Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

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* Report News


Cuyahoga Returns

11/30
The Cuyahoga made her second visit in as many weeks Friday. She arrived in port carrying a cargo of salt for Grey County Highway Department. It was unloaded in the parking lot of Great Lakes Elevators Ltd. The Cuyahoga arrived early morning and departed about 11:15 a.m.

Reported by: Mike Bannon


Seaway Terminal Rehabilitation

11/30
Rehabilitation of the Port Huron Seaway Terminal (Bean Dock) has begun on the St. Clair River. The first stage, demolition of the wharf is nearly complete. Over the winter and early spring crews will complete a new wharf along with improvements to the South Warehouse as well as landscaping. Completion is expected for the first week of May 2003.

During the interim period, the facility will be not be available for ships to moor at. The owners look forward to welcoming ships back in the spring.

Questions regarding mooring can be addressed to Acheson Ventures at (810) 966-0900.

Reported by: Robert Lafean


Conquest in Milwaukee

11/30
The Southdown Conquest arrived in Milwaukee on Thanksgiving Day. Friday the tug and barge were still at the Cemex dock. Extra lines have been put out and there was no sign of activity, indicating a temporary lay up.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde


Marquette Update

11/30
Friday brought an unusual sight to the Marquette ore dock, the Joseph Thompson and Joseph Thompson Jr. arrived to take on a load of taconite ore. The Charles M. Beeghly took on a load of ore as well. All other expected traffic has been put on hold because high winds and waves.

Thompson loading.
Another view.
Close up of tug.
Beeghly loading.

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Saginaw News

11/30
The Calumet passed the pump out station inbound at the mouth of the Saginaw River at 2:22 Friday afternoon. She was headed up to the Sargeant Dock in Zilwaukee.

Pictures by: Todd Shorkey
Calumet upbound at Smith Park.
Bow view.
Stern view.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


Kingston Update

11/30
The Halifax arrived in Picton at 4:00 p.m. Friday. The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was also heading for Picton. The English River planned to depart Bath but remained in port Friday morning as winds were blowing at 45 knots. Gale Warnings remained in effect for Lake Ontario Friday night.

The James Norris was anchored in Prince Edward Bay Friday morning waiting for weather.

Reported by: Ron Walsh


Quebec Report

11/30
Thursday saw a mix of ships in port. The Canadian Miner was unloading wheat from Thunder Bay, the saltie North Defiance was unloading chemicals from Houston, TX. The saltie Tai He Hai was loading scrap iron for Asia, Seattle Trader was unloading coal. The new USCG Cutter Oak was downbound or delivery trip.

CSL Teakglen (ex Mantadoc) on her last trip from Quebec City on Oct 02 2002 with a load of grain for Goderich Ont.
Stern view.
Away from the dock.
Close up.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette


Amherstburg Traffic

11/30
Below are images of traffic passing in the lower Detroit River at Amherstburg, Ont. Wednesday.

Walter J. McCarthy Jr. upbound.
Close up.
Another view.
Tug John Spence and McAsphalt 401.

Reported by: Eric Stapleton


Today in Great Lakes History - November 30

The CANADIAN PIONEER suffered a major engine room fire on 30 Nov 1987 at Nanticoke.

On November 30, 1981 the A.H. FERBERT (2) was laid up for the last time at the Hallett Dock #5, Duluth, MN.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 passed down the Welland Canal on November 30, 1973 in tow of the tugs JOHN PURVES and YVON SIMARD en route to Sorel, Que. where she was cut down to a barge for off-Lakes use.

On 30 Nov 1967, the CITY OF FLINT 32 was laid up, never to run again.

On 30 Nov 1900, ALMERON THOMAS (2-mast wooden schooner, 50', 35 gt, built in 1891 at Bay City, MI) was carrying gravel in a storm on Lake Huron when she sprang a leak and ran for the beach. She struck bottom and then capsized. She broke up in twenty feet of water near Point Lookout in Saginaw Bay, No lives were lost.

The schooner S. J. HOLLY came into the harbor at Oswego, New York on 30 November 1867 after a hard crossing of Lake Ontario. The previous day she left the Welland Canal and encountered a growing gale. Capt. Oscar Haynes sought calm water along the north shore, but the heavy seas and freezing winds made sailing perilous, The ropes and chains froze stiff and the schooner was almost unmanageable. The only canvas out was a two reef foresail and it was frozen in place. With great skill, the skipper managed to limp into port, having lost the yawl and sustained serious damage to the cargo. Fortunately no lives were lost.

On 30 Nov 1910, ATHABASKA (steel propeller passenger steamer, 263', 1774 gt, built in 1883 in Scotland) collided with the tug GENERAL and sank near Lonely Island in Georgian Bay. No lives were lost. She was later recovered and rebuilt as a bulk freighter and lasted until she was broken up in 1948.
Painting of the Athabaska by Father Dowling.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series





Beeghly Departs

11/29
Wednesday afternoon the Charles M. Beeghly departed Rouge Steel in Detroit and passed outbound through the Rouge River.

Backing from the Rouge.
Turning.
Bow view at the Jefferson St. Bridge.
Close up of stack.
Flower box. (Picture by Capt. Scott M. Briggs taken last summer)

Reported by: Wade P. Streeter


Algolake in Goderich

11/29
The Algolake made a rare visit to the salt mine on Sunday, loading for Marinette, Wisconsin. The Algorail visited port Monday and the Algoway was in Wednesday, both taking loads of salt to Parry Sound, Ontario.

Reported by: Lisa Stuparyk


Beeghly Departs

11/29
Wednesday afternoon the Charles M. Beeghly departed Rouge Steel in Detroit and passed outbound through the Rouge River.

Backing from the Rouge.
Turning.
Bow view at the Jefferson St. Bridge.
Close up of stack.
Flower box. (Picture by Capt. Scott M. Briggs taken last summer)

Reported by: Wade P. Streeter


Twin Ports Report

11/29
Vessels in the Twin Ports grain trade took Thanksgiving Day off, but other vessels remained active.

Grain elevators were idle on the holiday, a move that's usually done to avoid paying overtime to grain millers and longshoremen. In Superior, Stokmarnes was at Peavey, Tecam Sea was at Cenex Harvest States and Kinsman Independent remained at Elevator S. In Duluth, Mapleglen was at AGP. Anchored out for the past few days was Isolda.

Alpena arrived through the Duluth entry in late morning and proceeded to the Superior terminal to begin unloading. CSL Tadoussac and Saginaw were both scheduled to make rare appearances at the BNSF ore dock in Superior.

With nighttime temperatures well below freezing, the harbor has taken on a coating of ice. So far, it's not thick enough to hinder navigation.

Pictures by: Glenn Blaszkiewicz
Kinsman Independent loading.
Wide view. Midwest Energy Terminal can be seen in the back ground to the left.

Reported by: Al Miller


Tregurtha's Celebrate Thanksgiving in Marquette

11/29
Marquette saw the two Tregurtha’s at the upper harbor on Thanksgiving Day. The Lee A. was in taking a load of taconite pellets while big Paul brought a load of coal to the Presque Isle Power Plant.

Paul R. Tregurtha unloading.
Another view.
Lee A. Tregurtha loading.
Bow view.

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Saginaw Report

11/29
The Paul H. Townsend was downbound the Saginaw River early Thursday morning after unloading at the Lafarge Terminal in Carrollton. The Townsend arrived late Tuesday night.

Passing the outbound Townsend at the Front Range was the inbound Buffalo. The Buffalo went up to the Bay Aggregates Dock in Bangor Township to unload before departing later in the day.

Pictures by: Todd Shorkey
Paul H. Townsend downbound at the Karn-Weadock Plant.
Stern view.
Buffalo upbound at the Front Range.
Stern view.
Buffalo and Townsend passing.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


Busy Day in Lorain

11/29
It was another busy Thanksgiving in the port of Lorain Thursday. Last year saw five vessels in and anchored off port, Thursday saw four vessels.

At 6 p.m. the St. Clair was outbound in the Black River after unloading taconite up the river at Republic Tech. Earl W. Oglebay was right behind her outbound after unloading stone at the Jonick Dock. The Armco had just arrived and anchored off shore to wait for day light and less wind to back into the pellet terminal. They will unload a cargo of taconite. By 7 p.m. the American Republic gave a security call that it would be in to pellet term within the hour to take on a load of taconite for the Cleveland shuttle.

Also the Reserve was due in Silver Bay Thursday night to load taconite for Lorain and the Buckeye is due at the Pellet Terminal Saturday morning with a load of taconite from Silver Bay.

Reported by: Ned Gang


Toronto Update

11/29
The saltie Okolchitza arrived early Thursday assisted by McKeil harbor tugs into the Redpath Sugar dock. Repairs to the second gantry crane at Redpath have been completed and Thursday afternoon unloading was back in gear.

The only other arrival Thursday was the cement boat Stephen B. Roman, she will likely be gone by Friday morning.

Reported by: Gerry O.


Outage

11/29
The main network backbone that servers the Boatnerd sites was out for a time Friday morning, sorry for the interruption.


Southdown Challenger Thanksgiving Day Dinner Menu

11/29
November 28, 2002
Appetizers
Oyster Cocktail, Shrimp Cocktail, Assorted Olives & Raw Vegetables

Soups
Oyster Stew & Chicken Noodle Soup

Entree
Roast Tom Turkey w/Sage Dressing & Wild Rice
Lobster Tail w/Butter Sauce
Baked Virginia Ham w/Pineapple Rings
Mashed & Sweet Potatoes, Buttered Peas, Squash, Giblet Gravy, Hot Dinner Rolls, Cranberry Sauce

Desserts
Mincemeat, Apple, Peach & Pumpkin Pie Whipped Cream, Fruit Cake, Ice Cream, Chocolate Mints, Sugared Dates

Refreshments
Coffee, Tea, Milk, Hot Chocolate, Soft Drinks, Egg No, Cigars, Cigarettes, Hard Candy, Gum

Reported by: Andy LaBorde


Today in Great Lakes History - November 29

On November 29, 1966, the Daniel J. Morrell sank approximately 20 miles north of Harbor Beach in Lake Huron. Her nearly identical sistership, the Edward Y. Townsend, was traveling about 20 miles behind the Morrell and made it to the Lime Island Fuel Dock in the St. Mary's River where cracks were found in her deck; the Townsend proceeded to Sault Ste. Marie where she was taken out of service. The Townsend sank in the Atlantic on October 7, 1968, while being towed overseas for scrap.

E. B. BARBER was laid up for the last time at Toronto, Ont. on 29 Nov 1984.

On November 29, 1903 snow and stormy seas drove the two-and-a-half year old J.T. HUTCHINSON onto an uncharted rock (now known as Eagle River Reef) one-half mile off shore and 10 miles west of Eagle Harbor, MI near the northwestern coast of the Keweenaw Peninsula.

On November 29, 1974 the PERE MARQUETTE 21 was loaded with remnants of Port Huron's Peerless Cement Dock, which reportedly were bound for Saudi Arabia, and cleared there in tow of the GLT tugs AMERICA and OHIO.

The SYLVANIA was in a collision with the DIAMOND ALKALI in the Fighting Island Channel of the Detroit River on 29 Nov 1968 during a snow squall. SYLVANIA's bow was severely damaged.

The propeller BURLINGTON had barges in tow upbound on Lake Erie when she was damaged by the ice and sank in the Pelee Passage.

On 29 November 1856, ARABIAN (3-mast wooden bark, 116', 350 t, built in 1853 at Niagara, Ontario) had stranded on Goose Island Shoal, 10 miles ENE of Mackinac Island ten days earlier. She was relieved of her cargo and was being towed to Chicago by the propeller OGONTZ when a gale blew in and the towline parted. ARABIAN made for shore, her pumps working full force and OGONTZ following. During the night they were separated and ARABIAN sank off Point Betsey in Lake Michigan. Her crew escaped in her yawl.

In 1903 the Pere Marquette 19 arrived Ludington on her maiden voyage. Captain John J. Doyle in command.

On 29 November 1881, the 149' wooden propeller NORTHERN QUEEN, which had been involved in a collision with the 136' wooden propeller canaller LAKE ERIE just five days before, struck the pier at Manistique so hard that she was wrecked. Besides her own crew, she also had LAKE ERIE's crew on board.

On 29 Nov 1902, BAY CITY (1-mast wood schooner-barge, 140', 306 gt, built in 1857 at Saginaw as a brig) was left at anchor in Thunder Bay by the steamer HURON CITY during a storm. BAY CITY's anchor chain parted and the vessel was driven against the Gilchrist dock at Alpena, Michigan and wrecked. Her crew managed to escape with much difficulty.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Federal Hunter Arrives

11/28
Wednesday the Federal Hunter arrived in Thunder Bay under tow of the Purvis Marine tug Reliance. They were first spotted rounding Thunder Cape at around 10 a.m. and neared the North Entrance of the Breakwall around 1:30 p.m. The tow was greeted by Lake and Gravel Tugs Peninsula and Robert John. Each tug took a side and helped guide the saltie through the breakwall.

The tow then made a turn to starboard to line the Hunter up for the Pascol Engineering drydock. The Federal Hunter was towed for repairs in Thunder Bay after suffering damage to her propeller and rudder while at Algoma Steel in Sault Ste. Marie, ON.

Federal Hunter is met by tugs Peninsula and Robert John.
Lining up for Breakwall Entrance.
Entering inner Harbor.
Starting the turn.
Continuing the turn.
Lined up for the drydock.
Ready to enter the drydock.
Oakglen at Richardson Elevator.
Kapitonas A. Lucka enters the harbor.
BBC Iceland at Agricore United "a" Elevator (former UGG"a").
Calliroe Patronicola at Richardson Elevator.

Reported by: Rob Farrow


Sturgeon Bay Update

11/28
The tug Karen Andrie and barge A-397 were spotted taking a short cut Wednesday from Green Bay to Lake Michigan.

As the Karen Andrie passed Bay Ship, the yard's gantry crane was busy lifting the 60-ton tug Stephan M. Asher out of the Bay and placing it on a deck barge. The tug will be taken to Roen Salvage yard on the deck barge for the winter. Once there repairs and painting will be completed over the winter.

A-397 and tug Karen Andrie off Bay Ship.
Another view.
Gantry crane picks up the Stephan M. Asher .
Tug John R. Asher holds the barge to the dock while the Stephen is loaded.
Stack Markings on the John R.
Through the Michigan Street Bridge.
Side View.
Making the turn into the Roen Yard.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle


Saginaw Report

11/28
The Tug Rebecca Lynn and her barge were inbound the Saginaw River late Tuesday evening. The pair traveled upriver to the Bit-Mat Dock in Bangor Township to unload. By Wednesday afternoon the Rebecca Lynn pulled the barge from the slip and the pair departed for the lake.

Also inbound late Tuesday was the Paul H. Townsend. The Townsend was upbound to unload cement at the Lafarge Terminal in Carrollton.

Pictures by: Todd Shorkey
Tug Rebecca Lynn downbound at USCG Station Saginaw River.
Tug close up.
Stern view.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


Toronto News

11/28
The saltie Armonikos departed Redpath Sugar Dock Wednesday afternoon upbound for the Welland Canal.

Dredging the channel to remove Haida from Ontario Place continues. The contract was awarded to Con-Strata Construction; With Solderholm as a sub-contractor. Spud barges owned by McKeil Work Boats and Nadro Marine are being used for this job, along with Soderholm's tug Diver III and spud barge. Visitors to the site are reminded that they should bring a hard hat and safety shoes if they wish to take photos of the work in progress.

Pictures by Jim Gallacher
Armonikos unloading.
Close up.
Bow view.
Heading off onto Lake Ontario.

Reported by: Gerry O. and Jim Gallacher


Kingston Area Ferry Update

11/28
On Monday the Ferry Frontenac II returned to service at Amherst island and the ferry Quinte Loyalist returned to Glenora. The Frontenac II had been in Hamilton for her five year inspection while the Quinte Loyalist took over her run.

Upon her return to the area, Frontenac II took over the ferry run to Wolfe Island while the Wolfe Islander III tied up for a short maintenance refit at Kingston. Last Friday, the Wolfe Islander III returned to service while the Frontenac II had her engine room painted.

Reported by: Brian Johnson


Today in Great Lakes History - November 28

On November 28, 1905, the Pittsburgh Steamship Company vessel Mataafa was wrecked as it tried to re-enter the Duluth Ship Canal in a severe storm. The Mataafa had departed Duluth earlier but had decided to return to safety. After dropping her barge in the lake, the vessel was picked up by waves, was slammed against the north pier and was swung around to rest just hundreds of feet offshore north of the north pier, where it broke in two. Much of the crew froze to death in the cold snap that followed the storm, as there was no quick way to get out to the broken vessel for rescue. The Mataafa was repaired prior to the 1906 season; she ultimately ended her career as an automobile carrier for the T.J. McCarthy Steamship Company and was sold for scrap in 1965.

The CANADIAN OLYMPIC's maiden voyage was 28 Nov 1976 to load coal at Conneaut, Ohio for Nanticoke, Ont. Her name honors the Olympic Games that were held at Montreal that year.

On November 28, 1983 while upbound after leaving the Poe Lock the INDIANA HARBOR was in a collision, caused by high winds, with the downbound Greek salty ANANGEL SPIRIT resulting in a 10 foot gash in the laker's port bow.

LANCASHIRE was launched November 28, 1942 she would be renamed b) SEWELL AVERY

The CATHY B. towed the GOVERNOR MILLER to Vigo, Spain on November 28, 1980 where she was broken up.

The BENSON FORD (2) was renamed e) US.265808 and departed River Rouge on November 28, 1986 towed by the Sandrin tugs TUSKER and GLENADA bound for Ramey's Bend in the Welland Canal.

FRONTENAC (4) arrived at the Fraser Shipyard, Superior, WI on November 28, 1979. Her keel, which had hogged four feet, was declared a constructive total loss.

The BRANSFORD stranded on a reef off Isle Royal in Lake Superior during a major storm on 28 Nov 1905 (the same storm that claimed the steamer MATAAFA). She was recovered.

On her third trip in 1892 the Ann Arbor #1 again ran aground, this time three miles north of Ahnapee (now called Algoma). There was $15,000 damage to her cargo.

In 1906 the Ann Arbor #4 left Cleveland bound for Frankfort on her maiden voyage.

The Ann Arbor #4 ran aground off Kewaunee in 1924.

On 28 November 1905, AMBOY (2-mast wooden schooner-barge, 209', 894 gt, formerly HELENA) was carrying coal in tow of the wooden propeller GEORGE SPENCER in a gale on Lake Superior. In an effort to save both vessels, AMBOY was cut loose. The SPENCER was disabled quickly and was driven ashore near Little Marais, MN. AMBOY struggled against the gale for a full day before finally going ashore near Thomasville, Ontario on 29 November. No lives were lost from either vessel.

On 28 November 1872, W. O. BROWN (wooden schooner, 140', 306 t, built in 1862 at Buffalo) was carrying wheat in a storm on Lake Superior when she was driven ashore near Point Maimanse, Ontario and pounded to pieces. Six lives were lost. Three survivors struggled through a terrible cold spell and finally made it to the Soo on Christmas Day.

On 28 Nov 1874, the propeller JOHN PRIDGEON JR. was launched at Clark's shipyard in Detroit, Michigan. She was built for Capt. John Pridgeon. Her dimensions were 235' x 36' x 17'. The engines of the B. F. WADE were installed in her.

On 28 Nov 1923, the Detroit & Windsor Ferry Company and Bob-Lo docks were destroyed by a fire cause by an overheated stove in the ferry dock waiting room. The blaze started at 3:00 AM.

CANADIAN TRANSFER underwent repairs most of Tuesday, 28 Nov 2000 at the Algoma Steel dock at Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. She had run aground the previous night in the Canadian channel approaching Algoma Steel. Canadian Transfer was freed by two Purvis Marine tugs. The vessel suffered a crack or hole in the hull plating about 10 feet from the bottom along its port side.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Kinsman Independent

11/27
Tuesday the classic straight deck Kinsman Independent was loading grain at the General Mills Elevator in Superior, Wi. The grain will be taken to Buffalo, NY. and unloaded. The Independent is reported to have just one more trip after this one. They will return to Superior to take on a storage cargo for Buffalo.

The Independent is expected to enter lay-up and not return to service next year. Rumors continue to circulate that her owners have chartered the idle Joseph H. Frantz for service next season.

The lack of self unloading gear on the vessel may bring her long career to an end.

Early this year the General Mills elevator in Buffalo was fitted with an unloading hopper. With the ability to accept grain from self unloading vessels this will likely put the Independent out of work. The Kinsman Independent's fleet mate Kinsman Enterprise was sold early this year for scrapping.

Grain unloaded at the elevator is processed in the attached flour mill and used to make various General Mills cereals such as Cheerios, Lucky Charms and flour products such as Gold Medal Flour.

The Independent is the last operating U.S. Straight Deck bulk carrier and this is rumored to be her final season.

Entering port through the Duluth Piers.
On deck looking forward.
Close up of stack.
Looking forward from the Emergency Steering Station.
Looking aft.
Internal phone system.
View across bridge.
Chadburn and emergency whistle lever.
Guests enjoyed their own lounge.
Another view.
View from the guest’s private deck.
Bar in the guest quarters.
Guest galley.
Remnant of Kinsman past in the old name.
Staterooms 1-2 shared bathroom.
Another view.
Stateroom 2 as it would appear in use. (Staterooms have not been used in several years and still remain more or less original from Ford days)
Stateroom.
"S" painted on turbine casing in the engine room.
View across engine room (chad and pressure gauges in foreground).
Main gauge board for monitoring ships steam pressure.
Closeup of engine room chadburn.
Low Pressure Turbine from above prop shaft looking forward.
Steam turbine DC electric generator 1 of 2.
Builders plate on generator.
Turbine builders plate.
Electrical motor center in engine room.
Turbine from upper deck.
Looking forward to boilers.

Reported by: Steve Haverty




Federal Hunter Towed to Thunder Bay

11/27
The Federal Hunter was expected to be being towed from Algoma Steel in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. Tuesday afternoon for repairs in Thunder Bay. The Fednav vessel damaged her propeller and rudder while docking at Algoma Steel last week. The ship will be towed to Thunder Bay by the Purvis tug Reliance assisted by the tug Scott Purvis.

Federal Hunter towed from the Soo. (USCG Buckthorn is seen working Aids to Navigation)
Close up.

Reported by: Bonnie Barnes


Algolake Unloads

11/27
Tuesday morning the Algolake arrived in Marinette, Wi. to discharge a cargo of salt at Marinette Fuel & Dock. This was the Algolake's first trip to Marinette, and was the fourth cargo of salt at MF&D this year. She departed around 12:30 p.m. heading to Thunder Bay.

Pictures by Scott Best
Unloading at MF&D.
Another view.
Stern view unloading .
Stern view.
Wide view unloading .
Pictures by Dick Lund
Workboat hoisted aboard.
Departing.
Another view.
Passing North Pier Lighthouse.

Reported by: Dick Lund


Split Load for the McCarthy

11/27
Tuesday the 1000-foot Walter J. McCarthy Jr. turned downbound into the St. Clair River heading for Monroe, Mi. The vessel unloaded about 32,000 tons of coal at the St. Clair, Edison Coal Dock before heading downbound with the remaining 32,000 tons.

The trip to Monroe takes approximately eight hours. The cargo of coal was loaded in Superior, Wi., it is necessary to split a load because the channel at Monroe is not deep enough to handle the McCarthy at full draft.

Reported by: Craig S. Zimmerman


Marquette News

11/27
The Herbert Jackson waited on a snowy Tuesday to load taconite at Marquette. The Kaye Barker loaded and left before noon. Lake effect continued to bring heavy snow to the Marquette area.

Jackson waiting to load.
Bow view.

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Today in Great Lakes History - November 27

The ALGOSEA entered Lake service as a self-unloader for the first time with salt loaded at Goderich, Ont. and passed downbound in the Welland Canal November 27, 1976 for Quebec City.

The AVONDALE (2) was condemned and was not allowed to carry cargo after she arrived at Toledo, OH on November 27, 1975 to load soybeans.

The steam barge CHAUNCY HURLBUT was launched at the shipyard of Simon Langell at St. Clair, MI on Thanksgiving Day, 27 November 1873. She was built for Chandler Bros. of Detroit.

On 27 November 1886, COMANCHE (wooden schooner, 137', 322 t, built in 1867 at Oswego, NY) was carrying corn in a storm on Lake Ontario when she ran on a shoal and sank near Point Peninsula, NY. A local farmer died while trying to rescue her crew of 8. His was the only death. She was later recovered and rebuilt as THOMAS DOBBIE.

The Pere Marquette 22 collided with the Wabash in heavy fog in 1937.

In 1966 the City of Midland 41 ran aground at Ludington in a storm. Stranded on board were a number of passengers and 56 crewman. Ballast tanks were flooded to hold the steamer on until the storm subsided. She was pulled off four days later by the Roen tug JOHN PURVES.

The propeller MONTGOMERY, which burned in June 1878, was raised on 27 November 1878. Her engine and boiler were removed and she was converted to a barge. She was rebuilt at Algonac, Michigan in the summer of 1879.

On 27 November 1866, the Oswego Advertiser & Times reported that the schooner HENRY FITZHUGH arrived at Oswego, New York with 17,700 bushels of wheat from Milwaukee. Her skipper was Captain Cal Becker. The round trip took 23 days which was considered "pretty fast sailing."

The CITY OF FLINT 32 was launched in Manitowoc on 27 Nov 1929.
Image of the City Of Flint 32 from the Father Dowling Collection

On Monday, 27 Nov 1996, the MALLARD up bound apparently bounce off the wall in the Welland canal below Lock 1 and into the path of the CANADIAN ENTERPRISE. It was a sideswipe rather than a head on collision. The ENTERPRISE was repaired at Port Weller Dry Docks. The repairs to the gangway and ballast vent pipes took six hours. The MALLARD proceeded to Port Colborne to be repaired there.

At 10:20 p.m. on Monday, 27 NOV 2000, the CANADIAN TRANSFER radioed Soo Traffic to report that the vessel was aground off Algoma Steel and "taking on water but in no danger." The crew reported that they had two anchors down and one line on the dock. Purvis Marine was contacted.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Iglehart off Dry Dock

11/26
Monday the J.A.W. Iglehart was removed from the floating dry dock at Bay Ship in Sturgeon Bay, Wi. The cement carrier was moved to Berth #8 for final work before returning to service.

As the dry dock was being pumped down, the Chicago based tour boat the Odyssey II was being placed into the small graving dock next to the floating dry dock.

Odessey II ready for dry docking.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle


LTV plant in Hoyt Lakes Faces Financial and Technical Hurdles

11/26
Teck Cominco, a Canadian based worldwide mining company, is pursuing plans to develop copper and nickel deposits near Babbitt, MN.

The project would use the old LTV plant in Hoyt Lakes, now owned by Cleveland-Cliffs. The metals would be extracted from the ore by a new liquid based process rather then smeltering.

"It's a new technology, a new approach for us and we're getting a lot of support," said David Godlewski, Teck Cominco environmental and public affairs manager. Tuesday, he updated the St. Louis County Commission on Mesaba's status.

"The deposit has been looked at for years," he said. "We're looking at it with new technology. Hopefully, with new technology and support from the state, the project will be a go."

The company is perfecting the technology at a pilot plant in Canada. He said testing is planned during 2003 to develop a design for a small scale commercial plant.

Godlewski explained the company's financial objectives are a 10 percent return on invested capital at each major asset.

"We have very strict and tight financial hurdles for new operations," he said. "It's a very tough hurdle to overcome. Not many mines operating in the world can make that hurdle.

He said the type of ore found there defeated efforts to develop in the 1970s. "What we're looking at is a deposit that has a challenging grade," he said. "We're going to have to be very efficient in producing."

He said the LTV plant is a critical element because it exists and without it project costs would be 50 percent higher. Developing the project to the production stage is expected cost about $600 million.

Teck is having is having discussions with Cleveland-Cliffs and it could become a joint project. Teck officials, IRRRA and other participants held a meeting at the plant Tuesday.

Godlewski said Teck has mineral control over the ore, which is about half state and half private.

They are currently working on permitting for a 55,000 ton sample that would be crushed and concentrated at LTV, providing some short-term jobs.

Teck is also seeking some financial help -- about $40 million -- possibly split between federal, state and local funds. "We are working to consolidate funding, and hope to by mid-2003," he said. "We would take the bulk sample, process it at LTV and take the concentrate to Vancouver, then start the permitting process."

"We are looking at four to five years at the earliest," Godlewski said. "We are moving as quickly as possible."

