Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News ARCHIVE

* Report News


Block Enters Ship Yard

10/31:
The Joseph L. Block entered Fraser Shipyard in Superior Friday morning. Word is that they had been experiencing some minor stern thruster problems and a diver was sent down to check it out. Her visit to the shipyard is expected to be very short. She is expected to be loading at the Duluth ore dock by late afternoon on Friday.

Reported by: Glenn Blaszkiewicz




Norasia Sheba to be delivered

10/31:
Norasia Shipping Services S.A. will take delivery of the Norasia Sheba the second week of November. It is the fourth new containership in a class of five being built by Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft AG in Kiel, Germany. The vessel will operate on the Canada Express Serice between Montreal, northern Europe and the Mediterranean, including Genoa and Naples in Italy. The weekly fixed-day service will also start calling Bremerhaven, Germany, and Le Havre, France. With the delivery of the Norasia Scarlet in January, the route will be extended to the eastern Mediterranean.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 31

CANADIAN EXPLORER's sea trials were conducted on October 31, 1983 on Lake Erie where a service speed of 13.8 m.p.h. was recorded.

The EDWIN H. GOTT was christened October 31, 1978 .

On October 31, 1973, the H.M. Griffith entered service.

J.W. McGIFFIN cleared Midland, Ont. on her maiden voyage October 31, 1973 bound for Thunder Bay, Ont. to load iron ore for Hamilton, Ont.

The CADILLAC (4) was launched October 31, 1942 as a) LAKE ANGELINA

ELMGLEN (2) cleared Owen Sound, Ont. on October 31, 1984 on her first trip in P. & H. colors.

On October 31, 1966 while downbound in the St. Marys River loaded with 11,143 tons of potash for Oswego, NY, the HALLFAX ran aground on a rocky reef and settled to the bottom with her hold full of water. She had grounded on Pipe Island Twins Reef just north of DeTour, MI.

The CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON (3) struck a reef the night of October 31, 1925 three miles south of Manitou Island, off the Keweenaw Peninsula, on Lake Superior.

On October 31, 1983 the SYLVANIA was towed out of the Frog Pond by the harbor tugs ARKANSAS and WYOMING. She was handed over to the tug OHIO for delivery to the Triad Salvage Co. at Ashtabula, OH arriving there on November 1st. Dismantling was completed there in 1984. Thus ended 78 years of service. Ironically the SYLVANIA, the first built of the 504 foot class bulkers, was the last survivor of that class. During her career with Columbia Transportation, the SYLVANIA had carried over 20 million tons and netted over $35 million.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Tug Kodiak

10/30:
The Port Huron based tug KODIAK (ex C & O 452) arrived at Nicholson Terminal in Ecorse on Monday evening 10/26. The captain said the tug will probably be sold to owners in France. On Wednesday October 28, she was still at Nick's apparently waiting for the drydock which is currently occupied by the JOHN R EMERY.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Twin Ports Report

10/30:
The General Mills elevators in Duluth and Superior have been receiving some interesting vessels in the past few days. Sarah Spencer/Atlantic Hickory unloaded at General Mills in Duluth earlier this week. Canadian Trader was loading at General Mills in Superior on Oct. 28,followed promptly by Kinsman Independent on Oct. 29

Edwin H. Gott loaded at the DMIR ore dock in Duluth Oct. 28. That was its second trip to Duluth in recent weeks. Usually it trades out of Two Harbors.

St. Clair once again is carrying cargo (apparently stone) to the Reiss Inland dock up the St. Louis River in Duluth, then shifting Oct. 29 to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal. The boat has made this trip several times this season.

Reported by: Al Miller




Some life left in the old girl?

10/30:
Last week a crew from Midwest Maritime Corp. sandblasted and painted the shipside of the laid up Day Peckinpaugh in Erie, PA. It was repainted in the original gray/white color scheme. Plans are to eventually paint the other side of the 254' long cement carrier as well.

Reported by: Dan Ocean




Today in Great Lakes History - October 30

The tugs GLENADA and MOUNT McKAY towed AMOCO ILLINOIS from Essexville on October 30, 1985 and arrived at the M&M slip on November 1st. where she was to be scrapped.

The CADILLAC (4) and her former fleetmate CHAMPLAIN (3) arrived under tow by the the Dutch tug/supply ship THOMAS DE GAUWDIEF on October 30, 1987 at Aliaga, Turkey to be scrapped there.

The ISLE ROYALE (2) (Canal Bulk Freighter) was launched October 30, 1947 as a) SOUTHCLIFFE HALL for the Hall Corporation of Canada Ltd. (which in 1969 became Hall Corporation (Shipping) 1969 Ltd.), Montreal.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Iron Ore Woes Hit U.S. and Canadian Ports

10/29:

Despite solid performances by the stone and coal trades, shipments of the leading dry-bulk commodities from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports fell nearly 4 percent in September to 16.6 million net tons. As with U.S.-Flag carriage in September, this total represents the second month in a row in which cargo volume fell short of the same period last year.

The Lakes iron ore trade accounted for the decline. With steel imports into the United States at historic highs, iron ore shipments slumped more than 10 percent to just 7.1 million tons. While the season-to-date total still represents an increase of 2.7 percent, a continued avalanche of dumped steel could whittle away that increase by season's end, and in fact, could hasten the close of navigation.

Driven by strong demand from a Canadian utility that is increasing its reliance on fossil fuels, coal loadings increased 4 percent in September to 4.6 million tons. Since the resumption of the coal trade in mid-March, shipments stand at 28.6 million tons, an increase of 7.3 percent

A booming construction industry in the Great Lakes basin boosted the September stone trade 3.7 percent to 4,859,811 tons; the season-to-date total of 28.8 million tons represents an increase of 5.8 percent. Should the stone trade continue at this pace, the 1998 season-end total will represent the fifth year in a row in which stone has set a modern-day record.

Visit the Lake Carriers' Association home page for complete details




La Baronessa

10/29:
The La Baronessa, the world's largest aluminum yacht, was opened by its builder, Palmer Johnson in Sturgeon Bay, Wis., to invited guests on 27 Oct. It cost U.S.$35 million. Among the features of the 59.4-meter/195-foot yacht, owned by a "Chinese gentleman from Singapore" who has four young children:
- Australian lacewood cabinetry
- Ebony wood from Madagascar
- A painting by Pablo Ruiz y Picasso
- Two drawings by Henri Emile Benoit Matisse
- White carpeting and white leather furniture
- Antique Lalique cranberry-colored crystal sconces
- A Jacuzzi on the top deck
- Televisions, floor-to-ceiling mirrors and bidets in each of seven cabins
- An espesso bar
- Surround-sound stereo system
- A grand piano
- An air-conditioned area for two inflatible boats
- A cedar closet in the master's cabin
- A "state dining room" with mahogany floors

The yacht involved Italian designer Dan Lenard. It will be under the command of Allan Lange, who will take the vessel out the St. Lawrence Seaway, across the Atlantic Ocean, into the Mediterranean Sea, Red Sea and Indian Ocean and through the Strait of Malacca to Singapore. The vessel will depart within the next two weeks.
The yacht, the largest built in the United States since the 1930s, took two years to construct.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Seaway Drill

10/29:
When an incident involving a cargo release occurs on the St. Lawrence Seaway, who cleans it up? How long does it take? Who makes all the important decisions for public safety and environmental quality? Who checks the facts? Who knows the proper procedure? These questions can leave both the public and the authorities in charge wondering. The group Save The River had the opportunity to evaluate the performance of Seaway, Coast Guard, public service, and other personnel as they struggled to answer those questions while enacting a simulated chemical spill and rescue mission in Eisenhower Lock in Massena on Saturday, September 12.
Click here to view the report

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Historian Passes

10/29:
Ted A Perusek 74 of Lorain Ohio died on Monday. He was a member of the Great Lakes Historical Society and had an enormous knowledge of Great Lakes history and lore. He enjoyed tracking routes of Great Lakes freighters whenever they came to Lorain and made daily trips to the shipping docks of Lorain. He also enjoyed travel to the Soo Locks, Welland canal and Middle Bass Island.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - October 29

ALGOLAKE was launched October 29, 1976

On October 29, 1986 the JAMES R. BARKER, who had suffered an engine room fire, was lashed side-by-side to the thousand-foot WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY and towed this way to Sturgeon Bay, Wis. for repairs.

The b) CANADIAN EXPLORER was christened on October 29, 1983 at the Port Weller Dry Docks.

The National Transportation Safety Board ruled on October 29, 1991 that Total Petroleum was responsible for the fire that destroyed the tanker JUPITER because of faulty moorings and exonerated the BUFFALO from primary responsibility.

On the afternoon of October 29, 1987 while upbound with coal from Sandusky, OH, the ROGER M. KYES ( b) ADAM E. CORNELIUS) went aground on Gull Island Shoal in Lake Erie's Middle Passage and began taking on water. About 3,000 tons of coal was transferred to the AMERICAN REPUBLIC after which the KYES freed herself the next morning. Damage from the grounding required extensive repairs.

The tug portion of the PRESQUE ISLE (2) departed New Orleans on October 29, 1973.

The H.C. HEIMBECKER's last trip started at Thunder Bay, Ont. with a load of grain bound for Owen Sound, Ont. where, on October 29, 1981, it was discovered that one of her boilers was cracked. When unloading was completed on October 30th, the HEIMBECKER proceeded under her own power to Ashtabula, OH for scrapping.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Iron Ore Slowdown In September Again Impacts U.S.-Flag Shipping

10/28:
A 7.8 percent decrease in iron ore cargos has produced the second month in a row in which U.S.-Flag carriage on the Lakes fell below the previous year's level. Cargo movement in U.S.-Flag lakers totaled 13.3 million net tons in September, a decrease of 1.3 percent compared to the corresponding period last year.

Record high levels of dumped foreign steel pushed iron ore shipments in U.S. bottoms in September down to 6,265,187 tons, a decrease of 7.8 percent compared to last September. For the season, the U.S.-Flag ore float stands at 43.6 million tons, an increase of 4 percent.

Coal loadings in U.S.-Flag lakers in September were essentially unchanged from a year ago, but for the season, the coal trade in U.S. bottoms, 15.1 million tons, represents a decrease of 3.8 percent. The mild winter of 1997-1998 left many utilities with extra large stockpiles of coal and inventory adjustments continue.

The stone trade remained a bright spot for U.S.-Flag shipping in September, rising to 3. 9 million tons, an 8.9 percent increase. Since the resumption of stone loadings in mid-March, the U.S.-Flag float has increased 7.8 percent to 22.5 million tons.

Salt cargos in Jones Act-qualified lakers doubled to 165,000 tons in September and for the season, stand at 860,000 tons, an increase of nearly 40 percent. These facts fly in the face of statements made by Cabotage law critics who contend there are no Jones Act-qualifed vessels available to move salt between American ports on the Great Lakes.

Through September, U.S.-Flag carriage stands at 85.5 million tons, an increase of 3.2 percent.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Job of Administrator for St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp.

10/28:
This position continues to remain unfilled as controversy holds up appointment to the post. A case of history repeating itself. In the past,nominees for this administrative position have rarely enjoyed smooth sailing according to an article written by Alan Emory,Senior Correspondent, Watertown Times, Watertown, N.Y. This article is submitted in its entirety for your enjoyment and also for your commiseration. "It's just like the dark cloud that hovered over Joe Bfstplk in the "Li'l Abner" cartoons.

The job of the St. Lawrence Seaway administrator must be jinxed. From the very first, 44 years ago, political gaffes and controversy have shadowed the top post in the Seaway Development Corp. The latest involves Albert S. Jacquez, a Californian, whom President Clinton has picked to head the Seaway Corp. The White House did not bother to run the prospective choice by any of the Seaway-area members of Congress, and the reaction of such long-time Seaway supporters as Reps. James L. Oberstar, D-Minn, and Sen. Spencer Abraham R-Mich. has been nearly vitriolic.

But why should Mr.Jacquez's nomination be any different from those of the past? The very first Seaway chief was Lewis G. Castle, a Duluth, Minn. banker, whose claim to fame was that he was an errand boy for the leading Seaway lobbyist,N.R.Danielian. Mr Castle demonstrated his expertise by allowing Canada to dictate the size of the Seaway locks,which were built so small they could not accommodate the larger vessels that now want to use the waterway system. His deputy was Martin W. Oettershagen of Flossmoor, Ill, a suburb of Chicago.

When John F. Kennedy was elected president, he decided the new Seaway administrator--then appointed at the pleasure of the president--should be Joseph H. McCann of Michigan. However, Mr Oettershagen wanted the job, and he pleaded with his friend Chicago Mayor William Daley to intercede with the president. The mayor explained that, while Mr.Oettershagen was a Republican, he really only wanted to serve a year as administrator, and Mr. Kennedy agreed. When Mr. McCann was told of the decision, he was stunned. The president then asked Mr. McCann to serve a year as deputy administrator, after which he would get his promised job. Mr McCann, a good soldier, agreed. After Richard M. Nixon was elected president, the political niceties dictated a Republican Seaway chief, George Wilson of Ohio wanted the job and lobbied vigorously for it, but lost out to David W.Oberlin, the port director of Duluth. Congress then passed a law giving the Seaway administrator a seven-year statutory term.

