Great Lakes NEWS & RUMOR Archive

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Engine room fire damages tug

10/31:
At approx. 1149 on Thursday, the tug Carolyn Joe left a tow,comprising the tug Glenside and barges, to bring a crew member to Kingston. Near Snake Island, just west of Kingston, the tug developed an engine room fire. The coast guard cutter Bittern was dispatched to render assistance. The crew of the Bittern extinguished the fire. The tug was taken to the dock at the Kingston Psychiatric Hospital where Kingston Firefighters checked to see the fire was totally extinguished. The tug was still at the dock this evening . There was obvious engine room damage but no injuries.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




J.A.W. Iglehart in for repairs while Mapleglen visits Superior

10/31:
J.A.W. Iglehart cleared Fraser Shipyards in Superior after a brief stay. The vessel arrived there Oct. 28 and was gone by Oct. 30. No word on the reason for the visit.

P&H's Mapleglen paid a rare call to Superior on Oct. 30 to load at Harvest States elevator.

Reported by: Al Miller




Milwaukee County may acquire lighthouse

10/31:
The Parks, Energy and Environment Committee of the Milwaukee County Board has recommended that the county should take ownership of the the North Point Lighthouse, located in the county's Lake Park along Lake Michigan. The property is available at no cost and includes the cast iron tower, residence and a storage building on 0.64 hectares/1.6 acres east of Wahl Avenue. The U.S. Coast Guard no longer operates the facility and it has been declared surplus by the federal government. Originally 12 meters/39 feet tall, the tower was built in 1855 on a bluff overlooking the lake. After the bluff began to erode, it was moved 30 meters/100 feet inland in 1879. The tower was built to 48.8 meters/160 feet in 1912 and is on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. Two organizations, the Lake Park Friends and the Water Tower Landmark Trust, have supported the committees recommendation while Hostelling International has shown interest in converting the residence to a hostel.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Bill upholds foghorns along Lake Michigan

10/31:
Yesterday's Detroit News reported that the U.S. House of Representatives has passed a bill that includes an amendment aimed at keeping more than half of 18 foghorns along the Great Lakes in operation. The amendment, passed last week as part of the Coast Guard authorization bill, orders the secretary of transportation to "take such actions as may be necessary to ensure that foghorns in the following ports are in working order."

The foghorns are in St. Joseph, South Haven, Grand Haven, Muskegon, Pentwater, Ludington, Marquette, Saugatuck and Frankfort in Michigan and Michigan City, Ind.

Reported by: Mark Jackson




Today in Great Lakes History - October 31

CANADIAN EXPLORER's sea trials were conducted on October 31, 1983 on Lake Erie where a service speed of 13.8 m.p.h. was recorded.

The EDWIN H. GOTT was christened October 31, 1978 .

On October 31, 1973, the H.M. Griffith entered service.

J.W. McGIFFIN cleared Midland, Ont. on her maiden voyage October 31, 1973 bound for Thunder Bay, Ont. to load iron ore for Hamilton, Ont.

The CADILLAC (4) was launched October 31, 1942 as a) LAKE ANGELINA

ELMGLEN (2) cleared Owen Sound, Ont. on October 31, 1984 on her first trip in P. & H. colors.

On October 31, 1966 while downbound in the St. Marys River loaded with 11,143 tons of potash for Oswego, NY, the HALLFAX ran aground on a rocky reef and settled to the bottom with her hold full of water. She had grounded on Pipe Island Twins Reef just north of DeTour, MI.

The CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON (3) struck a reef the night of October 31, 1925 three miles south of Manitou Island, off the Keweenaw Peninsula, on Lake Superior.

On October 31, 1983 the SYLVANIA was towed out of the Frog Pond by the harbor tugs ARKANSAS and WYOMING. She was handed over to the tug OHIO for delivery to the Triad Salvage Co. at Ashtabula, OH arriving there on November 1st. Dismantling was completed there in 1984. Thus ended 78 years of service. Ironically the SYLVANIA, the first built of the 504 foot class bulkers, was the last survivor of that class. During her career with Columbia Transportation, the SYLVANIA had carried over 20 million tons and netted over $35 million.

Data from: Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history



3rd Quarter profits for Canada's big 3 steelmakers

10/30:
STELCO: Canada's biggest steelmaker, made $41 million (35 cents a share), up from $5 million (two cents a share) last year. Sales rose to $763 million from $712 million.

DOFASCO: No. 2 steelmaker, earned $43.6 million (51 cents a share), down from $50.1 million (58 cents a share). Sales improved to $743.6 million from $732.4 million.

ALGOMA STEEL: Third largest producer, earned $14.6 million (28 cents a share), down from $17.8 million (39 cents a share). Sales revenue rose to $319.8 million from $303.6 million.

All three steelmakers have mills on the Great Lakes, and receive their raw materials in whole or in part by Great Lakes freighters. Industry experts beleive the demand for steel will continue to be strong.

Reported by: Mark Jackson




September U.S.-Flag Float Up 6.3%

10/30:
The leading U.S.-Flag carriers working the Great Lakes hauled 13.8 million net tons of dry- and liquid-bulk cargo in September, an increase of 6.3 percent compared to the corresponding period in 1996. For the season, U.S.-Flag carriage stands at 84.6 million tons, or more than 8 percent ahead of last year's record-setting pace. In 1996, U.S.-Flag carriers moved more than 117 million tons of cargo on the Great Lakes, the most in any single navigation season since the recession of the early- and mid-1980s.

The U.S.-Flag ore float in September was 6.8 million tons, an increase of 5 percent. For the season, Lakes Jones Act vessels have moved 41.9 million tons of iron ore, an increase of 6.1 percent.

September coal loadings in U.S. bottoms were essentially unchanged from a year ago. Since the resumption of the coal trade in March, the U.S.-Flag float is 15.8 million tons, an increase of 15 percent.

Stone cargos for U.S.-Flag operators totaled 3.6 million tons in September, an increase of 10.2 percent. For the season, stone loadings in U.S. bottom are nearing 21 million tons, an increase of 9.5 percent.

Reported by: Lake Carriers Association




Salty experiences engine troubles

10/30:
While upbound on Lake St. Clair last night, the salt water vessel ISLAND GEM experienced a cooling problem with her engines. It was necessary to stop the engine and perform repairs about a half mile above the St. Clair Crib Light. This was a minor inconvenience to other vessels moving across the lake and repairs were made before day light.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Today in Great Lakes History - October 30

The tugs GLENADA and MOUNT McKAY towed AMOCO ILLINOIS from Essexville on October 30, 1985 and arrived at the M&M slip on November 1st. where she was to be scrapped.

The CADILLAC (4) and her former fleetmate CHAMPLAIN (3) arrived under tow by the the Dutch tug/supply ship THOMAS DE GAUWDIEF on October 30, 1987 at Aliaga, Turkey to be scrapped there.

The ISLE ROYALE (2) (Canal Bulk Freighter) was launched October 30, 1947 as a) SOUTHCLIFFE HALL for the Hall Corporation of Canada Ltd. (which in 1969 became Hall Corporation (Shipping) 1969 Ltd.), Montreal.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history



Algowest conversion press release

10/29:
Algoma Central awards $20 million contract to Port Weller Dry Docks (St. Catharines, Ont.) October 28, 1997 - Algoma Central Marine has awarded a contract valued at approximately $20 million to Port Weller Dry Docks to convert the bulk carrier M.V. Algowest to a self-unloader. The conversion of the Algowest is in addition to an $85 million fleet modernization program for the 23-vessel Algoma fleet. The Algowest will arrive at Port Weller in December, and will be delivered in June, 1998. Upon delivery, the vessel will join the Seaway Self Unloaders fleet.

"This major investment in the Algowest demonstrates our confidence in Port Weller Dry Docks, and in the long-term viability of Great Lakes shipping," said Tim Dool, Vice President, Algoma Central - Marine Group. "This investment is also a sign of our commitment to our more than 1200 employees," added Dool.

"This contract, in addition to other work secured, will bring winter employment at Port Weller to more than 400," said Charles Payne, General Manager, Port Weller Dry Docks. Earlier this month, Port Weller announced a $5 million investment in state-of-the-art technology to upgrade the production facility, including a production panel line, a robotic welding line, and a robotic stiffener line. The investment coincided with the signing of a new 5-year collective agreement with the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers Union, Local 680. Algoma Central previously awarded to Port Weller Dry Docks a $5.5 million contract for a mid-life refit of the vessel M.V. Algorail, for delivery April, 1998, to coincide with the beginning of the Great Lakes shipping season.

The conversion of the Algowest is the fourth major conversion Port Weller has carried out for Algoma Central Marine during the last ten years. Other vessels converted to self-unloaders include the M.V. Capt. Henry Jackman, the M.V. Algomarine, and the M.V. Algosteel. The 730-foot (225-meter) Algowest, with a 32,000-tonne cargo capacity, was built in 1982 at Collingwood Shipyards.

A division of Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd., Port Weller Dry Docks was established in 1946, and is the only Canadian shipyard on the Great Lakes. Established in 1899, and with offices in St. Catharines and Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., Algoma Central Marine owns and operates the largest Canadian fleet on the Great Lakes, and employs more than 1200, including 300 in Niagara. On completion of the Algowest, the value of Algoma Central contracts to Port Weller Dry Docks since the fall of 1995 will total $60million.




Another Ship in Seaway is Halted Due To Lack Of Water

10/29:
The third ship since Saturday has been held up because of not having enough water in the St Lawrence Seaway to permit passage. The ALGOPORT, a Canadian laker was forced to anchor at Wilson Hill near Massena at 2:30 AM, Monday, October 27th because the ship dropped below the 26-foot, 3 inch draft level that the St Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation uses to determine if a ship can safely pass. Again, officials blame an easterly wind for reducing the water level. Is there a possibility that the Seaway will have to have an early closing if the apparent battle between high water and low water proponents is not resolved? This is the question that seems to be on the minds of many residents and business owners along the Seaway. Truly, if it is the wind direction that determines passage, Mother Nature may not cooperate by refraining from water lowering winds.

A decision by the International St.Lawrence River Control Board to compensate for high waters in western Lake Ontario's residential area by increasing the flow of water at the New York Power Authority's Robert Moses-Robert H. Sanders power dam has left areas like Lake St. Lawrence and the St.Lawrence River with less and less water. Now, to permit these stranded ships passage, the water flow has to be decreased so that sufficient water is retained to allow ships to continue.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Public hearings planned for water flow

10/29:
A news publication, yesterday, stated that the International Joint Commission has scheduled public hearings to guage reaction to Plan 35-p, which would require "minor adustments" to the levels and flows. This new plan would authorize regulators to INCREASE the maximum flow rate from 310,000 cubic feet per second to 350,000 cfs at the Moses-Sanders dam at Massena. Many people are interested in this plan as water levels and water flow affects the economy of the locale, fish and wildlife, water quality, recreational boating and the overall eco-system of the area. For those concerned about this increase or outflow of water, a listing of 4 of these public hearings are as follows:

10/29/97 7 to 9:30 Central Library at 130 Johnson St Kingston, Ontario {613} 549-8888
11/12/97 7 to 9:30 TBA Brockport, N.Y.
11/13/97 7 to 9:30 Heights Golf Course at 7030 Bayview dr. Sodus Pt.N.Y.{315} 483-4767
11/14/97 7 to 9:30 TBA Massena, N.Y.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Seaway Salties Sold

10/29:
The Seaway-Max salties OMISALJ and MALINSKA have been sold and re-registered in the Bahamas. The well known former Croatia Line light blue hulled vessels now sport green hulls similsr to another regular Seaway visitor -UTVIKEN.

The GOLIKEN-BAH, ex Omisalj was at Eisenhower Lock Oct 27 enroute to Hamilton Ont on her fourth trip to the Lakes this season.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Today in Great Lakes History - October 29

ALGOLAKE was launched October 29, 1976

On October 29, 1986 the JAMES R. BARKER, who had suffered an engine room fire, was lashed side-by-side to the thousand-foot WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY and towed this way to Sturgeon Bay, Wis. for repairs.

The b) CANADIAN EXPLORER was christened on October 29, 1983 at the Port Weller Dry Docks.

The National Transportation Safety Board ruled on October 29, 1991 that Total Petroleum was responsible for the fire that destroyed the tanker JUPITER because of faulty moorings and exonerated the BUFFALO from primary responsibility.

On the afternoon of October 29, 1987 while upbound with coal from Sandusky, OH, the ROGER M. KYES ( b) ADAM E. CORNELIUS) went aground on Gull Island Shoal in Lake Erie's Middle Passage and began taking on water. About 3,000 tons of coal was transferred to the AMERICAN REPUBLIC after which the KYES freed herself the next morning. Damage from the grounding required extensive repairs.

The tug portion of the PRESQUE ISLE (2) departed New Orleans on October 29, 1973.