Reported by: Andy Greenlees


Twin Ports Report

11/26
The Twin Ports grain trade remains brisk as November nears its end. On Monday, four ships were loading and two more were anchored out on the lake waiting their turns at the elevators. In Duluth, tiny Flinterspirit was dwarfed by the loading rig as it loaded at Cargill B1 and Utviken was loading at AGP. In Superior, Quebecois was loading at the Peavey elevator while Mathilde Oldendorff was loading at Cenex Harvest States. At anchor were Stokmarnes and Tecam Sea.

Showing up at an unaccustomed location Monday was American Mariner, unloading stone at the CLM dock in Superior. It later shifted to Midwest Energy Terminal to load coal for Marquette. George A. Stinson also put in an unusual appearance in Duluth. It arrived in midafternoon to load taconite pellets at the DMIR ore dock. The Stinson generally is a fixture at the BNSF ore dock in Superior.

Reported by: Al Miller


Marquette News

11/26
The Charles M. Beeghly left Marquette with a load of taconite on Monday. She met some rough water on her way out. Tuesday will see the Kaye Barker and Herbert Jackson loading. The American Mariner is expected Wednesday, and the Lee A. Tregurtha on Thursday. Big Paul Tregurtha will be bringing a load of coal to the Presque Isle Power Plant on Thursday.

Beeghly departing.
Heading for the lake.

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Busy Day in Owen Sound

11/26
On Saturday the Owen Sound harbor was a hotbed of activity. First in was Cuyahoga with a load of salt for the Grey County Highway Department. It was deposited in the parking lot of Great Lakes Elevators. Next in was the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Samuel Risley. The Risley is doing seasonal work in the area.

Finally, the Susan Hannah and barge Southdown Conquest were in port unloading cement at the E.C. King facility. All vessels came in after 7 p.m. and departed by early morning Sunday.

Reported by: Mike Bannon


Saginaw News

11/26
The Tug Mary E. Hannah and her tank barge were inbound early Monday morning passing the Front Range shortly before 3 a.m. She proceeded to the Triple Clean Liquifuels Dock in Essexville where she unloaded until the evening hours. The Mary Hannah moved to a towing position and the pair departed for the lake.

Behind the Mary Hannah was the tanker Gemini who passed the Front Range around 3:30 a.m. She was headed to the Ashland-Marathon Dock in Bangor Township to unload. Gemini finished unloading and was outbound passing the Front Range around shortly after 10 p.m. Outbound Monday morning was the Joseph H. Thompson who had unloaded overnight at the Saginaw Rock Dock. She was outbound passing the Front Range around 8 a.m.

Also outbound was the Algorail after unloading during the night at the BV Dock. She had quite an eventful morning first, having to check back as bridge hours were in effect until 8:30 a.m. for Lafayette Bridge. Next, a vehicle accident on Veteran's Bridge forced her to check back again until the cars were cleared and the gates could come down. Then after finally clearing Vet's, Liberty Bridge called saying a lock was stuck and that he had to call a maintenance man in. Algorail put it astern stopping in the river between Liberty and Vet's where she sat holding herself in the channel for about two hours before the bridge was repaired and able to open.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Algorail downbound clear of Veteran's Memorial Bridge.
Stopping for the stuck Liberty Bridge.
Sitting in the channel waiting.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


Hamilton Report

11/26
Monday afternoon saw lots of vessel activity in Hamilton Harbor. Starting at Pier 8, the saltie Commander was moored and had been unloading steel products, but no unloading activity was seen early that afternoon. The Lykes Energizer was moored at Pier 9 and was shifting cargo containers around its deck. Bright Laker was unloading a bulk cargo at Pier 11 as was the Adimon which was moored to the north face of Pier 12.

At Pier 12, the Vamand Wave was unloading steel coils. The Federal Weser was unloading steel products at Pier 23 and over at the JRI facilities at Pier 25, the Algosound was moored.

Dofasco's iron ore dock was busy, with the Algocape unloading iron ore and the CSL Niagara moored just north of the Algocape loading mill scale.

CSL Laurentien was unloading coal at Stelco, while being refueled by the Hamilton Energy.

The CCG Griffon left Hamilton Harbor and transited the Burlington Ship Canal at 1:47 p.m. and out into Lake Ontario. Coming into Hamilton, McKeil Marine's tug Lac Como waited for the Griffon to transit the canal and then the tug transited the canal at 1:53 p.m. and into the harbor.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon


Toronto Update

11/26
Late Saturday night the firetug Wm. Lyon Mackenzie responded to an electrical fire at Ontario Place's waterfront theatre. The fire shut the theatre down.

Dredging continues at Ontario Place for a channel to remove H.M.C.S. Haida. The dredging contract appears to have been given to Soderholm Contracting Ltd. Their tug Diver III and barge are on the scene.

CCG Griffon and the tug Wendy B. departed the harbor early Sunday.

The salty Armonikas remains at Redpath Sugar where unloading continues slowly due to one of the two unloading cranes being broken down. The salty Okolchitza remains in Port Weller anchorage awaiting this berth.

Reported by: Gerry O.


Today in Great Lakes History - November 26

The MESQUITE departed Charlevoix and locked through the Soo on November 26, 1989 to begin SUNDEW's normal buoy tending duties on Lake Superior.

The ELIZABETH HINDMAN was launched November 26, 1920 as a) GLENCLOVA.

November 26, 1910 - The Ann Arbor #5 was launched. She was the first carferry to be built with a seagate, as a result of the sinking of the Pere Marquette 18 in September of 1910.

On 26 November 1872, the steamer GEO. W. REYNOLDS burned at 1 o'clock in the morning at the dock in Bay City. The fire supposedly originated in the engine room. She was owned by A. English of East Saginaw.

On 26 November 1853, ALBANY (wooden sidewheel passenger/package freight, 202', 669 t, built in 1846 at Detroit, MI) was carrying passengers and miscellaneous cargo in a storm on Lake Huron.. She was making for the shelter of Presque Isle harbor when the gale drove her over a bar. Her crew and 200 passengers came ashore in her boats. Plans were made to haul her back across the bar when another storm wrecked her. Her boiler and most of her machinery were recovered the following year.

LAKE BREEZE (wooden propeller, 122', 301 gc, built in 1868 at Toledo, OH) burned at her dock in Leamington, Ontario on 26 November 1878. One man perished in the flames. She was raised in 1880 but the hull was deemed worthless. Her machinery and metal gear were removed in 1881 and sold to an American company.

The ANN ARBOR No. 5 (steel carferry, 359', 2988 gt) was launched by the Toledo Ship Building Company (hull #118) on 26 Nov 1910. She was the first carferry to be built with a seagate, as a result of the sinking of the PERE MARQUETTE 18 in September of 1910.

On 26 Nov 1881, JANE MILLER (wooden propeller passenger-package freight "coaster", 78', 210 gc, built in 1878 at Little Current, ON) departed Meaford, Ontario for Wiarton-- sailing out into the teeth of a gale and was never seen again. All 30 aboard were lost. She probably sank near the mouth of Colpoy's Bay in Georgian Bay. She had serviced the many small ports on the inside coast of the Bruce Peninsula.

HIRAM W. SIBLEY (wooden propeller freighter, 221', 1419 gt, built in 1890 at E. Saginaw, MI) was carrying 70,000 bushels of corn from Chicago for Detroit. On 26 Nov 1898, she stranded on the northwest corner of South Manitou Island in Lake Michigan during blizzard. (Some sources say this occurred on 27 November.) The tugs PROTECTOR and SWEEPSTAKES were dispatched for assistance but the SIBLEY re-floated herself during the following night and then began to sink again. She was put ashore on South Fox Island to save her but she broke in half; then completely broke up during a gale on 7 December 1898.

During the early afternoon of 26 Nov 1999, the LOUIS R. DESMARAIS suffered an engine room fire while sailing in the western section of Lake Ontario. Crews onboard the DESMARAIS put out the fire and restarted her engines. The DESMARAIS proceeded to the Welland canal where she was inspected by both U.S. and Canadian investigators. No significant damage was noted and the vessel was allowed to proceed.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history.





Agreement removes hurdle for Lake Ontario ferry

11/25
An agreement reached this week by state and local officials in New York could clear the way for fast ferry service between Rochester and Toronto to begin in May 2004.

Democrat and Republican officials said their bipartisan approach enabled them to reach an agreement over which organization would serve as a conduit to accept a $6.6 million state loan and pass it along to the ferry project. The agreement also is expected to clear the way for the private-public ferry venture to obtain $7.4 million in state grants.

The Rochester-Genesee Regional Transportation Authority was supposed to pass the loan to the private ferry company, Canadian American Transportation Systems, to build the ship. But the deal wavered as CATS and the RGRTA debated the terms. Finally, the city cut RGRTA out of the deal and instead used Rochester Urban Renewal Agency as the conduit for the money.

With the financial issues apparently out of the way, the focus now turns to making sure Rochester and Toronto are ready for the ferry. CATS also must get permits from Canadian officials, and the U.S. Coast Guard must approve the plans.

CATS has ordered a $42.5 million catamaran from Australian shipbuilder Austal Ltd.

Canadian officials said they are happy the project is progressing, and they are pushing the project in Toronto.

"We think the project and the service will be to the advantage of both cities and both countries," said Case Ootes, Toronto's deputy mayor.

Reported by: Tom Brewer and Mike Nomad


Trip down the River

11/25
Below are images on a trip aboard the saltie Vlistborg from Port Huron to Detroit Sunday. The Vlistborg arrived on the lakes with a load of pulp wood for Menominee, Mi. After unloading the small saltie sailed to Duluth where they loaded a cargo of Sugar Beet Pellets for Spain.

Vlistborg downbound above Port Huron.
Huron Belle Deckhand Assisting Pilot Craig Silliven down the pilot ladder after bringing the Great Laker down Lake Huron. Great Laker is rumored to be heading for a name change after this trip.
Pilot Boat Huron Belle along side of the Vlistborg in Lake Huron.
Approaching the Blue Water Bridges.
Pilot Alain Gindroz "wheels" the Vlistborg down through the rapids under the Blue Water Bridge while Guest Daniel Michelson and Capt. Henk Kars observe.
Capt. Henk Kars.
Remanants of smoke from the Cannon Salute as we passed the Flower Lady's Haven on Harsen's Island.
Chief Officer Gert Mol relaxes in the Wheelhouse.
2nd Officer Maarten Lankhorst .
Every pilothouse seems to have a copy of Know Your Ships.
Kaye E. Barker upbound.
Stern view.
David Z. Norton.
Stern view.
Gemini.
Wolverine.
Canadian Transfer.
Stern view.
No frozen meals here as Wade Streeter enjoys lunch.
Tug Karen Andrie and barge.
Paul R. Tregurtha.
Philip R. Clarke.
Stern view.
Group picture. From Top Left. Chief Officer. Gert Mol, Capt. Henk Kars, Pilot Alain Gindroz, 2nd Officer Maarten Lankhorst, Bottom from left. Guest Daniel Michelson, Jr. Officer Jeroen Way.

Reported by: Wade P. Streeter


Saginaw News

11/25
Two vessels called on the Saginaw River on Sunday. First, the Joseph H. Thompson arrived, passing the Front Range at 1pm. She stopped the Sargent Dock in Essexville to lighter before continuing up to Saginaw Rock in Saginaw to Finish.

Shortly after the Thompson departed Essexville, the Algorail was upbound about 20 minutes behind her. Algorail was passing the Sargent Dock around 6:45 p.m. and her security call indicated she was headed up to the Buena Vista dock to unload.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Joseph H. Thompson departing the Sargent Dock in Essexville.
Shifting cargo by unloading into her own hold.
Stern view.
Algorail upbound at Essroc.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


Montreal Traffic

11/25
Canada Senator downbound off Verchères, Nov. 16.
Stern view.
Spar Ruby upbound off Verchères for Seaway, Nov. 16.
Aivik passing Canadian Progress both bound for Seaway Nov. 16.
Aivik upbound off Verchères for Seaway, Nov. 16.
Peonia upbound off Verchères to Montréal, Nov. 20.
Bluewing downbound off Verchères from Seaway, Nov. 21.
Stern view
Canadian Enterprise off Varennes upbound for Seaway, Nov. 22.
Tug Ocean Reliance pushing barge 550-3 off Varennes, Nov. 22.
Ocean Reliance close up view.
Stern view.

Reported by: Marc Piché


Storm Photos

11/25
The pictures below were taken from an Oil Rig in the Atlantic. The ships in the photos are standby ships in case of emergency on the rig.

Climbing a wave.
Over the top.
View of the sea.
Must have been some ride.
Plowing through a wave.
Close up.
Ready for the next.

Reported by: Paul Beesley


Weekly Updates

11/25
The weekly updates have been uploaded.
Many new pictures and features including:
The long awaited revised First Volume of Ahoy & Farewell is Now Available
New detailed art work in the Great Lakes Shipping Profiles page
Preview 14 new images from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit's 2003 calendar
Our popular Maritime Buff Gift Guide in the Where to Buy Section. Many vendors offering special holiday sales

Click here to view




Today in Great Lakes History - November 25

INCAN SUPERIOR was withdrawn from service after completing 2,386 trips between Thunder Bay and Superior and on November 25, 1992 she passed downbound at Sault Ste. Marie for service on the Canadian West Coast.

ROBERT C. STANLEY was laid up for the last time November 25, 1981 at the Tower Bay slip, Superior, WI.

CITY OF MILWAUKEE was launched November 25, 1930

On 25 November 1866, F. W. BACKUS (wooden propeller, 133', 289 t, built in 1846 at Amherstburg, Ont.) was carrying hay, horses and cattle off Racine, WI. She was run to the beach when it was discovered that she was on fire. Her crew and passengers disembarked. The tug DAISY LEE towed her out while she was still burning, intending to scuttle her, but the towline burned through and she drifted back to shore and burned to the waterline. Her live cargo was pushed overboard while she was still well out and they swam to shore.

November 25, 1930 - The Grand Trunk carferry City of Milwaukee was launched in Manitowoc. She was sponsored by Mrs. Walter J. Wilde, wife of the collector of customs at Milwaukee. She entered service in January of 1931.

On 25 November 1874, WILLIAM SANDERSON (wooden schooner, 136', 385 gt, built in 1853 at Oswego, NY) was carrying wheat in a storm on Lake Michigan when she foundered. The broken wreck washed ashore off Empire, Michigan near Sleeping Bear. She was owned by Scott & Brown of Detroit.

During a storm on 25 November 1895, MATTIE C. BELL (wooden schooner, 181', 769 gt, built in 1882 at E. Saginaw, MI) was in tow of the steamer JIM SHERRIFS on Lake Michigan. The schooner stranded at Big Summer Island, was abandoned in place and later broke up. No lives were lost.

On 25 Nov 1947, the CAPTAIN JOHN ROEN was renamed ADAM E. CORNELIUS.

On 25 Nov 1905, the JOSEPH G. BUTLER, JR. (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 525', 6588 gt) entered service, departing Lorain, Ohio for Duluth on her maiden voyage. The vessel was damaged in a severe storm on that first crossing of Lake Superior, but she was repaired and had a long career. She was renamed DONALD B. GILLIES in 1935 and GROVEDALE in 1963. She was sunk as a dock in Hamilton in 1973 and finally sold for scrap in 1981.
Photo of the Butler from the Father Dowling Collection.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Algowood Departs

11/24
On Saturday afternoon the Gaelic tugs Susan and Patricia Hoey assisted the Algowood from Anderson's K Elevator to Lake Erie. The vessel arrived on Thursday to take on a load of grain for Baie Comeau, Quebec.

Tugs Susan And Patricia Hoey at the dock on the Maumee River.
Patricia Hoey upbound the Maumee River at the King and N & S South Bridges.
Another view.
Patricia Hoey moves into place.
Algowood preparing to depart the dock, the Patricia Hoey on the stern.
Pulling away from the dock.
Another view.
Algowood passing through the N & S South Bridge with only about 20 feet clearance, 10 feet on each side.
tug Susan Hoey.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls


Double Date in Manistee

11/24
Friday afternoon saw two ships anchored off Manistee awaiting better wind conditions. The Buffalo arrived in the morning and anchored off, while the Algoway arrived about 4:30 p.m. and also anchored. The Buffalo lifted anchored at about 10:30 p.m. and proceeded inbound through the river. When she was clear of Maple St. Bridge the Algoway departed her anchorage to head up the river. The Algoway proceeded inbound at dead slow speed, and it appeared as though her bow thruster was not working.

The vessel appeared to run aground at the foot of Cherry St. and backed full astern for 15 minutes in order to free herself from the sandy bottom. She then completed her turn and proceeded upriver at a slow pace and made the rest of the trip without incident.

The Buffalo was bound for the Tondu dock with a load of coal from Conneaut, Ohio, while the Algoway had the 5th load of rock salt for Seng's #1 Dock this year. She loaded her cargo in Goderich, Ontario. The Algoway was in Manistee on Monday the 18th also with a load of salt.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak


Return Trip for Maumee

11/24
On Saturday, the Maumee made her second visit to the Saginaw River in three days. She was inbound Saturday morning passing the Front Range around 10 a.m. Maumee continued upriver to Saginaw to unload and was back outbound at the Front Range around 9:30 p.m.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Maumee upbound at the North Star Dock.
Close up.
Bow view.
Stern view at the Lake State Rail Bridge.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


Today in Great Lakes History - November 24

On November 24, 1990, the Kinsman Independent ran hard aground off of Isle Royale. The vessel was on its way to load grain in Thunder Bay when she ended up 25 miles off course. The damage to the vessel was nearly $2 million, and she was repaired at Thunder Bay before the start of the 1991 season.

On November 24, 1950 while bound for South Chicago with iron ore, the ENDERS M. VOORHEES collided with the upbound steamer ELTON HOYT II (l) (now the MEDUSA CHALLENGER) in the Straits of Mackinac during a blinding snow storm. Both vessels received such serious bow damage that they had to be beached near McGulpin Point west of Mackinaw City to avoid sinking.

The ROSEMOUNT (2), stored with coal, inadvertently sank alongside CSL's Century Coal Dock at Montreal on November 24, 1934.
The THOMAS F. PATTON was launched November 24, 1945 as a C4-S-A4 cargo ship for U.S. Maritime Commission (U.S.M.C. Hull #2370) as a) SCOTT E. LAND.

PRINDOC (3) was launched November 24, 1965.

November 24, 1892 - The Ann Arbor #1 ran aground on her first trip just north of the Kewaunee harbor.

On 24 Nov 1881, LAKE ERIE (wooden propeller canaller, 136', 464 gc, built in 1873 at St, Catharine's, ON) collided with the steamer NORTHERN QUEEN in fog and a blizzard near Poverty Island by the mouth of Green Bay. LAKE ERIE sank in one hour 40 minutes. NORTHERN QUEEN took aboard the crew but one man was scalded and died before reaching Manistique.

The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 entered service in 1931.

On 24 November 1905, ARGO (steel propeller passenger/package freight, 174', 1089 t, built in 1896 at Detroit, MI) dropped into a trough of a wave, hit bottom and sank in relatively shallow water while approaching the harbor at Holland, MI. 38 passengers and crew were taken off by breeches' buoy in a thrilling rescue by the U.S. Lifesaving Service.

NEPTUNE (wooden propeller, 185', 774 gt, built in 1856 at Buffalo) was laid up at East Saginaw, Michigan on 24 November 1874 when she was discovered to be on fire at about 4:00 AM. She burned to a total loss.

The ANN ARBOR NO. 1 left Frankfort for Kewaunee on November 24, 1892. Because of the reluctance of shippers to trust their products on this new kind of ferry it was difficult to find cargo for this first trip. Finally, a fuel company which sold coal to the railroad routed four cars to Kewaunee via the ferry.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series





Stellanova Update

11/23
Repairs to the Stellanova are advancing rapidly. The entire bow section has been removed as of last week and the new modules are in various states of construction in the Verreault steel shop.

The Jumboship vessel Jumbo Vision arrived in Les Méchins on Wednesday morning to load the remaining cargo, originally carried by the Stellanova. The Jumbo Vision departed as scheduled at 3 p.m. Thrusday to complete delivery of the cargo to the southern United States.

Stellanova's bow.
New bow module under construction.
Stellanova and Jumbo Vision.
Jumbo Vision loading.

Reported by: Ryan Beaupré


Montreal Inspections

11/23
Stopping for inspection Thursday night was the saltie Adimon. The vessel is heading for Hamilton but stopped at the Pointe Aux Trembles Anchorage after a brief grounding near Contrecoeur. The ship was stuck for about an hour and then sailed to Montreal under power for inspection.

Also reported to have problems Thursday was the tug Ocean Reliance and barge 550-3. The pair reported to touch bottom while downbound in the Seaway Thursday. She was cleared to sail and depart Friday morning after inspections at the Pointe Aux Trembles Anchorage.

Reported by: Olive S. and Ryan Barbeau


Help keep the William G Mather at Cleveland's Lakefront

11/23
The final city planning meeting regarding city development is today Saturday, Nov. 23rd from 9 am - Noon. At this meeting, you'll get a chance to vote on Waterfront attractions if you attend that particular break-out session.

It's at the Cleveland Convention Center, and parking is free at metered parking. Enter through the Lakeside entrance. If you can't be there right at 9 am, if you arrive by 10, you should still be able to participate. We're trying to get a "critical mass" of Mather supported to attend & vote. Bring friends, or send friends if you can't attend.

Click here for more information on the William G. Mather Museum


Salties sold for demolition

11/23
The following vessels, all visitors to Great Lakes ports under at least one name were sold a few months ago to be broken up according to the October edition of "Marine News" published by the World Ship Society. In brackets next to the name of the vessel is the year the ship transited the St. Lawrence Seaway for the first time bound for the Lakes.

The Freedom type LLS 2 ex Platon was beached at Alang, India 18/5/2002. In the Seaway as Marabou (1982) and Pluto (1987).
Lima 1 arrived at Kolkata, India previous to 31/12/2001. In the Seaway as Roseline (1975), Dominique L.D. (1983) and La Chesnais (1986).
The B26 type Orgullo was beached at Alang 6/7/2002. In the Seaway under four previous names. First as Upwey Grange (1976), then Lily Village (1983), Puggi (1988) and Ranger (1993).
Salina arrived Alang 28/6/2002. In the Seaway under all ex names. Felicia V (1980), Kapitan Medvedev (1996) and Lynx (1996). As Kapitan Medvedev, she had been renamed Lynx at Duluth in July 1996.
The Fortune type Spyros was beached at Alang 20/7/2002. In the Seaway as Anangel Glory (1974).
Strength was beached at Alang 27/7/2002. In the Seaway as Jalamudra (1981).
Golden was beached at Alang 30/7/2002. In the Seaway as Chase One (1978). There is a typo error in Marine News. The vessel was named Antares until 1978, not 1979 as reported.

Also reported sold for demolition was the Marindus type Samos. Beached at Alang 2/5/2002, she had been built by Marine Industries of Sorel in 1978 as Marindus Trois-Rivières. Laid up upon completion, she was sold in 1979 to Dutch interests and renamed Amstelsluis. She never transited the Seaway. Only two Marindus ships visited Great Lakes ports, the fleetmates Babor and Biban, both flying the flag of Algeria. They are still in service under their original name.

Reported by: René Beauchamp


Coast Guard rescues three duck hunters

11/23
The U.S. Coast Guard rescued three duck hunters in the Ashtabula river entrance Friday. The three hunters were in a 12-foot boat when it started taking on water and capsized. One hunter swam to the shore and called for help.

Coast Guard Station Ashtabula sent a 30-foot rescue boat to pick up the two still in the water, and a truck to get the hunter who had swum to shore. All three were brought to Coast Guard Station Ashtabula where local EMS was waiting to transport them to a local hospital.

Reported by: Scott Bronson


Goderich News

11/23
Docking at the salt mine to load on Wednesday was the Agawa Canyon. Her load was destined for Milwaukee and St. Joseph. The Algoway loaded for a repeat trip to Manistee, Michigan on Thursday. More ships are expected in the next few days. The two Le Groupe Ocean tugs remain docked in the harbor, with no activity observed on either one.

Reported by: Lisa Stuparyk


Kingston Update

11/23
Thursday was a day of heavy traffic in western Seaway at Kingston. The tug Jerry Newberry and barge, Jean Parisien, Pineglen, Spar Ruby, Mapleglen, CSL Tadoussac, Commander, English River, Stephen B. Roman, Spar Garnet, Kastor P, and Lykes Energizer, area were westbound in the system. The Marie Jeanne and BBC Scotland were eastbound.

The English River was loaded with cement and headed for Oswego. The Stephen B. Roman was also bound for Oswego. The Algosoo anchored of Bath waiting for the English River to depart. She is unloading and expected to be in port for 30 hours. Her next trip will be in ballast for Point Noire.

On the dry-dock, is the Papoose III is having a shaft bearing replaced. This is the last local tour boat to go to winter lay-up.

The local Coast Guard base has been busy. In the last two weeks they have rescued three hunters from Hickory Island and assisted in a medevac, by helicopter, from the Metis, near Waupoos Island.

Reported by: Ron Walsh


Today in Great Lakes History - November 23

After discharging her cargo, the SAMUEL MATHER (6) proceeded to De Tour, MI laying up for the last time at the Pickands Mather Coal Dock on November 23, 1981.

In 1987 the ROGERS CITY (2) was towed out of Menominee, MI for scrapping in Brazil.

STADACONA (3)'s sea trials were completed on November 23, 1952 and was delivered to CSL the next day.

On 23 November 1872, Capt. W. B. Morley launched the propeller JARVIS Lord at Marine City, MI. Her dimensions were 193' x 33' x 18', 1000 tons. She was the first double decker built at Marine City. Her engine was from Wm. Cowie of Detroit.

On 23 November 1867, S. A. CLARK (wooden propeller tug, 12 t, built in 1863 at Buffalo) was in Buffalo's harbor when her boiler exploded and she sank.

November 23, 1930 - The Ann Arbor carferry Wabash grounded in Betsie Lake. She bent her rudder stock and her steering engine was broken up.

On 23 November 1853, the wooden schooner PALESTINE was bound from Kingston to Cleveland with railroad iron at about the same time as the like-laden schooner ONTONAGON. Eight miles west of Rochester, New York, both vessels ran ashore, were pounded heavily by the waves and sank. Both vessels reported erratic variations in their compasses. The cargoes were removed and ONTONAGON was pulled free on 7 December, but PALESTINE was abandoned. A similar event happened with two other iron-laden vessels a few years previously at the same place.

On 23 November 1853, the Ward Line's wooden side-wheeler HURON struck an unseen obstruction in the Saginaw River and sank. She was raised on 12 December 1853, towed to Detroit and repaired at a cost of $12,000. She was then transferred to Lake Michigan to handle the cross-lake traffic given the Ward Line by the Michigan Central Railroad.
Photo of the Huron from the Father Dowling Collection.

The carferry GRAND HAVEN was sold to the West India Fruit & Steamship Co., Norfolk, VA in 1946 and was brought down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, LA for reconditioning before reaching Port Everglades and the Port of Palm Beach, FL. She was brought back to the Lakes and locked upbound through the Welland Canal on 23 Nov 1964. She was intended for roll on/roll off carrier service to haul truck trailers laden with steel coils from Stelco's plant at Hamilton, Ont.

The CSL NIAGARA passed Port Huron, MI on 23 Nov 1999 on her way to Thunder Bay to load grain. This was her first trip to the upper lakes since the vessel was launched in June 1999.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




St. Lawrence River & Seaway News

11/22
Finally leaving Montreal under tow for Hamilton was the ferry Dalmig on Wednesday. The lead tug was Jerry Newberry assisted by Progress. That ferry had been laid up in Montreal since April 18 when she was towed from Dalhousie, N.B. She has been owned by McKeil Work Boats Ltd. since last year. Built in 1957 at Sorel by Marine Industries Ltd., she plied the Seaway before under her original name of Pierre de Saurel in 1971 when she went to Kingston following her purchase by the Government of Ontario. Somehow, she was never used by them and was purchased by the Quebec Government in 1974 to go in service between Tadoussac and Baie Ste. Catherine at the mouth of the Saguenay River. Alterations were done at Sorel. Later on, she was renamed Dalmig, in 1987, when entering service between Dalhousie, N.B. and Miguasha, QC, thus her name. Dal for Dalhousie and Mig for Miguasha.

