped the water level in Western Lake Erie below the critical level. At 9:00 p.m. last night the water level in the Western Basin was 39 inches below chart datum, a little over three feet below the critical level for safe navigation.

Tuesday afternoon the water level was dropping at a rate of 8 inches an hour as the winds pushed the water from the western end of the lake to the east.

The combination of low water and high winds sent a number of vessels to anchor to wait for better weather. With water levels already low, some vessel travel through parts of the lakes with less than a foot between the bottom of the vessel and the river bottom.

The level in the western basin was expected to remain below the critical mark through Wednesday morning as the gale force westerly winds continue and then begin to rise above the critical mark Wednesday afternoon.

The National Weather Service office in Cleveland warned masters planning navigation into the Western Basin of Lake Erie Tuesday night through Wednesday to check current levels with the Coast Guard before proceeding into the area.

On Lakes Huron and Erie Gale warnings were posted for Tuesday and part of Wednesday. Gales were forecast to peak at 45 knots overnight building waves 8-10 feet high on Lake Erie and 13 to 18 feet on the Southern half of Lake Huron.




Busy day in Escanaba

10/17
The Columbia Star was loading 64,000 tons of taconite pellets at the ore dock in Escanaba on Tuesday. About 12:30 p.m. the Wilfred Sykes headed in with a load of limestone for the C. Reiss Dock. The Philip R. Clarke was anchored about 10 miles south of Escanaba for the much of the day. It is unknown if it was waiting for weather or if the Sykes had taken its spot at C. Reiss. The Great Lakes Trader was also scheduled to make an appearance, but had not arrived by 3:30 p.m.

Columbia Star loading. Sandy Chapman
Close up of her cabins. Sandy Chapman
Another view. Dick Lund
View from the dock. Dick Lund
Looking down the bow. Dick Lund
Across the harbor. Dick Lund
Sykes arrives. Dick Lund
Close up of her bow entering port. Dick Lund
Unloading. Dick Lund
View from across the harbor. Dick Lund
Philip R. Clarke anchored off shore. Dick Lund

Reported by: Dick Lund and Sandy Chapman




Toronto Ferry Turns 50

10/17
The Toronto Island ferry Thomas Rennie unceremoniously celebrates its 50th birthday Tuesday. She was taken out of service a few weeks ago and tarped for the winter. The vessel's generators are presently being rebuilt. The winter ferry schedule took effect on Monday morning.

Thomas Rennie.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Buckeye Loads

10/17
On Monday the classic steamer Buckeye made a rare call to Stoneport. It arrived in the early morning hours to load for the Cutler/Magner Stone dock in Superior,WI. Her friendly crew finished loading the vessel and departed the dock at dusk.

Reported by: Ben and Chanda McClain




Great Lakes Maritime Industry Applauds Building Of New Icebreaker

10/17
The Great Lakes shipping community is praising the award of a contract to build an icebreaking buoy tender to replace the Cutter Mackinaw when the latter is decommissioned in 2006. “The letting of this contract ensures that Great Lakes carriers will be able to reliably deliver cargo during periods of ice cover,” said Daniel L. Smith, President of the Great Lakes Maritime Task Force, the largest coalition representing maritime interests on the fourth seacoast. “To meet the needs of commerce, vessels operate from early March until late January,” continued Smith, who is also Great Lakes Vice President of American Maritime Officers, “but unless the U.S. Coast Guard has a heavy icebreaker stationed on the Great Lakes, a harsh winter could stop that commerce in its tracks. This icebreaking buoy tender will ensure a steady flow of iron ore, coal, stone and other cargos during the ice season.”

The ice that forms on the Great Lakes rivals that found anywhere in the Continental United States. Ice thickness can easily approach one foot even in a mild winter. Windrows (slabs of broken ice piled atop on another by the wind) can be 15 feet thick. While modern lakers have the hull strength and horsepower to operate in such conditions, only a vessel designed to break ice can open and then maintain the shipping lanes.

Since 1944, the Coast Guard’s primary icebreaking asset on the Great Lakes has been the Cutter Mackinaw. However, a dated engine room and other internal inadequacies that contributed to the high cost of operation prompted the Coast Guard to seek a replacement vessel that could perform both icebreaking and other Coast Guard missions at a lower cost.

The contract for the $82 million vessel was awarded to Manitowoc Marine Group. The ship, also to be named Mackinaw, will be 240 feet long and 60 feet wide and built by Manitowoc’s Marinette Marine in Marinette, Wisconsin. It is being designed to perform all Coast Guard missions, so in addition to icebreaking, the vessel will service floating aids to navigation, and conduct search and rescue missions, law enforcement, environmental protection, and national defense missions. The vessel should be completed in 2005.

“We are grateful that our Great Lakes delegation fought tirelessly for this new icebreaking buoy tender,” said George J. Ryan, 1st Vice President of GLMTF and President of Lake Carriers’ Association. “In particular, I must thank Wisconsin Congressman David R. Obey and Minnesota Congressman James L. Oberstar for their commitment to this project. Many other House members and our Senate delegation was with us every step of the way too.”

Iron ore for the steel industry is the primary cargo moved during periods of ice cover. In some years, iron ore carried in the ice season (mid-December through mid-April) can total 15 million tons, or 20 percent of what moves that season. At the same time, the fleet can move as much as 4 million tons of coal, or 10 percent of that trade. Significant amounts of stone, cement, salt and liquid-bulk products also move during periods of ice cover.

“The normal competitive pressures facing our customers, coupled with the continued high level of unfair steel imports, demand that steel companies and others reduce stockpiling costs to the bare minimum,” Ryan continued. “Furthermore, vessel operators are in fierce competition with the railroads, so every day that navigation is possible must be used to the fullest. A fixed navigation season of March 25 - January 15 through the Soo Locks is crucial to the continued viability of Great Lakes shipping and its customers and cannot be reliably achieved without this new icebreaking buoy tender.”

The new Mackinaw will also encourage full utilization of international shipping via the St. Lawrence Seaway. “Ocean carriers need the assurance that their vessels won’t be trapped on the Lakes by a harsh winter,” said John D. Baker, 2nd Vice President of GLMTF and President of the ILA’s Great Lakes District Council. “This new icebreaking buoy tender means the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway system will remain a key component of our country’s marine transportation system.”

Selection of Manitowoc Marine Group is a strong endorsement of the Great Lakes shipbuilding industry. “Shipyards across the nation bid on this contract,” said James J. Driscoll, 3rd Vice President of GLMTF and Marketing Manager, Manitowoc Marine Group. “The skills and dedication of our workers enabled us to make the winning bid.”

Reported by: Great Lakes Maritime Task Force




Twin Ports Report

10/17
The motor vessel Paterson paid a rare call to the Twin Ports on Oct. 16, arriving at midday for the Cargill B1 elevator. Canadian Mariner, another uncommon visitor, was loading at the Peavey elevator in Superior. Other grain vessels in port include Isolda at Cenex Harvest States and Sandviken at AGP.

Elsewhere in port, Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived about 8 a.m. to load at Midwest Energy Terminal. Paul R. Tregurtha was due at the coal dock later in the day. After the Tregurtha, the dock has a long gap until Friday, when Indiana Harbor, Courtney Burton and Algosoo are due. The Burton will be taking another load of coal to Ashland, Wis.

Joe Block paid an unusual call to Two Harbors on Oct. 16 to load taconite pellets. The Presque Isle also was due there to complete a load begun at DMIR in Duluth. Oglebay Norton is scheduled to pay a rare call in Two Harbors on Oct. 17.

Reported by: Al Miller




Alpena Update

10/17
The Paul H. Townsend loaded at Lafarge Monday night and was headed for Muskegon. The Alpena arrived into port before noon on Tuesday to load for Superior. The J.A.W Iglehart and Jacklyn M/barge Integrity were expected into Lafarge sometime today.

The John J. Boland was loading at Stoneport on Tuesday and was scheduled to be followed by the Fred R. White Jr.

Reported by: Ben and Chanda McClain




Toledo Update

10/17
The Frontenac was upbound the Maumee River Tuesday morning with the "G" tugs Illinois and Louisiana assisting bound for the ADM/Countrymark Elevator to load a grain cargo. Her fleet mate Nanticoke was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator.

The Mississagi finished loading her grain cargo at Anderson's "E" Elevator and departed around 12:30 p.m. that afternoon. The former Boblo passenger boat remains in drydock at the Shipyard. The American Republic was loading coal at the CSX Coal Docks and The American Mariner was due in later that day to load coal.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Canadian Progress today followed by the Algomarine on Thursday. The Courtney Burton was at the Torco Dock unloading ore. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco on Wednesday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - October 17

The CANADIAN PROSPECTOR was launched October 17, 1963 as a) CARLTON (2)

The MONTCLIFFE HALL was launched October 17,1959 for Transatlantic Bulk Carriers, Monrovia, Liberia as a) EMS ORE.

With an inexperienced Taiwanese crew, boiler problems and the collapse of Lock 7's west wall in the Welland Canal on October 17th, SAVIC's (CLIFFS VICTORY) departure was delayed until December 17, 1985 when she departed Chicago under her own power.

The carferry PERE MARQUETTE 19 was launched October 17, 1903.

In 1893 the FLINT & PERE MARQUETTE NO. 1 was damaged by fire while in Ludington.

In 1988 the Society for the Preservation of the S.S. City of Milwaukee purchased CITY OF MILWAUKEE from the City of Frankfort for $2.

On 17 October 1871, CASCADEN (2 mast wood schooner, 138 T, built in 1866 at Saugeen, Ontario) was carrying much needed supplies for the Cove Island Lighthouse keeper and his family who were in desperate straits. But she went ashore 3 miles below Cape Hurd near Tobermory, Ontario in a storm and was wrecked.

On 17 October 1843, the wooden schooner ALABAMA collided with a pier during a storm at the mouth of the Grand River at Fairport, Ohio and was a total loss.

On 17 October 1871, the 42 ton wooden schooner SEA HORSE stranded on Fitzwilliam Island at the mouth of Georgian Bay in a storm. She was a total loss.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Bethlehem Steel files for bankruptcy protection

10/16
Bethlehem Steel Corp., suffering from low-cost foreign imports and high labor and retiree-benefit costs, filed Monday for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

Bethlehem’s operations include Hibbing Taconite Co. in Hibbing, Minn., and a Great Lakes fleet consisting of 1,000-footers Stewart J. Cort and Burns Harbor. The vessels carry taconite pellets from the BNSF ore dock in Superior, Wis., to Bethlehem’s facilities at Burns Harbor on Lake Michigan.

The filing came just weeks after Bethlehem replaced its chairman and chief executive on Sept. 24 with turnaround expert Robert S. Miller, who led financial negotiations with bank lenders and the federal government leading to the Chrysler bailout package.

Miller said the company could not overcome the economic damage caused by low-cost imports and the slowing economy despite nearly $300 million in net cost reductions since mid-1998.

"Chapter 11 does not solve our problems," Miller said in a news release. "It provides us a process and framework within which we can address and explore the significant issues facing the company."

The company hopes to reduce its debt, work with its unions to address money owed to its large numbers of pensioners, and seek a partner or buyer, Miller said.

In addition to its facilities on and around the Great Lakes, Bethlehem's principal operations include the Sparrows Point Division located on the Chesapeake Bay near Baltimore, Maryland; and Pennsylvania Steel Technologies located in Steelton, Pennsylvania, just south of Harrisburg. The Sparrows Point Division also operates steelmaking and plate operations in Coatesville and Conshohocken, Pennsylvania. Burns Harbor's operations include a galvanizing mill and coke-making operation in Lackawanna, New York, located just south of Buffalo. Bethlehem also has iron ore, lake shipping and trucking operations and operates nine shortline railroads.

Reported by: Al Miller, John Sarns and Michael Hegarty




More on the Peter R. Cresswell Christening

10/16
On October 14, 2001 Algoma Central Corporation renamed their self-unloading dry-bulk carrier, the Motor Vessel Algowest to the Motor Vessel Peter R. Cresswell. The ship was re-dedicated honoring the former President and Chief Executive Officer on the occasion of his retirement from that position.

Peter Cresswell is currently Deputy Chairman of the Board of Directors of Algoma Central Corporation.

The re-dedication ceremony was held near Lock 1 on the Welland Canal. During the ceremony, which was attended by Peter Cresswell’s family and friends, and employees from Algoma Central, Tim Dool, President and Chief Executive Officer of Algoma Central Corporation congratulated Peter Cresswell on his 37 years of service to the Corporation, saying: “Peter Cresswell’s leadership drove the significant growth, diversification and modernization of Algoma Central’s fleet to become the largest operating in the Great Lakes.”

Sponsor, Nancy Cresswell, wife of Peter Cresswell, re-dedicated the ship with the words: “I re-dedicate this ship, the Motor Vessel Peter R. Cresswell. May God guard her, and guide her, and keep all those who sail in her.” After the new name of the ship was revealed, the traditional bottle of champagne was then smashed against the ship’s bow.

The 19,853 tonne, 730-foot self-unloading vessel was converted to a self-unloader in 1998. Sailing under the Algoma Central house flag, she is marketed and scheduled by Seaway Marine Transport of St. Catharines.

With assets of over $370 million, the Algoma Central Corporation group includes Algoma Tankers, Fraser Marine & Industrial, Algoma Central Properties Inc., and a 50-percent interest in Seaway Marine Transport and Marbulk Canada Inc. The Corporation also owns a 25-percent interest in Cleveland Tankers (1991) Inc., based in Cleveland, Ohio. The Corporation employs approximately 1,300 employees.

Peter R. Cresswell, Deputy Chairman of the Board of Directors of Algoma Central Corporation, with the Re-Dedicated Algoma Central Corporation Motor Vessel Peter R. Cresswell.
The Re-Dedication champagne bottle hits the bow of the Peter R. Cresswell.
Tim S. Dool, President and Chief Executive Officer of Algoma Central Corporation speaks at the Re-Dedication.

Reported by: Algoma Central Corp




Icebreaker contract awarded

10/16
The U.S. Coast Guard has awarded a $82.5-millon contract to the Manitowoc Marine Group to build a new Great Lakes icebreaker to replace the Mackinaw.

The new vessel is expected to be completed in 2005. Its home port will be Cheboygan, Mich., and it will also carry the name Mackinaw.

The new icebreaker will be 240 feet long, have a maximum beam of 60 feet, carry 50 crew members and be equipped with the latest electronics and navigation gear. The replacement shall be capable of moving through 32 inches of layered ice at a speed of 3 knots.

In addition to breaking ice to keep shipping lanes open on the Great Lakes, the multi-mission vessel will service Aids to Navigation, as well as performing search and rescue, pollution control, security and law enforcement duties.

The current Mackinaw will be decommissioned in 2006. Efforts to replace the World War II-era Mackinaw began about 20 years ago.Click here for more information on the new ship
Click here for more information on the Manitowoc Marine Group




Provider Departs

10/16
The Canadian Provider departed Hamilton Saturday afternoon sailing for Montreal. The Provider was towed to Hamilton dead ship from Toronto in September. In Hamilton most of wheat cargo onboard the Windoc was transferred to the Provider. Crews were called back and the Provider departed under its own power joining the fall grain rush.

The Windoc remains at dock in Hamilton awaiting an unknown future.

Reported by: Bill Bird, Patricia Burgon and Jon Van Staalduinen




Chi-Cheemaun Upbound

10/16
On Monday the carferry Chi-Cheemaun stopped in the Canadian Soo to and dropped off her load of passengers. Owen Sound Transportation Company hosted the fall cruise from Tobermory to the Soo as the carferry heads for its 5-year survey in Thunder Bay.

The ship departed the Soo and entered the MacArthur Lock heading upbound.

The Chi-Cheemaun is used to ferry automobiles across the waters of Georgian Bay between Tobermory and South Baymouth.

Click here for more information

Reported by: Jerry Masson




Medevac of Captain

10/16
Sunday morning U.S. Coast Guard Group Sault Ste Marine received a call, via VHF, from the tug Susan W. Hannah requesting the medevac of their 41-year-old Master who had heart problems and was complaining of numbness in his left arm. The vessel was anchored in the South Channel of the Straits of Mackinac. A Station St. Ignace rescue boat transported the Master to EMS in Cheboygan, Mich. there was no update on his condition at the time of this report.




More Contracts for Manitowoc Marine Group

10/16
The Manitowoc Company announced last week that the city of New York recently awarded its Manitowoc Marine Group contracts to build three Kennedy-class ferries.

The new Kennedy-class ferries will be 310 feet long, 70 feet wide, and are capable of transporting 4,400 passengers and 30 vehicles. They will replace three existing ferries built in 1965 and will provide year-round transportation service between Staten Island and Manhattan. The ferries will feature twin pilot houses and state-of-the-art navigation and propulsion systems.

"This contract is an excellent example of the solid growth opportunities afforded us by our strategic acquisition program in general, and more specifically, last year's acquisition of Marinette Marine," said Terry D. Growcock, Manitowoc's president and chief executive officer. "It also continues our success in extending the reach of our shipyards beyond their traditional Great Lakes markets, while bidding and obtaining work that is ideally suited to our shipbuilding capabilities."

Tom Byrne, president of Manitowoc Marine Group, said the ferry contract is valued at approximately $120 million and will span nearly 30 months of work. The ferries will be built at Marinette Marine, with the first ferry scheduled for delivery in fall of 2003.

The ferries, which were designed by a well-known New York naval architect, will feature "old world" nautical aesthetics that are reminiscent of the ferries that plied New York's harbors decades ago. Material procurement and basic hull fabrication work for the first ferry will begin soon at Marinette Marine.

In addition, Manitowoc Marine Group also has received a contract from Great Lakes Dredge & Dock to build a 7,100-cubic-yard dump scow for the worldwide dredging contractor.

Work on the scow, which will be built by Bay Shipbuilding, is expected to begin later this fall. This vessel is the 50th vessel that Manitowoc has built for Great Lakes Dredge & Dock and continues a business relationship dating back to 1906. The 63-foot by 277-foot dump scow will be constructed and ABS-certified for ocean-class service, and is similar to two dump scows built by Bay Shipbuilding in 1987.

Delivery of the $4.8-million vessel is scheduled for next August.

Click here for more information on the Manitowoc Marine Group




Alpena Update

10/16
The J.A.W Iglehart arrived after midnight Monday morring to load and left before sunrise. The Joseph H. Frantz unloaded at the Lafarge coal dock on Monday, arriving about 8:00 a.m. after being achored in the straits of Mackinac due to high winds.

The Paul H. Townsend was expected at Lafarge around 9:00 p.m. on Monday. The Alpena is coming back from Green Bay and should be in port Tuesday morning.

The Buckeye was loading at Stoneport on Monday, headed for the Cutler/Magner dock in Superior.

Reported by: Ben and Chanda McClain




Detroit Traffic

10/16
Monday evening the tugs Pennsylvania and Wyoming were returning to their dock after assisting the Frontenac into Rouge Steel.

Wyoming.
Pennsylvania.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

10/16
The Nanticoke with the tugs Illinois and Louisiana were upbound the Maumee River Monday morning bound for the Anderson's "K" Elevator where she will load a grain cargo.

After two days of heavy rain the Maumee River is running with a strong current. The Nanticoke tow had difficulty turning around upriver by the elevators. The currents may also delay vessels arriving here to load grain during the next several days as more heavy rain is forecast.