Then came 1981, and Ronald Reagan became president. The Seaway job was promised as a patronage plum to the choice of George Clark, the New York state Republican chairman. But another surprise, James A. Baker 3rd, Mr Reagan's chief of staff, was approached by Eugene V. Atkinson of Pennsylvania, a Democratic congressman who switched parties, ran as Republican in 1980 and was defeated. Mr. Atkinson thought the Seaway job looked like a good security blanket, and Mr. Baker wanted to reward him for becoming a Republican, so he offered the ex-congressman the post, forgetting it had been promised to a New Yorker. New Yorkers were furious. Great Lakes members of Congress who knew nothing about Mr.Atkinson except for his reputation for inefficiency, were furious. The White House recoiled at this hostility, reinforced by New York freshman Sen.Alfonse M. D"Amato's demand that Mr.Clark be given the right to pick the administrator. When James L. Emery of Geneseo lost his bid to become lieutenant governor of New York in 1982, Mr. Clark tapped him for the Seaway job, and he eventually was nominated and approved. Mr. Emery later resigned the post, and after a hiatus of several months, it was given to Stanford E. Parris of Virginia. Mr. Parris, a Republican congressman, had, as a loyal Virginian, opposed the Seaway because of its competition with Virginia ports. He lost his bid for re-election in 1990, however, after which then-Rep. David O'B. Martin, R-Morristown, a House colleague,recommended that President George Bush pick Mr. Parris as Seaway administrator. Mr Parris then became a big Seaway booster, but, after a short time, quit to run for the Virginia state Senate. The Seaway jinx held, and he lost that race,too. David G. Sanders, whom Mr Parris had brought with him to the Seaway Corp. from Congress, took over as acting administrator, but President Clinton eventually chose Gail C. McDonald of Oklahoma, a former member of the Interstate Commerce Commission,as the new Seaway chief. Mrs. McDonald proved an able,energetic, and popular administrator, a high-profile figure in the Massena,N.Y. area. However, she dropped out to take a fat salary as a lobbyist for the oil and other industries, opposing strict environmental regulations. Apparently tired of that role, she managed to land a job as special aide to the Federal Railway Administration to handle the disposition of the Consolidated Rail Corp. That became effective 3 weeks ago. It apparently was not intended to be anything more than a way station, because, according to several government sources, she called Sen. Patrick Moynihan, D-N.Y., to see about the prospects of her getting her old Seaway job back Mr Moynihan then publicly promoted her. And that is where things stand today. Mr Sanders is still acting Seaway administrator and Congress has still refused to approve the Clinton administration's recommendation that the Seaway Corp. be transformed into a performance-based organization, whose leader would be someone chosen by the secretary of transportation and whose budget would be based on cargo revenue, rather than congressional appropriations.

The jinx cloud still hovers over the agency. Joe Bfstplk would be happy.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Today in Great Lakes History - October 28

The CANADIAN PIONEER's maiden voyage was on October 28, 1981 to Conneaut, OH to take on coal for Nanticoke, Ont.

The CANADIAN TRANSPORT (2) was launched October 28, 1978 for Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd., Toronto, Ont.

GEMINI was christened October 28, 1978 at Huron, OH.

The GEORGE M. CARL (2) was launched October 28, 1922 as a) FRED G. HARTWELL (2)

D.M. CLEMSON (2) was launched October 28, 1916

CHARLES M. WHITE was launched October 28, 1945 as a C4-S-A4 cargo ship a) MOUNT MANSFIELD for the U.S. Maritime Commission (U.S.M.C. Hull #2369).

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Barge capsizes in Lake Erie

10/27:
On the morning of 23 Oct., the U.S. Coast Guard was notified that one of two deck barges being pushed by the tug Capt. Marby had capsized near Conneaut, Ohio, dumping 1,200 tons of stone in 12 meters/40 feet of water. The barge remained afloat and was towed to Eire, Pa.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





St. Lawrence Seaway figures

10/27:
The Montreal to Lake Ontario section of the St. Lawarence Seaway handled 24.2 million metric tons through the third quarter, up 2.93 percent from last year. The Welland Canal section rose 1.2 percent to 25.8 million tons. Combined total traffic is up 0.8 percent.

For grain, Canadian movements are down, while U.S. exports are up from 1997. On Montreal to Lake Ontario, general cargo is up 40 percent to 4.9 million tons and on the Welland Canal, general cargo totaled 3.7 million tons, up 32 percent. Much of the general cargo is steel.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 27

While the JAMES R. BARKER was up bound October 27, 1986 on Lake Huron above buoys 11 & 12, a high pressure fuel line on the starboard engine failed causing an engine room fire, which was extinguished by on-board fire fighting equipment. Fortunately no one was injured. On October 29th the BARKER was lashed side-by-side to the thousand-foot WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY (b) Paul R. Tregurtha) and taken to Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

The PAUL THAYER (b) EARL W. OGLEBAY) was christened on October 27, 1973 at Lorain.

On her maiden voyage the HOCHELAGA (2) departed Collingwood on October 27, 1949 for Fort William, Ont. to load grain for Port Colborne, Ont.

The FRANCIS E. HOUSE was laid up at Duluth, MN on October 27, 1960 and remained idle there until April, 1966 when she was sold to the Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland and was renamed c) KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1).

On October 27, 1973 the HENRY LALIBERTÉ struck an embankment while backing from the Frontier Dock Slip at Buffalo, NY and damaged her steering gear beyond repair. As a consequence she was laid up there.

The RED WING (2) and the FRANK A. SHERMAN departed Lauzon, Que. on October 27, 1986 in tandem tow by the Vancouver based deep-sea tug CANADIAN VIKING bound for scrapping in Taiwan.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Duluth

10/26:
A recruiting representative from the Great Lakes Maritime Academy will be in Duluth, MN on Thursday November the 5th. Anyone interested in learning more about a career as an officer aboard Great Lakes vessels is encouraged to attend a free informational seminar. This seminar will take place at the Secondary Tech Center from 6:30 to 8:30 pm. Call the Academy at 1 800 748 0566 ext 1200 for more information




Today in Great Lakes History - October 26

LOUIS R. DESMARAIS was christened October 26,1977.

On October 26, 1968 the R. BRUCE ANGUS grounded in the St. Lawrence River near Beauharnois, Que. Sixteen hundred tons of iron ore were lightered to free her and she damaged 65 bottom plates.

The HUTCHCLIFFE HALL and OREFAX were sold October 26, 1971 to the Consortium Ile d'Orleans of Montreal made up of Richelieu Dredging Corp., McNamara Construction Ltd. and The J.P. Porter Co. Ltd.

On October 26, 1924 the E.A.S. CLARKE (2), anchored in the Detroit River opposite the Great Lakes Engineering Works because of dense fog was struck by the B.F. JONES (1) near her after deck house which caused the CLARKE to sink. No lives were lost.

On October 26, 1977 the MENIHEK LAKE struck a lock in the St. Lawrence Seaway sustaining damage estimated at $400,000.

On October 26, 1971 the ROGERS CITY (2) had her A-frame collapsed while unloading at Carrollton, MI on the Saginaw River. Her unloading boom was cut away and temporary repairs were made at Defoe Shipbuilding Co., Bay City, MI.

The tug ROUILLE was launched on October 26, 1929 as Hull 83 of Collingwood Shipyards Ltd.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Wait For Weather over

10/25:
The last of Sarnia's weatherbound armada cleared at about 9 a.m. with the passage of the MISEFORD and NIAGARA II on Saturday, October 24.

Loading at the Elevator at the time was the ATLANTIC ERIE with her unusual "www.csl.ca" billboards (look in Monday's Photogallery for a picture of the vessel). This marked the first visit of these billboards to the upper lakes and also, I believe, her arrival made her the largest vessel (736'06") ever to visit Sarnia.

Reported by: Norman Eakins and Larry Leverenz




The Last Trip of the Fitz

10/25:
"THE LAST TRIP OF THE FITZ"
Program to be held Saturday, November 7, at 2:00 p.m. at the Dossin Museum on Belle Isle in Detroit.

Chicago's Lee Murdock, Great Lakes Balladeer and the Captain of the William Clay Ford, Don Erickson, together at the Dossin Museum on Belle Isle to recount The Last Trip of the Edmund Fitzgerald

Detroit Don't miss this rare opportunity to meet Captain Don Erickson, who will answer questions from the floor and provide information from that dreadful night. Captain Erickson took the William Clay Ford from safe harbor out in heavy weather to seek the Edmund Fitzgerald, who foundered with all 29 hands on November 10, 1975 near Whitefish Point.

Murdock is on tour just after releasing his ninth recording, Great Lakes Chronicle. Murdock's work is a documentary and also an anthem to the people who live, work, and play along the Great Lakes today. Lee blends his contemporary musical tastes with the old songs and stories from the Great Lakes. Tickets are $12 per person ($10 for GLMI members). Charge by phone: TICKETS PLUS (800) 585-3737, visit automated kiosk at MEIJER, Hall Road, or purchase at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum.

Proceeds will benefit the Great Lakes Maritime Institute (GLMI). Please join us, Saturday, November 7, at 2:00 p.m. at the Dossin Museum on Belle Isle in Detroit.
For more information call 313-852-4051




Today in Great Lakes History - October 25

The ALGOBAY departed on her maiden voyage October 25, 1978 from Collingwood light for Stoneport, Mich. to load stone for Sarnia, Ont.

The STERNECLIFFE HALL entered service on October 25, 1947.

The HURON (4) arrived at Santander, Spain October 25, 1973 in consort with the WYANDOTTE (2) towed by the German tug DOLPHIN X. for scrapping.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Still Waiting For Weather

10/24:
The JERRY NEWBERRY & OC 183 cleared the Government Dock at about 9:00 am yesterday morning. She was followed by the DOVER which spent last night at the Sidney E. Smith Dock with her two barges.

Both tows were assisted under the Bluewater Bridge by the MISEFORD which then went back down to the Government Dock to rejoin the NIAGARA II.

Just after noon yesterday the JERRY NEWBERRY and DOVER are above buoys 11 & 12 coming back downbound with their tows! The weather proved to be too rough.

Reported by: Norman Eakins




Dominion Bridge being investigated

10/24:
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is reportedly investigating Dominion Bridge Corp., the owner of bankrupt Davie Industries Inc. at Levis, Quebec.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Rouge earnings, shipments decline

10/24:
Rouge Industries Inc., parent of Rouge Steel, reported a 21-percent drop in third-quarter earnings, reflecting lower sales to General Motors Corp. due to a strike and depressed prices caused by a sharp increase in steel imports. Net income totaled $5.5 million, or 25 cents a share, down from $7 million, or 32 cents a share, a year ago. Third-quarter sales fell 16 percent to $269.7 million, reflecting a 17.7-percent drop in steel shipments.

Reported by: Detroit News




U.S. Coast Guard bill proceeding

10/24:
Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., lifted a hold 21 Oct. that he had placed on a 1999 reauthorization bill for the U.S. Coast Guard. Reportedly, Levin agreed to a deal in which Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Sen. Olympia Snowe, R-Maine, agreed to take-up a provision included in the bill that would allow a foreign dredging vessel to enter the U.S. registry during the next Congress. The vessel is a former naval landing craft that had left the U.S. registry and returned a few years ago under a limited waiver. A provision in the bill would expand the waiver for additional operations.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Coast Guard City U.S.A. becomes official

10/24:
The U.S. Coast Guard's budget for fiscal 1999 was approved by the U.S. Senate on 21 Oct. Contained within the bill is language allowing the commandant of the Coast Guard to declare Grand Haven, Mich., "Coast Guard City, U.S.A." Last year, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to desigate the city directly, but the action was never taken.

Grand Haven is home of Group Grand Haven and Station Grand Haven and also holds an annual Coast Guard Festival.

Under the authorization bill, if the commandant wants to recognize any other community as a "Coast Guard City," the commandant must first notify Congressional committess 90 days before doing so.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Steelmaker modernizes

10/24:
Yesterday's Detroit News reports that Great Lakes Steel, aiming for higher sales to automakers and auto parts makers, will spend $176 million to modernize its mill and consolidate sales, marketing and technology operations in Ecorse.

Great Lakes, a subsidiary of National Steel Co., broke ground Thursday on a $150-million galvanizing line, and a $2-million office building for sales, marketing and technology operations now located in Livonia.

The galvanizing line project will create about 300 construction jobs. Other planned improvements:

  • $6 million for an expanded coil operation that will allow Great Lakes to boost manufacturing productivity, reduce defects and double the size of steel coils to 140,000 pounds.
  • $16 million for a modern temper mill that will eventually replace two others.

The upgrades will allow Great Lakes to boost annual shipments of automotive steel to 2 million tons from 1.5 million tons.

The renovations are moving forward despite a depressed earnings outlook for the steel industry.

Surging imports from economically depressed countries have forced steel prices downward, prompting Great Lakes to idle a blast furnace and redeploy about 100 employees. The company has also deferred all discretionary spending. "We can't match import prices across the board, or we'll go broke," National Steel President John A. Maczuzak said in an interview Thursday. "We've responded by going on a bread and water diet."

National Steel's share of the North American steel market has dropped from 6 percent in 1997 to 5.8 percent this year. Analysts expect the company to earn 20 cents a share during the third quarter, down from $1.76 a share a year ago.