On Wednesday the pilot station at Pointe des Ormes, QC was moved definitively to the Port of Trois Rivières at section 15. The move was to be done on Dec. 1 but for some reason the date was altered by a week and a half. The pilot station was established there since 1949. It was situated a few miles upstream from downtown Trois-Rivières. Until now, section 15 at Trois-Rivières was used only during the winter months but from now on, it will be used year round.

At Trois-Rivières the Canadian Ranger docked at section 1 behind her fleet mate Canadian Trader. According to the coast guard, the next destination of the laid up Canadian Trader will be Azrew, Algeria.

Reported by: René Beauchamp


Algowood arrives in Toledo

11/22
Late Thursday morning the Algowood arrived off the coal docks in Toledo bound for a grain elevator above the Conrail South Bridge. The Gaelic tugs Susan Hoey and Patricia Hoey met the ship and began a tow of about six miles, through five draw bridges and under one high level bridge the ship had to ballast to clear.

successfully completing this, the ship was turned around in the basin and landed at the grain elevator to complete the three hour tow about 2:30 p.m. The following photos were taken from the lead tug Susan Hoey.

Tug Susan Hoey outbound the Maumee River at the Conrail North bridge to meet the Algowood.
Chief engineer Andy Trynka getting the tow lie ready as the tug Patricia Hoey arrives off the coal docks.
Algowood entering the Maumee River from Lake Erie in a light rain.
Algowood under tow at the coal docks.
Captain Rich Sibbersen and the pilot house of the tug Susan Hoey.
Captain Rich Sibbersen at the controls of the tug Susan Hoey.
View aft from the tug Susan Hoey's pilot house, note the video monitor of the tugs tow bitts.
I-280 new bridge cason under construction.
Algowood tow passes downtown Toledo.
Tug Susan Hoey heads the tow for the last bridge at mile 6 of the Maumee River.
In the turning basin the Susan Hoey holds the bow up river as the tug Patricia Hoey pulls the stern of the Algowood upstream to turn the ship downbound.
Another view of the tug Patricia Hoey pulling the stern up river.
Algowood arrives at her destination and her deckhands are swung ashore to handle lines.
Tow completed, Captain Dave Jones heads the tug Patricia Hoey through the Conrail South bridge towards the home dock.
Algowood safe and sound at the grain elevator 6 miles from Lake Erie.
Tug Patricia Hoey approaches the I-280 Bridge.
Toledo Shiprepair Company crews pumping the drydock for a sailing ship in the drydock.
Tug James Hannah and barge waiting for orders lies at the shipyard dock..

Reported by: Bill Hoey


Tug and Barge Traffic

11/22
On the St Clair River Thursday were three different integrated tug/barges combinations. The cement barge Integrity and tug Jacklyn M. passed along with the Presque Isle upbound. The tug Everlast and barge Norman McLeod were downbound that afternoon.

Reported by: Craig S. Zimmerman


Maumee in Saginaw

11/22
The Maumee was inbound the Saginaw River Thursday morning passing the Front Range around 9am. She continued upriver to the Wirt Dock in Saginaw to unload. Later in the day the Maumee departed, turned in the Sixth Street Basin and was outbound for the lake. She passed the Front Range outbound around 10pm.

Pictures by: Todd Shorkey
Maumee upbound clear of Lafayette Bridge.
Close up view.
Stern view.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Soo Traffic

11/22
The Cedarglen locked through upbound at the Soo Thursday afternoon with plans to anchor in Wiskey Bay. The delay was necessary to make electrical repairs to one of its generators. With the assistance of the tug Adanac, the Cedarglen was able to make the necessary repairs and was underway late that evening.

Reported by: Chris Nelson


Today in Great Lakes History - November 22

Scrapping of the SPRUCEGLEN was completed on November 22, 1986 by Lakehead Scrap Metal Co. at Thunder Bay. The SPRUCEGLEN was the last Canadian coal-fired bulker.

The FRONTENAC (4) while in ballast sustained major structural damage from grounding on Pellet Reef attempting to enter Silver Bay, MN at 2140 hours on November 22, 1979.

On 22 November 1869, CREAM CITY (3-mast wooden bark, 629 t, built in 1862 at Sheboygan, WI) was carrying wheat in a gale when she lost her way and went ashore on Drummond Island. She appeared to be only slightly damaged, but several large pumps were unable to lower the water in her hull. She was finally abandoned as a total wreck on 8 December. She was built as a "steam bark" with an engine capable of pushing her at 5 or 6 mph. After two months of constant minor disasters, this was considered an unsuccessful experiment and the engine was removed.

The CITY OF MILWAUKEE was chartered to the Ann Arbor Railroad Co. and started the Frankfort, MI-Kewaunee, WI service for them on November 22, 1978.

November 22, 1929 - The City of Saginaw 31 went out on her sea trials.

On 22 November 1860, CIRCASSIAN (wooden schooner, 135', 366 t, built in 1856 at Irving, NY) was carrying grain in a gale and blizzard on Lake Michigan when she stranded on White Shoals near Beaver Island. She sank to her decks and then broke in two. Her crew was presumed lost, but actually made it to Hog Island in the blizzard and they were not rescued from there for two weeks.

A final note from the Big Gale of 1879. On 22 November 1879, the Port Huron Times reported, "The barge DALTON is still high and dry on the beach at Point Edward."

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series




Russian Steel Producer Possible Buyer for Rouge Steel

11/21
The American Metal Market reported Wednesday that the Russian steel producer Severstal JSC has shown interest in purchasing Rouge Steel. According to AMM, a deal may be near. A statement from Rouge said it was interested in partnership opportunities, but would not comment specifically on Severstal.

Severstal employs 45,000 people at a steel manufacturing facility and several other subsidiaries. Rouge has been hit hard by a series of serious accidents and other financial problems which have curtailed steel production. As a major supplier to the automotive industry, the deal could mean a much needed source of cash and support.

Reported by: Scott Spencer


Ocean Reliance Downbound

11/21
The new tug Ocean Reliance and its barge cleared the Welland Canal Wednesday morning around 10 a.m. The pair stopped in Port Colborne Tuesday night for some type of repairs. The news tug and barge are headed off the lakes on their delivery trip.

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Oak was expected to depart Toronto around Wednesday evening.

Reported by: Gerry O. and Jimmy Sprunt


October Brings Fourth Straight Rebound in U.S.-Flag Float

11/21
U.S.-Flag Lake carriers hauled 11.8 million net tons of dry-bulk cargo on the Great Lakes in October, an increase of 6.7 percent compared to a year ago. October's increase marks the fourth consecutive month in which U.S.-Flag carriage has outpaced last year and has reduced the gap with 2001 to 2.8 percent.

It is important, however, to understand these comparisons in the proper context. The 2001 navigation season was beset with problems related to domestic steel production. Turn the calendar back to 1997, the last year of full utilization of the nation's steelmaking capacity, and the monthly U.S.-Flag float routinely approached or even topped 14 million tons. Continued reduced demand for iron ore and sluggish orders for aggregate from the construction industry throughout 2002 have kept four U.S.-Flag lakers idle for what now will certainly be the entire season, so the past four months are just the beginning of the voyage back to normalcy.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association


Twin Ports Report

11/21
Armco paid a rare visit Wednesday to the BNSF ore dock in Superior. Other traffic included Isa at AGP grain elevator in Duluth, Vlistborg loading at General Mills Elevator A in Duluth, and Columbia Star loading at Midwest Energy Terminal.

Some interesting visits scheduled in the next few days include Kinsman Independent, due Friday at Elevator S in Superior; James R. Barker, scheduled to load Nov. 27 at Midwest Energy Terminal with coal for Taconite Harbor; and Mississagi due at DMIR in Duluth on Nov. 23.

Occasional Canadian vessels continue to make their rare calls at the DMIR ore dock in Two Harbors. Algomarine is due there today.

Reported by: Al Miller


Marquette Update

11/21
The Charles M. Beeghly brought a load of coal to the Presque Isle Power Plant Wednesday, and then took on a load of taconite. Other ships expected during the coming week are the Kaye Barker, the Lee A. Tregurtha, the Algosteel, H. Lee White, and American Mariner.

Beeghly unloading.
Close up.

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Green Bay Report

11/21
Ships visiting Green Bay are increasing in number and in variety as the shipping season begins to wind down. The cement carriers Paul Townsend and tug Petite Forte with barge St. Marys Cement II visited Lafarge and Blue Circle on Wednesday. Amelia Desgagnes and John G. Munson have also recently called on the Port of Green Bay. The Sam Laud, Joseph H. Thompson, and saltie Stolt Aspiration are among the ships due in port over the next few days.

Picture by Jeff DuMez
Townsend unloading.

Reported by: Jeff DuMez and Jason Leino


Saginaw News

11/21
The steamer Saginaw was outbound Wednesday morning from Sixth Street in Saginaw after unloading overnight at the old GM dock. The vessel was passing through Bay City about 10 a.m.

Pictures by Stephen Hause
Saginaw outbound at Essexville Wednesday morning.
Closeup of bow.
Stern view.
Herbert C. Jackson upbound on Saturday.
Joyce L. Van Enkevort returning to Great Lakes Trader after taking on fuel on Saturday.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Toledo News

11/21
The American Mariner finished loading coal at the CSX Docks and departed around 7:45 a.m. Wednesday morning. The H. Lee White was waiting at the #2 Dock when the Mariner departed she proceeded to the #4 dock to load coal. The Mississagi finished unloading stone at the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock and departed around 9 a.m.

The tug Karen Andrie with her barge finished unloading her cargo at the Seneca Dock and also departed around 9 a.m. The saltwater vessel Darya Devi was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. There was also another saltie at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge departed from the old Interlake Iron Company Dock and proceeded to the Sun Dock to load cargo. The tug James A. Hannah with her barge, and the Joseph H. Frantz remain in lay-up.

There was a large sailing vessel docked at the riverfront dock The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will now be the Algobay on Saturday. The Jean Parisien and Calumet on Sunday, followed by the John G. Munson and Algomarine on Monday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Courtney Burton on Tuesday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Today in Great Lakes History - November 21

The PATERSON (1) was launched November 21, 1953.

In 1924 the MERTON E. FARR slammed into the Interstate Bridge that linked Superior, WI with Duluth, MN. causing extensive damage to the bridge. The bridge span fell into the water but the FARR received only minor damage to her bow.

On 21 November 1869, the ALLIANCE (wooden passenger sidewheeler, 87', 197 gt, built in 1857 at Buffalo) slipped her moorings at Lower Black Rock in the Niagara River and went over the fall. She had been laid up since the spring of 1869.

November 21, 1906 - The Pere Marquette 17 encountered one of the worst storms in many years while westbound for the Wisconsin Central slip in Manitowoc. She made port safely, but the wind was so high that she could not hold her course up the river without assistance. The tug Artic assisted, and as they were proceeding through the 10th Street Bridge, a gust of wind from the south drove the ferry and tug against the north pilings of the 10th Street Bridge. The Arctic, pinned between the ferry and the bridge, was not damaged, but she crushed the hull of a fishing tug moored there, sinking her, and inflicted damage of a few hundred dollars to the bridge.

November 21, 1923 - Arthur Stoops, the lookout on the Ann Arbor #6 was drowned while stepping from the apron onto the knuckle to cast off the headline.

On the night of 21 November 1870, C. W. ARMSTRONG (wooden propeller steam tug, 57', 33 t, built in 1856 at Albany, NY) burned at her dock at Bay City, Michigan. No lives were lost.

More incidents from the Big Gale of 1879. On 21 November 1879, the Port Huron Times reported, "The schooner MERCURY is ashore at Pentwater. The schooner LUCKY is high and dry at Manistee; the schooner WAUBASHENE is on the beach east of Port Colborne. The schooner SUMATRA is on the beach at Cleveland; the large river tug J. P. Clark capsized and sunk at Belle Isle in the Detroit River on Wednesday [19 Nov.] and sank in 15 minutes. On e drowned. The schooner PINTO of Oakville, Ontario, stone laden, went down in 30 feet of water about one mile down from Oakville. At Sand beach the barge PRAIRIE STATE is rapidly going to pieces.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history


Buckeye Sails

11/20
Tuesday morning the Buckeye departed Toledo Shiprepair after a brief stay for some type of repairs. The Buckeye sailed upbound and is due in Superior, Wisconsin on Thursday November to load ore for Indiana Harbor.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman and Frank Frisk




Unusual trip for the Callaway

11/20
The Cason J. Callaway arrived at Ontario Hydro Lambton Generating Station in the St. Clair River at Courtright,Ont. at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday to unload coal from Sandusky, Ohio.

Algoma Central Marine, Upper Lakes Shipping and Canada Steamship Lines normally handle coal deliveries to Lambton from Lake Erie ports. It is very unusual to see a U.S. flagged laker delivering to this facility, although the Callaway had a partial unload there in 2001. The Callaway was expected to depart upbound for Calcite, Mi. at about 6 p.m. Tuesday evening.

Reported by: Barry Hiscocks




Wagenborg Ships visit Menominee

11/20
Menominee, Mi. has been busy this week with wood pulp ships. On Sunday morning, the Vlistborg arrived at Menominee's K&K Warehouse dock. She departed Monday night making room for the Vancouverborg who arrived Tuesday morning. This was the first visit of the year to Menominee for the Vlistborg and the fourth for the Vancouverborg. At least two more Wagenborg vessels are expected in Menominee in the next three weeks.

Stern view of Vlistborg at K&K dock.
Another view.
Stern view of Vancouverborg at K&K dock.
Another view.
Vancouverborg's hatch crane.

Reported by: Dick Lund




Marquette Update

11/20
Things are picking up at the docks in Marquette. The Lee A. Tregurtha is due Tuesday evening, the Charles M. Beeghly will be bringing coal on Wednesday to the Presque Isle Power plant and then taking on ore. On Friday the Kaye Barker will come for ore, followed by the Lee A. returning on Saturday, and the Algosteel on Sunday. Saturday will also see the H. Lee White bringing stone to the Shiras Steam Plant dock in the lower harbor, then moving to the ore dock for a load on Sunday. The American Mariner is expected to bring a load of coal to the Shiras Steam Plant on Monday.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Toledo News

11/20
The salt water vessel Darya Devi and another saltie were at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The Algolake was at the CSX Docks loading coal. There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

The tugs James A. Hannah and Mary E. Hannah with barges remain in temporary lay-up at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock north of the Shipyard. The Saturn was expected to depart from her lay-up berth Tuesday.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the American Mariner and H. Lee White on Wednesday. The Algobay on Saturday, followed by the Calumet, Jean Parisien, and John G. Munson on Sunday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Courtney Burton on Tuesday 26 Nov. The Mississagi is due in at the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock early Wednesday morning to unload stone.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto Update

11/20
The saltie Stokemarnes departed Redpath Sugar during the night and her place was taken today by the saltie Toro. Also departing Pier 51 during the night was the saltie Tecam Sea, which was in the Welland Canal Tuesday afternoon.

Laying over in Toronto at the firehall dock was the new U.S.C.G. tender Oak.

The unidentified tug that was brought up the Seaway by Techno Venture yesterday was Jarret McKeil. Both are now in Hamilton.

Pictures by Jim Gallacher
Toro unloading.
Another view.
Close up.
Bow.
Stern.
View over looking the dock.

Reported by: Gerry O. and Jim Gallacher




Aerial Views

11/20
Pilot and photographer Don Coles was flying over the Detroit River Monday and sent in the pictures below. All photographs are available for purchase. Don's company, Great Lakes Aerial Photos, is available for hire for any aerial photography need.
Tug Ocean Reliance and barge 550-3.
John D. Leitch loading at Ojibway Salt in Windsor.
Canadian Olympic.
Stern view.
Canadian Provider.
Algosteel.
Another view.
Algolake at Zug Island.

Reported by: Don Coles




Marine Mart December 7

11/20
Great Lakes Maritime Institute (Dossin Museum) Marine Mart, December 7 at Harbor Hill Marina foot of St. Jean St. Detroit, MI.

More than 30 dealers will be selling Great Lakes ship artifacts, relics, china, post cards, slides, models, paper, books, and much more. The show is from 10 am to 3 pm. There is a $3 admission charge with a 2-for-1 admission to Dossin Museum. Call (313) 852-4051 for more information or directions.

Look for me at the Know Your Ships table. Click here for a map.




Today in Great Lakes History - November 20

The Saginaw was christened at the Government Dock in Sarnia in 1999. Bonnie Bravener and Wendy Siddall broke the traditional bottle of champagne adding the second vessel to Lower Lakes Towing's fleet. The company then generously opened the vessel for tours to all those in the large crowd that had gathered to witness the event.

The EAGLESCLIFFE HALL (2) was launched in 1956 at Grangemouth, Scotland.

At 2240 hours on November 20, 1974 the ROY A. JODREY ran aground on Pullman Shoal, located at Wellesley Island in the St. Lawrence River near Alexandria Bay, NY. All of the crew were rescued. Early the next morning at 0305 hours she slid off the shoal, rolled on her side and sank in 150 feet of water.

RALPH H. WATSON was launched 1937.

On 20 November 1872, the sidewheel steamer W. J. SPICER was finally laid up and the crew dismissed. She had served for many years as the Grand Trunk ferry at Fort Gratiot on the St. Clair River.

On 20 November 1880, BAY CITY (wooden barge, 199', 480 t, built in 1852 at Trenton, MI as the sidewheeler FOREST CITY) was carrying coal when she was cast adrift east of Erie, PA by the steamer JAMES P. DONALDSON in a storm. She was driven ashore and wrecked. Her crew was saved by the U.S. Lifesaving Service using breeches' buoy. November 20, 1898 - Ann Arbor #3 left Cleveland for Frankfort on her maiden voyage.

November 20, 1924 - Pere Marquette fleet engineer Finlay MacLaren died after 42 years with the railroad. He was succeeded by his brother Robert until Leland H. Kent was named fleet engineer in 1925.

On 20 Nov 1871, the schooner E. B. ALLEN was sailing from Chicago to Buffalo with a load of corn when she crossed the bow of the bark NEWSBOY about six miles off the Thunder Bay Light on Lake Huron. The NEWSBOY slammed her bow deep into the schooner's hull amidships and the ALLEN sank in about 30 minutes. The crew escaped in the yawl. The NEWSBOY was badly damaged but did not sink.

On 20 Nov 1999, the Bermuda-flag container ship CANMAR TRIUMPH went aground on the St. Lawrence River, off Varennes about 15 kilometers downstream from Montreal. She was the third vessel to run aground in the St. Lawrence River that Autumn. The Canadian Coast Guard reported that she was having engine problems and the CBC News reported that the vessel's rudder was damaged in the grounding.

On Saturday morning. 20 Nov 1999, Marinette Marine Corporation of Marinette, Wisconsin, launched the 175-foot Coast Guard Cutter HENRY BLAKE. The BLAKE was one of the "Keeper" Class Coastal Class Buoy Tenders. Each ship in the "Keeper" class is named after a famous American lighthouse keeper.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Wolverine at the Soo

11/19
Monday afternoon the Wolverine made a rare appearance upbound at the Soo Locks. This comes less than a week after the Earl W Oglebay made a rare visit through the Locks. The Wolverine is headed to Silver Bay to load ore. Locking upbound just a few hours before the Wolverine was the Fred R White Jr. Behind the Wolverine was the Oglebay Norton and Columbia Star also upbound.

Upbound Monday afternoon.
another view.
Stern View.
Entering the Mac Lock as darkness falls.

Reported by: Scott Best




Ocean Reliance Downbound

11/19
The new tug Ocean Reliance and barge 550-3 were downbound passing Detroit Monday. The pair are on their delivery trip off the lakes for San Francisco.

Reported by: Alan Morris




Twin Ports Report

11/19
Alpena entered Fraser Shipyards on Monday for unspecified repairs.

Algoma vessels were plentiful in the Twin Ports on Monday. Algocen was loading at Cenex Harvest States, Algobay was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal and Algonorth was loading at the AGP elevator. Other vessels included Spar Opal loading at the Peavey elevator and Great Lakes Trader due late at night for BNSF ore dock.

Reported by: Al Miller




Goderich Update

11/19
The Agawa Canyon was in at the salt mine on Friday, loading for Milwaukee. The Algoway came in Saturday evening, loaded salt, and departed for Manistee, Michigan. The Oakglen was spotted Sunday afternoon unloading at the grain terminals. The Marie-Jeanne was at the other terminals Monday.

With the two Le Groupe Ocean tugs, pair of 'Glen' storage ships and two vessels at the grain terminals the harbor was full.

Reported by: Lisa Stuparyk




Detroit Report

11/19
Monday morning the Middletown passed upbound in the Detroit River. She was followed by the Canadian Provider a short time later. The Provider turned around in the river off Zug Island and headed down the river.

Canadian Leader was next, heading downbound. The Algosteel departed the Rouge River Short Cut Canal and followed downbound. The Montrealais was docked at the ADM elevator across the river in Windsor.

The Algolake with tug Carolyn Hoey entered the Short Cut Canal and tied-up at Zug Island to unload coal. John D. Leitch departed the Morton Salt mine in Windsor and turned in the River off the River Rouge power plant and went downbound.

An eventful day highlighted by three strait deckers in the river.

Reported by: Kenneth Borg and Doug Woggon




Toledo News

11/19
The Amelia Desgagnes finished loading coal at the CSX Docks and departed Monday afternoon. The Algosteel was checked down in the ship channel once the Desgagnes left the coal dock the Algosteel proceeded into the #4 Dock to load coal. The saltwater vessel Darya Devi remains at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The tug John Spence with her barge finished loading cargo at the B-P Dock and departed Monday morning. The tugs James A. Hannah with her barge and the Mary E. Hannah with barge remain at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock. The Saturn and Joseph H. Frantz remain in layup.

The Buckeye remained in drydock Monday at the Shipyard undergoing repairs. She may depart the drydock on Monday evening if the repairs are completed. The low water levels in the western basin of Lake Erie Monday may be a factor if the Buckeye would be able to leave the drydock.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algolake on Tuesday. The H. Lee White, and American Mariner on Wednesday, followed by the Calumet on Friday. There are no ore boats scheduled for the Torco Ore Dock at this time.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Welland Traffic

11/19
Late Monday afternoon the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was upbound at Lock 7 while her fleet mate Atlantic Huron was downbound below Lock 4. Also heading down in the canal were the salties Kapitonas A. Lucka and the Yarmouth. Upper Lakes vessel Canadian Miner was traveling light, heading up for another load of grain.

Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin departing Lock 7.
Passing Kapitonas A. Lucka.
Another view.
Stern view.
Kapitonas A. Lucka.
Stern view.
Yarmouth upbound.
Stern view.
Canadian Miner enters Lock 7.
Ready to lock through.
Waiting to depart.
Another view.
Departing.
Looking North from Lock 6.

Reported by: Alex Howard




Kingston News

11/19
The fall rush is on with several ships being delayed for pilots. On Sunday the Strange Attractor had to wait for a pilot at Cape Vincent. On Saturday the BBC Scotland and the Federal Asahi had wait, westbound, for pilots at Cape Vincent. The tug Traveler was anchored off Lynda Island as well.

The tug Techno Venture was westbound towing an unidentified tug. Monday morning Lake Ontario was only 17 cm above chart datum , which is 11 cm below last year. The Lake Temperature is 8 degrees Celsius, off Point Petre.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Mark Your Calendar

11/19
Great Lakes Maritime Institute (Dossin Museum) Marine Mart, December 7 at Harbor Hill Marina foot of St. Jean St. Detroit, MI.

The Harbor Hill Marina will again be hosting the annual Marine Mart from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The Marine Mart features dealers selling books, photographs, postcards, artwork and artifacts. For more information call 313-852-4051.

Look for me at the Know Your Ships table. Click here for a map.




Today in Great Lakes History - November 19

The The SAM LAUD was launched today in1974.

CONGAR (2) was launched November 19, 1945 as a) EMPIRE MALDON.

The keel for the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was laid November 19, 1942.

The MERLE M. McCURDY was laid up for the last time at Buffalo, NY on November 19, 1985.

On 19 November 1842, the wooden schooner BRANDYWINE was carrying flour in a storm on Lake Erie when she capsized and then drifted to the beach near Barcelona, New York. One passenger's body was found in the cabin, but the entire crew of 6 was lost.

More incidents from the terrible storm swept the Lakes in mid-November 1886. On 18-19 November of that year, the Port Huron Times listed the vessels that were known to have foundered in that storm. Here is the list of vessels that foundered as it appeared on 19 November 1886. "The barge EMERALD near Kewaunee, 5 lost. The barge F. M. DICKINSON near Kewaunee, 3 lost. Two unknown schooners (one supposed to be the HELEN) near Port Sherman. One unknown schooner near Hog Island Reef. The barge NORTH STAR near East Tawas, the fate of the crew is unknown." The list then continues with vessels ashore. "The barge WALLACE and consort on Choclay Beach, east of Marquette. The schooner SOUTH HAVEN near Pt. Sherman. The schooner MARY near Blenheim, Ontario. The schooner PATHFINDER near Two Rivers, the cargo and vessel are a total loss. The schooner Cuyahoga and two scows in North Bay. The schooner P. S. MARSH and an unknown schooner at St. Ignace. The schooner HARVEY BISSELL near Alpena. The propeller CITY OF NEW YORK near Cheboygan. The schooner KOLFAGE near Goderich, Ontario has broken up. The propeller NASHUA on Grass Island, Green Bay. The barge BISSELL near Kewaunee. The schooner GOLDEN below China Beach. The propeller BELLE CROSS and barges across from China Beach. The schooner FLORIDA on Marquette Beach is a total loss. And the barges BUCKOUT, McDOUGALL, BAKER, GOLDEN HARVEST near East Tawas.

The schooner HATTIE JOHNSTON sailed from Milwaukee loaded with 26,000 bushels of wheat on the night of 19 November 1879 and then a severe gale swept Lake Michigan. After two weeks, she was presumed lost with all hands. Aboard were Capt. D. D. Prouty, his wife and 8 crewmen.

On 19 Nov 1886, the steamer MANISTIQUE was towing the schooner-barges MARINETTE and MENEKAUNEE, all loaded with lumber, in a NW gale on Lake Michigan. The gale lasted three days. The barges broke loose after a long fight against the elements and both were wrecked near Frankfort, Michigan. 6 of the 7 aboard the MARINETTE were lost including the woman cook and her 13-year old daughter. The MENEKAUNEE broke up before the Lifesaving Service could get to her and all seven aboard died. When the Lifesaving Service arrived on the beach, they found a jumbled mass of lumber and gear and the ship's dog keeping watch over the dead bodies. The dog also died soon after the Lifesaving crew arrived.

EMPIRE MALDON (steel tanker, 343', 3734 gt) was launched on 19 Nov 1945 by Sir James Laing & Sons, Ltd., at Sunderland, UK for the British Ministry of War Transport She was sold to Imperial Oil Co. of Canada in 1946 and renamed IMPERIAL HALIFAX and served on the Maritime Provinces-East Coast trade. In 1969, she was purchased by Johnstone Shipping, Ltd. of Toronto and served on the Great Lakes. She lasted until 1977 when she was scrapped by United Metals, Ltd. in Hamilton, Ontario.
Images as the IMPERIAL HALIFAX from the Father Dowling Collection

On Friday morning, 19 Nov 1999, shortly after leaving the ADM dock in Windsor, the salty AVDEEVKA lost power in the Fighting Island Channel of the Detroit River. The main engine on the vessel quit while she was abreast of Grassy Island and she began drifting downstream. The stern anchor was dropped and then the port side bow anchor. She began swinging towards the middle of the channel with her stern outside the channel when the main engine was restarted and she headed back upstream for the Belle Isle anchorage. Once in the anchorage a team from the U.S. Coast Guard boarded the vessel to investigate. She was released the next day. It is reported that the vessel lost power due to main fuel valve being left closed after routine maintenance during her stay at the ADM dock.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Haida's Condition Raises Concern

11/18
As preparations begin for moving HMCS Haida from its long-time home in Toronto, some observers are concerned that towing the ship may cause leaks or hull damage. However, ship repair officials are confident the vessel can be moved successfully.

Parks Canada recently announced that it will move the historic warship from Toronto to a new home in Hamilton. First, however, the vessel will be towed to St. Catherines for $3.5 million in hull restoration and repairs at Port Weller Dry Docks.

Ross Thomson, field unit supervisor for Parks Canada's southwestern Ontario operations, said potential problems that could result from moving the ship are "very much a concern." The destroyer has spent the past 32 years moored in a landlocked basin at Toronto's Ontario Place.

Thomson said when Haida is towed, ex-naval personnel will be on board who will be in communication with escort craft by in case problems arise.