The Mississagi was upbound the Maumee River at 7:30 p.m. bound for Andersons "E" Elevator to load grain.

The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard. High winds a forecast for the area and may delay the move of the vessel.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the American Republic and American Mariner on Tuesday followed by the Canadian Progress on Wednesday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Courtney Burton on Tuesday. There are no other vessels in port at the time of this report.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Erie News

10/16
The American Mariner was in Erie Monday. She turned in the lake and backed in at about 7:00 p.m. The Adam E. Cornelius was in Erie Sunday.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Hamilton Report

10/16
Monday afternoon was a busy day at Piers 12 and 14. There were four salties moored there. Fed Nav's Lake Michigan was at Pier 14 unloading steel products. At Pier 12 the Lykes Energizer and Ziemia Chelminska were unloading steel products and the Rio Glory was unloading bauxite ore.

The Mackenzie (ex Federal Mackenzie) was at Pier 23. and the Windoc remains at Pier 8.

At noon a CSL vessel finished unloading coal at Stelco and departed. At 1:00 p.m. the Lykes Energizer departed the dock at Pier 12 and headed to the Burlington Ship Canal which she transited at 1:30 p.m. into Lake Ontario.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Toronto Update

10/16
The shipping season is slowly winding down. Three charter/tour boats were hauled out at Pier 35 last week: Nelvana, Island Princess VI and Ste. Marie I. They were followed by the charter vessels Obsession III, Wayward Princess, Empress of Canada, Jubilee Queen and Klancy II were out.

The houseboat Cordraulic (ex-dredge Doverdraulic) which was used in the Steven Segal movie "Exit Wounds" has been relaunched at Pier 35 and was towed to Toronto Drydock by C & C Marie's tug Patricia D., where she was rafted to the barge S. A. Queen. The auxiliary schooner Alison Lake was not placed on the drydock as previously reported, due to high winds. Next vessel due for drydocking is the charter vessel Klancy II.

Winter tarps were placed over the ferry Sam McBride's second deck last week. The ferry Thomas Rennie, which went out of service after Labor Day, has had her generators removed for rebuilding. Ferry service to Centre Island ended last week. The winter ferry began on Monday.

The tug Glenmont, which has been undergoing reconstruction into a charter vessel for Caribbean service, is rumored to be ready for launch soon. She is not ready (by along shot) to leave the lakes yet.

Reported by: Gerry O.




An Evening with Point Valour

10/16
On the evening of October 10, I was treated to a special event that most Boatnerds would give an arm and a leg for. No, not a ride on a Laker but something just as special, a chance to bang heads with a laker. The head banging would be done from the 90', 1280 horse powered tug Point Valour. This tug is owned by Thunder Bay Tug Services Ltd. and is maneuvered by veteran tugboat Captain, Roger Hurst. With permission from Company President, Gerry Dawson, I was invited aboard the Point Valour by Captain Hurst. A very friendly atmosphere greeted me as I boarded. Crewman Albert Carlson and Engineer David Gurney both offered the warmest of greetings and made me feel that I would not be cumbersome to their operation.

The Point Valour was built at Lauzon Quebec in 1958 as the Foundation Valour, this name stuck with her until 1983 when the current name was applied. In the early 90's Captain Hurst acquired her from a company in Nova Scotia and she was brought up here to the head of the lakes. She has operated here as a very reliable tug ever since. She has a single large diesel engine that sits in a surprisingly large engine room and turns a single propeller that pushes the tug up to a maximum of around 12 knots. She does not have a traditional steering wheel as one would expect but is steered by several controls.

We cast our lines and headed out of the slip toward our destination, the Canadian Steamship Line boat, Halifax. As we arrived at the Thunder Bay Coal Terminals, the Halifax crew was just finishing up loading and securing hatches. The Halifax was nose first into the slip at the Terminal dock and has to back out from that position. So our job was to push her stern lakewards and keep it in the tight channel as she backed out of the inner harbor and through the breakwall entrance. Thunder Bay Terminals is right at the mouth of the Kaministiqua River and currents and wind concerns at the time required the Point Valour's assistance. The winds were picking up and a Gale Warning had already been issued for Western Lake Superior earlier.

With an ear shattering long blast on her horn, the Halifax pulled in her Starboard lines and the stern began to swing out from the dock as the propeller churned up the harbor water. As she began to move backwards and clear the dock, Captain Hurst maneuvered the Point Valour up against the Starboard side of the huge stern hull of the Halifax. I was viewing this from the roof of the Point Valour that stood higher than the deck of the Halifax and although light conditions were poor for taking photos, I was snapping away! As the Halifax gained speed I watched as the outside channel marker grew nearer and I began to wonder if there was enough room. Just then the roof began to shake as all 1280 horses went to work. For a while I was certain that there was no way that the stern of the Halifax was going to come around. But sure enough she began to swing and finally ended up dead center of the channel, precisian boat handling by the Captains of both vessels.

We keep the Halifax's stern in the channel as she backed out the channel with a wind pushing on her Port side and threatening to put her on the West bank of the channel. The Halifax slid safely out through the breakwall entrance and about a half mile out the Point Valour gave one last, long mighty push turning the bow of the Halifax towards the Sleeping Giant and then pushed off! As the Point Valour pushed off the bow, the Algoma Line boat Algolake passed into view on her way to tie up at the Thunder Bay Terminal dock where the Halifax had just vacated. The Halifax was on her way down the lake with a load of coal for Hamilton, Ontario and we were on our way back to the dock to end a perfect evening.

Many thanks to Gerry, Roger, David and Albert for time of my life.

Point Valour in Thunder Bay Harbor.
Capt. Roger Hurst in the pilothouse.
Crew cabin.
Galley.
Engine room looking to the bow.
Looking aft.
Approaching the Halifax.
Halifax finishes loading.
Moving away from the dock. Begining to push, crewman Albert Carlson on the bow.
Smoke billows and the water churns.
Moving away from the dock.
Halifax crew secures as Capt. Hurst guides the tug.
Close up of the secured hatches on the Halifax.
Sliding to the bow as the sun sets.
Halifax pilothouse almost at eye level.
Working the bow.
Last push as the Algolake arrives.
David Gurney and Albert Carlson tie up.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Today in Great Lakes History - October 16

On October 16, 1990 the JOHN B. AIRD's loop belt caught fire while loading mill scale at Inland Steel Mill, East Chicago, Ill. Fueled by coal dust left over after unloading coal at the mill, 1,400 feet of the rubber conveyor belt burned causing nearly $500,000 in damages.

The PETER R. CRESSWELL (ALGOWEST) set a cargo record for a 27,517 tonne load of grain down the Seaway October 16, 1982 to Port Cartier, Que.

The RIO ORINOCO grounded off Anticosti Island, Que. on October 16, 1990 and was abandoned. Later she was salvaged by Le Groupe Desgagnes (1981) Inc., refloated, repaired and renamed d) THALASSA DESGAGNES.

Sea trials of the MERTON E. FARR were successfully completed October 16, 1920.

On October 16, 1954 the SCOTT MISENER (3) became the first laker to load a record 800,000 bushels of grain on the Great Lakes when she was loaded with barley at Fort William, Ont. for delivery to Port Colborne.

The WILLIAM G. MATHER (2) was towed from her Cuyahoga River berth on October 16, 1990 by the GLT tugs IDAHO and DELAWARE, she was placed at her permanent station next to the 9th Street Pier of Cleveland's North Coast Harbor.

On 16 October 1912, JAMES BUCKLEY (2 mast wood schooner-barge, 161’, 442 GC, built in 1884 at Quebec City) was carrying coal and being towed by the tug WILLIAM PROCTOR in consort with the barges H.B. and MENOMINEE in Lake Ontario. The BUCKLEY separated from this group in a storm and was driven into the shallows off the coast of Jefferson County, NY. The tug PROCTOR delivered MENOMINEE to Cape Vincent, then returned in time to take BUCKLEY’s crew out of the rigging - hand over hand on a heaving line - before BUCKLEY finally sank.

On 16 October 1855, the brig TUSCARORA was carrying coal from Buffalo to Chicago. She anchored off Chicago's Harrison Street, but a sto9rm dragged her in. Volunteers from shore were unable to get to the stricken vessel. A group of 9 ship captains and 4 seamen then organized a rescue party and took two new "Francis" metal lifeboats out and rescued the entire crew of eleven. By 21 October, TUSCARORA was pounded to pieces.

On 16 October 1853, PHILO SCOVILLE (2-mast wooden brig built in 1853 at Sheboygan, WI) was carrying flour, wheat, pigs and barreled fish when she encountered a gale in the eastern Straits of Mackinac. She was dismasted and drifted ashore where she was pounded to pieces. Her crew was saved by floating ashore while clinging to the floating main mast.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Peter R. Cresswell Christened

10/15
Sunday morning the former Algowest was re-christened the Peter R. Cresswell while docked at Warf 2 below Lock 1 in the Welland Canal.

The ship arrived at the dock Saturday with no name painted on the hull and crews spent the night painting the new name on the vessel. Sunday morning a short ceremony was held to christen the ship and then it continued on to Cote Catherine, Quebec to unload salt. Mr. Peter Ross Cresswell is the former President and CEO of Algoma Central Corporation.

The Cresswell was expected to pass Cross Over Island in the Seaway about 3:00 a.m. this morning.

Pictures taken Saturday by Alex Howard
Downbound below Lock 7.
Close up of the bow.
Passing the bow of the Oakglen.
Stern view entering Lock 6.

Please e-mail with pictures

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt, Gerry O. and Jason LaDue




Peter R. Cresswell Christened

10/15
Sunday morning the former Algowest was re-christened the Peter R. Cresswell while docked at Warf 2 below Lock 1 in the Welland Canal.

The ship arrived at the dock Saturday with no name painted on the hull and crews spent the night painting the new name on the vessel. Sunday morning a short ceremony was held to christen the ship and then it continued on to Cote Catherine, Quebec to unload salt. Mr. Peter Ross Cresswell is the former President and CEO of Algoma Central Corporation.

The Cresswell was expected to pass Cross Over Island in the Seaway about 3:00 a.m. this morning.

Pictures taken Saturday by Alex Howard
Downbound below Lock 7.
Close up of the bow.
Passing the bow of the Oakglen.
Stern view entering Lock 6.

Please e-mail with pictures

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt, Gerry O. and Jason LaDue




Gott Stops for Repairs

10/15
The Edwin H Gott stopped at the Soo Sunday night for mechanical repairs to her steering pumps. Because of no upbound traffic, the Gott was able to remain at the lock piers and did not have to move to the Carbide Dock. A few minutes after 10:00 p.m. the Gott was ready and with US Coast Guard approval were underway downbound.

Reported by: Jerry Masson




Ste Claire in Dry Dock

10/15
The former Boblo Steamer Ste. Claire was re-floated last Wednesday but remains tied up in the Toledo Shiprepair drydock waiting for better weather conditions before being towed to the Hocking Valley dock, possibly on Tuesday.

Reported by: Sam Buchanan




Wolverine in Muskegon

10/15
The Wolverine entered Muskegon Sunday at 7:00 a.m. and docked at the Verplank dock to unload stone. She departed Muskegon shortly after 1:00 p.m. and headed to Ferrysburg to finish the unloading. Other visitors this weekend included the Joseph H. Frantz, Canadian Transfer, and the Columbia Star is expected with a load of coal early this morning.

Images from the Muskegon Live Cam
Wolverine.
Outbound onto Lake Michigan.

Reported by: Scott Golin




Saginaw River News

10/15
The Saginaw River remained busy over the weekend, despite rain and windy weather.

The Sam Laud was outbound from Saginaw at about 3:00 a.m. Sunday after unloading overnight at Saginaw Rock Products. The vessel did not have far to travel to her next port. The Laud was loading Sunday afternoon at Port Gypsum, near Tawas, at the mouth of the Saginaw Bay.

The Paul H. Townsend entered the Saginaw River at about 8:00 a.m. Sunday with a cargo of cement for the Lafarge terminal at Saginaw.

The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. departed the Consumers Energy dock at about 10:00 a.m. Sunday after delivering coal. The vessel had unloaded Saturday, but remained at the dock overnight awaiting weather. The 1000-foot McCarthy must back a number of miles out into the bay to turn after unloading.

The tug James Hannah with her barge departed the Triple Clean dock in Essexville late on Sunday afternoon and was outbound into the bay at about 6:00 p.m. She had arrived Saturday evening.

Late on Friday afternoon, the CSL Tadoussac departed the Essroc dock in Essexville and the Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder departed the Bay Aggregates dock in downtown Bay City.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Detroit Traffic

10/15
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Sunday.

John G Munson downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Saginaw unloading at the ADM Dock in Windsor. She originally tied heading upbound but turned around and tied up downbound on Sunday morning. The Canadian Ranger has unloaded heading downbound the same way in the past
Stern view.
Unloading.
Close up of the grain dropping into the hopper.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

10/15
The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire in drydock at the Toledo shipyard was the only vessel in port Sunday afternoon. The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX docks will be the American Republic today followed by the American Mariner on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Courtney Burton on Tuesday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Lighthouse Festival

10/15
The sixth-annual Great Lakes Lighthouse Festival concluded on Sunday in Alpena. Thousands of people enjoyed the event that featured lectures and entertainment programs, vendor displays, live music, model building displays and more. The staff of Great Laker Magazine was on hand distributing copies of the new fall issue.

Below are picture from the event.

Crowds enjoy the vendor display area.
Great Laker booth.
Author Wes Oleszewski gives a presentation on Saginaw River shipwrecks.

Gary, aka the "Moonlight Modeler" was on hand demonstrating model building. Gary's models are highly detailed and radio controlled. The detail and level of accuracy is higher than you will find in a museum quality model.
Stern view of the Detroit Edison under construction.
Close up.
Bow view.
Self unloading boom that is made from over 8000 parts.
Close up.
Looking down on the pilothouse.
Another view. Note the detail in the chart room and desks. The detail items are all made by hand.
Deck view. Note the detail of the hatch covers
Passenger quarters.
Working bow thruster.
Bow thruster motor.
Looking down into the stern at the servo controlling the rudder.




Great Laker Magazine

10/15
The Fall issue of Great Laker Magazine was mailed last week, for those who have subscribed it typically takes one to three weeks to arrive.

The latest issue features: Alpena Lights - In conjunction with the Great Lakes Lighthouse Festival, we take a look at the many lighthouses in the area and interesting attractions for boat and lighthouse fans.

Smooth Sailing on the James R. Barker - Roger LeLievre takes us on board the 1,000-foot James R. Barker and looks at life on board one of these mammoth vessels and examines the challenges facing the Great Lakes shipping industry.

What's cooking on the Great Lakes? - A new cookbook by Paula McKenna answers that question with dozens of tasty recipes, plus photos and histories of the boats from which the recipes came. Sample recipes included in the article.

Bones in the Backwater - Great Lakes historian and author Wes Oleszewski writes about the little-known wreck of the tug Katy Reid in the Saginaw River.

Who Needs A Yacht? - Roger Tottman finds the Georgian Clipper offers a great way to see Georgian Bay.

Plus - lighthouse and laker news. Calendar of Events, book and video reviews and more.

Great Laker is published quarterly in full color and is dedicated to exploring all things Great Lakes, from lighthouses to lake boats, legends and lore, to lakes, ports and the wonderful attractions they have for visitors to enjoy.

Click here for more information




Legendary Lighthouses

10/15
Of special interest to lighthouse buffs, PBS TV has continued its Legendary Lighthouse series this fall. The last series several years ago included only Great Lakes lighthouses on Superior and Michigan, but this year's series includes the St. Lawrence Seaway and the lower lakes--Ontario, Erie and Huron. The segment on the Great Lakes is scheduled to air this week, probably on most PBS-TV stations.

Click here to check your local listings.

Reported by: Stephen Hause




Boatnerd Gathering East

10/15
Be sure to join us October 26-27 for the Boatnerd Gathering at the Welland Canal. If you wish to attend please be sure that you have filled out the registration form at www.boatnerd.com/gathering.htm. All events are free to attend and optional. See you at the Welland.




Picture Updates

10/15
I am back home from Alpena, I have a number of reports with pictures that will be updated tomorrow night.




Weekly Updates

10/15
The regular weekly updates are now available. Click here to view




Today in Great Lakes History - October 15

On her maiden voyage the LEON SIMARD (b) L'ORME NO.1. ) was spotted traveling eastward on the St. Lawrence River October 15, 1974.

The WOLVERINE (4) departed in Columbia Transportation Division colors October 15, 1974 on her maiden voyage from Lorain light to load stone at Stoneport, MI for delivery to Huron, OH.

HERBERT C. JACKSON cleared Fraser Shipyard on October 15, 1988 after having the 1000 h.p. bow thruster motor installed from the JOHN SHERWIN. The motor from the Jackson was later repaired and placed in the Sherwin's cargo hold for future use.

The PAUL H. CARNAHAN came out on her maiden voyage October 15, 1961.

On October 15, 1984 the a) JOHN O. McKELLAR (2) was sold to P.& H. Shipping of Parrish & Heimbecker Ltd., Mississauga, Ont. and renamed b) ELMGLEN (2).

Scrapping began on October 15, 1988 of the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON at Kaohsiung, Taiwan by Li Chong Steel & Iron Works Co. Ltd.

The C.H. McCULLOUGH, JR. was laid up on October 15, 1969 at Manitowoc, WI.

The MELDRUM BAY was launched October 15, 1949 as a) COVERDALE for Canada Steamship Lines, Montreal, Que.

The SCOTT MISENER (3) struck bottom October 15, 1973 near Whaleback Shoal on the St. Lawrence River reportedly damaging sixty of her bottom plates. She proceeded to the Port Arthur shipyard for dry docking and repairs from October 20th through the 28th.

On October 15, 1980 the NIPIGON BAY, loaded with ore for Hamilton, Ont., grounded at the "crossover" near Brockville, Ont. on the St. Lawrence River and sustained a 100-foot rip in her bottom plates. She proceeded to Thunder Bay, Ont. arriving there on October 24th where repairs were made at an estimated cost of $500,000.

The R. P. MASON (3 mast wooden schooner, 115’, 155 GT, built in 1867 at Grand Haven, MI) was bound from Chicago for Detroit when she struck a rocky reef near Waugoshance Point in the Straits of Mackinac on 8 October 1871. Water gushed in an 8-foot hole. However, she was temporarily patched and her cargo of grain, flour and meat was taken off over the next few days. The tug LEVIATHAN took her in tow, going to Little Traverse Bay, when, on 15 October, they encountered a gale near Cross Village, MI. The MASON broke free and capsized. 5 died and 4 were rescued. The MASON drifted ashore upside down. She was eventually salvaged and sailed for another 46 years. She ended her days when she burned in Lake Michigan in 1917.

The tug DOUGLAS caught fire near Wyandotte while going down the Detroit River and sank. The crew all jumped overboard and were saved by the steam yacht JOSEPHINE, except for John Cassidy, one of the firemen, who drowned. A few days later, plans were made to raise and rebuild the DOUGLAS.