The H.C. HEIMBECKER's last trip started at Thunder Bay, Ont. with a load of grain bound for Owen Sound, Ont. where, on October 29, 1981, it was discovered that one of her boilers was cracked. When unloading was completed on October 30th, the HEIMBECKER proceeded under her own power to Ashtabula, OH for scrapping.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history



More on the Algowest conversion

10/28:
Reports are that the Algowest will be taken to Port Weller sometime in December of this year. Her delivery is expected in June, 1998.

Reported by: Scott McLellan




News from the Twin Ports

10/28:
A pair of Algoma boats showed up in unusual ports Oct. 27. Algosteel was loading taconite at Silver Bay while Algolake called in Superior to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal.

Middletown is doing the tour of ports on western Lake Superior. The steamer called in Superior Oct. 27 to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal. It's then proceeding to Taconite arbor to unload the coal for the power plant there. Then it's on to Silver Bay for taconite pellets.

Two unusual callers for Twin Ports -- Mapleglen and Canadian Voyager -- are scheduled for Oct. 28

Reported by: Al Miller




Algorail in Manistee

10/28:
The Algorail arrived off of the Manistee piers at 1700 yesterday and anchored off the harbor. The captain stated that it was his first time in manistee, and he wanted the weather to be perfect. As of 2230 on 10/27 the rail will be in at 0700 on 10/28, providing the captain is comfortable with the weather. The rail has stone for the Seng dock.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




GLMA Open House in Duluth

10/28:
On Saturday November 1, 1997, John Tanner, Superintendent of the Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Traverse City, Michigan, will be presenting an informational seminar at the Canal Park Museum in Duluth, Minnesota. The seminar will last from 10 am to 1 pm. Anyone interested in learning more about the academy is welcome to attend.

Reported by: Gary Schweitzer




New vice president named at Medusa

10/28:
Medusa Corporation yesterday announced that Robert D. Vilsack, who joined the company in September, 1997, has been elected to the position of Vice President, Secretary and General Counsel of the Company in anticipation of the retirement of John P. Siegfried at the end of October, 1997. In this position, Mr. Vilsack will be reporting to George E. Uding, Jr., President of the Company.

Reported by: James Neumiller




Today in Great Lakes History - October 28

The BURNS HARBOR was launched October 28, 1979.

The CANADIAN PIONEER's maiden voyage was on October 28, 1981 to Conneaut, OH to take on coal for Nanticoke, Ont.

The CANADIAN TRANSPORT (2) was launched October 28, 1978 for Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd., Toronto, Ont.

The GEMINI was christened October 28, 1978 at Huron, OH.

The GEORGE M. CARL (2) was launched October 28, 1922 as a) FRED G. HARTWELL (2)

The D.M. CLEMSON (2) was launched October 28, 1916

The CHARLES M. WHITE was launched October 28, 1945 as a C4-S-A4 cargo ship a) MOUNT MANSFIELD for the U.S. Maritime Commission (U.S.M.C. Hull #2369).



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Algowest to be converted to a self unloader

10/27:
Saturday's Globe and Mail newspaper reported that Algoma Central Marine awarded Port Weller drydocks a $20million contract to convert the ALGOWEST to a self-unloader. Not word yet on when she is due at the shipyard.

Reported by: Brian Bernard




Low Water Level Halts Seaway Traffic For 6 Hours

10/27:
Low water in the St Lawrence River, which has been a problem for property owners, marinas, and recreational boaters for several year, was bad enough Saturday, October 25th to close a section of the Seaway for six hours. Two east bound vessels, Panamanian-flagged and Bolivian-flagged, dropped anchor after Seaway traffic was suspended at 11 am, according to Rhonda M Worden, spokeswoman for the St Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation. Reductions in water flow downstream at the New York Power Authority's power dam which affect water levels between Massena and Ogdensburg, N.Y. allowed the Seaway to reopen at 5 pm. Army Engineers, Power Authority officials, and Ms Worden were of the opinion that easterly winds that push much of Lake Ontario's water westward and reduces the outflow into the St Lawrence were the main reason behind the low water. The St Lawrence River Board of Control decides water levels and the rate of water flow. Residents on the west end of Lake Ontario who have built homes on the shoreline of the Lake have been lobbying their legislatures and pressing the Board of Control to keep the water low.

In June, the Board made a decision to compensate for high waters in Lake Ontario and the upper lakes but this decision left Lake St Lawrence and St Lawrence River residents with less and less water and some feel this may have some responsibility in this present Seaway traffic closure. Just a month ago, the St Lawrence County Legistlature passed a resolution asking the St Lawence River Board of Control to treat communities along the River equally in its regulation of water levels but the message seemed to fall on deaf ears

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Majestic Star delivered

10/27:
Atlantic Marine Inc. has delivered the Majestic Star to Barden Development Co. The 3,000-passenger vessel will be operated by Majestic Star Casino from Buffington Harbor, Ind. The 110-meter/360-foot Majestic Star has four decks and a 3,900-meter/43,300-square-foot casino with 2,100 gaming positions.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Cargo Vessel Sinks;Nine Rescued; Six Are Missing

10/27:
A rescue ship pulled nine people from a life raft adrift in churning North Atlantic waters late Thursday,October 23rd, after their cargo freighter sank more than 400 miles off the coast of Nova Scotia. Fifteen crew members were forced to abandon the MV Vanessa after its cargo of chemical fertilizer shifted, causing the vessel to list and then disappear beneath the water's surface. Leonato Cal, radio operator on the container ship Summer Wind, said there was no sign of the other six passengers, who were apparently wearing life jackets as they bobbed in two story seas about 420 miles east of St John's

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Log salvage company threatens to leave state

10/27:
Scott Mitchen, founder of Superior Water-Logged Lumber Co., will reportedly tell Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson to speed the licensing process for recovering logs from the bottom of Lake Superior or the company will leave the state next year. More than 800 permit applications are pending. The company's salvage of logs that sank in the 19th century has created 30 jobs and reportedly has attracted thousands of people to Ashland County, Wis. Further, Thompson's administration helped Superior Water-Logged Lumber secure a low-interest U.S.$350,000 loan from federal funding. Since then, it has also used political connections to try to make the permit process faster, which has bogged down due to the intensive investigations required and the limited amount of people to accomplish the task.

Superior Water-Logged Lumber has suggested it pay for new temporary positions at the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources but the proposal has raised legal questions about Wisconsin accepting money from a firm it regulates. The company has also offered to let the department use its sonar equipment.

Under the newly enacted state budget, the permit process was reformed and the new system will take effect next season. However, log salvage companies have said it is too little while others have criticized it as special interest legislation that gives too much power to the businesses.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Project to study Lake Michigan mud plume starts

10/27:
Forty-five researchers from the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, 11 other universities and six U.S. government agencies have received a U.S.$13.75 million grant to study an annual late-winter mud plume in southern Lake Michigan. The five-year project, sponsored by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. National Science Foundation, is reportedly the largest Canadian/U.S. Great Lakes study in 25 years. The university's involvement is through its Great Lakes WATER (Wisconsin Aquatic, Technological and Environmental Research) Institute. It was formerly the Great Lakes Research Facility.

After shoreline ice thaws each year, weather conditions agitate the area and send more than one million tons of material from the lake bottom's shallow areas into the lake. Currents form the material into a plume about 320 kilometers/200 miles long and 16 kilometers/10 miles wide along the southern shore of the lake from Milwaukee to Grand Haven, Mich. It is thought that the plume is material eroded from the shoreline as well as some sediment washed into the lake before. The plume usually dissipates in a month but is believed to carry with it nutrients and pollutants throughout the area. It begins to head into the lake with two main eddies before breaking up. After, the annual bloom of microscopic algae (diatoms) begins in which half of the lake's plant growth occurs. Through the lake ecosystem, the algae is consumed by small organisms which in turn are eaten by other species.

Earlier this month, sediment traps of plastic tubes were deployed between Fox Point, Wis., and Grand Haven. They will be collected in early November. About 12 other traps, which can collect 23 samples, will remain deployed along with meters to measure currents. Early next year, U.S. Coast Guard helicopters will drop drifting instrument packages into the lake which will be monitored by satellites. The Great Lakes WATER Institute's research vessel Neeskay will also sail this winter to collect samples. A section of heavy steel plate will be used to reinforce its hull for icebreaking.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 27

While the JAMES R. BARKER was up bound October 27, 1986 on Lake Huron above buoys 11 & 12, a high pressure fuel line on the starboard engine failed causing an engine room fire, which was extinguished by on-board fire fighting equipment. Fortunately no one was injured. On October 29th the BARKER was lashed side-by-side to the thousand-foot WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY (b) Paul R. Tregurtha) and taken to Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

The PAUL THAYER (b) EARL W. OGLEBAY) was christened on October 27, 1973 at Lorain.

On her maiden voyage the HOCHELAGA (2) departed Collingwood on October 27, 1949 for Fort William, Ont. to load grain for Port Colborne, Ont.

The FRANCIS E. HOUSE was laid up at Duluth, MN on October 27, 1960 and remained idle there until April, 1966 when she was sold to the Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland and was renamed c) KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1).

On October 27, 1973 the HENRY LALIBERTÉ struck an embankment while backing from the Frontier Dock Slip at Buffalo, NY and damaged her steering gear beyond repair. As a consequence she was laid up there.

The RED WING (2) and the FRANK A. SHERMAN departed Lauzon, Que. on October 27, 1986 in tandem tow by the Vancouver based deep-sea tug CANADIAN VIKING bound for scrapping in Taiwan.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




The SS Milwaukee Clipper will return to Muskegon!

10/24:
MUSKEGON, MI-The Great Lakes Clipper Preservation Association (GLCPA), a Muskegon-based nonprofit organization, will be returning the SS Milwaukee Clipper to her home port of Muskegon within the next month. The Hammond Port Authority has reached an agreement with the GLCPA to sell the Milwaukee Clipper for one dollar. Empress Casinos, the gaming company that now occupies the Clipper’s former berth at the Hammond Marina, has agreed to cover the costs of the prep, tow, and tow insurance for returning the historic ship to Muskegon after an absence of 20 years. Andrie, Inc. will perform the prep and tow of the vessel. The GLCPA along with its 200+ volunteers, will work towards the restoration and preservation of the ship. Once restoration work commences, the GLCPA will use the Milwaukee Clipper as a museumship, maritime activity and learning center, entertainment complex, and bed andbreakfast facility. Donations (both financial and material) are being sought by the GLCPA for restoration work on the famous ship. The Milwaukee Clipper will be the second of only two National Historic Landmarks located in Muskegon (the other being the USS Silversides, a WWII submarine). The SS Milwaukee Clipper dates back to 1905 when she was originally built as the SS Juniata, a passenger ship which carried tourists and pioneers alike into the heartland of our nation, traversing the Great Lakes from Buffalo, New York to Chicago, Mackinac Island, and Duluth, Minnesota. In 1941 she was rebuilt into the SS Milwaukee Clipper and became the first streamline passenger ship on the Great Lakes. She operated from Muskegon to Milwaukee and Chicago until 1970. In 1980, the Clipper was moved to Navy Pier in Chicago where she was used as a banquet facility and museum ship. She was sold to the Hammond Marina in 1990 and was their centerpiece until 1996 when her dock space was needed by a new casino boat.
GLCPA
PO Box 827
Muskegon, MI 49443

Contact: James Plant, President (616) 744-5101 or Mark Howell, board member and media relations (616) 893-9137 e-mail: HowellFilm@aol.com




U.S. House passes bill for ships with safety violations

10/24:
On 21 Oct., the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill affecting commercial vessels violating international safety standards. Under an amendment by Rep. Bob Clement, D-Tenn., a vessel detained by the U.S. Coast Guard for violating the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) regulations would be barred from carrying U.S. government cargo for a year. A report by the House Transportation and Infrastructure's Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Subcommittee states that 14 percent of the 476 vessels detained last year for safety problems had carried government cargo within the past five years and 22 owners cited had more than one vessel detained. The bill also would require the Coast Guard to continue publishing on the Internet a list of vessels registered outside the United States that have been detained within the past year.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Oglebay Norton Reports Strong Third Quarter Operating Results

10/24:
Oglebay Norton Company reported that earnings from continuing operations in the third quarter of 1997 improved to $6.5 million, or $2.72 per share, compared with $4.8 million, or $1.95 per share, in the third quarter of 1996. Sales increased from $49.7 million to $53.4 million, and income from operations improved to $10.3 million, compared with $5.9 million in the same quarter a year ago.

For the first nine months of 1997, earnings from continuing operations reached $12.4 million, or $5.19 per share, compared with $6.9 million, or $2.82 per share, for the first nine months of 1996. Sales increased from $113.3 million to $124.4 million, and income from operations increased to $18.8 million, compared to $7.5 million in the same period a year ago.

The Company's discontinued iron ore operations, which were sold in late 1996, contributed income of $1.3 million ($.54 per share) and $3.4 million ($1.39 per share) in the third quarter and first nine months of 1996, respectively.

