Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

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* Report News


Muskegon officials approve ferry dock lease

10/31
Muskegon, Michigan city commissioners have unanimously approved the city's portion of a three-way dock lease for a Milwaukee-Muskegon ferry scheduled to begin operating June 1.

The commissioners' approval came just days after city leaders announced that Lake Express and Great Lakes Marina had agreed on the site for the Muskegon terminal.

The deal calls for construction of a $1.2 million dock in Muskegon for the high-speed ferry, which will carry passengers and vehicles. The city will put up the money and be repaid with fees generated through the ferry's operation.

Construction is expected to begin soon, Great Lakes Marina co-owner John Bultema told The Muskegon Chronicle. The terminal will be built on Muskegon Lake property owned by the marina, which will be responsible for its construction.

Milwaukee-based Lake Express LLC will run the ferry, a 200-foot aluminum catamaran capable of carrying 250 passengers and 46 vehicles.

Reported by: Dave Parikh


Challenger Visits

10/31
The oldest operating laker entered Owen Sound, Ontario about 4 p.m. Thursday. The Southdown Challenger was carrying a load of cement destined for the Miller Paving silos.

Inbound.
Close up.
Another view.

Reported by: Ed Saliwonchyk and Torben Hawksbridge


Alpena Update

10/31
The Algorail arrived in the Thunder Bay River around 2 p.m. on Thursday. It tied up at the Alpena Oil Dock and unloaded 11,000 tons of salt. It departed after dark and carefully backed out of the river into the bay, which was choppy with east winds blowing.

The Steamer Alpena was also in port on Thursday coming into Lafarge before 9 p.m. to take on cement. The tug Jacklyn M and barge Integrity is expected back in port late on Friday.

The J.A.W Iglehart is heading for Cleveland.

Algorail unloading

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain


Saginaw River News

10/31
The Wolverine was inbound the Saginaw River Thursday afternoon passing the Pump-Out Island around 4:30 p.m. She called on the Bay Aggregates dock to unload and was outbound late in the evening.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Wolverine inbound passing USCG Station Saginaw River
Stern view at Essroc

Reported by: Todd Shorkey, Stephen Hause and Lon Morgan


Toledo Update

10/31
The Saginaw finished loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator and departed very early Thursday morning. Several hours later the John B. Aird arrived at Andersons "K" Elevator to load grain. The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge was at the Sun Dock loading cargo.

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will be the Lee A. Tregurtha on Saturday, followed by the Fred R. White, Cason J. Callaway, Saginaw, Adam E. Cornelius, and Charles M. Beeghly on Sunday. Note the boat lineup at the CSX Docks for Sunday, some vessels may be rescheduled to avoid a delay.

The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the CSL Niagara on Friday, followed by the Atlantic Superior on Wednesday.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Shannon/barge Lakewood tow inbound Toledo bound for the Shipyard where the Lakewood will be placed in drydock.
Willis B. Boyer/Pontiac in winter layup at the Hocking Valley North Dock.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Today in Great Lakes History - October 31

CANADIAN EXPLORER's sea trials were conducted on October 31, 1983 on Lake Erie where a service speed of 13.8 m.p.h. was recorded.

The EDWIN H. GOTT was christened October 31, 1978.

On October 31, 1973, the H.M. Griffith entered service.

J.W. McGIFFIN cleared Midland, Ont. on her maiden voyage October 31, 1973 bound for Thunder Bay, Ont. to load iron ore for Hamilton, Ont.

The CADILLAC (4) was launched October 31, 1942 as a) LAKE ANGELINA.

ELMGLEN (2) cleared Owen Sound, Ont. on October 31, 1984 on her first trip in P. & H. colors.

On October 31, 1966 while downbound in the St. Marys River loaded with 11,143 tons of potash for Oswego, NY, the HALLFAX ran aground on a rocky reef and settled to the bottom with her hold full of water. She had grounded on Pipe Island Twins Reef just north of DeTour, MI.

The CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON (3) struck a reef the night of October 31, 1925 three miles south of Manitou Island, off the Keweenaw Peninsula, on Lake Superior.

On October 31, 1983 the SYLVANIA was towed out of the Frog Pond by the harbor tugs ARKANSAS and WYOMING. She was handed over to the tug OHIO for delivery to the Triad Salvage Co. at Ashtabula, OH arriving there on November 1st. Dismantling was completed there in 1984. Thus ended 78 years of service. Ironically the SYLVANIA, the first built of the 504 foot class bulkers, was the last survivor of that class. During her career with Columbia Transportation, the SYLVANIA had carried over 20 million tons and netted over $35 million.

On 31 October 1883, CITY OF TORONTO (wooden passenger-package freight sidewheeler, 207', 898 GC, built in 1864 at Niagara, Ontario) caught fire at the Muir Brothers shipyard at Port Dalhousie, Ontario and was totally destroyed. She previously had her paddle boxes removed so she could pass through the Welland Canal, and she was in the shipyard to have them reassembled that winter.

On 31 October 1874, the tug FAVORITE was towing the schooner WILLIE NEELER on Lake Erie. At about 10:30 PM, near Bar Point, the schooner suddenly sheered and before the tow line could be cast off, the FAVORITE capsized and sank. One life was lost. The rest of the crew clung to the upper works which had become dislodged from the vessel and they were rescued by the schooner's lifeboats.

On 31 October 1821, WALK-IN-THE-WATER (wooden side-wheeler, 135', 339 t, built in 1818 at Black Rock [Buffalo], NY) was wrecked on Point Abino, on the Canadian shore of Lake Erie during a storm. She was the first steam-powered vessel above Niagara and her frequent comings and goings during her career were very much in the newspapers in Detroit but her loss was not mentioned not at all since this steamer was virtually the only source of news from the east. Her engine was installed by Robert Fulton himself. After the wreck, it went into the steamer SUPERIOR and later ran a lumber mill in Saginaw, MI.

On 31 October 1880, TRANCHEMONTAGNE (wooden schooner, 108', 130 t, built in 1864 at Sorel, P. Q.) was loaded with rye and sailing in a storm on Lake Ontario. She struck the breakwater at Oswego, New York head-on at about 3:00 AM. She stove in her bow and quickly sank. The crew took to the rigging, except for one who was washed overboard and rode a provision box from her deck to shore. The Lifesaving Service rescued the rest from the breakwater. The schooner broke up quickly in the storm.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Harriman Moved

10/30
Wednesday the Lewis G. Harriman tow departed the Purvis Dock just before 10 a.m. The tugs Adanac and Anglian Lady moved the retired cement carrier upbound through the MacArthur Lock.

At 11 a.m. they were clear of the Piers going to secure the Harriman at the Purvis West Dock.

It is unknown when scrapping will begin, crews are currently scrapping the Quedoc at the location.

In other news, the Roger Blough spent most of the day at Carbide Dock. The Blough was tied up for reported fuel system repairs. Once completed, they departed downbound Wednesday night for Conneaut, Ohio.

Approaching the Mac Lock upbound
Close up entering the lock
Stern view in the lock
Almost at High pool
Ready to depart the Mac Lock for the last time.
Proceeding upbound above the locks
Close up above the locks
Stern view headed to Purvis West Dock.
Roger Blough tied up at Carbide for Repairs
Michipicoten upbound Wednesday afternoon

Reported by: Scott Best


Badger Heads for Home

10/30
The Lake Michigan Carferry Badger departed Bay Shipbuilding about 11:30 a.m. Wednesday. Prior to departing the dock the Selvick tugs Mary Page Hannah and Jimmy L. rigged out for the tow back to Ludington.

As the Badger departed the dock, the Mary Page Hannah pulled the bow heading for the Michigan Street bridge, with the tug Jimmy L. trailing. They departed out bound passing through the shipping canal for Lake Michigan and Ludington, Mich. The tow should take about 10 to 12 hours, depending on the sea and weather conditions.

Stern being rigged for tow to tug Jimmy L. Tugs Escort II and Bay ship holding
Passing through Michigan Street bridge
Heading for Bay View bridge
Entering the ship canal
In the canal

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle


EVTAC spending OK may signal mine's revival

10/30
EVTAC Mining Co. has received a bankruptcy judge's approval to use company money to prepare the Minnesota taconite plant for reopening, pushing the facility closer to purchase by Cleveland-Cliffs and a Chinese steelmaker.

EVTAC closed May 14 because of lack of orders from owners Rouge Steel, Stelco and AK Steel. The taconite producer is now in Chapter 11 bankruptcy. but Cliffs and Laiwu Steel Group are working together to purchase and reopen the plant to supply taconite pellets to China.

EVTAC plans to spend $5.9 million to get its mine near Eveleth and processing plant in nearby Forbes back into operation before the possible purchase. Officials say they need to rebuild the plant's furnace, rebuild a rock crusher, rebuild a shovel, buy supplies and work on the mine.

Up to 100 steelworkers could be back on the job as early as next week.

Steelworker leaders and Cleveland-Cliffs negotiators will begin meeting Monday in Duluth to negotiate a new labor contract for EVTAC's hourly workers. Cliffs says agreement on a new progressive labor agreement is a key part of reopening the taconite plant.

Reported by: Gary Stevens


Ispat Inland successfully relines Indiana blast furnace

10/30
Ispat Inland employees recently completed a $95 million reline and restart of the company's mammoth No. 7 blast furnace.

A blast furnace is a towering cylinder lined with heat-resistant bricks, used by integrated steel mills to smelt iron from its ore. Its name comes from the ``blast'' of hot air and gases forced up through the iron ore, coke and limestone that load the furnace.

The reline of No. 7, the largest blast furnace in the Western Hemisphere, was completed Oct. 4. The furnace can produce twice the amount of iron daily as Ispat Inland's other two furnaces combined.

During the past three weeks, the No. 7 furnace has been slowly brought back up to its iron-making capacity of more than 10,000 tons a day.

``It was a major investment in the future of company, plant and region,'' an Ispat Inland spokesman said. ``It enables us to continue to serve the high-end of the market: automotive, appliance and electrical steels for motors and transformers.''

The successful project is significant for the Great Lakes shipping industry because the furnace consumes millions of tons of taconite pellets carried by ship from Minnesota and Michigan.

Ispat Inland's mine in Virginia, Minn., sends 2.9 million tons a year to No. 7 -- about 65 percent of what the furnace needs. The Empire Mine in Michigan's Upper Peninsula supplies the remainder.

During the peak construction period, as many as 1,350 contractors worked on the reline along with the steelworkers who normally staff the furnace.

Contractors removed and replaced the worn heat-resistant brick covering the interior of the huge steel-shelled vessel that had its last full reline in 1987. They also replaced the furnace's staves -- the hollow copper pipes that cool the furnace's exterior -- did electrical work and pipe-fitting to complete the project.

Reported by: Roger Davis


Twin Ports Report

10/30
Herbert C. Jackson was under the spouts Wednesday at Cenex Harvest States in Superior. Also in port for grain was the saltie Pytheas at Cargill B1. Olympic Mentor is anchored out waiting for Cenex Harvest States.

Elsewhere in port, Oglebay Norton was due at Midwest Energy Terminal.

U.S. Steel's purchase of the National Steel assets continues to send boats of Great Lakes Fleet to unusual ports. Presque Isle was due Wednesday at BNSF ore dock in Superior -- a rare call for that vessel before this season -- to load pellets for Detroit. Edwin H. Gott is due at BNSF on Nov. 2.

Up the shore, Lee A. Tregurtha was scheduled to make a rare call Wednesday in Two Harbors. Middletown was due at Silver Bay.

Reported by: Al Miller


Marinette Update

10/30
This week saw two Desgagnes ships in Marinette, WI. First was the Catherine Desgagnes, which arrived on Saturday afternoon with a load of pig iron for Marinette Fuel & Dock. She departed mid-day on Sunday. The Amelia Desgagnes arrived at MF&D early Wednesday morning, also with pig iron.

The USCG Hollyhock continues her sea trials. After being out in the bay of Green Bay most of the weekend, she spent Tuesday, Tuesday night and Wednesday (until about 4 p.m.) also in the bay. The USCG Hollyhock is due in Port Huron in about 10 days to report for duty as replacement for the now-retired USCG Bramble.

Catherine Desgagnes turns in the Menominee River alongside the crane ship William H. Donner.
Another view from down-river
Heading out of the Menominee River
Outbound past Menominee North Pier lighthouse (notice how high she is riding at the bow)
Amelia Desgagnes unloading at Marinette Fuel & Dock
On sea trials beyond the lighthouse

Reported by: Dick Lund


Saginaw River News

10/30
The Mississagi was outbound the Saginaw River during the afternoon Wednesday. She had entered the river Tuesday evening, lightering at the Bay City Wirt Dock and then heading upriver to the Saginaw Rock Products Dock to finish unloading. The Tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort & Barge Great Lakes Trader were also outbound on Wednesday after unloading overnight at a Saginaw dock.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Mississagi downbound at Wheeler's Landing
Another view
Stern view approaching By City Wirt

Reported by: Todd Shorkey, Lon Morgan, Stephen Hause


Two teens charged with faking distress call

10/30
Two 16-year-old Chicago boys were arrested Oct. 28 for falsely making a distress call two days earlier that sent Chicago police and fire rescue units and the Coast Guard racing into Lake Michigan in search of a non-existent sinking boat with 20 people aboard.

The youths were charged with disorderly conduct for making a false police report and are to appear in Juvenile Court, said police spokeswoman Alice Casanova. Rescuers searched for three hours Sunday before declaring the call a hoax. Typically, such pranksters are never caught, Casanova said.

Reported by: Alan Byers


Agency eyes truck ferry for Lake Erie

10/30
A truck ferry between Erie, Penn., and Nanticoke, Ont., could generate as much as $14.6 million a year for the Erie region, says the Erie-Western Pennsylvania Port Authority, and the agency hopes to begin operating the ferry in 2005.

The ferry would take thousands of trucks off congested Canadian highways, according to the report by Transportation Economics & Management Systems Inc. It could also bring hundreds of jobs to Erie, port officials said.

"You'd increase economic activity here tremendously," said Alex Metcalf, president of TEMS. "The jobs could be in the hundreds. The impact would be substantial."

The type of ferry that would be used has yet to be decided, though the Port Authority is considering a $17 million, 492-foot vessel. The ship would make two round trips per day at a cost of $120 per truck.

The ferry, capable of breaking ice, would operate at least 320 days a year and carry up to 100 trucks per trip, according to the study.

Before such a ferry could begin operation, however, the study suggests substantial infrastructure improvements are needed on both ends of the route. While there is an existing ferry dock in Nanticoke, there is some question about whether the already congested Canadian highways from Nanticoke would be able to handle increased truck traffic.

The Erie ferry loading area needs extensive work, Port Authority Executive Director Ray Schreckengost said.

Reported by: Bob Martin


The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald

10/30
On November 10, 1975, in the most famous shipwreck in Great Lakes history, the Edmund Fitzgerald sank in a treacherous storm on Lake Superior. Now in conjunction with its anniversary of the ship sinking, Southport Video Productions, a film company specializing in documentaries on shipwrecks and lighthouses, has released a new program titled The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.

"This is by far our most detailed and comprehensive look at this great ship' s story," says Southport producer Mark C. Gumbinger, who produced and directed two earlier entries on the Edmund Fitzgerald.

"The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald presents new interview material filmed for this program, with updated theories about what actually brought the Edmund Fitzgerald to the bottom of Lake Superior on that terrible, stormy night."

Thanks to the popular 1976 song by singer/songwriter Gordon Lightfoot, the story of the Edmund Fitzgerald has reached and maintained legendary status in Great Lakes maritime lore. The gigantic ore carrier, at one time the largest ship on the Great Lakes and holder of numerous tonnage records, was caught up in a vicious November storm on Lake Superior and, after hours of battling high winds and 30-foot waves, suddenly disappeared from radar without so much as a single warning or SOS from its captain or crew.

What happened that fateful night has been the subject of debate for more than a quarter of a century. The Fitzgerald came to rest in two pieces in deep frigid water, and authorities cannot even agree on whether the ship broke on the surface or whether it slammed into the floor of Lake Superior, not to mention the different and often conflicting theories.

The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald gives the details of the ship's final voyage, complete with details of its final minutes, the frantic search efforts that followed its sinking, and the Coast Guard's exhaustive investigation into the tragedy. The various theories about its sinking are explored by eleven Great Lakes maritime experts.

Reported by: Southport Video Productions


Today in Great Lakes History - October 30

The tugs GLENADA and MOUNT McKAY towed AMOCO ILLINOIS from Essexville on October 30, 1985 and arrived at the M&M slip on November 1st. where she was to be scrapped.

The CADILLAC (4) and her former fleetmate CHAMPLAIN (3) arrived under tow by the Dutch tug/supply ship THOMAS DE GAUWDIEF on October 30, 1987 at Aliaga, Turkey to be scrapped there.

The ISLE ROYALE (2) (Canal Bulk Freighter) was launched October 30, 1947 as a) SOUTHCLIFFE HALL for the Hall Corporation of Canada Ltd. (which in 1969 became Hall Corporation (Shipping) 1969 Ltd.), Montreal.

On 30 October 1874, LOTTA BERNARD (wooden sidewheel "rabbit", 125', 147 T, built in 1869 at Port Clinton, OH) was carrying general merchandise from Silver Islet to Duluth when she foundered in a terrific gale off Encampment Island in Lake Superior. Three lives were lost. She was capable of only 4 miles per hour and was at the mercy of any fast rising storm.

During a storm, the schooner ANNABELLA CHAMBERS was wrecked on the islands off Toronto, Ontario on 30 October 1873. One sailor was washed overboard and lost. The skipper was rescued, but he had the dead body of his small son in his arms.

October 30, 1971 - The PERE MARQUETTE 21 was laid up due to coal strike. She never sailed again as a carferry.

On 30 October 1877, CITY OF TAWAS (3-mast wooden schooner, 135', 291 t, built in 1864 at Vicksburgh [now Marysville], MI as a sloop-barge) was carrying 500 tons of iron ore when she struck a bar outside the harbor at St. Joseph, Michigan while attempting to enter during a storm. She drifted ashore with a hole in her bottom and was pounded to pieces. One brave crewman swam ashore with a line and the rest came in on it.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Harriman Moved

10/29 11 a.m. Update
The Harriman departed the Purvis Dock just before 10 a.m. Wednesday morning towed by the tugs Adanac and Anglian Lady. The tow moved upbound through the Mac Lock.

At 11 a.m. they were clear of the Piers going to secure the Harriman at the Purvis West Dock.

Original Report
The Lewis G. Harriman remained at the Government Dock in Sault, Ont. on Tuesday. The tow arrived on Monday from Green Bay with an ultimate destination of scrapping above the Export Dock.

It is unknown when the tow will be moved to the scrapping dock which is located above the Soo Locks. Crews are currently scrapping the Quedoc and it is expected to take up to 10 months before crews can begin on the Harriman.

Reported by: Scott Best


Bankrupt Rouge Steel may tempt other buyers

10/29
U.S. Steel Corp. remains interested in buying bankrupt Rouge Steel despite a recent announcement that Russian steelmaker Severstal plans to buy the company's Detroit mill.

Thomas Usher, chairman and chief executive officer of U.S. Steel Corp., said Monday that the Pittsburgh-based steel giant is still interested in buying Rouge in bankruptcy court proceedings.

Meanwhile, Rouge on Monday began the Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection process in U.S. bankruptcy court in Wilmington, Del. Rouge Industries Inc. announced the same day that its shareholders likely would receive nothing if the company is bought by Severstal.

Rouge, which has lost $360 million since 1999, announced last week that it had filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and had reached an undisclosed deal to sell all of its assets to Severstal.

Severstal did not file court documents Monday detailing Rouge's purchase price. At the end of June, Rouge listed $558 million in assets and $505 million in liabilities.

As part of the bankruptcy process, all of a company's assets can be auctioned. Although Rouge has an agreement with Severstal, the company could choose to sell to the highest bidder. That might open the door for U.S. Steel to bid for the company.

Reported by: Dan Whitmore


EVTAC wants money to prepare for re-start

10/29
Officials of EVTAC Mining Co. are asking a federal bankruptcy judge for approval to use company money to prepare the Minnesota taconite plant for reopening, pushing the facility closer to purchase by Cleveland-Cliffs and a Chinese steelmaker.

EVTAC closed May 14 because of lack of orders from owners Rouge Steel, Stelco and AK Steel. The taconite producer is now in Chapter 11 bankruptcy. but Cliffs and Laiwu Steel Group are working together to purchase and reopen the plant to supply taconite pellets to China.

EVTAC wants to spent $5.9 million to get its mine near Eveleth and processing plant in nearby Forbes back into operation before the possible purchase. Officials say they need to rebuild the plant's furnace, rebuild a rock crusher, rebuild a shovel, buy supplies and work on the mine.

Cliffs officials told the Duluth News Tribune that they want to close the deal to buy EVTAC by Dec. 1. Cliffs reportedly is offering to buy the taconite plant's assets for $500,000 in cash and the assumption of$40 million in environmental liabilities.

The News Tribune reported that Cliffs is talking with the state about numerous issues aimed at reducing the cost of acquiring and operating the plant. Among the issues is possible expansion of the Cliffs Erie Railroad to haul EVTAC pellets to Taconite Harbor, where the taconite-loading dock has been idle since LTV Steel Mining closed. EVTAC pellets currently are sent by rail to Duluth, where they are loaded aboard Great Lakes ships at the DMIR ore dock.

EVTAC's board of directors has approved the company's sale to Cliffs and Laiwu, as have Rouge Steel and Stelco. AK Steel has not cast a vote as an owner, although it approved the sale as a member of the board.

An AK Steel spokesman told the News Tribune that a new cost structure being proposed at EVTAC caught the attention of AK Steel. However, he said AK Steel does not plan to oppose a deal to sell the taconite plant.

Reported by: Steve Roper


Welland Canal News

10/29
Tuesday was an interesting day in the Welland Canal. The salt water ship BBC Spain stopped at the E.S. Fox Dock at Port Robinson to load an unknown cargo. The ship had departed by early evening.

The theme for the canal Tuesday was cement boats. Upbound were the barges St. Marys Cement II and Metis. Down bound was the barge St. Marys Cement and tug Petite Forte and the JAW Iglehart.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt


Toledo Update

10/29
Tuesday the Canadian Transfer was at the Kuhlman Dock unloading salt. The Gemini is in temporary lay-up at the Lakefront Docks. The Armco, Buckeye, and Courtney Burton remain in layup at their respective docksites.

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will be the Lee A. Tregurtha and Fred R. White Jr. on Saturday, followed by the Cason J. Callaway, Saginaw, Adam E. Cornelius, and Charles M. Beeghly on Sunday. The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the CSL Niagara on Friday.

Pictures by Mike Nicholls
Canadian Transfer unloading at Kuhlman's Dock on the Maumee River.
Just after passing through the N&S South Railroad Bridge outbound for Lake Erie.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Kingston Update

10/29
The Kingston area was busy Tuesday. The English River left Bath, Ont. with cement for Toronto. The Stephen B. Roman departed Picton, Ont. also heading for Toronto. The Atlantic Superior finished unloading in Picton Tuesday and departed with an eta for Cape Vincent of 2:45 p.m.

The Canadian Empress arrived back in Kingston Tuesday afternoon from a trip to Prescott. This was her last voyage of the season. She will head to her winter berth shortly.

The Nadro Clipper departed Prince Edward Bay at 11 a.m. heading for a location 4.5 miles SE of Point Pete and .5 miles south of the downbound Lane. They were to conduct diving operations in 180 feet of water.

Reported by: Ron Walsh


New Technology Highlighted by events at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum

10/29
A new, interactive Detroit River Watch webcam is now on-line at www.glmi.org.

The webcam, located on the top of the William Clay Ford freighter pilothouse at Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Isle, offers a 340-degree view of the passing freighter traffic on the Detroit River and activity in Belle Isle Park. The webcam can be controlled from any on-line personal computer, and is active 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

“The purpose of the camera is to introduce patrons to our maritime heritage, to encourage them to visit the museum on Belle Isle, and to participate in our programs,” says John Polacsek, Dossin Museum curator.

The Detroit River Webcam is a special project of the Great Lakes Maritime Institute and the Dossin Great Lakes Museum. The project is funded by donations; individuals who contribute $20 or more receive an authentic stock certificate from the Detroit & Cleveland Navigation Co., a passenger and freight line that was active on the Detroit River from 1860-1950.

The Detroit River Webcam is made possible due to new high-speed wireless Internet technology provided through the Zing Company of Detroit. Since the Dossin Museum is on the south shore of Belle Isle, no regular cable service is available. Zing provided a wireless connection to its downtown Detroit location after a clear line of sight was provided by the Belle Isle forestry crew. In the future, the webcam will be used to broadcast historical presentations about commercial navigation and Detroit River aquatic life direct to classrooms in the Motor City area and across the region.

The new technology will also be used Mon., Nov. 10 for a live webcast of a memorial service for the steamer Edmund Fitzgerald and her crew, from the grounds of the Dossin Great Lakes Museum. The 7 p.m. ceremony will include a lamp-lighting ceremony, and retired Great Lakes Capt. Donald Erickson, who helped search for Fitzgerald survivors on Lake Superior the night of the shipwreck, will speak. The Fitzgerald sank 29 years ago, at approximately 7 p.m. Nov. 10 1975.

“The last time we conducted a Fitzgerald Memorial we ran out of room, so this time, with the webcast, we hope to provide a greater service to our patrons in the Detroit area and across the country,” adds Polacsek.

The ceremony is open to the public, but there is only limited walk-up space available. In case of inclement weather, the ceremony will be moved inside the William Clay Ford pilothouse, where space is even more limited. In short, adds Polacsek, “the best bet is to watch is on the webcast.”

Thanks to the webcast’s interactive nature, people from around the world will be able to ask questions in real time by submitting their questions electronically.

For additional information, go to www.glmi.org.

The Great Lakes Maritime Institute has also scheduled a number of events Nov. 8 -9 to coincide with the perils of November that many sailors and vessels have experienced on the Great Lakes.

On Saturday, Nov. 8, a Silent Auction will be held from 11a.m.-1 p.m. at Dossin Museum to benefit the Webcam project. Among items on the auction block are two bottles of 90-year-old scotch that were recovered from the shipwreck of the S.S. Regina on Lake Huron. The Regina was lost Nov. 9, 1913 when a major storm battered the Great Lakes. Other artifacts up for auction include portholes and other memorabilia from the well-known Great Lakes passenger liner South American, items relating to Gold Cup racing on the Detroit River, Bob-Lo Island memorabilia and a number of pieces of nautical artwork. Following the auction, at 1:30 p.m., Dave Trotter, a diver who discovered another victim of the 1913 storm, the freighter John McGean, which lies upside down on the bottom of Lake Huron, will speak. Regular admission charges to Dossin Great Lakes Museum apply.

On Sunday Nov. 9 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m., maritime historian Elizabeth Sherman will be on hand to sign her new book “Beyond the Windswept Dunes – The Story of Maritime Muskegon.” Published by Wayne State University Press, the book chronicles the ships and shipwrecks along the Muskegon and eastern Lake Michigan shore. At 2 p.m., Great Lakes folk singer Lee Murdock will perform. Murdock’s ballads tell the stories of vessels and crews that have sailed the inland seas. Tickets are $10 for Great Lakes Maritime Institute members ($12 non-members) plus admission to the museum.


Today in Great Lakes History - October 29

ALGOLAKE was launched October 29, 1976

On October 29, 1986 the JAMES R. BARKER, who had suffered an engine room fire, was lashed side-by-side to the thousand-foot WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY and towed this way to Sturgeon Bay, Wis. for repairs.

The b) CANADIAN EXPLORER was christened on October 29, 1983 at the Port Weller Dry Docks.

The National Transportation Safety Board ruled on October 29, 1991 that Total Petroleum was responsible for the fire that destroyed the tanker JUPITER because of faulty moorings and exonerated the BUFFALO from primary responsibility.

On the afternoon of October 29, 1987 while upbound with coal from Sandusky, OH, the ROGER M. KYES ( b) ADAM E. CORNELIUS) went aground on Gull Island Shoal in Lake Erie's Middle Passage and began taking on water. About 3,000 tons of coal was transferred to the AMERICAN REPUBLIC after which the KYES freed herself the next morning. Damage from the grounding required extensive repairs.

The tug portion of the PRESQUE ISLE (2) departed New Orleans on October 29, 1973.

The H.C. HEIMBECKER's last trip started at Thunder Bay, Ont. with a load of grain bound for Owen Sound, Ont. where, on October 29, 1981, it was discovered that one of her boilers was cracked. When unloading was completed on October 30th, the HEIMBECKER proceeded under her own power to Ashtabula, OH for scrapping.

On 29 October 1892, ZACH CHANDLER (3 mast wooden schooner-barge, 194', 727 GT, built in 1867 at Detroit) was carrying lumber from Ashland, WI in tow of the steamer JOHN MITCHELL when the two became separated in a northerly gale in Lake Superior. The CHANDLER was overwhelmed and broke up on shore about three miles east of Deer Park, MI. Five of the crew made it to shore in the lifeboat and the Lifesaving Service saved two others, but one perished. Three years earlier, the CHANDLER stranded at almost the same spot and sustained heavy damage.

On 29 October 1879, AMAZON (wooden propeller freighter, 245', 1406 t, built in 1873 at Trenton, MI) was carrying "provisions" - 900 tons of freight plus 7000 barrels of flour - from Milwaukee to Grand Haven, Michigan. She struck the notorious bar off of Grand Haven in a gale and broke up. All 68 aboard survived. Her engine was later recovered.

On 29 October 1880, THOMAS A. SCOTT (4-mast wooden schooner-barge, 207', 1159 t, built in 1869 at Buffalo as a propeller) was riding out a storm at anchor one mile off Milwaukee when she was struck by the big steamer AVON (wooden propeller, 251', 1702 gt, built in 1877 at Buffalo, NY). The SCOTT sank quickly. She had been bound from Chicago for Erie, PA with 44,000 bushels of corn. Three of her crew scrambled onto the AVON while the seven others took to the yawl and were towed in by the Lifesaving Service.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Tow Stops

10/28
The tow of the Lewis G. Harriman from Green Bay to Sault Ste. Marie continued Monday. At 6:45 a.m. Monday morning the Avenger IV and Harriman tow were inbound at Detour, the lower entrance to the St Marys River. The tug Adanac took up the stern of the tow for the trip up the river.

The tow arrived about 2 p.m. at the Government Dock in Sault, Ont. It is unknown when the tow will pass upbound through the locks but the move is expected to take place today.

The Harriman will be tied up above the Import Dock and will wait for scrapping. Crews are currently scrapping the Quedoc and it is expected to take up to 10 months before crews can begin on the Harriman.

Pictures by Dave Wobser
Tow upbound.
Avenger IV on the bow.
Close up.
Pilothouse and name board.
Stern passing.
Adanac on the stern.

Pictures by Scott Best
Former fleet mate Alpena was downbound on Monday and met the tow of the Harriman near 9 mile Pt.
Close up of Harriman
Upbound near Mission Pt.
Entering Soo Harbor
Close up view
Tow stern view at Mission Pt.

Pictures by Lock Tours Canada Boat Cruises
At the Government Dock.
Another view.

Reported by: Dave Wobser and Scott Best


Last Cruise ship in Quebec harbour for 2003

10/28
The arrival of the Royal Caribbean Liner Grandeur of the Seas on Sunday morning brought an end to a successful 2003 Cruise ship season in Quebec Harbor. This season, three new cruise ships docked in Quebec for the first time, namely the Prinsendam, the Regal Princess and the Seven Seas Navigator.

On October 14, thousands of onlookers bid farewell to the popular Cunard QE2 on its last voyage to Quebec. In total, twenty-one cruise ships made 113 calls this year carrying an estimated 70,000 visitors, 80% of which are American. The cruise ship business represents a lucrative $15 M annual fall-out for the Quebec City area.

The Quebec Port Authority has high hopes for the 2004 season as Holland America Lines has announced plans to double its number of calls from 12 to 24 next season.

Picture of Grandeur of the Seas docked in Quebec Harbor.

Reported by: Frederick Fréchette


Mapleglen Heading for Suez Canal

10/28
The scrap tow of the Mapleglen continues as the deep sea tug Seaways 2 pulls the Mapleglen closer to the scrapper’s torch. The tow is expected to reach Port Said, Egypt on November 2. Port Said is the Northern entrance to the Suez Canal. The trip from Canada is expected to take a total of 70 days with the Mapleglen ending the tow beached in Alang, India.

Following behind the Mapleglen is the tow of the Seaway Queen and Oakglen. The deep sea tug Seaways 5 is towing the two lakers, they are currently crossing the Atlantic also heading for Alang.

Seaways International is the towing company charged with moving the hulls, the company has towed ten lakers to meet their end in India.

Reported by: Kent Malo


Twin Ports Report

10/28
Cenex Harvest States elevator in Superior was busy Monday with the saltie Milo loading on one side and Spruceglen loading on the other.

Elsewhere in port. Halifax loaded at BNSF ore dock. Walter J. McCarthy Jr. spent the day loading at Midwest Energy Terminal, and was pulling away about 4:30 p.m. amid light snow.

On Sunday, the Herbert C. Jackson paid the ports a welcome visit, loading coal at Midwest Energy Terminal for delivery to Marquette.

Reported by: Al Miller


Today in Great Lakes History - October 28

The CANADIAN PIONEER's maiden voyage was on October 28, 1981 to Conneaut, OH to take on coal for Nanticoke, Ont.

The CANADIAN TRANSPORT (2) was launched October 28, 1978 for Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd., Toronto, Ont.

GEMINI was christened October 28, 1978 at Huron, OH.

The GEORGE M. CARL (2) was launched October 28, 1922 as a) FRED G. HARTWELL (2)

D.M. CLEMSON (2) was launched October 28, 1916

CHARLES M. WHITE was launched October 28, 1945 as a C4-S-A4 cargo ship a) MOUNT MANSFIELD for the U.S. Maritime Commission (U.S.M.C. Hull #2369).

On 28 October 1887, BESSIE BARWICK, a 135' wooden schooner built in 1866 at St. Catherine's, Ontario as a bark, left Port Arthur for Kingston, Ontario with a load of lumber during a storm. For more than ten days, her whereabouts were unknown. In fact, a westerly gale drove her into the shallows of Michipicoten Island and she was pounded to pieces. Her crew was sheltered by local fishermen and then made it to the Soo in a small open boat.

On 28 October 1882, RUDOLPH WETZEL (wooden propeller tug, 23 t, built in 1870 at Buffalo, NY) was racing for a tow with the tug HENRY S. SILL when her boiler exploded 12 miles north of Racine, Wisconsin. She quickly sank. All three on board were killed and none of the bodies were ever found.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Harriman Tow Continues

10/27 2:30 p.m. Update
The Harriman tow tied up about 2 p.m. at the Government Dock in Sault, Ont. It is unknown when the tow will pass upbound through the locks but the move is expected to take place tomorrow.