Canadian Shipbuilding and Engineering Ltd., parent company of Port Weller Dry Docks, won the contract to perform the hull repairs. The firm plans to tow Haida across Lake Ontario sometime after Dec. 15. The tow could take up to eight hours.

Project Manager Paul Couture acknowledged that towing the "somewhat fragile" ship out of its berth and onto the lake is risky.

"There's only a certain amount that we can determine about the extent of restoration and repair necessary until we get the ship out of the water," he told The St. Catherines Standard. "There are risks and we would be irresponsible to deny it, but these are calculated and knowing the expertise of CSE, we're very confident."

Even if the ship began taking water, it could survive if watertight compartments were sealed. One or more compartments could be flooded without sinking the vessel, said Commander Bob Willson, a former navigator on the Haida and a director of Friends of the Haida. Wesley Allan, vice-president of operations for Canadian Shipbuilding, said Port Weller's naval architects and engineers have crawled through the ship to examine the hull.

"At this point, we're satisfied with it," Allan told The Standard. "But before we get insurance on it, the insurance underwriter will request a salvage surveyor also to do the same thing."

Reported by: Bill Bird and Jimmy Sprunt




Buckeye Remains in Dry Dock

11/18
Sunday the Buckeye remained in drydock at the shipyard undergoing repairs. It is unknown exactly how much longer the vessel will remain at Toledo Shiprepair but it could depart early this week.

In other port news, the tug John Spence with her barge were at the B-P dock loading cargo. The tugs James A. Hannah and barge along with the Mary E. Hannah and barge remain in temporary lay-up at the old Interlake Iron Dock just north of the Shipyard. The Saturn and Joseph H. Frantz remain in lay-up.

The salt water vessel Darya Devi was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading Magnesite Carbonate. The Earl W. Oglebay was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore and departed Sunday morning. The Amelia Desgagnes was at the CSX Docks. She will start loading coal on Monday morning. The Armco is due in at the Torco Dock on Sunday evening to unload ore.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel, American Mariner, and Algolake on Monday. The H. Lee White on Tuesday, followed by the Calumet on Friday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Ore Dock may be the John J. Boland on Wednesday.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Thornhill loading grain at the Midstates Elevator.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Changing Ferries at Kingston

11/18
It's a possibility that visitors returning to the Kingston area might get confused when driving by the waterways with a view to the larger area islands.

For instance, those expecting to see the Amherst Islander on the run to Amherst Island would be surprised to see the Glenora ferry Quinte Loyalist in operation. The Amherst Islander, which is now at Pelee Island, was replaced by the Frontenac II. However, the Frontenac II, which recently returned to the area from Hamilton, is now in service at Wolfe Island, replacing the Wolfe Islander III.

Not to worry. The Wolfe Islander III is tied to the wall at her Barrack St. terminal for routine maintenance. In her place is the Amherst Island boat Frontenac II. The Quinte Loyalist is replacing the Frontenac II for her run. At Glenora the ferry Glenora is operating on her own.

Meantime, the Glenora had to be tied up for a while on Sunday to replace a clutch. By next week, all should return to normal.

Reported by: Brian Johnson




Saginaw News

11/18
The Joseph H. Thompson was downbound the Saginaw River early Sunday morning after unloading overnight in Saginaw. The Thompson was delayed slightly by an vehicle accident on the Lafayette Bridge, but continued on after traffic was cleared.

The tanker Gemini unloaded at the Ashland-Marathon Dock in Bangor Township Sunday before departing during the afternoon.

The Frontenac arrived at the Essroc Terminal in Essexville to unload clinker during the afternoon Sunday. She radioed a security call at 9:20pm stating she would be departing in 45 minutes stern first for Light 12 in the Saginaw Bay to turn and head for the lake.

Joseph H. Thompson downbound at Independence Bridge.
Close up of tug.
Stern view.
Thompson passing the Gemini at the Ashland-Marathon Dock.
Gemini at Ashland-Marathon.
Frontenac unloading at the Essroc Terminal.
Another view.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Welland Traffic

11/18
Sunday afternoon, the Canadian Mariner was upbound in the canal, making its first appearance since coming out of lay up. This could be her last year to sail, as she already has a towing latch installed on the bow. Also in the canal was the English River upbound below Lock1 and the Algoville was downbound above Lock 1.

Canadian Mariner upbound.
Close up.
Snow covered deck.
Slideing in.
Stack and rear deck.
In Lock 2.
Waiting to depart.
Departing.
Passing the Algoville.
English River below Lock 1.
Stern view.
Algoville approaching Lock 1.

Reported by: Alex Howard




Funds Sought for Restoration

11/18
A group attempting to preserve the Pointe Aux Barques lighthouse on Lake Huron this week asked Huron County commissioners for their support in seeking grants for the project.

The Pointe Aux Barques Lighthouse Society was organized last April to preserve the lighthouse. Members want to restore the structure to a late 19th or early 20th century appearance. Located in a county park, the lighthouse currently attracts 3,000 to 5,000 visitors a year.

To receive many public and private grants, the society must be officially recognized by county government. Society members asked the commissioners to approve two resolutions:

One that would require commissioners to instruct their attorney to develop a contract between the county and the society which would allow the society to help the county with restoration and maintenance of the facility.

A second that would place the $30,000 in the 2002 parks budget meant for the lighthouse in an endowed fund to be used for acquiring matching grants for the facility.

Hank Weitenberner, board of commissioners finance committee chairman, said commissioners can't make any commitment to the society until the requests for resolutions have been examined by the board's legal counsel.

Reported by: Linda Whitman




Weekly Updates

11/18
The weekly updates have been uploaded.
Click here to view




Today in Great Lakes History - November 18

The CARL D. BRADLEY was lost in a violent storm on Lake Michigan on November 18, 1958.

The CANADIAN OLYMPIC's sea trials were conducted on 18 Nov 1976. Her maiden voyage was on 28 Nov 1976 to load coal at Conneaut, Ohio for Nanticoke, Ont.. Her name honors the Olympic Games that were held at Montreal that year.

The bow and stern sections of the vessel that was to become the STEWART J. CORT were built by Ingalls Shipbuilding Division, Litton Systems, Inc., Pascagoula, MS, as hull 1173. That 182' vessel, known as "STUBBY" was launched on 18 Nov 1969. "STUBBY" sailed under its own power from the Gulf of Mexico through the St. Lawrence Seaway and Welland Canal to Erie, PA where the sections were cut apart by Erie Marine, Inc. and the 818 foot mid section was added -- making the Lakes first thousand footer. The ASHCROFT was launched November 18, 1924 as a) GLENIFFER (2).

On 18 November 1873, the tug CRUSADER was launched at 1:20 p.m. on 18 November 1873 at the Leighton & Dunford yard in Port Huron, MI. Her dimensions were 138' overall, 125' keel, 23' beam, and 12' depth. She was built for Mr. G. E. Brockway of Port Huron.

On 18 November 1842, CHICAGO (wooden passenger & package freight sidewheeler, 105', 166 t, built in 1837 at St. Joseph, MI) was struck by a gale between Ashtabula and Conneaut in lake Erie. She lost both of her stacks and became unmanageable when her fires went out. She was driven ashore about 3 miles east of Silver Creek, New York and was wrecked. About 60 persons were on board and amazingly no lives were lost.

On 18 November 1882, DROMEDARY (wooden propeller, 120', 255 gt, built in 1868 at Port Dalhousie, Ontario) burned to a total loss at the dock at Hamilton, Ontario when her banked fires overheated. She was owned by Burroughs & Co. No lives were lost.

A terrible storm swept the Lakes in mid-November 1886. On 18-19 November of that year, the Port Huron Times listed the vessels that were known to have foundered in that storm. Here is the list as it appeared on 18 November 1886. "The barge CHARLES HINCKLEY is ashore near Alpena. The schooner P. S. MARCH is ashore at St. Ignace. She will probably go to pieces. The schooner THOMAS P. SHELDON is ashore about 10 miles north of Alpena. The crew were rescued by the tug HAND. The schooner NELLIE REDINGTON is reported going to pieces at Two Rivers. Three of her crew reached harbor all right, but the other 7 men on board are in danger of their lives. The coal barges F. M. DICKINSON and EMERALD were driven ashore at Kewaunee Wednesday morning [17 Nov]. Three of the DICKINSON's crew were drowned, the other four floated ashore on a plank. The EMERALD's crew started ashore in the yawl, but 5 were drowned.

On 18 November 1881, the schooner JAMES PLATT left Bay City with a cargo of lumber for Chicago. However, she was wrecked on Lake Michigan during a terrible snow storm during the first week of December and never made it to Chicago. The storm lasted two full days and six of the crew survived but the rest were lost.

The ANN ARBOR No. 4 ran aground on Green Isle, the island in Green Bay to the north of her course between Sturgeon Bay and Menominee on 18 Nov 1913. ANN ARBOR No. 3 pulled her off undamaged after about 2 hours work.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Cuyahoga in Parry Sound

11/17
Winter has arrived in Parry Sound as represented by the Cuyahoga.

Once upon a time you could forecast what type of winter you would have by observing nature. For example, if the wooly caterpillar was high in the tree it meant lots of snow; and if the squirrel was high in the tree it meant the wooly caterpillar would be homeless and would freeze.

Not any more if you carefully observe local shipping you can accurately forecast the upcoming winter. For example, the Cuyahoga arrived in Parry Sound overnight and added 30% to a rather large pile of road salt. This means we will have a very slippery winter because not only is this pile really big but the salt pile at the other dock is equally huge.

It was -10 degrees (C) Saturday morning when the Cuyahoga left. Nearly time to call an icebreaker.

Cuyahoga turning in the harbor.
Out bound through the narrows.
Salt pile with the new delivery uncovered.

Reported by: Paul Beesley




Marquette Update

11/17
The American Mariner took on a load of taconite at Marquette on Saturday. The H. Lee White is due at the ore dock on Sunday after bringing a load of stone to the Shiras Steam Plant dock. The rest of the week will be a quiet week at the dock, but expected to pick up for the following weekend.

American Mariner loading.
Bow view.
Departing.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Oakglen in Goderich

11/17
The Oakglen was due in at Goderich Elevators Saturday afternoon for a partial unload before continuing on to Owen Sound on Sunday evening to finish.

Reported by: Dale Baechler




Port Huron/Sarnia Update

11/17
Four Algoma boats were tied up at Imperial Oil around noon on Saturday. Algoway and Algobay were apparently fueling while the tankers Algoeast and Algonova were loading or unloading cargo. At Sarnia's Government dock, the St. Mary's Cement II/Sea Eagle II spent most of Saturday transferring around 8000 metric tons of cement to the St. Mary's Cement/Petite Forte. Most of Sarnia's commercial fishing fleet seemed to be in port and as usual there was a steady steam of lakers transiting the river.

Algoeast.
Algonova.
Training ship Gray Fox.
St. Mary's Cement II / Sea Eagle II (left) unloading into St. Mary's Cement / Petite Forte.
Fishing tug Everett-N.
Fishing tug L&R.
Other fishing boats.
Rest of the fleet.
American Republic downbound.
Montrealais downbound.

Reported by: Tom Hynes




Welland Traffic

11/17
It was a cold day along the Welland Canal as the Canadian Enterprise made its second trip downbound in as many weeks. BBC Iceland made her first trip to the area, traveling upbound with containers visible on deck. Also downbound was the salty Regina Oldendorff, loaded with wheat. The Saginaw was unloading coke at Wharf 6 in Thorold.

Canadian Enterprise downbound.
Stern view.
BBC Iceland in Lock 3.
Containers on deck.
Close up of pilothouse.
Ready to depart Lock 3.
Upbound from Lock 3.
Close up.
Stern view.
Entering Lock 4.
Regina Oldendorff exits Lock 4 East.
Close up.
Stern view.
Saginaw at Wharf 6.

Reported by: Alex Howard




More Welland Traffic

11/17
Below are images from last Sunday and Monday.
Mathilde Oldendorff up lock 7.
Alpena at Lock 7.
Close up.
Stephen B. Roman up Lock 7.
Blue Wing up Lock 3.
Close up of bow.
Stern view.
Marie Jeanne upbound.
Close up.
Menominee at Port Weller.
Pilotboat returns to station.

Reported by: Dave Merchant




Fresh Water Whales?

11/17
Muskegon teacher Deb Harris could hardly believe what she was reading to her fourth-grade class. Whales in Lake Michigan?

But that's what it said in her "Michigan Studies Weekly," a newspaper distributed to 462 teachers statewide. The article read: "Every spring, the freshwater whales and freshwater dolphins begin their 1,300-mile migration from Hudson Bay to the warmer waters of Lake Michigan."

Harris called Utah-based Studies Weekly Inc., which publishes the teaching aid, but she said an editor stood behind the story.

However, a retraction was later posted on the company's Web site with an explanation that the false information came from a different Internet site intended as a joke.

"We at Studies Weekly want this to be a lesson to you," the apology said. "Not all Web sites are true, and you cannot always believe them. When researching, you should always look for a reliable site that has credentials (proof of truthfulness)."

Studies Weekly publications have a circulation of 1.2 million readers in third through sixth grades nationwide.

In reality, the closest whales get to Michigan is the salty estuary at the mouth of the St. Lawrence River, which is home to beluga whales.

Lake Michigan Whale Watching web site

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - November 17

On 17 Nov 1969, the RIDGETOWN (steel propeller bulk freighter, 557', 7637 gc, built in 1905 at Chicago, IL) was laid up at Toronto for the last time with a load of grain. In the Spring of 1970, Upper Lakes Shipping, Ltd. sold her to Canadian Dredge & Dock Co., Ltd. of Toronto. She was sunk at Nanticoke, Ontario for use as a temporary breakwater during the construction of harbor facilities in the Summer of 1970. Still later, she was raised and sunk again in the Summer of 1974 as a breakwater to protect marina facilities at Port Credit, Ontario.

On November 17, 1984 the EUGENE P. THOMAS was towed by the TUG MALCOLM to Thunder Bay, Ont. for scrapping by Shearmet.

In the morning of 17 Nov 1926, the PETER A. B. WIDENER (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 580', 7053 gt, built in 1906 at Chicago, IL) was running upbound on Lake Superior in ballast when it encountered strong Northeasterly winds. About six miles Southwest of the Rock of Ages Light on Isle Royale, the captain gave orders to change course for Duluth, MN. There was no response because the wheel chains had parted from the drum, thus disabling the rudder. Repairs cost $4,000.

On 15 Nov 1972, the MICHIPICOTEN (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 549', 6490 gt, built in 1905 at W. Bay City, MI) departed Quebec in tow of Polish tug KORAL for scrapping in Spain. The tow encountered bad weather and the MICHIPICOTEN broke in two during a major fall storm on the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Her forward section sank on 17 Nov off Anticosti Island the after section sank the next day.

The propeller JOHN STUART burned about two miles from Seewaing, MI at 9:00 p.m., 17 November 1872. She had been aground there for some time.

On 17 November 1887, ARIZONA (wooden propeller package freighter, 189', 962 gt, built in 1868 at Cleveland) was carrying oils and acid used in mining operations when her dangerous cargo caught fire as she approached the harbor at Marquette, Michigan in heavy seas. Poisonous fumes drove all of the crew topside, leaving the vessel unmanageable. She ran against the breakwater and the crew jumped off. The burning steamer "chased" the crew down the breakwater toward town with the poisonous fumes blowing ashore. She finally beached herself and burned herself out. She was later recovered and rebuilt.

On 17 November 1873, the wooden 2-mast schooner E. M. CARRINGTON sank in nine feet of water at AuSable, Michigan. She had a load of 500 barrels of flour and 7,000 bushels of grain. She was recovered and lasted another seven years.

On 17 November 1880, GARIBALDI (2-mast wooden schooner, 124’, 209 t, built in 1863 at Port Rowan, Ontario) was carrying coal in a storm on Lake Ontario. She anchored to ride out the storm, but after riding out the gale for 15 hours, her anchor cable parted and her crew was forced to try to bring her into Weller’s Bay. She stranded on the bar. One of the crew froze solid in a standing position and his ghost is supposed to still haunt that area. The vessel was recovered and rebuilt. She lasted until at least 1898.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley, and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series





Twin Ports welcomes new saltie Bluewing

11/16
Port officials and representatives of maritime businesses in Duluth and Superior visited the saltie Bluewing on Friday to formally welcome the new ship on its first trip to the Head of the Lakes.

The 581-foot Bluewing is the first of six ships built for Canfornav specifically for service on the St. Lawrence Seaway and Great Lakes. At a time when the number of Seaway-size ships is declining, the building commitment by Canfornav is welcomed by Great Lakes ports.

Before the start of the onboard reception, Bluewing's master, Captain Andriy Gulyayev of Odessa, Ukraine, welcomed visitors to his vessel on behalf of its 17 Ukrainian crew members.

The Bluewing began its first voyage in February 2002. The deck officers have been aboard ship for five months, although a new crew of deck and engine room ratings joined the vessel in Montreal, Gulyayev said.

Gulyayev said people around the lakes will be impressed with his ship and its crew.

"The Ukrainian seaman is a good seaman, in my opinion," he said. Pointing out the ship's computerized engine room, automatic tension deck winches and antipollution devices, he said, "You can see (it is a) good ship and crew."

This is Bluewing's third trip on the Great Lakes but its first to the Twin Ports. The vessel arrived in port Thursday evening and docked at the Cenex Harvest States grain elevator. It was loading spring wheat and durum destined for Ecuador. Local agent for the Bluewing is Guthrie-Hubner Inc. of Duluth.

Bluewing's new fleet mates will become a common sight on the Great Lakes by next season, Gulyayev said. Fleet mate Greenwing was launched last June, Cinnamon, Mandarin and White Knight are expected to enter service in 2003, and Kakawi is due out in 2004. All the ships except White Knight are named for ducks.

By the end of 2004, Canfornav expects to have13 new ships in service in addition to the 20 to 25 vessels already under charter for Great Lakes service.

View of Bluewing's bulbous bow.
View alongside the dock.
Looking up from the dock.
Ship at the dock. Structure in the foreground is one of the legs for the elevator's loading gallery.
Visitors head up the boarding stairs.
On deck, looking toward the bow.
On deck, looking up at the superstructure.
Captain Andriy Gulyayev chats in his office with officials from the Duluth Seaway Port Authority.
View from the ship's bridge.
Ship's helm. The large monitor enables the bridge watch to see what's happening in the engine room, where a bulkhead-mounted camera offers a 180-degree view of the engine spaces.
Another view of the deck from the bridge.
Religious icon mounted on the bridge.
Bluewing's galley crew lays out an impressive spread for guests.
Another view of the helm.
Chuck Hilleren of the Guthrie-Hubner vessel agency, formally welcomes Captain Andriy Gulyayev to the Twin Ports while Andy McDonough of the Seaway Port Authority of Duluth looks on. The area behind the dignitaries is a small office at the rear of the ship's bridge.
Bluewing's chief engineer explains some of the vessel's features to Andy McDonough of the Seaway Port Authority of Duluth.
Ship's officers and officials from Guthrie-Hubner pose on the Bluewing's bridge wing with Duluth in the background.

More information on the Duluth Seaway Port Authority

Reported by: Al Miller




Buckeye Enters Dry Dock

11/16
Friday morning the Buckeye was working her way up the Maumee River bound for Toledo Shiprepair to be placed in dry dock. The vessel developed some type of problem in the Number 6 ballast tank earlier this week while in he St. Marys River.

The type of repairs were unknown but dry docking would indicate water leaking into the ballast tank from some type of damage. Tugs from the Great Lakes Towing Company were expected to assist the Buckeye into the drydock.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Famed Destroyer heading for Dry Dock

11/16
The famed Canadian destroyer HMCS Haida will soon be towed to a new home in Hamilton for restoration before returning to service as a floating museum.

Dubbed Canada's "fightingest ship," the HMCS Haida served in World War II and Korea. It has been moored in Toronto as a museum for nearly 30 years.

The Ontario government has now formally transferred ownership of the vessel to Parks Canada. Moving and restoring the vessel will cost about $7 million.

Just getting the warship into open water will cost more than $1 million because it's currently surrounded by a causeway. Engineers must dig a canal for the ship to pass through on its way to a dry dock at Port Weller Dry Docks in Port Weller, Ont., on the opposite shore of Lake Ontario.

Most of the restoration work will focus on the vessel's hull. "The plating needs to be replaced along the waterline and under water in a couple of places," said Commander Bob Willson, a former navigation officer on the ship and now a member of the Friends of HMCS Haida,. "Parts of the decking need work and there's other stuff to do too.... It needs a fair bit of work."

Not everyone is happy with the vessel's move. Elsie Wayne, the Conservative defense critic, said the money spent getting the Haida to Hamilton would be better spent on the modern navy.

"I have no problem with spending money on heritage, but this is just ridiculous," she said. "They're fooling around with money that should be used for rebuilding our navy."

However, Willson said the volunteers and veterans who have helped run and maintain the ship are happy it will get its badly needed refit.

"We're delighted that the [federal] government has stepped in ... and come up with the money needed to restore her," he said. "The important thing is that the ship survives."

HMCS Haida is the last of the Tribal Class destroyers. Built in 1943, it became Canada's most famous wartime ship by sinking 11 enemy vessels, including four German destroyers and one U-boat. As part of the 10th Destroyer Flotilla, she was a member of the fleet that supported the Normandy invasion in 1944. The ship also saw action during two tours off the Korean coast during the Korean War.

Reported by: Bill Bird, Wally Wallace and Jimmy Sprunt




Straits of Mackinac ready for Sinking

11/16
The retired auto ferry Straits of Mackinac will soon be sunk about 10 miles off Chicago's Navy Pier to serve as a dive attraction and artificial reef.

The 201-foot vessel will be sunk in 78 feet of water. The ship will be sunk when waves on the lake are 3 feet high or less, as choppier water might make the ship sink sideways. Waves lately have been about 5 feet high, but calmer water is expected any day now.

"It will be the first time someone purposely sunk a ship to do this," said Joe Rojas, one of the divers in the Mackinac Project, which organized the sinking.

A dozen holes, each a foot across, have been sawed out of the ship above the waterline. After a tugboat tows it out on the lake, water will be pumped into the ship, pushing it down so lake water can rush into the holes and sink it.

The Straits of Mackinac ferried cars across the Straits of Mackinac from 1928 until the Mackinac Bridge opened in 1957.

Pictures by Bill Hoey
Straits of Mackinac at Kewaunee July 26, 2001.
Straits of Mackinac in service at Mackinac Island in 1961.
Interior view.

Reported by: Heart Smith




Mackinaw Tours

11/16
Friday the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw arrived in Owen Sound. The big ice breaker is in town on a good will tour in support of Festival of Northern Lights and Santa Claus parade taking place today. The ship will be open for tours Saturday.

Reported by: Peter Bowers and Ron Vanderburgh




Beeghly Loads

11/16
The Charles M. Beeghly arrived at the Escanaba ore docks about 3:30 p.m. Friday afternoon. The vessel docked to load taconite.

Loading.
Close up through the snow flakes.

Reported by: Eric and Sandy Chapman




Hunter in Oshawa

11/16
The Federal Hunter was docked in Oshawa Friday unloading steel wire coils, the cargo was loaded in Brazil. The saltie is expected to depart for the Soo early Saturday afternoon. The Dean Crane dredge is still at work dredging the outer harbor.

Pictures by Jim Gallacher
Federal Hunter unloading.
Bow view.
Wire coils unloaded.
Another view.
Stern view at the dock.
Lac Como and Atomic ready to assist.
Tug Americo Dean and barge.
Dredge working.

Reported by: Jim Gallacher and John Bray




Saginaw News

11/16
The Algorail was outbound from Saginaw shortly after midnight Friday after delivering a load of salt from Goderich at the Saginaw Asphalt dock in Carrollton Township. The vessel had arrived in the river about noon on Thursday.

The Invincible/McKee Sons departed the Saginaw Rock Products dock about 4 a.m. Friday and was outbound during the early morning. The tug-barge had arrived at the dock on Thursday evening. This was the Invincible/McKee Sons' second visit to the Saginaw River within several days. The pair had called at the Wirt Stone Dock in Saginaw on Tuesday.

The Adam E. Cornelius was outbound from Bay City at about 7 a.m. on Friday. Also calling this week was the Algoway, which arrived late Wednesday evening at the GM dock in Saginaw. The vessel was outbound about noon Thursday after waiting at the Sargent dock during the morning for currents to slacken in the river.

Earlier this week, the Wilfred Sykes was outbound from Saginaw early Monday morning.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Today in Great Lakes History - November 16

The tug portion of the Presque Isle was upbound in the Welland Canal on November 16,1973 en route to Erie to join with the barge.

FRED R. WHITE, JR. was launched in 1978.

On 16 Nov 1909 the JAMES S. DUNHAM (steel propeller bulk freighter, 420', 4795 gt, built in 1906 at W. Bay City, MI) encountered heavy seas and began hitting bottom where charts indicated 35 feet of water, even though she was in ballast and only drawing 17 feet of water. Rather than risk tearing the bottom out of her, the captain decided to beach her at Marble Point, just east of the Bad River outlet. After the heavy snow showers cleared, a message in a bottle was floated ashore to an observer.

The steel bulk freighters SIR JAMES DUNN and GEORGIAN BAY in tow of the Panamanian tug McTHUNDER arrived at Aliaga, Turkey for scrapping on 16 Nov 1989, 129 days after departing Thunder Bay.

On 16 November 1887, PACIFIC (wooden propeller freighter, 187', 766 gt, built in 1864 at Cleveland, OH) was loaded with lumber bound from Deer Park, MI for Michigan City, IN. After leaving the dock, she grounded on a shoal due to low water levels. The nearby Lifesaving Service took her crew off and then returned for the captain's dog. She was broken up by a gale on 19 November.

In 1892 the Ann Arbor #1 arrived Frankfort on her maiden trip.

November 16, 1990 - MWT ceased operations, ending more than a century of carferry service. The last run was made by the Badger, with Capt. Bruce Masse in command.

In 1981 the John Sherwin entered lay-up and has not seen service since.

On 16 November 1869, ADELL (2-mast wooden schooner, 48', 25 gt, built in 1860 at Milwaukee, Wisconsin) was driven ashore during a storm about a half mile below Bay View Pier near Milwaukee. Her skipper had every penny he owned sunk into that vessel. He was able to salvage her rigging and spars and left them on the beach overnight. The next day he returned and found that all had been stolen during the night.

On 16 Nov 1883, MANISTEE (wooden side-wheeler, 184’, 677 t, built in 1867 at Cleveland, OH) broke up in a gale west of the Keweenaw Peninsula off of Eagle Harbor, Michigan. This is one of Lake Superior’s worst disasters. Estimates of the number who died range from 23 to 37.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Sykes Grounds in Muskegon

11/15
The steamer Wilfred Sykes spent much of Thursday aground in Muskegon Lake.

The 678-foot Sykes entered Muskegon Lake from Lake Michigan on Wednesday evening bound for the West Michigan Dock & Market Corp. dock with a cargo of limestone. The vessel apparently strayed from the navigation channel into a shallow area off the Bear Lake Channel.

The Andrie tug Mari Beth Andrie arrived on scene but was unable to free the ship from the clay and sand bottom. The tug Undaunted, also on Muskegon Lake, detached from the barge Pere Marquette 41 and assisted the Andrie but could not pull the Sykes free.

Thursday afternoon the Undaunted returned to the Pere Marquette and pulled along side the Wilfred Sykes to off load some of the cargo.

These efforts allowed the Sykes to float free about 3:30 p.m. and continue on her trip Thursday afternoon. There was no reported damage from the grounding.

Pictures by: Christopher Van Oosterhout and Ike Stephenson
Sykes grounded on Thursday.
Working to free her.
Close up.
Wide view with the museum ship Milwaukee Clipper in the back ground.

Reported by: Ike Stephenson, Christopher Van Oosterhout, Mark Taylor and Al Miller




Salvage Monarch Arrives

11/15
After an eventful trip the tug Salvage Monarch towing the tug Seven Sisters arrived in Goderich Thursday afternoon. The trip began in late October and was marked by several mechanical problems on the Salvage Monarch and the Seven Sisters breaking free and drifting on Lake Ontario.

It is unknown what the tugs will be used for.

Tow enters the harbor.
Salvage Monarch.
Seven Sisters close up.

Reported by: Jim Bauer




Twin Ports Report

11/15
New or uncommon callers continue to appear at the DMIR ore docks this season. Earl Oglebay paid a rare call to the Duluth DMIR dock on Nov. 13. Edwin H. Gott is scheduled to make an unusual call there Nov. 17 followed by a rare call by Algomarine on Nov. 18. George A. Stinson, another uncommon caller at the DMIR, is due Nov. 19.