Revenues and operating profit for the Company's Marine Transportation Division increased substantially in the third quarter of 1997, compared with the third quarter of 1996. Customer demand continued to be strong for the shipment of iron ore, coal and stone on the Great lakes. Aided by favorable weather conditions and high water levels, enabling vessels to carry increased tonnage, the fleet operated very efficiently. The Cleveland Bulk Terminal, which the Company began operating in the second quarter, continued to contribute modestly to Marine Transportation's strong performance.

The Company's Industrial Sands unit shipped 481,000 tons in the third quarter, bettering the second quarter's record shipments by 7,000 tons. Operating results mirrored the robust shipments, with net sales and operating profit improving by 17% and 6%, respectively, over the third quarter in 1996. Much of this improvement is attributable to the acquisition earlier this year of specialty screening operations in Bakersfield, California, which serve the oil and gas well service markets, and Kurtz Sports Turf operations in Ohio, which blends sands for golf courses and other recreation facilities.

The Engineered Materials business unit operated at about break even in the third quarter of 1997, on a 3% increase in net sales, compared with the third quarter in 1996. An improvement in operating profit on metallurgical products was not sufficient to offset a substantial decline in hot top product volume and profit. A decision regarding consolidation of our hot top operations into one facility will be made by the end of the year. Selling, general and administrative expenses continue to decline, amounting to a reduction of 6% in the quarter, compared with the third quarter of 1996.

R. Thomas Green, Jr., Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, stated: ``We expect 1997 to be a record-breaking year in several respects. Our stock price hit an all-time high of $61 per share in early October. Our Marine Transportation business unit is on course to haul a record 23 million tons, as long as weather conditions remain favorable. Our Industrial Sands business unit is on track for record revenues and operating profits, fueled in large part by the strong oil and gas well service markets; all indications point to continued strength in these markets for at least several months. These robust performances have offset lower-than-expected results from our Engineered Materials business unit, and we anticipate a record year as measured by income from operations. We have exceeded our expectations through the first nine months, and fully expect to sustain that level of performance through the remainder of the year.''

As reported earlier, the Board of Directors of Oglebay Norton Company on August 27, 1997 increased the quarterly dividend from $.35 to $.40 per share, and declared a 2-for-1 stock split payable via a 100% stock dividend to be distributed on October 3, 1997 to stockholders of record as of October 10, 1997.

Oglebay Norton is a Cleveland-based company engaged in Great Lakes marine transportation, the mining and marketing of industrial sands, and the manufacturing and marketing of metallurgical products and related materials used in steelmaking.

Reported by: James Neumiller




GATX Announces Third Quarter Earnings

10/24:
The GATX Corporation announced third quarter earnings of $28.0 million or $1.12 per common share. This compares to last year's third quarter net income of $33.4 million or $1.37 per common share.

Earnings for the first nine months of this year were $89.4 million or $3.59 per common share. Earnings for the nine months ended September 30, 1996, were $83.8 million or $3.43 per common share.

Cash flow from operations and portfolio proceeds was $206 million for the third quarter compared to $263 million for last year's period. For the first nine months of 1997, cash flow was $584 million compared to $501 million for the first nine months of 1996.

Ronald H. Zech, chairman and CEO of GATX, stated, "The third quarter and year-to-date results reflect positive trends for GATX, particularly at General American Transportation and GATX Capital. General American Transportation's earnings continue at record levels as a result of growth in the fleet and strong fleet utilization. GATX Capital's remarketing activity for the quarter was excellent, resulting in significant gains from the sale of assets. These gains, however, were partially offset by one time expenses incurred during the quarter. On a year to date basis, GATX Capital is reporting net income 22 percent higher than last year's levels.

American Steamship and GATX Logistics both reported earnings higher than a year ago. Strong demand for commodities carried in Great Lakes vessels and favorable operating conditions have resulted in American Steamship moving increased tonnage compared to last year's season. GATX Logistics is benefitting from new contracts.

American Steamship Company earned $3.3 million for the 1997 third quarter compared to earnings of $2.6 million a year ago. Iron ore, coal and stone demand all remained strong, and favorable weather conditions resulted in efficient vessel performance. For the third quarter of 1997, American Steamship carried 8.8 million tons of cargo compared to 8.3 million tons for the year ago period. For the sailing season through the third quarter, there were virtually no lost sailing days.



Reported by: James Neumiller




Today in Great Lakes History - October 24

TEXACO WARRIOR (2) was launched October 24, 1969 as a) THUNTANK 6.

The PHILIP D. BLOCK along with the W.W. HOLLOWAY scrap tow arrived Recife, Brazil. October 24,1986

The THOMAS W.LAMONT and her former fleetmate, ENDERS M. VOORHEES arrived at Alegeciras, Spain on October 24, 1987 on the way to the cutters torch. The LAMONT was one of the last bulkers that retained her telescoping hatch covers to the very end.

The NIPIGON BAY arrivied Thunder Bay, Ont. on October 24, 1980 where repairs were made from damage caused by her grounding a earlier in the month.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
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Demand opens second berth at Harvest States

10/23:
The fall grain rush apparently has prompted the Harvest States Cooperative elevator in Superior to put its second loading berth into operation for the rest of the season. Saltie Mena Cibi is loading Oct. 21-22 at the elevator's Berth No. 2, the second vessel in the past several days to use the berth. The berth had been idle all season until recently even as ships anchored out on Lake Superior waiting for the elevator's other loading berth.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - October 23

The CECILIA DESGAGNES was launched October 23, 1970 as a) CARL GORTHON, for Rederi A/B Gylfe, Hälsingborg, Sweden.

GRAND RAPIDS Rail Car Ferry was launched October 23, 1926 for the Grand Trunk-Milwaukee Car Ferry Co., Muskegon, MI.

WILLIAM B. SCHILLER was launched October 23, 1909 for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
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News from the Twin Ports

10/22:
Normally quiet AGP elevator in Duluth is again hosting back-to-back salties. Alexandr Nevskiy took a quick load Oct. 20, clearing about midnight. Federal Rhine was anchored in Duluth harbor waiting its turn under the spouts at midday Oct. 21.

Kinsman Independent was set to arrive in Duluth on Oct. 21 and make an unusual call at the General Mills elevator rather than its usual stop at the Peavey elevator in Superior.

The Reiss Inland dock up the St. Louis River in Duluth is busier than usual this season. Its latest visitor is scheduled to be Charles E. Wilson on Oct. 21.

Great Lakes Fleets triplets are all in the stone trade for the next few days. Cason J. Callaway is due into Duluth with stone on Oct. 22, followed by Arthur M. Anderson on the 23 and the Philip R. Clarke shortly after that. Meanwhile, John G. Munson is scheduled to make a rare appearance in St. Ignace on Oct. 22.

GLF's Calcite II also is due to call in Port Colborne Oct. 21 to load for Cleveland.

Reported by: Al Miller




Welland Canal Traffic busy with Fall Grain Rush

10/22:
There were 13 vessels downbound on Sundayafternoon with several more ETAs for Port Colborne and Port Weller entrances.

Many of the boats were in process of hauling grain from the Lakehead to St. Lawrence River Ports.

Tuesday night for example S.S. Algoriver (x John A. France) made a routine stop at the Port Colborne fuel dock enroute back in Thunder Bay for more grain.

Reported by: J.J. Van Volkenburg




St. Lawrence Seaway Authority makes profit

10/22:
St. Lawrence Seaway Authority made a profit for the 1996-1997 fiscal year for the third consecutive year. The authority had net operating income of Canadian $7.3 million/U.S.$5.3 million and had C$5.1 million/U.S.$3.7 million more in revenues. Total toll revenue was C$88.6 million/U.S.$64.3 million, an increase from C$83.5 million/U.S.$60.6 million in 1995-1996. Total traffic was at its highest since 1988, near 50 million tons. The 1996 navigation season of 272 days saw 3,953 vessel transits, up from 3,868 the year before. While grain cargoes were less, coal, general cargo, ore and steel all increased.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 22

The PRESQUE ISLE (2)'s tug completed her sea trials on October 22, 1973 in New Orleans.

It was announced on October 21, 1986 that Canada Steamship Lines and Upper Lakes Group would merge CSL's Collingwood shipyard and ULS' Port Weller shipyard and create Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering (1986) Ltd.

On October 22, 1986 the ALGOCEN spilled about four barrels of diesel fuel while refueling at the Esso Dock at Sarnia.

The TOM M. GIRDLER departed South Chicago light on her maiden voyage, October 22, 1951, bound for Escanaba, MI where she loaded 13,900 tons of ore for delivery to Cleveland, OH.

The THORNHILL (1) grounded on October 22, 1973 just above the Sugar Island ferry crossing in the St. Marys River.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
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Diver drowns exploring shipwreck off Milwaukee

10/21:
A 34-year-old man from Downers Grove, Ill., drowned the morning of 18 Oct. while diving with 11 other people off Milwaukee. Martin G. Petik, who had three years of diving experience, was found "free floating" over an engine room skylight of the Prins Willem V and was entangled in a guy wire. He was not wearing his air tanks though they contained 810 kilograms/1,800 pounds of air, enough for about 45 minutes in those conditions. Other divers attempted to give him air and when that failed, brought him to the Lender, a 9.8-meter/32-foot boat, at 0945 from 21 meters/70 feet of water. The boat is operated by Pirate's Cove Diving Inc. A call was sent about 1000 to the U.S. Coast Guard and Milwaukee Fire Department personnel were taken to the Lender by a Milwaukee Police Department boat. A Coast Guard 12-meter/41-foot utility boat then took Petik to shore where an ambulance and a medical evacuation helicopter were waiting. He died later that day.

The Prins Willem V, a Dutch-registry 1,567-gt steel general cargo ship, sank after colliding with a tank barge at 1916 14 Oct., 1954, about 2.5 kilometers/four miles and 92 degrees off Milwaukee's harbor. The Prins Willem V suffered a 6.1-meter/20-foot by 2.4-meter/eight-foot hole in its starboard side that flooded the engine room. The ship sailed east three kilometers/two miles before sinking bow first at 2030. The 30 crewmembers boarded lifeboats and were rescued. The 78.6-meter/258-foot ship has a 45-degree list and is in 27 meters/90 feet of water with 12 meters/40 feet above the wreck. It carried general cargo including television tubes and was to transit the St. Lawrence Seaway. The Prins Willem V had been scuttled in the Netherlands on 10 May, 1940, to block a waterway during World War II. It was raised and returned to service in 1949 for Oranje Line.

Petik is the fourth person to be killed exploring the Prins Willem V. In 1992, Paul Yost, 35, was found deep inside the shipwreck with empty air tanks. In 1989, a man was found dead in the engine room and a 15-year-old boy died in 1985 after he was tangled in a winch cable.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Historic marker set to commemorate church

10/20:
Yesterday's Detroit News reported that Michigan's secretary of state, Candice Miller, plans to speak today at the unveiling of a state historic marker at Mariner's Church, downtown on Jefferson between Hart Plaza and the Renaissance Center. The plaque commemorates the landmark church's founding in 1842.

Reported by: Detroit News




Recovery of 19th century logs less than expected

10/21:
Superior Water-Logged Lumber Co., which has been salvaging logs near Ashland, Wis., that sank in the 19th century, has said that this year its operations have recovered less than 100 hardwood trees of about 800 collected, according to a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel article by Dave Umhoefer on 18 Oct. Varieties collected included hemlock, red oak, red pine, sugar maple, white ash and yellow birch. The company had planned on recovering up to 30,000 logs this year and estimated that U.S.$30 million worth of logs were on only a few of the 10-hectare/40-acre sites licensed. To meet orders, Superior Water-Logged Lumber has been buying from other firms such as Wassarosen Co., which found 144 hardwoods this year of 215 total.

Superior Water-Logged Lumber installed a new president, David Neitzke, in August. He said the smaller numbers were due to mismanagement, poor sites in Chequamegon Bay and a slow and confused permit process. Part of the problem may be that several firms have applied for permits after hearing of prices paid for the salvaged logs, with more than 800 permits pending. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has allocated more staff to the permits and so far has not denied any.

Superior Water-Logged Lumber started in 1992 but began its intensive operations this summer. Neitzke said that the firm has sonar images that indicate better sites are available, although a Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources search found few or no logs at sites chosen by the company as top priorities.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 21

The JOHN B. AIRD arrived at Sarnia, Ont. October 21, 1990 for repairs after suffering a conveyor belt fire a week earlier.

The JAMES A.FARRELL and fleetmate RICHARD TRIMBLE were the first vessels to lock downbound in the newly opened Davis Lock at the Soo on October 21, 1914.

On October 21, 1954 the GEORGE M.HUMPHREY(2) set a record when she took aboard 22,605 gross tons of iron ore at Superior, WI. The record stood for six years until 1960.