8 a.m. Update
At 6:45 a.m. Monday morning the Avenger IV and Harriman tow were inbound at Detour, the lower entrance to the St Marys River. The tug Adanac will take up the stern of the tow for the trip up the river. Its unclear how long it will take to make their way up river, normal transit time from Detour to the Soo Locks in about five hours, the tow may take longer.

At 8 a.m.the tow was upbound at Fort St Joe, estimating two hours to Mud Lake.

Original Report
The tow of the Lewis G. Harriman from Green Bay to Sault Ste. Marie continued Sunday with the tow expected to enter the St. Marys River sometime on Monday.

The Harriman is bound for scrapping at the Export Dock in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

Chart of the St Marys River Check back for updates.

Reported by: Dave Wobser and Scott Best


Weekly Updates

10/27
The weekly updates have been uploaded. In addition to the regular updates this week features unique maritime items up for auction at the Dossin Museum. This year, the silent auction will accept online bids. Items range from authentic port holes to bottles of 90 year old scotch recovered from a ship wreck.

Also added are pictures from the Welland Canal Gathering.

Click here to view

More News updates and pictures will be added on Monday.


Today in Great Lakes History - October 27

The PAUL THAYER (b) EARL W. OGLEBAY) was christened on October 27, 1973 at Lorain.

While the JAMES R. BARKER was up bound October 27, 1986 on Lake Huron above buoys 11 & 12, a high pressure fuel line on the starboard engine failed causing an engine room fire, which was extinguished by on-board fire fighting equipment. Fortunately no one was injured. On October 29th the BARKER was lashed side-by-side to the thousand-foot WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY (b) Paul R. Tregurtha) and taken to Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

On her maiden voyage the HOCHELAGA (2) departed Collingwood on October 27, 1949 for Fort William, Ont. to load grain for Port Colborne, Ont.

The FRANCIS E. HOUSE was laid up at Duluth, MN on October 27, 1960 and remained idle there until April, 1966 when she was sold to the Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland and was renamed c) KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1).

On October 27, 1973 the HENRY LALIBERTÉ struck an embankment while backing from the Frontier Dock Slip at Buffalo, NY and damaged her steering gear beyond repair. As a consequence she was laid up there.

The RED WING (2) and the FRANK A. SHERMAN departed Lauzon, Que. on October 27, 1986 in tandem tow by the Vancouver based deep-sea tug CANADIAN VIKING bound for scrapping in Taiwan.

On 27 October 1869, ALFRED ALLEN (wooden schooner, 160 T, built in 1853 at Pultneyville, NJ as J. J. MORLEY) was bound for Toledo, OH with 500 barrels of salt when she went on the Mohawk Reef near Port Colborne, Ontario in a blizzard. She washed free and drifted to the mainland beach where she was pounded to pieces. No lives were lost.

During a snow storm on the night of 27 October 1878, the propeller QUEBEC of the Beatty Line ran aground on Magnetic Shoals near Cockburn Island on Lake Huron. She was four miles from shore and one of her arches was broken in the accident.

October 27, 1854 - Well-known Pere Marquette carferry captain Joseph "Joe" Russell was born in Greenfield, Wisconsin.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Lewis G. Harriman departs Green Bay

10/26
The Lewis G. Harriman departed from Green Bay for last time Saturday evening with the assistance of the PML tug Avenger IV and G tug Indiana. The tow started around 4:30 p.m. CST and made its way downriver until they were outbound at Buoy 30 at 6:55 p.m. CST.

The tow is now bound for the Purvis scrap yard in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. Many people followed her progress on both sides of the river as they made there way downriver.

Tugs Indiana and Avenger IV pull the Harriman from its berth
Avenger IV takes the lead
Passing Pier 64 as the sunsets
Passing the S.T. Crapo at Lafarge
Through the railroad bridge
Passing C. Reiss coal dock at sunset
Making its way downriver
Passing Western Lime at night
Departing Green Bay for the last time

More pictures of the Harriman

Reported by: Jason Leino


Laker Making Progress across Atlantic

10/26
The scrap tow of the Mapleglen continues, Saturday the tow continued with the deep sea tug Seaways 2 crossing the Atlantic with the Mapleglen in tow. The crew report the tow is progressing satisfactorily.

The voyage to India, where Mapleglen will be demolished and steel recycled, will take approx 70 days.

Reported by: Kent Malo


Saltwater Ship Woody Downbound

10/26
Saturday the saltwater ship Woody was downbound in the St. Marys River

Woody downbound.
Bow.
Passing.
Pilothouse and stack.
Stern view.

Reported by: B. Barnes


Alpena Update

10/26
The Earl W. Oglebay arrived at Lafarge late Friday night to unload a cargo of coal. It departed in the early morning hours on Saturday. The J.A.W Iglehart was also in port on Saturday, coming in before noon. It took on cement for Detroit and was heading out into the lake by 4 p.m.

The Alpena is delivering cement to the Lake Superior ports of Superior and Duluth. The Jacklyn M and barge Integrity is due back in port sometime on Monday.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain


Saginaw River News

10/26
The Buffalo was inbound the Saginaw River early Saturday morning calling on the Bay Aggregates dock. She unloaded into the afternoon and departed for the lake around 3 p.m.

Also outbound behind the Buffalo was the Algoway who was downbound from Saginaw. The Algoway unloaded overnight at Bay Aggregates then finished the split load at the Buena Vista Dock.

The Maumee was inbound Saturday night calling on the Sargent dock in Essexville to unload. Her whole load will be discharged there before departing early Sunday morning.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Buffalo downbound from the Bay Aggregate dock
Stern view

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


Port Huron Update

10/26
Below are images of traffic passing the Port Huron area Friday.

Algocen downbound at Marine City.
Algorail up at the Blue Water Bridge
Algowood up at the Blue Water Bridge
Algowood heading out into Lake Huron
American Republic passes Port Huron/Sarnia
Walter J McCarthy Jr. downbound off Lake Huron.
Peter R. Cresswell downbound.
Spruceglen upbound.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre


Detroit Traffic

10/26
Saturday saw a typical amount of commercial traffic on the Detroit River. About half the vessels seen on the river were tug-barge units with the Mark Hannah and barge downbound, the Mary E. Hannah and Hannah 3601 tied up just east of the Renaissance Center, either the Karen Andrie or the Rebecca Lynn and barge in the River Rouge and the Coast Guard tug Bristol Bay and barge CGB 12001 at the US Coast Guard Station. Ships transiting the river included the John D. Leitch, John J. Boland, and John B. Aird upbound and the Lake Ontario and Canadian Transfer downbound.

Bristol Bay at Coast Guard Station
Bristol Bay and CGB 12001bow view
CGB 12001, one of two USCG aid to navigation barges on the Lakes
Lake Ontario downbound at the rock sculptures, Belle Isle
John D. Leach unique pilot house
John D. Leicht stern view at the rock sculptures
Mark Hannah and barge downbound at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum

Reported by: Tom Hynes


Today in Great Lakes History - October 26

LOUIS R. DESMARAIS was christened October 26,1977.

On October 26, 1968 the R. BRUCE ANGUS grounded in the St. Lawrence River near Beauharnois, Que. Sixteen hundred tons of iron ore were lightered to free her and she damaged 65 bottom plates.

The HUTCHCLIFFE HALL and OREFAX were sold October 26, 1971 to the Consortium Ile d'Orleans of Montreal made up of Richelieu Dredging Corp., McNamara Construction Ltd. and The J.P. Porter Co. Ltd.

On October 26, 1924 the E.A.S. CLARKE (2), anchored in the Detroit River opposite the Great Lakes Engineering Works because of dense fog was struck by the B.F. JONES (1) near her after deckhouse which caused the CLARKE to sink. No lives were lost.

On October 26, 1977 the MENIHEK LAKE struck a lock in the St. Lawrence Seaway sustaining damage estimated at $400,000.

On October 26, 1971 the ROGERS CITY (2) had her A-frame collapsed while unloading at Carrollton, MI on the Saginaw River. Her unloading boom was cut away and temporary repairs were made at Defoe Shipbuilding Co., Bay City, MI.

The tug ROUILLE was launched on October 26, 1929 as Hull 83 of Collingwood Shipyards Ltd.

The schooner HEMISPHERE, which was being sought by the U.S. Marshals at Detroit and the St. Lawrence River, escaped at the Gallop Rapids and has gone to sea.

On 26 October 1851, ATLAS (wooden propeller, 153’, 375 T, built in 1851 at Buffalo) was carrying flour from Detroit to Buffalo when she was blown to shore near the mouth of the Grand River (Lorain, OH) by a gale, stranded and became a total loss. No lives were lost.

On 26 October 1895, GEORGE W. DAVIS (wooden schooner, 136', 299 gt, built in 1872 at Toledo, Ohio) was carrying coal in a storm on Lake Erie when she stranded near Port Maitland, Ontario. On 26 October 1895, a few days after the stranding, she floated off on her own, drifted two miles up the beach and sank. No lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Vintage Cement Carrier Sold for Scrap

10/25
The 1923-built Lewis G. Harriman has been sold for scrap and will be towed to Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario for scrapping by Purvis Marine. The tug Avenger IV departed the Soo Friday morning enroute for Green Bay where she will pick up the Harriman. Harriman has been in Green Bay used for a transfer and storage barge. It is expected that dismantling of the Harriman will begin after work on the Quedoc is completed.

The Lewis G. Harriman is unique as she was the first purpose-built cement carrier. She is also one of a dwindling number of triple-expansion steamers on the Lakes. Contrary to rumors, she remains largely intact and in very good condition inside.

In Spring 2003 a new preservation group was formed calling itself The Northeastern Maritime Historical Foundation. The group tried to preserve the Harriman upon hearing the news of her impending. Efforts to persuade the vessel's owners to donate the vessel to the Foundation ended earlier this week after a contract was signed with Purvis for scrapping.

The Northeastern Maritime Historical Foundation is considering further options, including a possible offer to purchase the vessel from the scrappers.

The Avenger IV was scheduled to arrive in Green Bay Friday night, the tow could depart as early as Saturday.

Reported by: Northeastern Maritime


Noted Ship photographer drowns in Duluth

10/25
Tim Slattery, acclaimed photographer of Great Lakes ships, U.S. Coast Guard vessels and Lake Superior, drowned Thursday afternoon after falling out of his boat while photographing ships in Duluth's St. Louis Bay.

The 52-year-old Slattery apparently fell out of his 14-foot aluminum boat about 4:30 p.m., the Coast Guard said. His camera equipment was found on board. Rescue workers recovered his body Thursday evening.

Two crewmen aboard the Columbia Star, which was docked at the nearby Midwest Energy Terminal, reported seeing a man fall out of the boat, yell for help three times and then disappear from view. The vessel's crew contacted the Coast Guard. A rescue boat was on the scene within 10 minutes and the found the boat with its motor still running, going in circles.

The water temperature at the time was about 48 degrees. Several boats from the U.S. Coast Guard and St. Louis and Douglas county rescue squads had searched for his body. The area has currents, because it's where the St. Louis River flows into Lake Superior.

Slattery was a professional photographer who shot weddings, portraits and high school graduation photos. But to Boatnerds he was best known for his highly regarded photos that often focused on the way natural light played on Lake Superior, ships and the Aerial Lift Bridge. He sold his work through his business Harbor Reflections.

He had a lifelong passion for photographing Coast Guard ships, particularly the 180-foot cutters like those stationed in Duluth. He lived on Duluth's Park Point just a few yards from Lake Superior, and frequently went out in his motor boat or kayak to photograph the lake, harbor and ships. Some of his work is on permanent display at the Minnesota State Capitol and his photographs were featured on the Seaway Port Authority's 1999 calendar. He occasionally posted messages on the Boatnerd website Information Search under the name "TJ Slatts."

Picture of Tim taken in March after he rode the Mackinaw. Patrick Lapinski

Reported by: Al Miller


State of Michigan Arrives

10/25
The State of Michigan arrived at Bayship in Sturgeon Bay, Wisc. Friday morning. The training vessel was placed into the floating drydock, which was waiting and ready for the ship to enter.

Two tugs from Selvick Marine were standing by to pull the ship into the dry dock. The vessel is in the ship yard for a 5 year inspection and for miscellaneous repairs.

State of Michigan over blocks in drydock.
Dock refloated and ship out of water.
Old sea dog on the hatch covers of the Edward L. Ryerson looking for the State of Michigan.
Her view looking down the main deck of the Ryerson.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle


Ranger III Departs for Bayship

10/25
The National Park Service passenger ferry Ranger III departed Houghton, Michigan at 6 p.m. Friday bound for Bay Ship in Sturgeon Bay. She is also heading to the shipyard for a regularly scheduled 5-year dry docking. It is expected to pass through the Soo Locks at about 10 a.m. on Saturday and the Mackinac Bridge about 5 p.m.

This trip is a rare chance to see the vessel off her normal run between Houghton and Isle Royale National Park on Lake Superior.

Reported by: W. Hanrahan


Fleet Mates in Port Stanley

10/25
On Thursday morning the Mississagi arrived out of the early morning sea smoke to join fleet mate Cuyahoga in Port Stanley on Lake Erie. The two vessels past in the harbor as the Cuyahoga was departing. The Cuyahoga was leaving for Sorrel, Quebec with soya beans and the Mississagi off loaded corn that will be trucked to Casco Inc. in London, Ont.

Fleet mates.
Mississagi unloads.
Big Steve from Newfoundland and Gobey from Aylmer Ont. working on deck.

Reported by: Ted Coombs


Toledo Report

10/25
The CSL Laurentien was unloading ore at the Torco Ore Dock. The Gemini was at the BP Dock loading cargo. The Armco, Buckeye, Courtney Burton remain in layup at their respective dock sites. There are no vessels in the shipyard at this time.

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Coal Docks will be the Mississagi and H. Lee White on Saturday. The Canadian Olympic on Sunday, followed by the Charles M. Beeghly on Monday. The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the Capt. Henry Jackman on Saturday, followed by the CSL Niagara on Friday 31 October.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Today in Great Lakes History - October 25

The ALGOBAY departed on her maiden voyage October 25, 1978 from Collingwood light for Stoneport, Mich. to load stone for Sarnia, Ont.

The STERNECLIFFE HALL entered service on October 25, 1947.

The HURON (4) arrived at Santander, Spain October 25, 1973 in consort with the WYANDOTTE (2) towed by the German tug DOLPHIN X. for scrapping.

October 25, 1895 - Shenago No. 2 (later Pere Marquette 16) was launched in Toledo, Ohio. She was built by the Craig Shipbuilding Company for the United States & Ontario Steam Navigation Company and later became part of the Pere Marquette carferry fleet.

The engines of the propeller WESTMORELAND, which sank in 1854 near Skillagalee Reef in Lake Michigan, were recovered and arrived at Chicago on 25 October 1874.

ARK was built on the burned out hull of the steamer E. K. COLLINS as a sidewheel passenger steamer in 1853 at Newport, MI, but she was later cut down to a barge. On 25 October 1866, she was being towed along with three other barges down bound from Saginaw, MI in a storm.. Her towline parted and she disappeared with her crew of 6. The other three tow-mates survived. There was much speculation about ARK's whereabouts until identifiable wreckage washed ashore 100 miles north of Goderich, Ontario.

On 25 October 1833, JOHN BY (wooden stern-wheeler, 110', built in 1832 at Kingston, Ontario) was on her regular route between York (now Toronto) and Kingston, Ontario when a storm drove her ashore near Port Credit, a few miles from York. Her terrible handling of open Lake water set the precedent that stern-wheelers were not compatible with lake commerce.

On 25 October 1887, VERNON (wooden propeller passenger/package-freight steamer, 158', 560 t, built in 1886 at Chicago, IL) foundered in a gale 6 miles northeast of Two Rivers Point on Lake Michigan. The death toll was estimated at 31 - 36. The sole survivor was picked up on a small raft two days later by the schooner POMEROY. He was on the raft with a dead body. Most casualties died of exposure. There were accusations at the time that the vessel was overloaded causing the cargo doors to be left open which allowed the water to pour in during the storm. This accusation was confirmed in 1969 (82 years after the incident) when divers found the wreck and indeed the cargo doors were open.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Russian Steelmaker Acquires Rouge Steel in Chapter 11 Sale

10/24
Rouge Industries, Inc. of Dearborn, Mich., announced late Thursday it has reached an agreement to sell substantially all its assets to Severstal, Russia's second largest steel producer and one of the world's top 20 steel makers.

Rouge Industries, and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, Rouge Steel Company, QS Steel Inc. and Eveleth Taconite Company, have filed voluntary petitions for protection under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware in Wilmington. During the bankruptcy process, Rouge Steel and its affiliates will continue to manufacture and ship steel products and provide uninterrupted services to its customers.

Rouge Steel's dock on the Rouge River is served primarily by vessels of the Interlake Steamship Co., particularly the Lee A. Tregurtha, Charles M. Beeghly and Kaye E. Barker.

Severstal is a leading automotive supplier in Russia with annual revenues in excess of $2 billion and annual steel production of 10.6 million tons. The deal is subject to bankruptcy court approval. Rouge intends to file a motion in bankruptcy court to formalize a procedure for reviewing this and other purchase offers.

Carl L. Valdiserri, chairman and chief executive officer of Rouge Industries, Inc., said the company would continue operations and fulfill customer obligations during the reorganization process and that management had sought to sell the assets of Rouge to provide maximum consideration for the company's creditors while securing the future viability of the business and the jobs of Rouge employees.

For Severstal, the acquisition of Rouge represents its first investment in the United States steel industry and the opportunity to expand its global steel making presence.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre


Carrol C I to replace Newberry

10/24
The McKeil Marine tug Carrol C I departed the Morterm dock in Windsor Thursday night. She headed upbound through the river to McKeil’s Courtright brine dock. The Carrol C will take over the Jerry Newberry's job pushing the barge Salty Dog #1 from the Courtright dock down to Amherstburg on the brine shuttle.

It is unknown where the Newberry will go. In other news, the Evans McKeil has taken the towing of the brine barge KTC 115. The Tony Mackay was delegated to pushing the Norman McLeod, as the tug Everlast is undergoing repairs from her recent engine room fire.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak


Marquette Update

10/24
The Charles M. Beeghly brought a load of coal to Marquette's WE Presque Isle Power Plant. The thousand footers back in to off-load the coal, but the smaller ships usually come in bow first. The Beeghly backed in this time, and was going out light.

The Kaye Barker was due around midnight for a load of ore.

Charles Beeghly at the dock unloading.
Ore trains on the dock above the Beeghly. Note the sailor waving at the stern of the ship.
Close up of the stern.
Coal being dumped on the pile at the WE power plant.
A dry load of ore creates a dust cloud as it's dumped into the pockets.

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Maumee Visits

10/24
The Maumee was inbound the Saginaw River early Thursday evening, arriving at the Bay City Wirt Dock just before dark Thursday night. She unloaded two different types of aggregate at the dock and is expected to depart late in the evening.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Maumee unloading at the Bay City Wirt Dock
View from the stern
View of the bow and unloading boom
Bow close up

Reported by: Todd Shorkey, Stephen Hause and Lon Morgan


Weekend Events

10/24
Port Huron Marine Mart
Saturday the Port Huron Seaway Terminal will feature a marine mart from 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Buy and sell books and other memorabilia. Seaway Terminal is located at 2336 Military Street. For more information call: (810) 982-0891 Ext. 16

Detroit River Railroad Car Ferry Program
In Detroit, the Dossin Museum will host an entertainment meeting Saturday from 10 a.m. 12 p.m. featuring a Michigan Central District of the New York Central System Historical Society meeting. The speaker will be Professor Billie Henning of the Michigan Transit Museum speaking on the Detroit River railroad car ferries. Free with paid admission to the Dossin Museum www.glmi.org


Today in Great Lakes History - October 24

TEXACO WARRIOR (2) was launched October 24, 1969 as a) THUNTANK 6.

The PHILIP D. BLOCK along with the W.W. HOLLOWAY scrap tow arrived Recife, Brazil. October 24, 1986

The THOMAS W.LAMONT and her former fleet mate, ENDERS M. VOORHEES arrived at Alegeciras, Spain on October 24, 1987 on the way to the cutters torch. The LAMONT was one of the last bulkers that retained her telescoping hatch covers to the very end.

The NIPIGON BAY arrived Thunder Bay, Ont. on October 24, 1980 where repairs were made from damage caused by her grounding earlier in the month.

On 24 October 1855, ALLEGHENY (wooden propeller, 178’, 468 T, built in 1849 at Cleveland) was carrying general merchandise and passengers in a storm, when she anchored near the Milwaukee harbor entrance for shelter. She lost her stack and then was unable to get up steam and was helpless. She dragged her anchor and came in close to the beach where she was pounded to pieces. There was no loss of life. Her engine and most of her cargo were removed by the end of the month. Her engine was installed in a new vessel of the same name built to replace her.

On 24 October 1873, just a month after being launched, the scow WAUBONSIE capsized at St. Clair, Michigan and lost her cargo of bricks. She was righted and towed to Port Huron, minus masts, rigging and bowsprit, for repairs.

On 24 October 1886, LADY DUFFERIN (3-mast wooden schooner-barge, 135', 356 gc, built at Port Burwell, Ontario) was lost from the tow of the propeller W. B. HALL and went ashore near Cabot Head on Georgian Bay. No lives were lost, but the vessel was a total loss.

On 24 October 1953, the Yankcanuck Steamship Lines' MANZZUTTI (steel crane ship, 246', 1558 gt, built in 1903 at Buffalo, NY as J. S. KEEFE) ran aground south of the channel into the Saugeen River. The tug RITH HINDMAN from Killarney pulled her free. No damage was reported.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Cuyahoga Lone Visitor

10/23
Fleet Mates Cuyahoga and Mississagi were expected to visit Port Stanley on Lake Erie at the same time this week. The pair were to arrive with the Cuyahoga loading soya beans and the Mississagi off loading corn.

What would be a great picture opportunity did not arise as the Mississagi was delayed in Toledo, however local boatwatchers were treated to the Cuyahoga loading by herself Wednesday morning.

Cuyahoga loading.
"Hound Dog" delivers the groceries.
Deck view of loading.
Erma the cook puts away the groceries.

Reported by: Ted Coombs


Eastbound and Westbound on Lake Erie

10/23
Below are images taken over the weekend on Lake Erie. The eastbound trip from Detroit Pilot Station to Lock 7 was aboard the 1985 built Spar Garnet. The vessel has been a stalwart caller since 1985. Originally trading here as Mary Anne until 1993 at which time she was sold and renamed Federal Vigra. In 1997 she was sold once again to her current Norwegian owners.

The westbound trip was aboard the Greek flagged Milo, which incidentally is correctly pronounced Melo in the native language. Milo was built in Hiroshima, Japan in 1984 and is one of numerous “Japanese Lake Bulker Class” vessels. Milo has visited the lakes under several names over the years. Her former names were Silver Leader, Alam United, United and finally her present name was given to her in December 2000.

Spar Garnet:
Spar Garnet underway on a dull Saturday morning. The day would deteriorate into rain later in the afternoon once we arrived at Port Colborne.
The nameboard. Spar Garnet’s sister ship is the Spar Jade. Other lake type fleet mates include the Spar Opal and Spar Ruby.
The Third Officer plotting the 11:00 hours position.
Second Officer (l) and the navigation cadet (r)
The cadet learning to take a range and bearing on the radar.
Plotting that information on the chart.

Milo:
Milo entering Lock 7 on another dismal looking weekend afternoon.
Ahoy!….Ship dead ahead!
The (cold) mooring party as seen from the lock wall.
Finally after a couple of days of heavy overcast the sun peeks out at Port Robinson.
The starboard bridgewing.
The Montreal based Canadian Forest and Navigation (Canfornav) logo on the funnel. Canfornav operate many vessels on the Great Lakes.
As we clear the Welland Canal another Greek vessel Doxa D is entering at Port Colborne. The 1984 Sunderland, U.K. built Doxa D is the former Nea Doxa and Alberta.
After a busy day in the canal we are now cruising at full sea speed towards Windsor, ON, Canada.
At 0749 hours the late October sun finally rises over the horizon as we sail on Western Lake Erie.
Early morning light off Colchester.
The bridgedeck.
Name and courtesy flag.
Helm and engine indicators.
Easy reference Harbour Speed Table on the bridge wing.
Inside the bridge.
Pilots view proceeding up the Amherstburg Channel at Bar Point.
The bridge deck. If it’s Monday morning it must be sunny and warm!
Buoy D-68 shows the heavy current ships have to negotiate in the tricky waters of the Amherstburg Channel.
Meeting Algoma Central Marine’s Peter R. Cresswell below Grassy Island.
Passing by the bridge wing.
Another Greek friend Olympic Mentor at Nicholson’s Ecorse.
Yet another Greek ship. Olympic Mentor’s sister Olympic Melody in ballast anchored at the Ojibway Anchorage waiting to head to Toledo. Today it is somewhat uncommon to see several Greek vessels at the same time in the same area. Year’s ago this was an everyday occurrence as the Greek flag was well represented on the lakes with old Liberty’s and such.

The following images show the approach and docking sequence.
On approach to Morterm in Windsor.
Final approach.
It is a very tight manoeuvre into the slip as we must turn almost 45 degrees to the main river against the swift current.
We will send a mooring line ashore to help warp the ship around the corner.
The hawser taking up a strain and acting as what we call “a poor man’s bow thruster”. A second hawser is on its way out.
The hawser is highly effective. Milo’s forward mooring crew were first rate and did their job in assisting the bow around.
Slowly but surely we win the battle against the current with helm, engine and “the poor man’s bow thruster”.
Almost in.
Half an hour later we are alongside and “Finished with engines”.
Looking aft. Note the open hatches.
The mooring hawser that helped warp the ship into the berth.
Another view. Mooring hawsers on salties are heavy duty. Salt water vessels require the strength of these ropes to remain safely alongside in all types of weather and tidal conditions around the world.
Cargo of fluorspar from Mexico.
Heavy equipment lowered into the hold.
At work.
More mooring ropes on the stern.
The familiar Greek flag flying on the stern.
Stern overhangs the berth.

Reported by: Capt. Alain M. Gindroz


Today in Great Lakes History - October 23

The CECILIA DESGAGNES was launched October 23, 1970 as a) CARL GORTHON, for Rederi A/B Gylfe, Hälsingborg, Sweden.

GRAND RAPIDS Rail Car Ferry was launched October 23, 1926 for the Grand Trunk-Milwaukee Car Ferry Co., Muskegon, MI.

WILLIAM B. SCHILLER was launched October 23, 1909 for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

October 23, 1926 - The Grand Trunk carferry Grand Rapids was launched in Manitowoc. She entered service in December of 1926.

October 23, 1953 - The S.S. SPARTAN arrived Ludington on her maiden voyage. Captain Harold A. Altschwager was in command.

On 23 October 1868, F. T. BARNEY (wooden schooner, 255 T, built in 1856 at Vermilion, OH) collided with the schooner TRACY J. BRONSON and sank below Nine Mile Point, NW of Rogers City in Lake Michigan. The wreck was found in 1987 and sits in deep water, upright in almost perfect condition.

On 23 October 1873, the wooden steam barge GENEVA was loaded with wheat and towing the barge GENOA in a violent storm on Lake Superior. She bent her propeller shaft and the flailing blades cut a large hole in her stern. The water rushed in and she went down quickly 15 miles off Caribou Island. No lives were lost. This was her first season of service. She was one of the first bulk freighters with the classic Great Lakes fore and aft deck houses.

On 23 October 1883, JULIA (2-mast wooden schooner, 89', 115 gt, built in 1875 at Smith's Falls, Ontario) was coming into Oswego harbor with a load of barley when she struck a pier in the dark and sank. No lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




CN says it will maintain GLF operations

10/22
CN plans to maintain current operations of Great Lakes Fleet and continue to run Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range ore docks if it's successful in purchasing assets of Great Lakes Transportation, a CN spokesman told the Duluth News Tribune.

CN, formerly known as Canadian National Railway Co., announced Oct. 20 that it has reached an agreement to buy Great Lakes Transportation LLC, based in Monroeville, Pa., for about $380 million. The purchase includes Great Lakes Fleet, the former U.S. Steel fleet that includes eight vessels; the DMIIR; Bessemer and Lake Erie Railroad Company; and The Pittsburgh & Conneaut Dock Company. The combined companies essentially make up the taconite and limestone supply chain for U.S. Steel's mills and taconite mine.

CN spokesman Mark Hallman told the newspaper that CN plans to maintain current dock operations as well as crew levels aboard Great Lakes Fleet's eight ships. The fleet employs about 200 people.

However, no decisions have yet been made about the administrative functions for maritime operations now headquartered in Duluth.

Because of requirements of the Jones Act, CN plans to hire Keystone Shipping Co. of Bala Cynwyd, Pa., to operate the fleet. The Jones Act is a federal law requiring ships trading between U.S. ports to be built, owned and crewed by Americans.

Adolph Ojard, executive director of the Duluth Seaway Port Authority and former head of Great Lakes Fleet, said he hopes CN will see the value of keeping maritime operations based in Duluth.

"With this transaction, CN could turn the Twin Ports into even more of a regional transportation center," Ojard said. "I hope it will continue to see the value of maintaining maritime headquarters here. It's something I'd like to see given serious consideration."

Ojard said CN has asked the port authority to support its bid to buy Great Lakes Transportation.

In 2001, the port authority sent a letter to the Surface Transportation Board voicing its concern about CN's plans to buy the Wisconsin Central railroad. At the time, CN said buying Wisconsin Central was a way to offer all-rail transportation of taconite pellets from Minntac's mine in Mountain Iron, Minn., to U.S. Steel's Edgar Thompson Works in Pittsburgh.

"They were proposing an alternative to water transportation, and they indicated they would market it as such," Ojard said.

This time, however, Ojard believes the situation is different because of CN's plans to integrate water transport with its rail operations.

In retrospect, David Novak, vice president of Great Lakes Transportation, told the News Tribune that his company may have been in error to oppose the CN/Wisconsin Central deal.

"We learned again last winter that there's no better transportation system than an Intermodal one," Novak said. "It was a cold winter fraught with customer service issues."

The deal to buy Great Lakes Transportation must be approved by U.S. regulators including the Justice Department and the Surface Transportation Board. The STB has in recent years taken a dim view of large railroad mergers, but acquisition of the Great Lakes properties should be seen as a minor transaction.

If the STB approves the deal, Canadian National expects to close the deal by the middle of next year.

Reported by: Andy Roper


Twin Ports Report

10/22
Tuesday saw a wide variety of traffic in the Twin Ports. Most interesting was the Roger Blough making one of its occasional visits to unload stone at the DMIR ore dock. Once done it was expected to head to Two Harbors to load pellets. Mesabi Miner was expected to load at BNSF. Canadian Olympic was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal, with Walter J. McCarthy Jr. expected to follow late in the evening. Chios Pride was loading at Cenex Harvest States, with Balaban 1 at anchor waiting for the berth.

Vessels of Great Lakes Fleet will be making some interesting calls in the next few days. Edwin H. Gott is scheduled to make a rare visit to the BNSF ore dock in Superior on Oct. 24. Presque Isle is due at Ecorse on Oct. 22. John G. Munson loaded at Sandusky on Oct. 20 with coal bound for Ontonagon, Mich., where it's due on Oct. 23.

Reported by: Al Miller


Saginaw River News

10/22
J.A.W. Iglehart was outbound from Saginaw at 1 p.m. Tuesday after delivering cement to the LaFarge terminal. The vessel had arrived early Monday evening. Inbound at the same time on Tuesday was the tug Rebecca Lynn, pushing a tank barge for the Bit-Mat dock near Bay City.

Other recent visitors to the Saginaw River included the Invincible-McKee Sons and the American Mariner, both calling on Sunday. The McKee Sons delivered a split load to the GM dock and Valley Asphalt in Saginaw, while the Mariner called at Bay Aggregates near Bay City.

The tug Gregory J. Busch was outbound from its home terminal at Saginaw on Sunday, pushing a deck barge.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Todd Shorkey and Lon Morgan


Toledo News

10/22
The Frontenac was loading coal at the CSX Docks. The Kaye E. Barker departed from the CSX Docks on Tuesday afternoon, She loaded coal on Monday and may have been in port for repairs. The Atlantic Huron was at the Torco ore dock unloading ore. The Mississagi was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. The Canadian Prospector was at Andersons "E" Elevator. The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin finished loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator and departed Tuesday afternoon. Once the Martin left, the Canadian Prospector was expected to shift over to the "K" Elevator to finish loading her grain cargo.

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will be the Mississagi on Friday. The H. Lee White, and Canadian Olympic on Saturday, followed by the Charles M. Beeghly on Sunday. The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the CSL Laurentien and Capt. Henry Jackman on Friday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Man survives plunge over Niagara Falls

10/22
A Michigan man Monday survived a 180-foot head-first plunge over Niagara Falls, the first person known to have done it without safety devices.

Authorities identified the man as 40-year-old Kirk Jones of Canton, Mich. He will be charged with illegally performing a stunt and could be fined $10,000, Niagara Parks Police said Tuesday.

Stunned tourists described seeing Jones float by on his back in the swift Niagara River, go headfirst over the churning on the Canadian side and then pull himself out of the water onto the rocks below.

"He just looked calm. He just was gliding by so fast. I was in shock really that I saw a person go by," Brenda McMullen told WIVB-TV in Buffalo.

"I saw him disappear over the edge of the falls," McMullen's husband, Terry McMullen, said. The Columbus, Ohio, tourists snapped photographs afterward, showing the man dressed in street clothes, apparently lying on the shoreline at the base of the Canadian Horseshoe Falls.

Only one other person known to have survived a plunge over the Canadian falls without a barrel or other apparatus was a 7-year-old boy wearing a life preserver who was thrown into the water in a 1960 boating accident.

No one has ever survived a trip over the narrower and rockier American falls. About a dozen daredevils have taken the plunge in barrels or other protective chambers since 1901. About half have survived.

Reported by: Phil Pietrowski


Weekend Events

10/22
Port Huron Marine Mart
Saturday the Port Huron Seaway Terminal will feature a marine mart from 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Buy and sell books and other memorabilia. Seaway Terminal is located at 2336 Military Street. For more information call: (810) 982-0891 Ext. 16

Detroit River Railroad Car Ferry Program
In Detroit, the Dossin Museum will host an entertainment meeting Saturday from 10 a.m. 12 p.m. featuring a Michigan Central District of the New York Central System Historical Society meeting. The speaker will be Professor Billie Henning of the Michigan Transit Museum speaking on the Detroit River railroad car ferries. Free with paid admission to the Dossin Museum www.glmi.org


Today in Great Lakes History - October 22

The PRESQUE ISLE (2)'s tug completed her sea trials on October 22, 1973 in New Orleans.

On October 22, 1986 the ALGOCEN spilled about four barrels of diesel fuel while refueling at the Esso Dock at Sarnia.

The TOM M. GIRDLER departed South Chicago light on her maiden voyage, October 22, 1951, bound for Escanaba, MI where she loaded 13,900 tons of ore for delivery to Cleveland, OH.