Story by: Dave Phillips/Detroit News




U.S. Coast Guard bill proceeding

10/24:
L.R. Jackson Fisheries Ltd. and its owner, Larry R. Jackson, were charged 19 Oct. with violating the Lacey Act, a U.S. law that protects wildlife.

Jackson, of Port Stanley, Ontario, is accused of catching fish 305 meters/1,000 feet inside U.S. territorial waters. He has been charged with a felony and a misdemeanor and if convicted, could be imprisoned for a year and fined U.S.$500,000.

U.S. District Judge Donald Nugent in Cleveland will hear the case. According to Joseph Dubyak, a Cleveland lawyer representing Jackson, he will plead guilty to what Jackson said was accidental fishing in U.S. waters.

On 26 Nov., a U.S. Coast Guard aircraft spotted an 18-meter/60-foot fishing vessel catch 270 kilograms/600 pounds of fish in Lake Erie. He is also accused of illegal fishing on 29 Dec.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 24

TEXACO WARRIOR (2) was launched October 24, 1969 as a) THUNTANK 6.

The PHILIP D. BLOCK along with the W.W. HOLLOWAY scrap tow arrived Recife, Brazil. October 24,1986

The THOMAS W.LAMONT and her former fleetmate, ENDERS M. VOORHEES arrived at Alegeciras, Spain on October 24, 1987 on the way to the cutters torch. The LAMONT was one of the last bulkers that retained her telescoping hatch covers to the very end.

The NIPIGON BAY arrivied Thunder Bay, Ont. on October 24, 1980 where repairs were made from damage caused by her grounding a earlier in the month.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Ships Collide in Welland Canal

10/23:
On Monday morning at around 03:00 the CSL self unloader H.M. GRIFFITH and the Cypriot registered bulker, SEVILLA WAVE collided above lock 7 in Thorold. The cause of the accident is likely under investigation at this time however both ships sustained minor damage to their port bows. One observer noticed that Sevilla Wave's port bow plating was bent upwards as a result of the impact. H.M. Griffith proceeded to wharf 16 in Port Colborne possibly for inspection while Sevilla Wave was cleared to continue downbound in the Canal.

Reported by: Jeff Cameron

Visit the Welland Canal page for daily Welland Canal News and passages




Still Waiting For Weather

10/23:
The JERRY NEWBERRY and the MISEFORD are still at Sarnia with their respective charges. Arriving at the dock yesterday morning to check out available accommodation there was the DOVER (the Lakes' prettiest tug in my opinion). She was downbound from Goderich when she encountered "eight foot waves"; she sensibly took a "short cut" and entered the channel at buoys 1 & 2 rather than the usual 11 & 12. She left after a few minutes for Port Lambton where she is to pick up to barges and now plans to return to the Dock later today before proceeding upbound.

Reported by: Norman Eakins




Tug Gets Strange Looks in Panama!

10/23:
The tug/supply vessel John Spence is currently abeam the west coast of Mexico enroute to Vancouver. She is not towing a barge nor is she running light. The strange looking craft completely filling her after deck space is not the newest design in Offshore lifeboats. She is the new CCG Hovercraft built at Hike Metal in Lake Erie. The hovercraft was loaded as cargo, in Quebec and the two are currently about 10 days steaming from Vancouver.

Reported by: D. Ocean




You might say it was a First-class Rescue

10/23:
Reported by John Sarns from the Tuesday, September 29, 1998 Detroit Free Press

For two men delivering mail to freighters in the Detroit River on Monday night, it was the topper to an unusually hectic night.

At about 9:25 p.m., Paul LaMarre and Charlie Weiss -- who work on the J.W. Westcott II, Detroit's floating post office -- heard a call for help about a man who had fallen into the Detroit River.

The two quickly hopped back on the boat, headed toward the Ambassador Bridge and found the man between 9:30 and 10 p.m.

"I had to proceed with caution to avoid running him over," said LaMarre, who has piloted boats on the Detroit River since 1996.

"He looked like half a beach ball in the water with just his nose sticking out of the water."

Westcott dispatcher Paul Jagenow, who also heard the radio call, called for an ambulance.

The drowning man was about 150 feet from a Windsor-based dinner boat [Aurora Borealis], which he'd fallen from. LaMarre, who was at the wheel of the rescue boat, said the dinner boat had lowered its lifeboat, but was having difficulties starting the motor.

Weiss, of Grosse Pointe, lowered a life preserver to the drowning man. On the deck, Weiss turned him over and hit him on the back until he coughed up water.

"I just kept talking to him, then he gave me the thumbs-up," said Weiss late Monday, after delivering mail to a freighter filled with iron ore on its way to the Ford Rouge plant.

"That made me feel better. I'm still kind of trembling about it." Officials said the man was taken to Detroit Receiving Hospital, but his condition was not known.

Steve Pierce of the Coast Guard said people occasionally fall overboard, but that it happens more with personal watercraft. He said the water temperature was about 60 degrees at the time the man fell in.

LaMarre, of Algonac, said he hadn't rescued anyone before while working for the 24-hour mail boat -- the nation's only post office riverboat, ZIP code 48222.

"It feels real nice," he said. "You get more of a rush afterwards, though."

Capt. Marty Tighe of the Detroit Fire Department fireboat said the drowning man was very lucky, considering the water's strong current. "He'd probably be down by Boblo if it wasn't for those two," he said.

And the rest of the mail? It got through on time, said Jagenow.

Mary Owen, the story's author can be reached at 313-222-6582.




U.S. Coast Guard budget held over dredger

10/23:
The U.S.$4 billion budget for the U.S. Coast Guard's 1999 fiscal year has been stalled in the U.S. Senate due to a dispute over a dredging vessel for the U.S. Great Lakes.

Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., is opposing final action, which has been approved by both the Senate and U.S. House of Representatives with an amendment, because it would allow a foreign-registered dredging vessel onto the U.S. registry. Michigan dredging firms and their unionized employees have sought to block the move.

The waiver for the vessel, under the so-called "Jones Act," needs Congressional approval. In addition, under the bill, the U.S. Maritime Administration would assume the waiver responsibility for small passenger vessels and ferries. There is also a provision that the waiver can be revoked if a U.S.-built vessel wants to enter a particular trade.

Elsewhere in the bill, the Coast Guard budget is a slight increase from last year, particularly in illegal drug interdiction efforts. Other provisions include banning vessels and their owners whose foreign-registry vessels have been cited by the Coast Guard for violations from carrying U.S. government cargo for a year. The bill would also require investigations into the public accessibility of internal safety information on vessels involved in casualties and the feasibility of alternatives to double-hulled tanker designs.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





U.S. Customs Service seeks comment

10/23:
The U.S. Customs Service is seeking comments until 14 Nov. on a plan to revoke two regulations, known as Headquarters Ruling Letters, approved in 1986. The letters state that U.S. cabotage law does not prevent the use of Canadian-registry tugs for docking or other assistance in U.S. territorial waters if such efforts did not involve towing or pushing.

A Customs Service review has shown that the letters are in conflict with other such letters and that the 1986 documents actually defeat protections meant for U.S.-registry tug firms.

The review stems from a July incident in which a Canadian-registry tug provided towing to a Norwegian-registry vessel near Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.

Comments should be sent to the Custom Service's Office of Regulations and Rulings, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W., Washington, D.C., 20229.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Oglebay Norton Reports Strong Results

10/23:
Oct. 21 -- Oglebay Norton Company today announced results for the third quarter and nine months ended September 30, 1998. Revenues for both the third quarter and nine months were the highest in the Company's history, reflecting four acquisitions completed during the year. The acquisitions, which have nearly doubled the Company's revenue base, are: Colorado Silica Sand (March); Port Inland Limestone operations (April); Global Stone Corporation (May); and Filler Products (August).

Revenues for the 1998 third quarter compared with the same period last year advanced 88% to $85,845,000 from $45,602,000. Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) increased 86% to $23,742,000 from $12,771,000 for the same quarter last year. Net income was $5,679,000 ($1.19 per share, fully diluted), compared with last year's $6,476,000 ($1.35 per share, fully diluted). The decline in net income was primarily due to increased interest expense on borrowings used to fund the acquisitions and a higher effective tax rate.

For the first nine months of 1998, compared with the same period last year, revenues increased 61% to $163,879,000 from $101,964,000. EBITDA for the 1998 first nine months rose 63% to $41,941,000 from $25,745,000 last year. Net income for the period was $10,908,000 ($2.28 per share fully diluted), compared with $12,438,000 ($2.58 per share fully diluted) for the same period one year ago. Again, acquisition-related increases in interest expense, as well as a higher effective tax rate, caused the decline.

Marine Transportation segment results, including EBITDA, were even with last year's record-setting third quarter. For the nine month period, EBITDA significantly improved over last year's level because of an earlier than normal start to the shipping season, continued strong customer demand, favorable operating conditions on the Great Lakes, and lower fuel costs.

John N. Lauer, Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Oglebay Norton said ``Consistent with our expectations and our public projections, the outlook for Marine Transportation remains encouraging for the near term. If the weather stays favorable, we expect a very strong finish to the year. While Marine remains on target for a record year, Industrial Sands is poised for their second-best year ever. Softening steel production may cause a modest slowing in the performance of the Lime and Limestone segment in the fourth quarter, but results for the year should still meet our expectations. Overall, we remain optimistic for improved Company results in 1999.''

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




Today in Great Lakes History - October 23

The CECILIA DESGAGNES was launched October 23, 1970 as a) CARL GORTHON, for Rederi A/B Gylfe, Hälsingborg, Sweden.

GRAND RAPIDS Rail Car Ferry was launched October 23, 1926 for the Grand Trunk-Milwaukee Car Ferry Co., Muskegon, MI.

WILLIAM B. SCHILLER was launched October 23, 1909 for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

10/22:
For the first time in a month or more, the waters off Duluth-Superior were empty of anchored grain ships Tuesday and Wednesday. Nonetheless, the grain trade remained brisk Wednesday. All three Duluth elevators were full: Lake Erie was loading at AGP, Lynx at Cargill and Praxitalis at General Mills. Oakglen was loading at the Peavey elevator in Superior.

Also Wednesday, Algosteel paid an unusual call to the BNSF ore dock in Superior.

Reported by: Al Miller




News From the Seaway

10/22:
Still tied up in Montreal since October 7 at section 25 is the Algonorth with a full cargo loaded at Pointe Noire. It is assume she is under repairs as vessels docking at section 25 are usually there for repairs or refit. In September, she had been reactivated for the fall season grain rush going to Thunder Bay to load grain for delivery at Baie Comeau arriving there on September 29th.

Also idled in Montreal is Mathilda Desgagnes since October 15th, her voyages to the Arctic regions to deliver supplies having been completed. She is laid up at section 56E, this section having been used by vessels waiting for drydocking when Canadian Vickers shipyard was in operation.

According to a Montreal newspaper, work has begun to rebuilt the Lachine Canal about the middle of September. It is expected it will reopen in the summer of 2002 for recreational navigation as the low bridges will be raised only slightly.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




7.1 Million for Detroit

10/22:
Tuesday's Detroit News reports that the Detroit-Wayne County Port Authority has received $7.2 million in government grants for a commercial dock on the Detroit River. The authority is working with city officials to find the right piece of city-owned property for a dock, and possibly a passenger terminal and restaurant, said port authority executive director John Jamian.

Port development is the latest effort in the growing movement to revitalize downtown Detroit. The three casinos planned for the city's riverfront make redevelopment and increased commercial use of the Detroit River more feasible. One as yet unidentified company has indicated it will be ready to start boat service between Windsor and Detroit and Toledo and Detroit as soon as Detroit's casinos open, Jamian said.

Reported by: Detroit News




Today in Great Lakes History - October 22

The PRESQUE ISLE (2)'s tug completed her sea trials on October 22, 1973 in New Orleans.

It was announced on October 21, 1986 that Canada Steamship Lines and Upper Lakes Group would merge CSL's Collingwood shipyard and ULS' Port Weller shipyard and create Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering (1986) Ltd.

On October 22, 1986 the ALGOCEN spilled about four barrels of diesel fuel while refueling at the Esso Dock at Sarnia.

The TOM M. GIRDLER departed South Chicago light on her maiden voyage, October 22, 1951, bound for Escanaba, MI where she loaded 13,900 tons of ore for delivery to Cleveland, OH.

The THORNHILL (1) grounded on October 22, 1973 just above the Sugar Island ferry crossing in the St. Marys River.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Ranger III to get new Engines

10/21:
A contract has been awarded to Bay Ship Inc. of Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin by the US Department of Interior, Isle Royale National Park for repowering and drydocking of the USNPS RANGER III. The 165' "packet" vessel will have her 40 year old "Kahlenberg" main engines removed and replaced with twin 850 hp, 3508 B Caterpillar engines. The contract will also include, the addition of a 250 hp, 36" dia. hydraulic bow thruster; refurbishment of four bathrooms (one with wheelchair accessibility) and new coatings from the keel to the upper deck. The ship will tentatively depart Houghton, Michigan on October 24th and pass downbound through the Soo locks on Sunday morning the 25th. This will mark the first time the ship has been off Lake Superior since delivery from Christy Ship (Bay Ship) on September 27, 1958.