The crew on the SAMUEL MATHER (3) was safely removed from the badly exposed steamer on October 21, 1923 by the Eagle Harbor life saving crew. She had run aground on the 19th.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News from the Twin Ports

10/20:
The western end of Lake Superior was busy this afternoon. The Edgar B. Speer and the Presque Isle were both at Two Harbors loading while fleetmate Philip R. Clarke departed Duluth. Within a few hours, the Columbia Star departed Duluth and passed the inbound Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. about eight miles from the Duluth piers. The McCarthy was headed in to wait for the Paul R. Tregurtha, which had taken its turn at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal after the Columbia Star departed. The Stewart J. Cort also departed Superior at about the same time the Columbia Star left Duluth, so 6 of the 13 1000-footers were within 30 miles of each other on Lake Superior this afternoon.

After a prolonged absence, Canadian Century is returning to the BN ore dock in Superior Oct. 19 for the second time in a week.

The grain traffic for salties remains strong in Duluth-Superior. Over the weekend of Oct. 18-19, Snow Rose and Oak were anchored on Lake Superior and expecting to come into port shortly, and Dobrush, Mini Cebi and Alexander Nevsky are expected to arrive. The Nevsky, a Russian ship, is due into the AGP elevator in Duluth, a normally quiet elevator that has hosted several vessels lately.

Reported by: Al Miller and Jody L. Aho




Group to buy Clipper

10/20:
The current owners agreed to sell the former car ferry for $1. The Milwaukee Clipper, which appeared heading for certain scrap last month, soon could be sailing back to its former home port after its owners agreed to sell the former car ferry for $1.00 to a Muskegon group.

Jim Plant, President of the Great Lakes Clipper Preservation Association, calls it "one step closer on a very tall ladder. We're very cautious and don't want to falsely raise hopes, but we certainly are encouraged".

Bob Nelson, Director of the Hammond Marina, said "what we did is tell the Great Lakes Milwaukee Clipper Preservation Association, 'The ship is yours. Now find a way to get it out of here'."

The group is now working with the Hammond Port Authority and Empress Casino, on a proposal for towing the ship to Muskegon. The article also mentioned concerns from local government officials. Up to this point, the group has not sought funding because a purchase agreement had not been signed. Once the details are ironed out, the group will begin fundraising and membership drives.

For more information on the S.S. MILWAUKEE CLIPPER preservation effort, please contact Mark Howell at howellfilm@aol.com

Reported by: George P. Micka IV




Japanese Ships Cleared For U.S.Ports

10/20:
Breakthrough in negotiations between the United States and Japan headed off a brewing trade war and Japanese ships can still enter and leave U.S. ports. Although the complete agreement has not been finalized, both sides feel it is clearly in reach. U.S. Maritime Commission has rescinded its earlier ban on Japanese ships in U.S.ports and have agreed to hold off until Monday, October 20th to reassess developments. Payment of fines by Japan would still be necessary for permanent lifting of the original order. Attorneys for Japan's three largest shipping lines said yesterday that the companies have no intention of paying the fines at that time. The United States argues that Japanese ports discriminate against non-Japanese ships and push up costs. They also require all ships to receive prior approval for even the most operational changes in handling cargo at its ports. A general overhaul of policies with alternate systems put in place would seem to be required to end this serious trade dispute.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Today in Great Lakes History - October 20

The SCOTT MISENER (3) proceeded to the Port Arthur shipyard for dry docking and repairs on October 20th, After striking bottom October 15, 1973 near Whaleback Shoal on the St. Lawrence River.

OTTO M. REISS (2) was launched October 20, 1906 as a) JAMES S. DUNHAM for the Chicago Navigation Co. (D. Sullivan & Co., mgr.) Duluth, MN.

PETER A.B. WIDENER was launched October 20, 1906 as a) PETER A.B. WIDENER for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. (later the U.S. Steel Corp. in 1952), Cleveland, OH.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - October 19

GEORGE A. SLOAN ran aground off Bob-Lo Island in the Amherstburg Channel on October 19, 1987. She was released when she unloaded part of her cargo to the CALCITE II. SLOAN was repaired in Toledo.

ALGOSEA was christened on October 19, 1976 at Port Colborne.

The BUFFALO was able to leave the Saginaw River once it opened on October 19, 1990. The river was closed after the tanker Jupiter exploded as the Buffalo passed.

The KINSMAN VOYAGER was launched October 19, 1907 as a) H.P. BOPE for the Standard Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

The WILLIAM LIVINGSTONE (c CRISPIN OGLEBAY (1) had the honor on October 19, 1912 of being the first vessel to navigate the opening of the Livingstone Channel named after the man who helped conceive the idea of a separate down bound channel on the east side of Bob-Lo Island in the lower Detroit River. Mr. Livingstone, President of the Lake Carriers Association at the time, piloted his namesake vessel in the channel on that historic trip.

The crew on the stranded WILLIAM C. MORELAND was removed in gale force winds on October 19, 1910 by the Portage life saving crew.

On October 19, 1923 the SAMUEL MATHER (3) was driven onto Gull Rock on Lake Superior near Keweenaw Point during a snow storm and gale winds. The crew was safely removed from the badly exposed steamer on October 21st by the Eagle Harbor life saving crew.

The B.H. TAYLOR (b) ROGERS CITY (2) sailed from Lorain on her maiden voyage on October 19, 1923

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
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Calcite II make rare trip up Menomonee

10/18:
The Calcite II, an occasional visitor to Milwaukee this year with salt, made a rare trip up the Menomonee River today with a delivery of stone to a local concrete company. At one time the Menomonee river valley was the center of maritime traffic in Milwaukee. The valley was filed with coal companies that received coal by boat, so many deliveries that Great Lakes Towing crewed their tugs around the clock to handle the load. The last regular fleet to venture up the valley was Huron Cement. The 'Crapo', with it's steam whistle blowing for the bridges, was a regular visitor until LaFarge built their new silo in the outer harbor. Today the only river traffic left consists of tug/barges that shuttle coal to the Wisconsin Electric plant and the Triton/St. Marys Cement I.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Water Control board to improve Lake St. Lawrence levels

10/18:
The St Lawrence Water Control board will carry out a a one day reduction of 200 m3/s water flow on October 18 to improve low levels of Lake St. Lawrence to aid the removal of large recreational boats at several marinas.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Order Bars Japanese Ships From U.S.Ports..Trade Dispute Escalates

10/18:
On September 4th, the United States began imposing a sanction of $100,000 per port visit on 3 Japanese shipping companies. The companies--Kawasaki Kisen Kaisa Ltd., Mitsuit O.S.K Lines Ltd., and Nippon Yusen KK. These companies carry about a third of U.S.-Japanese shipping traffic. These companies had until Wednesday, October 15th to actually begin paying these sanctions of over 4 billion dollars. They missed the deadline because they claim talks to resolve the trade dispute were still underway. On Thursday, October 16th, the U.S.Maritime Commission, an independent federal agency that enforces shipping regulations in U.S.ports voted 4 to 0 to direct the Coast Guard to keep Japanese ships from entering U.S. ports and to detain Japanese ships already in American harbors. Barring an 11th hour agreement between the two sides, the action against Japanese ships will have begun yesterday Friday, October 17th. The U.S. sanctions apply only to cargo ships and not oil tankers and are in retaliation for what American officials see as restrictive practices against shippers in Japanese ports. More than 180 billion dollars worth of goods travel between our country and Japan each year. Thursdays action marks the first time in more than a decade that the United States has imposed trade sanctions on Japan and it is believed to be the first time the maritime commission has used statutory authority to block another country's entire shipping fleet.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Today in Great Lakes History - October 18

The ALVA C. DINKEY departed Quebec City, October 18, 1980, in tandem with her former fleetmate GOVERNOR MILLER towed by the FedNav tug CATHY B.

Tragedy struck on the WILLIAM C. MORELAND's fifth trip October 18, 1910 loaded with 10,700 tons of iron ore from Superior for Ashtabula, OH when she stranded on Sawtooth Reef off Eagle Harbor, MI on Lake Superior. Visibility had been very limited due to forest fires raging on the Keweenaw Peninsula and the Lake was blanketed with smoke as far as one mile off shore. The MORELAND hit so hard and at such speed that she bounced over the first reef and came to rest on a second set of rocks.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
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Twin Ports shipping

10/17:
An infrequent visitor to the Twin Ports loaded today at the BNSF ore docks in Superior.The Canadian Century loaded taconite pellets at that facility. The Century makes maybe one or two trips a year into the Twin Ports,usually for pellets or on a rare occasions for a grain cargo.

Reported by: Gary A. Putney




Great Lakes Maritime Academy accepting new cadets

10/17:
Setting aside its long held schedule of accepting new cadets only in the summer, The Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Traverse City, Michigan will now be accepting new cadets for the winter semester beginning in January of 1998. This change was brought about by the increased need for qualified officers to operate the U.S. flag vessels on the Lakes. Anyone interested in learning more about the Academy should call 1-800-748-0566 extension 1200.

Reported by: Gary Schweitzer




Lakes Stone Trade Remains Strong

10/17:
Stone shipments from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 4.7 million tons in September, an increase of 9.4 percent compared to the same period last year.

For the season, stone shipments stand at 27.2 million tons, an increase of 10.4 percent

Reported by: Lake Carriers Association




Medusa Reports Record Third Quarter Earnings

10/17:
For the third quarter of 1997, Medusa Corporation reported net income of $23.7 million, a 7% improvement from $22.1 million in 1996's third quarter. On a per share basis, earnings were $1.41 compared with $1.38 (primary) and $1.27 (fully diluted) a year earlier.

Net income for the nine months ended September 30, 1997 was $43.9 million, a 15% improvement over net income of $38.3 million in 1996. On a per share basis, earnings were $2.61 compared with $2.37 per share (primary) and $2.23 (fully diluted) in the first nine months of 1996.

For the first nine months, net sales increased 15% to $277.1 million. Cement sales were almost 6% higher than 1996's level with volume up more than 4% and prices up more than 1%.

Medusa expects that its cement plants will continue to operate at practical capacity for the remainder of 1997 and that its cement shipments for the year will exceed 1996 levels. Year end cement inventories are expected to be lower than last year, reflecting strong demand.

Medusa Corporation produces and sells portland and masonry cements; mines, processes, and sells construction aggregates, home & garden and industrial limestone products; and provides construction services for highway safety. Medusa operations are principally in the eastern half of the United States.

Reported by: Company press release




Today in Great Lakes History - October 17

The CANADIAN PROSPECTOR was launched October 17, 1963 as a) CARLTON (2)

The MONTCLIFFE HALL was launched October 17,1959 for Transatlantic Bulk Carriers, Monrovia, Liberia as a) EMS ORE

With an inexperienced Taiwanese crew, boiler problems and the collapse of Lock 7's west wall in the Welland Canal on October 17th, SAVIC's (CLIFFS VICTORY) departure was delayed until December 17, 1985 when she departed Chicago under her own power.

The carferry PERE MARQUETTE 19 was launched October 17, 1903.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
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News from the Twin Ports

10/16:
H.M. Griffith is becoming a regular at the BN ore dock in Superior. The vessel was back again Oct. 15.

Some interesting coal action as the Northshore Mining Co. in Silver Bay, Minn., stocks up for the winter. Fred R. White Jr. loaded at Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior on Oct. 14 and hauled its cargo to Silver Bay. It's unusual to see a Columbia boat under 1,000 feet hauling coal out of port. The next day, Indiana Harbor loaded coal in Superior for Silver Bay. It's also unusual to see a 1,000-footer on these short-hauls for coal.

Reported by: Al Miller




Port Stanley's first soy bean ship

10/16:
Topnotch the west side of the harbour, received the cargo ship Mantadoc which was loading 12,000 tons of soybeans for Sorel Quebec. The vessel will stop of at Hamilton to get topped off before heading to Sorel. Mantadoc will then return to Port Stanley for another ship load of soyabeans. All soyabeans are then sold to Norway.

Reported by: Richard Hill




High winds send vessels to Keweenaw Waterway

10/16:
Mondays winds, some in excess of 60 miles per hour sent members of the Oglebay Norton fleet to the Keweenaw Waterway to seek refuge. The Str. Courtney Burton, and the MV Fred R. White, Jr. sought shelter from the gales.

Reported by: Jim Grill




New Fitzgerald Video Available

10/16:
The Edmund Fitzgerald Investigation was inspired by the success of the EDMUND FITZGERALD INTERACTIVE EXPLORER.. which is only available for IBM users. A MAC version would be too expensive to produce, and we decided it would be better to create a VHS documentary with the information that everyone could use.

Created by IMAGEWORKS, Ltd.. the documentary includes interviews and video included in the ROM, but more importantly uses extra interviews that wouldn't fit on the disc. The half hour program also includes more on the Fitzgerald's construction, and new information and comments from the men in charge of the 1989 3-D exploration of the Fitzgerald.

New interviews are also included with Capt Jimmy Hobaugh, the skipper who braved one of Superior's worst storms to look for survivors.

The Edmund Fitzgerald Investigation is the only videotape to chronicle ALL of the expeditions.. from the initial Coast Guard investigation to the removal of the bell in 1995.

The video is $19.95 and is just now going out into stores. You can also call Imageworks toll free at 1-888-747-TAPE to get a copy. Ordering by mail will include shipping and handling charges.