The THORNHILL (1) grounded on October 22, 1973 just above the Sugar Island ferry crossing in the St. Marys River.

On 22 October 1887, C.O.D. (wooden schooner-barge, 140', 289 GT, built in 1873 at Grand Haven, MI) was carrying wheat in Lake Erie in a northwest gale. She was beached three miles east of Port Burnell, Ontario and soon broke up. Most of the crew swam to shore, but the woman who was the cook was lashed to the rigging and she perished.

October 22, 1929 - The S.S. Milwaukee (formerly Manistique Marquette and Northern 1) sank in a gale with a loss of all 52 hands. 21 bodies were recovered. Captain Robert McKay in command.

On October 27, 1929, a Coast Guard patrolman near South Haven, Michigan, picked up the ship's message case, containing the following handwritten note:
"S.S. MILWAUKEE, OCTOBER 22/29 8:30 P.M.
The ship is taking water fast. We have turned around and headed for Milwaukee. Pumps are working but sea gate is bent in and can't keep the water out. Flicker is flooded. Seas are tremendous. Things look bad.
Crew roll is about the same as on last payday.
(signed) A.R. Sadon, Purser."

On 22 October 1870, JENNIE BRISCOE (wooden schooner, 85', 82 t, built in 1870 at Detroit, MI) was raised from where she sank off Grosse Isle, Michigan a couple of months earlier. She was in her first season of service when she collided with the propeller FREE STATE and sank there. Her raised wreck was sold Canadian in 1871 and she was rebuilt as the propeller scow HERALD.

In a severe gale on 22 October 1873, the three barges DAVID MORRIS, GLOBE, and SAGINAW from Bay City grounded and sank off Point Pelee on Lake Erie.

On 22 October 1887, DOLPHIN (wooden schooner-barge, 107', 147 t, built in 1855 at Milan, OH) and G. D. NORRIS (2-mast wooden schooner, 128', 262 gt, built in 1856 at Cleveland, OH) were both carrying lumber and were in tow of the steamer OSWEGATCHIE in a storm on Lake Huron. The tow line broke when the vessels were off Harbor Beach, Michigan. The DOLPHIN capsized and foundered. All 6 or 7 onboard perished. The NORRIS sank to her decks and her crew was rescued by the passing steamer BRECK. The NORRIS drifted ashore near Goderich, Ontario.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




CN agrees to buy Great Lakes Fleet, associated railroads and docks

10/21
Canadian National Railway Company announced Oct. 20 that it has reached an agreement to buy Great Lakes Transportation Company -- including the Duluth-based Great Lakes Fleet -- for $380 million.

The acquisition will improve CN's rail link between Western Canada and Chicago and expand its role in transporting bulk commodities used by U.S. steelmakers, the railroad said.

The purchase must still be approved by several federal regulatory agencies. If approved, CN anticipates taking control of the companies in mid-2004.

The purchase includes Great Lakes Fleet, the former U.S. Steel fleet that includes eight vessels; the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway; Bessemer and Lake Erie Railroad Company; and The Pittsburgh & Conneaut Dock Company. The combined companies essentially make up the taconite and limestone supply chain for U.S. Steel's mills and taconite mine.

The GLT companies have a total of approximately 1,000 employees. It derives about 70 percent of its revenue from carrying taconite pellets, with U.S. Steel Corp., being its primary customer. Great Lakes Fleet has a contract to carry U.S. pellets for several more years.

Great Lakes Fleet will be operated by Keystone Shipping Co., an operator of primarily coastal vessels which also runs the tug-barge Michigan/Great Lakes on the lakes. Under the Jones Act, U.S.-flag ships must be operated by a U.S. company. A CN spokesman said there will be no changes in crewing, trading patterns or appearance of the fleet. .

CN reached the purchase agreement with Monroeville, Pa.-based GLT, a company controlled by The Blackstone Group. GLT officials had publicly stated last spring that company assets were for sale.

GLT includes:

  • The 212-mile Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway Company (DM&IR) – the Class II railroad is a common carrier of taconite pellets primarily between U.S. Steel's Minntac mine in Mountain Iron, Minn., and DMIR's ore docks in Duluth and Two Harbors.

  • Bessemer and Lake Erie Railroad Company (B&LE) – a Class II railroad carrying primarily coal, iron ore and limestone between the Lake Erie port of Conneaut, Ohio, and steel mills in the Pittsburgh area;

  • The Pittsburgh & Conneaut Dock Company (P&C Dock) – a Class III switching railroad that performs ship-to-rail and rail-to-ship bulk transfer operations for the B&LE at three docks at Conneaut;

  • Great Lakes Fleet, Inc. (Great Lakes Fleet) – The fleet includes the Edwin H. Gott, Edgar B. Speer, Presque Isle, Roger Blough, Arthur M. Anderson, Cason J. Callaway, Philip R. Clarke and John G. Munson. The fleet was organized in 1901 by United States Steel Corporation and has been based in either Duluth or Cleveland throughout its history.

    CN relies on a rail link through Minnesota to connect it to the major railroad center of Chicago and CN's former Illinois Central trackage to the Gulf of Mexico.

    E. Hunter Harrison, president and chief executive officer of CN, said: “CN’s acquisition of the GLT carriers will drive new efficiencies in our network, improve customer service, preserve competition and expand our participation in the steel industry’s bulk materials supply chain. The transaction is also good news for the Mesabi Range iron ore-producing region of Northern Minnesota – it will strengthen its transportation ties to the United States steel industry in the Midwest and Pennsylvania.

    “The transaction will give us ownership of a 17-mile segment of DM&IR track in the Duluth, Minn./Superior, Wis., area that is an essential part of CN’s Chicago-Western Canada main line. CN currently operates over this short segment of track under a trackage rights agreement with DM&IR.

    “Also, by owning parallel CN and DM&IR lines in the 64-mile rail corridor north of Duluth/Superior, we will be able to move our freight trains through the region more efficiently and avoid capital expenses we would otherwise incur for improvements to our existing line.”

    Gordon T. Trafton, CN’s senior vice-president, United States Region, said: “We believe GLT customers will benefit from being served by CN -- the continent’s most efficient railroad -- whose only business is rail service and which has the financial wherewithal to invest in freight cars, locomotives, dock facilities and capital works that underpin a crucial supply chain for the steel industry. Second, the transaction will preserve shipper choice, as demonstrated by our commitment to keep open all active gateways.”

    Acquisition of the GLT carriers will increase CN’s annual revenues by about $285 million in Canadian dollars. CN plans to finance the transaction with debt and expects the acquisition to be accretive to earnings per share and free cash flow in the first year of control of the GLT carriers.

    The CN/GLT transaction is subject to a determination by the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (STB) that it is a minor one under the STB’s merger rules and, ultimately, STB approval. Reviews by the U.S. Maritime Administration and Coast Guard are required for CN’s acquisition of Great Lakes Fleet. Review of CN’s acquisition of Great Lakes Fleet by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Justice Antitrust Division is also required.

    Canadian National Railway Company spans Canada and mid-America, from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans to the Gulf of Mexico, serving the ports of Vancouver, Prince Rupert, B.C., Montreal, Halifax, New Orleans, and Mobile, Ala., and the key cities of Toronto, Buffalo, Chicago, Detroit, Duluth, Minn./Superior, Wis., Green Bay, Wis., Minneapolis/St. Paul, Memphis, St. Louis, and Jackson, Miss., with connections to all points in North America.

    Reported by: Al Miller and Andy Greenlees


  • Chi Cheemaun Ends Season

    10/21
    The Chi Cheemaun arrived in her home port of Owen Sound at about 3:30 p.m. Monday afternoon for her winter layover after a season of ferrying passengers and vehicles between Tobermory on the tip of the Bruce Peninsula and South Baymouth on Manitoulin Island.

    After a number of sunset dinner cruises helping to raise funds for local charities, she will winter on the west wall of the inner harbor.

    Reported by: Ed Saliwonchyk


    Door County lighthouse is first transferred to state

    10/21
    The Eagle Bluff Lighthouse in Door County's Peninsula State Park last week became the first lighthouse in Wisconsin to be transferred to state ownership.

    Eagle Bluff Lighthouse is the first “public domain” lighthouse in Wisconsin that the Coast Guard has relinquished. Three others -- Cana Island, Plum Island and Pilot Island, all in Door County -- are awaiting transfer to other entities.

    Public-domain lighthouses are those the Coast Guard claimed before homesteaders could in the early and mid-1800s.

    The Door County Historical Society has operated Eagle Bluff Lighthouse as a museum for 39 years. Historical Society President George Evenson on Wednesday signed a long-term lease to occupy and continue running the lighthouse. Ann Aldrich, associate state director for the federal Bureau of Land Management, said Eagle Bluff was an easy case because of its long history as a museum and the surrounding state park.

    Reported by: Chris Winkler


    10/21
    The tall ship Saint Paul arrived in Owen Sound, Ont. on September 10 and was expected to remain in port for a few days. She is now ashore at the Owen Sound Marina, it is apparent that she will be here for some time.

    Saint Paul
    Forward view
    Bow view
    Propeller and rudder.
    Visit www.pobor.com for more information and her world tour.

    Reported by: Ed Saliwonchyk


    Knotty Bear Stops

    10/21
    The planned passenger ship Knotty Bear is spending a few days at DeTour, Mich. because of high winds. She is on a trip to Holland, Mich. where she will be renamed Holland Princess and docked there for dinner and sight seeing cruises on Lake Macatawa.

    She has been slowly making her way here from Duluth, Minn. and if the weather cooperates she will continue her trip down Lake Michigan and arrive at her final destination of Holland.

    Docked at DeTour Harbor.
    Another view.

    Reported by: Cathy Kohring


    Iglehart Delivers

    10/21
    The J.A.W. Iglehart was inbound the Saginaw River Monday afternoon passing through Bay City around 4pm. She continued upriver to the Lafarge Terminal in Carrollton to unload and is expected to be outbound tomorrow afternoon.

    Pictures by Todd Shorkey
    J.A.W. Iglehart upbound approaching Wheeler's Landing
    Another view
    Stern view passing through Liberty Bridge

    Reported by: Todd Shorkey, Stephen Hause and Lon Morgan


    Alpena Update

    10/21
    The J.A.W Iglehart arrived in port early Monday morning to load at Lafarge. It departed before 7 a.m. for Saginaw. The Alpena was also in port before noon on Monday, taking on cement with warm weather to enjoy. By 3 p.m. the Alpena was backing from the dock and turning out to the lake for its next destination, Green Bay, Wisc.

    The Jacklyn M barge Integrity was heading to St. Joseph, Mich. The Paul H. Townsend is in Muskegon for lay-up.

    Vessels loading at Stoneport on Monday included the John J. Boland and the Arthur M. Anderson late in the evening.

    Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain


    Toledo update

    10/21
    The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The Canadian Provider finished loading grain at one of the Elevators and was towed outbound the Maumee River by the Gaelic tug Susan Hoey Monday afternoon. Once the Provider cleared the river and entered Maumee Bay the Mississagi was headed upbound for one of the Elevators to load grain.

    During Monday evening The Canadian Prospector with the Gaelic tug Susan Hoey assisting was headed upriver bound for one of the Elevators to load grain. The Kaye E. Barker was loading coal at the CSX Docks. There are no vessels at the Shipyard at this time. The Armco, Buckeye, and Courtney Burton remain in layup at their respective dock sites.

    The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will be the Frontenac on Tuesday. The Mississagi on Friday, followed by the H. Lee White, Charles M. Beeghly, and Canadian Olympic on Saturday.

    The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the Atlantic Huron on Tuesday followed by the CSL Laurentien and Capt. Henry Jackman on Tuesday.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman


    West Michigan Sunday

    10/21
    Ports along Michigan's west coast were quiet on Sunday. The Pere Marquette 41/Undaunted was loading scrap steel at the Padnos dock in Holland and the Integrity/Jacklyn M. was unloading cement in St. Joseph. The Paul H. Townsend is in lay-up at Muskegon.

    Paul H. Townsend laid up, Muskegon.
    Another view at dock
    The 1919-built tug John Purves, Muskegon
    John Henry, Ferrysburg
    Undaunted/Pere Marquette 41 loading at Padnos dock, Holland
    Keewatin with fresh paint, Douglas
    Bow view. At 346' x 43' x 26' she looks narrow by today's standards.
    Steam tug Reiss, Douglas
    Well restored or preserved Wilhelm Baum, South Haven
    Former fish tug Elsie J. Appears to be converted into a dive boat.
    Jacklyn M. and Integrity unloading in st. Joseph. The run-through CP train is just feet away.
    American Marine Construction crane barge at sunset, Benton Harbor

    Reported by: Tom Hynes


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 21

    The JOHN B. AIRD arrived at Sarnia, Ont. October 21, 1990 for repairs after suffering a conveyor belt fire a week earlier.

    The JAMES A.FARRELL and fleet mate RICHARD TRIMBLE were the first vessels to lock downbound in the newly opened Davis Lock at the Soo on October 21, 1914.

    On October 21, 1954 the GEORGE M.HUMPHREY(2) set a record when she took aboard 22,605 gross tons of iron ore at Superior, WI. The record stood for six years until 1960.

    The crew on the SAMUEL MATHER (3) was safely removed from the badly exposed steamer on October 21, 1923 by the Eagle Harbor life saving crew. She had run aground on the 19th.

    It was announced on October 21, 1986 that Canada Steamship Lines and Upper Lakes Group would merge CSL's Collingwood shipyard and ULS' Port Weller shipyard and create Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering (1986) Ltd.

    On 21 October 1941, AMERICA (steel tug, 80', 123 GT, built in 1897 at Buffalo) was on a cable along with the big tug OREGON off Belle Isle in the Detroit River trying to pull the steel bulk freighter B. F. JONES off a bar. The cable tightened, pulling AMERICA out of the water and spinning her upside down. Six of the crew of 13 lost their lives. AMERICA was later recovered.

    On 21 October 1916, JAMES B. COLGATE (whaleback bulk freighter, 308', 1713 gt, built in 1892 at W. Superior, WI) was carrying coal off Long Point on Lake Erie in a storm. She struck bottom in a plunge off a huge wave in one of the worst storms ever recorded on Lake Erie -- it's called the "Black Friday Storm". Of the 26 on board, only her skipper survived. The 360' steel freighter MERIDA also perished in this same storm.

    October 21, 1954 - Capt. Allen K. Hoxie, skipper of the MILWAUKEE CLIPPER, retired.

    On 21 October 1886, W. L. BROWN (wooden propeller freighter, 140', 336 gt, built in 1872 at Oshkosh, WI as NEPTUNE) was carrying iron ore from Escanaba for DePere. A storm struck while she was on Green Bay. She sprang a leak one mile from Peshtigo Reef and went down in 76 feet of water. No lives were lost. All of her outfit and machinery were removed the following summer. This vessel's first enrollment was issued at Milwaukee, WI on 22 April 1873 as NEPTUNE, but this enrollment was surrendered at Milwaukee on 30 September 1880, endorsed "broken up." However she was re-enrolled as a new vessel at Milwaukee on 15 June 1880, having been rebuilt by A. L. Johnson at Green Bay, WI as the W. L. BROWN.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Updates

    10/20
    Check back Monday for the latest news.


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 20

    The SCOTT MISENER (3) proceeded to the Port Arthur shipyard for dry docking and repairs on October 20th, After striking bottom October 15, 1973 near Whaleback Shoal on the St. Lawrence River.

    OTTO M. REISS (2) was launched October 20, 1906 as a) JAMES S. DUNHAM for the Chicago Navigation Co. (D. Sullivan & Co., mgr.) Duluth, MN.

    PETER A.B. WIDENER was launched October 20, 1906 as a) PETER A.B. WIDENER for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. (later the U.S. Steel Corp. in 1952), Cleveland, OH.

    The tug RESCUE was sent from Port Huron to Tawas, MI to release the 246' barge OCEAN that was grounded. After pulling the barge free, Capt. Fitch of RESCUE began towing her down Lake Huron, but the storm got so bad that he was about to turn back and run for Tawas. However, the captain of OCEAN yelled that they were all right and to go ahead down the lake. Soon the seas got the better of the barge. The tug kept with her until she was about to sink. Then the line was cut, the tug turned about, ran under her lee, and rescued her crew of 9 from the lifeboat. The barge then sank. On the way down Lake Huron, opposite Port Sanilac, the RESCUE picked up 6 men and 1 woman from the wrecked barge JOHN F. RUST. In this one trip, the RESCUE earned her name by rescuing 16 persons!

    October 20, 1898 - The SHENANGO NO. 2 (later PERE MARQUETTE 16) was arriving Milwaukee when her steering gear failed, causing her to crash into a grain elevator which was under construction.

    October 20, 1926 - The Keel was laid for the WABASH.

    On 20 October 1863, E. S. ADAMS (3 mast wooden bark, 135', 341 GC, built in 1857 at Port Robinson, Ont.) was carrying 18,500 bushels of wheat on a clear night when she collided with the American bark CONSTITUTION resulting in the loss of the ADAMS. One life was lost. Neither vessel was blamed for the accident.

    On 20 October 1854, JOHN J. AUDUBON (wooden brig, 370 t, built in 1854 at Black River, Ohio) was carrying railroad iron from Buffalo to Chicago when she was struck amidships by the schooner DEFIANCE on a dark night, halfway between Thunder Bay and Presque Isle, MI. AUDUBON was cut almost in half. Both vessels sank quickly. No lives were lost.

    On 20 October 1844, DAYTON (2-mast wooden schooner, 69', 85 t, built in 1835 at Grand Island, NY) capsized and sank in Lake Erie off Dunkirk, New York in a terrific gale. All onboard were lost.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Seaway Queen, Oakglen Scrap Tows Depart Montreal

    10/19
    The Seaway Queen tow with tugs Progress and Vigilant 1 departed Montreal Friday evening after a long delay created by inspector's clearance and downbound traffic in the port, which included the passenger liner Rotterdam. Originally set to leave at about 15:30, the tow didn't depart until 18:45 and it wasn't before 21:00 that the convoy proceeded downriver.

    The Oakglen tow, with tugs Seaways 5 and Lac Vancouver, which were set to leave about 4 p.m. Friday, actually departed much later, at about 22:30.

    The retired lakers are bound for Quebec City, where the two tows will be joined as one for their trip to the scrap yard at Alang, India. The Seaway Queen, built in 1959 and operated by the Upper Lakes Group, has been laid up in Toronto since 1999. Oakglen, built in 1954, last operated in 2002 for Canada Steamship Lines.

    Remaining in Montreal harbor and awaiting her eventual scrap tow is the retired Algoma Central Marine steamer Algosound.

    Oakglen and Seaway Queen waiting.
    Tug Progress holds the Seaway Queen steady.
    Tug Vigilant 1 waits at the stern.
    Freighter near the Lafontaine Vent tower was awaiting a tug.
    Cruise ship Rotterdam that evening.
    Tugs turned the Filomena Lembo to head downstream.
    Busy port.

    Reported by: Gord Beck


    Keewatin Returns

    10/19
    The tug Keewatin and barge Sand Merchant arrived in Wallaceburg Oct.18 to unload the 4th cargo of gravel for Southwestern Sales Co. The duo had been delayed while repairs to the Keewatin's rudder and props were undertaken at Sarnia. It is reported that possibly some underwater obstruction had caused the minor damage necessitating the remedial work.

    With other work commitments in the Chicago area, it is anticipated the Keewatin and Sand Merchant will not return to Wallaceburg with load five for approximately ten days. Departure from Wallaceburg came this morning escorted by the Lambton Marine tug Debbie Lynn.

    Reported by: Alan Mann


    Hamilton Update

    10/19
    Saturday turned into a busy day in Hamilton. The Algocen departed Dofasco at 7 a.m. The saltie Lykes Raider departed Pier 12 at 8 a.m. heading to Montreal. The Birchglen arrived with a load of gypsum for Pier 12 at 8:30 a.m. Next came the Thalassa Desgagnes departing at 12:30 p.m.

    The tour boat the Dalhousie Princess then entered the harbor at 3 p.m. going to the dry dock. The tug Enteau and her barge arrived at 3:30 p.m. The saltie Olympic Merit departed Pier 25 at 6:30 p.m. The tug Salvor and her barge McLeary's Spirit arrived at 6:45 p.m. and finally the Canadian Prospector departed Dofasco at 6:45 p.m. Friday afternoon saw the Algomarine depart at 3 p.m. after discharging a load of salt from Windsor.

    Reported by: Eric Holmes


    Yacht Heads for Florida

    10/19
    On Saturday the new 112 foot Burger yacht "Top Times" passed through the Welland Canal. The yacht is on its way to the Ft. Lauderdale, Florida Boat Show via Halifax.

    Downbound entering Lock 3.
    Stern view in Lock 3.
    Underway.

    Reported by: Brian Broadley & Rodger St. Amand


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 19

    GEORGE A. SLOAN ran aground off Bob-Lo Island in the Amherstburg Channel on October 19, 1987. She was released when she unloaded part of her cargo to the CALCITE II. SLOAN was repaired in Toledo.

    ALGOSEA was christened on October 19, 1976 at Port Colborne.

    The BUFFALO was able to leave the Saginaw River once it opened on October 19, 1990. The river was closed after the tanker Jupiter exploded as the Buffalo passed.

    The KINSMAN VOYAGER was launched October 19, 1907 as a) H.P. BOPE for the Standard Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

    The WILLIAM LIVINGSTONE (c CRISPIN OGLEBAY (1) had the honor on October 19, 1912 of being the first vessel to navigate the opening of the Livingstone Channel named after the man who helped conceive the idea of a separate down bound channel on the east side of Bob-Lo Island in the lower Detroit River. Mr. Livingstone, President of the Lake Carriers Association at the time, piloted his namesake vessel in the channel on that historic trip.

    The crew on the stranded WILLIAM C. MORELAND was removed in gale force winds on October 19, 1910 by the Portage life saving crew.

    On October 19, 1923 the SAMUEL MATHER (3) was driven onto Gull Rock on Lake Superior near Keweenaw Point during a snowstorm and gale winds. The crew was safely removed from the badly exposed steamer on October 21st by the Eagle Harbor life saving crew.

    The B.H. TAYLOR (b) ROGERS CITY (2) sailed from Lorain on her maiden voyage on October 19, 1923

    On 19 October 1868, PARAGON (wooden schooner, 212 T, built in 1852 at Oshawa, Ont. as a brig) was being towed up the St. Clair River by the tug WILLIAM A. MOORE with a load of lumber in the company of four other barges. During a gale, the tow was broken up. While the tug MOORE was trying to regain the tows, she collided with PARAGON causing severe damage. 4 were drowned, but two were rescued by the Canadian gunboat/tug PRINCE ALFRED. PARAGON was then towed into Sarnia, but she sank there and was abandoned in place.

    October 19, 1919 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 4, while on the Grand Haven to Milwaukee run, got caught in a gale stretching the normal 6-hour crossing to 27 hours.

    On 19 October 1876, MASSILON (3-mast wooden schooner with foretop and topgallant sails, 130', 298 gt, built in 1857 at Cleveland as a bark) was sailing from Kelley's Island for Chicago with limestone when she sprang a leak 20 miles above Pointe aux barques at the mouth of Saginaw Bay. She was abandoned at about 2:00 AM and then sank. The crew was in an open boat until 7:00 AM when they were rescued by the tug VULCAN.

    On 19 October 1873, JOHN F. RUST (wooden schooner-barge, 161', 347 gt, built in 1869 at E. Saginaw, MI) was carrying lumber in tow of the steamer BAY CITY in a storm when she broke her tow line and went ashore a few miles north of Lakeport, Michigan.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Crapo Departs, Badger Arrives

    10/18
    Friday tugs from Selvick Marine arrived and took the S.T. Crapo out of the Graving dock and rigged it for the tow back to Green Bay.

    While in the graving dock the hull was sand blasted and painted. Her propeller and tail shaft were removed and the shaft tube was blocked off and made water tight. Large angle iron was welded from the hull to the rudder to keep it in place. The Crapo is now to be used as a storage ship in Green Bay, these modifications will keep her from sailing again as an active vessel.

    The tugs took the Crapo from the graving dock out to Sherwood Point and headed down bound for Green Bay.

    As the Crapo headed out bound other Selvick tugs pulled the Lake Michigan Carferry Badger, who had arrived on Thursday, from Berth 15 and placed her into the graving dock. With the large dry dock, the ship yard crew had room to reblock the east end of the dock for the Badger before the Crapo arrived. This allowed the dock to be flooded one time, with the Crapo departing and the Badger entering.

    Tug Jimmy L. waiting for job of lead tug to Green Bay
    Crapo being pulled from Dock
    Heading and Tailing tugs with Crapo out of dock
    Missing Propeller and Angle Iron welded on rudder
    Another View
    Out bound Sturgeon Bay
    Past Sherwood Point
    Turning Down bound on Green Bay
    Badger coming out of berth# 15
    Lining up on Graving dock
    Stern first into dock
    Over Blocking, ready to be placed on blocks

    Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle


    Marquette Update

    10/18
    The Kaye Barker and Michipicoten came to Marquette on Friday for ore. the Herbert Jackson arrived at the Shiras Steam Plant dock with a load of coal very late and will switch to the ore dock Saturday once she finishes unloading. The Corps of Engineers is pulling out the pilings of the old wooden ore dock which is between the current ore dock and the Merchandise Dock.

    Kaye Barker at the dock.
    Corps of Engineers crane/barge at the old ore dock pilings
    Corps barge pulling a piling.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe


    Agawa Canyon Departs

    10/18
    Friday morning the Agawa Canyon departed the Seng dock in Manistee, Mi. just after sun rise.

    Agawa Canyon departing

    Reported by: Jim Lindholm


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 18

    The ALVA C. DINKEY departed Quebec City, October 18, 1980, in tandem with her former fleet mate GOVERNOR MILLER towed by the FedNav tug CATHY B.

    Tragedy struck on the WILLIAM C. MORELAND's fifth trip October 18, 1910 loaded with 10,700 tons of iron ore from Superior for Ashtabula, OH when she stranded on Sawtooth Reef off Eagle Harbor, MI on Lake Superior. Visibility had been very limited due to forest fires raging on the Keweenaw Peninsula and the Lake was blanketed with smoke as far as one mile off shore. The MORELAND hit so hard and at such speed that she bounced over the first reef and came to rest on a second set of rocks.

    On 18 October 1896, AUSTRALASIA (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 282', 1829 GT, built in 1884 at W. Bay City) was carrying 2,200 tons of soft coal when she caught fire, burned to the waterline and sank 3 miles east of Cana Island in Lake Michigan. The Bailey's Harbor Lifesavers saved her crew.

    At 8:00 PM on 18 October 1844, the steamer ROCHESTER left Rochester, New York for Toronto. She encountered a severe gale about halfway there. Captain H. N. Throop had the vessel put about and return to Rochester. The gale was so severe that all thought they were lost. When they finally arrived in Rochester, the passengers were so grateful that they had survived that they published a note of gratitude to Almighty God and Captain Throop in the Rochester Daily Democrat on 19 October 1844 -- it was signed by all 18 passengers.

    On 18 October 1876, the schooner R. D. CAMPBELL filled with water and capsized on Lake Michigan about 10 miles from Muskegon, Michigan. The crew clung to the vessel's rigging until rescued by the tug JAMES McGORDAN. The schooner drifted to the beach some hours later.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Miner Departs

    10/17
    The thousand foot Mesabi Miner departed from berth at Bay Ship Thursday afternoon about 4 p.m. With minor welding repairs completed and with the approval of the Coast Guard and ABS, the Miner departed through Sturgeon Bay to Sherwood Point and onto Green Bay where they headed up bound.

    Mesabi Miner heading to Sherwood Point
    Out Past Sherwood Point
    On Green Bay upbound

    Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle


    Marquette Update

    10/17
    The H. Lee White was in on Sunday with a load of stone. Weather has delayed the arrival of the Kaye Barker in Marquette. She is now expected on Friday along with a return of the Michipicoten. The Joseph Thompson/Jr. are in lay-up in Escanaba having some work done.

    H. Lee White unloading stone at the Shiras Steam Plant dock
    Joseph Thompson (barge) tied up at Escanaba.
    Joseph Thompson, work being done.
    Tug J. Thompson Jr. at coal dock
    Tug Olive Moore
    Old barge in Escanaba

    Reported by: Lee Rowe


    Mariner in Erie

    10/17
    The American Mariner arrived in Erie at 11:30 a.m. on Thursday to unload a cargo of stone from Drummond Island and docked at the Mounfort Terminal. The Mariner arrived after spending most of Wednesday anchored in western Lake Erie due to low water.

    Later Thursday afternoon the Mariner shifted to the Old Ore Dock to continue unloading. The vessel left the dock and turned in the basin at 7:30 p.m., heading outbound for the lake.

    Thursday was the American Mariner's second visit of the season to Erie.

    Passing the Lighthouse
    Inbound.
    Stern view.
    Crew members watch as the Mariner passes through the channel.
    Headed for the Mounfort Terminal.
    Docking.
    Secured against the dock.

    Reported by: Jeff Thoreson


    Hamilton News

    10/17
    Thursday evening was a busy time in Hamilton. The Nanticoke departed at 4 p.m. The Jade Star departed the Petro Canada Pier in ( Bronte ) Oakville Ontario at 5 p.m. The Canadian Provider arrived in Hamilton at 6:30 p.m. from Point Noir Quebec with iron ore pellets for Dofasco. Her next port will be Toledo.

    Next to arrive was the saltie Lykes Raider at 7:30 p.m. heading to Pier 12 North. At 7:45 p.m. the refueling ship Hamilton Energy departed for Toronto Harbor. Finally the Algocen arrived at 9 p.m. with iron ore pellets also for Dofasco.

    Reported by: Eric Holmes


    Ghost Ship Ghouls and Goblins Preoccupied

    10/17
    The ghostly creatures that normally haunt Manistee¹s National Historic Landmark vessel S.S. City of Milwaukee this time of year are a bit preoccupied. Normally about sixty individuals from Manistee, Mi and the surrounding areas volunteer their time to stage one of the regions most unique haunted houses. However this year volunteers are performing painting and restoration work funded under a recent $1.3 million federal loan. Work is being focused on repainting the ship and relocating it to the Moonlite Motel & Marina.

    Jed Jaworski, Curator with the ship, indicated that after careful consideration, the corporation¹s board voted to cancel this year's event. "Logistics and safety concerns were the issues. Having thousands of people through the ship while contracted industrial restoration and painting operations were underway was not feasible. Because work must be completed before the onset of freezing weather, delaying the work to accommodate the Ghost Ship event simply was not an option."

    Ghost Ship is an extremely popular event hosted locally aboard the ship by children and adults alike. Thousands flock to Manistee from other areas to experience the one of kind attraction. Richard Taber, Marketing Director with the ship, indicated Halloween events like Ghost Ship often draw in excess of 5,000 people. "In addition to being a fun recreational event for Manistee area residents, we know it will ultimately be an important economic factor for the area as well, drawing many visitors during a time of year that normally sees a steep decline in visitor spending here."

    Jaworski assures people that next year's Ghost Ship event will be well worth the wait. "With all the work being accomplished aboard the ship this year and having the benefits of the new location, the 2004 event will be unrivaled. We want to thank all of our Ghost Ship volunteers for their past commitment and everyone¹s understanding of the decision that had to be made with this year’s event."

    Information on the S.S. City of Milwaukee and future plans for the vessel in Manistee can be gained by visiting www.carferry.com. Persons wishing to sign up for cast and crew of next year¹s Ghost Ship can phone 231-723-3587.


    Capt. Robert "Bob" O'Brien dies

    10/17
    Long-time sailor Capt. Robert W. "Bob" O'Brien, 90, died Oct. 13, 2003, in Burnsville, Minn. O'Brien sailed the Great Lakes for more than 59 years. He started at age 16 and worked his way up to captain in 1952 for the Midland Steamship Lines. He was master of the Michael Gallagher and the John Davin. In 1962 he was a founding member of the Upper Great Lakes Pilots Association District 3. He was a pilot for salties until retiring at age 75.


    Tucker Update and Correction

    10/17
    A correction to the Capt. Ralph Tucker grounding story, at no time during the refloating of the Tucker was her cargo discharged over the side. The cargo was shifted between onboard tanks.


    Welland Canal Gathering

    10/17
    The Welland Canal Gathering starts on Friday. Below is a schedule of planned events.
    Friday, October 17
    Doors opened to the Burgoyne Room at the St. Catharines Museum at Lock 3 Impromptu Swap Meet and pre event gathering. 5:30 p.m. - 6 p.m.

    St. Catharines Shipwreck Millenium Project Presentation
    The St. Catharines Museum welcomes our group with a special pre-meeting presentation. Members of the Ontario Marine Heritage Committee will be on hand from 6 - 7 p.m. to give a presentation on the St. Catharines Shipwreck Millenium Project. The museum's well stocked gift shop will also be available for shopping during this time. Those attending will also receive a Welcome Kit provided by the museum staff. Each kit will include a ballot for a draw (which will be held from 6 - 7 p.m.). *Held at the St. Catharines Museum at Lock 3 in the Burgoyne Room 6 p.m. - 7 p.m.

    Presentation featuring the upcoming World Canals Conference in St Catharines on 2 - 4 June 2004.  The Conference is being held to celebrate the 175th Anniversary of the opening of the 1st Welland Canal with the theme "Channels of Prosperity". 7:15 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

    Slide Show & Impromptu Swap Meet
    7:30 p.m. - 10:30 p.m.
    Tables will be available in the, please bring any items you would like to show, sell or swap. Open to all at no charge. If you would like a table please e-mail

    Saturday, October 18
    Yard Tour of International Marine Salvage
    Take pictures of Kinsman Enterprise and Algogulf East side of the canal, go south to the end of Welland Street, past the Hamilton Marine office, and turn right into dirt road. Park to the right behind the office. Wear hard sole shoes. You walk in the yard at your own risk! Do not climb on the boats or hulls. If you want to buy something, ask John or Jordan at the office.
    10 a.m. - 11 a.m.

    Boatwatching and museum tour at the Lock 3 Visitors Center
    Visitors’ center and viewing platform are free to enter.
    This year many attractions in the region are participating in Doors Open Niagara. The historical sites are open free of charge to everyone including The St. Catharines Museum at Lock 3, Inner Range Lighthouse in Port Dalhousie and in Port Colborne, the Harbor Master's House and the Marine Museum. Visit www.doorsopenniagara.com for a list of all the participating locations.

    Impromptu Swap Meet
    Tables will be available at the Canadian Corps Hall, please bring any items you would like to show, sell or swap. Open to all at no charge. If you would like a table please e-mail 6:00 p.m.

    Welland Canal Ship Society meeting - Slide Show
    At the Canadian Corps Hall on Clairmont street at the corner of Ormond beside the 7 - 11, 1 block west from the Inn at Lock 7. in Thorold. 7:00 p.m. - ? (depends on number showing slides).

    Click here for more details or to register


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 17

    The CANADIAN PROSPECTOR was launched October 17, 1963 as a) CARLTON (2)

    The MONTCLIFFE HALL was launched October 17,1959 for Transatlantic Bulk Carriers, Monrovia, Liberia as a) EMS ORE.