On 15 October 1871, R. G. COBURN (wooden propeller passenger/package freight steamer, 193', 867 t, built in 1870 at Marine City, MI) was carrying 15,000 bushels of wheat, 3,500 barrels of flour and 30 barrels of silver ore from Lake Superior to Detroit. As she came down Lake Huron, she encountered a terrific gale which had driven most vessels to seek shelter. The COBURN fought the wind at Saginaw Bay throughout the night until she lost her rudder and turned broadside to the waves. Her large stack fell and smashed the cabin area and then the cargo came loose and started smashing holes in the bulwarks. About 70 passengers were aboard and almost all were terribly seasick. As the ship began her final plunge beneath the waves, only a few lifeboats were getting ready to be launched and those were floated right from the deck as the ship sank. 32 people perished, including Capt. Gilbert Demont. No women or children were saved.

On 15 October 1900 the wooden 186’ freighter F. E. SPINNER was sunk in a collision with the steamer H. D. COFFINBERRY in the St. Mary’s River. She was raised from 125 feet of water, one of the deepest successful salvage operations to that time. She was later renamed HELEN C and lasted until 1922.

October 15, 1910 - After the sinking of the PERE MARQUETTE 18 the previous September, the PERE MARQUETTE 18 (II) was ordered by the Pere Marquette Railway.

On 15 October 1871, the EXCELSIOR (3-mast wooden schooner, 156', 374 gt, built in 1865 at Buffalo, NY) was struck by a gale near Thunder Bay on Lake Huron. She sailed through the early morning hours only to sink about 4:30 AM. Only Charles Lostrom survived. He was on the cabin roof which blew off when the vessel went down. Mr. Lostrom remained on the floating roof-raft for two days and two nights until he was rescued by fishermen near South Hampton light on the Canadian side of Lake Huron.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, James Neumiller, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Nameless Transit

10/14
Saturday afternoon the former Algowest was departing Lock 7 of the Welland Canal with her name painted over leaving only the painted Algoma banner on her bow and "St. Catharines" on her stern. The ship stopped at Port Weller Dry Docks where the vessel's new name, "Peter R. Cresswell", will be painted on. The Cresswell will be re-christened today in a private ceremony at the dry docks. Mr. Peter Ross Cresswell is the former President and CEO of Algoma Central Corporation.

After the ceremony the Cresswell will continue on to Quebec to unload a cargo of salt loaded in Goderich.

Pictures by Alex Howard
Downbound below Lock 7.
Close up of the bow.
Passing the bow of the Oakglen.
Stern view entering Lock 6.

Please e-mail with pictures or updates

Reported by: George Wharton and Alex Howard




Other Traffic

10/14
In addition to the nameless transit of the Peter R. Creswell Saturday, the Oakglen was upbound and downbound was the Millenium Raptor (formerly Broompark.) The Canadian Voyager was at Port Colborne heading for the fuel dock. At International Marine Salvage work is quickly progressing on the scrapping of the Tarantau.

Oakglen and the Creswell pass.
Close up of the Oakglen.
Another view.
Stern view.
Canadian Voyager.
Close up of bow passing the Tarantau.
Stern view.
Scrapping of the Tarantau is moving along.
Millenium Raptor.
The pilothouse of the Fort Henry at Lock 3.
Another view.

Reported by: Alex Howard




More Bulkers Return to Service

10/14
Algoma's streamlined bulker Algonorth, left Montreal Saturday after spending most of the 2001 season in lay-up at Section 56. The downbound vessel was expected at Québec City pilot station at 2:00 a.m. this morning. Algonorth's fleetmate Algosound is scheduled to return to the trade on October 19, also from Montreal Harbor Section 56.

Reported by: J.F. Boutin




Thunder Bay Update

10/14
The port of Thunder Bay has livened recently with vessel traffic consisting mostly of salties. Last week boats were coming and going more frequently than they had for most of September.

The McNally tugs and barges were in the port for most of the summer and continue working in several different locations. The McNally dredge John Holden was working at the Mission Dump site while a few of their barges are anchored at the site of the new bridge over the Kaministiqua River. Their tug Sandra Mary continues to make trips towing the dump scow from the harbor over to the Mission dump site and then back to the Crane Barge working in the Harbor. Wednesday morning the crane barge was towed over to Richardson's to begin work on a nearby clay bank that needs dredging. The Bagotville remains tied up at Keefer Terminals.

Sault Ste. Marie based tug Avenger IV and barge Chief Wawatam arrived at Pascol Engineering. The Chief Wawatam was put into dry dock for a few days before departing back down the lake.

The Federal Agno arrived on October 3 and went to anchor outside the breakwall. On Wednesday the tug Robert W brought out a harbor pilot to the saltie around 4:00 p.m. and at 5:30 p.m. she lifted her anchor and met the tugs Glenada and Robert W at the South Entrance. She was then helped into the Agricore Elevator slip where the going was very slow and the quarters very cramped due to the saltie Kasteelborg who had arrived at United Grain Growers "m" house the day before after leaving the P&H Elevator.

The saltie Inviken arrived in port on October 7 and went to anchor. On Wednesday she pulled her anchor and was guided into Richardson Elevator slip by the tugs Peninsula and George N. Carleton. By 5:30 p.m. she was secure to the slip wall. During the maneuvering the tug Peninsula caught one of the dredging markers in her Propeller causing a minor inconvenience.

The saltie Armonikos arrived in port on Tuesday in ballast after visiting her last port of Toronto. She went to anchor at 3:35 p.m.

At the same time that the Armonikos dropped her hook, the saltie Mackenzie was sighted off Thunder Cape about 18 miles out. The Mackenzie is making her first trip back up to this port after being renamed from Federal Mackenzie. She is no longer chartered by FedNav International Ltd. and therefore the dropping of Federal in her name. The Mackenzie headed straight into the Mission River Entrance where she was met by the tugs Peninsula and George Carleton. She headed up to the Kaministiqua/Mission River Junction where she was pushed around and then headed back down to Valley Camp where she started loading Potash. On Wednesday at 10:00 p.m. she had finished loading and was downbound on Superior for the port of Montreal despite Gale Warnings being issued earlier in the day for western Lake Superior.

Another arrival on Wednesday was the Canadian Steamship Line boat Halifax arriving at 11:30 a.m. She sailed into port and was greeted by rain and fog. The Halifax was assisted by the Glenada as she nosed into the dock at Thunder Bay Terminals and tied up in preparation to take on a load of coal. As the Halifax was being loaded the Algolake announced her arrival and sailed around the West side of the Welcome Islands to drop anchor at 1:15 p.m. At this point there were four boats anchored out in the harbor, the most to be anchored out since last fall. At 6:00 p.m. the loaded Halifax pulled away from the dock and with some guidance from the tug Point Valour, was on her way down the lake headed for Hamilton. She is scheduled to return to Thunder Bay in 8 to 10 days.

The Algolake sat patiently out near the Welcomes until the Halifax had cleared the breakwall, at that time the Algolake pulled her hook and headed in to take up the now unoccupied space at the Thunder Bay Terminal dock. She was tied up at 7:50 p.m. and began loading Coal.

The Armonikos remained at anchor Wednesday evening, while the tug Radium Yellowknife was tied up at the Northern Woods old Ore Dock. By 11:30 p.m. the saltie Crio was making her way in amid 36 knot winds, to anchor outside the breakwall.

Sarah Spencer arriving Thunder Bay with Sleeping Giant in background.
Tug Avenger IV sits at Pascol while her barge is repaired.
Canadian Leader departing Thunder Bay.
Barge Chief Wawatam floating in Pascol's Dry Dock.
Dredging operations taking place in the Harbor.
Emerald Star at a dock in Thunder Bay.
Irma at anchor awaiting a slip.
Kasteelborg moving towards the P&H Elevator - Federal Agno in background.
Kasteelborg entering P&H slip.
Mackenzie passing Emerald Star with help from tugs Peninsula and Carleton.
Mackenzie being turned around in river.
Mackenzie heading back down river to Valley Camp.
Montrealais arriving Mission River Entrance.
Saltie Pormorze Zachodnie at Saskatchewan Pool 7b.
Quebecois in Lay up at Pascol behind the Long term lay up Algontario.
Tug Robert John with brand new pilothouse.
Saginaw proceeding from the Mission Entrance to the North Entrance.
Reflection of the bow of the old Saguenay boat.
Algolake loading at Thunder Bay Terminals.
Mackenzie heading up Mission River past the Kam River boat club.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Saginaw River Report

10/14
The Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. was inbound the Saginaw River passing Light 12 at 10:10 a.m. with a load of coal for the Consumers Energy/Karn-Weadock Dock. She had finished unloading by late afternoon, but high winds kept her at the dock. Conditions on the bay were winds at 25 knots and 3 foot waves at Light 12 where the McCarthy backs out and makes her turn.

The McCarthy's fleetmate, the Sam Laud was next in, passing through the Independence Bridge around 5:00 p.m. The Laud was upbound to the Saginaw Rock Dock with stone. The Tug James A. Hannah and her tanker barge were inbound at the Pump Out Island at 8:30 p.m. She was headed to the Triple Clean Liquifuels Dock to unload.

Pictures by: Todd Shorkey
Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. docking at Consumers Energy.
Sam Laud upbound at the old Fletcher Oil Dock.
Close up.
Another view.
Stern view at Liberty Bridge.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Toledo Update

10/14
The CSL Niagara was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator and was expected to depart later on Saturday night. The Saginaw was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator and was expected to depart later that night. The former Boblo passenger boat Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard.

The Jean Parisien finished loading coal at the CSX Dock and departed in the afternoon. The John J. Boland was due in later Saturday evening to load coal. The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the American Republic on Monday, followed by the American Mariner on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Buckeye on Thursday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Lake Erie News

10/14
The Algowood and Algosoo were in Ashtabula Saturday to load coal. The Algowood had unloaded ore in Ashtabula the previous night. The Algosoo was back from Picton,Ontario for another load. The Cartiedoc was due at noon with titanium slag. The Canadian Enterprise was loading in Conneaut.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Lighthouse Festival

10/14
The sixth-annual Great Lakes Lighthouse Festival continues today. Be sure to stop by and visit with the staff of Great Laker Magazine in the vendor area.

Planned events include:
Sunday, the Convention Center and Holiday Inn will be open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and will have a live auction of nautical memorabilia and raffle. Saturday's activities will continue on Sunday.

Click here for more information

Check back Monday for pictures from the festival.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 14

The keel to the JAMES R. BARKER was laid on October 14, 1974. She was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flagship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.)

On October 14, 1983 the CHI-CHEEMAUN encountered 48-knot winds after departing Tobermory with 113 passengers bound for South Baymouth. Due to high wind and waves the captain decided to find shelter rather than to continue on or return to port. The ferry made her way around the Bruce Peninsula southeast to Dyer Bay where she dropped anchor for the night, however she had no overnight accommodations. Complimentary meals were served and activities were organized by the crew. The anchor was lifted the next morning and the ferry returned to Tobermory.

The GEORGE A. STINSON departed Detroit on her maiden voyage October 14, 1978 light for Superior, WI to load iron ore pellets for delivery to the Great Lakes Steel Division of the National Steel Corp. at Zug Island in River Rouge, MI.

On October 14, 1966, loaded with potash bound for Oswego, NY, the STONEFAX collided with the Norwegian salty ARTHUR STOVE and sank in the Welland Canal between Locks 7 and 8.

On 14 October 1875, it was discovered that thieves had completely stripped the canvass and rigging from the schooner FORWARDER owned by Little & Brown. The schooner was lying about three miles below Port Huron.

On 14 October 1822, APPELONA (wooden schooner, 45’, 37 T, built in 1814 at Henderson, NY) was bound from Oswego for Genessee, NY when she was struck by lightning in Lake Ontario and sank about 15 minutes. All hands were injured but abandoned her for shore and all survived.

The tug NELSON burned at Chicago on Saturday, 14 October 1876. She was one of the smaller class of tugs and the damage was so great that she was not considered to be worth repairing.

October 14, 1911 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 4 ran aground while enroute to Manistique at full speed, damaging several plates. The ANN ARBOR NO. 3 pulled her off.

On 14 October 1876, NEW YORK (wooden propeller freighter, 183', 704 t, built in 1856 at Buffalo, NY) was carrying lumber and towing the schooner BUTCHER BOY and barges NELLIE McGILVERAY and A. J. CORREY from Cove Island in Georgian Bay to Buffalo when they encountered a severe storm near Pointe aux Barques. The tow line parted and the NEW YORK could not regain it in the heavy seas. She then sprang a leak and the water rose rapidly enough to put out her fires. The crew (15 men and one woman) abandoned in the yawl as NEW YORK was overwhelmed and sank. The open boat was adrift for five hours when the 74' schooner NEMESIS came upon it. NEMESIS tried twelve times to approach the yawl in the rough seas, losing a portion of her deck load of tanbark each time that she came about, but at last she got alongside the yawl. The NEW YORK's crew managed to get aboard the NEMESIS except for Fireman William Sparks who fell between the yawl and the schooner and was lost. The other vessels in the tow all made it to Port Huron safely.

On 14 October 1883, NELLIE GARDNER (wooden schooner-barge, 178', 567 gt, built in 1873 at Marine City, MI) was loaded with 39,000 bushels of corn while being towed by the steamer JOHN PRIDGEON, JR. in a storm on Lake Huron. The GARDNER released herself from the tow in the heavy weather to run for the shelter of Thunder Bay under sail. However, she was unable to make it, and turned back for Tawas, Michigan but struck a reef, broke in two and was wrecked 1 mile SE of Scarecrow Island. Her crew made it to shore in her yawl.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algowest to be Renamed

10/13
The Algowest is expected to arrive at Port Weller Dry Docks this evening where crews will begin painting a new name on the vessel. The new name will be "Peter R. Cresswell", honoring the former President and CEO of Algoma Central Corporation, Mr. Peter Ross Cresswell.

The ship will be re-christened with the traditional bottle of champagne in a private ceremony on Sunday and then continue on to Montreal with a cargo of salt.

Please e-mail with pictures or updates




Congressman Calls for Tighter Security at Soo Locks

10/13
Michigan Congressman Bart Stupak has written a letter to President Bush requesting increased military security at the Soo Locks. This request is in response to an incident last weekend involving the suspicious detailed video taping of the locks and their infrastructure by two men.

A local newspaper reported that the men and the van were on a FBI surveillance list. The Michigan Sate Police told the Associated Press that the incident may have been "blown a little out of proportion" and the men were not on a surveillance list.

The two men were described by the local paper as being of "apparent Middle-east heritage". The video taping pair live in Dearborn, MI which has about 20,000 Arab American residents. Whether an incident of international terrorism or just international boat watching, Congressman Stupak called the incident unsettling and requested adequate attention from President Bush to protect the locks.

Just what "adequate attention" will mean to the Soo Locks remains to be seen. The Corps of Engineers was obtaining more private guards and Congressman Stupak has requested military security personnel, according to the Associated Press.

Reported by: Chris Tuttle




Sylvia Headed for Dry Dock

10/13
The disabled salty Sylvia will be towed early next week to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs. While transiting the Seaway a mooring chain of a buoy wrapped around the shaft and possibly bent the shaft.

The vessel docked at the wall near the Eisenhower Lock. The Seaway was closed while divers completed underwater inspections. The Seaway reopened at 7:25 p.m.

The tow is expected to begin on Sunday or Monday and enter the dry dock on Tuesday or Wednesday. The ship's owners were reviewing bids for the job to tow the vessel to Port Weller. The tugs Duga and Advantage are possible tugs for the job.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt




National Steel Pellet plant to shut down for 6 weeks

10/13
National Steel Pellet Co. in Keewatin, Minn., will close Oct. 28 for six weeks to reduce taconite pellet inventories.

"We have too many pellets on the dock,'' Tom Peluso, National Steel Pellet Co. general manager, told the Duluth News Tribune.

NSPC ships its pellets by the BNSF railroad to the BNSF ore dock in Superior, Wis.

Idling the plant will reduce its annual production by 600,000 tons. The plant will now turnout about 4.8 million tons of pellets this year.

Some work at the mine and plant will continue during the shutdown, but many of the plant’s 500 employees will laid off or asked to take vacations.

National Steel Pellet Co. is owned by National Steel Corp., which is owned by Nippon Kokan KK.

Reported by: Al Miller




J.S. St. John departs

10/13
The sand sucker J.S. St. John departed Port Weller Dry Docks Friday morning returning to its home port of Erie, PA. The small vessel was in for repairs to bearings that had failed. This work was unrelated to her recent dry docking.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt




Canadiana Hull

10/13
The partially sunken hull of the former passenger ship Canadiana is once again expected to be moved from her resting place in the Welland Canal. The once proud steamer has had her decks burned away and is resting partially sunken on the bottom.

The vessel last operated during the 1958 season and spent many years in lay-up moving from port to port until she was purchased by the Friends of the Canadiana. The group towed the vessel to the Marsh Engineering Dock at Humberstone, Ontario for dry docking in 1988 in hopes of restoring the vessel.

Efforts to restore the vessel failed and it is reported that the owners of the land would like the vessel moved. Plans are in the early stages but the hull will likely be scrapped or could be sunken as a dive attraction.

More information on the Canadiana




Green Bay News

10/13
The Algomarine arrived in Green Bay early Friday morning about 3:00 a.m. It unloaded salt at the Fox River Dock and then departed at 9:45 a.m. The barge McKee Sons and tug Invincible were also in Green Bay Friday morning docked at the Reiss Coal Dock.

Reported by: Jason Leino




Toledo Update

10/13
The Canadian Voyager was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator on Friday. The CSL Niagara was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard, it is unknown when she will be removed from the drydock.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Jean Parisien and John J. Boland today, followed by the American Republic on Monday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Buckeye on Thursday 18 Oct. There are no other vessels in port at the time of this report.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Vancouver Sightings

10/13
In late August a number of vessels were spotted in Vancouver and the Fraser River that have a connection to the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River.

PRINCESS SUPERIOR : up until 1993, this train ferry was in service between Thunder Bay and Duluth under the name INCAN SUPERIOR.
GLENSHIEL : tug laid up somewhere along the Fraser River. Built at Owen Sound, Ont. in 1943.
ABITIBI : excursion vessel. Built by Canadian Vickers, Montreal. She operated as a tug in the Great Lakes until 1974 towing log booms.
GULF IVY : tug which was converted on the Fraser River into an excursion vessel for operation out of a Venezuelan port under that country's flag. A sister ship to Abitibi, she was originally named KAM and operated in the Lakes until 1967 towing log booms.
OCEAN WRESTLER : ocean-going tug which is owned by a McKeil subsidiary and is foreign-flag. She went to Hamilton in Nov. 1999 towing the oil barge Salty Dog 1 .
TALAPUS : a small tanker built by Marine Industries at Sorel in 1937 as BEECEELITE. She was laid up at North Vancouver at the Allied Shipbuilders yard.
PACIFIC AURORA : a coastal passenger ship that was laid up. She is a product of Collingwood Shipyards built in 1962 as TAVERNER for Canadian National.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Lighthouse Festival

10/13
The sixth-annual Great Lakes Lighthouse Festival takes place today and Sunday. Be sure to stop by and visit with the staff of Great Laker Magazine in the vendor area.

Planned events include:
Saturday, the events start at 10 a.m. From that time until 6 p.m., the Alpena Civic and Convention Center and Holiday Inn will have lighthouse and life-saving exhibits, nautical items for sale, entertainment, educational programs, authors and artists and food and drinks. Ships on the Thunder Bay River downtown will be open for tours.