Reported by: WH




Today in Great Lakes History - October 21

The JOHN B. AIRD arrived at Sarnia, Ont. October 21, 1990 for repairs after suffering a conveyor belt fire a week earlier.

The JAMES A.FARRELL and fleetmate RICHARD TRIMBLE were the first vessels to lock downbound in the newly opened Davis Lock at the Soo on October 21, 1914.

On October 21, 1954 the GEORGE M.HUMPHREY(2) set a record when she took aboard 22,605 gross tons of iron ore at Superior, WI. The record stood for six years until 1960.

The crew on the SAMUEL MATHER (3) was safely removed from the badly exposed steamer on October 21, 1923 by the Eagle Harbor life saving crew. She had run aground on the 19th.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

10/20:
Workers at Bend-Tec in Duluth spent Oct. 17 loading two 180-foot, 50-ton steel arches aboard a barge for delivery to Chicago. The arches will become part of the Damon Avenue Bridge over the north branch of the Chicago River. This is Bend-Tec's second large shipment by water this season. Earlier the company loaded a saltie with sections of a large pipeline boundfor an overseas gold mine.

Several vessels are taking two-way cargoes in and out of the Twin Ports this week. Buckeye is unloading stone at the CLM in Superior before moving over to the DMIR ore dock to load; Adam E. Cornelius is delivering stone to the Hallett dock before loading at DMIR; and Fred R. White Jr. is scheduled to unload at the Reiss Inland dock before loading coal at Midwest Energy Terminal.

Reported by: Al Miller




Waiting For Weather

10/20:
The sandsucker NIAGARA II arrived at the Government Dock in Sarnia in tow of the MISEFORD early on October 17. As of Tuesday morning, the tow is still weatherbound at this location. The NIAGARA II is bound for Owen Sound where she will winter before being taken to Flower Pot Island near Tobermory where she is scheduled to be scuttled as a "divers' delight".

Also weatherbound at the same location is the barge OC 183 in tow of the JERRY NEWBERRY. The barge is carrying parts for a new refinery being built on the Gulf of Mexico. She is bound for Burns Harbor on the second of such shipments where her cargo will be transhipped to another barge for delivery via the Mississippi River system.

The status of these tows is obviously contingent upon positive weather forecasts and their position is not being made any easier because of variations in the MAFORs received from U.S. and Canadian forecasters. Currently the former is more negative but yesterday their postions were reversed!

Reported by: Norman Eakins, Andrew Severson and Richard Weiss




Funding released for work at Milwaukee

10/20:
Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson has released U.S.$600,000 in state funding for the reconstruction of about 850 meters/2,800 feet of road and 10 rail crossings adjacent to the dockwalls and terminals of the Port of Milwaukee. The City of Milwaukee will contribute U.S.$360,000. The work should be done by summer.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 20

The SCOTT MISENER (3) proceeded to the Port Arthur shipyard for dry docking and repairs on October 20th, After striking bottom October 15, 1973 near Whaleback Shoal on the St. Lawrence River.

OTTO M. REISS (2) was launched October 20, 1906 as a) JAMES S. DUNHAM for the Chicago Navigation Co. (D. Sullivan & Co., mgr.) Duluth, MN.

PETER A.B. WIDENER was launched October 20, 1906 as a) PETER A.B. WIDENER for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. (later the U.S. Steel Corp. in 1952), Cleveland, OH.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Three C. Columbus cruises for Canadian, U.S. passengers

10/19:
Three of the six cruises of the C. Columbus in the North American Great Lakes next year will be offered exclusively to Canadian and U.S. passengers.

Great Lakes Cruises Inc. of Waukesha, Wis., is handling two of the cruises. The first leaves Toronto on 24 Aug. and concludes in Chicago on 2 Sept. The second departs Port Colborne, Ontario, on 14 Sept. and arrives at Chicago on 23 Sept. The third cruise is a three-night trip on Lake Huron, departing Windsor, Ontario, on 2 Oct. and arriving at Detroit on 5 Oct. Contact Conlin Travel of Ann Arbor, Mich., at 734-677-0900.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Meteor to become "haunted ship"

10/19:
The Meteor in on Barker's Island Superior, Wis., will be transformed into a "haunted ship," with a maze in several compartments and volunteers in costume, later this month. The ship will be open from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. on 23 and 24 Oct. and 29 to 31 Oct. The cost is $5.50 for adults and $3.50 for children 10 and younger. With each food item made as a donation, another 50 cents is taken off the price.

This is the seventh year the Meteor has become a haunted ship to raise funds for the S.S. Meteor Whaleback Museum and the Superior Jaycees. Some 18,000 to 20,000 people visit each Halloween.

For more information, call 800-942-5313 or view (www.visitsuperior.com).

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - October 19

GEORGE A. SLOAN ran aground off Bob-Lo Island in the Amherstburg Channel on October 19, 1987. She was released when she unloaded part of her cargo to the CALCITE II. SLOAN was repaired in Toledo.

ALGOSEA was christened on October 19, 1976 at Port Colborne.

The BUFFALO was able to leave the Saginaw River once it opened on October 19, 1990. The river was closed after the tanker Jupiter exploded as the Buffalo passed.

The KINSMAN VOYAGER was launched October 19, 1907 as a) H.P. BOPE for the Standard Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

The WILLIAM LIVINGSTONE (c CRISPIN OGLEBAY (1) had the honor on October 19, 1912 of being the first vessel to navigate the opening of the Livingstone Channel named after the man who helped conceive the idea of a separate down bound channel on the east side of Bob-Lo Island in the lower Detroit River. Mr. Livingstone, President of the Lake Carriers Association at the time, piloted his namesake vessel in the channel on that historic trip.

The crew on the stranded WILLIAM C. MORELAND was removed in gale force winds on October 19, 1910 by the Portage life saving crew.

On October 19, 1923 the SAMUEL MATHER (3) was driven onto Gull Rock on Lake Superior near Keweenaw Point during a snow storm and gale winds. The crew was safely removed from the badly exposed steamer on October 21st by the Eagle Harbor life saving crew.

The B.H. TAYLOR (b) ROGERS CITY (2) sailed from Lorain on her maiden voyage on October 19, 1923

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Sandsucker to be Sunk

10/18:
At around 11:00 pm on October 16, 1998, the Canadian tug Miseford passed Detroit upbound towing the sandsucker Niagara II. What made this tow unusual is that the Niagara II is reportedly being sunk for a diving wreck. The destination of the Miseford and tow is Tobermory, Ontario in the Georgian Bay.

Reported by: Wade P. Streeter and Tom Thornton




Today in Great Lakes History - October 18

The ALVA C. DINKEY departed Quebec City, October 18, 1980, in tandem with her former fleetmate GOVERNOR MILLER towed by the FedNav tug CATHY B.

Tragedy struck on the WILLIAM C. MORELAND's fifth trip October 18, 1910 loaded with 10,700 tons of iron ore from Superior for Ashtabula, OH when she stranded on Sawtooth Reef off Eagle Harbor, MI on Lake Superior. Visibility had been very limited due to forest fires raging on the Keweenaw Peninsula and the Lake was blanketed with smoke as far as one mile off shore. The MORELAND hit so hard and at such speed that she bounced over the first reef and came to rest on a second set of rocks.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

10/17:
After a brief midweek lull that saw most elevator berths empty, four vessels are loading grain Oct. 16 in the Twin Ports, with Cargill, Peavey and both Harvest States berths occupied. Two or three ships are anchored on the lake, although obscured by rain. The most unusual of the salties is the Dutch-flagged Vechtborg, a 434-foot vessel with two large holds and very little apparent sheer. The ship has been anchored on Lake Superior for about a week and reportedly will remain there until next Wednesday, when it's due to enter port to load bentonite from Wyoming.

Along with its usual callers like Columbia Star, the Midwest Energy Terminal is hosting several vessels which are seen only occasionally in the Twin Ports. Armco loaded Oct. 15, American Mariner is due in Oct. 16 and Fred R. White Jr. is scheduled for Oct. 19. Canadian Enterprise, due in Oct. 16, and Canadian Transport, scheduled for Oct. 18, have been frequent callers at the coal dock this season.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - October 17

The CANADIAN PROSPECTOR was launched October 17, 1963 as a) CARLTON (2)

The MONTCLIFFE HALL was launched October 17,1959 for Transatlantic Bulk Carriers, Monrovia, Liberia as a) EMS ORE

With an inexperienced Taiwanese crew, boiler problems and the collapse of Lock 7's west wall in the Welland Canal on October 17th, SAVIC's (CLIFFS VICTORY) departure was delayed until December 17, 1985 when she departed Chicago under her own power.

The carferry PERE MARQUETTE 19 was launched October 17, 1903.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




McKee Sons Refloated

10/16:
Thursday evening the Joseph H. Frantz offloaded two compartments at Wirt Stone in Bay City which made two compartments available for lightering the McKee Sons. The Frantz carefully moved through the Liberty Bridge and tied up along side the McKee Sons' starboard side. Once secure, the stranded vessel offloaded approximately 900 tons into the Frantz. The Frantz then proceeded to unload the 900 tons at the Bay Aggregates Dock in Bay City. The Joseph H. Frantz then moved onto Saginaw to offload the balance of her original cargo.

This lightering operation was enought to free the the McKee Sons. At last report Thursday she was unloading at the Bay Aggregates Dock in Bay City.

Reported by: Daniel J. Maus




Lake Ontario Ferry Update

10/16:
The growth of the cross-lake Ferry industry this past season on Lake Ontario was very encouraging.

Shaker Cruise Lines, the first to reintroduce service in 1997, ended prematurely due to ongoing difficulties with it's 71-passenger Hydrofoils. The 275-passenger Lakerunner (formerly the Marine Courier with Marine Atlantic) ended service today with a charter out of Port Dalhousie. It is rumoured that the Lakerunner will travel east to service a Petroleum Development Project similar to Hibernia.

Hydrofoil Lake Jet Lines, operating 139-passenger Hydrofoils between Toronto and Queenston, is still in operation and provides a limited service schedule.

Waterways Transportation Services operated Waterways I, a 300-passenger Catamaran. The value of their vessel proved itself as the Fall season approached - the Catamaran operated when Shaker's Hydrofoils were unable to. This bodes well for the next season, and for now Waterways has moored their Catamaran in Port Dalhousie.

T! he fut ure is bright for cross-lake Ferry services, but both Waterways and Shaker have questionable financing and may not survive to next year. We wish both companies well, and travelling the Lake is a renewed experience on Lake Ontario!

Reported by: Erin Diel




Today in Great Lakes History - October 16

On October 16, 1990 the JOHN B. AIRD's loop belt caught fire while loading mill scale at Inland Steel Mill, East Chicago, Ill. Fueled by coal dust left over after unloading coal at the mill, 1,400 feet of the rubber conveyor belt burned causing nearly $500,000 in damages.

ALGOWEST set a cargo record for a 27,517 tonne load of grain down the Seaway October 16, 1982 to Port Cartier, Que.

The RIO ORINOCO grounded off Anticosti Island, Que. on October 16, 1990 and was abandoned. Later she was salvaged by Le Groupe Desgagnes (1981) Inc., refloated, repaired and renamed d) THALASSA DESGAGNES.

Sea trials of the MERTON E. FARR were successfully completed October 16, 1920.

On October 16, 1954 the SCOTT MISENER (3) became the first laker to load a record 800,000 bushels of grain on the Great Lakes when she was loaded with barley at Fort William, Ont. for delivery to Port Colborne.

The WILLIAM G. MATHER (2) was towed from her Cuyahoga River berth on October 16, 1990 by the GLT tugs IDAHO and DELAWARE, she was placed at her permanent station next to the 9th Street Pier of Cleveland's North Coast Harbor.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




McKee Sons Aground

10/15:
The Tug Olive Moore and barge McKee Sons is currently (11:00am edt) aground in the Saginaw River. The combination is stuck between the Liberty Bridge and the Veterans Memorial Bridge, this is the same spot that has caused other vessels to ground (last one being the Cuyahoga). Dredgeing operations on the Sixth street turning basin in Saginaw have the Tug Curley B. working in the river. At last report the tug was tying up his loaded outbound scows and heading to attempt to free the Olive L. Moore/McKee Sons. The stranded vessel is blocking passage of the M/V Joeeph H. Frantz.

Reported by: Daniel J. Maus




Algolake Aground

10/15:
The Algolake ran hard aground Wednesday about 2.75 miles SSE of the Nanticoke Generating Station in Long Point Bay Lake Erie. She appears to have gone aground at a position we locals refer to as the "3 Mile Reef" which lies just to the NE of the Nanticoke Shoal. There's quite a bit of activity on the site as of 1600 hours EDT Wednesday, as some McKeil tugs are trying to manoeuver the Canadian Transport into position for a lightering. The Canadian Coast Guard Cutter "Spray" is also on scene doing some soundings around the site and pollution monitoring.

Reported by: Dave Otterman




Lake Erie Coal Charges Back

10/15:

After slipping in August, coal loadings at Lake Erie ports rebounded convincingly in September. Shipments from the four Ohio ports totaled 2.6 million tons, an increase of 15.1 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. For the season, the Lake Erie coal trade stands at 15,560,722 net tons, an increase of 8.8 percent.