    With an inexperienced Taiwanese crew, boiler problems and the collapse of Lock 7's west wall in the Welland Canal on October 17th, SAVIC's (CLIFFS VICTORY) departure was delayed until December 17, 1985 when she departed Chicago under her own power.

    The carferry PERE MARQUETTE 19 was launched October 17, 1903.

    In 1893 the FLINT & PERE MARQUETTE NO. 1 was damaged by fire while in Ludington.

    In 1988 the Society for the Preservation of the S.S. City of Milwaukee purchased CITY OF MILWAUKEE from the City of Frankfort for $2.

    On 17 October 1871, CASCADEN (2 mast wood schooner, 138 T, built in 1866 at Saugeen, Ontario) was carrying much needed supplies for the Cove Island Lighthouse keeper and his family who were in desperate straits. But she went ashore 3 miles below Cape Hurd near Tobermory, Ontario in a storm and was wrecked.

    On 17 October 1843, the wooden schooner ALABAMA collided with a pier during a storm at the mouth of the Grand River at Fairport, Ohio and was a total loss.

    On 17 October 1871, the 42 ton wooden schooner SEA HORSE stranded on Fitzwilliam Island at the mouth of Georgian Bay in a storm. She was a total loss.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Miner Enters Shipyard

    10/16
    Interlake's thousand foot Mesabi Miner entered Sturgeon Bay through the Shipping Canal on Wednesday. She was heading for Berth 15 at Bay Ship Building.

    The Mesabi Miner was going to the yard for inspection and repairs to welds in her ballast tanks. The exact length of her stay and amount of repairs is unknown at this time. The Coast Guard and ABS will conduct the inspections to determine what repairs, if any are required.

    The Miner is the third thousand footer to enter a ship yard this year for repairs to the ballast tank. Earlier this summer the James R. Barker underwent similar repairs in Superior, Wi. In late September the Edwin H. Gott spent an extended stay at Bay Ship undergoing repairs to a collapsed bulkhead in a ballast tank.

    Mesabi Miner between bridges in the inter Bay
    Off the Bow of the Ryerson
    In the Michigan Street Bridge
    Backing into berth #15
    Deck Crew waiting for Shipyard crew to handle Lines
    Mesabi Miner at Berth #15 next to the Gantry Crane (Photo from Bulhead Point across the Bay )

    Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle


    Low Water at the Soo

    10/16
    Wednesday afternoon five vessels had gone to anchor due to low water levels in the lower river. Overnight the Rock Cut water level readings were at 10.9 to 11 inches below datum leveling off to 12.6 by noon on Wednesday.

    At anchor was the Paul R Tregurtha, Charles M. Beeghly, Joyce L Van Enkevort and Great Lakes Trader, Lee A Tregurtha and James R Barker.

    About 8 p.m. Wednesday evening the Rock Cut readings had returned to a comfortable 8.5 inches. The waiting downbound vessels had pulled anchor and were on their way.

    Reported by: Scott Best


    High Winds Stop Traffic on Eastern Lake Ontario

    10/16
    Wednesday evening storm warnings remained in effect with winds up to 50 knots forecast. The winds were not expected to diminish until late Wednesday evening. Shortly before noon on Wednesday the Algolake reported winds of 40 to 50 Knots and 16 foot seas off Prince Edward County, Ont. The Algolake went to anchor in Prince Edward Bay to wait for the weather to improve. It is unusual for an eastbound vessel to anchor in all but the heaviest weather.

    The eastbound Canadian Transport planned to anchor in the bay joining the safe harbor with the Cuyahoga and Canadian Provider

    Gale and storm warnings were posted Wednesday for the St. Lawrence from Kingston to Montreal.

    The BBC Spain, Lykes raider and Olympic Mentor will all go to anchor at Carelton Island as the pilot boat from Cape Vincent has ceased operation due to the weather. They do not expect to resume operation until Thursday morning at the earliest. Lykes Raider reported from Granite Shoal that the winds were west at 40 knots and there was a 4 foot sea running in the sheltered area.

    Reported by: Ron Walsh


    Milwaukee Update

    10/16
    The Southdown Challenger arrived in Milwaukee early Monday morning for what they thought would be a typical unload. After just 5 minutes of unloading there was a breakdown at the Milwaukee terminal. The large electric motor that drives the conveyor belt elevator used to lift cement to the top of the silos failed. It was hoped repairs could be made quickly, but by noon Wednesday the still fully loaded Challenger was backing out of the KK River with the help of the G-tug Arkansas. Their new destination will be Cleveland, OH. This 700 mile trip will take the Challenger approximately 65 hours to complete, making it the boats longest single trip as a cement carrier. The crew joked that it will be odd to pass Charlevoix and not turn right.

    The residents of Whitefish Bay and Fox Point, WI were treated to a rare site on Wednesday morning. The Philip Clark was anchored of these two northern Milwaukee suburbs. Most boats waiting weather anchor close to the Milwaukee harbor entrance.

    A rainbow over the stern of the Challenger Tuesday evening failed to bring good luck to the crews repairing the Milwaukee terminal.
    Philip Clark anchored of Whitefish Bay, WI Wednesday morning.

    Reported by: Andy LaBorde


    St. Lawrence River Traffic at Verchères

    10/16
    Alison Lake downbound off Varennes on Oct.6 for Central America. She's a former USCG tug converted into a sailing vessel.
    Alioth upbound off Varennes to Montréal section 57 on Oct. 7.
    Stern view.
    Daniella downbound off Verchères from Montréal on Oct.8.
    Another view
    Kapitonas A. Lucka upbound off Verchères to the Seaway on Oct.9.
    Seaguardian II downbound off Verchères from the Seaway on Oct.9.
    Another view
    Excellent Pescadores at anchor at Pointe-aux-Trembles awaiting a berth at Elevator no.4 to load grain, Oct.11.
    Salvage tug Seaways-5 upbound from Montreal berth 94 returning to section 56 after refueling. Oct.11 She is to tow the Oakglen and Seaway Queen to scrap.
    Close up
    Stern view
    Thalassa Desgagnés departing Montreal berth 96 for the Seaway on Oct.11.
    Sirius-1 aground about a mile downriver from the eastern end of the Port of Montreal Picture taken about 5 hours after straying out of the main shipping channel in dense fog. Disgruntled passengers are awaiting rescue on the upper deck of the hydrofoil. Oct.11.
    Help is on the way as McKeil's workboat Boatman No.6 with a draft shallow enough to get close to the stricken Sirius-1 pulls the hydrofoil away from its precarious position much to the relief of the 69 passengers on board. Oct.11.
    Seemingly undamaged Sirius-1 sets off under her own power back to her Montreal berth. Originally she had left Montreal for Quebec City in fair visibility but as soon as she left the Port area, she was engulfed in thick fog and lost her heading. Many of the passengers had booked hotel rooms in Quebec City for the weekend but they never got there.Oct.11.
    IVS Kingfisher downbound off Verchères from Montreal to La Guaira, Venezuela, with a load grain, Oct.11.
    Team Actinia downbound off Verchères from Montreal, Oct.14.

    Reported by: Marc Piché


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 16

    On October 16, 1990 the JOHN B. AIRD's loop belt caught fire while loading mill scale at Inland Steel Mill, East Chicago, Ill. Fueled by coal dust left over after unloading coal at the mill, 1,400 feet of the rubber conveyor belt burned causing nearly $500,000 in damages.

    The PETER R. CRESSWELL (ALGOWEST) set a cargo record for a 27,517 tonne load of grain down the Seaway October 16, 1982 to Port Cartier, Que.

    The RIO ORINOCO grounded off Anticosti Island, Que. on October 16, 1990 and was abandoned. Later she was salvaged by Le Groupe Desgagnes (1981) Inc., refloated, repaired and renamed d) THALASSA DESGAGNES.

    Sea trials of the MERTON E. FARR were successfully completed October 16, 1920.

    On October 16, 1954 the SCOTT MISENER (3) became the first laker to load a record 800,000 bushels of grain on the Great Lakes when she was loaded with barley at Fort William, Ont. for delivery to Port Colborne.

    The WILLIAM G. MATHER (2) was towed from her Cuyahoga River berth on October 16, 1990 by the GLT tugs IDAHO and DELAWARE, she was placed at her permanent station next to the 9th Street Pier of Cleveland's North Coast Harbor.

    On 16 October 1912, JAMES BUCKLEY (2 mast wood schooner-barge, 161’, 442 GC, built in 1884 at Quebec City) was carrying coal and being towed by the tug WILLIAM PROCTOR in consort with the barges H.B. and MENOMINEE in Lake Ontario. The BUCKLEY separated from this group in a storm and was driven into the shallows off the coast of Jefferson County, NY. The tug PROCTOR delivered MENOMINEE to Cape Vincent, then returned in time to take BUCKLEY’s crew out of the rigging - hand over hand on a heaving line - before BUCKLEY finally sank.

    On 16 October 1855, the brig TUSCARORA was carrying coal from Buffalo to Chicago. She anchored off Chicago's Harrison Street, but a sto9rm dragged her in. Volunteers from shore were unable to get to the stricken vessel. A group of 9 ship captains and 4 seamen then organized a rescue party and took two new "Francis" metal lifeboats out and rescued the entire crew of eleven. By 21 October, TUSCARORA was pounded to pieces.

    On 16 October 1853, PHILO SCOVILLE (2-mast wooden brig built in 1853 at Sheboygan, WI) was carrying flour, wheat, pigs and barreled fish when she encountered a gale in the eastern Straits of Mackinac. She was dismasted and drifted ashore where she was pounded to pieces. Her crew was saved by floating ashore while clinging to the floating main mast.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Tucker Refloated

    10/15
    The grounded brine tanker Capt. Ralph Tucker was freed Tuesday afternoon after grounding on lower Lake St. Clair due to a power failure on Monday night.

    The McKeil tug Tony McKay and the Gaelic tug Carolyn Hoey arrived on scene about 10:15 a.m. Tuesday morning and took up station awaiting word from the Coast Guard.

    The Tucker shifted cargo and did not discharged any of the brine. The cargo transfer gave the Tucker a few more inches of freeboard and helped lift her from the muddy bottom.

    At 12:40 p.m. the Coast Guard cleared the Tucker to begin refloating operations, by 2 p.m. the Tucker was freed and proceeding downbound to the Morterm Dock in Windsor where electricians would continue to work on the generator that caused the outage.

    An excellent job was done by Capt. Seymour and the crew of the Tucker in avoiding a potentially hazardous situation.

    Images from the Dossin Web Cam
    Bow passing
    Stern tug Tony McKay

    Reported by: Chris Franckowiak


    Everlast Reaches Port Weller, Barge Reaches Windsor

    10/15
    On Monday the tow of the Everlast and barge Norman McLeod reached Port Weller and the tug Everlast was moved into the deep dry dock, facing out to the canal. It is believed that the tug was put in dry dock due to lack of space at the fit out wall and the dock will not be drained.

    The Everlast suffered an engine room fire last week and will have an extended stay at Port Weller while repairs are made.

    The barge Norman McLeod continued upbound for Windsor under tow of the tug Carrol C. The barge arrived Tuesday night with the tugs Carrol C. and Tony McKay assisting it into the North Slip at the Morterm Dock. The McLeod is expected to resume trading being pushed by the Tony McKay until repairs are complete on the Everlast.

    Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt and Barry Anderson


    Low Water Sends Ships to Anchor

    10/15
    At least three downbound vessels went to anchor Monday night because of low water readings in the Rock Cut. The Paul R Tregurtha anchored at Hay Lake, Stewart J Cort departed the lock area for a delayed anchorage in the lower river waiting for a drop to minus five or six. The Charles M. Beeghly received permission to tie at the south west pier in the lock area allowing the saltie Alioth to lock through ahead of him because of a shallower draft. Also downbound behind the Cort was the H Lee White. Upbound traffic included the Saginaw, Wolverine, Biscayne Bay, Herbert C Jackson, Columbia Star, David Z Norton and Marinette.

    Last night the water level in the Rock Cut was minus11.3 The lower pool was at minus 9. Winds were gusting over 30 mph Tuesday evening.

    Reported by: Scott Best


    Chios Pride in Marinette

    10/15
    The Chios Pride arrived at Marinette Fuel & Dock Tuesday afternoon. The Selvick tugs, Jimmy L and Jacqueline Nicole, assisted the ship into port. A small Coast Guard boat was also in attendance and a large contingent of the local police force was on hand to greet the arrival. The Chios Pride is carrying pig iron from South America. The presence of the police is nothing new to ships arriving in Marinette from South America.

    Meanwhile, the USCG Hollyhock is back in Marinette after a stint in Sturgeon Bay for dry-docking and painting. It rejoins the USCG Sequoia and the Staten Island Ferry, Guy V. Molinari, at the Marinette Marine dock.

    Chios Pride docked alongside the William H. Donner
    Close-up of stern deckhouse and small Coast Guard craft
    Close-up of the small Coast Guard craft
    USCG Hollyhock back at Marinette Marine

    Reported by: Dick Lund


    Twin Ports Report

    10/15
    After a couple of slow days, the Twin Ports were busy with both salties and some good-looking lakers.

    Reserve was busy early in the morning unloading stone at the CLM dock in Superior. It was due next at Silver Bay to load pellets. Later in the day, Halifax arrived to load at BNSF ore dock in Superior and Alpena arrived to unload cement at the Lafarge dock in Superior. It will later shift to the Duluth dock. Cason J. Callaway was unloading stone at the DMIR dock in Duluth.

    Several elevators were busy again. Spar Garnet was loading at Peavey, Isolda was loading at AGP and Persenk was at Cargill.

    Reported by: Al Miller


    Marquette Update

    10/15
    The Charles M. Beeghly and Michipicoten both took loads of taconite in Marquette on Tuesday. The Michipicoten is expected to make a return on Wednesday, weather permitting. The only other ship expected is the Kaye Barker on Thursday.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe


    Saginaw River News

    10/15
    Two-way traffic was the rule of the day on Tuesday in the narrow shipping channel of the Saginaw River.

    The Algoway entered the river at about midnight Monday, about two hours behind the Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder and the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. During the night, the McCarthy delivered coal from Duluth to Consumers Energy, the Pathfinder delivered a split load at the Burroughs dock in Zilwaukee and at Valley Asphalt in Saginaw, and the Algoway unloaded salt from Goderich at the Sargent dock in Zilwaukee.

    The Wilfred Sykes, on its second visit within three days, arrived early Tuesday morning with a load for the Wirt docks. The Sykes was followed by the CSL Tadoussac, with a load of cement clinkers for the Essroc plant at Essexville.

    The Sykes waited in Bay City for the outbound Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder to clear before continuing up to Saginaw. As the Sykes was upbound, the Algoway departed the Sargent dock ahead of it and continued up to Sixth Street in Saginaw to turn for the outbound trip.

    The Algoway was outbound from Saginaw at noon, while the Sykes was unloading at Wirt. The Sykes finished unloading early in the afternoon and followed the Algoway out.

    By that time, the tug Rebecca Lynn, with a tank barge, was inbound for the Bit-Mat dock. The Algoway and Rebecca Lynn passed each other late in the afternoon at the mouth of the river. The Sykes passed out of the river after the Rebecca Lynn had secured at its dock.

    After the other traffic was clear, the CSL Tadoussac departed Essroc at about 8:15 p.m. and backed out into the Saginaw Bay to turn. Picture by Stephen Hause
    Sykes passing Veterans Memorial Park Sunday

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


    St. Clair River Traffic

    10/15

    Pictures by Andy Severson
    Algolake downbound
    Algomairne downbound.
    Agosteel after departing Sarnia elevator for Bruce Mines
    Canadain Miner downbound
    Chios Pride upbound
    Close up of tug Keewatin
    Keewaitin and Barge Stone Merchant
    Mackinaw above Marine City
    Mamuee downbound.

    Pictures by Bill Bird
    Monday afternoon
    Algosteel unloading at Sarnia elevator.
    Having finished unloading, she heads up river and out into Lake Huron.
    Saltie Chios Pride clear of Bluewater Bridges
    Herbert C. Jackson upbound at Port Huron
    Maumee entering St. Clair River
    David Z. Norton nearing Marysville to unload. Loaded to anchor pockets.
    Saginaw up at Port Huron.

    Tuesday morning
    Quebecois loading at Sarnia elevator.
    Roger Blough at Buoys 1 and 2 heading into river.
    Fleetmate Edwin H. Gott about a half hour behind.


    Toledo Update

    10/15
    The John J. Boland departed from the CSX Docks Tuesday morning and is now back out sailing. The Algosoo finished loading coal at the CSX Docks and departed Tuesday morning. The Adam E. Cornelius immediately followed her loading coal and is expected to depart Tuesday afternoon. The salt water vessel Marinette was unloading cargo at the T.W.I. Dock. The salt water vessel Lady Hamilton was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. The Algoville was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The Algomarine was unloading a cargo of oats at the A.R.M.S. Dock which is located just north of the Craig (I-280) Bridge.

    The tug Ohio arrived in Toledo Tuesday morning with the barge Lockwood 1000 towed on the hip. The barge was carrying a large turbine.

    The Armco, Buckeye, and Courtney Burton remain in lay-up at their respective dock sites. The small carferry South Bass remains at Toledo Shipyard undergoing repairs.

    The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will now be the Charles M. Beeghly on Thursday. The H. Lee White and Canadian Progress on Friday. The Kaye E. Barker on Sunday, followed by the Frontenac on Tuesday.

    The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the Atlantic Huron on Monday, followed by the CSL Laurentien on Tuesday. The Canadian Transfer will be arriving here within the next several days to unload a partial cargo of potash at one of the upriver dock sites. The Gordon C. Leitch is also due in port soon to load a grain cargo.

    Classic views of Toledo Shipping
    Cliffs Victory in layup at the Hocking Valley South Dock.
    H.C. Heimbecker upbound the Maumee River from the Craig Bridge bound for one of the Elevators upriver to load a grain cargo.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman


    Buffalo Report

    10/15
    The Maumee arrived off the entrance to Buffalo late Tuesday afternoon. She waited there as a tug and dredge cleared the City Ship Canal. Once the dredge cleared the Joseph H. Frantz departed her berth at General Mills and headed for the open lake.

    The Frantz and Maumee passed in the channel just outside the break wall. The Maumee headed for the ship canal to unload her cargo of sand and the Frantz headed for another load of grain.

    Reported by: Tom Miller


    Kingston Update

    10/15
    A Storm Warning was posted Tuesday for Lake Ontario with winds expected to reach 50 to 55 Knots on Wednesday and a heavy rainfall warning is also in effect. The area could get 2 to 3 inches of rain by late Wednesday afternoon. Tuesday evening the wind was starting to blow in Kingston and it was raining. Many ships may go to anchor and wait on weather Tuesday night and Wednesday.

    The CCGS Simcoe has gone to the south shore of Lake Ontario, due to the weather, for her trip to the Welland canal. The Grande Mariner revised their eta for Oswego to late Tuesday night due to the weather. The Canadian Navigator was eastbound carrying a split load of salt mainly for Valleyfield and the remainder for Cote Ste. Catherine. The Canadian Provider was westbound and seems to be continuing on.

    Lake Ontario was 44 cm above the chart datum. This is down 6 cm for the week but 14 cm above last year.

    Reported by: Ron Walsh


    Cunard Queen Elizabeth 2 makes farewell visit to Quebec City

    10/15
    The Cunard liner QE2 docked in Quebec Harbor on Monday afternoon banked by the multicolour Fall foliage of Cape Diamond and greeted by hundreds of on-lookers. This sixth stopover will be its farewell visit to the City.

    The QE2 was built in 1969 at a cost of $70 million. To remain competitive, $675 million dollars was invested over the years. Now, after 776 Trans-Atlantic crossings, 20 World cruises, 5 million nautical miles, and after carrying over 2 million loyal passengers, the popular QE2 will be going into semi retirement and confined to world cruises. The new Cunard Queen Mary 2 built at a cost of $800 million will take over service in 2004.

    On Tuesday afternoon, prior to its last departure, the Quebec Port Authority planned a farewell ceremony and invited the public to come and say farewell to this popular visitor and veteran of the Falkans war.

    Also in Harbor Monday was the Holland American Prinsendam and Norwegian Crown (Norwegian Cruise Line)

    QE2
    Stern view
    Prinsendam
    Norwegian Crown
    View at dusk

    Reported by: Frederick Fréchette


    Aerial Views

    10/15
    Pilot and photographer Don Coles sent in the pictures below. All photographs are available for purchase. Don's company, Great Lakes Aerial Photos, is available for hire for any aerial photography need.

    Saginaw
    Maumee
    Another view
    Herbert C. Jackson
    David Z. Norton
    Canadian Miner
    Algomarine
    Harsens Island Ferry
    Algolake




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 15

    On her maiden voyage the LEON SIMARD (b) L'ORME NO.1. ) was spotted traveling eastward on the St. Lawrence River October 15, 1974.

    The WOLVERINE (4) departed in Columbia Transportation Division colors October 15, 1974 on her maiden voyage from Lorain light to load stone at Stoneport, MI for delivery to Huron, OH.

    HERBERT C. JACKSON cleared Fraser Shipyard on October 15, 1988 after having the 1000 h.p. bow thruster motor installed from the JOHN SHERWIN. The motor from the Jackson was later repaired and placed in the Sherwin's cargo hold for future use.

    The PAUL H. CARNAHAN came out on her maiden voyage October 15, 1961.

    On October 15, 1984 the a) JOHN O. McKELLAR (2) was sold to P.& H. Shipping of Parrish & Heimbecker Ltd., Mississauga, Ont. and renamed b) ELMGLEN (2).

    Scrapping began on October 15, 1988 of the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON at Kaohsiung, Taiwan by Li Chong Steel & Iron Works Co. Ltd.

    The C.H. McCULLOUGH, JR. was laid up on October 15, 1969 at Manitowoc, WI.

    The MELDRUM BAY was launched October 15, 1949 as a) COVERDALE for Canada Steamship Lines, Montreal, Que.

    The SCOTT MISENER (3) struck bottom October 15, 1973 near Whaleback Shoal on the St. Lawrence River reportedly damaging sixty of her bottom plates. She proceeded to the Port Arthur shipyard for dry docking and repairs from October 20th through the 28th.

    On October 15, 1980 the NIPIGON BAY, loaded with ore for Hamilton, Ont., grounded at the "crossover" near Brockville, Ont. on the St. Lawrence River and sustained a 100-foot rip in her bottom plates. She proceeded to Thunder Bay, Ont. arriving there on October 24th where repairs were made at an estimated cost of $500,000.

    The R. P. MASON (3 mast wooden schooner, 115’, 155 GT, built in 1867 at Grand Haven, MI) was bound from Chicago for Detroit when she struck a rocky reef near Waugoshance Point in the Straits of Mackinac on 8 October 1871. Water gushed in an 8-foot hole. However, she was temporarily patched and her cargo of grain, flour and meat was taken off over the next few days. The tug LEVIATHAN took her in tow, going to Little Traverse Bay, when, on 15 October, they encountered a gale near Cross Village, MI. The MASON broke free and capsized. 5 died and 4 were rescued. The MASON drifted ashore upside down. She was eventually salvaged and sailed for another 46 years. She ended her days when she burned in Lake Michigan in 1917.

    The tug DOUGLAS caught fire near Wyandotte while going down the Detroit River and sank. The crew all jumped overboard and were saved by the steam yacht JOSEPHINE, except for John Cassidy, one of the firemen, who drowned. A few days later, plans were made to raise and rebuild the DOUGLAS.

    On 15 October 1871, R. G. COBURN (wooden propeller passenger/package freight steamer, 193', 867 t, built in 1870 at Marine City, MI) was carrying 15,000 bushels of wheat, 3,500 barrels of flour and 30 barrels of silver ore from Lake Superior to Detroit. As she came down Lake Huron, she encountered a terrific gale which had driven most vessels to seek shelter. The COBURN fought the wind at Saginaw Bay throughout the night until she lost her rudder and turned broadside to the waves. Her large stack fell and smashed the cabin area and then the cargo came loose and started smashing holes in the bulwarks. About 70 passengers were aboard and almost all were terribly seasick. As the ship began her final plunge beneath the waves, only a few lifeboats were getting ready to be launched and those were floated right from the deck as the ship sank. 32 people perished, including Capt. Gilbert Demont. No women or children were saved.

    On 15 October 1900 the wooden 186’ freighter F. E. SPINNER was sunk in a collision with the steamer H. D. COFFINBERRY in the St. Mary’s River. She was raised from 125 feet of water, one of the deepest successful salvage operations to that time. She was later renamed HELEN C and lasted until 1922.

    October 15, 1910 - After the sinking of the PERE MARQUETTE 18 the previous September, the PERE MARQUETTE 18 (II) was ordered by the Pere Marquette Railway.

    On 15 October 1871, the EXCELSIOR (3-mast wooden schooner, 156', 374 gt, built in 1865 at Buffalo, NY) was struck by a gale near Thunder Bay on Lake Huron. She sailed through the early morning hours only to sink about 4:30 AM. Only Charles Lostrom survived. He was on the cabin roof which blew off when the vessel went down. Mr. Lostrom remained on the floating roof-raft for two days and two nights until he was rescued by fishermen near South Hampton light on the Canadian side of Lake Huron.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, James Neumiller, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Tucker Loses Power, Grounds

    10/14
    The calcium chloride tanker Capt. Ralph Tucker lost power Monday evening near Buoy 2 in Lake St. Clair around 7 p.m. The vessel was transiting upbound at the time when a generator set failed, shutting off the main engine.

    Two anchors were released, stopping the vessel just out of the channel, with the vessel grounding softly. The vessel attempted to restart her engines, but still could not maintain engine power.

    The vessel was not blacked out, as an emergency generator was still in operation. It is expected that the McKeil tugs Jerry Newberry, and Paul E. No.1 will come to the vessel's aid and tow her back down to the Morterm dock in Windsor.

    The Tucker had been in Hamilton for several days, undergoing a dry docking, and routine maintenance.

    Traffic was not affected by the grounding but 100-feet of the Tucker's stern remained in the channel.

    Reported by: Chris Franckowiak


    Sykes Loads in Stone Port

    10/14
    The Wilfred Sykes arrived at Stoneport around 10 a.m. on Monday to take on cargo.

    It was pleasant fall day and the Sykes departed by 6:30 p.m. heading for Bay City and Saginaw. The Arthur M. Anderson made its way for the dock once the Sykes was clear. The J.A.W Iglehart was also in port by 9 p.m. on Monday loading cement at Lafarge. The Alpena is expected to be in Superior, Wisc on Tuesday.

    Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain


    Saginaw River News

    10/14
    The Wolverine was inbound the Saginaw River Monday, passing the Front Range shortly after noon. She called on the Bay Aggregates dock to unload and was outbound for the lake around 7:30 p.m. This is the Wolverine's first visit to the Saginaw River in her short 2003 season and only the third by an Oglebay Norton vessel this year.

    Inbound late Monday night was the Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. She called on the Consumers Energy / Karn-Weadock dock to unload coal. The McCarthy is expected to be outbound Tuesday morning.

    The Tug Dorothy Ann & Barge Pathfinder were also inbound Monday night, headed upriver to the Burroughs dock to lighter before finishing at the Valley Asphalt dock. The pair is expected to be outbound Tuesday morning.

    Wolverine upbound at Consumers Energy
    Another view
    Stern view

    Reported by: Todd Shorkey


    Toledo Report

    10/14
    The salt water vessel Lady Hamilton was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. The Algoville was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The salt water vessel Marinette was unloading cargo at the T.W. I. Dock. The Algosoo was unloading stone at the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock. When finished she will proceed over to the CSX Docks to load coal on Monday afternoon.

    The Adam E. Cornelius will follow the Algosoo and will load coal at the CSX Docks on Monday evening. The John J. Boland appears to be in temporary layup at the CSX #1 Dock (She is docked where the Wolverine was).

    The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will be the Charles M. Beeghly on Thursday. The H. Lee White, and Canadian Progress on Friday, followed by the Lee A. Tregurtha on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the Atlantic Huron on Monday 20 October, followed by the CSL Laurentien on Tuesday. The Algomarine is due in port in the next few days, she will be bringing another cargo of oats that was loaded in Thunder Bay, Ontario to be unloaded at one of the dock sites here.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman


    Buffalo Update

    10/14
    The Joseph H. Frantz was unloading at the General Mills Frontier Elevator on the Buffalo Ship Canal at 7 p.m. Monday. A dredge is working the Entrance Channel and both vessels will be obstacles for the inbound Maumee who is due about 3 p.m. on Tuesday for the Sand Products Corp. Landing on Fuhrman Blvd.

    Reported by: Brian Wroblewski


    Hamilton News

    10/14
    Monday the Regina Oldendorff departed Hamilton at 7 a.m. heading to the Welland Canal and on to Duluth. The Gordon C Leitch arrived at 8 a.m. with iron ore pellets from Port Cartier Quebec for Dofasco. When she unloads she will depart for Toledo. The tug James A. Hannah and her barge departed at 10:30 a.m., also heading to the Welland Canal. The Vega Desgagnes anchored off the Petro Canada Pier in ( Bronte ) Oakville about noon and finally docked at 7 p.m.

    On Sunday the Quebecois departed at 7 a.m. heading for the canal and on to Sarnia. The James Norris departed at 10 a.m.

    Reported by: Eric Holmes


    Busy day at Oshawa

    10/14
    The Bulker Balaban 1 arrived in Oshawa early on Sunday to unload steel rebar, she is expected to depart late on Wednesday afternoon. The Bulker Woody arrived late afternoon on the same day to unload Barite from China, she is expected to depart Late Tuesday afternoon.

    Balaban 1 & Woody docked.
    Balaban 1 bow view.
    Stern view.
    Woody aft view with some Barite in the foreground.
    Woody Superstructure and a Water supply truck.
    Woody another view.
    Woody port side looking forward.
    Woody open cargo hold.
    Tugs Atomic & Glenevis from Woody's deck. Nice fall colors.
    Woody looking forward starboard side.
    Able seaman Maksym Maystrenko & 2nd Officer Volonymyr Sydorenko of the Woody.
    Glenevis, Atomic, Balaban 1 & Woody.

    Reported by: Jim Gallacher


    Coast Guard Cutter McLane Restoration

    10/14
    The Great Lakes Naval Memorial and Museum in Muskegon, Mich. is working to restore the twin GM-268 diesels aboard the Coast Guard Cutter McLane to operational condition. It may be possible to fire up the diesels later this year. The engine room has been cosmetically restored, electrical work has been done to convert AC to DC, sea valves are being reconditioned, and work is being done on the high pressure air compressor.

    If anyone is interested in contributing to the project with a donation of volunteer time or money, please contact Jack Fisher at 231-755-1230, or George P. Micka IV. at 231-206-7286. Plank ownership programs are available starting at $100, although any contribution is welcomed. Plank ownerships are $100, $250, $500, and $1,000.

    During 2003 the GLNMM towed the CGC McLane to the U.S. Coast Guard Festival in Grand Haven, Michigan. Our goal for 2004 is to have the diesels operational, and to have the Cutter fully operational by 2005.

    For more information please contact the group at the numbers above, or visit www.silversides.org

    Cutter McLane.

    Reported by: George P. Micka IV


    Weekly Updates

    10/14
    The weekly updates have been uploaded. In addition to the regular updates this week features unique maritime items up for auction at the Dossin Museum. This year, the silent auction will accept online bids. Items range from authentic port holes to bottles of 90 year old scotch recovered from a ship wreck.

    Information on the upcoming Welland Canal Gathering, be sure to register if you would like to be included in our tours.

    Click here to view


    Marine Historical Society of Detroit Renewal and 2004 Calendar

    10/14
    The Marine Historical Society of Detroit has issued its annual 2004 pictorial calendar, which is being mailed to its members with the October issue of the group's "Detroit Marine Historian."

    This year's calendar features rare color images from the 1950s and 1960s, taken by the late historian and photographer Gordon Bugbee. Individuals who would like to receive the calendar (and the Detroit Marine Historian) can do so simply by joining the group. In the process, they will be helping The Marine Historical Society of Detroit continue its work preserving Great Lakes maritime history, an effort that becomes even more important as the size of the Great Lakes fleet continues to dwindle.

    Dues are $30 annually, and may be mailed to the MHSD treasurer, Bob Pocotte, at 606 Laurel Ave. Port Clinton, OH 43452.
    The Marine Historical Society of Detroit is a non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization and a fully volunteer group.

    Click here to preview


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 14

    The keel to the JAMES R. BARKER was laid on October 14, 1974. She was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flagship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.)

    On October 14, 1983 the CHI-CHEEMAUN encountered 48-knot winds after departing Tobermory with 113 passengers bound for South Baymouth. Due to high wind and waves the captain decided to find shelter rather than to continue on or return to port. The ferry made her way around the Bruce Peninsula southeast to Dyer Bay where she dropped anchor for the night, however she had no overnight accommodations. Complimentary meals were served and activities were organized by the crew. The anchor was lifted the next morning and the ferry returned to Tobermory.

    The GEORGE A. STINSON departed Detroit on her maiden voyage October 14, 1978 light for Superior, WI to load iron ore pellets for delivery to the Great Lakes Steel Division of the National Steel Corp. at Zug Island in River Rouge, MI.

    On October 14, 1966, loaded with potash bound for Oswego, NY, the STONEFAX collided with the Norwegian salty ARTHUR STOVE and sank in the Welland Canal between Locks 7 and 8.

    On 14 October 1875, it was discovered that thieves had completely stripped the canvass and rigging from the schooner FORWARDER owned by Little & Brown. The schooner was lying about three miles below Port Huron.

    On 14 October 1822, APPELONA (wooden schooner, 45’, 37 T, built in 1814 at Henderson, NY) was bound from Oswego for Genessee, NY when she was struck by lightning in Lake Ontario and sank about 15 minutes. All hands were injured but abandoned her for shore and all survived.

    The tug NELSON burned at Chicago on Saturday, 14 October 1876. She was one of the smaller class of tugs and the damage was so great that she was not considered to be worth repairing.

    October 14, 1911 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 4 ran aground while enroute to Manistique at full speed, damaging several plates. The ANN ARBOR NO. 3 pulled her off.

    On 14 October 1876, NEW YORK (wooden propeller freighter, 183', 704 t, built in 1856 at Buffalo, NY) was carrying lumber and towing the schooner BUTCHER BOY and barges NELLIE McGILVERAY and A. J. CORREY from Cove Island in Georgian Bay to Buffalo when they encountered a severe storm near Pointe aux Barques. The tow line parted and the NEW YORK could not regain it in the heavy seas. She then sprang a leak and the water rose rapidly enough to put out her fires. The crew (15 men and one woman) abandoned in the yawl as NEW YORK was overwhelmed and sank. The open boat was adrift for five hours when the 74' schooner NEMESIS came upon it. NEMESIS tried twelve times to approach the yawl in the rough seas, losing a portion of her deck load of tanbark each time that she came about, but at last she got alongside the yawl. The NEW YORK's crew managed to get aboard the NEMESIS except for Fireman William Sparks who fell between the yawl and the schooner and was lost. The other vessels in the tow all made it to Port Huron safely.