Sunday, the Convention Center and Holiday Inn will be open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and will have a live auction of nautical memorabilia and raffle. Saturday's activities will continue on Sunday.

Click here for more information




Picture Updates

10/13
I am in Alpena for the Lighthouse Festival and am having a problem with my connection. I can't download images and I have a number of reports with pictures that I hope to download tomorrow.. connection willing.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 13

The SASKATCHEWAN PIONEER made her first trip out of Thunder Bay, Ont. with grain on October 13, 1983.

The tug GLENADA towed the BROOKDALE (2) from Port Colborne to Newman's scrap yard at Port Maitland, Ont. the week of October 13, 1980.

On October 13, 1902 the MAUNALOA collided with her whaleback consort BARGE 129 on Lake Superior and sank it 30 miles northwest of Vermilion Point, which is between Upper Michigan's Crisp and Whitefish Points. The MAUNALOA had been towing the BARGE 129, both vessels loaded with iron ore, when the towline parted in heavy seas. While trying to regain control of the barge, they came together and the steamer's port anchor raked the side of the barge which started taking on water. The crew was taken off the barge before it sank.

On 13 October 1875, off Alpena, Michigan, the tug E. H. MILLER had her boiler explode while racing with the tug CITY OF ALPENA -- both in quest of a tow. The ALPENA, who was ahead of the MILLER when she blew up, immediately turned around to pick up survivors. The ALPENA sunk in minutes. The engineer, fireman and a boy were rescued, but the captain and cook were lost. The fireman was in such poor shape that it was thought that he would not live.

On 13 October 1877, the Port Huron Times reported that the tug PRINDIVILLE and the 2-mast schooner PORTLAND had both gone ashore at the Straits of Mackinac and been pounded to pieces.

On 13 October 1886, SELAH CHAMBERLAIN (wooden propeller steam barge, 212', 1207 gt, built in 1873 at Cleveland, OH) collided with the 222' wooden lumber hooker JOHN PRIDGEON JR. in heavy fog off Sheboygan, WI. The CHAMBERLAIN had been towing the schooner FAYETTE BROWN. The CHAMBERLAIN sank quickly. Five of the crew went down with the vessel when the lifeboat davits became fouled and they were unable to launch the lifeboat. The rest of the crew made it to shore in the other lifeboat after a 3-hour pull through the fog.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




LTV deal could affect Taconite Harbor

10/12
An agreement by Cleveland-Cliffs and Minnesota Power to purchase many of the assets of the shuttered LTV Steel Mining Co. could revive shipping through Taconite Harbor on Minnesota’s North Shore, the Duluth News Tribune reported Thursday.

The $87.5 million deal transfers ownership of the Hoyt Lakes taconite plant and its related mining properties to Cleveland-Cliffs and its 225-megawatt electrical generating plant to a Minnesota Power subsidiary. The deal must still be approved by a federal bankruptcy court in Ohio.

The LTV property is not expected to reopen as a producer of taconite pellets, but it might eventually see use as a processor of copper or nickel mined from nearby deposits.

"Clearly we don't see that operation coming on line as an iron ore property,'' Ralph Berge, Cleveland-Cliffs spokesman, told the newspaper. "But we are buying it because there is some potential there. We are interested in working with the state of Minnesota and other constituencies to bring something else there.''

Teck Cominco, a Canadian nonferrous minerals development firm, is exploring copper and nickel mining near the taconite plant.

John Brinzo, Cleveland-Cliffs chairman and chief executive, said the LTV purchase could be used to provide “transportation support services to other Minnesota mining operations.''

Some industry experts speculate that Cliffs might use the 74-mile railroad and loading dock at Taconite Harbor to ship pellets from Cliffs-managed Hibbing Taconite Co. That would revive shipping at the idle port but it would harm the BNSF ore dock in Superior, which currently ships pellets from Hibbing Taconite.

Also located in Taconite Harbor is the LTV electrical generating station. Rainy River Energy Corp.-Taconite Harbor, a subsidiary of Minnesota Power, would use the electrical plant to supply energy to industrial customers, other utilities or residential customers, or sell the power on the open market.

The power plant will be fired with low-mercury coal from Wyoming. In the deal, the company received a stockpile of about 150,000 tons of coal -- about three months' of fuel. Additional coal could be shipped by boat, but Minnesota Power’s purchase of the power plant include rail rights to the plant, which leaves open the possibility of it receiving coal by train.

LTV Steel Corp. permanently closed LTV Steel Mining Co. in January, citing high stripping costs, poor pellet quality and the need for $700 million in modernization. The shutdown put 1,400 people out of work.

Reported by: Al Miller




Follow the Leader in Manistee

10/12
In a rare occasion in Manistee, the Sam Laud and the Wolverine arrived within five minutes of each other heading inbound to Manistee Lake. The Wolverine arrived at 5:15 p.m. on Thursday with the Sam Laud following ten minutes behind her.

The duo followed each other up the Manistee River with only 2,000 feet between the two. Both had anchored for windy conditions yesterday near Mackinaw and had followed each other down the lake. The Wolverine was bound for Tondu with a load of coal from Conneaut, Ohio and the Laud was bound for Morton Salt with a low quality grade of coal from Toledo, Ohio.

This was a great photo opportunity as two vessels in Manistee are seldom seen. The vessels will depart around 4:00 a.m. this morning with the Wolverine bound for Port Inland and the Sam Laud heading up to load stone.

The Fred R. White will be in on Sunday with a load of coal, and a vessel with Petroleum coke will also call on the Lake Michigan port in the near future. The Seng dock still has two loads of salt coming in the next few weeks.

The McKeil tug Paul E. No. 1 has been in Manistee for a few days providing assistance to the two tug/barges and the Capt. Ralph Tucker.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak and Steve Harold




Quebecois Returns to Service

10/12
The Quebecois left her Temporary lay-up Thursday morning and docked at United Grain Growers "a" house at 9:15 a.m. to take on a load of Grain.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Canadian Mariner Joins Grain Rush

10/12
Late Thursday afternoon saw the Canadian Mariner upbound in the Welland Canal, after leaving her lay-up berth in Toronto. Also in the canal was the NST Challenge in lock 1 and the Jean Parisien below the lock, both heading upbound.

Canadian Mariner in the canal.
Approaching Lock 2.
Stern view.
J.S. St. John has been moved to the fit out wall at Port Weller Dry Docks.
Jean Parisien below Lock 1.
NST Challenge.

Reported by: Alex Howard




Maumee in Holland

10/12
The Maumee made her first visit to Holland Thursday, bringing a load of coal from KCBX in Chicago to the Holland Board of Public Works' James DeYoung power plant. She arrived at the harbor entrance before dawn and waited for daylight to enter the channel travel to the eastern end of Lake Macatawa.

Reported by: Bob VandeVusse and Dale Rosema




Twin Ports Report

10/12
James R. Barker, laid up the past two weeks at the Duluth port authority's Garfield C berth, got under way Thursday. The vessel loaded at the DMIR ore dock before departing.

The grain trade remained steady. Kinsman Independent was back in port to load at Cenex Harvest States and General Mills S in Superior. Straight-decker Algocape entered port about 4:30 p.m. and was proceeding at a crawl to the General Mills elevator in Duluth. Lucky Lady was loading at Peavey and Gunay A was loading at the other Harvest States berth.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo News

10/12
The Arthur M. Anderson was loading coal at the CSX Coal Docks on Thursday. The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Jean Parisien today followed by the John J. Boland on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will now be the Courtney Burton on Tuesday 16 Oct. followed by the Buckeye on Thursday 18 Oct.

The Ste Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard and may be removed from the drydock today.

Classic Toledo Shipping
Helen Evans upbound from the Craig Bridge bound for one of the Elevators upriver to load a grain cargo.
Peter Reiss as a barge in winter lay-up at Bayview Park.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Update

10/12
The Cuyahoga was inbound the Cuyahoga River Thursday morning for Ontario 4. The tug Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys Cement II was outbound that afternoon. The American Republic was on a shuttle run to the LTV Steel Mill and the Isadora was at the Lakefront Docks. The Richard Reiss was expected to arrive Thursday night and the JAW Iglehart this morning.

Pictures by TZ.
Cuyahoga arrives.
Stern view.
Isadora inbound.
Stern view.
Close up.
St Marys Cement II.
American Republic arrives.
Stern view.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Hamilton Update

10/12
Thursday afternoon the Windoc and Canadian Provider remained moored at Pier 8 with no activity seen around either vessel.

The saltie Tecam Sea was unloading steel products at Pier 14.

At 1:35 p.m. the Jean Parisien finished unloading its cargo of coal at Stelco and departed the dock. The vessel transits the Burlington Ship Canal at 1:50 p.m. into Lake Ontario.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Lighthouse Festival

10/12
The sixth-annual Great Lakes Lighthouse Festival takes place today through Sunday. Be sure to stop by Saturday and Sunday and visit with the staff of Great Laker Magazine in the vendor area.

Planned events include:
Thursday: A day to tour the Alpena area on your own. The Jesse Besser Museum and Planetarium, Old & New Presque Isle Lighthouses, The Huron Lights store of Nautical Gifts, Gallery and Mini-museum, ships on the Thunder Bay River downtown, aerial lighthouse tours. All these attractions will be available during the weekend.

Friday the outside venders will be setting up and selling their wares. The activities start to come together for the weekend.

Saturday, the events start at 10 a.m. From that time until 6 p.m., the Alpena Civic and Convention Center and Holiday Inn will have lighthouse and life-saving exhibits, nautical items for sale, entertainment, educational programs, authors and artists and food and drinks. Ships on the Thunder Bay River downtown will be open for tours.

Sunday, the Convention Center and Holiday Inn will be open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and will have a live auction of nautical memorabilia and raffle. Saturday's activities will continue on Sunday.

Click here for more information




Today in Great Lakes History - October 12

The JEAN PARISIEN suffered considerable bottom damage when she ran aground near Comfort Island about a mile west of Alexandria Bay, NY. She was released October 12, 1981 and returned to service after repairs were completed at the Vickers Montreal yard.

The CLIFF S VICTORY was sold October 12, 1985 to Hai International Corp. of New York for scrapping in the orient and transferred to Panamanian registry. Her name was changed to c) SAVIC, utilizing the "S" from CLIFFS, the "VIC" from VICTORY and inserting an "A". All the other letters were painted out.

The JOHN A. KLING sailed on her maiden voyage October 12, 1922 light from Manitowoc to load stone at Rockport, MI.

The Keel was laid October 12, 1925 for the COLONEL JAMES PICKANDS.

The SYLVANIA returned to service on October 12, 1967. She sank at the Peerless Cement Co. dock at Port Huron, MI in June of that year after being struck by the Canada Steamship Lines package freight steamer RENVOYLE.

The tug EDNA G. remained at Two Harbors until October 12, 1993 when she was towed to the Fraser Shipyard at Superior, WI by the GLT tug KANSAS. She is now on display as a floating exhibit for the city.

On October 12, 1967, the Canadian Leader entered service as the last new steam-powered vessel on the Great Lakes. The vessel, originally named Feux Follets by her first owners, Papachristidis Company Limited, was given her present name when it was sold to Upper Lakes Shipping in 1972.

At 3:00 a.m., 12 October 1870, the 76 ton tug ONTARIO caught fire and burned to the waterline while lying at Harrow's dock in Algonac, MI.

On 12 October 1901, ALVINA (wooden schooner-rigged scow-barge, 89’, 95 GT, built in 1871 at Fair Haven, MI) was being towed by the steamer WESTON and had a load of 700 barrels of lubricating oil. They were bound from Cleveland for Manistique. The ALVINA was overwhelmed in a storm and sank near Thunder Bay Island in Lake Huron. Her entire crew made it to shore in her yawl. Her cargo was salvaged five days later.

On 12 October 1880, TRADER (wooden propeller, 115', 169 gt, built in 1865 at Marine City, MI) was carrying lumber in a storm on Lake Michigan. She was battered severely and became waterlogged. Her crew abandoned her with water up to her decks. They were saved by the schooner GUIDE in a daring rescue. A few days later, in the "Alpena Storm", her wreckage washed ashore near Holland, Michigan and she was erroneously reported as another "all-hands" victim of that storm.

On 12 October 1874, on her maiden voyage, the tug MARY passed Port Huron down bound with the bark FAVORITE in tow. The tug was owned by William Hardison of Port Huron.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Cliffs, Minnesota Power agree to buy most assets of LTV Steel Mining Company

10/11
Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. and Duluth-based Minnesota Power have agreed to buy most of the assets of shuttered LTV Steel Mining Co.

The deal, expected to be formally announced Oct. 10, must still be approved by the bankruptcy court overseeing LTV Steel’s filing for Chapter 11 protection. Even if the sale is approved, however, experts say it’s unlikely the former LTV taconite mine and processing plant will reopen as a taconite producer.

According to the Duluth News Tribune, Minnesota officials have signed off on an $87.5 million deal under which Minnesota Power, Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. and the Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation Board would acquire assets of the shuttered LTV Steel Mining Co. taconite plant in Hoyt Lakes.

"I believe it's the best thing for Northeastern Minnesota,'' IRRRB Commissioner John Swift said of a Cleveland-Cliffs and Minnesota Power ownership. "It gives us the best promise that the property will be available for future economic development in nonferrous mining or other developments.''

Under the agreement, a Cleveland-Cliffs subsidiary would pay LTV Steel Corp. $12.5 million to acquire the LTV Steel Mining Co. taconite plant and related property. That includes all the taconite plant's processing facilities, the 74-mile railroad linking Hoyt Lakes to Taconite Harbor on the North Shore, and the 2,234-foot loading dock at Taconite Harbor.

A Minnesota Power subsidiary would pay $75 million to LTV Steel Corp. and Cleveland-Cliffs for the taconite plant's 225-megawatt electrical generating facility, transmission lines and property. The power plant is located in Taconite Harbor and in years past received coal shipments by Great Lakes freighters. The plant can generate enough electricity for a city of about 100,000. A substantial amount of capital would be required to upgrade the plant's environmental controls.

The IRRRB would obtain several thousand acres of LTV Steel Mining Co. property. That property could be used in the future for companies mining minerals other than iron, officials said.

Any agreement must be approved by U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Youngstown, Ohio. Swift says it's his understanding that the bankruptcy court would have 23 days from the date of signing to approve an agreement.

Reported by: Al Miller




Bow Thruster Work

10/11
On a recent trip to Indiana Harbor the crew aboard the Oglebay Norton made repairs to the bow thruster tube. The stern was ballasted down raising the bow from the water so crews could work in the tube. A survey by crew members offered a unique photo opportunity.

Picture by watchman Scott Gosselin
In the tube, Captain Pat Nelson (left), chief engineer Bob Calder (bottom of picture), and assistant chief engineer Donald Beaudoin (top).

Reported by: Sue Hayward




Presque Isle Unloads

10/11
The Presque Isle was in Conneaut Wednesday to unload ore from Two Harbors.

Backing in.
Looking down the bow.
Another view.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Twin Ports Report

10/11
Midwest Energy Terminal is expected to be busy Oct. 11 with Paul R. Tregurtha, Indiana harbor and Oglebay Norton all scheduled to load. Friday will be nearly as busy with Columbia Star, Courtney Burton and Canadian Progess scheduled to load. The Courtney Burton will be taking another load of coal to seldom-visited Ashland, Wis., and the Xcel Energy generating station there.

Around the Twin Ports at midday, Herbert C. Jackson was loading grain at Peavey in Superior, Millenium Raptor was loading at AGP and Vancouverborg was fueling and then expected to shift to the General Mills elevator in Duluth to load beet pulp pellets for Spain.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo News

10/11
The Southdown Challenger was at the Cemex Dock unloading a partial load of cement Wednesday. The Canadian Voyager was loading grain at the Anderson's "E" Elevator. The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard and may be moved Friday.

There were no other vessels in port at the time of this report.

The next scheduled coal boat due in at the CSX Docks will be the Arthur M. Anderson today followed by the Jean Parisien on Friday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco on Tuesday.

Classic Toledo Shipping
Northern Venture approaching the C&O Coal Docks to load a coal cargo for Hamilton, Ontario delivery.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Images

10/11
Below are images of traffic in Cleveland on Tuesday.

Isolda unloading.
Close up of her bulbous bow.
Stern view of the Isolda and the Kapitonas Domeika.
Tug Idaho beginning to turn the barge St. Marys II and tug Sea Eagle II.
Taking up the stern tow halfway through the turn.
The tow entering the Cuyahoga River.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Toronto News

10/11
The charter vessel Yankee Lady III was floated off the Toronto Drydock Wednesday afternoon, and the auxiliary schooner Alison Lake was placed on the dock.

The ferry Sam McBride finished her season on Sunday. The ferry Ongiara will resume the winter ferry schedule to the island on October 14, with no service to Centre Island. The ferry Wm. Inglis will be kept in readiness as a back-up vessel.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Lighthouse Festival

10/11
The sixth-annual Great Lakes Lighthouse Festival takes place today through Sunday. Be sure to stop by Saturday and Sunday and visit with the staff of Great Laker Magazine in the vendor area.

Planned events include:
Thursday: A day to tour the Alpena area on your own. The Jesse Besser Museum and Planetarium, Old & New Presque Isle Lighthouses, The Huron Lights store of Nautical Gifts, Gallery and Mini-museum, ships on the Thunder Bay River downtown, aerial lighthouse tours. All these attractions will be available during the weekend.

Friday the outside venders will be setting up and selling their wares. The activities start to come together for the weekend.

Saturday, the events start at 10 a.m. From that time until 6 p.m., the Alpena Civic and Convention Center and Holiday Inn will have lighthouse and life-saving exhibits, nautical items for sale, entertainment, educational programs, authors and artists and food and drinks. Ships on the Thunder Bay River downtown will be open for tours.

Sunday, the Convention Center and Holiday Inn will be open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and will have a live auction of nautical memorabilia and raffle. Saturday's activities will continue on Sunday.

Click here for more information




Today in Great Lakes History - October 11

The BAIE COMEAU II cleared Sorel October 11, 1983 as c) AGIA TRIAS, Panamanian registry #1355. Her Canadian registry was closed on October 12, 1983. Her mission was to carry grain from New Orleans, La. to Mexican and Caribbean Island ports and sailed at least into the 1987 season. Subsequently she was renamed d) OCEAN VIEW, e) SEA DIAMOND, f) GOLDEN CREST and g) ATLANTIC WOOD in 1991 for Nexus Maritime Co. S.A., St. Vincent. Disposition unknown.

The MERCURY (2) scraped the South Grand Island Bridge in the Niagara River in heavy fog on October 11, 1974. Her forward mast snapped off, the midship mast was tilted and her smoke stack was toppled. She proceeded after the mishap to G&W Welding at Cleveland under her own power for repairs.

WHEAT KING, under tow arrived at Chittagong, Bangladesh on October 11, 1989 to be broken up.

In 1911 the Chief Wawatam arrived at St. Ignace and began service shortly thereafter.

On 11 October 1913, THOMAS H. CAHOON (3 mast wooden schooner-barge, 166’, 431 GT, built in 1881 at E. Saginaw) was carrying lumber in tow of the steamer C. W. CHAMBERLAIN. They were bound from Sault Ste. Marie to Byng Inlet. However during a storm, the CAHOON stranded and went to pieces on “Kenny Shoal” by the southwest corner of Innes Island in Georgian Bay. No lives were lost.