Today in Great Lakes History - October 16

On October 16, 1990 the JOHN B. AIRD's loop belt caught fire while loading mill scale at Inland Steel Mill, East Chicago, Ill. Fueled by coal dust left over after unloading coal at the mill, 1,400 feet of the rubber conveyor belt burned causing nearly $500,000 in damages.

ALGOWEST set a cargo record for a 27,517 tonne load of grain down the Seaway October 16, 1982 to Port Cartier, Que.

The RIO ORINOCO grounded off Anticosti Island, Que. on October 16, 1990 and was abandoned. Later she was salvaged by Le Groupe Desgagnes (1981) Inc., refloated, repaired and renamed d) THALASSA DESGAGNES.

Sea trials of the MERTON E. FARR were successfully completed October 16, 1920.

On October 16, 1954 the SCOTT MISENER (3) became the first laker to load a record 800,000 bushels of grain on the Great Lakes when she was loaded with barley at Fort William, Ont. for delivery to Port Colborne.

The WILLIAM G. MATHER (2) was towed from her Cuyahoga River berth on October 16, 1990 by the GLT tugs IDAHO and DELAWARE, she was placed at her permanent station next to the 9th Street Pier of Cleveland's North Coast Harbor.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
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Cuyahoga shuts down Amherstburg Channel

10/15:
The Cuyahoga blocked the Amherstburg Channel in the Detroit River Tuesday evening while she unloaded a cargo at Bob-Lo Island. The Cuyahoga caused several vessel, including the St. Clair to use the Livingston Channel for upbound transits. The Amherstburg channel is restricted to upbound traffic and the Livingston for Downbound. Vessels were allowed to transit up the Livingston based on their call in time, a practice only seen in the winter when the Amherburg Channel is closed. The Cuyahoga cleared Bob-Lo about 10:40, heading up to Fighting Island S. light and turning down bound.

Reported by: Neil Schultheiss




More on Anglo-Eastern Montreal

10/15:
Anglo-Eastern Ship Management Ltd. has formed Anglo-Eastern Montreal. It is reportedly the first full ship management firm in Canada set-up by a foreign ship operator and replaces a liaison office formed in 1993. Anglo-Eastern Montreal is the third such office of Anglo-Eastern Ship Management and currently operates the Arctic and the Arctic Trader, two Canadian-registry ships with Canadian citizens as crewmembers. Anglo-Eastern Montreal plans to manage up to 10 ships by the end of its first year.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Polish Steamship orders five new ships

10/15:
On 14 Oct., Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding Co. Ltd. received an order to build five 34,600-dwt geared bulk carriers for Polish Steamship Co. The order is reportedly worth 16 billion Japanese yen/U.S.$130 million. Deliveries will start in March 1998 in two month intervals and the order is covered by the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry's trade insurance. The Lakemax vessels will replace ships calling in the Canadian/U.S. Great Lakes.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 15

On October 15, 1974, the Wolverine entered service.

On her maiden voyage the LEON SIMARD (b) L'ORME NO.1. ) was spotted traveling eastward on the St. Lawrence River October 15, 1974.

The WOLVERINE (4) departed in Columbia Transportation Division colors October 15, 1974 on her maiden voyage from Lorain light to load stone at Stoneport, MI for delivery to Huron, OH.

HERBERT C. JACKSON cleared Fraser Shipyard on October 15, 1988 after having the 1000 h.p. bow thruster installed from the JOHN SHERWIN.

The PAUL H. CARNAHAN came out on her maiden voyage October 15, 1961.

On October 15, 1984 the a) JOHN O. McKELLAR (2) was sold to P.& H. Shipping of Parrish & Heimbecker Ltd., Mississauga, Ont. and renamed b) ELMGLEN (2).

Scrapping began on October 15, 1988 of the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON at Kaohsiung, Taiwan by Li Chong Steel & Iron Works Co. Ltd.

The C.H. McCULLOUGH, JR. was laid up on October 15, 1969 at Manitowoc, WI.

The MELDRUM BAY was launched October 15, 1949 as a) COVERDALE for Canada Steamship Lines, Montreal, Que.

The SCOTT MISENER (3) struck bottom October 15, 1973 near Whaleback Shoal on the St. Lawrence River reportedly damaging sixty of her bottom plates. She proceeded to the Port Arthur shipyard for dry docking and repairs from October 20th through the 28th.

On October 15, 1980 the NIPIGON BAY, loaded with ore for Hamilton, Ont., grounded at the "crossover" near Brockville, Ont. on the St. Lawrence River and sustained a 100 foot rip in her bottom plates. She proceeded to Thunder Bay, Ont. arriving there on October 24th where repairs were made at an estimated cost of $500,000.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Canadian Century to visit Twin Ports

10/14:
Canadian Century is scheduled to make a rare appearance in the Twin Ports on Oct. 14 when it calls at the BN ore dock in Superior.

Reported by: Al Miller




Great Lakes Coal Trade Up 5.8 Percent In September

10/14:
Coal shipments from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 4,450,973 net tons in September, an increase of 5.8 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. For the season, the Lakes coal trade stands at 26.6 million tons, an increase of 16.3 percent. The most significant increase has come at Lake Erie ports. In respond to increased demand from a Canadian utility, shipments from Toledo, Sandusky, Ashtabula and Conneaut have increased 22.4 percent to 14.3 million tons.

Reported by: The Lake Carriers Association




Ship operator opens office in Montreal

10/14:
Anglo-Eastern Ship Management Ltd. has formed Anglo-Eastern Montreal. It is reportedly the first full ship management firm in Canada set-up by a foreign ship operator. Anglo-Eastern Montreal is the third office of Anglo-Eastern Ship Management.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 14

The keel to the JAMES R. BARKER was laid on October 14, 1974. She was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flag ship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.).

On October 14, 1983 the CHI-CHEEMAUN encountered 48 knot winds after departing Tobermory with 113 passengers bound for South Baymouth. Due to high wind and waves the captain decided to find shelter rather than to continue on or return to port. The ferry made her way around the Bruce Peninsula southeast to Dyer Bay where she dropped anchor for the night, however she had no overnight accommodations. Complimentary meals were served and activities were organized by the crew. The anchor was lifted the next morning and the ferry returned to Tobermory.

. The GEORGE A. STINSON departed Detroit on her maiden voyage October 14, 1978 light for Superior, WI to load iron ore pellets for delivery to the Great Lakes Steel Division of the National Steel Corp. at Zug Island in River Rouge, MI.

On October 14, 1966, loaded with potash bound for Oswego, NY, the STONEFAX collided with the Norwegian salty ARTHUR STOVE and sank in the Welland Canal between Locks 7 and 8.



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




City of Midland conversion update

10/13:
Work on the City of Midland 41 doesn't show from the outside, but this past weekend they had the after pilot house cut all the way around. It appeared that the work crews were getting ready to lift it off with the crane. There has been a lot of cutting inside and the whole boat smells like a house that has burned. Crews have been removing the fixture, furnishings, etc. Stuff is piled everywhere.

Reported by: Max Hanley and A HREF ="http://www.t-one.net/~msh/spcm/">George Micka




News from the Twin Ports

10/13:
Kinsman Independent loaded at the Harvest States Elevator berth 2 this weekend, apparently the first time this season the berth has been used for loading. The ship was hurrying Sunday to beat the rain so it could depart. Meanwhile, the saltie Vulcan was loading on the other side at Berth 1

A pair of Interlake boats are making an unusual call at Two Harbors. Charles M. Beeghly arrived there Oct. 12. Elton Hoyt II is due in Oct. 13.

Reported by: Al Miller




Seaway statistics

10/13:
Eight million tons of grain moved through the Montreal-Lake Ontario section of the St. Lawrence Seaway by the end of September, compared to 7.19 million tons for the same period last year. The increased tonnage is reportedly due, in part, to more grain being loaded at Thunder Bay, Ontario. China is buying less wheat and the Canadian Wheat Board is therefore selling more to the Carribean and Europe. Wheat for China moves through Pacific coast ports, while Carribean and European cargoes are by the seaway.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





C. COLUMBUS Visits Toledo

10/13:
The German cruise ship c.COLUMBUS arrived in Toledo, from Port Colborne, about 1/2 hour ahead of time Saturday morning. She made a pretty picture coming thru the bridges in the early morning sun, escorted by the "G" Tugs TENNESSEE and IDAHO. The trio made their way thru the Martin Luther King (formerly Cherry St.) Bridge, and then spun her around in the middle of downtown. She docked at the Maritime Plaza, just down stream of the bridge. Most of the passengers were on deck for the trip up the Maumee River, and many went to the dining room for breakfast after the boat was docked.

Very few spectators were on hand for the arrival, but the crowd grew as motorists on the bridge saw the large white liner close to the bridge. TV camera appeared within a short period as word spread.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




End of season for the Lake Michigan Carferry

10/13:
Today was the last day of the 1997 season for the S.S. Badger. She arrived Ludington at about 7:12 PM. As she entered the channel, the crowd that had gathered started waving, horns started honking, and the Badger answered with her whistle, and the her passengers waved back. Able-bodied seaman Scott Peck was standing by the pilot house, playing his bagpipes.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Former Canada Ports president fined

10/13:
Jean-Maurice Tessier, former president of Canada Ports Corp., has been fined Canadian$3,300/U.S.$2,400 after he pleaded guilty to expense account fraud and several charges were dropped. Tessier left the job in September 1995 on extended sick leave and was charged by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police last year. Tessier pleaded guilty to overbilling his expense account C$7,744/U.S.$5,617.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Iglehart carrying fly-ash

10/13:
A few days ago the J.A.W. Iglehart was docked in Marysville loading. The ILM ships don't usually stop there. The Iglehart was loading fly-ash for the production of cement in Alpena.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Duluth-Superior figures

10/13:
Cargo moved through the ports of Duluth, Minn., and Superior, Wis., is up 7 percent through August. Some 20.9 million metric tons was handled, compared to 19.6 million metric tons for the same period last year. The figure is down 3 percent from the five year average of 21.5 million metric tons. In 1996, domestic cargo was up 12.6 percent to 16.4 million metric tons while international trade was down 8 percent to 4.4 million metric tons.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Algoriver visits Indiana Harbor

10/13:
The Algoriver was unloading at Inland Steel at Indiana Harbor on Saturday. She was scheduled to leave sometime yesterday,10/12. The Algoriver is truly a rare visitor here.

Reported by: Gary Clark




Canada to change oil spill liabilities

10/13:
Canadian Transport Minister David Collenette reintroduced legislative changes updating Parts IX and XVI of the Canada Shipping Act on 8 Oct. The changes will more than double the potential liability for oil spills by shipowners to a maximum of Canadian$270 million/U.S.$196 million. The current maximum is C$120 million/U.S.$87 million based on the International Convention Relating to the Limitation of Liability of Owners of Sea-Going Vessels of 1957. Canada will then become part of the Convention on Limitation of Liability for Maritime Claims of 1976 and its 1996 protocol. Also, the amendments will impleent the 1992 protocol to the Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage of 1969 and the Convention on the International Fund for Compensation for Oil Pollution Damage of 1971. Shipowners will now also be allowed to recover the cost of pollution prevention and there will be special provisions for liability limits for ships of less than 300-gt as well as liability by shipowners for passengers. Compensation will be available for oil pollution damage caused by empty tankers immediately after a voyage.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 13

The SASKATCHEWAN PIONEER made her first trip out of Thunder Bay, Ont. with grain on October 13, 1983.

The tug GLENADA towed the BROOKDALE (2) from Port Colborne to Newman's scrap yard at Port Maitland, Ont. the week of October 13, 1980.

On October 13, 1902 the MAUNALOA collided with her whaleback consort BARGE 129 on Lake Superior and sank it 30 miles northwest of Vermilion Point, which is between Upper Michigan's Crisp and Whitefish Points. The MAUNALOA had been towing the BARGE 129, both vessels loaded with iron ore, when the towline parted in heavy seas. While trying to regain control of the barge, they came together and the steamer's port anchor raked the side of the barge which started taking on water. The crew was taken off the barge before it sank.



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - October 12

The JEAN PARISIEN suffered considerable bottom damage when she ran aground near Comfort Island about a mile west of Alexandria Bay, NY. She was released October 12, 1981 and returned to service after repairs were completed at the Vickers Montreal yard.

The CLIFF S VICTORY was sold October 12, 1985 to Hai International Corp. of New York for scrapping in the orient and transferred to Panamanian registry. Her name was changed to c) SAVIC, utilizing the "S" from CLIFFS, the "VIC" from VICTORY and inserting an "A". All the other letters were painted out.

The JOHN A. KLING sailed on her maiden voyage October 12, 1922 light from Manitowoc to load stone at Rockport, MI.

The Keel was laid October 12, 1925 for the COLONEL JAMES PICKANDS.

The SYLVANIA returned to service on October 12, 1967. She sank at the Peerless Cement Co. dock at Port Huron, MI in June of that year after being struck by the Canada Steamship Lines package freight steamer RENVOYLE.