Shipments in September by port were:

  • Ashtabula - 752,964
  • Conneaut - 380,500
  • Sandusky - 686,572
  • Toledo - 791,390

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




  • Stone Trade Remains Strong In September

    10/15:

    With operations at Michigan Limestone essentially back to normal, the Lakes stone trade resumed its pace toward another record season. Shipments in September totaled nearly 4.9 million net tons, an increase of 3.7 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. For the season, stone loadings stand at 28.8 million tons, an increase of 5.8 percent over 1997.

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




    Fire onboard Lakes Visitor

    10/15:
    The Maltese bulk carrier BELUGA (15,548 gross) sustained a fire/explosion in her engine-room, which spread to the bridge and part accommodation. The vessel visited the lakes several times during 1994-1996. The incident occured at lat. 36 20N, long. 22 21E, late on Oct 8th. All her crew are reported safe, with some water ingress observed. Various vessels were on scene October 9th and a tug was proceeding from Piraeus.

    Reported by: John Meyland




    Coast Guard Cutter Visits Ogdensburg, N.Y.

    10/15:
    The city of Ogdensburg got a visit this past weekend from the James Rankin, a new Coast Guard cutter on its way from the shipyards in Wisconsin to its home in Baltimore, Md. Its next visit will be in Montreal. While in Ogdensburg, the 18 man crew gave tours and showed visitors what goes into sailing a ship. The James Rankin is named after a lighthouse keeper in the San Francisco Bay area. Mr Rankin joined the U.S.Lighthouse Service in 1877, retiring at age 78 in 1919. He is credited with saving 18 lives as light- house keeper.

    The 175 foot-long James Rankin left the Marinette {Wis.} Marine Corps shipyard on Sept.26 for a journey through the Great Lakes and up the Seaway to its home port. Along the way, the ship has visited Green Bay, Milwaukee, Cleveland, and Chicago and will also visit Quebec, Nova Scotia and Boston, among other places before arriving in Baltimore on October 27th. The ship has been well received everywhere. Seven to eight thousand people visited in Chicago and according to the Senior Chief of the ship, David Coffman there have been over 10,000 visitors at this point. The ship will serve as a buoy tender on the east coast. It will service and repair navigational aids floating in the Chesapeake Bay. The ship can also handle rescue, marine environmental protection, ice breaking and law enforcement duties.

    Reported by: Joan Baldwin




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 15

    On her maiden voyage the LEON SIMARD (b) L'ORME NO.1. ) was spotted traveling eastward on the St. Lawrence River October 15, 1974.

    The WOLVERINE (4) departed in Columbia Transportation Division colors October 15, 1974 on her maiden voyage from Lorain light to load stone at Stoneport, MI for delivery to Huron, OH.

    HERBERT C. JACKSON cleared Fraser Shipyard on October 15, 1988 after having the 1000 h.p. bow thruster installed from the JOHN SHERWIN.

    The PAUL H. CARNAHAN came out on her maiden voyage October 15, 1961.

    On October 15, 1984 the a) JOHN O. McKELLAR (2) was sold to P.& H. Shipping of Parrish & Heimbecker Ltd., Mississauga, Ont. and renamed b) ELMGLEN (2).

    Scrapping began on October 15, 1988 of the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON at Kaohsiung, Taiwan by Li Chong Steel & Iron Works Co. Ltd.

    The C.H. McCULLOUGH, JR. was laid up on October 15, 1969 at Manitowoc, WI.

    The MELDRUM BAY was launched October 15, 1949 as a) COVERDALE for Canada Steamship Lines, Montreal, Que.

    The SCOTT MISENER (3) struck bottom October 15, 1973 near Whaleback Shoal on the St. Lawrence River reportedly damaging sixty of her bottom plates. She proceeded to the Port Arthur shipyard for dry docking and repairs from October 20th through the 28th.

    On October 15, 1980 the NIPIGON BAY, loaded with ore for Hamilton, Ont., grounded at the "crossover" near Brockville, Ont. on the St. Lawrence River and sustained a 100 foot rip in her bottom plates. She proceeded to Thunder Bay, Ont. arriving there on October 24th where repairs were made at an estimated cost of $500,000.

    Data from: Jody L. Aho, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    August Sees First Downturn in U.S.-Flag Float in Years

    10/14:
    The avalanche of dumped foreign steel and the weak dollar finally came home to roost on the Great Lakes in August. Cargo movement in U.S.-Flag lakers and from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports fell below the previous year's level for the first non-weather-related reason in at least two shipping seasons.

    Cargo movement in U.S.-Flag lakers totaled 13.9 million tons, a decrease of 2.7 percent. Iron ore loadings, the trade most directly affected by the onslaught of unfairly traded steel, fell by 1.5 percent to 6,766,003 tons. The slowdown in steel production as imports reached historic highs even necessitated the short-term lay-up in September of the EDWARD L. RYERSON, a U.S.-Flag laker dedicated to supplying raw materials to Ispat Inland Steel Co. For the season, U.S.-Flag iron ore cargos stand at 37.3 million tons, an increase of 6.3 percent.

    Coal cargos in U.S. bottoms fell 8.1 percent to 2.6 million tons. The slump is again steel related; the metallurgical coal moving on the Lakes is used by steel mills, and as that industry reduced its production, the resulting decrease in power consumption deflated utility's demand for steam coal. Through August, the U.S.-Flag coal float totals 12.7 million tons, a decrease of 4.9 percent.

    Stone loadings in U.S.-Flag lakers also slipped by more than 130,000 tons, but in this instance, curtailed production following a fire at a major stone shipper influenced that decline. Since the resumption of the stone trade in mid-March, stone cargos in Jones Act lakers stand at 18.6 million tons, an increase of 7.5 percent.

    U.S.-Flag Great Lakes carriers utilized 66 of their 69 vessels during August, an increase of one integrated tug/barge compared to a year ago. Only two U.S.-Flag lakers available for service have not sailed this season, but unless the Clinton Administration takes swift action as called for by House and Senate resolutions to stem the flood of dumped steel, some Jones Act lakers could end their 1998 season early.

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association

    !


    S.S. Oakglen stops at Port Colborne

    10/14:
    The S. S. Oakglen former CSL T.R. McLagen, stopped at the Port Colborne fuel dock on her first trip throught the canal this season. She had been laid-up since last December in Owen Sound. The vesssel was drawing only 24' at the bow not quiet a full load. The skipper reported that she will be kept busy until the end of the season.

    Reported by: J J Van Volkenburg




    Diving accident update

    10/14:
    The U.S. Coast Guard has reported that Bradford Gagne, the 52-year-old man from Grosse Isle, Mich., who was killed while diving the afternoon of 10 Oct., had been ill for several days before the accident. Gagne, a double amputee, was diving on a shipwreck about 21 kilometers/13 miles northwest of Whitefish Point, Mich., near Ile Parisienne. Gagne had more than 30 years of diving experience and had just started a 53.3-meter/175-foot dive when he resurfaced unconscious without respiration or a pulse. He was taken by a dive boat to Whitefish Marina at Whitefish Point with a Coast Guard escort from Station Sault Ste. Marie, Mich..

    Reported by: Steve Schultz
    From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





    Lend Your Support to the Mather

    10/14:
    The Cleveland City Planning Commission will be holding public meetings to discuss changes to Cleveland's Downtown Plan.

    The Steamer William G Mather Museum is "signing on" supporters to represent "The ship that built Cleveland" at every "Civic Vision 2000 and Beyond" public meeting listed below:

    • Friday, 23 October 1998, 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM Stokes Wing, Cleveland Public Library,325 Superior Ave. Official public hearing to consider land use & policy changes.
    • Friday, 30 October 1998, 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM Cleveland City Hall, Room 514. City Planning Commission Vote on land use & policy changes and needs for further study.


    For more information on the William G. Mather Click Here




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 14

    The keel to the JAMES R. BARKER was laid on October 14, 1974. She was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flag ship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.).

    On October 14, 1983 the CHI-CHEEMAUN encountered 48 knot winds after departing Tobermory with 113 passengers bound for South Baymouth. Due to high wind and waves the captain decided to find shelter rather than to continue on or return to port. The ferry made her way around the Bruce Peninsula southeast to Dyer Bay where she dropped anchor for the night, however she had no overnight accommodations. Complimentary meals were served and activities were organized by the crew. The anchor was lifted the next morning and the ferry returned to Tobermory.

    The GEORGE A. STINSON departed Detroit on her maiden voyage October 14, 1978 light for Superior, WI to load iron ore pellets for delivery to the Great Lakes Steel Division of the National Steel Corp. at Zug Island in River Rouge, MI.

    On October 14, 1966, loaded with potash bound for Oswego, NY, the STONEFAX collided with the Norwegian salty ARTHUR STOVE and sank in the Welland Canal between Locks 7 and 8.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Transfer Update

    10/13:
    More than one month has past since the Canadian Transfer arrived at Pascol Engineering in Thunder Bay. Work continues on the vessel that damaged her rudder in the Saginaw River. Reports from Thunder Bay have the vessel's steering gear broken inside the hull. No word on if she bent the rudder post or not. Unknow is how much longer the vessel will be in the dry dock.

    Reported by: Ron Konkol




    Shipwreck diver dies near Whitefish Point

    10/13:
    Bradford Gagne, a 52-year-old man from Grosse Isle, Mich., was killed 10 Oct. while diving on a shipwreck about 21 kilometers/13 miles northwest of Whitefish Point, Mich. Gagne, who had more than 30 years of diving experience, was in 53.3 meters/175 feet of water just before the incident occurred at 1500. Investigations have been started by the Michigan State Police and the U.S. Coast Guard. He had been diving near the wreck of the EDMUND FITZGERALD, but was on a different wrecksite.

    Reported by: Jim Zeirke and Steve Schultz




    Medusa Challenger in Halloween Spirit

    10/13:
    The Medusa Challenger arrived in Milwaukee yesterday sporting a big orange pumpkin mounted on the after railing below the stack.

    Reported by: Andy LaBorde




    Boland Makes Unusual Run

    10/13:
    The John J. Boland made an unusual stop on Sunday at Harsens Island in the St. Clair River. The vessel headed down the North Channel and unloaded salt near the ferry landing on the island, she then proceeded upbound through the sysytem.

    Reported by: Dave Marcoux




    Anderson makes a Rare Run

    10/13:
    Also making an unusual trip this past week was USSGLF's Arthur M. Anderson who made a rare call to Ashland WI. After taking care of her business there she sailed for Silver Bay.

    Reported by: David French




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 13

    The SASKATCHEWAN PIONEER made her first trip out of Thunder Bay, Ont. with grain on October 13, 1983.

    The tug GLENADA towed the BROOKDALE (2) from Port Colborne to Newman's scrap yard at Port Maitland, Ont. the week of October 13, 1980.

    On October 13, 1902 the MAUNALOA collided with her whaleback consort BARGE 129 on Lake Superior and sank it 30 miles northwest of Vermilion Point, which is between Upper Michigan's Crisp and Whitefish Points. The MAUNALOA had been towing the BARGE 129, both vessels loaded with iron ore, when the towline parted in heavy seas. While trying to regain control of the barge, they came together and the steamer's port anchor raked the side of the barge which started taking on water. The crew was taken off the barge before it sank.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Badger Ends Season

    10/12:
    The S.S. Badger ended her 1998 sailing season tonight. She entered Ludington harbor just before 7:00 p.m. Captain Dean Hobbs dropped the Starboard and Port anchors at 6:55 p.m. and was officially docked shortly after 7:00 p.m. The 1998 sailing season was one of the best years for LMC. Unfortunately the season is never long enough. Next year she should begin sailing next year on May 14. Can't wait till then.

    Reported by: Mike Modderman




    Keep this Site Afloat

    10/12:
    The goal was almost met and I appreciate what all of you have done. The site will stay free. I'm glad to know so many of you find value in this site.
    Your contributions have given me the tools I need to continue to add new content and expand features on this site.

    Please visit the What do you want to See? Page and let me know.





    Today in Great Lakes History - October 12

    The JEAN PARISIEN suffered considerable bottom damage when she ran aground near Comfort Island about a mile west of Alexandria Bay, NY. She was released October 12, 1981 and returned to service after repairs were completed at the Vickers Montreal yard.

    The CLIFF S VICTORY was sold October 12, 1985 to Hai International Corp. of New York for scrapping in the orient and transferred to Panamanian registry. Her name was changed to c) SAVIC, utilizing the "S" from CLIFFS, the "VIC" from VICTORY and inserting an "A". All the other letters were painted out.

    The JOHN A. KLING sailed on her maiden voyage October 12, 1922 light from Manitowoc to load stone at Rockport, MI.

    The Keel was laid October 12, 1925 for the COLONEL JAMES PICKANDS.

    The SYLVANIA returned to service on October 12, 1967. She sank at the Peerless Cement Co. dock at Port Huron, MI in June of that year after being struck by the Canada Steamship Lines package freight steamer RENVOYLE.

    The tug EDNA G. remained at Two Harbors until October 12, 1993 when she was towed to the Fraser Shipyard at Superior, WI by the GLT tug KANSAS. She is now on display as a floating exhibit for the city.