On 11 October 1839, DEWITT CLINTON (wooden passenger/package freight side-wheeler, 147', 413 t, built in 1836 at Huron, Ohio) foundered off Milwaukee with the loss of 5 lives. She was recovered the following year and lasted until 1851. She and her near-twin ROBERT FULTON were reportedly the first Lake steamers built primarily as freighters with relatively few passenger accommodations.

On 11 October 1866, GREAT WEST (wooden 3-mast bark, 175', 765t, built in 1854 at Buffalo, NY) was carrying wheat in a storm on Lake Michigan when she stranded on Racine Reef. She was reported to be a total loss but she may have been recovered and then lost near Chicago in 1876. When launched, she was the largest sailing vessel on the Lakes and much was made of her beautiful lines. She was diagonally braced with iron. She stood 174 feet tall from her deck to her masthead. So if she were sailing today, although she'd be able to sail under the Mackinac Bridge, she'd be stopped at the Blue Water Bridge whose roadway is only 152 feet above the water.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Coast Guard Escort

10/10
Around the lakes the U.S. Coast Guard is tightening security on normally free-flowing ship traffic, increasing armed patrols and expanding security zones around the Great Lakes region to protect against attacks that could cripple shipping routes or strike waterfront cities.

The Coast Guard has expanded patrolled security zones around such areas as drinking water intake pipes and nuclear power plants and provides armed escorts for tankers and other selected vessels.

Included in theses escorts is the cruise ship c. Columbus. She has been receiving escorts in all restricted waterways.

On September 29, while departing Chicago Harbor, an unidentified speedboat came charging directly at the c.Columbus shortly after it had turned from Navy Pier. A Coast Guard escort boat sped, with blue light flashing, siren screaming and guns ready around the cruise ship's bow and cut directly into the path of the oncoming speedboat blocking it and ordering it to "HALT!" The careless boater, who turned out to be simply showing off, was turned back and warned to remain at least 100 yards from the cruise ship.

Those who witnessed the event took comfort in the Coast Guard's presence as they entered Lake Michigan, thinking back to last fall's terrorist attack in Yemen on the U.S.S. Cole. The Coast Guard then radioed c.Columbus and informed the ship that "If you see anyone else who makes you uncomfortable, just let us know."

Like its motto, "Semper Paratus, Always Ready" Coast Guard units around the Great Lakes remain at their highest state of alert and readiness since World War II.

The way clear, a Coast Guard boat escorts the Columbus from Chicago.


Reported by: Wes Oleszewski




Scenic Route for Reserve

10/10
The Reserve passed through the Portage Canal in Michigan's Upper Peninsula Tuesday morning as they headed for Two Harbors to load for Indiana Harbor. The ship normally would sail to the port on Lake Superior but was using the water way due to heavy weather on Lake Superior. The Reserve passed through the lift bridge in Houghton shortly after 10:00 a.m. and continued on for Lake Superior.

Pictures by: Jim Noetzel
The Upper Peninsula provides a colorful back drop.
Close up of the bow.
Passing under the bridge.

Reported by: Bryan Thomas and Jim Noetzel




Long Load for Burns Harbor

10/10
The Burns Harbor remained in Silver Bay loading on Tuesday. The vessel arrive at 8:00 a.m. Monday to begin what was expected to be a two-day loading process.

The dock is reported to have limited capacity when loading a 1000-footer from the bins. Once the bins are emptied into the ship, it can take some time to move pellets from the stockpile to the loading bins.

In the past few months the dock has loaded a vessel halfway and then sent them to Superior, WI to complete loading. Before the ore dock at Taconite Harbor was closed it could load a 1000-footer in 4-6 hours.

Reported by: Stephen Gose and Mike Cleary




Mid-River Mail

10/10
Below are images taken from the J.W. Westcott II as it delivered mail to the passing freighters on the Detroit River.

Approaching the Saginaw.
Coming along side.
Meeting the American Republic below the Ambassador Bridge.
Stern view.
Westcott II at the dock.

Reported by: Gordon A. Williams




Detroit Traffic

10/10
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Monday evening.

Tug Forney downbound in the Wyandotte Channel.
Stern view.
Stephen B Roman upbound at Grassy Island headed for the Premier Concrete Dock at the Ambassador Bridge.
Stern view.
H Lee White downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Middletown downbound at Fighting Island North Light.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Cleveland Update

10/10
The Salty Kapitonas Domeika was berthed at the lakefront dock Tuesday evening. The Domeika was expected to depart about 8:00 p.m. with the assistance of the G tug Delaware. The Isolda was also unloading with the assistance of shore side cranes Tuesday. The Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys II arrived off Cleveland at 5:30 p.m. The tug Idaho assisted in turning the St. Marys to head upriver stern first. This tow was completed by 8:00 p.m.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Toledo News

10/10
The Canadian Voyager was upbound the Maumee River Tuesday morning under tow of the Gaelic tugs Susan Hoey and William Hoey bound for the Andersons "E" Elevator to load a grain cargo. The Courtney Burton finished loading her coal cargo at the CSX Docks and departed in the late morning. The Jean Parisien followed the Burton to load coal. The Algomarine arrived at the CSX stone dock during the afternoon to unload stone.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Arthur M. Anderson on Thursday, followed by the Jean Parisien on Friday.

The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco on Tuesday, Oct. 16.

The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - October 10

While downbound with coal in the St. Lawrence River on October 10,1981, the JEAN PARISIEN suffered considerable bottom damage when she ran aground near Comfort Island about a mile west of Alexandria Bay, NY.

The BROOKDALE (2) was towed out of Toronto on October 10, 1980 by the tug GLENADA, assisted by the tug TERRY S. She was one her way to the cutters torch.

The CHAMPLAIN (3), with her former fleet mate CADILLAC (4) was towed past Gibraltar October 10, 1987 heading for Aliaga, Turkey for dismantling by Cukurova Celik Endustrisi A.S.

The SAVIC (CLIFFS VICTORY) cleared New York on October 10, 1986.

The HULL NO.1, ex KINSMAN ENTERPRISE(1), being towed by the Polish tug JANTAR arrived in Aliaga, Turkey on October 10, 1989 to be scrapped there.

October 10, 1906 - The PERE MARQUETTE 5 was sold to The Barry Transportation Co. for $75,000. The PERE MARQUETTE 5 was the last of the "break-bulk" boats operated by the Pere Marquette Railway Co.

On 10 October 1905, CHARLES H. BURTON (3 mast wooden schooner, 158’, 514 GT, built in 1873 at Bangor, MI) was carrying coal in a storm in Lake Erie when she was driven ashore 4 1/2 miles east of Barcelona, NY and broke up. No lives were lost. She had been built on the hull of the bark GLENBULAH that had burned in the Chicago fire of 1871.

On 10 October 1877, ELIZA R. TURNER (wooden schooner, 156', 409 gt, built in 1867 at Trenton, MI) was carrying wheat from Detroit to Buffalo when a storm drove her aground nine miles west of Long Point on Lake Erie where she was wrecked. The skipper and cook drowned, but the remaining 8 were saved.

The tug CRUSADER of Oswego burned and sank in the middle of the Straits of Mackinac about 9:00 PM on 10 October 1878.

On 10 October 1877, ABEONA (wooden scow-schooner, 100t, built in 1863 at Lambert, Ontario) was carrying lumber and shingles down bound on Lake Huron when she stranded during a storm one mile west of Port Austin where she reportedly later broke up.

In 1877, PORTLAND (2-mast wooden schooner, 118', 250 t, built in 1847 at Pillar Point, NY) stranded and went to pieces north of False Presque Isle on Lake Huron. Salvage attempts only retrieved her anchor and chain.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Vancouverborg Unloads

10/09
The Dutch-flagged Vancouverborg made a rare visit to the Cutler-Laliberte-Magner dock in Superior on Oct. 8 to unload salt using the dock's bridge crane.

This is the first vessel of the season to be unloaded by CLM's bridge crane. A Wagenborg vessel also used the crane to unload last season. Before that, no vessels had used the bridge crane since the Kinsman Independent and William A. McGonagle in the early and mid-1980s.

Bridge cranes were once a common sight on the Twin Ports skyline. The ports' numerous coal and stone docks often each had several bridge cranes, which could unload cargo from ships and dump it onto the dock. Once the ship was gone, the crane could shift the cargo on the dock or load railcars and trucks.

Bridge cranes got their name because they span the dock like a bridge. They are supported at each end by legs set on large steel wheels that roll along parallel tracks. This enables the bridge crane to move the length of the dock. An unloading bucket and operator's cab are suspended beneath the bridge span, and can move the length of the span.

In recent years, most of the remaining bridge cranes in the Twin Ports have been demolished. The only working bridge crane remaining is at the CLM dock. Most deliveries to this dock are now made by self-unloaders, so the bridge crane is primarily used to move stone and salt around the dock.

The bridge cranes are massive structures. The span of the CLM dock is longer than the 443-foot Vancouverborg.

The Dutch-flagged Vancouverborg, launched in 2001, beneath the bridge crane at the CLM dock in Superior, Wis.
A closer view of the crane's bucket dipping into the vessel's holds.
Another close up of the bucket.
Video of the bridge crane in action. 1 meg
More bridge crane action. 1 meg

Reported by: Al Miller




LeLevant Departs

10/09
The Cruise ship LeLevant departed Kingston on Wednesday after a short stay "riding her chain" in the outer harbor. Passengers were shuttled back and forth to take in the sites of the harbor front.

At noon, she raised anchor and proceeded downbound on the north side of Wolfe Island giving her passengers a rare glimpse of this side of the Seaway.

Reported by: Brian Johnson




Port Inland Recap

10/09
The following vessels loaded at Port Inland from the Middle of August to the middle of September.
Vessel Name Number of Trips
American Mariner 1
McKee Sons 1
Pathfinder 1
Middletown 1
Calumet 1
John G Munson 2
Kaye E Barker 1
American Republic 1
H Lee White 1
Joe Frantz 1
Buffalo 2
Sam Laud 3
Great Lakes Trader 2
Algorail 1
Capt. Henry Jackman 1
Algowest 1
Joe Block 1
Wolverine 2
David Z Norton 1
Earl W Oglebay 7
Wilfred Sykes 10

So far the three Algoma Vessel's have represented the only Canadian boats to load at Port Inland in the past month. Scheduled to load at Port Inland over the past weekend was the David Z. Norton on Saturday, Wilfred Sykes on Sunday as well as the Arthur M Anderson. On Monday the Canadian Navigator was expected to make a rare visit to load with the Sykes and David Z. Norton both due back that day.

Bow view of the Maumee.
Fred R. White Jr. at anchor waiting for a dock.
The Maumee side view also view of the harbor.
Stern view of the Maumee loading.
Courtney Burton loading.
Courtney Burton stern view at the loading dock.

Reported by: Scott Best




Twin Ports Report

10/09
Traffic was moderate in the Twin Ports on Oct. 8. In the grade trade, Canadian Prospector was loading at Cenex Harvest States No. 2 and Federal Maas was loading at Cargill B1. Vancouverborg was unloading salt at the CLM dock in Superior and American Mariner was under the gravity chutes at the DMIR ore dock. Down at the BNSF ore dock, Stewart J. Cort was loading, to be followed late in the day by George A. Stinson.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

10/09
The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder arrived at the Kuhlman Dock to unload cargo on Monday. The Sam Laud finished loading coal at the CSX Dock and departed, the John G. Munson followed her loading coal and departed in the late afternoon. The McKee Sons was due in late Monday evening.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Courtney Burton and Jean Parisien on Tuesday followed by the Arthur M. Anderson on Thursday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco on Sunday.

The salt water vessel Gunay-A was at the T.W.I. Dock. The ex Boblo passenger boat Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Quebec Images

10/09
Below are recent images taken around Quebec.

Theodore Too entering Beauharnois Lock 3.
Stern view.
Canadian Leader in Lock 3.
Departing.
Anna Desgagnes Loading above Lock 2, cote Ste. Catherine's for the Artic.
Anna Desgagnes with her ramp down.
CSL Laurentian entering St Lambert Lock.
In the lock.
Small cruise ship Seabourn Pride with Imperial Lachine on her port side.
Large cruise ship Crystal Harmony at Alexander Pier Montreal.
Stern view.
Daniel Mc Allister to be used as a museum.
New lock gates Lachine Canal.

Reported by: Kent Malo




Lighthouse Festival

10/09
The sixth-annual Great Lakes Lighthouse Festival is planned for October 11-14. Be sure to stop by Saturday and Sunday and visit with the staff of Great Laker Magazine in the vendor area.

Planned events include:
Thursday: A day to tour the Alpena area on your own. The Jesse Besser Museum and Planetarium, Old & New Presque Isle Lighthouses, The Huron Lights store of Nautical Gifts, Gallery and Mini-museum, ships on the Thunder Bay River downtown, aerial lighthouse tours. All these attractions will be available during the weekend.

Friday the outside venders will be setting up and selling their wares. The activities start to come together for the weekend.

Saturday, the events start at 10 a.m. From that time until 6 p.m., the Alpena Civic and Convention Center and Holiday Inn will have lighthouse and life-saving exhibits, nautical items for sale, entertainment, educational programs, authors and artists and food and drinks. Ships on the Thunder Bay River downtown will be open for tours.

Sunday, the Convention Center and Holiday Inn will be open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and will have a live auction of nautical memorabilia and raffle. Saturday's activities will continue on Sunday.

Click here for more information




Today in Great Lakes History - October 09

The CHIMO (b) CANADIAN RANGER) was moved onto the Port Weller Dry Dock on October 9, 1983 where work began to cut her apart forward of her aft located pilot house and engine room.

The GULF MACKENZIE (b) L. ROCHETTE) was launched October 9, 1976

The SASKATCHEWAN PIONEER arrived in the Welland Canal on her delivery trip October 9, 1983 en route for her formal christening at Thunder Bay.

The JAMES DAVIDSON was launched October 9, 1920 for the Globe Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH (G.A. Tomlinson, mgr.)

On October 9, 1984 the PATERSON (1) was sold to Shearmet Recycling, a Thunder Bay ship breaker, and was broken up at their Mission River dock.

The a) COL. JAMES M. SCHOONMAKER (b) WILLIS B. BOYER) sailed from the shipyard on her maiden voyage on October 9, 1911 to Toledo, OH where she loaded coal bound for Sheboygan, WI. The SCHOONMAKER was the largest vessel on the Great Lakes when she came out. For much of the decade this vessel either broke or held many bulk cargo records.

On 9 October 1820, ASP (wooden schooner, 57 T, built in 1808 at Mississauga, Ontario) was carrying lumber and staves when she sprang a leak near Long Point in Lake Ontario. She waterlogged, then capsized. The upturned vessel was driven across the lake and finally went ashore off the Salmon River at Mexico Bay, NY and broke up quickly. 9 of the 11 onboard lost their lives. She was originally built as the British armed schooner ELIZABETH.

On 9 October 1931, CHARLES H. BRADLEY (wooden propeller, 201', 804 gt, built in 1890 at W. Bay City, MI) was carrying pulpwood and towing the barge GRAMPIAN. She was traversing the Portage Canal in the Keweenaw Peninsula when she ran onto a bar and stranded. The barge kept coming and ploughed into her stern. The Bradley caught fire and burned to the waterline. The wreck still lies in 6' - 17' of water just off the mouth of the Sturgeon River.

On 9 October 1895, AFRICA (wooden propeller steam barge, 135', 352 gc, built in 1873 at Kingston, Ontario) was towing the schooner SEVERN in a storm on Lake Huron when she struck a reef, 15 miles south of Cove Island light on Lake Huron. She released SEVERN which rode out the storm. However, AFRICA broke up in that storm. All 13 of her crew were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Ste Clair Expected to Move

10/08
Hull repairs and painting are nearing completion at Toledo Shiprepair on the Steamer Ste. Claire. The Ste. Claire will be refloated and moved to the Hocking Valley dock in Toledo on Thursday. Repairs to the superstructure will begin there immediately and are expected to be completed by mid summer 2002. There has been no announcement as to what the Ste Claire will be used for.

Ste Claire in dry dock.
Work on the hull.
Close up.
Sam Buchanan under the hull.
Propellor.

Reported by: Sam Buchanan




Voyager Returns to Service

10/08
The Canadian Voyager has departed its temporary lay-up berth in Toronto. She left about 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.

Reported by: Bill Bird and Gerry O.




Algorail Delivers

10/08
On Sunday the Algorail arrived in Gladstone with a load of salt. The cargo was loaded in Goderich and will be used to clear roads as winter approaches. Some parts of Michigan's Upper Peninsula have seen their first snowfall of the season, but no real accumulation..

Inbound.
Another view.

Reported by: Eric and Sandy Chapman




Marquette Update

10/08
During the month of September visits by vessels appeared to have improving in both harbors, but the number of vessel visits to Marquette is down compared to the same time frame last year. For the month of September, Marquette saw a total of 42 vessels which is down by 14% for the same period last year. This is the second best showing (by percentage) thus far this season. For the year, a total of 237 vessels have visited Marquette's harbor, down by 25% for the same period last year.

The increase continues to be in the number of vessels visiting the lower harbor. For the second month in a row, the number of vessels visiting the lower harbor improved for the same period last month. A total of 8 vessels visited the waters of the lower harbor, an increase of 33% over last September. For the year, 37 vessels have visited the lower harbor which is down by 21% for the same period last year. Leading the way with the most visits during the month of September was c. Columbus and the H. Lee White, each having 3 visits in the lower harbor. Other visits included the American Mariner with two visits and the Adam Cornelius who visited the lower harbor for the first time this season. So far this season, American Steamship has 29 visits (76%) followed by Hapag-Lloyd Cruises with 4 visits (11%), USCG with 3 visits (8%) and two others with one visit each (3%). Furthermore, U.S. vessels have 89% of the visits this season.

For the upper harbor, vessel visits is showing slight improvement compared to the previous months. A total of 34 vessels visited the upper harbor in the month of September, down by 21% from the same month last year when 43 vessels visited. For the season, 200 vessels have visited the upper harbor down by 25% compared to the same time frame last year when 268 vessels visits were recorded. Leading the way this month was the Lee Tregurtha and the Charles Beeghly, each having 5 visits. They were followed closely by the Algomarine and the Algosteel which each had 4 visits in September followed by the H. Lee White which had 3 visits. Five different vessels each had two visits which included the Kaye Barker, American Mariner, Great Lakes Trader, Paul Tregurtha, and the Buckeye. The James Barker, Mesabi Miner, and the John Boland each had one visit. So far this season, Algoma Central is leading the way with the most shipping line visits with 54 (27%) but Lakes Shipping is closing in fast with 49 visits (24%) followed by Interlake’s Steamship with 46 visits (23 %). American Steamship has 29 visits (14%) while Oglebay Norton has 9 visits (4%), Upper Lakes Barge has 8 visits (4%), Upper Lakes Group has 6 visits (3%) and Canadian Steamship has 2 visits(1%). American vessel visits outpace the Canadian by a 2-1 margin (69% to 31%).

Reported by: Art Pickering




Saginaw River News

10/08
On Sunday the Walter J McCarthy Jr departed the Consumers Energy/Karn Weadock Dock in Essexville at 5:00 p.m. She backed out to Light 12 and turned outbound for the lake. She had been stranded at the dock since arriving Friday to unload coal, due to high winds across the Saginaw Bay.