The tug EDNA G. remained at Two Harbors until October 12, 1993 when she was towed to the Fraser Shipyard at Superior, WI by the GLT tug KANSAS. She is now on display as a floating exhibit for the city.

On October 12, 1967, the Canadian Leader entered service as the last new steam-powered vessel on the Great Lakes. The vessel, originally named Feux Follets by her first owners, Papachristidis Company Limited, was given her present name when it was sold to Upper Lakes Shipping in 1972.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




LaFarge plant back in service

10/11:
The LaFarge plant in Alpena is back on-line after a brief interruption. The only vessels to lay up were the M/V Paul H. Townsend and S.S. J.A.W. Iglehart. The S.S. Alpena and the ITB Jacklyn M./Integrity remained in service. The Iglehart is scheduled to return to service 10-16 or sooner if the plant caches up on production. The Townsend is likely to return toward the end of the month.

Reported by: Stu Schmitz




Algolake visits Port Stanley

10/11:
The harbour has been very quit, until Thursday 10:00am when the ALGOLAKE self-unloader delivered 23,000 tons of coal on the east side of the harbour for Lakes Terminals & Warehousing. The ship was done at 15:30 hours and had to race back to Ashtabula Ohio to beat a nother ship to get loaded of coal, which is heading down Lake Erie near Niagra when it's done in Ashtabula. "FULL STEAM AHEAD" the captian said.

Reported by: Richard Hill




Today in Great Lakes History - October 11

The BAIE COMEAU II cleared Sorel October 11, 1983 as c) AGIA TRIAS, Panamanian registry #1355. Her Canadian registry was closed on October 12, 1983. Her mission was to carry grain from New Orleans, La. to Mexican and Caribbean Island ports and sailed at least into the 1987 season. Subsequently she was renamed d) OCEAN VIEW, e) SEA DIAMOND, f) GOLDEN CREST and g) ATLANTIC WOOD in 1991 for Nexus Maritime Co. S.A., St. Vincent. Disposition unknown.

The MERCURY (2) scraped the South Grand Island Bridge in the Niagara River in heavy fog on October 11, 1974. Her forward mast snapped off, the midship mast was tilted and her smoke stack was toppled. She proceeded after the mishap to G&W Welding at Cleveland under her own power for repairs.

WHEAT KING, under tow arrived at Chittagong, Bangladesh on October 11, 1989 to be broken up.



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




LaFarge plant out of operation

10/10:
Reports are that the LaFarge cement plant was out of operation on 10-8-97 due to two of the three cement processers being out of order. The fleet of three vessels and one tub/barge combo will be laid up for at least 8 days. All crew members are laid off until repairs are completed.

Reported by: B. Kenwood




Saguenay arrives in Thunder Bay

10/10:
The tug AVENGER IV and dead ship M.V.SAGUENAY arrived in Thunder Bay early Wednesday morning (see original story dated 10/1). The two waited at anchor until day break, then entered port with the help of the tug POINT VALOUR. The tow headed to the south side of the C.N. Ore dock, where the M.V.SAGUENAY tied up, bow in.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Unusual USS Transfers off Lorain

10/10:
An unusual set of taconite transfers took place off Lorain, Ohio this week. EDGAR B. SPEER arrived off Lorain and anchored late on Tuesday the 7th. She was met by ARTHUR M. ANDERSON. ANDERSON pulled alonside the SPEER and received a load via the SPEER's shuttle conveyor and proceeded up the Black River to the Lorain USS/Kobe Steel Plant. GEORGE A. SLOAN arrived later, from Detroit, and went through the same procedure. SLOAN came down the river, after unloading, and headed for Stoneport on Thursday morning. JOHN G. MUNSON had loaded from the SPEER during the night and headed up the river after SLOAN cleared the breakwater. SPEER headed back up Lake Erie behind SLOAN.

Judging by the scanner traffic between the skippers of the SLOAN and MUNSON, these trips aren't the favorite mission for the smaller USS boats. One captain mentioned that this type of transfer was being scheduled again in the near future. The reply was "I hope I'm up in Lake Superior when they do it".

During much of the USS river traffic, EARL W. OGLEBAY was loading at the Lorain Pellet Terminal with a load for LTV Steel up the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland. Once the USS boats cleared, MESABI MINER appeared and backed into the harbor to unload at the pellet terminal. OGLEBAY finally started her trip after MINER was tied up. OGLEBAY arrived at the Cleveland breakwater about 3:30 PM Thursday afternoon.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




News from the twin Ports

10/10:
Gale-force winds Oct. 9 on western Lake Superior affected some ships in the Twin Ports. Charles E. Wilson tied up at the port terminal to wait for wind to ease before transitting the harbor's front channel to load at BN ore dock. St. Clair was forced to wait several hours before attempting to enter Two Harbors.

Canadian Transport departed Duluth on Oct. 9 and proceeded down the lake about 10 miles before turning around and returning to calmer waters off Duluth to transfer off a crewman for a medical emergency. There's no word on the nature of the problem.

Federal Bergen was in the steel berth at the Duluth Port Terminal on Oct. 9. The ship called at the terminal on the heels of Florentia's departure earlier. It's unusual to get two ships in the terminal in the same week.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - October 10

While downbound with coal in the St. Lawrence River on October 10,1981, the JEAN PARISIEN suffered considerable bottom damage when she ran aground near Comfort Island about a mile west of Alexandria Bay, NY.

The BROOKDALE (2) was towed out of Toronto on October 10, 1980 by the tug GLENADA, assisted by the tug TERRY S. She was one her way to the cutters torch.

The CHAMPLAIN (3), with her former fleetmate CADILLAC (4) was towed past Gibraltar October 10, 1987 heading for Aliaga, Turkey for dismantling by Cukurova Celik Endustrisi A.S.

The SAVIC (CLIFFS VICTORY) cleared New York on October 10, 1986.

The HULL NO.1, ex KINSMAN ENTERPRISE(1), being towed by the Polish tug JANTAR arrived in Aliaga, Turkey on October 10, 1989 to be scrapped there.



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Port Weller Dry Docks to get new equipment after union approves contract

10/09:
(St. Catharines, Ont.) - Encouraged by Port Weller Dry Docks' employees endorsement of a new five-year labour contract, Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd. announced today that it would proceed with the purchase and installation of advanced technological equipment, valued at $5 million, at its Port Weller division.

On Sunday, at the Ramada Parkway Inn, Port Weller employees, members of the International Boilermakers Union, Local 680, voted 75 percent in favor of a new five-year contract valid until May 2003.

"The support of our employees assures long-term stability in our operations at Port Weller," Charles Payne, General Manager said.

"We can now go ahead with major capital improvements in the latest state-of-the-art technology. This will enable us to confidently bid on highly competitive shipbuilding and ship repairing contracts, many of which will require several years to secure and complete. It will also provide attractive new opportunities for our metal fabrication department," Payne added.

Major components of the new equipment to be installed over the next six to nine months include: numerically controlled plasma arc steel-cutting machine; Robotic-operated steel profile cutting and welding equipment, and semi-automated panel fabricating production line.

The five-year contract provides for wage increases for the first three years tied to the Consumer Price Index and increases in contract benefits and pension contributions. The last two years provide for full CPI protection for the employees.

A profit sharing plan will also be included during the life of the new contract.

Alan S. Thoms, President, Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering, Port Weller's parent company, described the union vote as "good news for the company, the employees and the St. Catharines-Niagara community". Other CSE divisions include Pascol Engineering, Thunder Bay; Lansdowne Technologies, Ottawa; Canal Marine and CSE Marine Services, both of St. Catharines.

Port Weller Dry Docks is the only Canadian full-service shipyard throughout the Great Lakes system. Founded in 1946, the firm celebrated its 50th anniversary last year when at peak periods 450 employees were at work.

Summer employment this year averaged 350. At present the HMCS Athabaskan, a Canadian Navy destroyer, is undergoing a major overhaul with 325 working at various stages of the $6 million job.

Contact: Charles Payne
Port Weller Dry Docks
(905) 934-2581




Today in Great Lakes History - October 9

The CHIMO (b) CANADIAN RANGER) was moved onto the Port Weller Dry Dock on October 9, 1983 where work began to cut her apart forward of her aft located pilot house and engine room.BR>
The GULF MACKENZIE (b) L. ROCHETTE) was launched October 9, 1976

The SASKATCHEWAN PIONEER arrived in the Welland Canal on her delivery trip October 9, 1983 en route for her formal christening at Thunder Bay.

The JAMES DAVIDSON was launched October 9, 1920 for the Globe Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH (G.A. Tomlinson, mgr.)

On October 9, 1984 the PATERSON (1) was sold to Shearmet Recycling, a Thunder Bay ship breaker, and was broken up at their Mission River dock.

The a) COL. JAMES M. SCHOONMAKER (b) WILLIS B. BOYER) sailed from the shipyard on her maiden voyage on October 9, 1911 to Toledo, OH where she loaded coal bound for Sheboygan, WI. The SCHOONMAKER was the largest vessel on the Great Lakes when she came out. For much of the decade this vessel either broke or held many bulk cargo records.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Repairs Completed, Ship Leaves After A Long Wait

10/08:
After an unplanned lengthy layover at Cape Vincent, the cargo ship Seba M and its crew of 22 departed Sunday, October 5th at 10:15 PM for Chicago. All of the crew had to remain on board during the 16 day wait as they were foreign nationals. Parts to repair the mechanical problems had to be obtained fron Japan and shipped here to this upstate New York village on the St. Lawrence Seaway. When repairs were completed, according to Rhonda M Worden,spokeswoman for the Seaway Development Corporation, both the United States and Canadian Seaway Authority representives and the U.S.Coast Guard went aboard to inspect the ship and the crew started the engine 16 times for the officials and they cleared it for transit.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Delphine Lives!

10/08:
The following is an article that appears in the current issue of the Modoc Whistle, the news letter of the Saginaw River Marine Historical Society:

Last week it was reported on the internet Maritime History Discussion Group that, on September 26, a fine -hulled, riveted steel vessel of about 80 meters had arrived at the port of Zebrugge, Belgium, from Marseilles, France behind the Polish tug POSEJDON.
The writer was impressed by her beautiful lines and large brass whistle. She was painted bright white, had a ram bow and cruiser stern, and on her transom was the name DELPHINE. There was a question as to her identity and i suggested the possibility that she might be the 1921 former Horace Dodge yacht DELPHINE - perhaps the finest yacht ever built or sailed on the Lakes - as the description given matched the boat.

Though she had been reported scrapped as long as 25 years ago, this indeed turned out to be her. She had been languishing in French and Spanish ports for years, but is now scheduled to be rebuilt by Belgian parties as a cruise or charter vessel. She still retains her 76-year-old triple-expansion steam engine, which will also be refurbished. She was the largest private yacht ever to sail the Great Lakes. For more about her fascinating career, see Great Lakes Ships We Remember II, by the Detroit Marine Historical Society [Marine Historical Society of Detroit].
- Dave Swayze




News from the Seaway

10/08:
Salty visitors on a first trip to the Seaway and Great Lakes include:
Lis Weber-DAN, '79, 1100 DWT, this small vessel wil be in Cleveland early November, perhaps the smallest salty this year.
Snowrose-MAL, '78 14382 grt standard bulk carrier is in the Seaway bound for Detroit
Kevser Gunes-TUR, '94, 7289 GRT was above Sarnia on Sunday bound for Sault St Marie

In early November a series of large heavy crated reactors and reactor parts is due to leave Sarnia Ontario on a 45 day voyage to China, conditional upon delivery there by December 25/97. A suitable ship has not yet been found

A formidable bridge structure was double barged down the Southshore Canal to Montreal and was transferred to the seagoing barge Ocean Hauler by The Port of Montreal/St Lawrence Seaway Authority 750ton capacity mobile floating crane Hercules. The tow departed Montreal for Boston USA October 05/97. The tow is by Cdn. tug Jerry Newberry

The tug Daniel McAllister has been sold to the Port of Montreal for use as a Museum in the old Port of Montreal adjacent to the inactive lake Comeaudoc (R.Beauchamp)

The CCCG vessel Eider-Can, was broken up during the last year at Louiseville Qc. where she has lain since 1978. This ex WWII landing ship was converted to a multi-purpose vessel for Northern operations and was very active in the CDN Arctic from the late 50's. (R.Beauchamp)

The 156,000 ton tanker Romea Champion-LIB now in Quebec City will not be entering the Seaway this trip. Amongst other things she exceeds the bridge heights.

The pusher tug Dixie Commander-USA and barge DXE 1640 05 (9.946 GRT) entered the St Lawrence Gulf via the Cabot Straits, Newfoundland and are now at the Ultramar berth in Montreal East

Reported by: John Whitehead and R.Beauchamp




ULS Marbulk to convert ships

10/08:
ULS Marbulk Inc., a subsidiary of Upper Lakes Group Inc., will convert two bulk carriers to self-unloading vessels. The two are likely the Richmond Hill and the Thornhill, 37,939-dwt, 193.8-meter/635.8-foot motor bulk carriers built in 1981.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





October 1 Vessel Report

10/08:
On October 1, U.S.-Flag Great Lakes carriers had 63 of their 70 ships and tug/barge units in service. This total represents a decrease of one ship compared to a year ago. As of the survey date, a 635-foot-long self-unloader was in the shipyard for minor repairs and a liquid-bulk barge and a self-propelled tanker were in short-term lay-up.