    On 14 October 1883, NELLIE GARDNER (wooden schooner-barge, 178', 567 gt, built in 1873 at Marine City, MI) was loaded with 39,000 bushels of corn while being towed by the steamer JOHN PRIDGEON, JR. in a storm on Lake Huron. The GARDNER released herself from the tow in the heavy weather to run for the shelter of Thunder Bay under sail. However, she was unable to make it, and turned back for Tawas, Michigan but struck a reef, broke in two and was wrecked 1 mile SE of Scarecrow Island. Her crew made it to shore in her yawl.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Everlast Tow

    10/13
    The tugs Carrol C. and Bonny B. were expected to arrive at Port Weller shortly after mid night with the tug Everlast and barge Norman McLeod in tow.

    The tugs planned to leave the Everlast at Port Weller and continue on to Windsor with the barge Norman McLeod. The Everlast will be repaired at Port Weller Dry Docks while another tug take takes over pushing the barge Norman McLeod.

    Reported by: Kent Malo


    Keewatin Returns

    10/13
    The tug Keewatin and barge Stone Merchant arrived in Wallaceburg at 10:15 a.m. to offload the third of an expected 15 loads of crushed stone from the Cedarville, Michigan quarry.

    Entering the Chenal Ecarte at Port Lambton at 7:30 a.m., escorted by the Lambton Marine tug Tammy Lynn, the combination eased smoothly through the Walpole Island Bridge at 8:10 a.m. during her inbound trip while experiencing a brisk northwest wind. A minor mishap occurred as they entered the Sydenham River near the junction of the East Passage when the Keewatin hit some underwater obstruction, possibly a log.

    However this did not deter her continued passage to the Southwestern Sales dock. Company official Bob Tulloch is pleased with the results of the contract thus far indicating in all likelihood the Southestern Sales Wallaceburg dock will continue to be busy next season as well.

    It is reported another tug may be acquired by Husky Marine to augment the new route. As word of the Keewatin's arrivals spread across Chatham-Kent and area more interested observers are attracted to the site, many remembering when arrival of bulkers and package freighters was a common sight on the Wallaceburg waterfront.

    The Keewatin and Sand Merchant were expected to depart at daybreak on Monday.

    Reported by: Alan Mann


    Ohio Upbound

    10/13
    The tug Ohio returned upbound Sunday morning entering the Welland Canal with the barge Lockwood 1000. The barge is carrying a large turbine that will be delivered to Toledo, OH.

    Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt


    Calumet Unloads

    10/13
    The Calumet made a rare, and possibly first, trip to Marquette with a load of coke breeze early Sunday morning. She will take on a load of ore once she finishes unloading the breeze, which has the consistency of powder. It is loaded into a hopper at the WE power plant.

    The Lee A. Tregurtha remained tied up at the ore dock after finishing her load on Saturday because of weather out on the lake. The winds continued to be strong Sunday morning.

    Calumet unloading
    Wide view
    Calumet accommodations
    Lee A. Tregurtha waiting

    Reported by: Lee Rowe


    Busy Day in Grand Haven

    10/13
    Friday saw two ships in Grand Haven. Shortly after noon, the McKee Sons and tug Invincible passed the docked LeLevant. The McKee Sons proceeded up the Grand River heading for Meekhof's to deliver a load of stone. She pulled as far up the river as a freighter can go.

    The LeLevant was docked at Escanaba Park allowing its passengers to stroll the beautiful boardwalk on a beautiful Indian summer day. Later the LeLevant would be heading to Milwaukee.

    McKee Sons entering Grand River in Grand Haven
    McKee Sons and LeLevant
    Close up
    Head on view
    McKee Sons passing
    Bow
    Invincible
    Stern view
    McKee Sons passing sand loader in Grand Haven
    Unloading
    Wide view unloading
    LeLevant
    Plaques in Escanaba park in Grand Haven
    Another view
    Historical Marker
    Other side
    USCG Ships that served from Grand Haven

    Reported by: Dale Rosema


    Sykes in Saginaw

    10/13
    The Wilfred Sykes provided a bonus Sunday afternoon for the folks who came out to enjoy the sunshine and autumn colors along the Saginaw River. The Sykes lightered Sunday morning at the Wirt Stone Dock in Bay City. Early in the afternoon, the vessel continued up to the Wirt dock in Saginaw to finish unloading.

    The Sykes attracted considerable attention as it passed Veterans Memorial Park, along M-13 between Bay City and Saginaw, where fall colors were reaching their peak this weekend.

    After unloading at Saginaw, the vessel was outbound shortly after 8 p.m.

    Pictures by Todd Shorkey
    Wilfred Sykes upbound at Lafayette Bridge
    Stern view

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


    Thunder Bay Traffic

    10/13
    Below are recent images taken at Thunder Bay.
    Thunder Cape
    Canadian Miner
    Cedarglen
    Donald Mac
    George N Carleton & WI Scott Purvis
    Kwe
    Montrealais at Richardson
    Pine Bay Dryden, ONT.
    Russel Hipwell Hull 1104
    Algomarine at Richardson

    Reported by: Rob Farrow


    Fog Hampers Navigation in the Welland Canal

    10/13
    The warm and gorgeous Indian summer weather has given way to very dense fog rolling in off the cold waters of Lake Ontario. On Friday and Saturday shipping was delayed somewhat due to foggy conditions that existed in the lower reaches of the canal. Below are images taken onboard the downbound Federal Kumano Saturday.

    After extensive fog during the night the fog it begins to dissipate over the countryside and we continue our transit to Lock 2.
    Some fog lingers over the shore.
    Barely thirty minutes after the beautiful sunrise we partially exit Lock 2 as more fog rolls in off the lake. At this point we hold our position at the head of the lock and await improved conditions.
    The Algoville is secured below the lock but we can not see her yet. However, conditions are improving and we will soon depart the lock. Federal Kumano’s name board. This 199,99m (656’) Japanese built vessel is only seven months old.
    The starboard bridge wing. Federal Kumano is headed to Antwerp, Belgium with a load of flax from Thunder Bay.
    With improved conditions we carry on and exit Lock 2.
    Pilot’s front window view passing by the Algoville.
    Now secured on the approach wall above Lock 1 it’s time for lunch! This is a typical Indian lunch served aboard this vessel. It is hot, spicy and delicious. If your palate can tolerate the spices this is a first class meal.
    Outbound out of Lock 1 the Lithuanian vessel Kapitonas A. Lucka is headed in ballast for Thunder Bay.
    We wait for her to pass our position before casting off. In the background at the fit out berth of Port Weller Dry Docks are the HMCS Halifax and CCGS Griffon.
    Close up of the Kapitonas A. Lucka’s accommodation.
    It’s a beautiful day in Lock 1 but below the lock is another story. Unfortunately, more fog rolls in below the lock in Port Weller Harbor.

    Reported by: Capt. Alain M. Gindroz


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 13

    The SASKATCHEWAN PIONEER made her first trip out of Thunder Bay, Ont. with grain on October 13, 1983.

    The tug GLENADA towed the BROOKDALE (2) from Port Colborne to Newman's scrap yard at Port Maitland, Ont. the week of October 13, 1980.

    On October 13, 1902 the MAUNALOA collided with her whaleback consort BARGE 129 on Lake Superior and sank it 30 miles northwest of Vermilion Point, which is between Upper Michigan's Crisp and Whitefish Points. The MAUNALOA had been towing the BARGE 129, both vessels loaded with iron ore, when the towline parted in heavy seas. While trying to regain control of the barge, they came together and the steamer's port anchor raked the side of the barge which started taking on water. The crew was taken off the barge before it sank.

    On 13 October 1875, off Alpena, Michigan, the tug E. H. MILLER had her boiler explode while racing with the tug CITY OF ALPENA -- both in quest of a tow. The ALPENA, who was ahead of the MILLER when she blew up, immediately turned around to pick up survivors. The ALPENA sunk in minutes. The engineer, fireman and a boy were rescued, but the captain and cook were lost. The fireman was in such poor shape that it was thought that he would not live.

    On 13 October 1877, the Port Huron Times reported that the tug PRINDIVILLE and the 2-mast schooner PORTLAND had both gone ashore at the Straits of Mackinac and been pounded to pieces.

    On 13 October 1886, SELAH CHAMBERLAIN (wooden propeller steam barge, 212', 1207 gt, built in 1873 at Cleveland, OH) collided with the 222' wooden lumber hooker JOHN PRIDGEON JR. in heavy fog off Sheboygan, WI. The CHAMBERLAIN had been towing the schooner FAYETTE BROWN. The CHAMBERLAIN sank quickly. Five of the crew went down with the vessel when the lifeboat davits became fouled and they were unable to launch the lifeboat. The rest of the crew made it to shore in the other lifeboat after a 3-hour pull through the fog.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Everlast tow Departs

    10/12
    The tug Everlast and barge Norman McLeod departed the Iroquois Lock under tow Saturday about 10:35 a.m. The tug and barge were towed by the tugs Carrol C and Bonny B. The tow's departure was delayed by fog in the area.

    The tow is expected to go to Port Weller where repairs will be completed. The Carrol C and Bonny B. are expected to continue upbound with the barge for Windsor, Ontario.

    Arrival time at Port Weller is estimated for early Monday morning. The actual time will depend on the weather conditions, fog or heavy weather on Lake Ontario could force them to stop.

    A replacement tug for the Everlast hasn't been chosen but it will be a tug owned by Mc Keil. It is unknown how long it will take to repair the damaged areas of the Everlast's engine room.

    Pictures by Capt. Maurice Fodey
    A few wisps of heavy overnight fog remain, delaying tow for 4 hours
    As soon as the Pineglen is clear, the Carrol C, and the Bonnie B spring into action
    Assisted by the McCloud's bow thruster, the tow is worked away from the wall
    Lining up for upbound lockage
    Carrol C doing the pulling
    Bonnie B on the stern
    Tow leaving Iroquois Lock upbound
    Carrol C working up to speed
    Tow meets Downbound Virginiaborg above lock
    Upbound
    Tow passed McNair Island that afternoon
    Passing 2 miles up the Brockville Narrows

    Reported by: Kent Malo


    Hollyhock Delivery

    10/12
    On Wednesday the U.S. Coast Guard will officially accept the Coast Guard Cutter Hollyhock. The cutter was launched into the Menominee River at Marinette Marine Corporation on January 25, 2003 and has since been undergoing outfitting and sea trials. This date marks the first day the ship's crew will take responsibility for the cutter and the cutter will be placed into a temporary “In-Commission Special” status. Hollyhock will be first cutter, built under this contract, to remain in the Great Lakes. The cutter's official commissioning will take place at her homeport of Port Huron, Michigan.

    Coast Guard Cutter Hollyhock is the fourteenth Juniper Class Seagoing Buoy Tender and the ninth “B Class” cutter built by Marinette Marine Corporation. Currently the Coast Guard has contracted for eleven “B Class” cutters. The “B Class” cutters will join the five “A Class” cutters built by Marinette Marine that are operating worldwide.

    Hollyhock’s primary missions are Aids to Navigation, Marine Environmental Protection, Search and Rescue, and Domestic Ice Breaking. The principal characteristics of Hollyhock are: Length: 225 ft, Beam: 46 ft, Draft: 13 ft, and Displacement: 2,000 Long Tons. The major equipment aboard Hollyhock will be 2 Caterpillar 3608, 3100 Brake Horse Power Engines for propulsion which will power a single shaft, Bird Johnson Controllable Pitch Propeller; a Bow and Stern thruster, which provide 460 and 550 Horsepower respectively; in addition to one 20 Ton Hydraulic 60 foot telescoping beam Appleton Crane. Power generation is to be provided by 2 Caterpillar 3508, 450 kilowatts generators.

    Wednesday’s ceremony will commence at approximately 11 AM onboard the cutter. Marty Lakes, Vice President and General Manager of Marinette Marine Corporation will present the cutter to Captain Richard A. “Mac” McCullough, Commanding Officer of the Project Resident Office who will receive the cutter on behalf of the Coast Guard. The responsibility of the cutter is then transferred to the Commanding Officer of Hollyhock, Lieutenant Commander Mike McBrady, along with the crew of 8 officers and 42 enlisted who become the “plankowners” of the new vessel.

    Reported by: Andy Severson


    Grain Rush Starts in Buffalo

    10/12
    The Herbert C Jackson was unloading at the ADM Standard Elevator on the Buffalo River Saturday morning. The Joseph H Frantz is expected to arrive early this week to unload at the General Mills Frontier Elevator on the City Ship Canal.

    Reported by: Brian Wroblewski


    Saginaw River News

    10/12
    The barge Great Lakes Trader & tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort were outbound from the Saginaw Rock Products dock Saturday afternoon after unloading. The pair were upbound early in the morning after lightering overnight at the Sargent Dock in Essexville. The Joyce L. Van Enkevort detached from the Trader while in Saginaw to get fuel downriver at the Burroughs Dock.

    The Alpena was also outbound late in the afternoon after unloading overnight at the Lafarge Terminal in Carrollton. She had arrived at the dock on Friday.

    Great Lakes Trader - Joyce L. Van Enkevort downbound at the old Bay Aggregates Dock
    Stern view
    Alpena downbound at Consumers Energy

    Reported by: Todd Shorkey


    Marquette Update

    10/12
    The Paul R. Tregurtha brought a load of coal to Marquette's WE Presque Isle plant on Saturday and continued unloading on a windy night. The Lee A. Tregurtha joined her fleet mate at the dock to take on a load of taconite. The Calumet will bring a load of coke breeze early Sunday morning, then take on a load of taconite.

    Wide view of Paul R. Tregurtha at dock unloading coal.
    Stern view of the Tregurtha at night.
    Bow view of Lee A. Tregurtha loading ore on a windy night.
    Wide view of Lee A. Tregurtha at dock.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe


    Toledo Update

    10/12
    The Algosteel was at Andersons "E" Elevator loading grain which will be bound for Sarnia, Ontario. The Canadian Enterprise and Catherine Desgagnes were due into the CSX Coal Docks Saturday afternoon to load coal. The small carferry South Bass was at Toledo Shipyard for repairs.

    The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will be the Saginaw on Sunday, followed by the Algosoo and Adam E. Cornelius on Monday. The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the Atlantic Huron on Oct. 20

    Future vessel arrivals due at Toledo during the next several days will be the Peter R. Creswell, and Algosoo due at the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock to unload stone. The Algoville will be arriving at one of the grain Elevators to load grain.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman


    Erie Report

    10/12
    The Middletown paid another visit to Erie on Saturday morning, arriving at 8 a.m. and proceeding slowly inbound to the Mounfort Terminal. An hour later the vessel tied up at the Mounfort Terminal to unload stone from Calcite.

    The Middletown no sooner approached the Mounfort Terminal then the J.S. St. John departed Erie to dredge sand. With construction of a 100 foot reinforced section of the North Pier now complete, the St. John unloads sand there. This sand is for beach replenishment at Presque Isle State Park, and will cut down on truck traffic through town as the trucks hauled sand from Erie Sand & Gravel to the park.

    Middletown departed Erie at 5:30 p.m., exchanging salutes with the St. John as it passed. Immediately after the Middletown passed by, the St. John departed the North Pier outbound. The St. John only got as far as buoys 1 and 2 before turning around and heading inbound for unknown reasons. The St. John then departed again an hour later.

    Middletown inbound.
    Departing.
    Close up of the name board and battle stripes.
    Passing the St. John.
    Passing the lighthouse.
    J.S.St. John tied up at the North Pier.

    Reported by: Jeff Thoreson


    Hamilton News

    10/12
    Saturday a heavy blanket of fog covered Lake Ontario. The James Norris called the Burlington Lift Bridge at approximately 10 a.m. and decided to proceed into Hamilton Harbor. At 12:40 p.m. she was finally tied up at Pier 25.

    The Canadian Leader departed Hamilton at 2 p.m. The Quebecois, who was anchored in the Burlington Bay anchorage, finally lifted her anchor and proceeded in after the Leader had passed through the canal. The Regina Oldendorff was also anchored outside the Burlington Piers and ventured in after the Quebecois had gone through. The tug Lac Como waited to assist her docking at Pier 23.

    The tug Salvor and barge McCleary's Spirit arrived at 4:30 pm and passed through the ship canal. All ships entering and departing Saturday asked the Bridge master for assurances that the lift bridge was fully raised as the could not see the green light on the bridge span.

    Reported by: Eric Holmes


    Oswego Report

    10/12
    Friday was a busy day at Oswego, New York. The tug Ohio arrived and docked in port to wait for an unnamed tug and Hollister Co. barge loaded with a large turbine to be brought in tandem to Toledo, OH. The tow was set to sail for the Welland Canal early on Saturday morning.

    The tug Apalachee came in through the breakwall on Friday, she was returning from the Nine Mile 2 Nuclear Power Plant removing zebra mussels. On the West side of the harbor the LT-5 :The Nash" US Army Tug, the last surviving vessel from the Normandy Invasion, was still open for tours and tied up at her pier. The small tug Donald Sea was without her usual small bar accompaniment. Perhaps waiting for the chance to assist one of the last salties bring Aluminum or steel coils into the Port Authority Terminal.

    The Capt Alix (Oswego, NY) was lashed to her small barge, and tied to the pier directly behind the Apalachee. The USGS R/V Kaho was visible at her berth just behind the Station Oswego USCG Station, in from research.

    Also on Friday the USCG patrol boat number 47462 came out of her berth and departed on her daily patrol around the harbor and headed out into Lake Ontario eastbound to patrol the waters off the nuclear plant.

    Tug Ohio
    Close up of stack
    Stern view
    Pilothouse of the tug Ohio
    Dry Hopper Rail cars waiting to be loaded with rock salt for delivery to inland areas from Oswego
    The fire tug (Ret.) Apalachee in Oswego, NY - now privately owned.
    USCG Patrol Vessel number 47462on patrol, note the small inflatable SAR boat at dock in background.
    Small tug Donald Sea
    Harbor tug Capt. Alix for Oswego Harbor, lashed to an unnamed barge.
    USGS R/V Kaho - research vessel for Lake Ontario
    US Army Tug LT-5 (The Nash).
    Historical markers on the vessel LT-5 - showing history and National Registry of Historical Places.
    Fishing tug Eleanor - D.

    Reported by: Tom Moriarty


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 12

    The JEAN PARISIEN suffered considerable bottom damage when she ran aground near Comfort Island about a mile west of Alexandria Bay, NY. She was released October 12, 1981 and returned to service after repairs were completed at the Vickers Montreal yard.

    The CLIFF S VICTORY was sold October 12, 1985 to Hai International Corp. of New York for scrapping in the orient and transferred to Panamanian registry. Her name was changed to c) SAVIC, utilizing the "S" from CLIFFS, the "VIC" from VICTORY and inserting an "A". All the other letters were painted out.

    The JOHN A. KLING sailed on her maiden voyage October 12, 1922 light from Manitowoc to load stone at Rockport, MI.

    The Keel was laid October 12, 1925 for the COLONEL JAMES PICKANDS.

    The SYLVANIA returned to service on October 12, 1967. She sank at the Peerless Cement Co. dock at Port Huron, MI in June of that year after being struck by the Canada Steamship Lines package freight steamer RENVOYLE.

    The tug EDNA G. remained at Two Harbors until October 12, 1993 when she was towed to the Fraser Shipyard at Superior, WI by the GLT tug KANSAS. She is now on display as a floating exhibit for the city.

    On October 12, 1967, the Canadian Leader entered service as the last new steam-powered vessel on the Great Lakes. The vessel, originally named Feux Follets by her first owners, Papachristidis Company Limited, was given her present name when it was sold to Upper Lakes Shipping in 1972.

    At 3:00 a.m., 12 October 1870, the 76 ton tug ONTARIO caught fire and burned to the waterline while lying at Harrow's dock in Algonac, MI.

    On 12 October 1901, ALVINA (wooden schooner-rigged scow-barge, 89’, 95 GT, built in 1871 at Fair Haven, MI) was being towed by the steamer WESTON and had a load of 700 barrels of lubricating oil. They were bound from Cleveland for Manistique. The ALVINA was overwhelmed in a storm and sank near Thunder Bay Island in Lake Huron. Her entire crew made it to shore in her yawl. Her cargo was salvaged five days later.

    On 12 October 1880, TRADER (wooden propeller, 115', 169 gt, built in 1865 at Marine City, MI) was carrying lumber in a storm on Lake Michigan. She was battered severely and became waterlogged. Her crew abandoned her with water up to her decks. They were saved by the schooner GUIDE in a daring rescue. A few days later, in the "Alpena Storm", her wreckage washed ashore near Holland, Michigan and she was erroneously reported as another "all-hands" victim of that storm.

    On 12 October 1874, on her maiden voyage, the tug MARY passed Port Huron down bound with the bark FAVORITE in tow. The tug was owned by William Hardison of Port Huron.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Everlast Tow to Depart Saturday Morning

    10/11
    The tug Everlast and barge Norman McLeod are expected to depart the Iroquois Lock Saturday about 6 a.m. The pair will leave under tow of the tugs Carrol C and Bonny B.

    The tow is expected to go to Port Weller where repairs will be completed. The Carrol C and Bonny B. are expected to continue upbound with the barge for Windsor, Ontario.

    A replacement tug for the Everlast hasn't been chosen but it will be a tug owned by Mc Keil. It is unknown how long it will take to repair the damaged areas of the Everlast's engine room.

    Reported by: Kent Malo


    Back to Back Trips for the Shannon

    10/11
    Gaelic Tugboat Company's tug Shannon has been assigned the outside towing work formerly designated to the tug Roger Stahl.

    The Shannon arrived in Detroit early Friday morning from White Lake with two construction barges for the Faust Corporation, a lakes wide marine construction and dredging company. The tug was quickly resupplied and fueled, and promptly headed back to Muskegon to pick up two more barges for Faust to be delivered to Detroit.

    The tug is under the command of Captain John Wellington, with Gaelic fleet engineer Jim Storen supervising the operation of the tug's 2,000 hp Caterpillar power plant. Photos are being taken by other crew members which will be posted upon the return of the tug to Detroit.

    Reported by: Bill Hoey


    Minnesota lawmakers eye shipments through Taconite Harbor

    10/11
    Two Minnesota lawmakers are working on a plan to reopen the shiploading facility at Taconite Harbor to cut pellet transportation costs for a reopened EVTAC as well as Hibbing Taconite or other Iron Range mines, the Duluth News Tribune reported.

    Under the plan, EVTAC and Hibbing Taconite pellets would be transported to the former LTV Steel Mining Co. loading facility at Taconite Harbor. The Duluth Missabe & Iron Range Railway would haul the pellets to tracks near the former LTV Steel Mining Co. plant at Hoyt Lakes before being transferred by rail to Taconite Harbor. Industry analysts say the Taconite Harbor dock is the most efficient taconite pellet loading facility on Lake Superior and because of its location, reduces ship costs.

    About six miles of new track and a new loading facility would be needed at Hibbing Taconite, said Rep. David Dill, DFL-Crane Lake, one of the legislators promoting the plan.

    Hibbing Taconite's pellets currently are shipped over the BNSF to its loading dock in Superior, Wis. Hibbing Taconite and National Steel Pellet Co. are the only mines using the BNSF dock.

    "It would create tremendous cost savings and create from 30 to 50 new jobs in Cook and Lake counties," Dill said. "We've all been pitching different angles to get EVTAC reopened, and now it appears there's some life. I'm hoping that the rail connection is a way of making EVTAC and other plants more efficient."

    Officials announced earlier this week that the EVTAC mine and processing plant might be purchased by a Chinese steel company and Cleveland-Cliffs. One question that hasn't been addressed is how EVTAC pellets would be shipped to China. The News Tribune reported that under one possible plan pellets from the Cliffs-managed Wabush Mine in Newfoundland would end up in China in a trade for EVTAC pellets that would be shipped to other Cliffs customers.

    Reported by: Steve Smith


    Calumet Visits the Soo

    10/11
    The classic laker Calumet paid a rare visit to the Algoma Steel Plant on Friday. The Calumet arrived Friday morning with a cargo of coal from Toledo, Ohio. Friday evening they had switched over to the Export Dock to load Petroleum coke for Marquette, MI.

    This is believed to be the Calumet's first trip to Marquette under her new name. Also at Algoma Steel, the saltie Rega shifted from the Export Dock to the Commercial Dock Friday afternoon with the assistance of the tugs Ivan Purvis and Adanac.

    Calumet unloading at Algoma Steel
    Close up
    Close up of bow and deckhouse
    Unloading coal into the hopper (Note: end of boom that was replaced after accident at Marblehead this summer)
    Rega unloading at the Commercial Dock
    Stern view
    Rega and Calumet at Algoma
    Tug Adanac docked at Algoma Steel
    Rochelle Kaye overseeing work on the West Center Pier above the locks.
    Tug Ivan Purvis downbound above the Mac Lock Rochelle.
    Diver emerges from the water at the construction site.

    Reported by: Scott Best


    EPA searches Lake Michigan for new pollutants

    10/11
    In its final trip of 2003, the Environmental Protection Agency research vessel Lake Guardian is taking scientists out on Lake Michigan to sample lake water in their hunt for a new class of chemical pollutants.

    Known as "emerging contaminants," the toxins appear to be steadily spreading through the environment and winding their way up the food chain. The current study is one of many trying to determine how these chemicals spread and how dangerous they are.

    The emerging chemicals include PBDEs, or polybrominated diphenyl ethers, which are used as flame retardants in everything from chair cushions to computer plastics. Their use is so ubiquitous, the EPA has found, that levels of PBDEs in humans, wildlife and the environment have been doubling every four to five years.

    Europe and California have banned some fire retardants with the chemical starting in 2004 and 2008 respectively. Unregulated in the United States, PBDEs accumulate in body fat much like their chemical cousins PCBs.

    With sampling done in four areas down the length of Lake Michigan, the $100,000 pilot study is the first of its kind in the Great Lakes seeking to learn how many emerging contaminants have made their way into lake waters and how they got there.

    Scientists are watching the levels of emerging contaminants make an alarming rise, even as levels are dropping for the "legacy chemicals" such as DDT and PCBs -- which persist in the environment although their use was banned decades ago.

    The long-term health effects of the emerging pollutants are not known, even though a majority of Americans are estimated to have trace amounts of the chemicals in their blood. No one is sure how they get in the food chain and certainly nobody knows how to get rid of them.

    Scientists are more befuddled by two other related chemicals--PFOS and PFOA--used in the manufacture of a range of products from Teflon to microwave popcorn bags.

    Results from the EPA water study will not be complete for months. But emerging contaminants already have been detected in Lake Michigan's lake trout, coho salmon and chinook salmon in a three-year analysis of top predators in all five Great Lakes. Emerging contaminants were found in fish from every lake, from healthy Superior to struggling Erie.

    Reported by: Dan French


    Marquette Update

    10/11
    The Michipicoten took a load of taconite in Marquette on Friday, and will make a quick return on Saturday. Saturday will also see the Paul R. Tregurtha with coal, the Lee A. Tregurtha for ore, and a rare trip from the Calumet.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe


    St. Clair River Traffic

    10/11
    Wednesday was a wonderful Indian Summer day on the St. Clair River.

    Mesabi Miner up-bound at Marine City, passing Fawn Island.
    Pineglen and Coast Guard down-bound, meeting Mesabi Miner near the St. Clair DTE
    Highlander Sea, at berth South of Port Huron
    Decommissioned Bramble berthed South of Port Huron, her replacement, the Hollyhock has still not made her appearance.
    Saltie, Persenk at Sarnia
    CCG Gull Island upbound near Marysville

    Reported by: Tom Welles


    Aerial Views

    10/11
    Pilot and photographer Don Coles was flying over Northern Michigan and sent in the pictures below. All photographs are available for purchase. Don's company, Great Lakes Aerial Photos, is available for hire for any aerial photography need.

    Walter J. McCarthy Jr. on the St. Marys River.
    Another view.
    Wilfred Sykes back from Rogers City while the Fred R. White Jr. loads.
    Fred R. White loading.
    Algorail unloading salt in Alpena.
    Another view.
    Close up.
    Another view.
    American Republic loading in Stoneport.




    Shipping Videos Online

    10/11
    To test conditions in a real world Webcast the Great Lakes Maritime Institute will run a webcast from the Dossin Museum today. They will be showing shipping related videos online. The videos range from old 16mm films of ships long gone to current day subjects. Please visit www.glmi.org/webcast/ for more details.

    Upcoming programs at the Dossin Museum include:
    Silent Auction & Entertainment meeting on November 8 - Silent auction of Great Lakes memorabilia including artwork, two portholes from the S.S. South American, and other unique items. The highlight will be two bottles of ninety year old scotch which were recovered from the shipwreck of the S.S. Regina on Lake Huron . This 90th Anniversary of the Storm of 1913 will include these unique artifacts that originally were carried by the Regina past the Dossin Museum on the Detroit River to Lake Huron where they were lost with the crewmembers. Bids will be taken online and the event will be Webcast in real time.

    Lee Murdock on concert November 9. - Come to the museum and enjoy the Great Lakes balladeer live

    November 10 a memorial service for the Edmund Fitzgerald - Held at the anchor of the "Fitz" in the yard of the Dossin Museum. This program will be webcast live from the museum grounds. Lamp lighting ceremony followed by a talk from Capt. Don Erickson who searched for the Fitzgerald on Lake Superior the night of the loss. This outside ceremony will mark the 29th Anniversary of the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald on Lake Superior at approx. 7:00 pm November 10, 1975.
    *Due to reduced hours at the museum this program will only be available online through the webcast, the museum is only open weekends due to budget cuts.

    Visit www.glmi.org for more details


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 11

    The BAIE COMEAU II cleared Sorel October 11, 1983 as c) AGIA TRIAS, Panamanian registry #1355. Her Canadian registry was closed on October 12, 1983. Her mission was to carry grain from New Orleans, La. to Mexican and Caribbean Island ports and sailed at least into the 1987 season. Subsequently she was renamed d) OCEAN VIEW, e) SEA DIAMOND, f) GOLDEN CREST and g) ATLANTIC WOOD in 1991 for Nexus Maritime Co. S.A., St. Vincent. Disposition unknown.

    The MERCURY (2) scraped the South Grand Island Bridge in the Niagara River in heavy fog on October 11, 1974. Her forward mast snapped off, the midship mast was tilted and her smoke stack was toppled. She proceeded after the mishap to G&W Welding at Cleveland under her own power for repairs.

    WHEAT KING, under tow arrived at Chittagong, Bangladesh on October 11, 1989 to be broken up.

    In 1911 the Chief Wawatam arrived at St. Ignace and began service shortly thereafter.

    On 11 October 1913, THOMAS H. CAHOON (3 mast wooden schooner-barge, 166’, 431 GT, built in 1881 at E. Saginaw) was carrying lumber in tow of the steamer C. W. CHAMBERLAIN. They were bound from Sault Ste. Marie to Byng Inlet. However during a storm, the CAHOON stranded and went to pieces on “Kenny Shoal” by the southwest corner of Innes Island in Georgian Bay. No lives were lost.

    On 11 October 1839, DEWITT CLINTON (wooden passenger/package freight side-wheeler, 147', 413 t, built in 1836 at Huron, Ohio) foundered off Milwaukee with the loss of 5 lives. She was recovered the following year and lasted until 1851. She and her near-twin ROBERT FULTON were reportedly the first Lake steamers built primarily as freighters with relatively few passenger accommodations.

    On 11 October 1866, GREAT WEST (wooden 3-mast bark, 175', 765t, built in 1854 at Buffalo, NY) was carrying wheat in a storm on Lake Michigan when she stranded on Racine Reef. She was reported to be a total loss but she may have been recovered and then lost near Chicago in 1876. When launched, she was the largest sailing vessel on the Lakes and much was made of her beautiful lines. She was diagonally braced with iron. She stood 174 feet tall from her deck to her masthead. So if she were sailing today, although she'd be able to sail under the Mackinac Bridge, she'd be stopped at the Blue Water Bridge whose roadway is only 152 feet above the water.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Everlast Repairs

    10/10
    The tug Everlast and the barge Norman McLeod will be taken to Hamilton under tow of a McKeil tug after the Everlast suffered an engine room fire Wednesday. Once in Hamilton the tug Everlast will be dropped off for repairs and the McKeil tug will then continue with the barge Norman McLeod to Detroit to load for Valleyfield, Quebec.

    Reported by: Kent Malo


    Columbia Downbound

    10/10
    The dredge Columbia has finished her work in Toledo and is departing the Seaway system for the Atlantic. On Thursday she was downbound in the Welland Canal.

    Columbia approaches Lock 2 downbound.
    Close-up of bow.
    Close-up of accommodation block.
    Stern view. She is making Lock 2, "on the fly." Usually ships, "slide the wall" but there was no wind and she appeared to be a maneuverable vessel.
    Entering the lock with full reverse. Notice the exhaust and prop wash. Looks like she is twin screw.

    Reported by: David Bull


    Algomarine Delivers

    10/10
    Early Thursday morning the Algomarine arrived at the Carbide Dock in Sault Ste Marie, MI to unload the second load of salt for that dock this year. The first load was delivered by the Canadian Transport almost two weeks ago. On Friday morning the Calumet is due to make a rare trip to the Algoma Steel Plant with a load of coal.

    Pictures by Scott Best
    Stern view unloading salt at Carbide Dock.
    Algomarine, Algowood and upbound Montrealais.
    Tug Missouri departing her dock to assist a salty.
    Michipicoten near Big Point with bow of Quedoc visible.
    Mesabi Miner upbound at Mission Pt.
    Entering Soo Harbor.
    Atlantic Huron departing the Poe Lock downbound.
    Atlantic Huron passing Mesabi Miner
    close up of the sterns passing in Soo Harbor

    Pictures taken Monday by Ed Schipper
    Quedoc scrapping bow
    Stern view
    Dry-dock being flooded for Avenger IV.

    Reported by: Scott Best


    Ohio Passes Through

    10/10
    The big tug Ohio was downbound in the Welland Canal Thursday. Based in Cleveland, the tug was heading for Oswego, NY.

    Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt


    Twin Ports Report

    10/10
    Edwin H. Gott departed the shipyard in Sturgeon Bay, Wis., early on Oct. 9 after undergoing repairs for a collapsed bulkhead in a ballast tank. The vessel is scheduled to arrive in Duluth on Oct. 11 to load pellets at the DMIR ore dock.

    After sitting at the Cenex Harvest States elevator for two days, the Joseph H. Frantz shifted to the terminal's other side Thursday to load. Elsewhere in port, Algocape was unloading at St. Lawrence Cement and Joseph H. Thompson was unloading salt at the Cutler Magner dock in Duluth.

    Midwest Energy Terminal was expecting a busy day, with Indiana Harbor, Paul R. Tregurtha and Walter J. McCarthy Jr. all scheduled to arrive.

    Reported by: Al Miller


    Alpena Update

    10/10
    Thursday was an active day in port with three vessels calling at Lafarge.