The Earl W. Oglebay passed the pump out station just above the Front Range Lights at the mouth of the Saginaw River at 8:05 p.m. She was headed for the Wirt Stone Dock in Bay City and will lighter there before going up to the Wirt Dock in Saginaw to finish.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Detroit Traffic

10/08
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Sunday.

Calumet downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Sandviken (Bahamas) in Ojibway Anchorage.
Old name showing on her stern.
Stern view.
Goviken (Bahamas) unloading at Morton Terminals. She departed about 11:45 headed for Chicago.
Stern view.
Durocher barges D2007 & D2006 loaded with rip rap at Nicholson's. The tug Champion is tied up at Bishop Park.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo News

10/08
The Canadian Transfer was at Andersons "K" Elevator unloading cargo and departed Sunday morning. The Atlantic Huron finished loading coal at the CSX Dock and departed. The salt water vessel Gunay-A was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo.

The Buckeye arrived at the Torco Dock Sunday morning to unload ore and was expected to depart in the afternoon. The former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire still remains in drydock at the Shipyard.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Sam Laud, John G. Munson, McKee Sons, and Courtney Burton on Monday, followed by the Jean Parisien on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco on Sunday 14 Oct.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Saginaw Bay loading coal at the C&O #4 Dock.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Special on TV

10/08
Tonight TV Ontario will air a Thanksgiving Special on "Canada's South Coast," the series of waterways that enables ships to travel from the heart of the continent to the open seas. In a one-hour documentary, Studio 2 joins Captain "Bill Sullivan" and the crew of the Canadian Venture as she sails from Thunder Bay on Lake Superior to Baie Comeau in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Check your local listings for times.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Boatnerd Gathering East

10/08
A weekend of boat watching and touring will take place October 27-28 at the Welland Canal. The program will be similar to last year's event with more details to follow later in the week. Check back for details.

2000 Gathering East




Weekly Updates

10/08
The regular weekly updates are now available. Click here to view




Fall Issue Preview

10/08
A preview of the Fall Issue of Great Laker Magazine is now available at www.greatlaker.com.

Our fall issue was delayed due to problems with airmail delivery after the events of Sept 11. The magazines will be mailed today and typically take one to three weeks to arrive.

The "In Port" feature for this issue is on Alpena and the Annual Lighthouse Festival. The entire story is online and we wanted everyone to be able to not only find out about the lighthouse festival in a timely way but for non-subscribers to see what Great Laker has to offer.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 08

The Keel was laid October 8,1976 for the 660 ft. forward section of the a) LEWIS WILSON FOY (b) OGLEBAY NORTON ) for the Bethlehem Steel Co., Cleveland, Ohio.

The MATHEWSTON (b RALPH S. MISENER (2) entered service on October 8, 1922. On her maiden voyage she sailed from Port Arthur with 11,634 tons of barley and wheat.

The Canadian registry for MENIHEK LAKE was officially closed on October 8, 1985 with the notation "sold Spain."

The WILLIAM G. MATHER arrived on October 8, 1988 in tow of the GLT tugs WYOMING and ALABAMA at the G&W Shipyard at Collision Bend in the Cuyahoga River to be refurbished.

On 8 October 1906, PASADENA (wooden barge, 250’, 1761 GT, built in 1889 at Cleveland as a propeller bulk freighter) was carrying coal, in tow of the steamer GLADSTONE, bound for Superior, WI. The PASADENA went out of control in a gale and her skipper had the tow line cut. She was thrown against a pier near the upper entry to the Keweenaw Waterway and pounded to pieces in a few hours. Two lives were lost, but 8 made it to shore on the floating wreckage.

On 8 October 1854, E. K. COLLINS (Wooden passenger/package freight side-wheeler, 256', 1095 gt, built in 1853 at Newport, MI) caught fire and beached near the mouth of the Detroit River where she burned to the waterline. About 23 lives were lost. About 43 persons were rescued in small boats and by the steamers FINTRY and GLOBE. There was some speculation that arson was the cause. The hull was recovered in 1857 and rebuilt as the barge ARK.

On 8 October 1871, the Chicago fire destroyed many fine vessels while they were docked in the harbor. These included the new propeller NAVARINO, the steamer PHILO PARSONS, the schooner GLENBULA, the schooner ECLIPSE, the schooner BUTCHER BOY, the bark VALETTA, the schooner ALNWICK, the bark A. P. NICHOLS, the bark FONTANELLA, the fore-and-aft schooner STAMPEDE, the schooner N. C. FORD, and the schooner CHRISTINA NEILSON. The only recorded casualties among the sailors were on the ALNWICK; her mate died and the captain burned his hands severely.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Winds Delay Traffic

10/07
High winds on Lake Erie Saturday brought the John B. Aird, which was headed for Conneaut, to anchor behind Long Point. She told the Barbara Andrie that she was not going too far behind Long Point because it would just add time to their trip. The Adam E. Cornelius waited weather in Ashtabula and the CSL Niagara was waiting to enter to load coal. The Isolda was in Cleveland.

CSL Niagara waits.
Pinney Docks at Ashtabula.
G Tugs in Cleveland.
Isolda in Cleveland.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Thousand Footers Pass

10/07
Saturday afternoon the Presque Isle was departing Duluth's inner harbor, loaded and stodgy, it moved through the Piers while the incoming Columbia Star moved forward toward the Piers.

The Presque Isle cleared the piers and engaged its bow thruster and turned its rudders to port, she started to turn west at a 30-40 degree angle from its direct outward course.

The two passed on Lake Superior and the Columbia Star entered port. After the Star passed under the Aerial Bridge it entered into a sharp left turn, heading to load in Superior, WI.

The Presque Isle had partial loaded at the DMIR docks and it was headed to Two Harbors to finish loading.

Reported by: Richard Mc Govern




Saginaw River News

10/07
The Buffalo passed the Front Range Lights at 5:20 a.m. Saturday morning. She was headed to the Bay Aggregates dock in Bay City. Buffalo completed unloading early in the afternoon and departed for the Airport Turning Basin around 1:45 p.m., after the downbound Earl W. Oglebay cleared. She was turned and downbound passing the Independence Bridge around 3:40 headed for the lake.

The Walter J. McCarthy, Jr., who arrived to unload coal at Consumers Energy late Friday night, gave a security call around 5:00 a.m. Saturday morning stating that she would be departing stern first for the lake in 20 minutes. That would have been after her upbound fleet mate, Buffalo, cleared. As of 1:00 p.m. Saturday afternoon the McCarthy is still at the dock, must likely due to strong winds in the Bay Area.

The Earl W. Oglebay was downbound passing through Downtown Bay City around 1:45 p.m. She had unloaded at both the Bay City and Saginaw Wirt Docks overnight.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. waiting at Consumers Energy.
Earl W. Oglebay downbound approaching Independence Bridge.
Stern View.
Buffalo downbound at Wheeler's Landing.
Close up.
Buffalo Stern View at Bay City Wirt.
Saginaw River Rear Range Light.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Detroit Traffic

10/07
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Saturday.

Canadian Progress departing Ojibway Salt Dock in Windsor with a load of salt for Milwaukee. Notice she is far off the dock and still had stern two lines on the dock. It took her over an hour to get fully away from the dock.
Underway.
Saginaw upbound below Grassy Island.
Stern view.
tug Champion at Bishop Park in Wyandotte. She left her two barges loaded with rip rap on the face of the dock at Nicholson's and Champion will be tied up in Wyandotte until Monday.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers barge Veler and tug Forney tied up at the BASF Wyandotte Chemical Dock in Wyandotte.
Stern view.
Tug Forney.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

10/07
The Algocen was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator and was expected to depart later on Saturday. The loading of grain was delayed because of the steady moderate rain on Friday. The Atlantic Huron was due in at the CSX Docks late Saturday evening to load coal.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Sam Laud on Sunday, followed by the John G. Munson, McKee Sons, and Courtney Burton on Monday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Buckeye on Sunday.

The passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard. There were no other vessels in port at the time of this report.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Erie News

10/07
The Richard Reiss came into Erie and went to the Mounfort Terminal Saturday morning at 10:00 a.m., but called Sarnia Traffic and told them that there was no time for departure "due to wind and weather". She was joined at 4:00 p.m. by the tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder that had left Nanticoke earlier but found the lake too rough to continue. The Pathfinder came into Erie and on her approach was rocking from side to side and listing slightly to the starboard as she came in. The Reiss backed up on the Mounfort Terminal so the Pathfinder could turn and dock bow to bow with the Reiss.

Pathfinder inbound.
Stern view.
Passing the docked Reiss.
Turning in the bay.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Today in Great Lakes History - October 07

The ALGOWOOD was launched October 7, 1980 for Algoma Central Marine, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

PAUL THAYER (b) EARL W. OGLEBAY) was launched October 7, 1973 for the Union Commerce Bank Trustee, Cleveland, OH and managed by Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland. She was built under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970 for $12.6 million.

BIRCHGLEN was launched October 7, 1926 as a) WILLIAM McLAUCHLAN, US.226176, for the Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

BLACK RIVER, Lake Bulk Freighter. Built as a Steel Barge in 1897 by the F.W. Wheeler & Co., she was Launched October 7, 1896 as a) SIR ISAAC LOTHIAN BELL

The HUTCHCLIFFE HALL was raised October 7, 1962 and taken to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs. She had sunk after a collision a few days earlier.

October 7, 1923 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 4 went back into service after being overhauled and having new cabins built on her main deck.

The MADISON suffered a fire on October 7, 1987 while lying idle at Muskegon and was badly damaged.

In 1903, ADVENTURE (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 108’, 142 GT, built in 1875 at Detroit as a schooner) caught fire while tied to the Kelly’s Island Line & Transport Co. dock. The blaze spread so quickly that those on board barely escaped. She was towed from Kelly’s Island out into Lake Erie by the tug SMITH to save the dock and the adjacent schooner ANDERSON.

In a severe gale and rain/hail storm on 7 October 1858, the 247 ton schooner OSPREY approached Oswego, New York. As she was about to enter the harbor, the vessel struck the east pier broadside. Her masts and rigging were carried away and she started to sink. Capt. John Parsons got his wife and child out of the cabin to try to escape to the pier. His wife was washed overboard and drowned. Capt. Parsons held on to his child, but another wave struck the wreck and swept the child into the water. George Crine, the mate, was also swept overboard. Those three were lost, but the next wave swung the wreck about with her bowsprit over the pier and the captain and the six remaining crewmen scrambled to safety. The entire town and harbor mourned those deaths and held a dockside service two days later with many prayers and all flags at half mast. Donations were accepted for the surviving sailors since they escaped with only the clothes on their backs.

On 7 October 1873, the PULASKI was launched at the Archibald Muir yard on the Black River in Port Huron. Her dimensions were 136' x 26' x 11', 349 gt. She was a three mast "full canaler", painted white and her private signal was a red M on a white ground bordered with blue. Her sails were made by Mr. D. Robeson of Port Huron.

On 7 October 1886, the Port Huron Times reported that "The old side-wheel ferry SARNIA, which was a familiar sight at this crossing [Port Huron-Sarnia] for so many years, and which is said to have earned enough money in her time to sheet her with silver, the hull of which has been for some years back used as a barge by the Marine City Salt Company, has closed her career. She was last week scuttled and sunk near the Marine City Salt Works wharf."

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Cliffs, Minnesota Power close to buying LTV taconite facility

10/06
Cleveland-Cliffs and Duluth-based Minnesota Power are close to completing a deal to purchase the shuttered Minnesota taconite mine, shipping dock and power plant that LTV Steel closed last January, Duluth news media reported Friday.

John Swift, a commissioner for Minnesota’s Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation Board, was quoted in the Duluth News Tribune as saying the purchase could be completed as soon as Friday if certain legal hurdles could be overcome. Officials of the companies involved would only say that they are continuing efforts to buy the taconite facilities.

A purchase involving Cliffs’ would be welcome news on Minnesota’s Iron Range. Industry, regional development and union officials say Cliffs would be likely to use the facility in some way. Cliffs has considered several possible uses for the plant, including non-ferrous ore processing and steel slab production. In addition, the plant’s purchase would relieve LTV of millions of dollars in long-term liabilities at the site.

LTV Steel Corp. permanently closed LTV Steel Mining Co. on Jan. 5. The shutdown affected 1,400 employees and damaged the Iron Range economy. The shutdown ended shipping through the port of Taconite Harbor on Minnesota’s North Shore.

According to the News Tribune, the purchase would give Cleveland-Cliffs all the taconite plant's processing facilities, including the 74-mile railroad linking the mine in Hoyt Lakes to the shipping facility in Taconite Harbor, and the 2,234-foot shipping pier at Taconite Harbor.

Minnesota Power would acquire a 225-megawatt power plant at Taconite Harbor, transmission lines and some non-mining property formerly owned by LTV. Minnesota Power reportedly would use the power plant to generate electricity for sale but some generating capacity would be reserved to supply any new mining development at the taconite facility.

If an agreement is reached, documents signed by representatives of entities involved in the deal would be faxed to U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Youngstown, Ohio.

Reported by: Al Miller




Frantz Unloads

10/06
The Joseph H. Frantz was in Holland unloading gravel at Brewer's Coal and Dock. The Frantz is a frequent visitor to Holland, not only because of the vessel size but with a boom that can be rotated 130 degrees to reach the far end of Brewer's property where the shipping channel ends.

Reported by: Dale Rosema




Soggy day at Welland Canal

10/06
Friday afternoon was a soggy day along the Welland canal, which saw the Canadian Century downbound at Lock 7 loaded with salt. Also downbound was the Canadian Miner returning from Toledo with a load of grain. The upbound parade included the Nanticoke loaded with iron ore, CSL Niagara at Lock 6 in ballast and the Halifax at Lock 3 with a cargo of cement clinker.

Canadian Century.
Stern view.
Candian Miner above Lock 7.
Entering the lock in heavy rain.
Close up of deck as the Miner rises.
Stern view.
Nanticoke passing the Century.
CSL Niagara.
Close up, note transition section forward of the engine room.

Reported by: Alex Howard




Duluth Images

10/06
Below are images of traffic in Duluth Friday.

John G. Munson outbound.
Stern view.
Alpena arrives.
Stern view passing through the ship canal .

Reported by: Gordon A. Williams




Equipment Problems Add To Stone's Slump

10/06
Stone shipments from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 4,365,251 net tons in September, a decrease of 8 percent compared to the same period last year. Adding to the problem of decreased demand was a lengthy outage of the primary crusher at Michigan Limestone's Calcite plant.

For the season, stone shipments stand at 25.8 million tons, a decrease of 4.8 percent from last year's end-of-September total.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Dossin museum to air film on salvage

10/06
The film "Salvage of Sidney Smith" will be shown from today 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Isle in Detroit. Call (313) 852-4051 for information.




Great Lakes Maritime Academy Open House

10/06
The Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Traverse City will host and open house today from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm.

During the open house you will have the opportunity to:

  • Pilot a 730' Great Lakes Ship in the St. Marys River on our Ship Handling Simulator
  • Watch cadets monitor and run the power plant of a Steam or Diesel powered ship on our Engine Simulator
  • View the training vessels: M/V Northwestern and tug, Anchor Bay
  • Talk with faculty and staff members about your opportunities at the Academy
  • Ask current cadets about their experiences aboard ships during sea projects
  • Talk with faculty members who sailed as Officers last summer about their experiences

    Click here for more information




  • Fall Issue Preview

    10/06
    A preview of the Fall Issue of Great Laker Magazine is now available at www.greatlaker.com.

    Our fall issue was delayed due to problems with airmail delivery after the events of Sept 11. The magazines are expected to be delivered today or Monday and typically take one to three weeks to arrive.

    The "In Port" feature for this issue is on Alpena and the Annual Lighthouse Festival. The entire story is online and we wanted everyone to be able to not only find out about the lighthouse festival in a timely way but for non-subscribers to see what Great Laker has to offer.




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 06

    Herb Fraser & Associates completed repairs on the Algosoo at the Welland Dock on October 6 1986. She had suffered a serious fire at her winter mooring on the west wall above Lock 8 at Port Colborne, Ont. on March 7, 1986.

    The bow section of the PRESQUE ISLE (2) arrived Erie October 6, 1972. The section was towed from Defoe Shipbuilding at Bay City, MI by the tugs MARYLAND and LAURENCE C. TURNER. The total cost to construct the tug/barge thousand footer was approximately $35 million.

    October 6, 1981 the ERINDALE's bow was damaged when she hit the Allanburg Bridge abutment running downbound in the Welland Canal

    In 1980 the LAC DES ILES grounded in the Detroit River just below Grassy Island, the result of a faulty steering mechanism. She freed herself a few hours later. The damage caused by the grounding ended her career.

    This day in 1870, the schooner E. FITZGERALD was launched at the Fitzgerald & Leighton yard at Port Huron, MI. Her dimensions were 135' x 26' x 11'.

    In 1875, the MERCHANT (iron propeller passenger/package freight steamer, 200', 750 t, built in 1862 at Buffalo) was carrying lumber on Lake Michigan when she stranded on Racine Reef near Racine, Wisconsin. Then she caught fire and was gutted before she could be refloated. She had stranded on that same reef twice previously. She was the first iron cargo ship built on the Lakes and the first one lost.

    On 6 October 1873, JOHN A. McDOUGALL (wooden schooner-barge, 151’, 415 GT) was launched at Wenona, MI. She was built at the Ballentine yard in only five weeks.

    On 6 October 1889, PHILO SCOVILLE (3-mast wooden schooner, 140', 323 t, built in 1863 at Cleveland) was sailing from Collingwood for Chicago when a storm drove her into the shallows and wrecked her near Tobermory, Ontario. Her captain died while trying to get ashore through the rocks. The Canadian Lifesaving Service saved the rest of the crew. At first the vessel was expected to be recovered, but she broke up by 10 October.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Arcadia goes under the hammer

    10/05
    The 33 year-old Greek cruise ship Arcadia is to be sold by the Federal Court of Canada through a sealed bid auction in Montreal on November 6. All creditors must file their claims with the Court by December 1.

    The 5,113 GT vessel was arrested during the summer at the request of Great Lakes Cruises, which had chartered it to sail the Great Lakes. The vessel, converted from a ferry to a cruise ship in 1990, was supposed to be the centerpiece of a major expansion of Great Lakes cruising this summer. But the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) imposed a no-sail order when the ship arrived in North America in July because of sanitary problems. The order was eventually lifted, but not before too many cruises had been cancelled.

    Reported by: Roger LeLievre




    Beeghly Grounds

    10/05
    Thursday afternoon the Charles M. Beeghly grounded while proceeding downbound on the Detroit River near the Detroit River buoy 111 at the head of Belle Island. The grounding did not effect vessel traffic. Marine Communications and Traffic Services Sarnia directed vessels not to meet in the immediate vicinity of the grounding. Marine Safety Office duty inspector conducted investigation and determined that no damage to the vessel had occurred.

    Tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort assisted the Beeghly in refloating. She dropped her barge Great Lakes Trader at a dock in Detroit and detached from the notch. She proceede up river and freed the Beeghly and then continued on after connecting to the barge.




    Algoway In Hancock

    10/05
    The Algoway arrived in Hancock, Michigan Thursday with a partial cargo of salt. The cargo was loaded in Goderich, Ontario with part being unloaded in Sault Ste. Marie on Wednesday.