Vessels yet to see service this season are the straight-decker KINSMAN ENTERPRISE and the small cement carriers S. T. CRAPO and E. M. FORD. The idle cement carriers are presently holding storage cargos of cement. The CRAPO was recently disenrolled from LCA.

The straight-decker J. L. MAUTHE is currently undergoing conversion to a self-unloading tug/barge at Bay Shipbuilding Company in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers Association




Lloyd's Register of Shipping reaches milestone

10/08:
Lloyd's Register of Shipping has become the first non-U.S. classification society authorized to survey and plan approvals for ships on behalf of the U.S. Coast Guard. The society will be an alternative to the American Bureau of Shipping.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 8

The Keel was laid October 8,1976 for the 660 ft. forward section of the a) LEWIS WILSON FOY (b) OGLEBAY NORTON ) for the Bethlehem Steel Co., Cleveland, Ohio.

The MATHEWSTON (b RALPH S. MISENER (2) entered service on October 8, 1922. On her maiden voyage she sailed from Port Arthur with 11,634 tons of barley and wheat.

The Canadian registry for MENIHEK LAKE was officially closed on October 8, 1985 with the notation "sold Spain."

The WILLIAM G. MATHER arrived on October 8, 1988 in tow of the GLT tugs WYOMING and ALABAMA at the G&W Shipyard at Collision Bend in the Cuyahoga River to be refurbished.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Challenger damaged by water spout

10/07:
On Saturday afternoon, Oct. 5 while passing White Shoal Light on their way to Charleviox, the Medusa Challenger found itself in the middle of a water spout. As the skies turned black and the crest of the waves were being blown in a horizontal direction, it began to hail violently. A spotlight on the pilothouse bridge wing lifted out of its support and crews bikes stored on deck began to rise vertically. At the same time the 1906 built boat was vibrating in an unusual manner. It was all over in 10 minutes. The Challenger's anemometer was of no use in measuring the wind as it "pegged" itself in both directions. Another boat in the area reported wind gusts of almost 100 mph in the brief storm. That same day the eastern UP was hit with a violet storm that blew down trees a foot in diameter.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




c. Columbus draws a crowd in Duluth

10/07:
The German cruise ship Columbus turned out to be quite a tourist attraction in its own right during its stay at Duluth. Hundreds of curious onlookers turned out Oct.4 to watch the vessel depart.

Reported by: Al Miller




News from the Welland on ULS Flatback steamers

10/07:
ULS's Seaway Queen stopped at the fuel dock in Port Colborne-enroute to a St. Lawrence River port. This marks her first run for the season--she is carring grain from Thunder Bay. She was at Port Weller for her 5 year earlier in the season-only to go to Toronto for a 2 month fit-out. She is expected to finish off the season. (She looked good loaded and freshly painted.)

Quebecois passed her while she was at the fuel dock also downbound from the Lakehead. (Other ULS (Flat back) steamers are also running-namily Can. Mariner,Leader and Montrealais. Each of these ships have been throught the Welland in the last Week.

Reported by: J.J. Van Volkenburg




News from the Twin Ports

10/07:
Grain traffic remains brisk in the Twin Ports. On Oct. 6 the Canadian Venture was loading at General Mills and Great Laker was at AGP, both in Duluth. Lake Champlain was docked at Harvest States elevator in its unused Berth 2. No indication on whether it was going to load there or was just using it as a layby berth. Vulcan was anchored on the lake waiting for Harvest States and Kalliope was anchored out waiting for Peavey. Olympic Merit is due in Oct. 6 to load at the Peavey elevator in Superior.

The Reiss Inland dock, located several miles up the St. Louis River, has received several ships this fall. Most recent was Oct. 6 when Reserve called there to unload stone.

Reported by: Al Miller




Greenpeace protests disrupts coal unloading

10/07:
Five members of Greenpeace prevented a ship from unloading coal 6 Oct. at a storage area of Lakeview Thermal Generating Station in Mississauga, Ontario. The five, wearing a banner that read "Coal Kills, Go Solar," chained themselves to a hopper used in handling coal. The action was taken in protest of plans by Ontario Hydro to increase its use of coal to compensate for the closure of seven nuclear generating facilities. The coal originated in Pennsylvania and was loaded in Ohio.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 7

The ALGOWOOD was launched October 7, 1980 for Algoma Central Marine, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

PAUL THAYER (b) EARL W. OGLEBAY) was launched October 7, 1973 for the Union Commerce Bank Trustee, Cleveland, OH and managed by Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland. She was built under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970 for $12.6 million.

BIRCHGLEN was launched October 7, 1926 as a) WILLIAM McLAUCHLAN, US.226176, for the Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

BLACK RIVER, Lake Bulk Freighter. Built as a Steel Barge in 1897 by the F.W. Wheeler & Co., she was Launched October 7, 1896 as a) SIR ISAAC LOTHIAN BELL

The HUTCHCLIFFE HALL was raised October 7, 1962 and taken to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs. She had sunk after a collison a few days earlier.

The MADISON suffered a fire on October 7, 1987 while lying idle at Muskegon and was badly damaged.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Update on the Saguenay and c. Columbus

10/06:
The Saguenay tow entered the St. Mary's River yesterday (5th) just after 14:00 and made very slow progress. The Scott Purvis assisted the tow through the river. The Saguenay tow is just now entering the locks. (09:20EST ) Avenger IV on bow with Scott Purvis on stern. The tow must have stopped overnight.

C. Columbus is presently moored at the Bondar Dock in Sault, Ontario.

Reported by: Scott McLellan




Canadian seaway legislation introduced

10/06:
On 2 Oct., Canadian Transport Minister David Collenette introduced legislation to commercialize Canadian operaton of the St. Lawrence Seaway and reform Canadian ports. The bill is essentially identical to a December 1995 version that died in April when an election was held. Under the bill, the seaway would be commercialized through agreements between the government and non-profit user groups. Management of Canada's major ports would by handled by a board of directors.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Michigan law on photographs takes effect

10/06:
As of 1 Oct., it is a felony to take photographs of human remains in Michigan waters without written permission of relatives. Violating the law is punishable by up to two years in prison and a U.S.$5,000 fine. Exceptions are allowed for court orders, law enforcement actions, or for archaeological, medical or scientific purposes. Sponsored by Rep. Pat Gagliardi, the bill was passed after a 1994 expedition to the Edmund Fitzgerald that located a body. A U.S.-registry bulk carrier owned and operated by Oglebay Norton Co.'s Columbia Transportation Division, the Edmund Fitzgerald, loaded with iron ore, broke in half and sank 10 Nov., 1975, about 24 kilometers/15 miles off Whitefish Point, Mich. All 29 crewmembers were killed. The 222.28-meter/729.25-foot ship was sailing from Superior, Wis., to Detroit and was built in 1958 by Great Lakes Engineering Works at River Rouge, Mich. Fred Shannon, who led the expedition, included brief images of the remains in a videotape released last year. The body was not identifiable. A group of relatives of the ship's crew requested the legislation in response. Critics have said that the bill might have broader effects than intended.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 6

Repairs were completed on the Algosoo by Herb Fraser & Associates at the Welland Dock on October 6 1986. She had suffered a serious fire at her winter mooring on the west wall above Lock 8 at Port Colborne, Ont. on March 7, 1986.

The bow section of the PRESQUE ISLE (2) arrived Erie October 6, 1972. The section was towed from Defoe Shipbuilding at Bay City, MI by the tugs MARYLAND and LAURENCE C. TURNER. . The total cost to construct the tug/barge thousand footer was approximately $35 million.

On October 6, 1981 the ERINDALE's bow was damaged when she hit the Allanburg Bridge abutment running downbound in the Welland Canal

On October 6, 1980 LAC DES ILES grounded in the Detroit River just below Grassy Island, the result of a faulty steering mechanism. She freed herself a few hours later. The damage caused by the grounding ended her career.

The IRVING S. OLDS departed Lorain light on her maiden voyage October 6, 1942 bound for Lake Superior to load iron ore, thus becoming the last of the "Supers" to enter service.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Engine part for vessel anchored at Cape Vincent is due

10/05:
The cargo ship, Seba M, that has been stranded off the shoreline of Cape Vincent, New York for the past 16 days with air compressor problems is finally expected to receive the part needed for repair. This foreign-made part was apparently not accessible in either the United States or Canada and had to be ordered from Japan. While the St Lawrence Seaway Authority had originally predicted that the ship would be able to resume its journey to Chicago within 2 days after its breakdown September 18th, the difficulty in obtaining parts has meant a prolonged stay for this ocean-going ship. Some Cape Vincent residents have expressed interest in the fact that ships using United States waters and experiencing mechanical problems are so dependent on other countries for parts and that they are not obtainable in our country. After this length of time, Cape residents are becoming use to seeing the massive hulk of the Seba M anchored near their village break-wall. When it is finally able to depart, the sight of this shabby old craft will probably be missed by some.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Today in Great Lakes History - October 5

The ARTHUR B. HOMER, loaded with ore, was in a head-on collision, October 5, 1972, with the unloaded Greek salty NAVISHIPPER at Buoy 83 in the Detroit River's Fighting Island Channel. NAVISHIPPER reportedly had no licensed pilot aboard at the time, a violation of Maritime law. There were no injuries, but the HOMER suffered extensive bow damage up to and including part of her pilothouse.

The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2) was christened on October 5, 1954 for the National Steel Corp. (M.A. Hanna Co., mgr.), Cleveland, OH.

HUTCHCLIFFE HALL was in collision with steamer RICHARD V. LINDABURY on a foggy October 5, 1962 off Grosse Pointe Farms in Lake St. Clair. The canaller suffered a 12 foot gash on her port side forward of her after cabins and sank. She was raised October 7th and taken to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs.

On October 5, 1967 while outbound on the Saginaw River after discharging a load of limestone at Saginaw, MI, the J.F. SCHOELLKOPF, JR.'s steering failed which caused her to hit the west side of the I-75 Zilwaukee Bridge. The SCHOELLKOPF, JR. incurred little damage but the south bound lanes of the bridge were out of service for several days until repairs were completed.

The ARTHUR H. HAWGOOD was launched October 5, 1907 for the Neptune Steamship Co. (Hawgood, mgr.), Cleveland, OH.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Saguenay tow making progress

10/04:
CSL's Saguenay passed St. Clair, Michigan upbound on Friday evening at dusk (7:30 pm) with the tug Avenger IV on the bow and the Patricia Hoey (I believe) along her port side. I'm not sure if there was a third tug involved on the starboard side. She is head to Thunder Bay to aid in the clean up effort of the harbor (see story dated 10/1). The tow appeared to be making approximately 4 or 5 mph. It's a little hard to believe that a 1964-built, diesel self-unloader is done sailing for her intended purpose.

Reported by: J. Luke and Andrew Severson




Ship damages dock in Windsor

10/04:
The Nea Doxa (Greek-registry 17,882-gt, 30,820-dwt, 188.14-meter/617.25-foot motor bulk carrier built in 1984, operated by Fafalios Shipping S.A.) collided with a dock at Morterm Ltd. in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, on 1 Oct. The ship sustained a small dent to its starboard side but the dock has considerable damage.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





C. Columbus arrives in Duluth

10/04:
At 7:30 this morning, the German passenger vessel C. Columbus arrived at the Duluth Aerial Bridge. It made a nearly 180 degree turn around the traffic buoy near Cargill Elevator to position herself to tie up behind the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center.

A possible problem with the vessel's docking was solved after some quick last-minute planning yesterday. After manual soundings were taken of the area behind the DECC, it was discovered that the water depth at the dock edge was not enough for the C. Columbus' 18'6" draft. However, a few feet out from the dock edge, the water depth was sufficient. It seems local authorities were told the ship's draft is 16.5 feet, the discrepancy may have been in the difference between the ship's draft in saltwater versus fresh water. DECC officials were able to obtain several large tires from the D. M & I. R. Railway in Two Harbors and had them trucked down to Duluth, where a crane was put in place along Harbor Drive to lower them to be fastened to the dock. Workers did not finish making the last minute modifications to the dock until 1:30 this morning, just hours before the C. Columbus arrived. The vessel docked with no problems.

Reported by: Al Miller and Jody L. Aho




Algorail visits Holland

10/04:
Holland saw a small change in routine 10/2, as the Algorail tied up at Verplank's to deliver salt at 2130. Of the twenty deliveries this season, she is the first vessel other than an Ogelbay Norton ship to unload in this port.