In Two Harbors, Algomarine is due to make a rare call Nov 15. St. Clair is due there Nov. 18 and Joe Block is due Nov. 21.

Several American Steamship/Oglebay Norton vessels have a full slate of coal runs scheduled well into December at Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior. Walter J. McCarthy Jr. is scheduled to load at least seven cargoes through Dec. 23; Indiana Harbor is scheduled for seven cargoes through Dec. 28; Columbia Star is scheduled for four loads through Dec. 21; and Oglebay Norton is scheduled for eight cargoes through Dec. 22, including trips to Silver Bay on Nov. 30 and Dec. 22.

Reported by: Al Miller




Trip up the Rivers

11/15
The pictures below were taken on a trip aboard the tug Shannon and barge Marysville from Detroit to St. Clair and Marysville.

Reserve downbound below the Lake St. Clair Crib Light.
Stern view.
U.S.C.G.C. 49424 downbound behind the Reserve.
Close up.
John G Munson upbound below the St. Clair Cutoff.
Stern view.
barge Marysville.
Another view.
Dredging on the St. Clair River.
Another view.
tug Sandra Mary at the dredge site.
Another view. Southdown Conquest & Susan W Hannah downbound in the St. Clair Cutoff.
Stern view.
Susan W Hannah.
Stern view.
Fred R White Jr downbound.
Canadian Leader upbound above Willow Point.
Stern view.
Algoeast upbound at St. Clair.
Canadian Transfer upbound at St. Clair.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

11/15
The Buckeye was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore. The tug Everlast with the barge Norman McLeod were at the Sun Dock loading cargo. The tugs Mary E. Hannah with barge and tug James A. Hannah with a barge appear to be in temporary lay-up at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock just north of the shipyard.

There is a large sailing vessel at the Shipyard, vessel identity unknown at this time. The Saturn and Joseph H. Frantz remain in lay-up.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Canadian Olympic on Friday. The Amelia Desgagnes on Sunday, followed by the Algosteel, American Mariner, and Algolake on Monday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the John J. Boland on Friday. The Earl W. Oglebay on Saturday, followed by the Armco on Sunday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Shipping Merchandise

11/15
Force 5 Promotions has updated their special sale section with many new items featured in a Pre-Christmas sale.
Click here to view




Today in Great Lakes History - November 15

The cargo mid-body of the then under construction GEORGE A. STINSON was towed to Lorain in 1977.

PAUL THAYER b) EARL W. OGLEBAY left Lorain on her maiden voyage November 15, 1973 light for Escanaba, MI to load iron ore.

On November 15, 1974 the W.W. HOLLOWAY struck an embankment at Burns Harbor causing extensive damage.

Departing Duluth on November 15, 1909, the BRANSFORD, encountered a gale driven snowstorm. She battled the storm the entire day only to end up on the rocks near Siskiwit Bay on Isle Royal.

On 15 November 1894, ANTELOPE (Wooden Schooner, 56', 32 gt, built in 1878 at Grand Haven, MI) capsized in a storm while trying to make harbor at Grand Haven, MI. 4 lives were lost.

November 15, 1924 - The carferry Pere Marquette was renamed Pere Marquette 15.

On 15 November 1875, the Port Huron Times reported that "there is little doubt but that the scow SUTLER GIRL has been lost with all hands on Lake Erie. She has now been overdue two weeks."

On 15 November 1869, W. W. ARNOLD (wooden schooner, 426 gt, built in 1863 at Buffalo, NY) was carrying iron ore when she was driven ashore near the mouth of the Two Hearted River on Lake Superior during the great gale of November 1869. The violent storm tore the schooner apart and she sank quickly losing all hands (11) including several passengers.

On 15 Nov 1905, the W. K. BIXBY (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 480', 5712 gt, later J. L. REISS, then SIDNEY E. SMITH, JR.) was launched at Wyandotte, MI for the National Steamship Co. (M.B. McMillan). She lasted until 1972 when she was wrecked at Sarnia, Ontario in a collision with the PARKER EVANS.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Buffalo Has an Extended Stay in Holland

11/14
After lightering in Ludington, the Buffalo arrived in Holland early Wednesday morning. The vessel remained anchored about a mile out until about 9 a.m. when she proceeded into Lake Macatawa. The boom was back in the stowed position by 2 p.m. after unloading two hatches worth of stone.

With the forecast calling for gale force winds on Lake Michigan, they decided to stay in Holland until the winds subside. Several members of the crew used the extended stay to enjoy an evening in the city of Holland. The next forecast was due in at midnight, if the gale warning persist, they may wait until morning. She is bound for Port Inland to load for Ashtabula.

Reported by: Dale Rosema and Bob Vande Vusse




Bluewing to Make Inaugural Visit to the Port of Duluth-Superior Today

11/14
The first of six new Canfornav ships built specifically for Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway trade—all but one of which are named after ducks—will make an inaugural visit to the Port of Duluth-Superior today (November 14), the Duluth Seaway Port Authority reported.

The Cypriot-flag Bluewing, named after the blue-winged teal duck, is scheduled to arrive under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge at approximately 5 p.m., then proceed to Superior’s Cenex Harvest States facility for spring and durum wheat destined for Ecuador.

Canfornav Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of Canadian Forest Navigation Co., Ltd., Montreal, ordered the six 27,000-ton bulk carrier newbuilds from the Wuhu Shipyard in China. The Bluewing made her maiden voyage in February of 2002, with sister-ship Greenwing getting her bottom wet in June of 2002. The Cinnamon, Mandarin and White Knight (the only non-duck) are due in early 2003, and the Kakawi is scheduled to enter service by August of 2003.

Each of the ducks in the series of vessels are matched with wood carvings of their namesake designed by master carver Roger Desjardins, Orleans, Ontario.

By the end of 2004, Canfornav, which took over operations from its parent company in 2000, expects to have in place a fleet of 13 new ships in addition to the 20-25 handy size vessels already under charter for Great Lakes service, ranking the company as one of the largest carriers on the Great Lakes.

“We want to support Great Lakes shipping,” said Errol Francis, Canfornav vice president of operations. “This has been our bread and butter for many years. This is where we are, and this is what we intend to support. Our vessels are painted green and are environmentally friendly. They are equipped with special holding tanks for retaining waste water after washing the ships’ holds in between voyages on the Great Lakes.”

Commanded by Captain Andriy Gulyayev, from Odessa, Ukraine, the Bluewing is 581-feet long and 78-feet wide. All crewmembers are Ukrainian, and local agent for the vessel is Duluth’s Guthrie-Hubner, Inc.

Reported by: Lisa Marciniak, Duluth Seaway Port Authority




Salvage Monarch Expected Today

11/14
The tug Salvage Monarch with tug Seven Sisters were moving upbound in the St. Clair River early Thursday morning heading for Goderich. The pair was expected to arrive in Goderich about 6 a.m.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Frontenac II Returns To Kingston

11/14
The car ferry Frontenac II departed Pier 14 in Hamilton on Tuesday headed back to Kingston. The ferry had been at Heddle Marine for her five year inspection since October 16. She arrived at the Barrack St. Ferry Terminal in Kingston early Wednesday morning and tied up at the south wall. The aft end propeller unit will be replaced tomorrow morning before she goes into service at Wolfe Island.

Reported by: Brian Johnson




Dry Spell Ends in Grand Haven

11/14
Another lull in local shipping activity has been broken by the arrival of two vessels. The Adam E. Cornelius arrived Tuesday to deliver a cargo of coal to the Sims Generating plant of the Board of Light and Power. The Wolverine arrived Wednesday morning with a load of stone for the Verplanks dock. The Wilfred Sykes was due in Wednesday night or early Thursday with a split stone cargo after a Muskegon visit.

Reported by: David Swain




Alpena Update

11/14
Paul H. Townsend arrived at Lafarge around noon on Wednesday. It came out of lay-up in Muskegon and loaded cement for Detroit. It left around 4:30 p.m.

The Alpena was also due into port on Wednesday before midnight. The Sam Laud came into Lafarge to unload coal Wednesday afternoon. The American Republic is due in Thursday morning at Lafarge to unload coal also.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Cresswell in Milwaukee

11/14
The Peter R. Cresswell arrived in Milwaukee at 1 a.m. Wednesday to unload salt. She had a split load of industrial salt and road salt, both of which she unloaded in then outer harbor. The Cresswell then shifted over to the Nidera Elevator in the inner harbor where she will spend a few days taking on a load of soy beans for Hamilton, Ont.

Fleet Mate John B. Aird had been at the Nidera Elevator and departed Tuesday. Her load took longer than normal due to mechanical problems at the elevator.

Reported by: Jim Zeirke




Search ended for missing Cessna bound for Beaver Island

11/14
Tuesday afternoon the Coast Guard District Nine Command Center ended its search for an aircraft missing since Sunday afternoon. The plane was being flown from Fond du Lac, WI to Beaver Island, MI.

The aircraft is a Cessna 175 with the tail number N7091M. Reported aboard are Melvin Bellamy and his wife Judy Bellamy from Beaver Island.

The Bellamy's were returning to Beaver Island after attending a Marine Corps Ball in Missouri. They were last seen fueling their aircraft in Fond du Lac at 4:42 pm central time, Sunday. The flight time from Fond du Lac to Beaver Island is approximately two hours.

The search continued into Tuesday afternoon based on amplifying information from a concerned citizen living near Fairport, MI. They reported seeing a low flying aircraft Sunday evening near their home.

Michigan and Wisconsin Civil Air Patrol are continuing their search at least until nightfall, 12 November. In most cases of this nature, the Civil Air Patrol organizes and directs the over-land portion of a search. The Coast Guard can then focus their attention on the possibility of finding survivors in the water.

The estimated possible survival time for a person in the waters of Lake Michigan is six hours. This is based on current air and water temperatures, wind, and the survival equipment worn by the persons involved

Reported by: Paul Roszkowski




Toledo News

11/14
The Algosteel was at the CSX Docks loading coal. The Charles M. Beeghly was at the CSX #2 Dock waiting to follow. The tug James A. Hannah with her barge is at the old Interlake Iron Dock, while the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge has now moved to the riverfront dock of the Shipyard. The Joseph H. Frantz and Saturn remain in lay-up at their respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Canadian Olympic on Thursday. The Amelia Desgagnes on Sunday, followed by the Algosteel, American Mariner, and Algolake on Monday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will now be the Buckeye on Thursday to unload what’s left of her ore cargo that was not transferred to the Earl W. Oglebay near the Soo recently. The John J. Boland on Friday, followed by the Earl W. Oglebay on Saturday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - November 14

The ALGOBAY (steel propeller bulk freighter, 719', 22466 gt, built at Collingwood, ON in 1978) departed Sept Iles, Que. on 14 Nov 1978 with an iron ore pellet cargo for Sydney, N.S. when she collided with the 90,000 ton Italian-flag ore carrier CIELO BIANCO. The Collingwood-built tug POINTE MARGUERITE, which was towing the big salty, was unfortunately crushed between the two vessels and sank, killing two crew members.

On November 14, 1934 the WILLIAM A. REISS grounded off Sheboygan, she was declared a constructive total loss.

Cracks across the ENDERS M. VOORHEES' spar deck were first noticed in a storm on Lake Superior November 14, 1942. Her fleetmate NORMAN B. REAM came to her assistance by releasing storm oil which helped calm the seas so the crew of the VOORHEES could run cables the length of her deck and winch them tight to arrest the cracking. She proceeded to the Soo escorted by the REAM and later sailed to the Great Lake Engineering Works for repairs.

The THOMAS WILSON (2) was launched November 14, 1942.

The MESQUITE was launched November 14, 1942 at a cost of $894,000.

On November 14, 1952, the Sparrows Point (now Buckeye) entered service.

On 14 November 1879, C. G. BREED (2 mast wooden schooner, 140', 385 t, built in 1862 at Milwaukee) was carrying 24,000 bushels of wheat from Detroit to Buffalo when she capsized and sank in a sudden squall near Ashtabula, OH in Lake Erie. 5 lives were lost, but 3 were saved. The 3 survivors were rescued by 3 different vessels. In 1940 following the Armistice Day Storm, The PM32 was freed by the tug John F. Cushing assisted by the PM 21.

In 1990 Glen Bowden (of MWT) announced that he would suspend cross-Lake Michigan ferry service indefinitely.

On 14 November 1886, the steamer BELLE WILSON was crossing Lake Ontario with a load of 11,800 bushels of oats when a severe gale and snow storm blew in. The vessel lost her rudder and the crew rigged sails, but these were blown away. Then they rigged a drag made of 600 feet of line and a log to help maneuver the vessel and they headed for Oswego, New York. This lasted for 12 hours, but the chain parted at 3:00 AM and the vessel was driven ashore at Ford's Shoals, 4 miles east of Oswego harbor. No lives were lost.

On 14 November 1892, the 2-mast, 95’ wooden schooner MINNIE DAVIS was rammed on a dark night by the 2-mast, 117’ wooden schooner HUNTER SAVIDGE near Amherstburg, Ontario. The DAVIS sank, but no lives were lost. The wreckage was removed in May, 1893.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Buckeye off Loads for Repairs

11/13
Tuesday morning the Buckeye was offloading part of her cargo into fleet mate Earl W. Oglebay near Squaw Island in the lower St. Marys River. The vessel reported some type of problem with the number 6 ballast tank.

After offloading was complete the Buckeye continued upbound to the Carbide Dock in Soo, MI for repairs.

The Earl Oglebay was originally scheduled to load stone at Cedarville but will now continue on to Duluth to load more ore for the Torco Dock in Toledo Ohio. The Earl W Oglebay is an infrequent visitor of the St. Marys River.

Repairs were quickly completed and the Buckeye departed the Carbide Dock downbound shortly before 11:30 p.m. It is unknown if the repairs made were permanent or may require a visit to the ship yard.

Buckeye upbound near Mission Point.
Crane and equipment trucks at Carbide Dock .
Buckeye turning in the river near the Carbide Dock.
Earl W. Oglebay upbound.

Reported by: Brian Kloosterman, Scott Best and Jerry Masson




Salvage Monarch Heading for Goderich

11/13
The tug Salvage Monarch towing the tug Seven Sisters departed Port Maitland, Ontario Tuesday afternoon continuing their delivery trip to Goderich.

The Salvage Monarch developed problems on Lake Erie and was towed into Port Maitland by the tug Miseford late last week.

Early Wednesday morning the pair were traveling across Lake Erie off Port Stanley and could reach Goderich by Thursday morning.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Loan dispute may stall Lake Ontario ferry plan

11/13
Negotiations over a $14 million state-aid package for the proposed Toronto-Rochester fast ferry are near an impasse and likely will delay the project until 2004.

Early this week the Rochester Genesee Transportation Authority signed a loan agreement that officials said would pass the proceeds of a critical $6.6 million state loan to Canadian American Transportation Systems and at the same time relieve transit authority officials of their concerns about the deal.

But in a news conference following the announcement, Rochester Mayor William A. Johnson Jr. said terms of that agreement are unacceptable and obstructionist.

“There is no conceivable reason for this matter to drag on for this length of time, except that the RGRTA does not want to see this deal done,” he said.

As a result of the stalemate, it is unlikely the ferry will operate between Rochester and Toronto next August as targeted, Johnson said. Delays are not only jeopardizing the timely construction of the vessel but also the port improvements needed in Rochester to dock it.

The dispute centers on a contract that would pass the $6.6 million loan portion of the aid package from the state to Canadian American Transportation Systems through the Transportation Authority. That's necessary because the money cannot be directly loaned to the company.

Transportation Authority officials say they are concerned the authority would be on the hook financially and politically if the ferry service defaults on the state loan.

Reported by: Al Miller




Former Fireboat at Bay Ship

11/13
As reported last week the former Chicago Fireboat Joseph Medill was towed to Bay Ship recently for a brief stay before being towed to Algoma Wi. Once at Algoma the fire boat will be prepared to be sunk as a dive site for the Green Bay Dive Club "Neptune's Nimrods".

The Medill is 92-feet long, 23-feet wide and has a draft of 15-feet. It was built in 1946 at Christy Corp (now Bay Shipbuilding) in Sturgeon Bay. The fire boat was donated to the Nimrods by Mr. John Selvick owner of Calumet River Towing of Chicago.

After she is prepared for sinking, Selvick Marine of Sturgeon Bay will tow the Medill to the dive sight in Lake Michigan off Algoma Wi. and sink her.

In other news, the tug Ocean Reliance and barge 550-3 is preparing to depart Bay Ship for San Francisco. The tug and barge were built at the yard for off lakes use.

The retired fireboat Joseph Medill at Berth #3 Bay Shipbuilding.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




Coast Guard Resumes Search for Missing Plane

11/13
The U.S. Coast Guard resumed the search for a missing Cessna 175 Tuesday after receiving a new report on the aircraft's last known position. The new search area is five miles west of Point Detour in Green Bay. It will also include a land search in the area of Fairport, Mich.

Tuesday, a local citizen in Fairport reported seeing an aircraft matching the description of the missing Cessna flying at treetop level heading North-Northeast on Sunday evening.

Melvin Bellamy and his wife Judy, from Beaver Island, were returning to home aboard the Cessna after attending a Marine Corps Ball in Missouri. They were last seen fueling their plane in Fond du Lac, Wisc. The flight time from Fond du Lac to Beaver Island is approximately two hours.

Rescue helicopters from Coast Guard Air Station Traverse City searched more than 1200 nautical miles Monday. No sign of the aircraft or the Bellamys has been found.

Reported by: Paul Roszkowski and Al Miller




Sailors Evacuated

11/13
On Monday the barge Sarah Spencer stopping at Contrecoeur, Quebec to let an emergency crew onboard to remove a sailor who hurt his back shoveling grain in the hold. The emergency crew had trouble getting to the man in the hold but was able to remove him and transport to a hospital in Sorel. The Spencer was delayed for three hours but the sailor was reported to be in good condition at the hospital.

On Friday a crew member was evacuated from the Frontenac after falling 10-feet into the unloading tunnel. The Frontenac was anchored off Port Weller when the man fell and proceeded to go to shore where he was then taken to the hospital in St. Catharines. From St. Catharines he was taken by helicopter to Hamilton. The injured crew member was reported to be recovering in good condition.

Reported by: Laurent Coté and J. J. Van Volkenburg




Toledo News

11/13
The Armco was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore. The John G. Munson was due in at the CSX Docks to load coal on Tuesday evening. The Agawa Canyon was unloading cargo at the Kuhlman Dock.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel and Charles M. Beeghly on Wednesday followed by the Canadian Olympic on Thursday.

The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will now be the John J. Boland on Friday. The Earl W. Oglebay on Saturday, followed by the Armco on Sunday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Lake Erie Ports

11/13
The saltie Yarmouth was unloading at Pinney Dock in Ashtabula on Sunday. Her cargo was a powdery black material, which scattered in the strong wind.

In Buffalo the Herbert C. Jackson finished unloading grain and backed downriver past the Buffalo Naval Park, assisted by a G-tug. She initially turned her stern to starboard to obtain windage, then rotated her bow to starboard and departed westbound.

Yarmouth unloading.
Close up.
Jackson departing Buffalo.
Passing in the darkness.
Outbound at Naval Park.

Reported by: Dave Merchant




Today in Great Lakes History - November 13

On November 13, 1976 the TEMPLE BAR (e ALGONORTH) arrived at Singapore where she was lengthened 202 feet.

CONALLISON was laid up for the last time on November 13, 1981.

JAMES DAVIDSON entered service on November 13, 1920 when she loaded 439,000 bushels of wheat at Duluth, MN for delivery to Buffalo, NY.

The GEORGE HINDMAN (2) was in collision with the British salty MANCHESTER EXPLORER on Lake St. Louis, above the Lachine Lock in 1956.

J.P. MORGAN, JR. was launched November 13, 1909.

The HOMER D. WILLIAMS was involved in a collision with the steamer OTTO M. REISS at Duluth November 13, 1917.
In 1984 the WILLIAMS was towed to Thunder Bay, Ont. by the TUG MALCOLM for dismantling.

On 13 November 1870, the schooner E. FITZGERALD left Port Huron on her maiden voyage to load lumber at Au Sable, MI for Chicago. She was commanded by Capt. A. McTavish.

On 13 November 1883, H. C. AKELEY (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 240', 1187 t, built in 1881 at Grand Haven, MI) was carrying corn from Chicago to Buffalo when she encountered a heavy storm off Holland, MI. She took the disabled tug PROTECTOR in tow but let her go when her own rudder broke off. AKELEY anchored but started to sink when she fell into the troughs of the waves. The disabled schooner DRIVER managed to save 12 of the crew who had taken to AKELEY's yawl before she went down. 6 lives were lost.

Captain W.H. Van Dyke was born at Escanaba, MI on November 13, 1871 and spent most of his life on the Great Lakes (he joined the crew of a schooner at the age of 15). He first captained the Pere Marquette Line Steamer No. 8, then in 1916 he joined the Pere Marquette carferry fleet. His first command was the Steamer 15. Then for 10 years he served as master of the Steamer 17, and after the launch of the City of Flint 32 in 1929, he served as master of the Steamer 22.

On 13 November 1865, CLARA PARKER (3-mast wooden schooner, 175', 425 gt, built in 1865 at Detroit) was fighting a losing battle with storm induced leaks, so she was beached 400 yards off shore near the mouth of the Pigeon River, south of Grand Haven, Michigan. The local Lifesaving Service plucked all 9 of the crew from the rigging by breeches buoy after the vessel had gone down to her decks and was breaking up.

On 13 November 1888, LELAND (wooden steam barge, 148’, 366 gt, built in 1873 at New Jerusalem, Ohio) burned at Huron, Ohio. She was valued at $20,000 and insured for $15,000. She was rebuilt and lasted until 1910.

The JAMES DAVIDSON (steel propeller bulk freighter, 587', 8349 gt, built at Wyandotte, MI in 1920) entered service on 13 Nov 1920 for the Globe Steamship Co. (G. A. Tomlinson, mgr.) when she loaded 439,000 bushels of wheat at Duluth, MN for delivery to Buffalo, NY. She was the last ship built at Wyandotte, Michigan
Click here for an image of the Davidson from the Father Dowling Collection.

The unnamed salty (formerly RANGUINI) arrived at Milwaukee's heavy lift dock on Saturday night, 13 Nov 1999 to load a large desalinization filtration system built in Milwaukee for Korea. The vessel entered the Seaway in ballast for Milwaukee on 09 Nov 1999. The following day, the crew rigged scaffolding over the side so the new name BBC GERMANY could be painted on the ship.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history.




No penalties expected in Fraser grounding

11/12
The U.S. Coast Guard is wrapping up its investigation into the grounding of the Fraser last August in Duluth and no penalties are expected to be assessed, according to the Duluth News Tribune.

The grain-laden saltie Fraser was departing Duluth in dense fog on the evening of Aug. 29 when it grounded off the city's Bayfront Festival Park. No one was injured, and the ship was released the following day without damage.

Lt. Mike Farrell of the Coast Guard's Chief Inspections and Investigations Department told the newspaper that human error caused the grounding. Navigational equipment failure, mechanical failure and weather were ruled out as causes.

The final report is now being reviewed. The case will be closed with no penalties assessed to the ship's crew, pilot or owner/operator, said Commander Hung Nguyen, captain of the port and officer-in-charge of marine inspection in Duluth.

The Coast Guard won't pursue any civil penalties against the owner/operator or the crew, the newspaper said.

"Basically, with the facts before us, we really didn't find any one person at fault," Farrell said.

Although the fog was extremely thick at the time, Coast Guard officials said it's not clear how that turn could have been missed -- particularly with the wealth of modern navigational technology, such as radar and global positioning system charting.

Reported by: Chris Graham




Pere Marquette 41 in Menominee

11/12
The barge Pere Marquette 41 and tug Undaunted arrived in Menominee Monday to unload limestone at Marinette Fuel & Dock. When she is finished unloading, she will then take on a load of large stones from the same dock.

Pere Marquette 41 docked.
Close-up of bow.
Clam shell used to pick up limestone with unloader in background.
Clam shell loaded.
Clam shell poised over hopper.
Stone emptied into hopper is transferred to conveyor belt for unloading.
Tug Undaunted.
Rear view unloading, stone pile (in center) waiting to be loaded.

Reported by: Dick Lund




Jumbo Vision in Twin Ports

11/12
Monday the Dutch heavy lift vessel Jumbo Vision was unloading a 520-ton piece of equipment destined for the Syncrude UE-1 oil sands project near Ft. McMurray, Alberta. The cargo was unloaded onto 12 axle heavy duty railcars. Each crane is operated by a man using a remote control around his waist which allows them to be on the dock to watch where they are positioning the load.

Also in port was the Algocape at the General Mills Elevator A in Duluth and the Kinsman Independent loading grain at the Great Northern elevator in Superior. The Burns Harbor was loading at the DM&IR Dock 6. This is a rare site, normally she loads at the BNSF Dock over in Superior, WI.

Jumbo Vision unloading.
View from the dock.
Burns Harbor at DM&IR Dock 6.

Reported by: Kent Rengo




Acushnet Arrives Home

11/12
Sunday the tug Acushnet arrived at the Gaelic Dock on the Rouge about 6 p.m. The tug departed MCM Marine in the Soo Friday morning. The tug was damaged in a grounding last summer in the St. Marys River. The tug spent the past few weeks undergoing repairs at MCM.

Reported by: Brian Williams




Marquette Update

11/12
The H. Lee White loaded taconite on Monday while the James R. Barker unloaded coal. The next ship due is the Lee A. Tregurtha on Tuesday morning. The next ship expected is the American Mariner on Friday.

James R. Barker unloading.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Toledo Update

11/12
The Canadian Transfer finished unloading potash at Andersons "K" Elevator and departed Monday morning. There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report. The Saturn, Joseph H. Frantz, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in lay-up at their respective dock sites. There are no vessels at the Shipyard at this time.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the John G. Munson on Tuesday, followed by the Algosteel and Charles M. Beeghly on Wednesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Armco and Buckeye on Tuesday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Montreal Traffic

11/12
Sunday Caribic Star departed her layup berth about 1:00 p.m. with the assistance of tug Ocean Jupiter. As the winds were gusting up to 30 knots, the river pilot requested the assistance of a second tug to move down the narrow confines of the Bickerdyke pier area. Ocean Intrepide arrived 40 minutes later and the tow moved to the turning basin where the two z-tugs swiftly swung the small cruise liner around to allow her to proceed downriver.

Tugs prepare to pull the Caribic Star from dock.
Tug Ocean Jupiter on the bow.
Ocean Intrepide on the stern.
Proceeding downriver from her lay-up berth.
Backing into to Bickerdyke turning basin.
Off Verchères, 90 minutes later downbound for Cuba.
Canadian Ranger towed from Montreal.
Coriolis II from Montréal to Québec City for winter lay-up. She is a research vessel owned by four Québec universities for oceanographic work. The vessel is the ex-Canadian Coast Guard vessel John Jacobson one of two built on the west coast in 1991. After less than a decade of service, she was taken out of service in 2000. Acquired by the universities to replace the 38 year-old small research vessel Alcide C. Hort, she underwent a four million dollar-refit to adapt her to her new role. More conversion work will be done at Québec City during the winter
Jumbo Vision upbound off Varennes for Seaway, Nov. 3.
Stern view.
BBC Holland upbound off Verchères for Montréal Nov.8.

Reported by: Marc Piché




Today in Great Lakes History - November 12

On 12 Nov 1964, the THOMAS F. COLE (steel propeller bulk freighter, 580', 7268 gt, built in 1907 at Ecorse, MI) collided with the British motor vessel INVEREWE off the south end of Pipe Island on the lower St. Marys River in foggy conditions. The COLE suffered severe damage to the port bow and was taken to Lorain for repairs.

On 12 Nov 1980, the ALVA C. DINKEY (steel propeller bulk freighter, 580', 7514 gt, built in 1909 at Lorain, OH) and GOVERNOR MILLER (steel propeller bulk freighter, 593', 8240 gt, built in 1938 at Lorain, OH) arrived near El Ferrol del Caudillo, Spain for scrapping in tow of the FedNav tug CATHY B. Demolition by Miguel Partins began on 28 Nov 1980 at Vigo, Spain.

In 1980 the PERE MARQUETTE 21 renamed c) CONSOLIDATOR, foundered in the Caribbean off the coast of Honduras a victim of the hurricane Jean.

On November 12, 1919, the PANAY, upbound on Lake Superior for Duluth, Minnesota in rough weather, was one of the last vessels to see the downbound JOHN OWEN which, apparently later the same day, disappeared with all hands.