    On October 12, 1967, the Canadian Leader entered service as the last new steam-powered vessel on the Great Lakes. The vessel, originally named Feux Follets by her first owners, Papachristidis Company Limited, was given her present name when it was sold to Upper Lakes Shipping in 1972.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Taconite Production Cut

    10/11:
    A story in the Duluth News-Tribune reports that taconite pellet production at LTV Steel Mining Co. in Hoyt Lakes, Minn., is being cut back by roughly 360,000 tons during the fourth quarter in response to high levels of steel imports.

    None of the taconite plant's roughly 1,350 workers will be laid off but it could be an ominous sign for other Iron Range taconite producers and the Iron Range economy.

    LTV is the second Iron Range taconite plant to announce reductions in pellet production. Three weeks ago, Minntac Mine in Mountain Iron, North America's largest taconite plant, announced it would shut down one of its pellet-making lines at least until May.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 11

    The BAIE COMEAU II cleared Sorel October 11, 1983 as c) AGIA TRIAS, Panamanian registry #1355. Her Canadian registry was closed on October 12, 1983. Her mission was to carry grain from New Orleans, La. to Mexican and Caribbean Island ports and sailed at least into the 1987 season. Subsequently she was renamed d) OCEAN VIEW, e) SEA DIAMOND, f) GOLDEN CREST and g) ATLANTIC WOOD in 1991 for Nexus Maritime Co. S.A., St. Vincent. Disposition unknown.

    The MERCURY (2) scraped the South Grand Island Bridge in the Niagara River in heavy fog on October 11, 1974. Her forward mast snapped off, the midship mast was tilted and her smoke stack was toppled. She proceeded after the mishap to G&W Welding at Cleveland under her own power for repairs.

    WHEAT KING, under tow arrived at Chittagong, Bangladesh on October 11, 1989 to be broken up.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Jacquez hearing blocked

    10/10:
    A hearing by the U.S. Senate's Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee on 8 Oct. to approve the nomination of Albert Jacquez as the next administrator of St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. was delayed after Sen. Spencer Abraham, R-Mich., said he blocked the "hastily scheduled" hearing in order "to take a closer look" at Jacquez's qualifications. Abraham said that President Clinton made the announcement 29 Sept. without notifying him, the only senator on the committee from a Great Lakes state.

    Jacquez is chief of staff to Rep. Esteban Torres, D-Calif., and has experience in finance and banking.

    Reported by: Steve Schultz

    From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





    City of Milwaukee may be forced to ship out

    10/10:
    The October 7th edition of the Traverse City Record-Eagle reports that Eighty-fifth District Judge Brent Danielson last week gave the boat's support group (Society for the Preservation of the S.S. City of Milwaukee) 10 days to remove the 350-foot former railroad car and passenger ferry from the village waterfront in Western Michigan.

    As of Sunday the village will have the legal authority - at least locally - to evict the 67-year-old vessel from the village waterfront.

    Danielson's decision followed a five-hour hearing in Beulah last Thursday. The village council last spring decided to pursue eviction proceedings in District Court, although legal notice requirements weren't met the first time and the villag! e had to file the action a second time.

    Village attorney Joseph E. Quandt said the court found that the village "was validly exercising its rights as a property owner." He said he was pleased with the ruling. "The judge did have a very thorough review of the facts before rendering a decision," Quandt said. But don't expect the boat to be gone by Monday.

    Quandt said the village won't pursue removing the vessel until a federal court lawsuit filed in early July by the Society for the Preservation of the S.S. City of Milwaukee is resolved.

    In the pending federal action, the group alleges that village officials misled federal officials on their plans for the boat while seeking grant funds for planning along the waterfront. The suit seeks an injunction preventing eviction of the boat from the property, although a hearing in the federal case has not been held.

    The society's attorney, Peter Zirnhelt, said his group is considering its other legal options in the wake of Danielson's r! uling.

    The group may appeal the decision to the 19th Circuit Court, or file another action in federal court to block any eviction efforts the village may pursue. Zirnhelt said he was sending out a letter Tuesday to the society's board outlining the group's legal possibilities.

    Zirnhelt said he was surprised by the local court's ruling, as the society argued that the village's property doesn't extend to the water's edge, nor does it include the bottomlands of Betsie Bay where the boat is moored.

    "Yes, under the circumstances and under the issues we raised at the trial, I was (surprised)," Zirnhelt said. "We believe he made some mistakes in the law."




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 10

    While downbound with coal in the St. Lawrence River on October 10,1981, the JEAN PARISIEN suffered considerable bottom damage when she ran aground near Comfort Island about a mile west of Alexandria Bay, NY.

    The BROOKDALE (2) was towed out of Toronto on October 10, 1980 by the tug GLENADA, assisted by the tug TERRY S. She was one her way to the cutters torch.

    The CHAMPLAIN (3), with her former fleetmate CADILLAC (4) was towed past Gibraltar October 10, 1987 heading for Aliaga, Turkey for dismantling by Cukurova Celik Endustrisi A.S.

    The SAVIC (CLIFFS VICTORY) cleared New York on October 10, 1986.

    The HULL NO.1, ex KINSMAN ENTERPRISE(1), being towed by the Polish tug JANTAR arrived in Aliaga, Turkey on October 10, 1989 to be scrapped there.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    CSL Web Site Makes Big Splash

    10/09:
    One of the largest Web site addresses in the world was launched today (October 6th), literally, when the M/V Atlantic Erie left shipyard with www.csl.ca painted on both sides.

    The vessel, a state-of-the-art self-unloading bulk carrier, is owned and operated by Canada Steamship Lines (CSL) of Montreal. It is 730 feet long and 75 feet wide. The address, centered on both ship sides, measures 125 feet long x 7 feet high; the individual letters are 7 feet x 8 feet.

    Traditionally, CSL has reserved the highly visible space for the company name. But due to the phenomenal popularity of the World Wide Web, and in an effort to promote its own site, the company decided to go with www.csl.ca.

    "The Web reflects the modern image of our company," said Ray Johnston, CSL President and CEO. "We see ourselves as lea! ders i n our industry in regard to navigational systems, shipboard informaton technology and fleet management systems. Web technology fits nicely with all of this."

    Johnston went on to say that visitors to www.csl.ca will be pleased with what they find.

    "The site is very well designed, simple to navigate and has easy-to-read text," he said. "It features historic photos of our fleet from years past and pictures of our modern ships with explanations on how they work. It's sure to appeal to everyone from the boardroom to the classroom."

    Click here for a picture, while there be sure to take a look at CLS's excellent site, it even has animations showing how a self-unloader works.

    Technology leader Canada Steamship Lines deserves a salute for this one.




    Soo Locks Closed

    10/09:
    Early morning radio here in the Sault tells us that the locks are closed and some 9 boats are at anchor in the lower river. Should be a big day for boat watchers as the fog lifts here in the Sault.

    Reported by: Lou Lundquist




    Armco Visits Marquette

    10/09:
    Oglebay Norton's, ARMCO, took a break from her normal western Lake Superior loadings and made an uncommon trip to Marquette on October 8 to load taconite for Ashtabula.

    Reported by: Rod Burdick




    Twin Ports Report

    10/09:
    The turning basin in Duluth harbor was busy about 7:30 a.m. Oct. 9 as Presque Isle and Paul R. Tregurtha carefully passed each other. Half a mile away, Oglebay Norton was just snuggling into the Midwest Energy Terminal dock.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Jamian elected to AAPA board

    10/09:
    John Jamian, executive director of the Detroit/Wayne County Port Authority, was elected to a two-year term on the board of directors of the American Association of Port Authorities at its annual meeting in Houston this week.

    Reported by: Steve Schultz
    From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





    Two shows on Great Lakes ships shown on Milwaukee PBS

    10/09:
    Last night two shows featuring Great Lakes ships were shown on WMVS-TV10, a Milwaukee, WI PBS station. The first was a new documentary on the EDMUND FITZGERALD called "The EDMUND FITZGERALD Investigation". A well done show that ended with recordings of radio traffic from that night. The second show was Mark Howell's well-done and entertaining documentary on the MILWAUKEE CLIPPER. It was a nice night for fans of Great Lakes ships.

    Reported by: Jim Zeirke

    If you would like your local PBS station to run these programs try e-mailing




    Shipwrecks Remembered '98 updated

    10/09:
    S.S. Carl D. Bradley 40th Anniversary Remembrance, McMorran Place Port Huron, MI.
    Sat. Nov. 28th, 1998, Maritime Exhibits open at 5 PM, Evening Program starts at 7 PM.
    Evening Program:
    A video history of the Carl D. Bradley produced by Out of the Blue Productions
    Dan Hall performing a selection of Great Lakes songs
    The story of the sinking of the Bradley by survivor Frank Mays. Also appearing is Dennis Hale, sole survivor of the Daniel J. Morrell.
    Lieutenant Commander Harold Muth, USCG Retired Commanding Officer of the Coast Guard Cutter Sundew.
    The program will conclude with a special ceremony remembering the crew of the Carl D. Bradley.

    Tickets $8.00 before the day of show or $10 at the door.

    The phone number for tickets is (810) 985-6166 or all Ticketmaster Locations. The events is listed under "Carl D. Bradley" on the Ticketmaster machines.




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 09

    The CHIMO (b) CANADIAN RANGER) was moved onto the Port Weller Dry Dock on October 9, 1983 where work began to cut her apart forward of her aft located pilot house and engine room.

    The GULF MACKENZIE (b) L. ROCHETTE) was launched October 9, 1976

    The SASKATCHEWAN PIONEER arrived in the Welland Canal on her delivery trip October 9, 1983 en route for her formal christening at Thunder Bay.

    The JAMES DAVIDSON was launched October 9, 1920 for the Globe Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH (G.A. Tomlinson, mgr.)

    On October 9, 1984 the PATERSON (1) was sold to Shearmet Recycling, a Thunder Bay ship breaker, and was broken up at their Mission River dock.

    The a) COL. JAMES M. SCHOONMAKER (b) WILLIS B. BOYER) sailed from the shipyard on her maiden voyage on October 9, 1911 to Toledo, OH where she loaded coal bound for Sheboygan, WI. The SCHOONMAKER was the largest vessel on the Great Lakes when she came out. For much of the decade this vessel either broke or held many bulk cargo records.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Twin Ports Report

    10/08:
    Duluth and Superior are experiencing another full house Oct. 7 at their grain elevators. All seven active loading berths are occupied. In addition, two salties are at harbor layby berths and two more are anchored on the lake.

    Midwest Energy Terminal also is maintaining the frenetic pace it has set all season. Walter H. McCarthy Jr. is loading there Oct. 6. Fred R. White Jr and Paul Tregurtha are scheduled Oct. 8, and Fred R. White Jr, Oglebay Norton, Algolake and Canadian Transport are due in Oct. 9.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Superior Coal Continues On Record Pace

    10/08:
    September shipments of low-sulfur coal from Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wis., totaled 1,712,832 net tons, an increase of 11.3 percent compared to the same period last year. For the season, shipments from SMET stand at 10.8 million tons, an increase of 9.6 percent compared to the same point in the 1997 navigation season. SMET is solidly on pace to set a new benchmark for the operation that began shipping in 1976.

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




    Time limitations decided in harbor maintenance tax case

    10/08:
    Judge Jane A. Restani of the Court of International trade ruled 5 Oct. that many exporters who had to pay a harbor maintenance tax that was declared unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court earlier this year are entitled to an additional 18 months of refunds in addition to the 24 months being offered by the federal government now.

    Restani, however, rejected a claim by exporters that they are entitled to complete refunds. She agreed with the government that a two-year statute of limitations applies. But the period is suspended for the 18 months when applications were made, unsuccessfully, for a class action suit.

    The tax, started in 1987, was struck down in March. Thousands of exporters have sought refunds for the fees they had to pay under the program for each shipment through a U.S. port.

    The statute of limitations alone means exporters are eligible for refunds paid in the two years before lawsuits were filled. But the limitation is suspended from 27 Oct., 1994, to 7 May, 1996.

    As a result of the ruling, lawsuits filed during the suspension are treated as if they were filed prior to the period, so refunds would be granted on all taxes paid since 27 Oct., 1992.

    Lawsuits filed from 7 May, 1996, to 7 May of this year have a different formula. Using the total days between the filing and 7 May, 1996, subtract 731, then take the result and count the days back from 27 Oct., 1994. All taxes paid from the final date to present are eligible.

    Restani's ruling was made in Stone Container Corp. vs. United States, a test case. The U.S. Customs Service will reportedly start the first refunds this winter, but only on money paid in the two-year statute of limitations period and not the 18-month suspension.

    Reported by: Steve Schultz

    From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





    Dinner to Benefit the Milwaukee Clipper

    10/08:
    The Muskegon Evening Y's Men's Club, YFCA, Carlson's Catering and the Great Lakes Clipper Preservation Association are sponsoring a roast beef dinner on Friday, November 6, 1998, at the Muskegon YFCA. Tickets must be purchased in advance at the YFCA, or by contacting an evening Y's Men's Club member. Only 250 tickets are available for this event and it is expected to sell out quickly. Dinner will be served from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. in the upstairs banquet room at the YFCA. Take Outs are also available. Prices are $7.00 for adults, $4.00 for children under 12.