Reported by: Bob Vande Vusse




Today in Great Lakes History - October 4

On October 4, 1979 the ST. LAWRENCE NAVIGATOR arrived at the Port Weller Dry Docks, St. Catharines, Ont. where she was lengthened to the Seaway maximum length of 730' overall. A new bow and cargo section was installed including a bow thruster and was assigned Hull #66. New tonnage; 18,788 GRT, 12,830 NRT, 32,279 dwt. The ST. LAWRENCE NAVIGATOR was renamed c) CANADIAN NAVIGATOR in 1980 and now sails for ULS Corp.

The TEXACO BRAVE (2) was launced today in 1976 by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Shimonoseki, Japan for Texaco Canada Ltd., Don Mills, Ont.

The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS was laid up for the last time at the M.P.& L., Dock Duluth, MN on October 4, 1982.

On October 4, 1980 the ARTHUR B. HOMER was laid up for the last time at Erie, PA.

As a result of the collision between the PARKER EVANS and the SIDNEY E. SMITH, JR. 4 months earlier alternate one-way traffic between the Black River Buoy and Buoys One and Two in Lake Huron was agreed upon by the shipping companies. This happened on on October 4, 1972

The JAMES E. FERRIS' last trip before scrapping was from Duluth, MN with a split load of 261,000 bushels of wheat for Buffalo, NY arriving there October 4, 1974.

The JIIMAAN, Twin Screw RoRo Cargo/Passenger Ferry built to Ice Class 1D standards had its Keel laid October 4, 1991

On October 4, 1982, the Benjamin F. Fairless laid up for the last time in Duluth. She was towed out of Duluth on her way to an overseas scrapyard on June 17, 1988.

Data from: Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Elmglen damaged in allision near Quebec

10/03:
The Vekua (Maltese-registry 10,948-gt, 16,231-dwt, 151.31-meter/496.42-foot motor tanker built in 1987, operated by Anglo-Georgian Shipping Co. Ltd.) collided with the Elmglen (13,884-gt, 207-meter/678-foot barge built in 1952 by Port Weller Dry Docks Ltd. at St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada; operated by Groupe Ocean Inc.) on 1 Oct. near Quebec at 46 degrees 49 minutes north, 71 degrees 12 minutes west. The Vekua sustained slight damage to its upper bow and has sailed for Tampa, Fla. The Elmglen, formerly a bulk carrier, suffered a 0.6-meter/two-foot gash about 6.1 meters/20 feet above the waterline and a 3.0-meter/10-foot dent.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Fednav International has two options

10/03:
As part of its order for four 34,000-dwt geared bulk carriers from Oshima Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Fednav International Ltd. also has options for two more ships. It signed a contract with Sumitomo Corp. in Tokyo on 18 Sept. worth 12 billion Japanese yen/U.S.$98 million. The four will be built at Nagasaki, Japan, for delivery in the latter half of 1999 and the first half of 2000. In addition to acting as Fednav International's contractor, Sumitomo will be a partner with Fednav International in owning the vessels. Each ship will have six cargo holds and three 30-ton cranes. The bulk carriers will be built for navigating the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 3

The E.G. GRACE was delivered to the Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland on October 3, 1943. The E.G. GRACE was part of a government program designed to upgrade and increase the capacity of the U.S. Great Lakes fleet during World War II. In order to help finance the building of new ships, the U.S.M.C. authorized a program that would allow existing fleets to obtain new boats by trading in their older boats to the Government for credit. As partial payment for each new vessel, a fleet owner surrendered the equivalent tonnage of their existing and/or obsolete vessels, along with some cash, to the Maritime Commission.

The STERNECLIFFE HALL's register was closed on October 3, 1973 after her dismantling was completed.

On October 3, 1989 the SIR JAMES DUNN broke loose from her tow to the cutters torch in a fierce storm, forcing the tug and the GEORGIAN BAY back to the Azores. The DUNN was found wallowing in heavy seas 300 miles southwest of the Azores and was brought back by the tug DALMAR SERVANT.



Data from: Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




City of Midland 41 update

10/02:
The tugs "Mary Page Hannah" and the "Bonnie G. Selvich" arrived Ludington at 2:15 PM. They hooked on to the City of Midland and began pulling her out at around 3:15. The Midland was flying the centennial flag that the Badger flew on her maiden voyage this year on her foremast.

The Midland cleared the harbor at 3:38 PM, and the onlookers in their cars started honking their horns in salute. The tug "Mary Page Hannah" was pulling, and the tug "Bonnie G. Selvich" was pushing.

The last time the carferry City of Midland steamed into Muskegon was in 1985, when the former owners were contemplating operating the ship out of the Port City. Contractors working at the West Michigan Dock & Market Corp. over the next three months will remove the superstructure of the 406-foot ship and turn the hull into a freight barge.

The Lake Michigan Carferry owners have an opportunity to enter the tug barge operations with the Midland's hull through a new company, P.M. Shipping Inc. When converted into a barge, the Midland will be pushed by a 150-foot ocean-going Navy tugboat. Plans are that the Midland's hull will be towed to a shipyard in either Sturgeon Bay, Wis., or Escanaba to complete the conversion. P.M. Shipping Inc. hopes to have the barge ready for operations by early next summer. Once the conversion is completed the barge will be named P.M. 41 and carry her original hull number. The open-air barge will be able to carry heavy cargo such as iron, steel, large stone, coal, wood or containers.

Reported by: Max Hanley and Steve Vanden Bosch




More on the Saguenay

10/02:
The Saguenay will be used in the clean up of cresote at the bottom of Thunder Bay Harbor. Creosote is a derivative of petroleum and is used for the preservation of wood. It is black and has been used for many years to coat rail road ties. A vast quantity has leached into Thunder Bay Harbour and is now being cleaned up by a partnership including CN Rail, Northern Wood Preservers, federal and provincial governments. They are building a berm around what they call the black blob and will then pump it off the bottom of the lake, separate the water from the polluted material and then deposit the material into the old laker (Saguenay) and add microbes of some kind. The microbes eat the material and leave behind a reasonably clean product which is then diposed of in a landfill.

Reported by: Industry source




Salt boat in Manistee

10/02:
The ALGOWAY arrived Manistee at 6:00PM on Wednesday with salt for the Seng dock. The Algoway is an unusual visitor to the dock, as the Agawa Canyon is the main salt vessel for Manistee. The Algoway brought in a partial cargo, it unloaded part in Muskegon Michigan and the rest in Manistee. Manistee should get a full load of salt in the next month.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Dreamward update

10/02:
The Dreamward (Bahamian-registry 39,172-gt, 5,589-dwt, 190-meter/623-foot passenger ship built in 1992, owned operated by Norwegian Cruise Line Ltd.) docked in Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada, early 1 Oct. after drifting in the Gulf of St. Lawrence for more than 17 hours with 1,567 people aboard. An electrical problem disabled propulsion on 30 Sept. The Canadian Coast Guard's research vessel Hudson escorted the ship to Sydney. The Dreamward left Montreal on 27 Sept. with 1,053 passengers and 514 crew on a cruise chartered by a French firm. It then called at Quebec and was sailing to Sydney when it lost power. The cruise will end in New York, after a rotation that included New York; Boston; Halifax, Nova Scotia; Montreal; Quebec; Sydney; and New York.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





New Edmund Fitzgerald Song

10/02:
The well loved Gordon Lightfoot song "Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" was recorded and released by a rock group named Simon Bar Sinister. This group puts a new spin on an older song. Keep your ears perked for this one.

Reported by: Doug Wirsing




Today in Great Lakes History - October 2

CANADIAN OLYMPIC was christened on October 2, 1976 at St. Catharines. Her name honors the Olympic Games that were held at Montreal that year.

The TADOUSSAC (2) departed Collingwood on her maiden voyage October 2, 1969 to load iron ore at Fort William, Ont.

The AMERICAN last operated in 1956 and then was laid up at Manitowoc, WI. On October 2, 1972

The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON and CONSUMERS POWER (3) arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan October 2, 1988 where dismantling began on October 14th by Li Chong Steel & Iron Works Co. Ltd.

On her maiden voyage October 2, 1943, the E.G. GRACE cleared Lorain bound for Superior, WI to load iron ore.

The HOCHELAGA (2) departed Toronto October 2, 1993 in tow of the McKeil tugs GLENBROOK and KAY COLE for Montreal, Que and then to the cutters torch.

On October 2, 1969, the Tadoussac entered service.

Data from: Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Saguenay heading for Thunder Bay

10/01:
The SAGUENAY is headed for Thunder Bay. She will be used in the remediation of creasote pollution in the harbour. New owner is P. Gagne of Thunder Bay, contractor involved in pollution clean up at Northern Wood Preservers.
No word on what role she will play in the clean up.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Merchant mariner pleads guilty to intoxicated vessel operation

10/01:
In the first known case of its kind, a foreign merchant mariner has pled guilty in Federal court in Albany, NY for operating a vessel while intoxicated in U.S. waters. The third mate of the 644 ft Croatian bulk carrier M/V HERCIGOVINA was sentenced to 13 days in jail and fined $10,000. Assistant U.S. Attorney Rick Hartunian reflected the U.S. Coast Guard's firm stance that they will not tolerate operation of any vessel by intoxicated crewmembers when he asked the court to assess a severe penalty.

The third mate was in control of the propulsion of the vessel when U.S. Coast Guard boarding officers from Marine Safety Detachment Massena conducted a boarding on September 17th in conjunction with Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. personnel in Massena NY. Alert Coast Guard personnel detected evidence of alcohol consumption and took immediate action.

Further interviews with the crew and results of field sobriety tests revealed that crewmembers-including the master-had been drinking alcohol. The results of sobriety tests administered later by the New York State Police confirmed that the third mate's blood alcohol content (BAC) significantly exceeded the U.S. regulatory limit of .04 for commercial mariners. The master's BAC was very near the legal limit; he was released but still faces possible civil penalty action. The third mate was arrested by Coast Guard personnel.

The condition of the crew came to light during a routine Coast Guard boarding aimed at preventing the introduction of non-indigenous aquatic species into the Great Lakes through foreign ballast water. This boarding is one of the various types of safety inspections conducted by the U.S. and Canadian agencies to keep waterways and the surrounding community safe and protect the environment.

Reported by: Dan Ocean




Algoma rumors

10/01:
Rumor mill has the Algowest being converted to self-unloader in the near future, Algowood receiving new engine blocks, and an unidentified boat getting new Pielstick engines.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




News from the Twin Ports

10/01:
Canadian vessel traffic into Silver Bay continues. Algomarine and Canadian Transport were scheduled to arrive there Sept. 30. Kaye E. Barker also was scheduled to arrive that day.

Grain traffic remains heavy in Duluth. Canadian Leader and Canadian Miner were loading Sept. 30. At anchor waiting to load are salties Verily, Florentia and Captain Christos. Canadian Venture and Ocean Pretty were expected to arrive Sept. 30 for grain.

Reported by: Al Miller




Cargo Vessel Still Sitting Off Cape Vincent Shore

10/01:
The Seba M spent its 10th day yesterday waiting as workers continued to make repairs to the ship's engine. The 424 foot ship and its 22 crew members are bound for Chicago with 10,000 metric tons of steel but due to mechanical problems was forced to lay anchor at this small waterfront village at the east end of Lake Ontario and the mouth of the St. Lawrence River. The Watertown, N.Y. Daily Times reports that the spokeswoman for the Seaway Authority, Rhonda M. Worden has said that shuttling the broken engine parts between Cape Vincent and Montreal has meant a prolonged stay for the ocean-going vessel. Ms Worden said "the problems center on the ship's faulty air compressor but the ship is safe and the crew is OK." Different engine problems delayed it for several days a few miles up river from the Eisenhower lock at Massena, N.Y. earlier this month. SAVE THE RIVER, a non-profit environmental organization with about 1000 members, seek to protect the water and shoreline of the St. Lawrence River through educational and promotional events, has been in touch with Ms Worden and the U.S. Coast Guard and was told that the parts needed to repair the ship's engine "were pretty scarce." Based on the information the Clayton-based organization hs been given, Ms.Grimes,executive director said, "SAVE THE RIVER" has identified no major threats to the River but we are continuing to monitor the situation."

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Passenger ship adrift in Gulf of St. Lawrence

10/01:
The Dreamward (Norwegian-registry 39,000-gt, 5,589-dwt, 190-meter/623-foot passenger ship built in 1992, owned operated by Norwegian Cruise Line Ltd.) was adrift in the Gulf of St. Lawrence on 30 Sept. with 1,567 people aboard, after an electrical short-circuit disabled propulsion and steering. The ship was sailing from Quebec to Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada, and was last reported slowly drifting northeast about 59 kilometers/37 miles northeast of the Magdalen Islands of Quebec, Canada. Winds were reported to be brisk with seas of 3.0 meters/9.8 feet. The ship left Montreal on 27 Sept. with 1,053 passengers and 514 crew on a cruise chartered by a French firm. It was to call at Boston and Newport, R.I., before sailing to New York.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 1

The CHICAGO TRADER was laid up on October 1, 1976 at the Frog Pond in Toledo.

Dismantling commenced October 1, 1974 on the KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1) at Santander, Spain.

Data from: Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





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