November 12, 1980 - The Consolidator, formerly the Pere Marquette 21, sank 17 miles off the coast of Honduras during Hurricane Jean. No lives were lost.

On 12 November 1881, BRUNSWICK (iron propeller bulk freighter, 248', built in 1881 at Wyandotte, MI) was carrying 1500 tons of hard coal in a night of fitful squalls in Lake Erie. CARLINGFORD (wooden schooner, 155', built in 1869 at Port Huron, MI) was also sailing there, loaded with 26,000 bushels of wheat. They collided. After the skipper of BRUNSWICK made sure that the sinking schooner's crew were in their lifeboats, he ran for shore with his sinking vessel, but sank a few miles off Dunkirk, NY. A total of 4 lives were lost.

On 12 November 1835, the "small" wooden schooner ROBERT BRUCE was sailing from Kingston, Ontario to Howell, New York when she was wrecked west of Henderson, New York. Her crew of 4, plus one passenger, were all lost.

On 12 Nov 1886, the tug WM. L. PROCTOR (wooden tug, 104', 117 gt, built in 1883 at Buffalo, NY) left Oswego, New York with the schooner-barges BOLIVIA and E. C. BUCK in tow before a big storm struck. During the snow storm, the tug got lost and the tow line broke. Alone, the PROCTOR finally made it to Charlotte, badly iced up, but there was no word on the barges. They were presumed lost with all onboard.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Former Arcadia Departs for Cuba

11/11
Departing Montreal Sunday afternoon was the cruise ship Caribic Star. Her destination according to the agent is Santiago de Cuba for refurbishing.

From Cuba the vessel will to go to the Bahamas to begin cruise service. As Arcadia, after only a very few cruises in the Great Lakes, she was placed under arrest at Windsor in July 2001. Later on the same month, the vessel arrived in Montreal where she remained under arrest until this fall. In Early April the ship was renamed Caribic Star hoisting the Panama flag.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Lakes/Seaway Iron Ore Trade Up Nearly 11 Percent in October

11/11
Shipments of iron ore from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes and Seaway ports destined for Great Lakes basin steelmakers totaled 5.5 million gross tons in October, an increase of 10.6 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. On a season-to-date basis, the Lakes/Seaway ore trade stands at 40.9 million gross tons, an increase of 1.4 percent. Computed on a calendar-year basis, the trade totals 42.4 million gross tons, an increase of 1.7 percent.

Shipments of iron ore from Canadian ports in the Seaway to other North American destinations nearly doubled to 460,000 gross tons in October. For the year, this segment of the ore trade has increased 46 percent to 2.9 million gross tons.

All-rail deliveries of iron ore in North America fell 57 percent to 380,000 gross tons in October. Year-to-date, all-rail shipments stand at 7.3 million gross tons, a decrease of 16.4 percent.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




New Paint Job For Crapo

11/11
The cement storage vessel S.T. Crapo was recently given a fresh paint job at its dock in Green Bay. The vessel has been in lay-up since 1996 and this painting stirred rumors that the vessel might return to service. The company reports that there are no plans to return the vessel to service and the painting was done strictly for appearance and maintenance reasons.

Crapo docked at Green Bay in 2001 before painting.
2001 close up.
Fresh paint on Friday.
Close up.
Pilot house.
Forward end.
Aft cabins.
Rudder even received a fresh coat of red.
Wide view.

Reported by: Dick Lund




Veteran Great Lakes Steam Yacht Delphine Refit Nearly Complete

11/11
Built in Ecorse, Michigan by the Great Lakes Engineering Works in 1921, for the wife of car manufacturer Horace Dodge, the steam yacht "Delphine" spent many seasons as one of the grandest and most luxurious vessels on the Great Lakes before being requisioned by the U.S. Navy in World War II. From January 1942 till May 1946 as "U.S.S. Dauntless" PG-61 she was flagship of the then Commander-in-Chief of the U.S. Fleet, Admiral King. Returned to Mrs. Dodge after the war she was used again as a yacht on the Great Lakes until 1962 when she was taken to the East Coast. After Mrs. Dodge's death she was acquired by the Seafarers International Union in 1968 as a training vessel. Supposedly sold for scrap in 1972, she has in fact changed ownership a number of times and sailed variously from the East Coast to Singapore and back to the Mediterranean in the ensuing years (all under her own steam) before been acquired by the current owner. In refit since 1997 in Brugge, Belgium, the vessel has been completely rebuilt to modern passenger ship standards, yet retains both her luxurious interior fittings and her original quadruple expansion steam engines and steam auxiliaries although new boilers have been installed. It is expected she will sail for the Mediterranean by April 2003, being based out of Monaco for charter.

Resumes are currently being accepted for qualified steam engineers and deck officers holding valid STCW95 certification.

Visit www.ssdelphine.com for more information.

Reported by: Chris Wiley




Fleet Down One Hull On November 1

11/11
U.S.-Flag Lakes operators had 59 vessels in service on November 1, a decrease of one hull compared to a year ago. However, a comparison with November 1, 1998 finds the fleet down 7 hulls. A struggling steel industry and uneven demand for aggregate have idled a number of vessels in recent years. This season, four U.S.-Flag lakers never sailed: Elton Hoyt 2nd, Edward L. Ryerson, Richard Reiss and Joseph H. Frantz. The 1,000-footer James R. Barker did not depart its winter berth until June 29.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Seaway News

11/11
Former tug sold, as reported earlier the yacht ex tug Theodore was sold to Luc Lachapelle of Montreal. According to the new owner, she will keep that name. Theodore will winter at the maritime museum at St. Joseph-de-la-Rive. Amongst her several former names, she was Rosanne Simard when owned by Branch Lines. She is a product of the Canadian Vickers shipyard in Montreal and built in 1932.

Two vessels owned by the well known ship owners Briese Shipping are on their way to the Lakes. BBC Iceland should be up the Seaway by midweek and the second one , BBC Scotland less than a week later. Both will be on their first voyage up the Seaway. Actually, it is believed BBC Scotland will be on her maiden trip having been delivered lately from a shipyard in China. The vessel was launched under the name Knock and is going to Windsor. BBC Iceland is the ex Industrial Accord which was renamed earlier this year. She was built in 1999 and is on her way to Thunder Bay. Both were built by Xingang Shipyard at Tianjin. Another vessel in the fleet, the BBC Holland unloaded containers in Montreal last week and remained less than 24 hours in port, her next destination being Halifax.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Twin Ports Report

11/11
The grain trade remains brisk in the Twin Ports as the season winds down. On Sunday, Algocape was at the General Mills elevator. Clipper Eagle was expected late in the night for the AGP elevator while Kinsman Independent was due late at night for the General Mills S elevator in Superior. If past practice is any indication, the Kinsman Independent likely will clear the elevator some Tuesday afternoon.

Heavy-life vessel Jumbo Vision remained at the port terminal. Joseph H. Thompson was scheduled for BNSF ore dock.

Midwest Energy Terminal was unusually quiet Sunday and is expecting no vessels Monday. St. Clair is scheduled to make an unusual call there Tuesday for the season's last load of coal to Consumers' Power's Cobb plant. After that the heavyweights returns, with Columbia Star, James R. Barker and Mesabi Miner all due to load Tuesday.

Reported by: Al Miller




Marquette Traffic

11/11
The Charles M. Beeghly arrived in Marquette on a rainy/snowy Sunday and took on a load of taconite while the James Barker waited for her spot at the dock to unload coal. The H. Lee White brought stone to the Shiras Steam Plant dock, and will be making the move to the ore dock in the upper harbor on Monday.

H. Lee White arrives.
Boom out.
Unloading.
Beeghly loading.
Bow view.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Port of Indiana Burns Harbor Traffic

11/11
Below are recent images from the Lake Michigan Port

Algocen moored Cargill on a windy day.
Bigane fuels the Lee Tregurtha at Bethlehem Steel.
G tug pulls the Federal Rhine, Cort in background.
Tug Arizona works the Daviken Stern.
Tug Massachusetts Works the Daviken Bow.
The saltie Doxa D.
Bow Thruster of the Federal Rhine. Burns harbor in background.
Close up.
Saltie Kasteelborg.
Federal Rhine on her own.
Saginaw loads at Cargill.
Stern View.
Saltie Utviken.
Federal Rhine clears the dock.
Shenehon in Alpena, Mi. at the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory.
Shenehon Stern.

Reported by: Petar Zagorac




Saginaw Update

11/11
The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons was outbound from the Saginaw Rock Products dock at 8:30 a.m. Sunday. The Algoway was outbound early Saturday morning from the Buena Vista dock. The vessel had arrived Friday evening with a load of salt from Goderich, Ontario.

The tanker Gemini was outbound early Friday evening from the Marathon-Ashland dock in Bay City.

The tug Kurt Luedtke continued work around the clock over the weekend at a dredging site by the Consumers Energy plant at the mouth of the river.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Toledo News

11/11
The John J. Boland finished unloading ore at the Torco Dock and departed Sunday morning. The Canadian Transfer is due at Andersons "K" Elevator on Sunday to unload potash. The Saturn, Joseph H. Frantz, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in layup at their respective dock sites. There are no vessels in at the Shipyard at the present time.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the John G. Munson on Tuesday, followed by the Algosteel and Charles M. Beeghly on Wednesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Armco and Buckeye on Tuesday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toledo Traffic

11/11
Algomarine at CSX Dock #4.
Capt. William A. Hoey in command of the tug William Hoey.
tug Susan Hoey upbound Maumee River after assisting the Algomarine.
Stern view.
barges Roanoke & Windsor at the CSX Frog Pond.
Pathfinder & Dorothy Ann unloading at the TWI Dock with the Susan Hoey passing.
Another view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Jackson in Buffalo

11/11
Sunday the Herbert C. Jackson was unloading at the ADM Standard Elevator in Buffalo. By 9 p.m. the Jackson had departed the river and was outbound heading to Conneaut.

Pictures by Dan Sweeley and Jeff Thoreson
Jackson unloading.
Close up.
Bow view.
Unloading boom and hopper.
Flock of geese watches the Jackson .

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski, Dan Sweeley and Jeff Thoreson




Welland Traffic

11/11

English River Downbound in ballast.
Stern View.
Heavy Lift Daniella downbound below Lock 1, in ballast.
Stern View.
Inviken downbound above Lock 3, cargo of feeding peas.
Close up of the prop wash.
Close Up as the Inviken slides along the wall.
Stern View.
Algoville upbound Above Lock 7, in ballast.
Stern View.
Canadian Prospector in Port Weller.
Close Up.
Inviken downbound below Lock 1.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Toronto Update

11/11
Saturday CCG Griffon departed the harbor early and went out into Humber Bay to work on buoys. The cement boat Stephen B. Roman departed later in the day.

The schooner Empire Sandy was shifted from its summer berth at the foot of Spadina Ave. to its winter berth at Pier 4. She was assisted in the anchor positioning by the water taxi Robert L.

The only tour boat seen operating Saturday was Miss Kim Simpson. The Royal Canadian yacht Club, Queen City Yacht Club, Toronto Island Marina and Island Yacht Club tenders are still running.

QCYC recently retired its main tender Algonquin Queen after 30 years of service. A new tender has been built in Newfoundland and is scheduled for delivery this month.

The firetug Wm. Lyon Mackenzie was out for a run Saturday to the island and back.

The hobby tug Torville was out for a late season run on a beautiful fall day, as were several motor yachts and a handful of sailboats.

Island ferry service is operating on winter schedule, with one trip an hour to Ward's Island being performed by Ongiara. The airport ferry Maple City continues on its regular schedule.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Fitz Remembered at Split Rock

11/11
Sunday the Split Rock Lighthouse held the annual lighting of the lighthouse to commemorate the sinking of the Fitzgerald. The light was lit from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. with a crowd of about 300 people on hand.

At 4:30 the names of the crew were read by a staff member dressed in an authentic 1920's light keepers uniform. The bell was rung one time for each crew member and a 30th time for all lost mariners. The light was started as the name reading ended. After the reading, visitors were allowed to go to the top of the light for a close up look.

Reading of the names begins.
Light is lit.
Close up.

Reported by: Glenn Blaszkiewicz




Steel Survey

11/11
Below is a link to the Steel Village web site survey page. Be sure to vote on the important issues that effect Great Lakes Steel Manufacturers.
Click here to take the survey.




Shipping Merchandise

11/11
Force 5 Promotions has updated their special sale section with many new items featured in a Pre-Christmas sale.
Click here to view




Weekly Updates

11/11
The weekly updates have been uploaded.
Click here to view




Today in Great Lakes History - November 11

The Armistice Day Storm of November 11, 1940 was one of the worst storms in the recorded history of Lake Michigan. In all, the storm claimed 5 vessels, and 66 lives. The storm hit late Monday afternoon, November 11th, with winds of hurricane proportions. The winds struck suddenly from the southwest at about 2:30 P.M. and were accompanied by drenching rain, which later changed to snow. The winds reached peak velocities of 75 miles per hour, the highest in local maritime history. Some of the vessels affected were: City of Flint 32: Beached at Ludington, no damage. Jens Vevang, relief captain, in command. Her regular captain, Charles Robertson, was on shore leave.

Pere Marquette 21: Blown into a piling at Ludington, no damage, captained by Arthur Altschwager. She had 5 passengers aboard.

City of Saginaw 31: Arrived Milwaukee 6 hours late with over a foot of water in her hull. The wireless aerial was missing and her seagate was smashed by the waves. She was captained by Ed Cronberg.

Ann Arbor carferry "Wabash": A railcar broke loose from it's moorings on her cardeck and rolled over, nearly crushing a crewman.

The steamer Novadoc: Ran aground at Juniper Beach, South of Pentwater.

Two crewman (cooks) drowned when the ship broke in half. Seventeen crewman, found huddled in the pilot house, were rescued by Captain Clyde Cross and his 2 crewman, Gustave Fisher and Joe Fontane of the fishing tug "Three Brothers".

Conneaut (2) ran hard aground on Lansing Shoal near Manistique, MI. on Lake Michigan. She reportedly had lost her propeller and rudder. Two days later she was pulled off.

The SINALOA had taken on a load of sand near Green Island and was heading for Chicago through Death's Door on Wisconsin's Door Peninsula when the November 11th Armistice Day storm of 1940 struck in upper Lake Michigan. During the storm the SINALOA lost her rudder. The anchor was dropped but her anchor cable parted. In this helpless condition she ran aground at Sac Bay on Michigan's Garden Peninsula. Fortunately the stricken vessel was close to shore where the Coast Guard was able to rescue the entire crew. Declared a constructive total loss, her owner collected the insurance and forfeited the vessel to the Roen Salvage Co.

Anna C. Minch: Sank South of Pentwater with a loss of 24 lives.

William B. Davock: Sank with the loss of all hands.

The fishing tugs "Indian" and "Richard H.": Lost with all hands off South Haven.

On 11 November 1872, the schooner WILLIS collided with the bark ELIZABETH JOENS on Lake Erie and sank in a few minutes. The crew was saved.

On 11 November 1936, J. OSWALD BOYD (steel propeller fuel tanker, 244', 1806 gt, built in 1913 in Scotland) was carrying 900,000 gallons of gasoline when she stranded on Simmons Reef on the north side of Beaver Island. The U.S. Coast Guard from Beaver Island rescued the entire crew of 20.

On 11 November 1890, BRUNO (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 136'. 475 gc, built in 1863 at Montreal) was carrying coal to Cleveland with the schooner LOUISA in tow when she struck Magnetic Reef, south of Cockburn Island in Georgian Bay and sank in rough weather. No lives were lost.

On 11 November 1835, the 2-mast wooden schooner COMET was carrying iron and ashes on Lake Erie when she foundered in a gale, one mile northwest of Dunkirk, New York. Just her topmasts protruded from the water. All seven on board lost their lives, including a passenger who was a college student bound for Vermont.

In a storm on the night of 11 November 1874, The schooner La PETITE (3-mast wooden schooner, 119', 172 gt, built 1866, J. Ketchum, Huron, OH) was on Lake Michigan carrying a cargo of wheat and corn from Chicago when she sprang a bad leak and tried first to reach Ludington, then Manistee. Before reaching safety, she grounded off Big Point au Sable, eight miles from land, in eight feet of water. Previous to striking, the vessel had lost her bowsprit and foremast. After she struck, her main and mizzenmasts went by the board, and the schooner began to break up rapidly. The crew clung to the forecastle deck, and when that washed away, four men were drowned. Captain O. B. Wood had his arms broken by the falling off a square-sail yard. When he fell into the water, the ship's dog jumped in and kept him afloat until they were rescued by the crew of the steam barge CHARLES REITZ. Of the 10 crewmen, six were saved. The La PETITE was salvaged and repaired and lasted until 1903 when she was lost in another storm.

On 11 November 1936, J. OSWALD BOYD (steel propeller fuel tanker, 244', 1806 gt, built in 1913 in Scotland) was carrying 900,000 gallons of gasoline when she stranded on Simmons Reef on the north side of Beaver Island. The U.S. Coast Guard from Beaver Island rescued the entire crew of 20.

On 11 Nov 1999, the Maltese-flag bulk carrier ALCOR was examined by personnel from Transport Canada, the Canadian Coast Guard, a salvage company and the vessel's owners in hopes of forming a plan to save the vessel. She ran aground on a sand bar off the eastern tip of d'Orléans Island on the St. Lawrence River two days earlier. This vessel did not visited Great Lakes ports under the name ALCOR, but she did so under her two previous names, firstly as PATRICIA V and then as the Soviet flag MEKHANIK DREN. The Groupe Desgagne finally refloated the Alcor on 05 Dec 1999 after part of the cargo of clinker had been removed. The ship was then towed to Quebec City. Later, it was reported that Groupe Desgagne purchased the ALCOR from its Greek owners.

Below is a first hand account of the Storm of 1913 from the journal of John McLaughlin transcribed by his great grandson Hugh McNichol. John was working on an unknown vessel during the Storm of 1913. The boat was captained by John McAlpine and Harry Roberts as Chief Engineer. The boat was loading iron ore in Escanaba when the storm started on November 8th.
Tuesday, November 11, 1913
I got up at 12 a.m. and went on watch. We were above Presque Isle. It is still blowing hard and quite a sea running. Presque Isle at 1:45 a.m., Thunder Bay island at 4:30 a.m., Harbor Beach at 1:00 p.m., we are about in the River at 7:05p.m. It is fine tonight, wind gone down.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series





Heavy Lift in Erie

11/10
The saltie Jumbo Spirit arrived in Erie on Saturday to unload machinery. The vessel docked bow out at the Mounfort Terminal to unload.

This is the second Jumbo Ship to visit Erie in 2002, and the fifth saltie to visit in 2002. The other Jumbo was the Stellaprima, which loaded locomotives on July 4-6.

Jumbo Spirit at dock .
Machinery is offloaded. Note the railroad caboose, engine and car with machinery in these photos.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




October Is Stone's Best Month So Far This Season

11/10
A late season rally enlivened the Lakes stone trade in October. Shipments from U.S. and Canadian ports totaled 4.7 million net tons, the highest monthly total recorded this season, and an increase of 10 percent compared to a year ago. While improved market conditions spurred some of the upturn, stockpile building also factored into the increase. Time will tell if this momentum was maintained in November.

Thanks to October's strong showing, the Lakes stone trade is now two boatloads ahead of last year's end-of-October total. Earlier this season, the gap between last year was roughly 375,000 tons.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Anderson Unloads

11/10
Friday the Arthur M. Anderson was unloading coal at the Reiss 2 dock in Escanaba.

Unloading.

Reported by: Eric & Sandy Chapman




Marquette Report

11/10
The Great Lakes Trader and Joyce L. Van Enkevort loaded taconite in Marquette on Saturday. The Charles M. Beeghly is due on Sunday to take on a load, while the James Barker will be bringing a load of coal to the Presque Isle Power Plant. The H. Lee White will arrive late with stone for the lower harbor, and then move to the ore dock on Monday to take on ore. The Lee A. Tregurtha, American mariner, and Kaye Barker are all expected in the following days.

Great Lakes Trader loading.
Bow view.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Toledo News

11/10
The Algowood finished loading coal at the CSX Docks and departed Saturday morning. The Algomarine then shifted over from the #3 Dock to the #4 Dock and began loading coal. The Philip R. Clarke was unloading salt at the A.R.M.S. Dock when finished here she is supposed to go to the Kuhlman Dock to finish unloading salt at this dock site. When finished unloading salt she will proceed to the CSX Docks where she will follow the Algomarine loading coal.

The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge are in temporary lay-up at the Hocking Valley North Dock. The Saturn and Joseph H. Frantz remain in lay-up at their respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the John G. Munson on Tuesday, followed by the Algosteel and Charles M. Beeghly on Wednesday The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Armco and Buckeye on Tuesday. The Canadian Transfer is due in on Sunday at Anderson's "K" Elevator to unload potash from Thunder Bay, Ontario.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Sylvania inbound Maumee Bay bound for the C&O Coal Docks to load coal.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Update

11/10
The Algorail delivered a load of stone overnight and was departing at 9 a.m. Saturday with the assistance of the G tug California. The barge St. Marys II was upbound to the Blue Circle dock at the same time with the assistance of the tug New York. St. Marys docked at collision bend to allow the Algorail to pass.

The tug James Palladino and barge Kellstone I were departing the Cuyahoga at the same time and tied up at Dock 20 to fix a minor engine problem. She headed west at 10 a.m.

The American Republic arrived off Cleveland at 10 a.m. and headed upriver to unload pellets at ISG.

Algorail outbound.
Another view.
Bow view.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Hamilton Update

11/10
A converted tug now used for private use named the Prescotont was seen cruising Hamilton Harbour off Pier 4 Saturday afternoon.

At 2:10 pm the Spar Opal transited the Burlington Ship Canal into Hamilton Harbour where it was met by two McKeil Marine tugs, one being the Paul E # l and assisted into its berth at Pier 14. The Spar Opal was secured by 3:15 pm.

Over at Dofasco's iron ore dock, the Algoville was unloading while being refueled by the Hamilton Energy.

At Pier 25, the Nanticoke arrived approximately 2 pm and within half an hour was secured at the JRI facilities to load grain/soybeans. There were about a dozen transport trucks waiting at the dock ready to offload their cargo of grain/soybeans to the Nanticoke.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Boatnerd R/C Fun Run

11/10
Saturday was the first annual R/C Boat Fun Run at Fire Fighters Park in Troy, MI. The weather was pleasant for both operators and spectators.

Fleet in action.
Group shot.
'HO' scale Fitz dwarfs the 'N' scale thousand footers.
Scale ore dock.
Another group shot.
View from above.
G Tug based on the Lindberg hull.
Hurricane force winds (to scale) made for high waves. this model thousand footer had about an inch of water from taking a wave over the deck. It still was running.

Click here for more information




Edmund Fitzgerald

11/10
The EDMUND FITZGERALD foundered on Lake Superior during a severe storm November 10, 1975 at approximately 7:10 pm about 17 miles north-northwest of Whitefish Point, MI at position 47_0'N by 85_7'W in Canadian waters.
Click here for Fitzgerald sites.

Painting of the Fitzgerald. The painting shows what Capt. Bud Robinson experienced on Nov. 10, 1975 while first mate on the Tadoussac. The painting displays the Fitz after the eye of the storm passed, from what Capt. Robinson had seen that afternoon. The Tadoussac crossed the Fitzgerald and Anderson's wake above Michipicoten Island as they proceeded towards the North Shore.

The Tadoussac made the passage safely and proceeded on to Silver Bay. Over the radio that evening he heard the Coast Guard reports that the Fitzgerald was missing.
Capt. Robinson's gallery




Today in Great Lakes History - November 10

IMPERIAL ST. CLAIR was launched November 10, 1973.

The STEELTON (2) sailed on her maiden voyage November 10, 1943.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY, in her first season of operation on November 10, 1943 during a Lake Superior storm, she developed a significant crack across her spar deck and 12 to 14 feet down both sides of her hull. As the hull worked in the heavy seas, the crack widened to as much as three to four inches. The crew ran cables between the fore and aft winches that maintained a force sufficient to hold the hull together.

November 10, 1972 in the vicinity of the entrance to the East Outer Channel near Amherstburg, Ont. the UNITED STATES GYPSUM (2) collided with her towing tug MAINE and as a result her bow was punctured. The GYPSUM was beached to prevent further sinking.

WILLIAM A. IRVIN was launched November 10, 1937.

November 10, 1892 the carferry Ann Arbor #1 left the shipyard in Toledo, bound for Frankfort on her maiden voyage.

In 1895 the first major accident caused by cars coming free on the car deck of a rail ferry happened when the Ann Arbor #1 was on an eastbound voyage. Approaching Frankfort in a northwest gale, she rolled so violently that many of the car fastenings broke and the cargo began to move about on the car deck. None of the early rear-loading car ferries was equipped with a sea gate to protect the stern from the seas, and seven cars of flour and butter went off the deck of the #1 into the lake. Captain Charles Moody resigned from the Ann Arbor as a result of this incident and returned to the Pere Marquette and Goodrich lines.

ATLANTIC (formerly MANITOULIN, wooden propeller passenger/package freight, 147', 683 Gt., built in 1880 at Owen Sound, Ont.) was bound for Byng Inlet with lumber camp supplies when she was caught in a storm and grounded in the lee of Pancake Island in Georgian Bay. Her cargo and aft cabin were thrown overboard to lighten her, but she caught fire and was destroyed. Her passengers and crew took to her boats and survived.

On 10 November 1856, ST. JOSEPH (wooden propeller steam barge, 170’, 460 t, built in 1846 at Buffalo, NY) stranded and was wrecked near Fairport, Ohio. No lives were lost.

November 10, 1911 - The ANN ARBOR No. 4 was back in service after damaging several plates in October.
Image of the Ann Arbor No. 4

The tanker MARIA DESGAGNES struck the bottom St. Lawrence Seaway on 10 Nov 1999. After temporary repairs were made, the vessel was cleared to proceed to Hamilton, ONT to discharge its cargo of jet fuel. A survey of the seaway was completed with no indications as to what caused the vessel to ground.

On 10 November 1887, BLAZING STAR (wooden schooner, 137', 265 t, built in 1873 at Manitowoc, WI) was sailing on Lake Michigan in fine weather with a load of lumber. However, she grounded on Fisherman Shoal near Washington Island, Wisconsin even though the wreck of the steamer I. N. FOSTER was in full view on that reef. The captain was unable to locate a tug to pull the BLAZING STAR off and later she broke up in heavy weather. No lives were lost.

Below is a first hand account of the Storm of 1913 from the journal of John McLaughlin transcribed by his great grandson Hugh McNichol. John was working on an unknown vessel during the Storm of 1913. The boat was captained by John McAlpine and Harry Roberts as Chief Engineer. The boat was loading iron ore in Escanaba when the storm started on November 8th.
Monday, November 10, 1913
I got up at 12 a.m. and went on watch. We were laying at anchor. It was blowing a living gale and kept it up. They hove up the anchor near 10 o'clock but monkeyed around until after dinner. We got under way. We passed the Light Ship about 3, and White Shoal at 5:15.
More entries from the Storm of 1913 tomorrow.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Salvage Monarch in Port Maitland

11/09
The tug Salvage Monarch and tug Seven Sisters remained in Port Maitland, Ontario Friday. The pair passed through the Welland Canal Wednesday on the delivery trip to Goderich. The Salvage Monarch developed problems on Lake Erie and was towed into Port Maitland by the tug Miseford. It is unknown how long the tug will remain in port for repairs.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Canadian Ranger Arrives

11/09
The Canadian Ranger arrived in Trois-Rivières early Friday in tow of the tugs Jerry Newberry & Bonnie B. III. The Ranger docked with her fleet mate Canadian Trader at Section 2. The Trader is used for grain storage in port.

The grain elevator in Trois-Rivieres is owned by Upper Lakes and the Ranger may be used a storage hull.

The Canadian Ranger had been laid up in Montreal since Dec. 31, 2000.

Pictures by: Yves Richard
Canadian Trader.
Canadian Ranger.
Wide view.
Laviolette barge, former Canadian Explorer forward section.

Reported by: Yves Richard, Jimmy Sprunt and René Beauchamp




Canadian Mariner Departs

11/09
The Canadian Mariner departed her lay-up berth in Toronto Friday and was eastbound in Lake Ontario. The Mariner is heading for Port Cartier to load.

Reported by: Bill Bird




Iglehart Enters Dry Dock

11/09
Thursday evening the tug Ocean Reliance was moved from the floating dry dock at Bay Ship and placed at the Steel face dock.