    On Wednesday morning it was passing through the little used Portage Canal heading for the Mattila's dock in Michigan's Upper Peninsula.

    Passing under the lift bridge. George La Motte
    Another view. George La Motte
    Image from the Pasty Central web cam. Sent in by Philip Nash
    At the dock unloading. Jim Noetzel
    Another view. Jim Noetzel
    From the dock the salt is transported by truck. Jim Noetzel
    Outbound for Lake Superior. Jim Noetzel

    Reported by: George La Motte, Jim Noetzel and Philip Nash




    Algorail Visits the Saginaw River

    10/05
    The Algorail was inbound the Saginaw River Thursday afternoon. She passed the Pump Out Island at 2:45 p.m. as she sailed for the Buena Vista Dock. The Algorail was also carrying a cargo of salt loaded in Goderich.

    Pictures by: Todd Shorkey
    Algorail passing the Ashland-Marathon Dock upbound.
    Close up.
    Bow View.
    Passing through the Independence Bridge.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Duluth - Superior News

    10/05
    Traffic picked up a bit from Wednesday's pace, the John G. Munson arrived in the morning and proceeded to the DMIR Ore dock to unload stone. She was attended by the work boat Maxine Thompson. The Buckeye, which had arrived over night, departed mid-morning. The Jean Parisien arrived midday and proceeded to the DMIR Ore dock to unload limestone and take on taconite. The Federal Maas was still loading at Cargill and the Oakglen continued to load at Harvest States.

    John G. Munson entering through the ship canal.
    Unloading.
    Close up.
    Stern view.
    Maxine Thompson along side.
    Buckeye departs.
    Jean Parisien heading for the DMIR Ore dock.
    Stern view.
    Federal Maas at Cargill.
    Oakglen loading at Harvest States.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Gordon A. Williams




    Toledo Update

    10/05
    The Canadian Miner finished loading grain at the ADM Elevator and departed early Thursday afternoon. The Nanticoke finished loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator and departed in the early evening. The Algocen was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator.

    The passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard.

    The Algomarine was loading coal at the CSX Docks. The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Atlantic Huron on Saturday followed by the Buffalo on Sunday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Buckeye on Sunday.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Hamilton News

    10/05
    Thursday afternoon the Windoc and the Canadian Provider were still moored at Pier 8. No activity was seen around either vessel.

    The saltie Sandviken was unloading steel products at Pier 14. The Frontenac was moored at Pier 25 at the Agrico facilities.

    Maintenance or repairs were being done on one of Dofasco's unloading crane bridges, no vessels were in at Dofasco unloading iron ore.

    At 1:25 p.m. the Canadian Transport, with a cargo of coal, transited the Burlington Ship Canal into Hamilton Harbor. The vessel then headed for Dofasco's coal dock and within the half hour the Transport was lining up along the coal dock.

    Reported by: Patricia Burgon




    Hamilton Pictures

    10/05
    Below are images taken in Hamilton on Thursday.

    Quinte Loyalist on Heddle's drydock, with Trillium astern.
    Close up of the Trillium.
    Trillium's paddlebox.
    Evans McKeil is on Heddle's other smaller drydock in Hamilton.
    Stern view.
    Everlast docked behind Trillium.
    Yankee Lady III on the Toronto Drydock.

    Reported by: Gerry O.




    Toronto Update

    10/05
    Stephen B. Roman arrived in port Thursday to delivery a load of cement. The salty Mackenzie was turned by McKeil tugs to facilitate unloading her sugar cargo. Steam was up on Canadian Voyager that afternoon, a sign that she will soon be out of her temporary lay-up at Pier 35.

    Reported by: Gerry O.




    Dossin museum to air film on salvage

    10/05
    The film "Salvage of Sidney Smith" will be shown from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Isle in Detroit. Call (313) 852-4051 for information.




    Toronto Marine Historical Society Meeting

    10/05
    The Toronto Marine Historical Society resumes it meetings tonight. As always in October, members and guests are invited to show ship slides.

    Please e-mail Gerry Ouderkirk for more information.




    Great Lakes Maritime Academy Open House

    10/05
    The Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Traverse City will host and open house Saturday, October 6 from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm.

    During the open house you will have the opportunity to:

  • Pilot a 730' Great Lakes Ship in the St. Marys River on our Ship Handling Simulator
  • Watch cadets monitor and run the power plant of a Steam or Diesel powered ship on our Engine Simulator
  • View the training vessels: M/V Northwestern and tug, Anchor Bay
  • Talk with faculty and staff members about your opportunities at the Academy
  • Ask current cadets about their experiences aboard ships during sea projects
  • Talk with faculty members who sailed as Officers last summer about their experiences

    Click here for more information




  • Fall Issue Preview

    10/05
    A preview of the Fall Issue of Great Laker Magazine is now available at www.greatlaker.com.

    Our fall issue was delayed due to problems with airmail delivery after the events of Sept 11. The magazines are expected to be delivered today or Monday and typically take one to three weeks to arrive.

    The "In Port" feature for this issue is on Alpena and the Annual Lighthouse Festival. The entire story is online and we wanted everyone to be able to not only find out about the lighthouse festival in a timely way but for non-subscribers to see what Great Laker has to offer.




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 05

    On Saturday afternoon, Oct. 5 1997, while passing White Shoal Light on their way to Charlevoix, the Medusa Challenger was hit by a waterspout. The only damage reported was a spotlight on the pilothouse bridge wing lifted out of its support and crews bikes stored on deck rose vertically. The 1906 built boat was also reported to have been vibrating in an unusual manner. Another boat in the area reported wind gusts of almost 100 mph in the brief storm. That same day the eastern UP was hit with a violent storm that blew down trees a foot in diameter.

    The ARTHUR B. HOMER, loaded with ore, was in a head-on collision, October 5, 1972, with the unloaded Greek salty NAVISHIPPER at Buoy 83 in the Detroit River's Fighting Island Channel. NAVISHIPPER reportedly had no licensed pilot aboard at the time, a violation of Maritime law. There were no injuries, but the HOMER suffered extensive bow damage up to and including part of her pilothouse.

    The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2) was christened on October 5, 1954 for the National Steel Corp. (M.A. Hanna Co., mgr.), Cleveland, OH.

    HUTCHCLIFFE HALL was in collision with steamer RICHARD V. LINDABURY on a foggy October 5, 1962 off Grosse Pointe Farms in Lake St. Clair. The canaller suffered a 12-foot gash on her port side forward of her after cabins and sank. She was raised October 7th and taken to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs.

    On October 5, 1967 while outbound on the Saginaw River after discharging a load of limestone at Saginaw, MI, the J.F. SCHOELLKOPF, JR.'s steering failed which caused her to hit the west side of the I-75 Zilwaukee Bridge. The SCHOELLKOPF, JR. incurred little damage but the south bound lanes of the bridge were out of service for several days until repairs were completed.

    The ARTHUR H. HAWGOOD was launched October 5, 1907 for the Neptune Steamship Co. (Hawgood, mgr.), Cleveland, OH.

    On 5 October 1889, BESSEMER (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 178’, 436 GT, built in 1875 at St. Clair, MI) was carrying iron ore along with her consort SCHUYLKILL (wooden schooner, 152’, 472 GT, built in 1873 at Buffalo) in Lake Superior. They were struck by a rapidly rising gale and ran for the Portage Ship Canal. It became obvious that BESSEMER was sinking. The two collided and went onto a reef at the mouth of the canal and they both broke up quickly. The crews were able to jump onto the breakwater. The wrecks partly blocked the canal until they were dynamited the next September.

    On 5 October 1877, TIOGA (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 549 t, built in 1862 at Cleveland) was towing two barges in a storm on Lake Erie when she caught fire. The high winds fanned the flames. Her crew escaped to the barges and were later picked up by the steamer BADGER STATE. The burned out hulk of TIOGA sank the next day in 30 feet of water off Point Pelee. This was her first year of service as a bulk freighter; she had been built as a passenger steamer and was converted in 1877.

    On 5 October 1900 the lumber hooker SWALLOW was involved in a collision in the early morning hours and ended up ashore near Cherry Beach. A week later, she was lightered and freed, then taken to Detroit for repairs. She foundered in a storm one year later (18 October 1901).

    On 5 October 1904, CONGRESS (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 267', 1484 gt, built in 1867 at Cleveland as the passenger vessel NEBRASKA) was seeking shelter at S. Manitou Island on Lake Michigan when she caught fire. The fire spread quickly. To prevent it from destroying the dock, a courageous tug skipper got a line on the CONGRESS and towed her out on the lake where she burned for 13 hours and then sank in 26 fathoms of water. No lives were lost.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Seaway Ships Move in Secrecy

    10/04
    A number of ships moving up and down the St. Lawrence River will be traveling secrecy from now on.

    The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp., following a bi-national decision by its' U.S. and Canadian members, says it will no longer provide the public with a list of all vessels traveling through the Iroquois Lock and the seaway, or the estimated time of arrival and departure times from the lock. The decision is a result of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in the United States.

    Seaway authorities have also asked that the same information be restricted on the Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping web site.

    Raynald Dallaire, St. Lawrence Seaway Management's support co-coordinator of marine services, said some vessels will still be listed but the whereabouts of many, including tankers and tanker barges carrying potentially explosive petroleum products or chemical materials, will not be announced. "There is a high risk on this type of vessel," Dallaire said Tuesday. "We aren't going to give this information because of the risk of terrorism," he said. "They are anxious. There is a concern," Dallaire said of the corporation's board of directors.

    It is the first time in the seaway's 42-year history that such a step has been taken, Dallaire believes. "It is for safety's sake, security measures. We don't give any position or details on tanker ships, ocean or domestic."

    Other vessels that will now move along the seaway unannounced are government, military and coast guard vessels, along with vessels from the St. Lawrence Seaway's own fleet.

    Information will be made available on tankers carrying non-threatening cargo such as wheat. This is a very important waterway for the economy of both countries. The Seaway lock system is a single point of failure. One downed lock and the system is down.

    Reported by: Rose Phillips




    MacArthur Lock Closed

    10/04
    The MacArthur Lock at Sault Ste. Marie was closed to shipping traffic for a time on Wednesday as crews performed repairs to the lock. The little used Davis Lock was pressed into service allowing shallow draft vessels to pass through with out delay waiting for the Poe Lock.

    The Davis Lock is the oldest of the existing four locks, opened in 1914. It is 1,350 feet long, 80 feet wide and 23 feet deep.

    Reported by: Jerry Masson




    Donner Dismantled

    10/04
    It appears that more scrapping is taking place on the cargo transfer vessel William H. Donner. Over the winter her mast and other equipment were removed, in June her propeller was removed. Now, a large green dumpster sits on her deck just behind the pilothouse and a door leading to the pilothouse that had been boarded up has been removed. The dumpster is being filled with large pieces of metal and piping. It is unclear if the entire deckhouse will be removed but it seems that little by little the Donner is being dismantled.

    The once proud ship remains today in Marinette, WI used to transfer cargo from other ships that dock along her side with its deck mounted cranes.

    The Donner has been moved up the Marinette Fuel Dock near the Ogden Street Bridge to make room for a load of stone or coal that should be arriving by ship in the near future.

    The tug Carla Anne Selvick is docked in port at K&K waiting for the next salty to assist into port.

    Close up bow view of the Donner at Marinette Fuel and Dock.
    Side view of Donners Pilot House with open door and dumpster at right of photo.
    Back of the Pilot House looking forward.

    Reported by: Scott Best




    Earl W. Returns

    10/04
    The Earl W. Oglebay was inbound at the Saginaw River Front Range lights at 6:00 p.m. Wednesday, going to the Wirt dock at Essexville. This was the Oglebay's second visit to the Saginaw River in as many days. The ship is working a route from Stoneport (Rogers City) to the aggregate docks in the Saginaw River.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Wolverine in Holland

    10/04
    Sister ship to the Earl. W. Oglebay, the Wolverine enter Lake Macatawa from Lake Michigan at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday saluting those on the pier while entering. It proceeded to the Holland BPW power plant to unload coal. The Wolverine finished unloading and departed during the night.

    Reported by: Dale Rosema




    Twin Ports Report

    10/04
    The fall grain rush is bringing some of the few remaining straightdeckers to Superior. Kinsman Independent loaded Monday at Cenex Harvest States in Superior, then moved up river a short distance on Tuesday to load at General Mills Elevator S. On Wednesday, Oakglen -- sporting a sharp new CSL stackmarking -- was loading at Cenex Harvest States.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Twin Ports Images

    10/04
    Below are images of traffic taken on Wednesday.

    Indiana Harbor outbound.
    Stern view.
    CSL Tadoussac heads out onto Lake Superior.
    Federal Maas loading at Cargill.
    Oakglen loading at Harvest States.

    Reported by: Gordon A. Williams




    Toledo News

    10/04
    The Algocen was loading grain at the Andersons "E" Elevator. The Nanticoke was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The Canadian Miner was loading grain at the ADM Elevator. The Catherine Desgagnes was at the CSX Coal Docks loading coal. The passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algomarine today followed by the Atlantic Huron on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Buckeye on Sunday.

    Classic views of Toledo Shipping
    George Hindman loading grain at Midstates Elevator.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Duluth Gathering Pictures

    10/04
    I have added a photo gallery with images and video from the recent Boatnerd Gathering in Duluth.

    Click here to view.




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 04

    On October 4, 1979 the ST. LAWRENCE NAVIGATOR arrived at the Port Weller Dry Docks, St. Catharines, Ont. where she was lengthened to the Seaway maximum length of 730' overall. A new bow and cargo section was installed including a bow thruster and was assigned Hull #66. New tonnage; 18,788 GRT, 12,830 NRT, 32,279 dwt. The ST. LAWRENCE NAVIGATOR was renamed c) CANADIAN NAVIGATOR in 1980 and now sails for ULS Corp.

    The TEXACO BRAVE (2) was launched today in 1976 by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Shimonoseki, Japan for Texaco Canada Ltd., Don Mills, Ont.

    On October 4, 1980 the ARTHUR B. HOMER was laid up for the last time at Erie, PA.

    As a result of the collision between the PARKER EVANS and the SIDNEY E. SMITH, JR. 4 months earlier alternate one-way traffic between the Black River Buoy and Buoys One and Two in Lake Huron was agreed upon by the shipping companies. This happened on October 4, 1972

    The JAMES E. FERRIS' last trip before scrapping was from Duluth, MN with a split load of 261,000 bushels of wheat for Buffalo, NY arriving there October 4, 1974.

    The JIIMAAN, Twin Screw RoRo Cargo/Passenger Ferry built to Ice Class 1D standards had its Keel laid October 4, 1991

    On October 4, 1982, the Benjamin F. Fairless laid up for the last time in Duluth. She was towed out of Duluth on her way to an overseas scrap yard on June 17, 1988.

    October 4, 1940 - The Ludington Daily News reported "The Pere Marquette carferries handled approximately 95,000 freight cars last year." (1939)

    On 4 October 1877, BRITISH LION (3 mast wooden bark, 128', 293 T, built in 1862 at Kingston, Ontario) was carrying coal from Black River, OH to Brockville, Ont. She was driven ashore at Long Point in Lake Erie by a storm and wrecked. She was the first bark on the Lakes to be wire rigged and she was built for the Great Lakes - Liverpool trade.

    The barges BELLE CASH and GEO. W. HANNAFORD, owned by Capt. Cash of East China Township, Michigan, were driven ashore on Long Point in Lake Erie on 3 October 1875.

    On 4 October 1883, JAMES DAVIDSON (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 231', 1456 gt, built in 1874 at W. Bay City, MI) was carrying coal and towing the barge MIDDLESEX in a storm on Lake Huron. She was driven onto a reef near Thunder Bay Island and ripped up her bottom. The barge was rescued by the tug V. SWAIN. No lives were lost. Financially, the DAVIDSON was the most extensive loss on the Lakes in the 1883 season. She was valued at $65,000 and insured for $45,000. Her coal cargo was valued at $8,000.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Busy Saginaw

    10/03
    The first two days of October have seen heavy traffic on the Saginaw River, with visits by more than half a dozen vessels.

    The Saginaw was departing the Sixth Street turning basin in Saginaw early Monday morning after unloading at Essexville and Saginaw during the night. On her outbound transit during the morning, she met the inbound Sam Laud and the tanker Gemini, and pulled over to empty docks to allow those vessels to pass.

    The Sam Laud called at the Sargent dock just below the I-75 bridge, and the Gemini carried a load of gasoline to the Marathon-Ashland dock in Bay City.

    Also arriving was the Alpena, with a load of cement for the Lafarge terminal at Saginaw. The Alpena remained at the dock during the day on Tuesday and departed at 9:35 p.m. that night.

    The Earl W. Oglebay arrived early Tuesday at the Wirt Stone Dock in Bay City. Her fleet mate Fred R. White Jr followed her into the river. Both vessels were docked at Wirt on Tuesday morning, with the White ahead of the Oglebay.

    Entering the river behind the White was the Mississagi, which passed through Bay City about 9:00 a.m. Tuesday on her way up to the Buena Vista dock at Saginaw. The Mississagi departed the Buena Vista dock late in the afternoon and was outbound through Bay City after bridge hours ended at 5:30 p.m.

    Pictures by: Stephen Hause
    Mississagi upbound for Saginaw.
    Earl W. Oglebay and Fred R. White at the Wirt Dock in Bay City.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Hogan Heads North

    10/03
    The Mail boat Joseph J. Hogan will head to Port Huron this morning from the J.W. Westcott Co. dock in Detroit and be put into service as the Port Huron pilot boat. Crews from the pilot office will depart Detroit at 7:00 a.m. and expect to arrive about 1:00 p.m. on station in Port Huron.

    Reported by: Neil Schultheiss




    Strike Mandate Approved

    10/03
    Employees have voted to give their union a strike mandate for mid-November if contract talks with the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp fail, company spokesman Sylvie Moncion told local media on Monday. The 550 workers are members of the Canadian Autoworkers Union and include operational and maintenance employees working on the Welland Canal and Seaway offices at St. Lambert, Cornwall and St. Catharines.

    The two sides continue to negotiate with the assistance of a mediator appointed by the federal government. If the union decides to strike it will have to give a 72-hour notice before any action is taken.

    Reported by: John Stark




    Ranger III

    10/03
    Tuesday the National Park Service ship Ranger III was emerging from the morning mist on her way to Isle Royale National Park from Houghton Michigan. She was on one of her final runs of the season as the leaves begin to turn in Michigan's Copper Country.

    Outbound.
    Close up.

    Reported by: Jack Holland




    Quebecois in Thunder Bay

    10/03
    The Quebecois is in lay-up in Thunder Bay at Pascol Engineering's lay by dock. She arrived September 27, it is unknown just how long she will remain in lay-up but is it expected to be short term.

    Reported by: Rob Farrow




    Navigator in Hamilton

    10/03
    The Canadian Navigator arrived in Hamilton late on Sunday and appears to be in lay-up. The ship appears to be under going extensive repairs or refit both inside and outside the vessel.

    Reported by: John van Staalduinen




    Hamilton Images

    10/03
    Below are recent images of the Mapleglen and Canadian Leader in Hamilton.

    Mapleglen at Pier 26 in Hamilton to load grain.
    Looking down the bow.
    Profile.
    Canadian Leader at Dofasco.