    The Paul H. Townsend arrived early Thursday morning to take on cement. It departed by 9 a.m. and is headed for Muskegon. The Jacklyn M barge Integrity came in about 4 p.m. to load cargo for Detroit.

    Once the Integrity left the Steamer Alpena pulled up to the silos before 10 p.m. to load for Saginaw.

    On Wednesday morning the Algorail delivered salt to the Alpena Oil Dock. It added to the already large pile that is being loaded onto semi- trucks to be hauled away to different areas. The Algorail departed by 2 p.m. and carefully backed out of the river.

    Algorail.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain


    Saginaw River News

    10/10
    The barge McKee Sons and tug Invincible were unloading at the Saginaw Wirt Dock early Wednesday morning. The pair were outbound during the afternoon. The barge Great Lakes Trader and tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort lightered at the Bay City Wirt Dock Wednesday afternoon before moving upriver to Saginaw to finish her unload. The pair were outbound early Thursday morning.

    The barge Pere Marquette 41 and tug Undaunted were inbound very early Thursday morning bound for the Bay Aggregates Dock. The pair unloaded through the day and were outbound early in the evening.

    Also outbound on Thursday was the tug Rebecca Lynn and her tank barge. The pair unloaded at the Bit Mat Dock after arriving there early Thursday morning. They were outbound during the afternoon.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


    Hamilton Report

    10/10
    Thursday afternoon, five salties, one laker and one tanker were in Hamilton Harbor.

    The Regina Oldendorff was at anchor in the harbor. The Olympic Merit was moored at Pier 23 while the Canadian Navigator was docked at Dofasco's coal dock having just unloaded.

    At Pier 14 the Lake Ontario was unloading steel coils. The Capt. Ralph Tucker was moored on the north face of Pier 14 at Heddles. The Goviken was docked on the north face of Pier 12 and the Doxa D docked on the north face of Pier 8.

    Reported by: Patricia Burgon


    Windsor to Goderich Views

    10/10
    The following images were taken during the period of September 25th to October 9th.
    September 25th.
    Federal Weser discharging Urea at the Cargill Elevator in Sarnia.

    September 27th.
    Bluewing passing Red Wing City.
    Canadian Forest funnel markings.
    Kaye E. Barker downbound in the St. Clair cut-off Channel.
    Kaye E. Barker is loaded and headed for Rouge Steel in the Rouge River.
    Pilot’s view of the St. Clair River approaching Stokes Point. Rebecca Lynn can be seen turning downbound out of the anchorage.
    AAA Steamer Reserve downbound in the upper St. Clair River.
    Bluewing in ballast in the Huron Cut bound for Thunder Bay.
    Heading back to the pilot station as seen from the speedy pilot boat Huron Belle.

    October 1st.
    Gordon C. Leitch loading in Goderich.
    Gordon C. Leitch’s unique looking forward accommodation.
    Close up.
    Shelter Bay now hosts tourists as a marine museum in the summer months.
    Teakglen and Willowglen in use as storage barges.

    October 2nd.
    Early morning light on Le Levant in the St. Clair Cut-Off Channel.
    Turning off Detroit headed for Dieppe Park in Windsor, Ontario.
    Le Levant at Dieppe Park while passengers enjoy a day excursion ashore.
    Riverside Park in Windsor is a great place for a stroll and watch ships pass by.
    Pineglen passing by downtown Detroit.

    October 3rd.
    Fred R. White Jr. downbound on Lake St. Clair.
    Passing by Federal Kumano’s bridge wing.
    Heading for Lake Erie.
    Looking forward on the seven month old ship.
    Federal Kumano’s bridge deck.
    Meeting fleetmate Federal Ems in the St. Clair Cut-Off Channel.
    About to head across Lake St. Clair.
    Saginaw downbound in the St. Clair River adjacent to Algonac, Michigan.
    Federal Weser (sister to Federal Ems) in Sarnia. Discharging is now almost complete and will soon be ready to sail for Duluth.

    October 4th.
    The smaller Bulgarian vessel Persenk (POR Valletta) has taken Federal Weser’s place at the elevator and will also discharge fertilizer from Sagunto, Spain.

    October 5th.
    Persenk discharging at the Cargill Elevator in Sarnia.
    Barge McAllister 132 about to depart the government dock in Sarnia.
    Tug W.N. Twolan positioning herself ahead of the barge to connect the towline.
    The captain looking on.
    Towline connected.
    With a gentle strain on the towline the tug and barge start to move forward.
    Next port – Thunder Bay for more lumber.
    Pilot’s guest Barry Hiscocks looking over the Lake St. Clair chart while transiting the lake aboard the Dutch flagged vessel Kwintebank.

    October 6th.
    Heading up the St. Clair River bound for the town of Little Current on Manitoulin Island. A beautiful Indian summer sunset off Algonac, Michigan aboard the French passenger ship Le Levant.
    Pilot’s dinner is served on the bridge. The libation in the wine glass is in fact only water. Positively no drinking and sailing!

    October 7th.
    A partial view of the port of Goderich, Ontario on the shores of Lake Huron. The Sifto salt mine and dock can be seen in this view. The grain elevators are just visible on the right edge of the image.
    Goderich Harbour lighthouse.
    CCGS Cape Hurd alongside the SAR station in Goderich. Mac Donald Marine tugs Dover and Debbie Lyn can be seen secured at their berth in the background.
    The former Mc Allister Towing tug Cathy Mc Allister.
    Salvage Monarch also formerly owned by Mc Allister Towing of Montreal. Salvage Monarch towed many lakers for scrap in the 70’s and 80’s.
    Close up.
    Historical plaque of “The Great Storm of 1913”.
    Memorial at the Maitland Cemetery to the unidentified seaman whose bodies were recovered off the shores of Lake Huron in the aftermath of this horrific three day storm.
    It is hard to imagine the tragedy that occurred off these tranquil shores of Lake Huron 90 years ago. Debris, wreckage and bodies were found strewn along these shores of Huron County.

    October 8th.
    After shifting from the Cargill Elevator the Persenk is at the Government Dock in Sarnia to allow the CSL Laurentien to load at the elevator.
    Once safely secured alongside it’s time to give retired trucker and “road pilot” Barry Hiscocks a few lessons on how to become a river pilot.
    Persenk’s communication equipment.
    Looking aft from the forecastle.

    October 9th.
    CSL Laurentien loading cargo in Sarnia.
    Persenk alongside the Government Dock.
    Heavy duty mooring lines.

    Reported by: Capt. Alain M. Gindroz


    World's Second Largest Ship Scrapping

    10/10
    The world's second largest vessel arrived for scrapping at Gadani Beach, Pakistan in September.

    Sea Giant was built in 1979 at Chantiers de l'Atlantique in St. Nazaire, France as Hull No. H26 and started her career as PRAIRIAL. After several changes in ownership, the tanker was sold in 1997 to Lamar Navigation Ltd. and renamed Sea Giant.

    Sea Giant's dimensions are 1,359' x 206'10". Her draft is 93'10" with a molded depth of 117'10". She has a GRT of 261,862, a NRT of 214,248 and a DWT of 555,051. Compare these tonnages to that of the lakes largest vessel Paul R. Tregurtha which is 36,360, 32,580 and 69,172.

    Beached for scrapping.

    Reported by: Tom Stewart


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 10

    While downbound with coal in the St. Lawrence River on October 10,1981, the JEAN PARISIEN suffered considerable bottom damage when she ran aground near Comfort Island about a mile west of Alexandria Bay, NY.

    The BROOKDALE (2) was towed out of Toronto on October 10, 1980 by the tug GLENADA, assisted by the tug TERRY S. She was one her way to the cutters torch.

    The CHAMPLAIN (3), with her former fleet mate CADILLAC (4) was towed past Gibraltar October 10, 1987 heading for Aliaga, Turkey for dismantling by Cukurova Celik Endustrisi A.S.

    The SAVIC (CLIFFS VICTORY) cleared New York on October 10, 1986.

    The HULL NO.1, ex KINSMAN ENTERPRISE(1), being towed by the Polish tug JANTAR arrived in Aliaga, Turkey on October 10, 1989 to be scrapped there.

    October 10, 1906 - The PERE MARQUETTE 5 was sold to The Barry Transportation Co. for $75,000. The PERE MARQUETTE 5 was the last of the "break-bulk" boats operated by the Pere Marquette Railway Co.

    On 10 October 1905, CHARLES H. BURTON (3 mast wooden schooner, 158’, 514 GT, built in 1873 at Bangor, MI) was carrying coal in a storm in Lake Erie when she was driven ashore 4 1/2 miles east of Barcelona, NY and broke up. No lives were lost. She had been built on the hull of the bark GLENBULAH that had burned in the Chicago fire of 1871.

    On 10 October 1877, ELIZA R. TURNER (wooden schooner, 156', 409 gt, built in 1867 at Trenton, MI) was carrying wheat from Detroit to Buffalo when a storm drove her aground nine miles west of Long Point on Lake Erie where she was wrecked. The skipper and cook drowned, but the remaining 8 were saved.

    The tug CRUSADER of Oswego burned and sank in the middle of the Straits of Mackinac about 9:00 PM on 10 October 1878.

    On 10 October 1877, ABEONA (wooden scow-schooner, 100t, built in 1863 at Lambert, Ontario) was carrying lumber and shingles down bound on Lake Huron when she stranded during a storm one mile west of Port Austin where she reportedly later broke up.

    In 1877, PORTLAND (2-mast wooden schooner, 118', 250 t, built in 1847 at Pillar Point, NY) stranded and went to pieces north of False Presque Isle on Lake Huron. Salvage attempts only retrieved her anchor and chain.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Everlast Docked after Engine Room Fire

    10/09
    The tug Everlast anchored in the navigation channel below the Iroquois Lock on Tuesday morning after fire broke out in its engine room. Navigation through the channel was suspended as the tug Robinson Bay was en route to move the Everlast out of the channel.

    About noon on Wednesday the Robinson Bay and Everlast / Norman McCloud arrived below the Iroquois Lock, tying up at the lower emergency tie wall. Once secured the Robby Bay departed for Eisenhower Lock.

    Preliminary reports said a fuel line burst but the fire is now blamed on electrical wiring in the engine control system. At the time of the fire the tug was approaching the lock. Crew members reportedly were on deck when the fire broke out so no one was injured. The captain activated the carbon dioxide fire extinguisher to douse the flames. Repairs are expected to take several days.

    Everlast and Robinson Bay approaching lower emergency tie wall at Iroquois Lock
    Another view
    Everlast and Robinson Bay
    Another job well done, Robinson Bay departs for Eisenhower Lock
    Another view
    No apparent damage, however wiring for main engines was burned

    Reported by: Kent Malo


    Proposed power plant could bring more vessel traffic to Manistee

    10/09
    Tondu Corp. is working to build a power plant in Manistee, Mich., that would burn coal shipped by lake freighter from Chicago.

    Plans call for construction of a 425-megawatt generating facility on a 50-acre site on Manistee Lake. The site was home to salt manufacturing plants for many years but has been idle since December 2002.

    The proposed plant would burn about 1.8 million tons of low-sulfur coal a year. The coal would be shipped by rail from mines in Wyoming to Chicago, then transported by boat to Manistee.

    To reach Manistee Lake, freighters must slowly negotiate the Manistee River, which includes a sharp bend, two highway drawbridges and a narrow railroad swing bridge. The obstacles limit the size of vessels that can use the port.

    Reported by: Chris Franckowiak


    EVTAC may be sold to Cliffs, Chinese steelmaker

    10/09
    EVTAC Mining, a Minnesota taconite producer that's been shut down since May, might be sold to Cleveland-Cliffs and the Laiwu Steel Group of China, Twin Ports news media reported Wednesday.

    Cliffs and Laiwu reportedly signed letters of intent to purchase the mine and processing plant located near Eveleth.

    A Cliffs spokesman cautioned that all "stakeholders" in EVTAC must cooperate for the proposed sale to succeed.

    EVTAC closed last May after its owners turned elsewhere to buy pellets and the plant was unable to find new customers.

    EVTAC had shipped most of its pellets through the DMIR ore dock in Duluth. There was no word Wednesday on whether sale of the plant would result in lake shipments resuming, or if the pellets would be shipped westward by rail to China.

    Reported by: Roger Weaver


    Fuel cleanup completed

    10/09
    Workers have collected what appears to be most of the fuel oil that washed ashore on Lake Superior's Keweenaw Peninsula after being spilled last week from the Presque Isle.

    The Presque Isle was transferring fuel on board early Sept. 30 when about 1,300 gallons spilled onto the deck. Initial reports indicated the fuel remained on board the vessel, but further investigation showed much of it went overboard into Lake Superior.

    Cleanup of the spilled fuel was completed last weekend along a beach about four miles south of the Portage Lake Shipping Canal's North Entry on the Keweenaw Peninsula.

    Lt. Cmdr. Mark Ledbetter of the U.S. Coast Guard's Marine Safety Office in Duluth said cool weather aided the recovery of about 800 gallons of dime-sized "tar balls" that washed ashore from a fuel oil spill aboard the 1,000-foot tug-barge Presque Isle.

    Cold water helped keep the oil from remaining liquid, the Coast Guard said. About 20 55-gallon drums worth of oil, sand and debris were recovered, amounting to about 800 gallons of oil.

    Reported by: Steve Cunningham


    Keewatin Returns to Wallaceburg

    10/09
    The Husky Marine tug Keewatin and barge Sand Merchant arrived in Wallaceburg, late Wednesday, Oct. 8 to offload a second cargo of gravel at the Southwestern Sales Dock. According to the company salesperson, Southwestern is contracted to bring 60,000 tonnes of gravel to Wallaceburg, although it may not be possible to fulfill the agreement before the conclusion of the shipping season.

    The tug and combination exited the St. Clair River at Port Lambton, ON. on Wednesday afternoon and transited the very twisty Chenal Ecarte and then into the Sydenham River for the three hour trip to Wallaceburg. Capt. Gerry Peats of Peats Marine Construction of Port Lambton, provided escort and cornering assistance with his tug Tammy Lynn through the very narrow turns and confines of the waterway. It is interesting to note the channel turning basin, about one half km from the offloading site is utilized to turn the tug and barge for the return trip.

    Departure was at daybreak this morning with the third Wallaceburg arrival expected to be sometime on Saturday October 11th.

    The Keewatin is registered out of Hay River, Northwest Territories. Since there has been little commercial shipping in Wallaceburg since 1987, the present gravel offloading is drawing a number of interested spectators.

    Pictures by Barry Hiscocks
    Peats Marine Construction tug Tammy Lynn (Capt. Gerry Peats), barge Stone Merchant and tug Keewatin just as they left the St. Clair and entered Chenal Ecarte
    Tug Tammy Lynn
    Tammy Lynn close up
    Walpole Is. bridge opening
    approaching the bridge
    Tight squeeze
    Keewatin tight squeeze
    Powering up the Keewatin after clearing the bridge
    Tammy Lynn assisting on a tight corner

    Pictures by Bing Frye
    Keewatin and gravel barge inbound on Chenal Ecarte during first trip to Wallaceburg Oct. 4
    Bing Frye company spokesperson at Walpole Island bridge Oct. 4

    Reported by: A. Mann and Barry Hiscocks


    Busy day at the Soo

    10/09
    Wednesday was a beautiful day at the Soo, and traffic was plentiful all day. The Algomarine is due at the Carbide Dock on Thursday sometime with another load of salt. Downbound on Wednesday was the new saltie Federal Kumano.

    Paul R Tregurtha waits below the Poe Lock
    Lee A Tregurtha passing Paul R Tregurtha below the Poe Lock.
    Another view of two ships named for husband and wife passing below the Soo Locks.
    Federal Saguenay upbound at Mission Pt.
    Reserve downbound at Mission Pt.
    Stern view heading down river.
    Federal Kumano passing Paul R Tregurtha near Big Point.
    Federal Kumano downbound at Mission Pt.
    Close up of her bow
    Stern view

    Reported by: Scott Best


    October off to busy start in Green Bay

    10/09
    Traffic has picked up in the port of Green Bay since the start of October as terminals are starting to stock pile cargos for the winter months.

    The American Republic brought in a load of coal to the C. Reiss coal dock and the Paul H. Townsend brought cement to Lafarge on October 3. Another load of coal was brought in on October 5 by the Earl W. Oglebay, she delivered 10,300 tons of coal for Georgia Pacific.

    Arthur M Anderson brought in a load of 14,080 tons of coal for the C. Reiss coal dock on October 6. Sam Laud arrived on October 7 carrying 11,304 tons of coal for the C. Reiss coal dock and was followed by the Paul H. Townsend returning with a load of cement for the Lafarge dock.

    The John J. Boland arrived in Green Bay Wednesday with a load of 21,000 tons of limestone for Western Lime. Sam Laud is due back in port early Thursday morning with another load of limestone for the same dock.

    John G. Munson unloads stone at night, the last ship to visit Green Bay in September.

    Reported by: Jason Leino


    Gemini Returns to Manistee

    10/09
    It had been quite a long time since the Gemini docked in Manistee until she arrived last Saturday. The vessel headed to her normal loading berth at General Chemical to take on brine for Amherstburg. She is reported to have two or three trips scheduled out of Manistee as McKeil vessels undergo repair. Both the Capt Ralph Tucker and Evans McKeil / Ocean Hauler are in Hamilton, Ontario. The Tucker is being dry docked, while the Evans McKeil is undergoing repair. This leaves only the Tony Mackay / KTC 115 on the Manistee to Amherstburg brine run.

    Jerry Newberry and the Salty Dog #1 continue the Courtright to Amherstburg shuttle. It is unknown whether brine shipments will continue out of Manistee through the winter on the Tucker, or if General Chemical will only rely on its Courtright facility.

    Reported by: Chris Franckowiak


    Upper Peninsula Shipping Activity

    10/09
    Tuesday morning the Kwintebank arrived in the Menominee River to unload a cargo of wood-pulp at a local warehouse dock. Meanwhile the Joseph L. Block was loading ore in Escanaba, MI early Tuesday. Pictures by Dick Lund
    Kwintebank inbound Menominee River at sunrise
    Another view framed by the trees
    Joe Block loading ore in Escanaba

    Reported by: Dick Lund and Scott Best


    Toledo Update

    10/09
    The Rt. Hon Paul J. Martin was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The Calumet was loading coal at the CSX Docks.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will now be the Buffalo on Thursday. The Canadian Enterprise and Catherine Desgagnes on Saturday, followed by the Saginaw and Adam E. Cornelius on Sunday. The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the Atlantic Erie on Thursday, followed by the Atlantic Superior on Friday. Note: this time of year because of weather, cargo commitments, and dock conditions it is quite common for vessels to be added or changed at a moments notice for the CSX/Torco Docks/grain elevator complexes.

    C.L. Austin (Kinsman Colors) in winter layup at the Lakefront Coal Docks.
    Calgadoc downbound the Maumee River from the Cherry Street Bridge. She just finished loading a grain cargo at one of the elevators upriver.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman


    Thalassa Desgagnes in New York

    10/09
    The Thalassa Desgagnes was outbound the Black Rock Canal at 9 a.m. Wednesday morning. She had delivered a cargo to the NOCO refinery overnight in Tonawanda, NY. This is the first powered tanker to deliver on the Niagara River this season. In the past these cargos are delivered by barge or by the Saturn.

    Reported by: Dan Sweeley and Brian Wroblewski


    Nadro Clipper in Oshawa

    10/09
    The tug Nadro Clipper was docked in Oshawa, Ont. Wednesday. The tug is used as a dive vessel with a diving chamber onboard. It was used as the Shipwreck Search Vessel in National Geographic's Clive Cussler Seahunter show " Search for the young Phoenix".

    It is in Oshawa to be used by Aquatic Sciences for an inspection of the water intake pipe at the Darlington Power station.

    Nadro Clipper bridge.
    Nadro Clipper bow view.
    Nadro Clipper stern view.
    Hydraulic Gear.

    Reported by: Jim Gallacher


    Coast Guard to hold public meetings on ballast water standard

    10/09
    The U.S. Coast Guard will hold five public meetings in October and November, including one on the Great Lakes, to discuss the potential environmental impact of a ballast water discharge standard that the service is developing.

    The Coast Guard is developing a standard to protect the environment from the introduction and spread of nonindigenous species via ballast water. Exotic plant and animal species are increasingly viewed as a global environmental problem with long-lasting ecological and economic impacts.

    The meetings will include discussion of issues to be addressed in an environmental impact statement that the Coast Guard is preparing as part of the ballast water discharge standard initiative.

    The Coast Guard is looking at a range of alternatives it will explore in developing a ballast water discharge standard.

    One of the public meetings is in Cleveland, set for Oct. 31. Other hearings are set for New Orleans, Norfolk, Va., Oakland, Calif., and Washington, D.C.

    The Environmental Protection Agency, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service will be cooperating. The public can submit comments until Dec. 26. For information on the meetings or on how to comment, contact Bivan Patnaik at (202) 267-1744 or e-mail bpatnaik@comdt.uscg.mil.

    Reported by: Dave Miller


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 09

    The CHIMO (b) CANADIAN RANGER) was moved onto the Port Weller Dry Dock on October 9, 1983 where work began to cut her apart forward of her aft located pilot house and engine room.

    The GULF MACKENZIE (b) L. ROCHETTE) was launched October 9, 1976

    The SASKATCHEWAN PIONEER arrived in the Welland Canal on her delivery trip October 9, 1983 en route for her formal christening at Thunder Bay.

    The JAMES DAVIDSON was launched October 9, 1920 for the Globe Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH (G.A. Tomlinson, mgr.)

    On October 9, 1984 the PATERSON (1) was sold to Shearmet Recycling, a Thunder Bay ship breaker, and was broken up at their Mission River dock.

    The a) COL. JAMES M. SCHOONMAKER (b) WILLIS B. BOYER) sailed from the shipyard on her maiden voyage on October 9, 1911 to Toledo, OH where she loaded coal bound for Sheboygan, WI. The SCHOONMAKER was the largest vessel on the Great Lakes when she came out. For much of the decade this vessel either broke or held many bulk cargo records.

    On 9 October 1820, ASP (wooden schooner, 57 T, built in 1808 at Mississauga, Ontario) was carrying lumber and staves when she sprang a leak near Long Point in Lake Ontario. She waterlogged, then capsized. The upturned vessel was driven across the lake and finally went ashore off the Salmon River at Mexico Bay, NY and broke up quickly. 9 of the 11 onboard lost their lives. She was originally built as the British armed schooner ELIZABETH.

    On 9 October 1931, CHARLES H. BRADLEY (wooden propeller, 201', 804 gt, built in 1890 at W. Bay City, MI) was carrying pulpwood and towing the barge GRAMPIAN. She was traversing the Portage Canal in the Keweenaw Peninsula when she ran onto a bar and stranded. The barge kept coming and ploughed into her stern. The Bradley caught fire and burned to the waterline. The wreck still lies in 6' - 17' of water just off the mouth of the Sturgeon River.

    On 9 October 1895, AFRICA (wooden propeller steam barge, 135', 352 gc, built in 1873 at Kingston, Ontario) was towing the schooner SEVERN in a storm on Lake Huron when she struck a reef, 15 miles south of Cove Island light on Lake Huron. She released SEVERN which rode out the storm. However, AFRICA broke up in that storm. All 13 of her crew were lost.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Engine room fire leaves tug blocking channel below Iroquois Lock

    10/08 Noon Update
    The tug Everlast anchored in the navigation channel below the Iroqouis Lock on Tuesday morning after fire broke out in its engine room. Navigation through the channel was suspended. The tug Robinson Bay reportedly was en route to move the Everlast out of the channel.

    Preliminary reports said a fuel line burst as the tug was approaching the lock. Crew members reportedly were on deck when the fire broke out so no one was injured. The captain activated the carbon dioxide fire extinguisher to douse the flames.

    Everlast apparently was towing a barge when the fire broke out, and now a generator on the barge is supplying power to the tug. Early reports said the Everlast may be taken alongside the Robinson Bay and moved to a nearby dock.

    Reported by: Kent Malo


    Crewmember Airlifted by Coast Guard

    10/08
    A helicopter from U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Detroit removed a 46-year-old female from the Algocen on Monday as the vessel passed downbound on Lake St. Clair. The woman was suffering from heart attack symptoms. The helicopter transported her to Windsor Airport for further transit to Windsor Hospital by ambulance.

    The helicopter was unable to take the patient directly to the hospital because the helipad was under reconstruction.

    Reported by: USCG


    Coast Guard searches Federal Weser off Duluth

    10/08
    The U.S. Coast Guard in Duluth boarded the Greek vessel the Federal Weser just outside the Duluth ship canal early Monday to search for "contraband," the Duluth News Tribune reported.

    The vessel later entered port Monday afternoon and was loading Tuesday at the Cenex Harvest States grain elevator in Superior

    Coast Guard officials boarded the vessel at 3 a.m. Monday and spent six hours searching the vessel. Divers were used to check the vessel's hull.

    Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. Mark Ledbetter wouldn't comment on specific details of the search but said it was "based on intelligence." Security measures in ports nationwide have increased as a result on the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

    Reported by: Dave Arndt


    Great Lakes & Seaway News

    10/08
    Over the weekend, following a marshal sale, the bulk carrier Tranquility was renamed Weston in Montreal. Her saga begun at the end of April when the vessel arrived in Montreal to unload sugar at Sutherland Pier. About a week later, she sailed for Trois-Rivières in ballast to load grain. After inspection by the Coast Guard, the owner was told to fix several deficiencies. Nothing was done and the vessel spent about three weeks docked in port. On May 22, the ship limped back to Montreal docking at Section 25 where she remained under arrest. She was sold at auction in mid-September.

    Another one of the BBC's fleet of small vessels is expected in the Great Lakes mid October. BBC Spain is bound for Sault Ste. Marie and will be on her first transit of the Seaway. She is one of several vessels operated by Briese Shipping of Germany.

    Downbound at Cape Goose on the St. Lawrence River Tuesday from Montreal was the sailing ship Alison Lake heading for Colombia, expect time of arrival there on Nov. 10. There is speculation she has been sold but that has not been confirmed. The sailing ship now used as a private yacht was originally the USCG Sauk and was in service on the Great Lakes. Built in 1943 at Brooklyn, N.Y. , this tug was converted into a sailing ship at Toronto in the late nineties.

    Reported by: René Beauchamp


    Active U.S.-Flag Fleet Down By 5 Hulls On October 1

    10/08
    The active U.S.-flag fleet on the Great Lakes totaled 55 vessels on October 1, a decrease of five hulls compared to both a year ago and the 5-year average for October 1. For the first time this year, the total includes the Wolverine, a 635-foot-long river class self-unloader operated by Oglebay Norton Marine Services Company. The vessel ended its extended winter lay-up on September 21.

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association


    Metis in Service

    10/08
    The cement barge Metis and tug Doug McKeil. were upbound on the Welland Canal Tuesday. The pair are reported to have four trips into Cleveland carrying cement. This is the first time this season that Metis has been in the canal. As of mid morning, the pair were heading up for Lock 8.

    Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt


    Wallaceburg Visit

    10/08
    The tug Keewatin and barge Stone Merchant visited Wallaceburg, Ont. Oct. 4. The barge unloaded 4050 T of gravel at the revived Southwestern Sales Co. dock in south Wallaceburg immediately south of the former St. Clair Grain Marine Terminal.

    The last time this gravel dock was used came between April and June of 1960 when the Roen Steamship barges Marion, Hilda and Lillian pulled by either tug Arrow or John Roen V offloaded gravel.

    According to Southwestern Sales officials’ additional trips are planned this season with the next arrival expected today.

    Reported by: Alan Mann


    Lone Ranger in Montreal

    10/08
    Tuesday the yacht Lone Ranger was docked in Montreal. She was expected to depart later that day heading downbound.

    The tug was built for the German company Bugsier as their salvage tug Simson and served as such before being sold and converted for use as a yacht.

    Lone Ranger docked.
    Bow view
    Looking down from the top of the dock in Old-Port
    Water monitor on top of bridge
    View of forward deck from dock
    Stern view. Lines are tied to a higher dock forward and aft
    View of exercise room right underneath masts. top cabins
    View of mast
    On the stern, there is a small covered pool walled on three sides but opened at the stern
    Side view from dock at midship
    Deck holds one catamaran sailboat with runners folded and one impressive run about.

    Reported by: Laurent Cote


    Twin Ports Report

    10/08
    Both U.S.-flag vessels in the lakes grain trade were in Superior on Tuesday. Herbert C. Jackson arrived in port Monday afternoon, fueled at the Murphy Oil dock and then proceeded to the Peavey elevator to load. Joseph H. Frantz arrived Tuesday morning and was docking about 7:30 a.m. at the Cenex Harvest States berth 1. On the other side of the terminal was the saltie Federal Weser, which was allowed to dock after being searched for six hours Monday by the U.S. Coast Guard.

    No vessels called at Midwest Energy Terminal on Monday, but the rest of the week is expected to be busy, with 10 vessels due to load between today and Saturday. The line-up includes: Algowood, Tuesday; Columbia Star and Canadian Transport, Wednesday; Paul R. Tregurtha, Indiana Harbor, James R. Barker and Walter J. McCarthy Jr., Thursday; Oglebay Norton, Friday; and Canadian Progress and Canadian Olympic on Saturday.

    Reported by: Al Miller


    Marquette Update

    10/08
    After a few slow days, shipping will again resume in Marquette with the arrival on Tuesday of the Lee A. Tregurtha. She will be followed in on Wednesday morning by the Wilfred Sykes, and later Wednesday by the Michipicoten.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe


    Alpena Report

    10/08
    The J.A.W Iglehart arrived in port about 11 a.m. on Tuesday to take on cement. It departed by early afternoon and is headed for Milwaukee. The American Republic was also at Lafarge on Tuesday, unloading coal. The Republic left by 6 p.m. and was expected to go to Stoneport and load after the Great Lakes Trader.

    The Alpena and the Jacklyn M/barge Integrity are delivering on Lake Michigan, stopping at Waukegan, IL and St. Joseph.

    Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain


    Saginaw River News

    10/08
    The Algorail was outbound early Tuesday morning after unloading salt overnight at the Sargent Dock in Zilwaukee.

    Inbound was the tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder. The pair were unloading early in the morning at the Burroughs dock. They finished up and were outbound early in the afternoon.

    Also calling on the Saginaw River was the Fred R. White, Jr. She called on the Bay Aggregates dock for the second time in three days to unload. The Fred White was outbound early Tuesday evening.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


    Toledo Update

    10/08
    The Agawa Canyon was unloading salt at the City Salt Dock. The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The Maumee that was originally due into the CSX Docks to load coal on Tuesday but that trip was cancelled. The dredge Columbia continues dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay north of the pump out station.

    The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will now be the Calumet and H. Lee White on Wednesday, followed by the Catherine Desgagnes on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the Atlantic Erie on Thursday, followed by the Atlantic Superior on Saturday.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman


    Montreal and Beauharnois

    10/08
    The Everlast and the Norman McLeod were upbound in the Seaway after spending some time hauling on the East coast, the Everlast was in Halifax for engine repairs while the Norman McLeod was operational with the Atlantic Hickory, together the pair hauled asphalt products along the East coast of Canada and the United States, Tuesday the Everlast and the Norman McLeod were bound for Detroit to load for Valleyfield, Quebec.

    Doxa D Bow view unloading fertilizer at the Cote Ste Catherine wharf into a hopper and subsequently into the truck below.
    Stern view.
    Bow view of the Norman McLeod and the tug Everlast entering Cote Ste Catherine lock.
    Tug and barge sliding the wall at Beauharnois lock approach to lock 3.
    View of the tug's bow and the stern notch of the barge Norman McLeod.
    Funnel markings on the tug Everlast showing the Upper Lakes logo and McAsphalt logo.
    Gordon C Leitch enjoying a full view of the fall foliage close up.

    Reported by: Kent Malo


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 08

    The Keel was laid October 8, 1976 for the 660 ft. forward section of the a) LEWIS WILSON FOY (b) OGLEBAY NORTON ) for the Bethlehem Steel Co., Cleveland, Ohio.

    The MATHEWSTON (b RALPH S. MISENER (2) entered service on October 8, 1922. On her maiden voyage she sailed from Port Arthur with 11,634 tons of barley and wheat.

    The Canadian registry for MENIHEK LAKE was officially closed on October 8, 1985 with the notation "sold Spain."

    The WILLIAM G. MATHER arrived on October 8, 1988 in tow of the GLT tugs WYOMING and ALABAMA at the G&W Shipyard at Collision Bend in the Cuyahoga River to be refurbished.

    On 8 October 1906, PASADENA (wooden barge, 250’, 1761 GT, built in 1889 at Cleveland as a propeller bulk freighter) was carrying coal, in tow of the steamer GLADSTONE, bound for Superior, WI. The PASADENA went out of control in a gale and her skipper had the tow line cut. She was thrown against a pier near the upper entry to the Keweenaw Waterway and pounded to pieces in a few hours. Two lives were lost, but 8 made it to shore on the floating wreckage.

    On 8 October 1854, E. K. COLLINS (Wooden passenger/package freight side-wheeler, 256', 1095 gt, built in 1853 at Newport, MI) caught fire and beached near the mouth of the Detroit River where she burned to the waterline. About 23 lives were lost. About 43 persons were rescued in small boats and by the steamers FINTRY and GLOBE. There was some speculation that arson was the cause. The hull was recovered in 1857 and rebuilt as the barge ARK.

    On 8 October 1871, the Chicago fire destroyed many fine vessels while they were docked in the harbor. These included the new propeller NAVARINO, the steamer PHILO PARSONS, the schooner GLENBULA, the schooner ECLIPSE, the schooner BUTCHER BOY, the bark VALETTA, the schooner ALNWICK, the bark A. P. NICHOLS, the bark FONTANELLA, the fore-and-aft schooner STAMPEDE, the schooner N. C. FORD, and the schooner CHRISTINA NEILSON. The only recorded casualties among the sailors were on the ALNWICK; her mate died and the captain burned his hands severely.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    New Arrangement Announced for Seaway Marine Transport

    10/07
    Algoma Central Corporation and Upper Lakes Group Inc. jointly announced Monday that they have entered into a memorandum of understanding to increase the scope of their Seaway Marine Transport partnership. Formed in 1990, Seaway Marine Transport originally comprised the joint operation of gearless bulk vessels but was expanded in 1994 to include self-unloading vessels. The current jointly operated fleet includes 22 self-unloading and 13 gearless bulk vessels and is the largest and most versatile fleet operating in the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Seaway and the Gulf of St. Lawrence. In making the announcement, Tim Dool of Algoma and Marcel Rivard of Upper Lakes commented that the new arrangements, which will take effect in January 2004, will increase efficiencies by integrating the operations, purchasing, accounting and administrative functions of the respective fleets with the commercial functions of Seaway Marine Transport. With this integration, Seaway Marine Transport looks forward to providing an enhanced level of customer service.