This cleared the dock for the waiting J.A.W. Iglehart. The Iglehart was taken from Berth #15 and placed into the dock where she will begin her 5 Year Inspection.

Selvick Tugs move the Ocean Reliance.
J.A.W. Iglehart in dry dock (Stern View).
Bow view in dock.
Wide view of Bayship from across the Bay.
Bow Shot of Iglehart.
Tugs position the Iglehart.
Moving to the small dry dock.
Stern view.
Working to the dock.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle and Carl Grota




Lock Dam Test

11/09
The Sault Ste. Marie Canal National Historic Site of Canada reports that the much-anticipated Fall Swinging of the Emergency Swing Bridge Dam will take place at 9:30 a.m. on Thursday, November 14.

Located above the Canadian Lock at the Soo, the 107-year-old structure is said to be the only remaining emergency swing bridge dam in the world. It is designed to reduce the flow of water through the canal, allowing repairs to be made after accidents.

The dam proved its usefulness on June 9, 1909, when the steamer Perry G. Walker knocked out the lower gates. The released water from the lock pushed the Walker and two other waiting vessels back into the shipping channel and across the river.

The dam must be moved twice a year to make sure that its moving parts remain functional.

Passing the Emergency Swing Bridge Dam aboard the Chief Shingwauk.
Sign explaining the dam.
Diagram of how it works.
Text expalining the dam.
Swing dam in place.

Reported by: Ed Schipper




Saginaw News

11/09
The Wilfred Sykes was outbound from Saginaw on Friday morning after delivering a split load to the Wirt stone docks in Bay City and Saginaw. The Sykes had arrived on Thursday and had finished unloading in Saginaw late in the evening. After turning at Sixth Street, the vessel tied up for the night at the Sargent dock near the I-75 bridge to await better weather conditions.

Due to strong southerly winds, the water level in the river at the time was 10 to 15 inches below datum.

The Jacklyn M./Integrity was outbound from Saginaw early Thursday morning after unloading at the LaFarge cement terminal. The Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder was outbound from the Bay Aggregates dock near Bay City at about the same time.

The tanker Gemini was inbound Thursday evening for the Marathon-Ashland dock in Bay City.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Boatnerd R/C Fun Run

11/09
Saturday, November 9 will be this first Boatnerd R/C Boat Fun Run at Fire Fighters Park in Troy, MI.

Starting at 10 a.m., all boats are welcome and spectators are invited. The park is located off Square Lake Road east of Crooks, conveniently located off I-75.

Directions: From I-75 take Exit 72, Crooks Road. Turn right heading north on Crooks. First light is West Square Lake Road. Make a Michigan U-turn left (no left turn at light) onto Square Lake heading west. The park is a half mile down on the north (right) side.

Click here for a map




Today in Great Lakes History - November 09

The EDWIN H. GOTT's keel was laid November 9, 1977.

The aft section of the ATLANTIC SUPERIOR was launched November 9, 1981.

In the fall of 1962 the W.F WHITE left the Lakes for coal shuttle service in the Chesapeake Bay area passing down the Welland Canal November 9th.

The keel for the GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2) was laid November 9, 1953.

NORMAN B. REAM was laid up at Duluth, MN on November 9, 1960. In 1965 she would be sold and renamed b) KINSMAN ENTERPRISE (1).

In 1971 the City of Midland 41 was laid up due to coal strike.

On 9 November 1923, AZTEC (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 180', 835 gt, built in 1889 at Marine City) was destroyed by fire at her home port of Marine City, MI. The wreck lay in the Belle River until dynamited in the 1930s and what was left was placed on the previously raised barge PROVINCE which was then towed up the St. Clair River, into Lake Huron and scuttled.

On 9 November 1877, the Port Huron Times announced that the Lake schooners W. C. GRANT and CITY OF GREEN BAY had left Montreal on a voyage to Europe.

The Big Storm of 1913
On November 7, 1913, the storm responsible for sinking or damaging more vessels than any other began a six-day assault on the Great Lakes. The "Big Blow" of 1913 struck Lake Superior on November 7 and reached Lake Michigan by November 8.

At 10:00 p.m. on November 9, 1913 the HOWARD M. HANNA, JR. was blown broadside onto the Port Austin Reef (off the tip of Michigan's thumb on Lake Huron) by Northerly winds in excess of 60 mph during the Great Storm of 1913. The ship finally lost power and was driven onto the reef where she broke in two at hatch number seven.

On November 9, 1913 while downbound with ore, the FRED G. HARTWELL (1) encountered very strong southwest winds in Lake Superior. She reached a position one mile east of Iroquois Point, on Whitefish Bay and dropped her anchor to ride out the storm. Her anchor began to drag when the winds shifted to the north and increased to unprecedented gale-force velocity. This was the beginning of the "Great Storm" of 1913 which drove her aground onto a rocky bottom. The seas pounded her until her bottom plates were torn open and she sank the next day in twenty-six feet of water.

On November 9th during the Big Storm of 1913, the MATTHEW ANDREWS (1) was downbound in Lake Huron with a cargo of iron ore. Captain Lempoh decided to drop anchor rather than risk trying to enter the St. Clair River during the fury of the storm. Taking bearings for anchorage from Lightship 61 (stationed at Corsica Shoal), which unknown to him had been blown two miles off station, the MATTHEW ANDREWS (1) grounded heavily on Corsica Shoal.

Below is a first hand account of the storm from the journal of John McLaughlin transcribe by his great grandson Hugh McNichol. John was working on an unknown vessel during the Storm of 1913. The boat was captained by John McAlpine and Harry Roberts as Chief Engineer. The boat was loading iron ore in Escanaba when the storm started on November 8th.
Sunday, November 9, 1913
I got up at 12 a.m. and went on watch. They were loading us but awful slow, It is blowing hard and some snow falling and colder. We got away at 11:35 am. There is a heavy sea on and blowing a gale. We ain't making much headway, about 2 miles in 4 hours.
More entries from the Storm of 1913 tomorrow.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Salvage Monarch Continues

11/08
The tug Salvage Monarch with Cathy McAllister now renamed "Seven Sisters" in tow stopped Thursday in Port Maitland, Ontario on Lake Erie. The pair passed through the Welland Canal Wednesday on the delivery trip to Goderich.

On Wednesday the Salvage Monarch's ownership was changed on the Transport Canada web site. The owners of the tug are now listed as Heritage Harbour Marine Ltd. of London, Ontario, the same owners as the Seven Sisters.

Pictures by Jim Gallacher
Monday the pair were docked in Oshawa, Ont. waiting on the weather.
Another view.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt, Gerry O. and René Beauchamp




Windoc Special Brings New Details

11/08
A CBC documentary says a bridge operator was "probably impaired" when he lowered the bridge's lift span onto the passing laker Windoc in August 2001.

The operator, who isn't identified in the program, was taking medication for back pain and had consumed three glasses of wine before being unexpectedly called back to work the night of the accident, according to the documentary The 5th Estate.

As the bridge span was lowered, it tore off the Windoc's pilothouse and smokestack, triggering a fire that gutted the vessel's stern. The program reported that the accident prompted vessel owner N.M. Patterson & Sons to sell its Great Lakes fleet.

According to the documentary, the bridge operator was not scheduled to work on the day of the accident. The operator was called into work about 6:30 p.m. that day. Four vessels passed beneath the bridge without difficulty before the Windoc arrived.

After the collision, police and Seaway officials found the bridge operator sitting in the dark, seemingly in shock. A union official took him home, but there was no trip to the hospital and no test to determine whether the bridge operator might have been under the influence of medication or alcohol.

The documentary obtained first-hand information about the crash from interviews with the Windoc's skipper, Captain Ken Strong, and its wheelsman, Alan Hiscock.

The program will be repeated on CBC Newsworld Sunday at 4 p.m.

Click here for a story from the St. Catharines Standard

Reported by: Bill Bird and Frank Frisk




Laker Under Tow

11/08
Towed from Montreal Thursday was the self-unloader Canadian Ranger. The vessel was under tow of McKeil tugs Jerry Newberry & Bonnie B.III and assisted by Groupe Ocean's tug Ocean Jupiter from the Port of Montreal.

The Canadian Ranger has been laid up in Montreal since Dec. 31, 2000. The tow was expected to arrive in Trois-Rivières shortly after mid night. At Trois-Rivières the vessel will be docked alongside her fleet mate Canadian Trader at section 2. It is unknown what Upper Lakes Shipping intends to do with the ship.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Iglehart Arrives for 5 Year

11/07
The J.A.W. Iglehart arrived at Bay Ship Wednesday for her scheduled 5 year Inspection. The Iglehart was placed at Berth #15 while the tug Ocean Reliance was placed in the small dry dock for builders adjustments prior to the tug and Barge 550-3 departing later this month. When the tug and barge depart the Iglehart will be placed into the small dock.

Iglehart at Berth #15, from Bulhead Point across the bay.
Ocean Reliance being placed into dock, behind her Barge 550-3, and the bow of the Iglehart.
Ocean Reliance going into dry dock, from Bulhead point.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




Heavy Lift for Duluth

11/08
The second of three ships bringing enormous pieces of equipment manufactured in Spain and Italy and destined for Canada via record-setting rail shipments is scheduled to arrive in the Port of Duluth-Superior tomorrow (November 8) aboard the Dutch vessel Jumbo Vision.

The Rotterdam-based vessel is scheduled to arrive under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge at approximately 5 p.m., then proceed to Duluth's Clure Public Marine Terminal with equipment destined for the Syncrude UE-1 oil sands project near Ft. McMurray, Alberta.

Jumbo, a heavy-lift shipping company headquartered in Rotterdam, arranged for arrival of the equipment via three ships outfitted with deck cranes capable of handling heavy loads. The first shipment, which arrived in Port August 3, 2002, aboard Jumbo's 314-foot (96-meter) vessel Fairload, consisted of 10 pressure cylinders manufactured in Spain measuring up to 147-feet (45-meters) long and weighing as much as 131 metric tons. It required four special eight-axle railcars supplied by TTX Corp., Chicago.

Lake Superior Warehousing Co., Inc., will offload the second shipment of equipment (manufactured in Italy) from the Jumbo Vision. This record-setting rail shipment, scheduled to occur November 20, will include seven 520-ton pieces that will require 14 12-axle railcars, and two 200-ton pieces that will require two eight-axle railcars. The largest pieces measure approximately 80-feet (24-meters) in length and are 14-feet, 7-inches (4-meters) wide.

Only 28 of the special 12-axle railcars required for this shipment are available in North America. Syncrude UE-1 is handling the project in conjunction with Burlington Northern Santa Fe Company, Fort Worth, Texas, and Superior, Wis., (to Noyes, Minn.), Canadian National Railway, Edmonton, Alberta, and Montreal, Quebec, (to Edmonton), Rail Link America, Denver, Col., (to Boyle, Alberta), and Athabasca Northern Railway, Winnipeg, Manitoba, (to Ft. McMurray, Alberta).

The third shipment, scheduled to move in spring 2003, will move on a yet-to-be-named Jumbo vessel and be similar in dimension and weight to the Fairload’s.

"The November 20 shipments will represent the largest (in terms of length and weight) multiple loads ever carried over U.S. and Canadian railways, breaking a record set in November 2000 when Jumbo’s vessel Fairlift brought 56 pieces of Japanese-built equipment through the Port for a Shell Canada project in northern Alberta," said Ed Clarke, Calgary, Alberta, senior logistics coordinator for Syncrude UE-1.

"Duluth was once again selected as the North American port of entry because of a combination of its facilities for dimensional cargoes, the professional services provided by Lake Superior Warehousing and the excellent rail service and clearances available. The BNSF is responsible for initiating all clearances and weight and size limitations for the total move to Ft. McMurray. This is the only rail route that can accommodate this size of dimensional equipment."

The largest single loads carried on North American railroads also moved through the Port of Duluth-Superior. In October 1990 two Japanese-built cylinders destined for the BiProvincial Upgrader oil project in Lloydminster, Saskatchewan, arrived at the Clure Public Marine Terminal aboard the Dutch vessel Starman Asia. The 773-ton cylinders were transported to Canada on the Asea Brown Boveri 36-axle Schnabel car, the world's largest capacity railcar according to the Association of American Railroads.

"Duluth has the equipment, technology, and, most importantly, the people to make such projects a reality," said Gary Nicholson, Lake Superior Warehousing president.

"Clearances for oversize loads from Duluth are often the best available whether the product is moving via rail or truck. Coupled with the strong work ethic of Lake Superior Warehousing's employees, shippers of oversized cargo are provided with a powerful combination of reasons for choosing Duluth."

The 361-foot (110-meter) long Jumbo Vision, built in 2000 at a Turkish shipyard, is a heavy-load carrier owned by Kahn Shipping, Rotterdam. Local agent for each of the above-mentioned vessels is Guthrie-Hubner, Inc., Duluth.

The Syncrude UE-1 oil extraction and upgrading endeavor is one of several underway in northern Alberta. It involves removing sand from the earth that is impregnated with oil, separating the two and then using new technology to upgrade the oil to a usable product.

Reported by: Lisa Marciniak, Duluth Seaway Port Authority




Former Arcadia to Depart

11/08
Taking on fuel from trucks Thursday in Montreal was the Panamanian-flag cruise ship Caribic Star, ex Arcadia. The cruise ship has been laid up since problems with the ship cut short a planned season of Great Lakes Cruises in the summer of 2001. Crews were painting the vessels and inspecting the lifeboats. It is expected she will leave for the Caribbean later this month. According to the Equasis website, she is owned by Anaconda Maritime of Montreal.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Oakglen Unloads

11/08
The Oakglen arrived in Goderich at 6 pm Thursday evening to unload. She will be in port until Saturday morning when she will depart for Owen Sound to finish unloading.

Reported by: Dale Baechler




Tug Sale

11/08
Docked at a shipyard in the Vancouver area was the tug Escort Protector owned by McKeil Marine. Last summer she delivered a barge there from Montreal and upon arrival, was offered for sale.

The yacht Theodore, formerly a tug built by Canadian Vickers in 1932 was sold a few weeks ago to Luc Lachapelle of Montreal. No new name was bestowed on the hull yet.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Marquette Traffic

11/08
Shipping has been slow in Marquette lately, although there is lots of ore to be shipped out yet this season. The Lee A. Tregurtha is due Friday morning, the Great Lakes Trader Saturday morning. The H. Lee White will be bringing a load of stone to the lower harbor Sunday morning before heading to the upper harbor to join the Charles Beeghly for a load of ore. The James Barker is also due Sunday with a load of coal.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Toledo News

11/08
The Alpena was at the Lafarge Dock unloading cement and departed early Thursday morning. The Reserve was due in at the Torco Ore Dock to unload ore late Thursday evening. There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Cason J. Callaway, Algowood, and Algomarine on Friday, followed by the Algosteel and John G. Munson on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the John J. Boland on Saturday, followed by the Buckeye on Tuesday.

Pictures taken Wednesday by Mike Nicholls
Susan Hoey waiting to tow the Agawa Canyon.
Agawa Canyon with a load of salt for Kuhlmans.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Welland Traffic

11/08
Thursday morning the German vessel Skagen was upbound in the canal heading for Lock 2. Upbound at Lock 7 was the Cuyahoga, sailing light headed to the stone dock at Port Colborne. Work was also continuing on the Canadian Prospector at Port Weller Dry Dock.

Skagen departs Lock 1.
Passing Port Weller Dry Docks.
Approaching Lock 2.
Cuyahoga departing Lock 7.
Close up.
Heading for Port Colborne.
Work on the Prospector's bow.

Reported by: Alex Howard




Kingston News

11/08
The summer season has certainly closed here as the marinas are empty and the area had the first light snow. There is a bit of thin ice in old elevator bay.

The tour boat Canadian Empress is tied at Crawford Wharf as is the Island Star. The Island Star will go to her winter lay-up berth this weekend. Already at lay up are the Island Queen, Island Belle and Papoose II (ex Bo-lo Island Boat). Along with them are the Ottawa tour boats Sea Prince and Senator. There is a for sale sign on the Sea Prince and possibly one on the Senator. The Senator was supposed to go back to Ottawa last month but both boats appear to be moored for the winter.

The Ida M II from Rockport is on the drydock but should leave soon. The CCGC Bittern has about six weeks before she is finished for the season. The harbor is quiet except for the regular crossings of the Wolfe Island Ferry.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Boatnerd R/C Fun Run

11/08
Saturday, November 9 will be this first Boatnerd R/C Boat Fun Run at Fire Fighters Park in Troy, MI.

Starting at 10 a.m., all boats are welcome and spectators are invited. The park is located off Square Lake Road east of Crooks, conveniently located off I-75.

Directions: From I-75 take Exit 72, Crooks Road. Turn right heading north on Crooks. First light is West Square Lake Road. Make a Michigan U-turn left (no left turn at light) onto Square Lake heading west. The park is a half mile down on the north (right) side.

Click here for a map




Today in Great Lakes History - November 08

The COLUMBIA STAR (steel propeller bulk freighter, 1000', 35,923 gt) was launched November 8, 1980 at Bay Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wis. She is part of the Oglebay Norton fleet.

The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS and IRVING S. OLDS arrived on November 8, 1988 at Kaohsiung, Taiwan for scrapping by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.

The STADACONA (1) was renamed ROBERT S. McNAMARA by its new owner Ford Motor Company's Marine Division. The McNAMARA was rescued from potential scrapping when Ford purchased her for $80,000 and spent $15,000 for renovation at AmShip's Toledo yard.

The J.P. MORGAN, JR. arrived at Avilés, Spain on November 8, 1980.

PETER A.B. WIDENER passed down the Welland Canal November 8, 1986 towed by the tugs TUSKER and GLENADA en route to Lauzon, Que. From there she was towed overseas for scrapping. When built, the PETER A.B. WIDENER and fleet mates J. PIERPONT MORGAN, NORMAN B. REAM and HENRY H. ROGERS were the first 600-footers built for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.;"The Class of 1906."

On 08 Nov 1986, the B. F. AFFLECK (steel propeller freighter, 588', 7964 gt, built in 1927 at Toledo, OH), under tow of the tug THUNDER CAPE, went adrift on Lake Superior in a storm after the tug lost power. The tug AVENGER IV was dispatched to pick up the AFFLECK, which was headed for scrap, and the tanker EASTERN SHELL towed the THUNDER CAPE to Thunder Bay for repairs.

BEN HUR, a wooden schooner-barge wrecker, 314 t, built in 1874 at Dunville, Ont., had been purchased for the job of salvaging the schooner M. E. TREMNBLE. On 8 November 1890, she was at the job near Port Huron in the St. Clair River when she was rammed and sunk by the schooner-barge SUPERIOR which was being towed by the steamer PASSAIC. BEN HUR settled on top of the schooner she was attempting to salvage and a lighter-scow she was using also went down with her.

On 8 November 1877, the bark GREAT WEST was carrying 262,000 feet of lumber from Caseville to Chicago. Much of it was piled topside. In a big storm on Lake Michigan, she lost her deck load. She then became waterlogged and finally went ashore near Hyde Park, Illinois on 10 November. The crew were all saved.

On 8 November 1877, KATE L. BRUCE (3-mast wooden schooner, 307 t, built in 1872 at Manitowoc, WI) was carrying wheat in tow of the tug JOHNSON when she was let go in heavy weather. She disappeared with all eight of her crew off Alpena, Michigan. A bureau containing her papers washed ashore in August 1878. The sunken wreck was discovered in 6 fathoms of water in Thunder Bay during the Autumn of 1879.

The forebody of the former CANADIAN EXPLORER arrived in Prescott on 05 Nov 2000, under tow of the Trois Rivieres tug DUGA. It remained there for three days. The previous March, it was reported that the hull was undergoing conversion to a 498-foot grain storage barge for Les Elevateurs des Trois Rivieres, Quebec. (The engine room portion of the former CANADIAN EXPLORER was mated to the forward section of the HAMILTON TRANSFER in 1998 and now sails as the CANADIAN TRANSFER.)

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Death of the Windoc news show subject

11/07
The $20 million lawsuit filed by N.M. Paterson & Sons against the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp. continues to move forward with no signs of a settlement being reached.

The Thunder Bay company is suing the Seaway over the Aug. 11, 2001, wreck of the Windoc, which collided with a lift bridge near Allanburg, Ontario. The loss of the ship led the company to sell off its Great Lakes fleet.

The lawsuit has moved through the discovery stage, in which both parties discussed the facts and arguments, Paterson lawyer David Marler of Montreal-based Marler and Associates told the Thunder Bay Chronicle-Journal.

“The parties are at the moment exchanging the undertakings which arise out of those discoveries,” he said. “There has been, and continues to be, no admission of liabilities by the seaway.”

Marler said he couldn’t go into more detail.

Paterson says the Seaway is at fault for the accident because the Allanburg bridge's lift span allegedly was lowered early, shearing off the Windoc’s wheelhouse and smokestack, which caused a fire.

The Seaway has said the Windoc’s crew was at fault because the ship lacked adequate firefighting or escape plans. It also says Paterson didn’t make an adequate effort to use the rest of its fleet — or hire other ships — to finish the season.

Company Vice Chairman Donald Paterson has seen an early copy of the report by the Transportation Safety Board, which is investigating the accident.

“It was pretty much what we had expected,” he told the newspaper. “We did everything we were supposed to do, and they weren’t doing anything they were supposed to do.”

Reported by: Eric Clarke




Weak oil market cuts profits at Algoma Central

11/07
Third-quarter profits at Algoma Central Corp., the largest shipowner on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway, were down 23 percent from the same period last year, the Sault-based company reported Wednesday.

The 1,300-employee corporation reported profit of $6,178,000 for the three-month period ended Sept. 30, down by $1,843,000 or 49 cents a share from the same period last year.

"The decrease in net income related principally to lower earnings in the tanker fleet due to fewer operating days as a result of a softening petroleum market compared to the same period last year and a reduction in the operating results of the ocean-going fleet," president and chief executive officer Tim Dool said in a written statement.

"We remain cautious about the financial results for the final quarter of 2002," Dool said.

"Although our marine fleet's utilization is expected to improve during the last quarter, the financial results can vary depending on the extent of weather delays to our vessels during this period."

The Algoma Central family includes Algoma Central Marine, Algoma Tankers, Fraser Marine & Industrial, Algoma Central Properties Inc., and shares of Marbulk Canada Inc., Cleveland Tankers (1991) Inc. and Seaway Marine Transport.

Its fleet of 27 vessels includes 14 self-unloaders, eight bulkers and five Canadian-flag petroleum tankers.

Reported by: Ed Schipper




Sturgeon Bay Report

11/07
Wednesday the tug Ocean Reliance and barge 550-3 were in final fitout for delivery, the second tug notch barge 550-4 in the graving dock. The J.A.W. Iglehart arrived from Green Bay late Tuesday. The retired fireboat Joseph Medill is in the south yard to be towed to Algoma, WI.

Reported by: Wendell Wilke




Saginaw River Traffic

11/07
The David Z. Norton was outbound from the Sixth Street turning basin in Saginaw Wednesday morning after unloading overnight at the GM dock. Waiting downriver at the Sargent dock for its turn at the GM dock was the Algoway, which had come up to Saginaw earlier in the morning after lightering in Essexville. Once the Norton had passed, the Algorail continued up to the dock.

The Algoway finished unloading during the afternoon and was outbound from Sixth Street at 5 p.m.

The tug Jacklyn M. with barge Integrity remained alongside the E.M. Ford at the Lafarge terminal during the day Wednesday. The vessel had also arrived overnight and was expected to depart about 4 a.m. Thursday.

The Dorothy Ann-Pathfinder was inbound during the evening Wednesday, passing the outbound Algoway around Light 12 in the Saginaw Bay. She proceeded upriver to unload at the Bay Aggregates Dock in Bangor Township.

Pictures by: Todd Shorkey
David Z. Norton upbound passing the CSL Tadoussac at Essroc.
Stern view at Smith Park.
Jacklyn M.-Integrity upbound passing the Tadoussac.
Norton & Integrity upbound.
Algoway upbound approaching Bay Aggregates.
Entering the Bay Agg. Slip.
David Z. Norton outbound at Wheeler's Landing.
Close up.
Stern view.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Toledo Update

11/07
The Southdown Challenger was at the Cemex Dock unloading cement. The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was at the CSX Docks loading coal.

There were no vessels in at the Shipyard, the Saturn and Joseph H. Frantz remain in lay-up.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will now be the Cason J. Callaway, Algowood, and Algomarine on Friday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will now be the Reserve on Thursday, followed by the John J. Boland on Saturday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Hamilton Report

11/07
It was a busy Wednesday afternoon at Dofasco. The Algocape was unloading iron ore and moored north of her was the Montrealais, also loaded with iron ore waiting her turn to unload.

Over at Dofasco's coal dock, the John D. Leitch (Canadian Century) was unloading coal while being refueled by the Hamilton Energy.

The carferry Frontenac is still in drydock at Heddles.

The only other vessel in Hamilton Harbour at this time is the Kapitonas A. Lucka which is moored on the north face of Pier 12 with no unloading activity to be seen.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Toronto Update

11/07
The saltie Strange Attractor cleared port Wednesday heading upbound. The reason for the long unloading is that one of the two unloading clams at Redpath sugar is out of commission.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Today in Great Lakes History - November 07

On 7 November 1852, ST. LOUIS (wooden side-wheeler, 190 , 618 t, built in 1844 at Perrysburg, OH) was carrying railroad cars when she capsized and sank in a gale off Kelley s Island on Lake Erie. She was owned by Beer & Samuel Ward.

On 07 Nov 1906, the Grand Trunk carferry GRAND HAVEN (steel carferry, 306', 2320 gt, built in 1903 at Toledo, OH) was put up for sale at a receiver's auction when the Grand Trunk Car Ferry Line defaulted on it's bonds. It was purchased by a new Grand Trunk subsidiary, the Grand Trunk Milwaukee Car Ferry Company. This vessel had a long carrier both on the Lakes and in the Caribbean. She was finally scrapped at Hamilton, Ontario in 1970.
Image of the Grand Haven from the Father Dowling Collection

The T2 converted laker HILDA MARJANNE's 1961 German-built hull forward of the engine room, minus her pilot house, was towed by the tugs G.W. ROGERS and BAGOTVILLE to Port Weller Dry Docks arriving there on November 7, 1983. This section was to become part of the CANADIAN RANGER.

On November 7, 1989 the SAMUEL MATHER (7) was moved to the Frog Pond on her way to the cutter's torch.

The ARTHUR B. HOMER was launched November 7, 1959 for the Bethlehem Steel Corp., Cleveland, OH. She was the last ship built by Great Lakes Engineering at River Rouge.

In 1902 the BRANSFORD rammed and sank the tug RECORD with a loss of a tug crewman in the Portage Lake Ship Canal in Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula.

On November 7, 1913, the storm responsible for sinking or damaging more vessels than any other began a six-day assault on the Great Lakes. The "Big Blow" of 1913 struck Lake Superior on November 7 and reached Lake Michigan by November 8, where the Pittsburgh Steamship Company vessel Clarence A. Black was severely damaged by the waves at the dock in Gary.

On 7 November 1893, ALBANY (steel propeller package freighter, 267', 1918 gt, built in 1884 at Wyandotte, MI) collided with the iron freighter PHILADELPHIA in a think fog. PHILADELPHIA took ALBANY in tow to try to save her, but she sank a few miles off Pointe Aux Barques, MI. Her crew transferred to PHILADELPHIA, but they soon had to abandon her too since she also sank. 8 lives were lost, presumably when one of the lifeboats was run down by the still running, but abandoned, PHILADELPHIA.

On 7 November 1865, LILY DANCEY (2-mast wooden schooner, 92', 132 gc, built in 1856 at Goderich) was carrying grain in a gale on Lake Huron when she was driven ashore near Port Elgin or Kincardine, Ontario. Her cargo was later recovered, but the schooner broke up by 27 November of that year.

The City of Flint 32 ran aground at Manitowoc in 1947.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Salvage Monarch Continues

11/06
The tug Salvage Monarch towing Cathy McAllister on the hip proceeded through the Welland Canal Tuesday. That night the tugs were stopped for the night at Wharf 16. According to the delivery crew both tugs have been sold. Cathy McAllister is bound for Goderich and a refit, the Salvage Monarch may go to Thunder Bay.

When Salvage Monarch entered the Seaway last Thursday towing Cathy McAllister, the McAllister had actually been renamed on paper to "Seven Sisters" according to the Transport Canada website. Her new port of registry is Goderich, Ontario. The change of ownership occurred on Oct.31.