    S.S. Milwaukee Clipper merchandise will be available, and a baked goods raffle will be held. Proceeds benefit YFCA programs and the S.S. Milwaukee Clipper restoration. Both the YFCA and S.S. Milwaukee Clipper will discuss volunteer opportunities, and information about the Evening Y's Men's Club will be provided.

    The Great Lakes Clipper Preservation Association realizes this event will probably sell out, and is working to plan additional events. Information on upcoming GLCPA events will be provided as it becomes available. The next YFCA dinner will be held in the Spring. For more information please write to George P. Micka at sscitymilw@aol.com or by phone at (616) 759-6328 (phone and fax).

    The Great Lakes Clipper Preservation Association is working to establish a store in the Muskegon Mall over the holidays. Details are still being worked out, but we hope to open a store in the mall that would offer S.S. Milwaukee Clipper, U.S.S. Silversides, and S.S. City of Milwaukee merchandise. Volunteers will be needed to staff the store. For more information on the store and how you can help, please contact George Micka at sscitymilw@aol.com or (616) 759-6328 (phone and fax).

    Click here for more information





    Today in Great Lakes History - October 08

    The Keel was laid October 8,1976 for the 660 ft. forward section of the a) LEWIS WILSON FOY (b) OGLEBAY NORTON ) for the Bethlehem Steel Co., Cleveland, Ohio.

    The MATHEWSTON (b RALPH S. MISENER (2) entered service on October 8, 1922. On her maiden voyage she sailed from Port Arthur with 11,634 tons of barley and wheat.

    The Canadian registry for MENIHEK LAKE was officially closed on October 8, 1985 with the notation "sold Spain."

    The WILLIAM G. MATHER arrived on October 8, 1988 in tow of the GLT tugs WYOMING and ALABAMA at the G&W Shipyard at Collision Bend in the Cuyahoga River to be refurbished.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Atlantic Hickory-Sarah Spencer docked in Buffalo

    10/07:
    The Atlantic Hickory-Sarah Spencer was seen unloading grain at the ADM Elevator on the Buffalo River at 5PM on the 6th. The gates at the parking lot were locked and there were union members observing the un-load from the surrounding streets. There were also more security guards around at the other waterfront elevators than usual.

    This is the first self unloader to discharge grain at Buffalo into an elevator. (The Transfer unloaded grain into the Enterprise last month.) It is also the first Canadian grain boat since the Willowglen and Beechglen laid up.

    Also note worthy is the fact that this is the first Lake Boat tug/barge conversion to go up the river and the first time the ex. Cornelius has been in Buffalo since she was owned by American Steamship.

    Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




    Twin Ports Report

    10/07:
    Calm seas on Lake Superior enabled ship traffic in the Twin Ports to resume overnight, and a temporary halt to the rain allowed grain-loading to continue Oct. 6. Algoma vessels were particularly active. Algoisle arrived for Harvest States elevator, Algoville arrived for General Mills, Algocape departed Harvest States elevator and Algomarine arrived to unload at the Reiss Inland stone-and-coal dock. Several of the vessels anchored off Duluth entered port this morning, including Agamemnon, which proceeded to the General Mills A elevator in Duluth.

    While the Oct. 5 gale prompted many vessels to remain in port, some took shelter out on the lake. Edgar B. Speer reportedly dropped anchor in the Apostle Islands to wait for the winds to subside.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    LCA Asks Lakes Delegation To Help American Steel

    10/07:
    Lake Carriers' Association has sent the following letter to Great Lakes Senators and members of the House of Representatives seeking their support for resolutions calling on the Administration to defend the American steel industry from dumped steel. The text of the letter follows:

    October 1, 1998
    Dear Senator/Dear Representative:
    Subject: S. Con. Res. 121/H. Con. Res. 328

    Lake Carriers' Association represents 11 American corporation operating 58 U.S.-Flag self-propelled ships and integrated tug/barge units exclusively on the Great Lakes. Last year our members and other U.S.-Flag carriers operating on the Great Lakes moved more than 125 million tons of cargo, a modern-day record for the Lakes Jones Act trades. Through August of this year, cargo movement in U.S.-Flag lakers in 4 percent ahead of last year's pace.

    I am writing to urge you to cosponsor H. Con. Res. 328/S. Con. Res 121. This resolution calls on the Administration to deal with the crisis facing our American steel industry. Our nation is being flooded with foreign steel, often priced below the cost of production. In fact, during the past four months, steel imports have been the highest in U.S. history. This dumped steel is causing serious injury to the American steel industry. Already we have seen layoffs, short work weeks, production costs, lost orders, and most recently, Acme Steel's filing for protection under the bankruptcy laws.

    Iron ore for the steel industry is the primary cargo moving in U.S.-Flag lakers, last year accounting for more than half of all cargo we moved. Much of the limestone and coal we move is destined for steel companies. Without a healthy steel industry, the U.S.-Flag Great Lakes fleet faces the very real prospect of vessel deactivations and layoffs of crews.

    In the Great Lakes basin, more than 100,000 jobs are directly tied to the steel industry. The American steel industry is not asking that we bar steel imports, only that the competition for our market be based on fair trade.

    If you have already cosponsored this resolution, thank you for supporting our American steel industry and U.S.-Flag Great Lakes fleet.

    Sincerely,

    George J. Ryan
    President

    Click here to find and e-mail your Representative
    Click here to find and e-mail your Senator(s)

    Asked them to support the above resolutions.




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 07

    The ALGOWOOD was launched October 7, 1980 for Algoma Central Marine, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

    PAUL THAYER (b) EARL W. OGLEBAY) was launched October 7, 1973 for the Union Commerce Bank Trustee, Cleveland, OH and managed by Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland. She was built under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970 for $12.6 million.

    BIRCHGLEN was launched October 7, 1926 as a) WILLIAM McLAUCHLAN, US.226176, for the Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

    BLACK RIVER, Lake Bulk Freighter. Built as a Steel Barge in 1897 by the F.W. Wheeler & Co., she was Launched October 7, 1896 as a) SIR ISAAC LOTHIAN BELL

    The HUTCHCLIFFE HALL was raised October 7, 1962 and taken to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs. She had sunk after a collison a few days earlier.

    The MADISON suffered a fire on October 7, 1987 while lying idle at Muskegon and was badly damaged.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Canadian seaway operations change hands

    10/06:
    During a ceremony on 2 Oct., the Canadian government officially transferred operational responsibility for the St. Lawrence Seaway from the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority to St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp. Under a 20-year agreement, the new entity will operate the eight locks in the Welland canal and five of the seven locks between Montreal and Lake Ontario. The other two locks are operated by St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp., a U.S. organization. The government will own the infrastructure and act as a regulator, with everything else handled by the corporation.

    As part of the agreement, a new toll schedule has been created that will see existing fees increased. Terms and conditions of current Canadian employees will be transferred from the old organization to the new one. A new pension agreement has also been reached, with benefits comparable to the Public Service of Canada, according to St. Lawrence Seaway Management.

    In December 1995, the Canada National Marine Policy outlined commercialization of the seaway through transfer to non-profit corporation. The policy was the result of Canadian House of Commons Standing Committee on Transport work.

    The Canada Marine Act, to provide the framework to do so, was introduced in the House of Commons in June 1996. However, the bill expired when parliament was dissolved for elections in April 1997. Reintroduced in August 1997, it was approved this June.

    Reported by: Steve Schultz

    From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





    Ryerson to Sail Wednesday

    10/06:
    The engine room and galley crew reported aboard the Ryerson sometime yesterday, 10-5. The deck crew will report aboard today. The vessel is scheduled to sail for Escanaba, MI on the afternoon of the 7th. It looks like there is enough cargo for her to sail through most of December. It looks like she will be in the Escanaba trade for the rest of the season.

    Reported by: Ronald Brezinski




    Salty Dog No. 1 grounds in Quebec

    10/06:
    The tow between the Doug McKeil (Canadian-registry 292-gt, 719-dwt, 51.72-meter/169.67-foot motor tug built in 1971, operated by McKeil Marine Ltd.) and the Salty Dog No. 1 (Canadian-registry 4,018-gt, 95.4-meter/313-foot tank barge built in 1945, operated by McKeil Marine) separated on 1 Oct. at 48 degrees 58 minutes north, 62 degrees 21 minutes west. The barge then ran aground on Anticosti Island, Quebec, on 2 Oct. but was not apparently damaged.

    Reported by: Ron Konkol and Steve Schultz




    Medical evacuation off Grand Haven

    10/06:
    The afternoon of 3 Oct., the Rebecca Lynn (433-gt, 120-foot motor tug built in 1964, operated by Andrie Inc.) requested a medical evacuation for a 23-year-old crewmember apparently suffering from food poisoning. The tug was 24 kilometers/15 miles southwest of Grand Haven, Mich. A U.S. Coast Guard flight surgeon approved the evacuation and a boat from Coast Guard Station Grand Haven took the man from the Rebecca Lynn to emergency medical services ashore.

    Reported by: Steve Schultz
    From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





    Calcite II visits Gladstone

    10/06:
    USS Great Lakes Fleet vessel, CALCITE II, made a rare visit to Gladstone, MI, on Saturday, October 3, delivering salt from Cleveland. The cargo was in preparation for the long "U.P." winter ahead.

    Reported by: Rod Burdick




    Canadian Grain boats out for fall grain rush

    10/06:
    Algosound (Freshly painted) was downbound in the canal enroute to a St Lawrence River Port. As was the Canadian Mariner. Quebecois was upbound enroute back to Thunder Bay for her second trip of grain this season. The Oakglen was up in Georgian Bay (Owen Sound) on her first trip of the season.

    Reported by: J J Van Volkenburg




    Twin Ports Report

    10/06:
    Winds approaching 40 mph Oct. 5 delayed many of the vessels in the Twin Ports. Four vessels, including Algocape and Kinsman Independent, were occupying loading berths while another was anchored in the harbor and four or five more were anchored on the lake, including Algoisle, Panay R, Millenium Amythyst and Agammenon. Several masters talking on the radio said the winds were too high for them to safely maneuver in the harbor or to enter port. One master said he moved his vessel to the end of the elevator dock to check the seas, but then decided against leaving. "It doesn't look to appealing to me," he said. "I don't think it would be a very good career move."

    Despite the winds, several vessels were using tugs to help them shift around the harbor by mid-morning. Tugs assisted Columbia Star, Kinsman Independent and at least one saltie in entering or leaving berths, but by mid-day the wind had risen again and the tug dispatcher reported at least one saltie could not make its berth until the wind diminished.

    To handle the brisk winds, the saltie Malyovitza was scheduled late in the afternoon to make the rare move of using three tugs to swing into the berth at Peavey Connors Point elevator in Superior. One tug took its usual station at the bow and another at the stern while the third took up position on the starboard quarter.

    The weather on Lake Superior was severe enough to prompt Kinsman Independent to lay over night at the General Mills Elevator S in Superior.

    All told Monday, 16 vessels are either in port, at anchor or scheduled to arrive to load grain.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Latest Print Version now available

    10/06:
    The response has been incredible to the print version of this news page. Those of you in the Detroit area may have seen one of the printed copies available at the many local businesses offering the newsletter. Those of you sailing on a commercial vessels can find copies available from the Mailboat in Detroit. If you would be interested in downloading and printing your own click on the link at the bottom of the page. All I ask is that the page not be modified in any way.

    This weeks edition is 5 pages when printed on both sides of a page (lots of pictures). I encourage you to print out and distribute the page. If you own a business on the lakes (or else where) please feel free to offer the newsletter to customers at no charge.
    Also, I would appreciate feed back on lay-out and content.
    The file is a Microsoft Office '97, Word document 576k.

    Click here to download





    Today in Great Lakes History - October 06

    Repairs were completed on the Algosoo by Herb Fraser & Associates at the Welland Dock on October 6 1986. She had suffered a serious fire at her winter mooring on the west wall above Lock 8 at Port Colborne, Ont. on March 7, 1986.

    The bow section of the PRESQUE ISLE (2) arrived Erie October 6, 1972. The section was towed from Defoe Shipbuilding at Bay City, MI by the tugs MARYLAND and LAURENCE C. TURNER. The total cost to construct the tug/barge thousand footer was approximately $35 million.

    On October 6, 1981 the ERINDALE's bow was damaged when she hit the Allanburg Bridge abutment running downbound in the Welland Canal

    On October 6, 1980 LAC DES ILES grounded in the Detroit River just below Grassy Island, the result of a faulty steering mechanism. She freed herself a few hours later. The damage caused by the grounding ended her career.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Twin Ports Report

    10/05:
    Most of the vessels loading grain in the Twin Ports cleared port Friday afternoon and evening. But by Sunday, five more vessels -- three salties and two Canadian lakers were anchored off Duluth waiting to enter port to begin loading Monday. Another saltie arrived Sunday evening and entered port while a CSL self-unloader dropped anchor outside. Both the CSL boat and the saltie took the unusual step of following the route toward Superior Entry and then cutting across the western tip of the lake to Duluth, apparently so they could keep today's brisk seas dead astern.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Barge Due in Buffalo

    10/05:
    The tug/barge Atlantic Hickory/Sarah Spencer was scheduled to arrive in Buffalo some time this morning. If the tug/barge combo heads up to ADM it will be the first self unloader to discharge grain at Buffalo into an elevator. (The Transfer unloaded grain into the Enterprise last month.) It will also be the first Canadian grain boat since the Willowglen and Beechglen laid up.