    Algoma Central owns the largest Canadian fleet on the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Seaway and Eastern Seaboard of Canada. The Algoma fleet includes 14 self-unloaders and five bulk carriers operated by Seaway Marine Transport and five Canadian flag tankers which are operated independently of Seaway Marine Transport . Upper Lakes Group owns a versatile fleet of dry bulk carriers and tankers on the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Seaway and Eastern Seaboard of Canada. The Upper Lakes fleet includes eight self-unloaders and 11 conventional bulk carriers operated by Seaway Marine Transport, and a fuelling tanker. Upper Lakes Group also operates an integrated tug/tanker barge which is jointly owned with a partner.

    Reported by: Roger LeLievre


    Fall Brings Fall In Limestone Trade

    10/07
    Shipments of limestone from U.S. and Canadian ports on the Great Lakes totaled 3,763,116 net tons in September, a decrease of 11 percent from both the same period last year and the month's 5-year average. For the season, the trade stands at 22.9 million net tons, a decrease of 9 percent from both the corresponding point in 2002 and the 5-year average for the end of September.

    While the decreases registered in March, April and May of this year reflected to varying degrees the harsh weather conditions that slowed the start of the stone trade, the summer construction season failed to give shipments a much of a boost and demand for fluxstone from the steel industry remains well below the levels of just a few years ago. The September tally is but another in a string of lackluster totals for limestone.

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association


    Tow Trucks Assist Cruise Ship

    10/07
    On Monday the Georgian Clipper returned to her dock in Parry Sound, Ontario after her final trip of the season. Her home dock is located close to the outfall of the Seguin river. After a tremendous amount of rain this fall the Seguin is running heavy and this caused the Georgian Clipper some trouble while approaching the dock. Estimates of the current speed in the harbor are between 5 and 8 knots, with a number of eddies in the area of the docks and marina.

    The Georgian Clipper approached the dock bow in and attempted to turn against the current. This was progressing slowly until one of the ship’s heaving lines parted and got caught in one of the propellers. This caused the engine to trip off, and the Clipper was left across the current with 3 lines secured. A 4th line was run out as protection against breakage as the current pressure against the ship’s hull was high.

    With only one engine it was impossible to maneuver the ship alongside her dock, so a tow-truck was called. After some deliberation a snatch block was set up on one of the mooring posts, the trucks wire was passed outboard and secured to the ship’s stern line, and the ship was slowly winched in. This operation was repeated several times because the snatch block limited the pull length of the wire.

    Nearly two hours after first approaching the dock the Georgian Clipper was secured and the passengers were allowed to disembark, surely a memorable end to a Georgian Bay cruise.

    Photo showing the water flow only 200 feet above the Georgian Clipper dock.
    The Georgian Clipper makes her approach through the current.
    Georgian Clipper with bow on the rocks and stern secured with two lines.
    Another view of the Clipper stuck across the current.
    Passengers and crew waiting for assistance. At no time was the ship in any danger.
    While the Clipper was waiting for help this person enjoyed the results of all the rain.
    The Cavalry arrives! In all my experience this is the first time I have ever seen a tow truck used to move a ship.
    Another view of the passengers waiting.
    Snatch Block rigged and waiting for strain.
    Holding the strain while the tow-truck takes up the strain on its wire.
    A view of the current against the side of the ship.
    A better view of the current against the ship’s side.
    Almost Secured.

    Reported by: Paul Beesley


    Saginaw River News

    10/07
    The Algorail was inbound on the Saginaw River shortly after 5 p.m. Monday. The vessel was going to the Sargent Dock in Zilwaukee to deliver salt loaded in Goderich.

    The Fred R. White called on the Bay Aggregates Dock and was outbound by 11 p.m. Sunday night.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


    Toledo Update

    10/07
    The J.A.W. Iglehart was at the Lafarge Dock unloading cement. The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore. The dredge Columbia continues dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay north of the pump out station which is just north of the Torco Ore Dock. The Armco, Buckeye, and Courtney Burton remain in layup at their respective dock sites. There are no vessels in at the Shipyard at this time.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Maumee on Tuesday. The H. Lee White on Wednesday followed by the Lee A. Tregurtha on Friday. The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the Atlantic Erie on Thursday, followed by the Atlantic Superior on Saturday.

    Below are images of Great Lakes Shipping from around the lakes.
    Dredge Columbia dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay while outbound.
    Quedoc at the scrap yard at Soo, Ontario in early September.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman


    Welland Canal Traffic

    10/07
    Below are images taken last week.

    Algocatalyst.
    Bluewing - Passing the stone docks in Port Colborne.
    Capt Henry Jackman - Upbound Lock 3
    At Lock 8.
    CCG Griffon at Port Weller Dry Dock fit out wall
    Federal Asahi - Downbound at Glendale Bridge meeting Capt Henry Jackman
    HMCS Halifax 330 - at Port Weller Dry Dock fit out wall
    Kwinterbank - Passing Port Weller
    Le Levant - Heading to Bridge 21 Port Colborne
    Orna - Downbound passing Port Weller Dry Docks
    Peonia - Passing under Niagara Skyway
    Peter R Cresswell - Upbound at Port Weller.
    Night photo from our room at the Inn At Lock 7.
    New park built near Robinhood Flour Mill in Port Colborne near Lock 8.

    Reported by: Geoff DeLuca


    Sunday in the Leelanau Peninsula

    10/07
    Sunday was a crisp fall day in Michigan's Leelanau Peninsula. Fall colors had not yet arrived in any quantity, but cool air and rain showers made it feel like fall. The following boats were seen along the shores of the peninsula.

    Fishtug at maritime museum at Glen Haven
    Joy at Leland
    Unidentified fish tug at Leland
    Stern view
    Fishing nets in Leland. Leland is an old fishing village that has tried to preserve its historic harbor area. Although many of the fishery buildings are now gift shops catering to tourists, it still has a traditional fishing village look.
    Passenger boats Manitou Isle and Mishe-Mokwa at Leland
    Fishtug Niibing Nimnido, Leland
    Raven's Nest, Northport
    Tug-barge Michigan/Great Lakes tied up at Greilickville in the West Arm of Grand Traverse Bay
    Closeup of tug Michigan at sunset
    State of Michigan at the Great Lakes Maritime Academy, Traverse City

    Reported by: Tom Hynes


    Shipping Videos Online

    10/07
    To test conditions in a real world Webcast the Great Lakes Maritime Institute will run a webcast from the Dossin Museum this week. They will be showing shipping related videos online. The videos range from old 16mm films of ships long gone to current day subjects. Please visit www.glmi.org/webcast/ for more details.

    Upcoming programs at the Dossin Museum include:
    Silent Auction & Entertainment meeting on November 8 - Silent auction of Great Lakes memorabilia including artwork, two portholes from the S.S. South American, and other unique items. The highlight will be two bottles of ninety year old scotch which were recovered from the shipwreck of the S.S. Regina on Lake Huron . This 90th Anniversary of the Storm of 1913 will include these unique artifacts that originally were carried by the Regina past the Dossin Museum on the Detroit River to Lake Huron where they were lost with the crewmembers. Bids will be taken online and the event will be Webcast in real time.

    Lee Murdock on concert November 9. - Come to the museum and enjoy the Great Lakes balladeer live

    November 10 a memorial service for the Edmund Fitzgerald - Held at the anchor of the "Fitz" in the yard of the Dossin Museum. This program will be webcast live from the museum grounds. Lamp lighting ceremony followed by a talk from Capt. Don Erickson who searched for the Fitzgerald on Lake Superior the night of the loss. This outside ceremony will mark the 29th Anniversary of the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald on Lake Superior at approx. 7:00 pm November 10, 1975.
    *Due to reduced hours at the museum this program will only be available online through the webcast, the museum is only open weekends due to budget cuts.

    Visit www.glmi.org for more details


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 07

    The ALGOWOOD was launched October 7, 1980 for Algoma Central Marine, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

    PAUL THAYER (b) EARL W. OGLEBAY) was launched October 7, 1973 for the Union Commerce Bank Trustee, Cleveland, OH and managed by Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland. She was built under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970 for $12.6 million.

    BIRCHGLEN was launched October 7, 1926 as a) WILLIAM McLAUCHLAN, US.226176, for the Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

    BLACK RIVER, Lake Bulk Freighter. Built as a Steel Barge in 1897 by the F.W. Wheeler & Co., she was Launched October 7, 1896 as a) SIR ISAAC LOTHIAN BELL

    The HUTCHCLIFFE HALL was raised October 7, 1962 and taken to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs. She had sunk after a collision a few days earlier.

    October 7, 1923 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 4 went back into service after being overhauled and having new cabins built on her main deck.

    The MADISON suffered a fire on October 7, 1987 while lying idle at Muskegon and was badly damaged.

    In 1903, ADVENTURE (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 108’, 142 GT, built in 1875 at Detroit as a schooner) caught fire while tied to the Kelly’s Island Line & Transport Co. dock. The blaze spread so quickly that those on board barely escaped. She was towed from Kelly’s Island out into Lake Erie by the tug SMITH to save the dock and the adjacent schooner ANDERSON.

    In a severe gale and rain/hail storm on 7 October 1858, the 247 ton schooner OSPREY approached Oswego, New York. As she was about to enter the harbor, the vessel struck the east pier broadside. Her masts and rigging were carried away and she started to sink. Capt. John Parsons got his wife and child out of the cabin to try to escape to the pier. His wife was washed overboard and drowned. Capt. Parsons held on to his child, but another wave struck the wreck and swept the child into the water. George Crine, the mate, was also swept overboard. Those three were lost, but the next wave swung the wreck about with her bowsprit over the pier and the captain and the six remaining crewmen scrambled to safety. The entire town and harbor mourned those deaths and held a dockside service two days later with many prayers and all flags at half mast. Donations were accepted for the surviving sailors since they escaped with only the clothes on their backs.

    On 7 October 1873, the PULASKI was launched at the Archibald Muir yard on the Black River in Port Huron. Her dimensions were 136' x 26' x 11', 349 gt. She was a three mast "full canaller", painted white and her private signal was a red M on a white ground bordered with blue. Her sails were made by Mr. D. Robeson of Port Huron.

    On 7 October 1886, the Port Huron Times reported that "The old side-wheel ferry SARNIA, which was a familiar sight at this crossing [Port Huron-Sarnia] for so many years, and which is said to have earned enough money in her time to sheet her with silver, the hull of which has been for some years back used as a barge by the Marine City Salt Company, has closed her career. She was last week scuttled and sunk near the Marine City Salt Works wharf."

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Busy Day in Saginaw

    10/06
    The Saginaw River saw another busy day on Sunday with the departure of two ships and the arrival of three others.

    Joseph H. Frantz was outbound about 3 a.m. Sunday from the Bay Aggregates dock near Bay City. At about 7 a.m., Paul H. Townsend departed the Lafarge cement terminal in Saginaw and was outbound during the morning. Both vessels had arrived in the river about 24 hours earlier.

    Agawa Canyon was inbound about 8 a.m. with salt loaded in Windsor to be delivered to the Sargent dock in Zilwaukee. The Canyon waited at the Wirt Stone Dock in Bay City for the outbound Townsend to pass, then continued up the river to its destination.

    Inbound about two hours behind Agawa Canyon was the Canadian Transfer. The Transfer had departed Thunder Bay two days earlier with a load of potash and was to make deliveries to North Star in Essexville and Sargent in Zilwaukee.

    After unloading part of its cargo in Essexville, the Canadian Transfer continued up to Zilwaukee and waited at an adjacent dock for Agawa Canyon to finish. Once the Canyon departed the Sargent dock late in the afternoon, the Transfer moved up to take its place.

    The tug-barge Invincible/McKee Sons was inbound at the Front Range at about 5:30 p.m., going to the Sargent dock in Essexville.

    Pictures by Todd Shorkey Paul H. Townsend downbound at Bay City Wirt
    Stern view
    Townsend passing the Agawa Canyon at Bay City Wirt
    Agawa Canyon upbound at Wheeler's Landing
    Another view
    Agawa Canyon stern view
    Canadian Transfer unloading at the North Star Dock
    Fred R. White, Jr. upbound passing Consumers Energy
    Another view
    Stren view at Essroc

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


    Tug and Barge Make Rare Call

    10/06
    On Saturday the tug Keewatin and the self unloading barge Stone Merchant, arrived at Southwestern Sales' Border Road dock in Wallaceburg, Ontario. The barge was carrying a cargo of stone from Oglebay Norton's Cedarville Quarry. It is believed to be the first cargo of stone delivered into Wallaceburg since 1959.

    The crew began discharging the stone onto the newly cleared site and was expected to return to Cedarville for a second cargo for Wallaceburg. The Wallaceburg dock becomes the sixth dock for Southwestern Sales in Southwestern Ontario.

    Reported by: Bob Barnes


    Grant to help save Lake St. Clair Range Lights

    10/06
    A $450,000 state grant and another $150,000 in local matching funds should provide enough money to renovate and protect the South Channel Lights that have long guided ships entering Lake St. Clair's delta.

    "That's too much history to let crumble into the water," Chuck Brockman, founder of the volunteer group Save Our South Channel Lights, told The Macomb Daily of Mount Clemens, Mich. "Those lights helped open up this whole area to commerce and settlement."

    The South Channel Lights, built in 1859, are one of nine lighthouses that shared $1.2 million worth of grants from the Clean Michigan Initiative, an environmental bond issue approved by Michigan voters in 1998.

    The state grant will pave the way for a two-year renovation project to restore the lighthouses to their original form. Work is scheduled to begin next spring. Once restoration is completed, the group plans to open the two towers to tours by boaters.

    Reported by: Steve Mills


    Alpena Update

    10/06
    The Steamer Alpena arrived in port Sunday afternoon to take on cement. It departed by 7 p.m. and is headed for South Chicago. The Paul H. Townsend also came into Lafarge to load cement on Sunday, tying up under the silos before 10 p.m. The Townsend is expected to leave early Monday morning for Green Bay, WI.

    The J.A.W Iglehart is scheduled to be in Toledo on Monday.

    The Denis Sullivan has been in port for most of the past week, tied up in the river. The crew has been taking local school children out in the bay for educational cruises. Many people have enjoyed seeing the tall ship.

    Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain


    Toledo Update

    10/06
    The Saginaw finished loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator and departed late Sunday morning. The Algosoo was at the City Salt Dock unloading salt. The Lee A. Tregurtha was at the CSX Docks loading coal with the Charles M. Beeghly scheduled to follow on Sunday evening. The dredge Columbia continues dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay north of the pump out station.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Maumee on Tuesday. The H. Lee White on Wednesday followed by the Lee A. Tregurtha on Friday.

    The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Docks will be the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Monday. The Atlantic Erie on Thursday, followed by the Atlantic Superior on Saturday.

    Classic Views of Toledo Shipping
    Cartiercliffe Hall downbound Maumee River from the Cherry Street Bridge with the tug Pennsylvania assisting.
    Adam E. Cornelius inbound Maumee Bay headed for the C&O Coal Docks to load a coal cargo.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman


    Hamilton News

    10/06
    Saturday the Algonorth arrived in Hamilton at 4 p.m. heading to Dofasco. The Thalassa Desgagnes arrived about 6:30 p.m. The Canadian Progress departed at 7:30 p.m. and the Makiri Green departed at 9 p.m.

    Sunday the Canadian Miner passed through the Burlington Ship Canal at 5:30 a.m. as the Algonorth was departing Dofasco and heading out into the lake. The refueling ship Hamilton Energy departed at 8:30 a.m. heading to Clarkson Ontario to refuel an unknown ship. The Hamilton Energy returned to Pier 24 at 1:30 p.m.

    Reported by: Eric Holmes


    Quebec City Traffic

    10/06
    Tanker Alam Bistari.
    CCGS Des Groseilliers distant view.
    Des Groseilliers another view.
    Des Groseilliers Snr Engr, Gerardus M. Olsthoorn.
    Des Groseilliers stern view.
    Ocean Bravo returning to dock.
    Ocean Bravo & Ocean Charlie stern view.
    Ocean Delta & Ocean Hercule docked.
    Ocean Hercule stern view.
    A group of Ocean tugs.
    Cruise ship Seabourn Pride stern view.
    Seabourn Pride another view.
    One of the service boats.
    Cruise ship Silver Whisper stern view.

    Reported by: Jim Gallacher


    Weekly Updates

    10/06
    The weekly updates have been uploaded.

    Click here to view


    Shipping Videos Online

    10/06
    To test conditions in a real world Webcast the Great Lakes Maritime Institute will run a webcast from the Dossin Museum this week. They will be showing shipping related videos online. The videos range from old 16mm films of ships long gone to current day subjects. Please visit www.glmi.org/webcast/ for more details.

    Upcoming programs at the Dossin Museum include:
    Silent Auction & Entertainment meeting on November 8 - Silent auction of Great Lakes memorabilia including artwork, two portholes from the S.S. South American, and other unique items. The highlight will be two bottles of ninety year old scotch which were recovered from the shipwreck of the S.S. Regina on Lake Huron . This 90th Anniversary of the Storm of 1913 will include these unique artifacts that originally were carried by the Regina past the Dossin Museum on the Detroit River to Lake Huron where they were lost with the crewmembers. Bids will be taken online and the event will be Webcast in real time.

    Lee Murdock on concert November 9. - Come to the museum and enjoy the Great Lakes balladeer live

    November 10 a memorial service for the Edmund Fitzgerald - Held at the anchor of the "Fitz" in the yard of the Dossin Museum. This program will be webcast live from the museum grounds. Lamp lighting ceremony followed by a talk from Capt. Don Erickson who searched for the Fitzgerald on Lake Superior the night of the loss. This outside ceremony will mark the 29th Anniversary of the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald on Lake Superior at approx. 7:00 pm November 10, 1975.
    *Due to reduced hours at the museum this program will only be available online through the webcast, the museum is only open weekends due to budget cuts.

    Visit www.glmi.org for more details


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 06

    Herb Fraser & Associates completed repairs on the Algosoo at the Welland Dock on October 6 1986. She had suffered a serious fire at her winter mooring on the west wall above Lock 8 at Port Colborne, Ont. on March 7, 1986.

    The bow section of the PRESQUE ISLE (2) arrived Erie October 6, 1972. The section was towed from Defoe Shipbuilding at Bay City, MI by the tugs MARYLAND and LAURENCE C. TURNER. The total cost to construct the tug/barge thousand footer was approximately $35 million.

    October 6, 1981 the ERINDALE's bow was damaged when she hit the Allanburg Bridge abutment running downbound in the Welland Canal

    In 1980 the LAC DES ILES grounded in the Detroit River just below Grassy Island, the result of a faulty steering mechanism. She freed herself a few hours later. The damage caused by the grounding ended her career.

    This day in 1870, the schooner E. FITZGERALD was launched at the Fitzgerald & Leighton yard at Port Huron, MI. Her dimensions were 135' x 26' x 11'.

    In 1875, the MERCHANT (iron propeller passenger/package freight steamer, 200', 750 t, built in 1862 at Buffalo) was carrying lumber on Lake Michigan when she stranded on Racine Reef near Racine, Wisconsin. Then she caught fire and was gutted before she could be refloated. She had stranded on that same reef twice previously. She was the first iron cargo ship built on the Lakes and the first one lost.

    On 6 October 1873, JOHN A. McDOUGALL (wooden schooner-barge, 151’, 415 GT) was launched at Wenona, MI. She was built at the Ballentine yard in only five weeks.

    On 6 October 1889, PHILO SCOVILLE (3-mast wooden schooner, 140', 323 t, built in 1863 at Cleveland) was sailing from Collingwood for Chicago when a storm drove her into the shallows and wrecked her near Tobermory, Ontario. Her captain died while trying to get ashore through the rocks. The Canadian Lifesaving Service saved the rest of the crew. At first the vessel was expected to be recovered, but she broke up by 10 October.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Low Water at the Soo

    10/05
    Low water levels in the lower pool and at Rock Cut caused again by strong winds at the Soo have delayed downbound vessels on Saturday and early Sunday morning.

    Anchored in Hay Lake was the Canadian Prospector, who had arrived early Saturday afternoon. The Algolake was tied up east of the locks. The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. may tie up at the Carbide Dock after locking through. Federal Wiser is also planning to tie at the Carbide Dock waiting for better weather in Lake Superior. The downbound Birchglen was expected to go to anchor and wait for the water levels to rise.

    Strong winds on Lake Superior sent the upbound Herbert C. Jackson and H. Lee White to anchor Saturday afternoon after locking upbound. Early Sunday morning the lower pool reading was minus13 and the Rock cut has been holding steady at minus 9.5 most of the day.

    Reported by: Scott Best


    Navigator Loads Sand

    10/05
    The Canadian Navigator arrived in Milwaukee Saturday morning to load sand. The sand is railed to the Port of Milwaukee and then loaded, one clam bucket at a time.

    The sand has a particular granular shape that makes it ideal for the foundry industry. The Navigator will be taking the sand to Hamilton, Ontario.

    Canadian Navigator at Terminal one in Milwaukee's outer harbor.
    Loading sand.

    Reported by: Andy LaBorde


    10/05
    The Paul H. Townsend was upbound Saturday passing the Pump-Out Island at 11 a.m. She headed upriver to the Lafarge Terminal in Carrollton to unload. The Townsend is expected to be outbound on Sunday.

    Earlier in the morning, the tug Mary E. Hannah and her barge departed the Dow Chemical Dock headed outbound for the lake.

    Paul H. Townsend upbound at Wheeler's Landing.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Todd Shorkey


    Toledo Report

    10/05
    Saturday the Arthur M. Anderson was at the CSX Coal Docks loading coal. The dredge Columbia continues dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay north of the pump out station.

    The Armco, Buckeye, and Courtney Burton remain in lay-up. There were no vessels at the Shipyard at this time.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Lee A. Tregurtha, and Charles M. Beeghly on Sunday. The Maumee and H. Lee White on Tuesday, followed by the Lee A. Tregurtha on Friday. The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Monday. The Atlantic Erie on Thursday, followed by the Atlantic Superior on Saturday.

    Classic views of Toledo Shipping
    The Ashland in lay-up at the CSX Docks "Frog Pond" area awaiting her overseas scrap tow.
    Fort Chambly upbound the Maumee River from the Craig Bridge bound for the Toledo Warehouse dock to unload newsprint.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman


    Toronto Update

    10/05
    The saltie Peonia got underway early Saturday morning after unloading its cargo of raw sugar at Redpath. Friday the French passenger vessel Le Levant arrived in port at the Queen Elizabeth terminal. It was expected to depart Saturday.

    Reported by: Art Church


    Clarkson Update

    10/05
    Traffic in port picked up last week. Tuesday Synnove Knutsen was at Petro Canada unloading cargo. Tuesday the James Norris was back on her regular run with limestone from Colborne, Ont. for St. Lawrence Cement.

    Thursday Algosteel and Algocape were both in at the cement dock. Algosteel was unloading limestone while Algocape loaded outbound product.

    Reported by: Bryan Ridley


    Quebec City Traffic

    10/05
    Below are images taken last week in Quebec City.

    Alphonse Desjardins close-up.
    Canmar Bravery with the pilot boat turning to meet it at Quebec City.
    CCGS Des Groseilliers.
    CCGS George R. Pearkes at the Quebec City Coast Guard station.
    CCGS George R. Pearkes another view.
    CCGS George R. Pearkes & CCGS Martha L. Black.
    Tall Ship Jeanie Johnston stern view.
    Tall Ship Jeanie Johnston bow view.
    Tour boat Louis Jolliet, with Le Chateau Frontenac in the background.
    Tour boat Louis Jolliet close-up.
    Louis Jolliet arriving back at her dock after an excursion.
    Martha L. Black close-up.
    Ferry Boat Raddison approaching Quebec City.
    Raddison another view.
    Raddison close-up.
    Trois Rivieres Ferry.
    Windoc stern view.
    Windoc another view.
    Windoc distance shot from the Ferry.
    Windoc another stern view.

    Reported by: Jim Gallacher


    40 Mile Point Lighthouse to Host "A Night at the Lighthouse"

    10/05
    Tour the 40 Mile Point Lighthouse and Calcite pilothouse on Friday, Oct. 10, from 7-9 pm. Great opportunity to take night time photos of the lighthouse in operation, and the pilothouse. Music in the fog signal building. Free admission. Bring a camera and a flashlight. Located 7 miles north of Rogers City, Michigan, we will be open Oct. 9-12 from 10 am - 4 pm.

    Reported by: Kaye Spomer


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 05

    On Saturday afternoon, Oct. 5 1997, while passing White Shoal Light on their way to Charlevoix, the Medusa Challenger was hit by a waterspout. The only damage reported was a spotlight on the pilothouse bridge wing lifted out of its support and crews bikes stored on deck rose vertically. The 1906 built boat was also reported to have been vibrating in an unusual manner. Another boat in the area reported wind gusts of almost 100 mph in the brief storm. That same day the eastern UP was hit with a violent storm that blew down trees a foot in diameter.

    The ARTHUR B. HOMER, loaded with ore, was in a head-on collision, October 5, 1972, with the unloaded Greek salty NAVISHIPPER at Buoy 83 in the Detroit River's Fighting Island Channel. NAVISHIPPER reportedly had no licensed pilot aboard at the time, a violation of Maritime law. There were no injuries, but the HOMER suffered extensive bow damage up to and including part of her pilothouse.

    The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2) was christened on October 5, 1954 for the National Steel Corp. (M.A. Hanna Co., mgr.), Cleveland, OH.

    HUTCHCLIFFE HALL was in collision with steamer RICHARD V. LINDABURY on a foggy October 5, 1962 off Grosse Pointe Farms in Lake St. Clair. The canaller suffered a 12-foot gash on her port side forward of her after cabins and sank. She was raised October 7th and taken to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs.

    On October 5, 1967 while outbound on the Saginaw River after discharging a load of limestone at Saginaw, MI, the J.F. SCHOELLKOPF, JR.'s steering failed which caused her to hit the west side of the I-75 Zilwaukee Bridge. The SCHOELLKOPF, JR. incurred little damage but the south bound lanes of the bridge were out of service for several days until repairs were completed.

    The ARTHUR H. HAWGOOD was launched October 5, 1907 for the Neptune Steamship Co. (Hawgood, mgr.), Cleveland, OH.

    On 5 October 1889, BESSEMER (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 178 , 436 GT, built in 1875 at St. Clair, MI) was carrying iron ore along with her consort SCHUYLKILL (wooden schooner, 152 , 472 GT, built in 1873 at Buffalo) in Lake Superior. They were struck by a rapidly rising gale and ran for the Portage Ship Canal. It became obvious that BESSEMER was sinking. The two collided and went onto a reef at the mouth of the canal and they both broke up quickly. The crews were able to jump onto the breakwater. The wrecks partly blocked the canal until they were dynamited the next September.

    On 5 October 1877, TIOGA (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 549 t, built in 1862 at Cleveland) was towing two barges in a storm on Lake Erie when she caught fire. The high winds fanned the flames. Her crew escaped to the barges and were later picked up by the steamer BADGER STATE. The burned out hulk of TIOGA sank the next day in 30 feet of water off Point Pelee. This was her first year of service as a bulk freighter; she had been built as a passenger steamer and was converted in 1877.

    On 5 October 1900 the lumber hooker SWALLOW was involved in a collision in the early morning hours and ended up ashore near Cherry Beach. A week later, she was lightered and freed, then taken to Detroit for repairs. She foundered in a storm one year later (18 October 1901).

    On 5 October 1904, CONGRESS (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 267', 1484 gt, built in 1867 at Cleveland as the passenger vessel NEBRASKA) was seeking shelter at S. Manitou Island on Lake Michigan when she caught fire. The fire spread quickly. To prevent it from destroying the dock, a courageous tug skipper got a line on the CONGRESS and towed her out on the lake where she burned for 13 hours and then sank in 26 fathoms of water. No lives were lost.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Seaway Queen, Oakglen Readied for Tandem Tow

    10/04
    Although an exact date has not been set, reports from Montreal indicate the Oakglen and Seaway Queen are about ready to leave on their one-way trip to shipbreakers in India, perhaps by late next week. The tug Seaways 5 has arrived in Montreal and will likely be the one to take the pair overseas in a tandem tow. A second tug will likely be called in to help handle the trip as far as Les Escoumins.

    If the vessels do leave together it will be reminiscent of the 1980s, when a purge of older lakers saw many such tandem tows.

    Preparations for towing the Algosound off-lakes have yet to begin so evidently she will be the last to leave.

    Meanwhile, a representative of the firm that will be scrapping the retired Canadian lakers indicated that the company has yet to buy any U.S.-flag lakers. There are reportedly at least four for sale.

    Other Montreal harbor scuttlebutt reports that Jean Parisien, secured at Section 36, could be used as a topping-off boat for the immediate future. She is reported to be finished as an active carrier.

    Pictures by Kent Malo
    Seaways 5 along side the Queen and Oakglen.
    Regal Princess passing.
    Atlantic Erie passing.

    Reported by: Kent Malo and Ron Walsh


    Crapo Update

    10/04
    Work continues at Bay Shipbuilding Co. in Sturgeon Bay aboard the cement storage and transfer vessel S. T. Crapo. Reports indicate she will have her propeller shaft removed and other hull openings sealed. This type of work means she will lose her classification as a ship and officially become a storage barge.

    The Crapo was towed to Bayship Thursday. As soon as the work is completed, she is expected to return to her berth in Green Bay.

    Although she was converted from coal to an oil fuel over the winter of 1994-'95, the Crapo has been inactive since September, 1996. Built in 1927, she has one of the last triple-expansion steam engines left on the lakes.

    Reported by: Bob Schaar


    Saturn Says Goodbye on Last Seaway Trip

    10/04
    The tanker Saturn is evidently on her way off-lakes. As the Saturn passed eastbound through the Eisenhower Lock Friday, reportedly bound for Sorel, she indicated this would be their last trip through the lock as the vessel has been sold. Rumors have been circulating for some weeks that her departure, possibly for service in Panama, was imminent, however a few cargoes evidently delayed her departure.

    Saturn was built in 1974 in Louisiana for the former Cleveland Tankers fleet. She has been operated the last few years by Algoma Tankers. Her departure leaves only the Gemini as the last operating remnant of a once- familiar fleet on the lakes (the whaleback museum Meteor, berthed in Superior, Wis., also was a unit of Cleveland Tankers).

    Reported by: Kent Malo


    Bluewing Downbound

    10/04
    The salt water vessel Bluewing was downbound through the Soo Locks Friday afternoon. She is loaded with grain from Thunder Bay and headed off the lakes. She passed through the Soo on a day that included rain, snow, wind, and fog.

    Downbound, approaching the Sugar Island Ferry dock at Rotary Park
    Bluewing meets the upbound Spruceglen with the Border patrol boat passing.
    BW Bufe passing.
    A break in the clouds.

    Reported by: B. Barnes


    Hurricane Damages Sinks Tall Ship

    10/04
    Last weekend Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island were badly damaged by Hurricane Juan. The damage included the sinking of the tall ship Larinda.

    The Larinda sank early Monday in the harbor when a retired naval warship broke free from its mooring during the hurricane and slammed into it. The crew was safe after the sinking but the ship remains on the bottom of the harbor.

    The eye of the hurricane passed directly over Halifax harbor.

    The masts of the Larinda are all that remain above the water's surface after being sunk by Hurricane Juan.
    A view of the Pilot boat dock showing some of the flotsam which blew onto it. The pilot boat is visible on the left, and an ocean-going tanker is in the background.

    Reported by: Paul Beesley


    Twin Ports Report

    10/04
    Birchglen was back in port late this week. The vessel loaded first at the Peavey elevator in Superior on Thursday. In the evening, with the assistance of two tugs, it shifted for Cenex Harvest States' seldom-used berth 2, where it was loading Friday.

    Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal on Friday morning. It was due to be followed by Canadian Olympic. American Mariner was scheduled to arrive to unload stone, then shift to Midwest Energy Terminal to load coal for Ashland, Wis.

    Reported by: Al Miller


    Marquette Update

    10/04
    The Charles M. Beeghly came to Marquette on a rainy Friday for a load of taconite. The H. Lee White will be in on Saturday at the lower harbor with a load of stone, and then take on ore on Sunday. No ships due on Monday.

    Charles Beeghly at the dock.
    Bow view on a rainy day.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe


    Saginaw River News

    10/04
    Friday was a busy day on the Saginaw River with visits from four different vessels. High wind and low water levels proved challenging with the lows more than a -26 inches at one point.

    The Barge McKee Sons and Tug Invincible was inbound in the afternoon calling on the Essexville Sand & Stone Dock to lighter before departing for the Saginaw Wirt Dock to finish unloading. The pair is expected to be outbound Saturday morning.

    Minutes after the McKee Sons departed Essexville, the Maumee arrived there to lighter. She almost missed the dock as her orders were to go straight to the Bay City Wirt dock. The dock boss in Essexville contacted her on the radio and said that the first two holds were to go at Sand & Stone, so the Captain ordered full astern to stop from five mph. He skillfully stopped, backed up and made the dock without problem. After lightering at the Essexville Sand & Stone dock, the Maumee continued upriver to finish at the Bay City Wirt Dock. She is expected to be outbound early Saturday morning.

    At the Dow Chemical Dock, the tug Mary E. Hannah and her tank barge spent the day unloading there. The pair is expected to be outbound Saturday morning.

    Across the river, the Tug Rebecca Lynn and Barge A-410 arrived at the Triple Clean Liquifuels Dock Friday morning to unload. The pair were outbound early in the evening heading downriver to the Consumers Energy Dock to rig for their trip out on the lake.

    McKee Sons - Invincible unloading at Essexville Sand and Stone
    Upbound at Wheeler's Landing
    Stern view
    Maumee full astern stopping for Essexville Sand & Stone
    Lining up for the dock
    Maumee bow view
    Tug Rebecca Lynn and Barge A410 at Triple Clean Liquifuels
    Tug Mary E. Hannah at Dow Chemical.

    Reported by: Todd Shorkey


    Toronto News

    10/04
    The saltie Peonia remains at the Redpath sugar dock unloading Friday.

    Thursday the Canadian Enterprise was in with a load of salt; departing later the same day.

    Wednesday was an interesting day. The mega yacht Lone Ranger departed around 9:30 a.m. Later in the day the tug Doug McKeil came into port and connected itself to the idle cement barge Metis. The pair departed late in the day.

    The idle charter vessel Galactica 001 was hauled out recently at the Atlas crane on Pier 35. The vessel may return to service under new owners. It has not turned a wheel since 2000.

    A work gang has been modifying the newly arrived passenger vessel Samuel De Champlain for its owner. A deck crane is being installed. The vessel is currently berthed in the south slip at the Essroc dock, behind Carolina Borealis - work on the latter vessel continues slowly. The owner plans to put it into Georgian Bay overnight passenger service after completion.

    Reported by: Art Church


    Fleet Mates Meet

    10/04
    Fleet mates Canadian Leader and Canadian Miner passed each other just on the downstream side of the Champlain Bridge in the Seaway Friday.

    Leader headed for the St. Lambert Lock.
    Miner headed upstream with traffic on the bridge and dome on Mount Royal of St Josephs Oratory.