    Reported by: Rodney Aitchison




    Toledo News

    10/03
    The Canadian Miner was loading grain at the ADM Elevator. The Cuyahoga was loading grain at Anderson's "E" Elevator. the Nanticoke was loading grain at Anderson's "K" Elevator. The passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Dock will be the Catherine Desgagnes on Wednesday followed by the Algomarine on Thursday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Buckeye on Sunday. There were no other vessels in port at the time of this report.

    Classic views of Toledo Shipping
    Lehigh downbound the Maumee River from the Cherry Street Bridge. She just finished loading grain at one of the Elevators upriver.
    Paul L. Tietjen getting ready to load coal at the C&O #3 Dock.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Toronto Update

    10/03
    The salty Armonikos departed Tuesday evening after unloading her powdered cement cargo. The passenger vessel Le Levant also departed that evening. The salty Mackenzie remains at Redpath sugar dock, and Canadian Voyager remains in temporary lay-up at Pier 35.

    Winter tarps were placed around the upper deck of the ferry Thomas Rennie Tuesday. The ferry Trillium remains in Hamilton on Heddle's drydock along with the Glenora-Adolphustown ferry Quinte Loyalist. The Loyalist is being extended on both ends and is having Harbormaster outdrive engines installed for propulsion. She is expected to remain in Hamilton for 2 1/2 months.

    The charter vessel Yankee Lady III went on Toronto Drydock Monday, replacing the auxiliary schooner Alison Lake, which has been on for about two weeks. The next scheduled vessel for dry docking is the charter vessel Klancy II.

    Alison Lake on the Toronto Dry Dock.

    Reported by: Gerry O.




    SMET Now A Million Tons Ahead Of 2000 Pace

    10/03
    Coal loadings at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal totaled 1,868,306 net tons in September, an increase of 4.4 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. For the season, SMET's shipments stand at 12.1 million tons, an increase of 8.9 percent compared to the same point in 2000. That increase has come with only 10 more cargos being loaded; with ore demand down, some 1,000-footers have increased their participation in the western coal trade.

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 03

    The E.G. GRACE was delivered to the Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland on October 3, 1943. The E.G. GRACE was part of a government program designed to upgrade and increase the capacity of the U.S. Great Lakes fleet during World War II. In order to help finance the building of new ships, the U.S.M.C. authorized a program that would allow existing fleets to obtain new boats by trading in their older boats to the Government for credit. As partial payment for each new vessel, a fleet owner surrendered the equivalent tonnage of their existing and/or obsolete vessels, along with some cash, to the Maritime Commission.

    October 3, 1941 - The CITY OF FLINT 32, eastbound from Milwaukee collided with the PERE MARQUETTE 22 westbound. The PERE MARQUETTE 22 headed directly for Manitowoc for repairs while the CITY OF FLINT 32 continued to Ludington where she discharged her cargo, then headed for the shipyard in Manitowoc.

    On 3 October 1887, ALBION (wooden propeller steam barge, 134’, 297 GT, built in 1862 at Brockville, Ont.) was carrying lumber and towing the schooner ARK in a foggy night during a gale. She stranded on the rocks near Grindstone City, MI in Lake Huron. The U. S. Lifesaving Service rescued her crew and some of her gear and cargo, but she was totally wrecked the next day. The schooner ARK survived.

    The barges BELLE CASH and GEO. W. HANNAFORD, owned by Capt. Cash of East China Township, Michigan, were driven ashore on Long Point in Lake Erie on 3 October 1875.

    On 3 October 1900, one hundred years ago, The steel freighter CAPTAIN THOMAS WILSON left Port Huron on her maiden voyage for Marquette, Michigan where she loaded 6,200 tons of iron ore for Cleveland, Ohio.

    ARK (3-mast iron-strapped wooden scow-schooner-barge, 177', 512 t, built in 1875 at Port Dalhousie, Ontario) was in tow of the steam barge ALBION (wooden propeller, 134', 297 gt, built in 1862 at Brockville, Ontario) on Lake Huron when a terrific storm struck on 3 October 1887. Both were loaded with lumber. Both vessels were driven ashore near Grindstone City, Michigan. The U.S. Lifesaving Service rescued the crews. The ALBION was pounded to pieces the next day and the ARK was declared a total loss, but was recovered and was sailing again within the month.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    St. John Repairs

    10/02
    The sand sucker J.S. St. John is at Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs to a shaft bearing. The vessel arrived over the weekend and is expected to be in dry dock for only a few days. Crews will remove the shaft and replace the bearing. It was damaged after the vessel hit something in the water.

    J.S. St. John in the Welland Canal in August. Alex Howard

    Reported by: Roger Tottman




    Crewman Evacuated

    10/02
    Late Sunday morning, U.S. Coast Guard Group Detroit received a request for the medevac of a 46-year-old man who had fallen 15 feet and injured his back and hips. His conditions was stable but he was in pain and having trouble breathing. A helicopter from Air Station Detroit responded, hoisted the man from the ship and transported him to a hospital in Sarnia.

    Reported by: Gary Jackson




    Theodore Too

    10/02

    Theodore Too made a stop in Port Dover, Ontario Sunday as it makes its way back to the eastern seaboard. The tug will stop in Prescott on Friday but will not be open for tours. It is expected to transit the Seaway on Oct. 10 as it completes its Great Lakes tour.

    For more details on the Theodore Too's schedule while on the lakes visit www.theodoretugboat.com

    Theodore in Port Dover.

    Reported by: Karen Walker




    Badger Expected to Sail

    10/02
    The Lake Michigan Carferry Badger is expected to return to service this morning after boiler feed pumps failed on Saturday. The Badger had departed Manitowoc, WI for Ludington, MI when the pumps failed about 5 miles off shore. The carferry was towed back to Manitowoc where the passengers and cars were safely offloaded. Lake Michigan Carferry paid for traveler's motel rooms and bought them breakfast, passengers then took their own vehicles or tour buses and continued their travels on the road.

    The Badger was towed to back Ludington on Sunday, the repairs could have been completed in Wisconsin but the Badger needs a 400 amp electrical supply to restart its engines. This electrical supply is only available at the Ludington dock.

    The Badger is the last coal fired ship operating on the Great Lakes, it is a favorite destination of boatwatchers who enjoy the crossing on Lake Michigan.

    Lake Michigan Carferry




    Lakes Visitors in Belgium

    10/02
    On Sunday two familiar visitors to the Great Lakes were spotted in the port of Antwerp, Belgium. The Lake Michigan was departing the main port through the Zandvliet Lock. Once clear of the lock she was joined by a tug on her stern and together they docked at a river terminal to load containers. Two hours later the Federal Oshima entered the Berendrecht Lock.

    The locks are parallel to each other, every ship that goes into port must use a locks with the exception of two container terminals that have been built on the Western Schelde River.

    The older Zandvliet lock is 1640-feet long and 187-feet wide with a depth of 58-feet. The newer Berendrecht lock is also 1640-feet long but 223-feet wide.

    Lake Michigan in the Zandvliet Lock.
    Close up.
    Stern view departing the lock.
    Federal Oshima entering the Berendrecht Lock.
    In the lock The Oshima is in the lock together with a giant car-carrier, leaving room for two more ships on the right side of the lock.

    Reported by: Chris Rombouts




    Twin Ports Report

    10/02
    Four vessels were loading or waiting to load Monday at Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior. The Columbia Star was at the dock early on the morning of Oct. 1. Next in line were the Algosoo and John B. Aird. Walter J. McCarthy Jr., which was in port before 7 a.m., spent the day tied up at the Duluth port terminal waiting to load.

    Indiana Harbor and Paul R. Tregurtha are both scheduled for the terminal on Tuesday. After that, there's an unusual two-day gap until the Oglebay Norton is scheduled to arrive Friday.

    Other port traffic Monday included a full house at Cenex Harvest States Kinsman Independent was loading in Berth 2 and Pontoporos was in Berth 1. Federal Maas was lying at anchor on the lake but due into Cargill B1 late in the evening. Down the bay, Stewart J. Cort was due at BNSF ore dock late in the evening.

    The steady boat-a-day pace that the DMIR ore dock in Two Harbors maintained for much of the season is slipping. The Edgar B. Speer was scheduled for the dock on Oct. 1, to be followed by Armco on Oct. 4. Then the Edwin H. Gott, St. Clair and Presque Isle are all due Oct. 6. This dock handled mainly vessels from USS Great Lakes Fleet this season, but in recent weeks the Armco and St. Clair have made several calls there.

    At DMIR Duluth, the pace seems to be unchanged, with the usual callers scheduled. CSL Tadoussac was due Oct. 2; Jean Parisien and John G. Munson, Oct. 4, Presque Isle to unload stone, Oct. 5; Joe Block, Oct. 7. American Mariner currently is scheduled to make an unusual call at the dock on Oct. 7.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Alpena News

    10/02
    The Joseph H. Frantz arrived at Lafarge early Monday morning to unload coal. The Alpena came in before noon to load cement for Saginaw. The Paul H. Townsend is expected in early this morning to load. The tug Jacklyn M and barge Integrity is headed to Milwaukee and the J.A.W Iglehart is in Cleveland.

    The Earl W. Oglebay was loading at Stoneport on Monday. Also scheduled in was the tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder.

    Reported by: Ben and Chanda Bruski




    Detroit Traffic

    10/02
    Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Monday evening.

    Jean Parisien upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Washington Rainbow II (Cyprus) at the ADM Dock in Windsor.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Mike Nicholls




    Toledo Update

    10/02
    The Canadian Miner arrived Monday morning at the ADM Elevator to load grain. The Cuyahoga arrived at one of the Anderson's Elevators to load grain. The Algocen is due in port to load grain within the next several days.

    The Algosteel was loading coal at the CSX Dock with the Algowood waiting to follow and the H. Lee White due in Monday afternoon, she will follow the Algowood. The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Catherine Desgagnes on Wednesday, followed by the Algomarine on Thursday.

    The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Buckeye on Sunday, Oct. 7. The passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard. There were no other vessels in port at the time of this report.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 02

    CANADIAN OLYMPIC was christened on October 2, 1976 at St. Catharines. Her name honors the Olympic Games that were held at Montreal that year.

    The TADOUSSAC (2) departed Collingwood on her maiden voyage October 2, 1969 to load iron ore at Fort William, Ont.

    The AMERICAN last operated in 1956 and then was laid up at Manitowoc, WI. On October 2, 1972

    The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON and CONSUMERS POWER (3) arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan October 2, 1988 where dismantling began on October 14th by Li Chong Steel & Iron Works Co. Ltd.

    On her maiden voyage October 2, 1943, the E.G. GRACE cleared Lorain bound for Superior, WI to load iron ore.

    The HOCHELAGA (2) departed Toronto October 2, 1993 in tow of the McKeil tugs GLENBROOK and KAY COLE for Montreal, Que and then to the cutters torch.

    On October 2, 1969, the Tadoussac entered service.

    October 2, 1954 - The PERE MARQUETTE 21 sailed into Ludington on her second maiden voyage of her career.

    On 2 October 1888, OLIVER CROMWELL (wooden schooner-barge, 138', 291 T, built in 1853 at Buffalo) was being towed by the steamer LOWELL in a storm in Lake Huron when she broke her towline. She rode out most of the storm at anchor, but then she snapped her anchor chains and she was driven ashore at Harbor Beach, MI where she broke up.

    The 183', 3-mast wooden schooner QUEEN CITY was launched at W. Bay City, Michigan on 2 October 1873.

    The Port Huron Times reported the following shipwrecks from a severe storm that swept the Lakes over 2-3 October 1887: Schooner CITY OF GREEN BAY lost near South Haven, MI; the schooner-barge CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON, lost near Buffalo, NY; the steam barge ALBION and her consort the schooner-barge ARK ashore near Grindstone City, MI; the 3-mast schooner EBENEZER ashore near Holland, MI; the wooden package freighter CALIFORNIA sunk in the Straits of Mackinac; the schooner HOLMES ashore at Middle Island on Lake Huron; the schooner GARIBALDI ashore near Port Elgin on Lake Huron; the barge MAYFLOWER disabled near Grand Haven, MI; the schooner D. S. AUSTIN ashore at Point Clark; and the schooner HENRY W. HOAG ashore at Erie, PA.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Expansion halted at Sept-Isles

    10/01
    A $360 million expansion of taconite operations at Iron Ore Company of Canada has been suspended because of declines in the steel market.

    The 4.5 million-ton project at Sept-Isles, Quebec, had been scheduled to become operational by the middle of 2002. Officials of Rio Tinto, majority owners of the taconite facility, said Thursday that the expansion will be halted over the next few months as the steel industry continues to slump.

    Company officials say they are confident construction will resume when market conditions improve. Iron Ore Company of Canada shareholders include Rio Tinto (56 percent), Mitsubishi Corp. (25 percent), and Labrador Iron Ore Royalty Income Fund (19 percent).

    Taconite pellets produced at Iron Ore Company of Canada are among the lowest-cost pellets produced in North America.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Duel loading for Marquette

    10/01
    Both the Lee A. Tregurtha and the Great Lakes Trader were loading pellets at Marquette's upper harbor Saturday. With the slowdown in steel this summer, it has been unusual to see two ships loading at the same time.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe




    Saginaw River News

    10/01
    The tug Dorothy Ann with barge Pathfinder entered the river at about 8:00 a.m. Sunday, going up to the Sargent dock just below the I-75 Bridge. The vessel completed unloading late Sunday afternoon and was outbound at about 6:00 p.m. from the Sixth Street turning basin in Saginaw.

    The Saginaw came into the river that evening. She stopped at the Essexville Sand and Stone Dock with a split cargo. At 10:25 p.m. she departed and moved up the river to the Wirt Stone Dock in Bay City to finish.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Detroit Traffic

    10/01
    Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Sunday.

    Joseph H Franz upbound approaching the Sterling Fuel Dock. She is loaded with coal for Port Washington.
    Stern view.
    Charles M. Beeghly downbound off Sterling Fuel bound for Rouge Steel.
    Stern view.
    She moved to the Canadian side and allowed the Courtney Burton to pass on the American Side before her turn into the Rouge River.
    Four ships, from left to right Beeghly, Burton, Algosteel and Frantz.
    Courtney Burton downbound at Grassy Island. The Courtney Burton was headed for Ashtabula after which she will load stone for Thunder Bay
    Stern view.
    Kapitonas A Lucka (Lithuania) downbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    George A Stinson downbound off Zug Island just before her turn to the Great Lakes Steel Dock.
    Stern view.
    Algosteel unloading at the Lafarge Dock in Windsor.
    Close up.
    Mississagi downbound of Zug Island before and after the turn into the Southwest Sales Dock in Windsor.
    Another view.
    Stern view.
    Diamond Belle downbound across from Zug Island headed for the Trenton Channel area for a day of cruising.
    Stern view.
    Le Levant (France) downbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Mike Nicholls




    Toledo Update

    10/01
    The CSL Laurentien was loading grain at Anderson's "K" Elevator on Sunday. The Canadian Miner and Cuyahoga are due in to load grain within the next several days at the ADM and Anderson Elevators respectively. The Algosteel was due in late Sunday night at the CSX Docks and is scheduled for a 7:00 a.m. start to load coal this morning. The Algowood was due in later on Monday and will follow the Algosteel.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX docks will be the American Mariner and Catherine Desgagnes on Wednesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Buckeye on Saturday followed by the Courtney Burton on Sunday. The passenger vessel Ste. Claire remains in drydock at the Shipyard. There were no other vessels in port at the time of this report.

    Classic views of Toledo Shipping
    G.A. Tomlinson outbound Maumee Bay. She just finished loading coal at the C&O Coal Docks.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Loading in Prescott

    10/01
    Sunday saw the Inviken and Paterson at the Prescott elevator.

    Inviken unloading.
    Paterson docked across the slip.
    Close up of the Paterson.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Jim Winsor




    Tug for Sale

    10/01
    The 1929 built tug Captain George is for sale in Frankfort, MI. The tug was built in Charleston, WV for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

    Click here for more information




    Dossin museum to air film on salvage

    10/01
    The film "Salvage of Sidney Smith" will be shown from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 6 at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Isle in Detroit. Call (313) 852-4051 for information.




    Great Lakes Maritime Academy Open House

    10/01
    The Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Traverse City will host and open house Saturday, October 6 from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm.

    During the open house you will have the opportunity to:

  • Pilot a 730' Great Lakes Ship in the St. Marys River on our Ship Handling Simulator
  • Watch cadets monitor and run the power plant of a Steam or Diesel powered ship on our Engine Simulator
  • View the training vessels: M/V Northwestern and tug, Anchor Bay
  • Talk with faculty and staff members about your opportunities at the Academy
  • Ask current cadets about their experiences aboard ships during sea projects
  • Talk with faculty members who sailed as Officers last summer about their experiences

    Click here for more information




  • Lighthouse Festival

    10/01
    The sixth-annual Great Lakes Lighthouse Festival is planned for October 11-14. Be sure to stop by Saturday and Sunday and visit with the staff of Great Laker Magazine in the vendor area.

    Planned events include:
    Thursday: A day to tour the Alpena area on your own. The Jesse Besser Museum and Planetarium, Old & New Presque Isle Lighthouses, The Huron Lights store of Nautical Gifts, Gallery and Mini-museum, ships on the Thunder Bay River downtown, aerial lighthouse tours. All these attractions will be available during the weekend.

    Friday the outside venders will be setting up and selling their wares. The activities start to come together for the weekend.

    Saturday, the events start at 10 a.m. From that time until 6 p.m., the Alpena Civic and Convention Center and Holiday Inn will have lighthouse and life-saving exhibits, nautical items for sale, entertainment, educational programs, authors and artists and food and drinks. Ships on the Thunder Bay River downtown will be open for tours.

    Sunday, the Convention Center and Holiday Inn will be open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and will have a live auction of nautical memorabilia and raffle. Saturday's activities will continue on Sunday.

    Click here for more information




    Boatnerd Gathering East

    10/01
    A weekend of boat watching and touring will take place October 27-28 at the Welland Canal. The program will be similar to last year's event with more details to follow later in the week. Check back for details.

    2000 Gathering East




    Weekly Updates

    10/01
    The regular weekly updates are now available. Click here to view




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 01

    The CHICAGO TRADER was laid up on October 1, 1976 at the Frog Pond in Toledo.

    Dismantling commenced October 1, 1974 on the KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1) at Santander, Spain.

    October 1, 1997 - The CITY OF MIDLAND 41 was towed out of Ludington to be converted to a barge.

    On 1 October 1843, ALBANY (wooden brig, 110T, built in 1835 at Oswego, NY) was carrying merchandise and passengers when she went aground in a storm and was wrecked just a few miles from Mackinaw City, MI.

    The steam barge C. H. GREEN was launched at E. Saginaw, Michigan for Mason, Green & Corning of Saginaw on 1 October 1881. She was schooner rigged and spent her first year as a tow barge. The following winter her engine and boiler were installed. Her dimensions were 197' x 33' x 13', 920 tons. She cost $70,000.

    On 1 October 1869, SEA GULL (wooden schooner, 83 tons, built in 1845 at Milan, Ohio) was carrying lumber in a storm on Lake Michigan. She was driven ashore and wrecked south of Grand Haven, Michigan. The wreck was pulled off the beach a few days later, but was declared a constructive loss, stripped and abandoned. She was owned by Capt. Henry Smith of Grand Haven.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




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