    Also note worthy is the fact that this will also be the first Lake Boat tug/barge conversion to go up the river and the first time the ex. Cornelius has been in Buffalo since she was owned by American Steamship.

    Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




    The C&O 452 sold to European interests

    10/05:
    The former railroad tug "C & O 452" has been sold by its owners, PHS Tugboat Co. of Port Huron, MI to an unidentified French national for use on rivers in France. According to a PHS Tugboat spokesperson the vessel will be delivered to the port of Quebec and placed on a heavy lift ship sometime in late October.

    Reported by: Mark Mills




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 05

    On Saturday afternoon, Oct. 5 1997, while passing White Shoal Light on their way to Charleviox, the Medusa Challenger was hit by a water spout. The only danage reported was a spotlight on the pilothouse bridge wing lifted out of its support and crews bikes stored on deck rose vertically. The 1906 built boat was also reported to have been vibrating in an unusual manner. Another boat in the area reported wind gusts of almost 100 mph in the brief storm. That same day the eastern UP was hit with a violet storm that blew down trees a foot in diameter.

    The ARTHUR B. HOMER, loaded with ore, was in a head-on collision, October 5, 1972, with the unloaded Greek salty NAVISHIPPER at Buoy 83 in the Detroit River's Fighting Island Channel. NAVISHIPPER reportedly had no licensed pilot aboard at the time, a violation of Maritime law. There were no injuries, but the HOMER suffered extensive bow damage up to and including part of her pilothouse.

    The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2) was christened on October 5, 1954 for the National Steel Corp. (M.A. Hanna Co., mgr.), Cleveland, OH.

    HUTCHCLIFFE HALL was in collision with steamer RICHARD V. LINDABURY on a foggy October 5, 1962 off Grosse Pointe Farms in Lake St. Clair. The canaller suffered a 12 foot gash on her port side forward of her after cabins and sank. She was raised October 7th and taken to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs.

    On October 5, 1967 while outbound on the Saginaw River after discharging a load of limestone at Saginaw, MI, the J.F. SCHOELLKOPF, JR.'s steering failed which caused her to hit the west side of the I-75 Zilwaukee Bridge. The SCHOELLKOPF, JR. incurred little damage but the south bound lanes of the bridge were out of service for several days until repairs were completed.

    The ARTHUR H. HAWGOOD was launched October 5, 1907 for the Neptune Steamship Co. (Hawgood, mgr.), Cleveland, OH.

    Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

    This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 04

    On October 4, 1979 the ST. LAWRENCE NAVIGATOR arrived at the Port Weller Dry Docks, St. Catharines, Ont. where she was lengthened to the Seaway maximum length of 730' overall. A new bow and cargo section was installed including a bow thruster and was assigned Hull #66. New tonnage; 18,788 GRT, 12,830 NRT, 32,279 dwt. The ST. LAWRENCE NAVIGATOR was renamed c) CANADIAN NAVIGATOR in 1980 and now sails for ULS Corp.

    The TEXACO BRAVE (2) was launced today in 1976 by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Shimonoseki, Japan for Texaco Canada Ltd., Don Mills, Ont.

    The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS was laid up for the last time at the M.P.& L., Dock Duluth, MN on October 4, 1982.

    On October 4, 1980 the ARTHUR B. HOMER was laid up for the last time at Erie, PA.

    As a result of the collision between the PARKER EVANS and the SIDNEY E. SMITH, JR. 4 months earlier alternate one-way traffic between the Black River Buoy and Buoys One and Two in Lake Huron was agreed upon by the shipping companies. This happened on on October 4, 1972

    The JAMES E. FERRIS' last trip before scrapping was from Duluth, MN with a split load of 261,000 bushels of wheat for Buffalo, NY arriving there October 4, 1974.

    The JIIMAAN, Twin Screw RoRo Cargo/Passenger Ferry built to Ice Class 1D standards had its Keel laid October 4, 1991

    On October 4, 1982, the Benjamin F. Fairless laid up for the last time in Duluth. She was towed out of Duluth on her way to an overseas scrapyard on June 17, 1988.

    Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

    This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Cruise Ship to Dock in Detroit, First time in 30 years

    10/03:
    The German cruise ship C. Columbus is scheduled to dock at Detroit's Hart Plaza today at 10:00 A.M. This marks the first time since 1967 that a cruise ship docks in Detroit. The last was the S.S. South American.

    The ship will embark on a 12-day Lakes cruise leaving Hart Plaza at 5:00 P.M. heading for Mackinac Island. 423 German tourists were scheduled to fly into Detroit Metropolitan Airport last night to meet the ship.

    Last year Toledo, OH was the ships embarkation point. Reported delays on the Maumee River caused Toledo to lose this distinction.

    Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




    Ryerson Due out of Lay-up

    10/03:
    The Edward L. Ryerson is coming out of short term layup, and is scheduled to load in Escanaba on Wednesday, October 7.

    She entered lay-up on September 3, reports at that time had the vessel fitting out and then running the remainder of the season.

    Reported by: Jim Grill




    Tanker runs aground in St. Lawrence River

    10/03:
    The Moruy (Venezuelan-registry 34,422-gt, 55,918-dwt tanker built in 1983, operated by PDV Marina S.A.) ran aground in the St. Lawrence River on 29 Sept. near Champlain, Quebec. It was refloated 1 Oct. with forepeak damage.

    Reported by: Steve Schultz
    From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





    News from the Seaway

    10/03:
    Earlier this week, a third saltie was renamed in a Great Lakes port. This was Clipper Amethyst at Toronto taking the new name Millenium Amethyst before heading for Duluth with her new identity. She is a general cargo ship equiped with gantry cranes and belongs to a class of ship named "Friendship" of which 21 were built in Japan to the design of the Montreal architect GTR Campbell.

    Leaving Montreal on Oct.2 is the tug/supply ship John Spence owned by McKeil Marine. She has a long journey to complete as she will go through the Panama Canal bound for Vancouver to deliver a Canadian Coast Guard hovercraft built in Ontario. Before leaving Mtl, she anchored at Pointe-aux-Trembles to take on stores.

    The new names of the five bulkers sold by the Indian company Larsen Toubro in August to a Greek firm for operation under the flag of the Cayman Islands are the following ones: Mangal Desai is now Millenium Eagle leaving Mtl. for the Lakes today Oct.2, LT Argosy is Millenium Hawk upbound on the St.Lawrence River for Cleveland, Soren Toubro now Millenium Falcon downbound from the Lakes for a bunkering dock in Mtl., Holck-Larsen now Millenium Condor also downbound from the Lakes and LT Odyssey which was renamed Millenium Osprey in Mtl on Aug.26. A sixth vessel, the LT Pragati, too large to go in the Seaway has also been sold to thar Greek firm. She is not to be confused with Lok Pragati, another Indian ship calling occasionnally at Great Lakes ports.

    It is interesting to note that another company has decided to name recently acquired vessels by the prefix "Millenium". But what is more confusing is the fact they also have one vessel named Millenium Eagle. This one built in 1994 is much smaller at 7 249 gr.tons. She took that name at the beginning of the summer and is the former Philippines-flag Vidal Aboitiz.

    Reported by: René Beauchamp




    Next administrator named

    10/03:
    President Clinton has announced his intent to nominate Albert S. Jacquez as the next administrator of St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp.

    Reported by: Steve Schultz
    From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





    Ship Downtime Mars August Float

    10/03:
    With the carrying capacity of Jones Act lakers having increased dramatically since the early 1970s, just a small number of lost steaming days in August produced a noticeable decrease in cargo movement in U.S.-Flag vessels. Because four U.S.-Flag lakers lost a combined 40 or so steaming days due to repairs or short-term lay-ups, cargo movement in U.S. bottoms decreased 2.7 percent compared to the corresponding period last year - 13.9 million net tons versus 14.3. For the season, U.S.-Flag carriage stands at 72.1 million net tons, an increase of 3.8 percent.

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




    October 1 Vessel Survey - U.S.-Flag Fleet

    10/03:
    The major U.S.-Flag Lakes lines had 64 of their 69 vessels in service on October 1, a decrease of one hull compared to a year ago. Three lakers that have seen service this year are currently in short-term lay-up: the ore carrier EDWARD L. RYERSON; the cement carrier PAUL H. TOWNSEND; and the double-hulled tanker GEMINI.

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 03

    On September 3, 1977, the Belle River (now Walter J. McCarthy, Jr.) set a Great Lakes record for coal when it loaded 62,802 tons of coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal on its maiden voyage. This record has since been surpassed many times.

    On September 3, 1981, the U.S. Steel bulk freighter Sewell Avery was laid up for the final time in Duluth.

    Keel laying ceremonies for the 437 foot bow section of the ROGER BLOUGH took place on September 3, 1968 and was float launched December 21, 1968 less ballast tanks because the existing dry dock wasn’t wide enough to accommodate her 105 foot width. In the mean time a new 125 foot wide dry dock at Lorain was being built and at its completion the keel for the full width stern section of Hull #900 was laid on December 29, 1969. The bow section was floated into the new dry dock on July 25, 1970 and was joined with the 421 foot stern section. The launch of the completed hull was scheduled for July, 1971 but a fire broke out in the engine room on June 24, 1971 killing four yard workers and extensively damaging her Pielstick diesel engines. Extensive repairs, which included replacement of both engines, delayed the launch for nearly a year. The vessel was moved out of the dry dock on June 3, 1972. She was christened June 5, 1972 as a) ROGER BLOUGH, honoring the retired Chairman of the Board of the United States Steel Corp. Sea trials began on June 9th.

    SOODOC (b) AMELIA DESGAGNES ) departed on her maiden voyage when she loaded salt at Goderich, Ont. on September 3, 1976.

    The SEWELL AVERY was laid up for the last time September 3, 1981 at Superior, WI.

    The THOMAS LAMONT was cited for “exemplary service” by the U.S. Coast Guard. On September 3, 1981 for her role in the rescue of seventeen crew members from the burning CARTIERCLIFFE HALL on Lake Superior. The THOMAS LAMONT was laid up the last time at Duluth’s Hallett dock #6A.

    The H.H. PORTER sailed on her maiden voyage September 3, 1920 light from Lorain to load iron ore at Two Harbors, MN.

    On September 3, 1985, PHILIP R. CLARKE plowed into the Drawbridge Cove Marina in Lorain's Black River damaging 5-10 small craft and sinking one at the steel dock. CLARKE managed to stop before hitting the Route 6 drawbridge.

    Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, and Ahoy & Farewell II

    This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Twin Ports Report

    10/02:
    Grain-loading continues in the Twin Ports under clear skies Oct. 1. Six of seven active grain-loading berths were occupied yesterday morning. A number of Canadian straight-deckers are here, including Canadian Mariner at Harvest States, Canadian Provider at Peavey Connors Point, and Algocape anchored on Lake Superior.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    This Repair Brought To You By The Letter "A"

    10/02:
    The latest issue of the "Seaway Review" details an article reporting Great Lakes shipyard activity. Oddly, there are or have been four salties run aground, collided with or damaged in some way this season Each of these vessel names begin with the letter "A". The "Arabella", "Arosa", "(LT) Argosy", and ironically, the "Apt Mariner".

    Reported by: D. Ocean




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 02

    CANADIAN OLYMPIC was christened on October 2, 1976 at St. Catharines. Her name honors the Olympic Games that were held at Montreal that year.

    The TADOUSSAC (2) departed Collingwood on her maiden voyage October 2, 1969 to load iron ore at Fort William, Ont.

    The AMERICAN last operated in 1956 and then was laid up at Manitowoc, WI. On October 2, 1972

    The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON and CONSUMERS POWER (3) arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan October 2, 1988 where dismantling began on October 14th by Li Chong Steel & Iron Works Co. Ltd.

    On her maiden voyage October 2, 1943, the E.G. GRACE cleared Lorain bound for Superior, WI to load iron ore.

    The HOCHELAGA (2) departed Toronto October 2, 1993 in tow of the McKeil tugs GLENBROOK and KAY COLE for Montreal, Que and then to the cutters torch.

    On October 2, 1969, the Tadoussac entered service.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Lansdowne on the Move in Buffalo

    10/01:
    The Lansdowne was towed from the Port Terminal to the Union Furnace Dock on the Buffalo River at 12 Noon on the 30th. She waited in the channel next to the English River just below Ohio St. for almost an hour and a half with two tugs alongside. She can now be seen from the corner of Hamburg and South St. This is the first time a large vessel has tied up at what is basically an abandoned dock in many years.

    This vintage trainferry has turned into a hard luck vessel in recent years. Last operating in 1974, she was later opened on the Detroit river front as a restaurant then bar. After these failed ventures she was towed to Lorain Ohio and then Buffalo. Her future is still uncertian.

    Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




    Algogulf Sails

    10/01:
    To update yesterday's report, The Algogulf departed Montreal sometime yesterday. She is believed to be headed for a St Lawrence Gulf port.

    Reported by: John Whitehead




    Today in Great Lakes History - October 01

    The CHICAGO TRADER was laid up on October 1, 1976 at the Frog Pond in Toledo.

    Dismantling commenced October 1, 1974 on the KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1) at Santander, Spain.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





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