    Reported by: G. Beck


    St. Lawrence River Traffic at Verchères

    10/04
    Jo Kashi, a brand new tanker on her second voyage, upbound off Verchères to Montréal, Sept. 25. Jo Kashi, stern view, Sept. 25.
    Cielo Di Baffin, more familiar to Boatnerds as Rasmine Maersk, at anchor at Lanoraie awaiting a berth at the Montreal oil docks, Sept 26.
    Birchglen, upbound off Verchères to the Seaway, Sept. 26.
    Mercy Wisdom, another newbuild, upbound off Verchères to Valleyfield, Sept. 26.
    Mercy Wisdom, stern view, Sept. 26.
    Reliance and Progress towing Nova D as they enter the Seaway upbound to Côte Ste. Catherine to load cargo for Iqaluit, Sept. 29.
    Reliance, bow view, Sept. 29.
    Reliance, stern view with La Ronde Amusement Park and the Jacques Cartier Bridge in the background, Sept. 29.
    Nova D entering Seaway, Sept. 29.
    Niagara Prince downbound off Verchères from Montréal, Oct. 3.
    R Hon. Paul J. Martin upbound off Contrecoeur to the Seaway on a particularly chilly morning, Oct 3.

    Reported by: Marc Piché


    Little Traverse Lighthouse Open House

    10/04
    The Little Traverse Lighthouse will be hosting an open house on October 18. With the generous permission of the Harbor Point Association this will be the first time the lighthouse has been made available for public viewing. On the day of the tour a trolley will transport confirmed reservation holders from the gates of Harbor Point to the lighthouse. Information about the history of the light will be presented as participants tour the building and grounds.

    This event will help to support the history preservation efforts of the Harbor Springs Area Historical Society (HSAHS). Renovation plans for the historic Harbor Springs City Hall building are underway. HSAHS plans to open an area history museum in that location.

    Tours will take place from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm and will be by reservation only. Click here for more details

    Reported by: Rob Englund


    Robert "Jake" Jacobson

    10/04
    Captain Robert "Jake" Jacobson, who sailed 43 years for U.S. Steel and commanded the Roger Blough, died Sept. 30, 2003, in Maple, Wis. He started sailing in August 1953. He earned his mate's original license in 1958, received his master's license in 1963 and retired in 1996.


    Delmar R. Webster Jr.

    10/04
    Delmar R. Webster Jr., 44, of Oregon Ohio passed away unexpectedly at the Merchant Marine Firefighting Academy in Leonardtown, Maryland.

    His career on the Great Lakes was spent with the Columbia Transportation Fleet (Oglebay Norton) and Inland Lakes Management. He was most recently employed as 1st Assistant Engineer aboard the Str. Alpena and had been one of the key players in the automation of her engine room and boiler room. He also served on saltwater during Desert Storm.

    He leaves behind his son Ian and daughter Cassandra. Also surviving are his mother Catherine Webster, Sisters Michalle (Robert Spradling, and Patrice (Gary Clapsaddle) Webster. He also leaves behind two nieces and three nephews. He was predeceased by his father Capt. Delmar R. Webster Sr. and his sister Tina Marie Webster.

    The family will receive visitors at the Coy Road Chapel of the Eggelston - Meinert Funeral Home in Oregon, OH on Sunday October 5, 2003 from 2 p. m. until 9 p. m.

    Reported by: Wade P. Streeter


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 04

    On October 4, 1979 the ST. LAWRENCE NAVIGATOR arrived at the Port Weller Dry Docks, St. Catharines, Ont. where she was lengthened to the Seaway maximum length of 730' overall. A new bow and cargo section was installed including a bow thruster and was assigned Hull #66. New tonnage; 18,788 GRT, 12,830 NRT, 32,279 dwt. The ST. LAWRENCE NAVIGATOR was renamed c) CANADIAN NAVIGATOR in 1980 and now sails for ULS Corp.

    The TEXACO BRAVE (2) was launched today in 1976 by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Shimonoseki, Japan for Texaco Canada Ltd., Don Mills, Ont.

    On October 4, 1980 the ARTHUR B. HOMER was laid up for the last time at Erie, PA.

    As a result of the collision between the PARKER EVANS and the SIDNEY E. SMITH, JR. 4 months earlier alternate one-way traffic between the Black River Buoy and Buoys One and Two in Lake Huron was agreed upon by the shipping companies. This happened on October 4, 1972

    The JAMES E. FERRIS' last trip before scrapping was from Duluth, MN with a split load of 261,000 bushels of wheat for Buffalo, NY arriving there October 4, 1974.

    The JIIMAAN, Twin Screw RoRo Cargo/Passenger Ferry built to Ice Class 1D standards had its Keel laid October 4, 1991

    On October 4, 1982, the Benjamin F. Fairless laid up for the last time in Duluth. She was towed out of Duluth on her way to an overseas scrap yard on June 17, 1988.

    October 4, 1940 - The Ludington Daily News reported "The Pere Marquette carferries handled approximately 95,000 freight cars last year." (1939)

    On 4 October 1877, BRITISH LION (3 mast wooden bark, 128', 293 T, built in 1862 at Kingston, Ontario) was carrying coal from Black River, OH to Brockville, Ont. She was driven ashore at Long Point in Lake Erie by a storm and wrecked. She was the first bark on the Lakes to be wire rigged and she was built for the Great Lakes - Liverpool trade.

    The barges BELLE CASH and GEO. W. HANNAFORD, owned by Capt. Cash of East China Township, Michigan, were driven ashore on Long Point in Lake Erie on 3 October 1875.

    On 4 October 1883, JAMES DAVIDSON (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 231', 1456 gt, built in 1874 at W. Bay City, MI) was carrying coal and towing the barge MIDDLESEX in a storm on Lake Huron. She was driven onto a reef near Thunder Bay Island and ripped up her bottom. The barge was rescued by the tug V. SWAIN. No lives were lost. Financially, the DAVIDSON was the most extensive loss on the Lakes in the 1883 season. She was valued at $65,000 and insured for $45,000. Her coal cargo was valued at $8,000.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Crapo Enters Dry Dock

    10/03
    The cement storage and transfer vessel S.T. Crapo was towed from her dock in Green Bay Thursday to Bayship Building in Sturgeon Bay, Wi.

    The tugs William Selvick and Jimmy L. towed the steamer from Green Bay and arrive at Bayship that afternoon. By early evening the Crapo was ready to enter the graving dock. She is reported to be at Bayship for survey and repairs.

    The Edwin H. Gott remains at Bayship undergoing repairs to a collapsed ballast tank bulkhead.

    Pictures by Jeff DuMez
    Towed from Green Bay on the Fox River.
    Passing through the Walnut St. Bridge.
    Forward cabins.
    Jimmy L. guides the bow.
    Pilothouse.
    Outbound for Sturgeon Bay.

    Reported by: Mike Jackson and Jeff DuMez


    Seaway Corporations Lead Great Lakes Trade Mission to Belgium and the Netherlands 

    10/03
    The Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (SLSDC) and the Canadian St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation (SLSMC) are leading a 23-member delegation of U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes executives to Belgium and the Netherlands for the Seaway’s 26th trade mission from Oct. 3 - 12. The delegates will promote the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway system as a safe, reliable and competitive route for exporting and importing goods. 

    Programs and meetings during the week-long mission will provide opportunities for delegates to make contacts with European maritime industry leaders and decision-makers. The delegation represents a cross section of the maritime industry: port and terminal operators, shipowners and operators, shipping agents and labor.

    “Trade missions serve a key role in promoting the entire Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway System,” said SLSDC Administrator Albert Jacquez. “Marketing our System’s competitive advantages demands that we reach out, person-to-person, to new and existing customers, educating and updating them on what we have to offer: expertise, technology, customer-focus, and safe, efficient, reliable service.” 

    Canadian counterpart, President and CEO Richard “Dick” Corfe, noted the importance of European markets to the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway System. “We recognize that the ports of Rotterdam and Antwerp remain one of our best opportunities to grow our business,” said Corfe. “In addition to promoting our system’s competitive advantages, we are also keen on observing and adapting for our own use the best practices applied in European ports.”

    Delegates arrive in Brussels and travel to the Ports of Ghent, Zeebrugge, and Antwerp in Belgium; the latter port is one of the largest container ports in Europe. After receiving country briefings they begin a series of meetings with shippers, government officials and marine professionals. An integral part of the trade mission is learning as well as teaching. After touring ports and terminals to get an up close look at existing infrastructure and discussing planned upgrades, the delegates will conduct an education and information seminar about the Seaway for local maritime officials.

    The delegation will spend two days in the Netherlands, splitting its time between the ports of Amsterdam and Rotterdam. In addition to meeting with steel experts and seeking new customers, the Seaway delegates are interested in hearing details on short sea shipping operations that could be adopted in the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway system.

    Since 1985, Seaway trade missions have visited 29 countries, oftentimes traveling to European ports and cities, which comprise the major overseas export-import trade partner for the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway system. This latest mission, scheduled October 4-11, marks the fifth trade mission to Rotterdam, the fourth to Antwerp and second to Amsterdam.

    Seaway trade missions have historically helped attract new business in the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway System in cruising, project cargoes, and forestry products. The cruising industry, largely absent from the System for decades, has recently been growing steadily with the addition of vessels such as the French luxury yacht Le Levant and the German cruise vessel C. Columbus. Reaching out to Dutch shipper Wagenborg resulted in that company designing more than a dozen ships capable of transiting the Seaway, which were used in moving oversized project cargoes such as oil drilling equipment to Canada’s Athabasca Oil Sands Project fields in northern Alberta. Lumber shipments from Germany to the Lakehead in Duluth, MN have opened a niche market officials there are optimistic will grow.

    Reported by: Tim Downey


    Minnesota nugget plant resumes operation

    10/03
    Mesabi Nugget, the Minnesota pilot plant demonstrating iron nugget technology, is operating again after a three-month shutdown for maintenance and fine-tuning.

    The plant at Northshore Mining Co. in Silver Bay began operating last May, using taconite concentrate to produce nuggets of nearly 100 percent iron. If technically and commercially successful, the process could offer a new product line to Minnesota's taconite producers, enabling them to feed the growing electric arc mini mill segment of steelmaking.

    Between June 7 and July 7 the nugget plant turned out 10,000 tons of iron nuggets, which were sold to Steel Dynamics Inc., a mini mill in Butler, Ind. The plant was then shut down so improvements could be made to the production process.

    The plant is expected to operate with only minor interruptions until next May, producing another 10,000 tons of nuggets.

    If successful, the pilot plant could lead to development of a $95 million prototype iron nugget facility at Silver Bay. Partners in the project are Kobe Steel Ltd., Cleveland-Cliffs Inc., Ferrometrics Inc. -- a Minnesota subsidiary of Mesabi Nugget -- and Steel Dynamics Inc.

    Reported by: Greg McDougal


    Marquette Report

    10/03
    Necessary rail work kept the ore dock quiet for a few days. The dock was back in business Thursday with the arrival of the Lee A. Tregurtha for a load of ore while her fleet mate Paul Tregurtha brought a load of coal.

    Lee A. Tregurtha ready to load.
    Paul Tregurtha unloading coal.
    Stern of the Paul Tregurtha and bow of the Lee A. seen through the ore dock.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe


    Toledo Update

    10/03
    The CSL Niagara finished unloading ore at the Torco Ore Dock and departed late Thursday morning. The Atlantic Huron arrived at the Torco Ore Dock several hours later to unload ore. The Kaye E. Barker finished loading coal at the CSX Docks and departed on Thursday morning. The Cuyahoga was loading grain at ADM/Countrymark Elevator and is expected to depart Thursday afternoon.

    The dredge Columbia continues dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay north of the pump out station which is located north of the Torco Ore Dock. There are no vessels in at the Shipyard at this time. The Armco, Buckeye, and Courtney Burton remain in lay-up.

    The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will be the Atlantic Huron coming over from the Torco Dock after unloading ore and Canadian Progress on Thursday evening. The Arthur M. Anderson on Friday. The Arthur M. Anderson makes a return visit on Saturday, followed by the Lee A. Tregurtha and Charles M. Beeghly on Sunday.

    The next scheduled ore boat due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Monday.

    Classic views of Toledo Shipping
    Woodland at the Toledo Warehouse Dock unloading newsprint. She currently sails as the barge Nova D.
    Silver Bay loading grain at Midstates Elevator. She has just been sold to the Canadian Fleet Soo River Company. When she arrived in Canada she was renamed Judith M. Pierson.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 03

    The E.G. GRACE was delivered to the Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland on October 3, 1943. The E.G. GRACE was part of a government program designed to upgrade and increase the capacity of the U.S. Great Lakes fleet during World War II. In order to help finance the building of new ships, the U.S.M.C. authorized a program that would allow existing fleets to obtain new boats by trading in their older boats to the Government for credit. As partial payment for each new vessel, a fleet owner surrendered the equivalent tonnage of their existing and/or obsolete vessels, along with some cash, to the Maritime Commission.

    October 3, 1941 - The CITY OF FLINT 32, eastbound from Milwaukee collided with the PERE MARQUETTE 22 westbound. The PERE MARQUETTE 22 headed directly for Manitowoc for repairs while the CITY OF FLINT 32 continued to Ludington where she discharged her cargo, then headed for the shipyard in Manitowoc.

    On 3 October 1887, ALBION (wooden propeller steam barge, 134’, 297 GT, built in 1862 at Brockville, Ont.) was carrying lumber and towing the schooner ARK in a foggy night during a gale. She stranded on the rocks near Grindstone City, MI in Lake Huron. The U. S. Lifesaving Service rescued her crew and some of her gear and cargo, but she was totally wrecked the next day. The schooner ARK survived.

    The barges BELLE CASH and GEO. W. HANNAFORD, owned by Capt. Cash of East China Township, Michigan, were driven ashore on Long Point in Lake Erie on 3 October 1875.

    On 3 October 1900, one hundred years ago, The steel freighter CAPTAIN THOMAS WILSON left Port Huron on her maiden voyage for Marquette, Michigan where she loaded 6,200 tons of iron ore for Cleveland, Ohio.

    ARK (3-mast iron-strapped wooden scow-schooner-barge, 177', 512 t, built in 1875 at Port Dalhousie, Ontario) was in tow of the steam barge ALBION (wooden propeller, 134', 297 gt, built in 1862 at Brockville, Ontario) on Lake Huron when a terrific storm struck on 3 October 1887. Both were loaded with lumber. Both vessels were driven ashore near Grindstone City, Michigan. The U.S. Lifesaving Service rescued the crews. The ALBION was pounded to pieces the next day and the ARK was declared a total loss, but was recovered and was sailing again within the month.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Grant will help restore Point Betsie lighthouse

    10/02
         A $431,000 state grant will help restore Michigan’s famous Point Betsie light and might prompt the federal government to transfer the 145-year-old lighthouse to local ownership.

          The money is expected to pay for extensive restoration of the lighthouse and nearby foghorn building. Work will include exterior masonry renovations, a new roof, a security system, windows, and restored heat and water service.

          "It's just tremendous news," Benzie County Administrator Chuck Clarke said. "This is a great day for the future of Point Betsie."

          The lighthouse, built in 1858, helped ships navigate Lake Michigan through the Manitou Passage.

          The light was automated in 1983 and the building continued to serve as quarters for U.S. Coast Guard personnel until 1996.

          This spring marked the first season for public visits to the lighthouse, a key factor in securing the state grant. The almost 7,000 visitors and donations from the 500-member Friends of Point Betsie helped raise a $143,000 match for the grant.

    Reported by: Lisa Melville


    Lake Express hires ship operator

    10/02
    Lake Express LLC, which proposes to run a high-speed ferry between Muskegon and Milwaukee, has hired Hornblower Marine Services Inc. to operate the vessel.

    Hornblower is overseeing construction of the 192-foot ferry at Austal USA shipyards in Mobile, Ala. Austal calls the Lake Express catamaran ferry a "landmark" construction project because it will be the first high-speed car ferry in the continental United States. Delivery is expected in May.

    Meanwhile, debate continues over where the ferry will dock in Muskegon. The two remaining dock options are the Mart Dock downtown and the Great Lakes Marina in the city's Lakeside neighborhood. County and community leaders made a major push to have the ferry operate downtown on the Mart Dock but negotiations are continuing.

    Hornblower provides a number of maritime services to vessel owners and operators throughout North America. The company has clients with high-speed and traditional passenger ferries, casino boats, excursion boats and small cruise ships.

    Reported by: Phil Barry


    Toledo News

    10/02
    The Cuyahoga was upbound the Maumee River Wednesday afternoon bound for one of the elevators to load grain. The CSL Niagara was due into the Torco Ore Dock on Wednesday evening to unload ore.

    There were no vessels at the Shipyard on Wednesday. The Armco, Buckeye, and Courtney Burton remain in lay-up.

    The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will be the Kaye E. Barker, Arthur M. Anderson, Atlantic Huron, and Canadian Progress on Thursday. The Arthur M. Anderson makes a return visit on Saturday, followed by the Lee A. Tregurtha, and Charles M. Beeghly on Sunday.

    The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the Atlantic Huron on Thursday followed by the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Monday.

    Future vessel arrivals will have the Algoway due in at the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock on Monday. The Algomarine is expected to arrive in several days to unload a cargo of oats loaded in Thunder Bay, Ontario at one of the upriver dock sites.

    With stormy weather and low water conditions predicted for the western basin of Lake Erie for the next several days some of the vessels scheduled to arrive at the various dock sites may be delayed.

    Classic views of Toledo Shipping
    Canadian Explorer with the tug Montana upbound the Maumee River from the Hi Level Bridge bound for one of the elevators to load a grain cargo.
    Judith M. Pierson inbound Maumee Bay with a load of ore bound for the Lakefront Docks.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman


    Cote Ste. Catherine Traffic

    10/02
    Artic supplies being loaded into the hold of the Nova D., which will soon be departing for the port of Iqaluit on her last trip of the season.
    Chaffing on the hull from the towing chains on the Nova D.
    Purvis Marine tug Reliance based at the Soo Ont. waiting for the completion of loading on the Nova D. This handsome looking tug will then tow the barge Nova D. to Iqaluit in the Artic.
    Saturn up bound at the Cote Wharf above the Cote lock passing the stern of the Reliance.
    Saturn's small but very effective wheelhouse.

    Reported by: Kent Malo


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 02

    CANADIAN OLYMPIC was christened on October 2, 1976 at St. Catharines. Her name honors the Olympic Games that were held at Montreal that year.

    The TADOUSSAC (2) departed Collingwood on her maiden voyage October 2, 1969 to load iron ore at Fort William, Ont.

    The AMERICAN last operated in 1956 and then was laid up at Manitowoc, WI. On October 2, 1972

    The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON and CONSUMERS POWER (3) arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan October 2, 1988 where dismantling began on October 14th by Li Chong Steel & Iron Works Co. Ltd.

    On her maiden voyage October 2, 1943, the E.G. GRACE cleared Lorain bound for Superior, WI to load iron ore.

    The HOCHELAGA (2) departed Toronto October 2, 1993 in tow of the McKeil tugs GLENBROOK and KAY COLE for Montreal, Que and then to the cutters torch.

    On October 2, 1969, the Tadoussac entered service.

    October 2, 1954 - The PERE MARQUETTE 21 sailed into Ludington on her second maiden voyage of her career.

    On 2 October 1888, OLIVER CROMWELL (wooden schooner-barge, 138', 291 T, built in 1853 at Buffalo) was being towed by the steamer LOWELL in a storm in Lake Huron when she broke her towline. She rode out most of the storm at anchor, but then she snapped her anchor chains and she was driven ashore at Harbor Beach, MI where she broke up.

    The 183', 3-mast wooden schooner QUEEN CITY was launched at W. Bay City, Michigan on 2 October 1873.

    The Port Huron Times reported the following shipwrecks from a severe storm that swept the Lakes over 2-3 October 1887: Schooner CITY OF GREEN BAY lost near South Haven, MI; the schooner-barge CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON, lost near Buffalo, NY; the steam barge ALBION and her consort the schooner-barge ARK ashore near Grindstone City, MI; the 3-mast schooner EBENEZER ashore near Holland, MI; the wooden package freighter CALIFORNIA sunk in the Straits of Mackinac; the schooner HOLMES ashore at Middle Island on Lake Huron; the schooner GARIBALDI ashore near Port Elgin on Lake Huron; the barge MAYFLOWER disabled near Grand Haven, MI; the schooner D. S. AUSTIN ashore at Point Clark; and the schooner HENRY W. HOAG ashore at Erie, PA.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Gott in for Repairs

    10/01
    The Edwin H. Gott arrived at Bay Shipbuilding over the weekend for repairs to a ballast tank bulkhead.

    The bulkhead is located between two ballast tanks and it collapsed last week while on Lake Erie.

    Reported by: Phil Hammond


    Low Water Sends Ships to Anchor

    10/01
    Strong winds in the area on Tuesday sent ships to anchor for most of the day in the St. Marys River due to low water levels in the lower pool and at the Rock Cut. The Algowood and Middletown anchored at Hay Lake, while the Quebecois tied up at West Pier for a few hours. Roger Blough and Oglebay Norton were anchored for several hours above the locks near Paradise, MI.

    The Rock Cut was reading minus ten inches below datum for a few hours Tuesday afternoon. Around 5 p.m. water levels began to slowly rise and the vessels began to get underway. At 5:45 p.m. the water level was at minus 8 inches and rising.

    Adam E Cornelius waiting to lock upbound.
    Quebecois tied up at West Pier waiting for water levels to go up.
    Great Lakes Trader upbound for Superior WI.
    Saltie Rega departs the Mac Lock upbound.

    Reported by: Scott Best


    Fleet's August Ore Total Worst In Years

    10/01
    U.S.-flag Great Lakes carriers suffered one of their lowest monthly iron ore totals in memory in August. The fleet moved only 4 million net tons of iron ore, the lowest total for a full month of non-weather impacted navigation in a number of years. The comparison with last year is equally bleak; this August's ore float represents a decrease of 30.6 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. In terms of the 5-year average, this August represents a drop of 27.9 percent compared to the month's 5-year average.

    The August ore float reflects the still-weak state of the steel industry. For much of August, the steel industry operated at less than 75 percent of capacity. Since it takes 1.3 tons of iron ore to make a ton of steel in a blast furnace, demand for iron ore plummeted.

    The coal trade for U.S.-flag lakers fared better in August. Shipments totaled 2.9 million net tons, an increase of 17.7 percent compared to a year ago and a boost of nearly 11 percent over the month's 5-year average. Exceptionally strong demand for western coal drove the trade in August.

    Sluggish is again the best way to characterize the August stone trade for U.S.-flag lakers. Loadings in U.S. bottoms totaled 3.2 million net tons, a decrease of 3.6 percent compared to August 2002 and a drop of 5.2 percent compared to the 5-year average. The trade has been plagued by reduced demand for fluxstone from steelmakers and lackluster demand for aggregate from the construction industry.

    For the year, the U.S.-flag ore float stands at 25.1 million net tons, a decrease of 9.9 percent compared to the same point in 2002 and a plunge of 19.4 percent compared to the 5-year average. Coal shipments are essentially on par with last year and the 5-year average, but stone loadings are down 9 and 11 percent respectively.

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association


    Presque Isle reports onboard fuel overflow

    10/01
    About 1,000 gallons of fuel oil overflowed through a vent onto the deck of the Presque Isle Tuesday morning while the vessel was downbound on Lake Superior, the U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Office in Duluth reported.

    The Presque Isle's master reported the incident to the Coast Guard and said it appeared all the spilled fuel oil remained aboard the vessel, said Lt. Cmdr. Mark Ledbetter, executive officer of MSO-Duluth.

    Ledbetter said late Tuesday afternoon that his office was trying to arrange for an aircraft to fly over the area where the incident occurred to check whether any fuel oil made its way into the lake.

    According to Ledbetter, the Presque Isle was between the Apostle Islands and the Keweenaw Peninsula and conducting an onboard transfer of 310 blend fuel oil when a "burp" sent fuel through a vent onto the vessel's deck. The Coast Guard is investigating.

    Presque Isle loaded taconite pellets at Two Harbors, Minn., on Monday and is bound for Gary, Ind. The vessel is owned by Great Lakes Fleet in Duluth.

    Reported by: Dan Kennedy


    Manitowoc Wins Contract To Build Two Hot Oil Barges For Moran Towing

    10/01
    The Manitowoc Company, Inc. through its subsidiary, Bay Shipbuilding Co., has been awarded a contract from Moran Towing Corporation to build two ocean-class, double-hull, hot oil tank barges. The first barge is scheduled for delivery in the fourth quarter of 2004, and the second in the second quarter of 2005. Other contract terms were not disclosed.

    Each of the 110,000-barrel capacity barges will measure 425 feet in length by 78 feet in width and will be configured with 10 cargo compartments serviced by three diesel-driven, deep-well cargo pumps. The barges will also feature a stern notch and an Intercon coupling system, which will link the units to customer-supplied tugs. In addition, the barges will be equipped with an onboard heating system to maintain consistent cargo temperatures of 135° F. Both vessels will be ABS, U.S. Coast Guard, and OPA-90 compliant.

    “This contract award is another indication that the pace of orders for OPA-90 class vessels is increasing,” said Dennis McCloskey, president of Manitowoc’s Marine Group. “We are also pleased to be Moran’s yard of choice for this project. While these barges will be the fifth and sixth OPA-90 vessels built by Bay Shipbuilding, this is our first opportunity to serve Moran as a customer. Upon completion, these tank barges will be among the most sophisticated petroleum carriers in Moran’s growing fleet of ocean-class vessels.”

    Earlier this month, Manitowoc announced that Bay Shipbuilding Co. (BSC) had won a contract for construction of a 140,000-barrel, double-hull, hot oil tank barge from Penn Maritime, Inc. This contract also includes a high- horsepower, ocean-class tug, which BSC will build at its Sturgeon Bay facility.

    The Moran Towing Moran Towing Corporation is based in Greenwich, CT and has a 150-year heritage of serving the maritime industry. With a fleet of 85 tugs and 26 barges, Moran serves 13 ports along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Its range of services includes ship docking, general towing, marine transportation of petroleum and dry bulk products, as well as contract and specialty towing.

    Reported by: Andy Severson


    Safety board charges shipyard

    10/01
    Port Weller Dry Docks faces 47 charges from Canada’s Workers Safety and Insurance Board of knowingly providing false or misleading information to the board, and other offences, The Standard newspaper in St. Catharines reported recently.

    With maximum penalties under the Workers Safety and Insurance Act at $100,000 a count for businesses and $25,000 a count for individuals, the fines could total $4.7 million for the shipyard if convictions are recorded.

    But Alan Thoms, president and chief executive of Canadian Shipbuilding and Engineering Ltd., parent company of Port Weller Dry Docks, told the newspaper the charges are “administrative in nature.

    A search warrant was executed on Port Weller Dry Docks March 19, said WSIB spokesman Perry Jensen. The violations are not criminal and fall under the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act.

    Reported by: Mike Jackson


    Twin Ports Report

    10/01
    Tuesday was a pretty slow day in the Twin Ports. Columbia Star was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal. Orna was finishing a load of grain at Cenex Harvest States 2 while Canadian Prospector was anchored out on the lake waiting to take the berth once it's vacated.

    Most of this season's vessel traffic at Cenex Harvest States has been confined to its No. 2 berth. But a couple of trains of grain cars have been unloaded on the No. 1 side of the complex, raising the likelihood that one or more vessels will load there soon.

    Today isn't likely to be much busier. Paul R. Tregurtha is due to arrive in the middle of the nigh to load coal for Presque Isle near Marquette; Adam E. Cornelius is due at the DMIR ore dock in Duluth; and Great Lakes Trader is due at BNSF ore dock in Superior.

    Reported by: Al Miller


    Saginaw River News

    10/01
    After several quiet days, commercial shipping traffic picked up Tuesday on the Saginaw River.

    The Mississagi was inbound during the night and unloaded Tuesday morning at the Sargent dock near the I-75 Bridge at Zilwaukee. The vessel had completed unloading early in the afternoon and was outbound from Saginaw at about 2:30 p.m.

    The Canadian Transfer arrived at the GM dock in Saginaw at noon on Tuesday. About 4 p.m., the Transfer continued up the the Valley Asphalt dock to finish unloading. The vessel was outbound from Sixth Street in Saginaw shortly after 6 p.m.

    The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. passed Light 12 on the Saginaw Bay at 8:15 p.m. Tuesday, inbound with a load of coal from Duluth for the Consumers Energy plant at the mouth of the river.

    Canadian Transfer upbound at Wheeler's Landing.
    Another view approaching Lafayette Bridge.
    Stern view.
    Mississagi downbound at Liberty Bridge.
    Another view.
    Stern view.
    Mississagi silhouetted against a fall sky.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


    Shiploading Conveyor on the Move Again

    10/01
    With the help of the Ferriss Marine tugs Magnetic and Norma B, the Klochko ship loading conveyor was again moved by barge back to the Harridon Dock in the Rouge River in preparation for an upcoming boat.

    It had been moved to the face of Zug Island late last week to be used in the loading of the Philip R. Clarke. The next boat scheduled to use the conveyor will be loading a cargo of rock salt destined for Duluth from the Detroit Salt Company Mines at Detroit.

    In order for there to be enough room to offload the conveyor at Harridon, the tug Rebecca Lynn and her tank barge A-410 were kind enough to wait at the Michigan Marine Dock in the Rouge River. Meanwhile a stiff wind off the dock developed while unloading the conveyor, so after the conveyor was unloaded the Magnetic assisted the Rebecca Lynn into Trumbull Asphalt dock.

    Tug Magnetic with the conveyor and barge makes their way through the Conrail Bridge in the Rouge River as the Tug Norma B. stands by.
    Magnetic hold the bow of the Andrie Tank Barge A-410 against the dock at Trumbull Asphalt while lines are being made fast.
    Magnetic with the empty deck barge No. 48 heading out of the Rouge River to pick up the conveyor at Zug Island.
    Magnetic pushing hard to keep the A-410 in position while the crew is putting out lines.
    Inbound at the Short Cut Bridge
    A view of the Magnetic’s Stack through the pilothouse window of the Norma B. The cement pillars in the background are for the bridge that carries I-75 over the Rouge River.
    Standing by to assist the Tug Rebecca Lynn/Barge A-410 into Trumbull with the Alabama resting peacefully alongside at Harridon.
    Magnetic finished with the Rebecca Lynn/A-410 and heading back to the Harridon Dock.
    Stern view of the Magnetic waiting for the Rebecca Lynn to arrive at Trumbull Asphalt.
    Norma B. and Magnetic slowly winding their way up the Rouge River toward the Harridon Dock.
    Tug Rebecca Lynn and Barge A-410 patiently wait at the MMT dock in the Rouge.

    Reported by: Ferriss Marine Contracting


    St. Marys River Tour

    10/01
    Saturday a special cruise was held on the St. Marys River. The cruise traveled from the Soo down through the Rock Cut and down to DeTour.

    Burns Harbor approaching the Poe Lock
    Burns Harbor 21 feet lower than the tour boat. We had already locked through the MacArthur Lock and were at the Lake Superior level leaving us above the Burns Harbor.
    Canadian Transport offloading salt at Soo carbide Plant.
    Oglebay Norton at Mission Point.
    Research ship Kiyi at the Lake Nicolet junction upbound to the Soo.
    Alpena upbound near junction Buoy in Lake Nicolet.
    Dredging work going on in St. Marys River above the Rock Cut.
    Oglebay Norton upbound at Mission Point .

    Reported by: Cathy Kohring


    Fish tugs in Michigan's Upper Peninsula - II

    10/01
    This is the second set of fish tug and workboat photos taken last week along the Michigan coast of Lake Superior. These photos cover boats seen from Keweenaw Bay east to Whitefish Point. Most public harbors were visited except for Little Lake. The Bay Mills area was visited after dark so it was not explored. Several trapnet boats were seen at Iroquois Beach also at dark. These appear to be working off the beach as no dock or harbor could be seen from the public roadway.

    While a considerable number of fish tugs were seen in the Upper Peninsula, many were out of the water or converted to non-fishing uses. It is perhaps telling that in four days, only one fish tug was seen underway.

    Unidentified fish tug on blocks at Pequaming.
    Kathy in lower harbor, Marquette.
    Linda Lee in lower harbor, Marquette.
    Tug BeeJay with crane barge in upper harbor, Marquette.
    Former fish tug Oluf Mechalson in upper harbor, Marquette.
    Grand Island ferry tug Abraham W. Williams .
    Unidentified fish tug in Munising. Life ring onboard said Jessie K..
    Kathy, Munising.
    C&R, Munising Also present in Munising were the Max B, the Arlend A and the Alice L, all trapnet boats.
    Vagabond, Grand Marais.
    Arbutus, Grand Marais. Also beached at Grand Marais were the Janice E, a gill net boat and the trap net Winnebago.
    Casey- D, Whitefish Point.
    David Boyd. This former federally-owned boat is now listed as a research vessel for the Great Lakes Shipwreck Historical Society.
    Cassie-K, Whitefish Point.
    Emerald's Son, Whitefish Point.
    Unnamed open boat, Whitefish Point.
    Fish Hog, Whitefish Point.
    Mr M$ne, Whitefish Point.
    H.W. Hocks, Whitefish Point.
    La Belle, Whitefish Point.
    Another open boat, Whitefish Point.
    6 Fish tugs at Whitefish Point. Left to right are an unidentified beached trapnet boat, an unidentified gillnet boat, the Stuart Barry (beached), the gillnet H.W. Hocks, another beached trapnet boat almost out of view in the trees and the gillnet La Belle.
    Landing Craft approaching St. Ignace.
    Opening bow door.
    On the Beach. The landing craft contained two fuel tanks that were filled by tanker. It appeared that these tanks may be horse drawn in Mackinac Island.

    Reported by: Tom Hynes


    Today in Great Lakes History - October 01

    The CHICAGO TRADER was laid up on October 1, 1976 at the Frog Pond in Toledo.

    Dismantling commenced October 1, 1974 on the KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1) at Santander, Spain.

    October 1, 1997 - The CITY OF MIDLAND 41 was towed out of Ludington to be converted to a barge.

    On 1 October 1843, ALBANY (wooden brig, 110T, built in 1835 at Oswego, NY) was carrying merchandise and passengers when she went aground in a storm and was wrecked just a few miles from Mackinaw City, MI.

    The steam barge C. H. GREEN was launched at E. Saginaw, Michigan for Mason, Green & Corning of Saginaw on 1 October 1881. She was schooner rigged and spent her first year as a tow barge. The following winter her engine and boiler were installed. Her dimensions were 197' x 33' x 13', 920 tons. She cost $70,000.

    On 1 October 1869, SEA GULL (wooden schooner, 83 tons, built in 1845 at Milan, Ohio) was carrying lumber in a storm on Lake Michigan. She was driven ashore and wrecked south of Grand Haven, Michigan. The wreck was pulled off the beach a few days later, but was declared a constructive loss, stripped and abandoned. She was owned by Capt. Henry Smith of Grand Haven.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




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