Pictures by Jim Gallacher
Monday the pair were docked in Oshawa, Ont. waiting on the weather.
Another view.
The Dean Crane Dredge was also waiting for better weather before continuing dredging at the Oshawa Harbor mouth.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt, Gerry O. and René Beauchamp




Newcomer ISG mulls purchase of old-timer Bethlehem Steel

11/06
International Steel Group, which resurrected the steelmaking assets of bankrupt LTV Steel and Acme Steel, said Tuesday it's considering the purchase of all or part of Bethlehem Steel Corp., which is operating under Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

ISG said it has a 60-day "exclusivity period" to determine whether it can work out a plan to buy Bethlehem.

“We will try to determine quickly the extent to which Bethlehem’s facilities complement ours, as well as the potential for cost saving and cross selling,” International Steel’s chief executive, Rodney Mott said. Mott said the company will work with Bethlehem’s management and union to develop a possible acquisition plan.

Bethlehem filed for bankruptcy protection in October 2001. It said last month that it had access to enough cash to last into 2003 as it considers alternatives for reorganization. Earlier this week Bethlehem reported a loss of $13.5 million on sales of $315.5 million for September.

The U.S. steel market, which has suffered years of falling prices, has seen prices increase as much as 90 percent for some products since January, reflecting in part steps taken by the Bush administration to bolster the industry.

Reported by: Dan Wilcox




Port Weller tackles big repair job

11/06
Workers at Port Weller Dry Docks have begun repairing the bow of Canadian Prospector, which was damaged last month in a collision near Montreal with the heavy-lift saltie Stellanova.

Thirty-five workers were recalled from layoff for the project, which is valued at nearly $500,000. Work is estimated to take five weeks.

"It's a major revamp of the whole bow, with damage above the waterline and some below it," said Alan Thoms, chief executive officer of Canadian Shipbuilding and Engineering Ltd., the parent company of Port Weller.

"There's fairly extensive damage to the bow, so there will be a fair amount of plate and bow sections changed. In fact, we'll be building a complete upper bow unit and modifying the lower bow," he said.

"The upper section of the bow with the forecastle is sufficiently damaged that we'll probably cut that off completely and build a whole new unit for it."

Canadian Prospector was built in 1963 as a deep-sea bulk carrier. It joined the Upper Lakes fleet in 1975.

Prospector entering the piers with tarps covering the damage in late October.
Close-up of the damage below the tarp.
Another view.

Reported by: Paul Beesley




Stellanova Enters Dry Dock

11/06
The damaged heavy lift ship Stellanova arrived in Les Méchins, Québec early Friday evening. The vessel spent two days unloading her cargo for transfer to truck, train and eventually another vessel.

On Monday the Dutch heavy lift vessel entered the Verreault Navigation drydock at noon for repairs to damaged suffered during a collision with the Canadian Prospector.

Last week preliminary preparations in the form of a new modular bow were started round the clock in the Verreault steel shop, while drydock work was expected to begin Monday after an initial inspection was carried out.

In addition the vessel's six pontoon cargo hatches, each weighing roughly 50 tonnes, were floated in and dry docked along with the Stellanova.

Stellanova ready for dry docking.
Another view.
Close up.
Close up of stern and rudder.
Pontoon hatches ready to go.

Reported by: Ryan Beaupré




Roger Stahl on the Move

11/06
Monday afternoon the tug Roger Stahl arrived in Toledo from Cheboygan with the ex Durocher barges Mobro 2000 and Mobro 2001. These barges were purchased by Gradel of Toledo.

Roger Stahl towing the barges.
Close up of the Roger Stahl.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




FedNav in Belgium

11/06
On Saturday the Federal Weser arrived in Antwerp, Belgium.

Federal Weser approaching the Berendrecht Lock.
Close up.
Tug Union Diamond controlling her stern.
Departing the lock and into the harbor (The freighter Southway is behind her in the lock).
Clearing the lock.

Reported by: Chris Rombouts




Twin Ports Report

11/06
Vessels with familiar and distinctive profiles were the rule Tuesday in the Twin Ports.

The familiar profile of the Herbert C. Jackson was seen early in the day as the stone-laden vessel arrived and stopped to fuel. From there it proceeded to the DMIR dock to unload. Once finished, it was to shift to the Cenex Harvest States elevator to load.

Late in the day, the unusual profile of the heavy-lift vessel Daniella was seen as the vessel entered Duluth shortly after 5 p.m. The ship has a cargo of machine parts for the oil-sands project in Alberta. The largest piece weighs more than 250 tons. Several special railroad flatcars each with several extra trucks for support were spotted in the BNSF yard near the port terminal, waiting to carry away the Daniella's heavy cargo.

Around the port, the grain trade remained brisk. In addition to the Jackson, vessels loading included Quebecois at Peavey, Isadora at AGP and Gunay-A, still unloading oats at Cargill B2. By late in the day, the saltie Antalina was anchored out on the lake waiting for a grain berth. Not far away was the Gordon C. Leitch, with its distinctive profile of large stack and raked bow.

Picture by Glenn Blaszkiewicz
Herbert C. Jackson unloading stone at the DM&IR Dock in Duluth Tuesday afternoon.

Reported by: Al Miller




Saginaw River News

11/06
The CSL Tadoussac was inbound the Saginaw River early Tuesday morning. She unloaded at the Essroc Terminal during the day and prepared to depart around 9:30 p.m. Inbound traffic however delayed her departure for hours until it passed as the Tadoussac must back out to Light 12 in the Saginaw Bay to turn around.

The David Z. Norton was inbound passing Lights 1 & 2 of the Saginaw Entrance Channel at 10 p.m. She indicated that she was headed up to the GM Dock in Saginaw.

Also inbound behind the Norton is the tug Jacklyn M. and Barge Integrity. The pair are headed upriver to the Lafarge Terminal in Carrollton to unload cement. The Algoway is the last in the group Monday night following behind them all.

The Canadian Transfer was outbound from Saginaw on Monday morning after unloading during the night. The vessel passed through Bay City about noon.

Calumet was upbound early Monday evening for the Saginaw Rock Products dock at Saginaw. The tug Rebecca Lynn and her barge departed the Bit Mat Dock in Bay City Tuesday morning after unloading during the night.

Canadian Transfer outbound from Saginaw.
Stern view.
Passing the James Clements Airport.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Toledo Report

11/06
The Agawa Canyon was at the Kuhlman Dock unloading cargo. The Courtney Burton was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore. There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report. There are no vessels at the Shipyard at this time. The Saturn, and Joseph H. Frantz remain in layup at their dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Wednesday. The Algowood on Thursday followed by the Algomarine and Cason J. Callaway on Friday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Reserve on Thursday, followed by the Courtney Burton on Sunday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Windoc Special on CBC

11/06
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s 'Fifth Estate' is scheduled to air a program tonight at 9 PM ET on the Windoc accident. The investigative piece is described on the CBC web site as "And...it seemed like a case of 'boat crashes into bridge', and at the time everybody wondered how people could be so clumsy. The Fifth Estate has learned what really happened the night the Windoc hit Bridge Number 11".

Reported by: Bill Bird, J. Nelson, Warren Otto and Wayne Sapulski




Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping Turns Seven

11/06:
November 1995 marked the launch of this web site.
Launched as Great Lakes Vessel Passage, it was a small site with only four sections and less than a dozen pictures in the single Photo Gallery.

Today it has grown into the most comprehensive resource for Great lakes Shipping online with over three million visits. My thanks go to all that have contributed to the web site and the viewers for their dedication and enthusiasm.
Neil




Memorial Monday at Maritime Academy

11/06
The Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Traverse City invites the public to its annual Great Lakes Mariners Memorial Service, Monday, November 11 at noon. The service is to remember and honor those who have perished on the Great Lakes. It is sponsored by the GLMA Student Propeller Club. The GLMA is located in Traverse City on East Front Street at Barlow Avenue (next to the Holiday Inn). For more information, call (231) 995-1200 or visit www.nmc.edu/maritime




Today in Great Lakes History - November 06

The b) US.266029 (WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) was towed from Nicholson's River Rouge dock November 6, 1986 by tugs TUSKER and GLENADA to Port Maitland, Ont. for scrapping there in 1987.

On November 6, 1913 the SHEADLE left Fort William, Ont. bound for Erie, PA with grain and encountered fog, gale winds and a snow blizzard in one of the fiercest storms of the century.

On November 6, 1925 the Northern Navigation passenger steamer HAMONIC lost her propeller 20 miles west of Caribou Island in Lake Superior and was wallowing in gale force winds with gusts to 80 m.p.h. She was later towed to safety by the RICHARD TRIMBLE

On 06 Nov 1985, Desguaces Heme began scrapping the LEON FALK, JR. in Gijon, Spain. This vessel was built in Chester, Pa in 1945 as a tanker (504', 10,534 gt) and then was converted to a bulk freighter in Baltimore, MD in 1960-61 (710', 12,501 gt).

On 6 November 1872, the wooden propeller tug MILDRED, while towing a vessel out of Alpena, had her engine fail. Soon she was in trouble and sank. The crew was saved.

On 6 November 1827, ANN (wooden schooner, 53', 58 t, built in 1819 or 1821 at Black River, Ohio) was carrying salt, general merchandise and passengers when she was driven ashore on Long Point almost opposite Erie, PA. 7 Lives were lost, including 5 passengers. 6 survived.

In 1912 the Pere Marquette Railroad announced plans to build a new roundhouse at Ludington, it still stands today.

On 6 November 1874, the Port Huron Times listed the following vessels lost in the month of October and in the first week of November of that year: Propellers - BROOKLYN, FRANKFORT, NEW YORK; tug DOUGLAS; schooners - CITY OF PAINSVILLE, WANDERER, PREBLE, THOS. S. MOTT; and barges - CLIFTON and SHERMAN.

On 6 November 1883, GUIDING STAR (3-mast wooden schooner, 139’, 324 t, built in 1869 at Oswego, NY) was carrying coal to Milwaukee in fog when she went ashore 12 miles north of Milwaukee. Four of the crew made it to shore in the yawl, but it was wrecked in the process. The rest of the crew was finally rescued by the Milwaukee Lifesavers.

Crews began painting the hull of the SAGINAW (formerly JOHN J. BOLAND) in the colors of Lower Lakes Towing Ltd. (gray) on 06 Nov 1999 at Sarnia, Ontario. The vessel had recently been purchased from American Steamship Co. Inside the vessel, crews were gutting the living quarters to remove asbestos and add fire proof walls and new flooring. The engine room equipment and the unloading gear were also refurbished.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Marquette News

11/05
The Great Lakes Trader and Lee A. Tregurtha loaded taconite at Marquette Monday. Due Tuesday are the Algosteel about noon, the H. Lee White (which will go to the lower harbor to unload, first), and the Charles M. Beeghly very late.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Toledo Report

11/05
The James A. Hannah with her barge finished loading cargo at the B-P Dock and departed Monday afternoon. The Buffalo finished loading coal at the CSX Docks and departed Monday morning.

The next scheduled boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Weds. The Algowood on Thursday, followed by the Algomarine and Cason J. Callaway on Friday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Courtney Burton on Tuesday, followed by the Reserve on Thursday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - November 05

The LOUIS R. DESMARAIS cleared Owen Sound, Ont. on her maiden voyage November 5, 1977 bound for Thunder Bay, Ont. to load 27,117 gross tons of iron ore for Stelco at Hamilton, Ont.

On her final trip, the IRVIN L. CLYMER passed upbound at the Soo on November 5, 1990 and arrived at Duluth two days later to unload limestone at the Hallet Dock #5 after which she moved to her final lay-up berth at Fraser's shipyard and tied up blowing one last three long and two short salute from her whistle. In 1993, she was sold to Arzon Corp. of Duluth, MN for scrapping

The GRAND HAVEN was raised on November 5, 1969 from the Old River Bed where she sank on September 19, 1969. She was raised for scrapping

Mr. J.W. Isherwood visited the Great Lakes Engineering Works ship yard on November 5, 1910 and personally inspected the hull which was being built according to his patented design. This vessel, the WILLIAM P. PALMER (2) was the first vessel on the Great Lakes built to the Isherwood system of longitudinal framing.

On 05 Nov 1917, a foggy and rainy day, the JAMES S. DUNHAM (steel propeller bulk freighter, 420', 4795 gt, built in 1906 at W. Bay City, MI) sank in a collision with the steamer ROBERT FULTON (steel propeller bulk freighter, 424', 4219 gt, built 1896 at Wyandotte, MI) just below Grassy Island on the Detroit River. Repairs for both vessels totaled $125,000.

On 5 November 1896, ACADIA (iron-framed wooden propeller, 176', built in 1867 at Hamilton, Ont.) was driven ashore and broke up in a gle near the mouth of the Michipicoten River in lake Superior. her crew made it to shore and five of them spent more than a week trying to make it to the Soo.

Port Huron Times of 5 November 1878: "The schooner J. P. MARCH is reported lost with all on board. She was lost at Little Traverse Bay on the northern shore of Lake Michigan. The MARCH was a three masted schooner and was owned by Benton & Pierce of Chicago."

On 5 November 1838, TOLEDO (2-mast wooden schooner, 98', 215 t, built in 1836 at Buffalo) was carrying dry goods valued at more than $100,000 up-bound on Lake Erie when she was driven ashore by a gale a half mile east of the mouth of the Grand River. She broke in two. No lives were lost.

On 5 November 1869, TITAN (wooden schooner, 132’, 361 gt, built in 1856 at Oswego, NY) was carrying 17,500 bushels of wheat on Lake Michigan in a terrific gale. She was driven toward shore. Her anchors were dropped as she came close in and they held for about an hour. However, the ship finally dragged ashore, losing both of her masts and breaking up as she struck. Of the nine on board, only one survived and that one was found crawling along the beach in a dazed state. When she was new, TITAN broke the record by completing the trip from Chicago to Oswego in only 8 days and 4 hours. Her record only lasted one day since the schooner SURPRISE broke it by 6 hours the following day.

In the summer of 1875 the propeller EAST ran down and sank the tug JOE MAC, not even pausing to save her crew from drowning. The following winter Messrs. Seymour & Co., owners of the JOE MAC, obtained a judgement in a U.S. court against the owners of the EAST. Since the EAST was a Canadian vessel, they were unable to seize her because the judgement could only be effected in American waters. On Sunday morning, 05 Nov 1876, the steam tug SEYMOUR, with a United States marshal and posse on board, proceeded up to Allen's (presumably at Ogdensburg, NY), and there lay in wait for the EAST, which went up by the Crossover light channel into American waters. The SEYMOUR ran out and captured the vessel and brought her to Averell's wharf in U.S. waters to await justice.

CALCITE II arrived in Sarnia at 6:00 AM on Sunday, 05 NOV 2000, for lay-up. After leaving Cleveland the previous day, she anchored in Western Lake Erie, so she could arrive at the North Slip in Sarnia when shore side personnel would be on-hand to assist. A chartered bus from Rogers City left about noon to take many of the crew home to Rogers City. Around 4:10 p.m., the downbound MYRON C. TAYLOR passed her fleetmate CALCITE II, perhaps for the last time in USS Great Lakes Fleet colors, and she blew her sister an extended 3 long and 2 short master salute. The TAYLOR was bound for Cleveland with a load of stone.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Drifting tug Recovered

11/04
Early Sunday morning the Canadian Coast Guard ship Griffon was standing by about a half mile away from the drifting Cathy McAllister. The tug had broken loose and set adrift on Lake Ontario Saturday evening. Before it was located by the Griffon the tug was last seen alongside the breakwall at Cape Vincent with the tug Salvage Monarch awaiting weather.

Shortly after 1 a.m. Sunday morning Prescott Coast Guard reported that the Cathy McAllister was under tow of the Griffon.

There was no explanation given for how the tug broke free or why the Salvage Monarch could not retrieve the drifting tug.

Sunday night the Salvage Monarch was docked in Oshawa, Ontario. The McAllister is being towed to Goderich where it has been purchased by Heritage Harbour Marine Ltd. of London, Ont.

Reported by: Ron Walsh and Brian Johnson




Ste Claire Moved in Toledo

11/04
After a successful tour as a Halloween attraction on the Toledo Water Front the Ste. Claire was moved Sunday back to its winter dock at the Lake Front Coal Dock.

The historic passenger ship thrilled crowds in Toledo as the "Nautical Nightmare". The ship was temporarily converted to a floating haunted house to helped raise funds for the continuing restoration of the vessel. Crews will again work this winter restoring the Ste Claire for future use.

Pictures by Mike Nicholls
You can't see the tugs for the gulls! This is the Susan Hoey in the Maumee River.
Ste Claire at the Toledo City Dock.
Gaelic Crew members discussing line handling.
Capt. Dave & Chief Engineer Tim of the William Hoey.
Susan Hoey and Ste Claire downbound in the Maumee River.
Close up.
From the William Hoey.
Susan Hoey backing out after delivering the Ste Claire to Lakefront.
tanker Saturn in the same slip as the Ste Claire.

Click here for more information about the Ste. Claire

Reported by: and Jim Hoffman




Former Fireboat Prepared for Sinking

11/04
The former Chicago fireboat Joseph Medill was recently towed to Sturgeon Bay and will soon be towed to Algoma, Wi. in preparation's for sinking as a dive sight. The former carferry Straits of Mackinac was to be sunk off Algoma, but time the vessel was towed to Chicago, Ill. where she is to be sunk as a dive sight.

Reported by: Wendell Wilke




Saginaw River News

11/04
The Fred R. White, Jr. was inbound the Saginaw River Sunday morning passing the Front Range shortly after 8am. She continued up to the Bay Aggregates Dock where she entered the slip stern first to unload.

The Tug Mary E. Hannah and her tank barge were just upriver unloading at the Triple Clean Liquifuels Dock in Essexville.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Fred R. White, Jr. upbound past the Karn-Weadock Plant.
Close up.
Stern view.
White across the Saginaw River starting to back into the Bay Aggregates Slip.
Another view.
Tug Mary E. Hannah and her barge at the Triple Clean Liquifuels dock.
Tug close up.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Rouge River Traffic

11/04
Below are images taking Saturday in Detroit on the Rouge River
Kaye E Barker entering the Rouge Steel Slip to unload.
Curtis Randolph in winter quarters at Rouge Steel.
deck of the Kaye E Barker.
Canadian Progress and Carolyn Hoey in the Rouge Steel Slip.
Canadian Progress backed into the Rouge Steel Slip to load mill scale.
tug Mohawk working in the turning basin.
dredge No 55, Mohawk & barges working in the Rouge Turning Basin.
Another view.
Canadian Progress & Kaye E Barker in the Rouge Slip.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo News

11/04
The Cason J. Callaway finished loading coal at the CSX Docks and departed on Sunday morning. The Kaye E. Barker then shifted over to the CSX Dock to load coal. Waiting to follow the Barker is the Algobay, then the Buffalo. The John J. Boland was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore. The Canadian Transfer was at Andersons "K" Elevator unloading potash, she departed early Sunday morning.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Wednesday. The Algowood on Thursday, followed by the Algomarine and Cason J. Callaway on Friday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Courtney Burton on Tuesday. The Reserve on Thursday, followed by a return visit of the Courtney Burton on Sunday.

W.C. Richardson at the Consolidated Dock at Toledo She just arrived from long term layup from the Cleveland area. She was purchased for use as a transfer vessel for use at this dock site. The following year all of her cabins were removed to make it easier for them to unload cargo from saltwater vessels. She served this dock site well, eventually she ended up at the T.W.I. Dock for a time then she was shifted over to the CSX Docks Frog Pond area where she was scrapped several years ago

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toledo Pictures

11/04
Below are images taking Saturday in Toledo
USCG Neah Bay and Ste. Claire.
Close up of Neah Bay.
Close up of life ring & raft on Neah Bay.
Tugs Illinois & Idaho downbound past Neah Bay.
Looking up river to the museum ship Willis B. Boyer.
Ste Claire being prepared to be a Halloween tour billed as a "Nautical Nightmare".
Stern view of Ste Claire; note the thin wheelsman at the aft steering station.
Bridge wing decoration on Ste Claire for "Nautical Nightmare".
I-beams welded to the rub rail from her lay-up in Detroit outside the Columbia.




Erie update

11/04
The American Mariner made her first visit this season to Erie on Sunday. The vessel arrived in the morning with stone for both the Old Ore Dock and the Mounfort Terminal. The Mariner gave a one hour security call at 8 a.m., but anchored just north of Erie's Outer Buoys. The Mariner came in and docked at the Old Ore Dock shortly after 11 a.m.

By 5 p.m. the Mariner was finished unloading at the Old Ore Dock, and the vessel gave a security call that they were turning in the harbor and headed for the Mounfort Terminal. After a short unload there, the Mariner gave a twenty minute security call departing the Mounfort Terminal outbound at 7 p.m.

The Mariner is next scheduled to load in Conneaut Sunday night. The vessel should arrive shortly before 10:00 pm. With the Mariner's Sunday visit, all vessels that visited Erie in 2001 have also visited in 2002.

Mariner unloads at the Old Ore Dock.
With the J.S. St. John in foreground.
Day Peckinpaugh.
J.S.St. John.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Kingston News

11/04
Traffic remains heavy on the Western end of the Seaway. The John B. Aird passed Kingston Sunday carrying a cargo from Quebec City destined for Burns Harbour. The Stephen B. Roman was eastbound for Bath. The Atlantic Elm was eastbound and cement barge Metis.

The Tug Salvor and barge McCleary Spirit passed Sunday heading for Hamilton. The Emerald Star passed by headed for Clarkson.

The Jo Spirit passed by on Saturday carrying a cargo of Bacardi Rum for Hamilton.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Seaway Traffic

11/04
The Jumbo Vision was continued upbound Sunday morning departing the Pointe aux trembles anchorage heading for Duluth. Draught: 7.3m. Sunday the saltie Yarmouth arrived for the Seaway heading for Ashtabula. The vessel is loaded with a cargo of sand.

The BBC Iceland arrived for the Seaway on Friday. She is heading up for Thunder Bay. This is the first trip onto the lakes for the vessel. Registered in the Netherlands, the BBC Iceland was built in 1999 by Xingang shipbuilding and is owned by Briese Schiffahrts in Germany.

Arriving last Thursday was the ISA the saltie is heading upbound for Cleveland with steel products.

Montreal shipping pictures taken Saturday by Laurent Côté
Nanticoke and McKeil's Lac Vancouver .
Lac Vancouver at McKeil's Montreal Boatman base, tied to its barge and dredge Primrose now used as an office.
Shell's Horizon Montreal at its dock.
Close up.

Reported by: Olive S.




Boatnerd R/C Fun Run

11/04
Saturday, November 9 will be this first Boatnerd R/C Boat Fun Run at Fire Fighters Park in Troy, MI.

Starting at 10 a.m., all boats are welcome and spectators are invited. The park is located off Square Lake Road east of Crooks, conveniently located off I-75.

Directions: From I-75 take Exit 72, Crooks Road. Turn right heading north on Crooks. First light is West Square Lake Road. Make a Michigan U-turn left (no left turn at light) onto Square Lake heading west. The park is a half mile down on the north (right) side.

Click here for a map




Shipping Merchandise

11/04
Force 5 Promotions has updated their special sale section with many new items featured in a Pre-Christmas sale.
Click here to view




Weekly Updates

11/04
The weekly updates have been uploaded.
Click here to view




Today in Great Lakes History - November 04

On 4 November 1875, SWAN (wooden propeller tug, 11 gt, built in 1862 at Buffalo, NY) caught fire while lying out in the Saginaw River near East Saginaw. She was abandoned by the crew and burned to the water’s edge.

The JOSEPH G. BUTLER, JR. (steel bulk freighter, 525', 6588 gt) was launched on 04 Nov 1905 at Lorain, Ohio for the Tonopah Steamship Co. (Hutchinson & Co., mgr.). She lasted until 1971 when she was stripped of her cabins and scuttled, along with HENRY R. PLATT, JR., at Steel Co. of Canada plant, Burlington Bay, Hamilton, Ont., as breakwater and fill.

The CARTIERCLIFFE HALL was registered at Toronto, Ont. on 04 Nov 1977, but didn't enter service until the spring of 1978 because of mechanical difficulties during her sea trials.

On 04 Nov, 1986 the TEXACO CHIEF (2) was renamed A.G. FARQUARSON. She is now the ALGONOVA.

CALCITE II departed Cleveland at 5:30 a.m. Saturday, 04 Nov 2000, on her last trip for USS Great Lakes Fleet. She sailed upbound for Sarnia, Ontario where she spent the winter in lay-up. Grand River Transportation had entered into a sale agreement with USS Great Lakes Fleet, Inc. for the purchase of the CALCITE II, GEORGE A. SLOAN and MYRON C. TAYLOR.

HERON BAY (2) proceeded under her own power to Lauzon, Que. for her final lay-up on November 4, 1978.

NIPIGON BAY was launched November 4, 1950

On November 4, 1986 the TEXACO CHIEF (2) was renamed b) A.G. FARQUARSON.

The CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON (3) developed a sizable leak and almost sank November 4, 1925 during her tow to Superior after she struck a reef a few nights before.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY's keel was laid November 4, 1942.

UNITED STATES GYPSUM (2) grounded at Toledo, OH on November 4, 1972 resulting in damages totaling $125,000. Her propeller was removed and the rudder shaft was locked in position to finish the season as a manned barge on the coal run from Toledo to Detroit, MI.

The Joseph H. Thompson became not only the largest vessel on the Great Lakes but also the longest dry bulk cargo vessel in the world when it entered service on November 4, 1952, departing Chicago on its first trip.

Setting the stage for the fateful storm which followed less than a week later which sank the Edmund Fitzgerald, many locations in Minnesota and Wisconsin were setting all-time record high temperatures for the month of November during the period of November 4-6, 1975. Grand Marais, MN reached 67 on November 5 and Superior reached 74 on November 6, both all-time records for the month. Many other notable Great Lakes storms, including the Armistice Day storm of 1940 and the storm that sank the Henry Steinbrenner in 1953, were proceeded by record-setting warm weather.

On 4 November 1877, MARY BOOTH (wooden scow-schooner, 132 t, built in 1857 at Buffalo) was carrying maple lumber in a storm in Lake Michigan. She became waterlogged but her crew doggedly clung to her until she appeared ready to turn turtle. Then her crew abandoned her and she rolled over. She drifted in the lake for several days. The crew landed at White Lake, Michigan and they were near death.

Port Huron Times of 4 November 1878: "The propeller CITY OF MONTREAL is believed to have gone down on Lake Michigan Friday [1 NOV 1878]. The schooner LIVELY, laden with coal for Bay City, is reported ashore 6 miles above Sand Beach, having gone on at 12 o'clock Sunday night [3 NOV 1878]. The schooner WOODRUFF, ashore at Whitehall, is a total loss. Two men were drowned, one died from injuries received, and Capt. Lingham was saved. The tugs E. M. PECK and MYSTIC, which went from the Sault to the assistance of the propeller QUEBEC, were wrecked near where she lies, one being on the beach and the other sunk below her decks. Both crews were rescued and were taken to St. Joseph Island."

On 4 November 1856, J. W. BROOKS (wooden propeller, 136', 322 t, built in 1851 at Detroit) was carrying provisions and copper ingots to Ogdensburg, New York in a storm when she foundered on Lake Ontario, 8 miles northeast of False Ducks Light. Estimates of the loss of lives range from 22 to 50. In July 1857, she was partially raised and some of her cargo was recovered. She only had a five year career, but besides this final incident, she had her share of disasters. In July 1855, she had a boiler explosion and in May of that same year, she sank in Canadian waters.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




McAllister Adrift

11/03 11 a.m. update
At midnight the Canadian Coast Guard ship Griffon was reported to be standing by about a half mile away from the drifting Cathy McAllister. This was 12 miles SW of Pointe Petre

Shortly after 1 a.m. Sunday morning Prescott Coast Guard radio reported that the Cathy McAllister was under tow and the urgency was canceled. At 2:35 the Salvage Monarch was reported at Oshawa. Ont.

There was no explanation given for how the tug broke free or why the Salvage Monarch could not retrieve the drifting tug.

Original Report
The 102 foot tug Cathy McAllister was reported adrift on Lake Ontario Saturday evening by Prescott Coast Guard Radio. Unlighted and unmanned, her last reported position by the English River was: 43 42.8N and 77 24.25W or about 11 miles SW of Salmon Point.

At 11:45 the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Griffon was on her way to recover the tug. She was last seen alongside the breakwall at Cape Vincent with the tug Salvage Monarch awaiting weather.

Both vessels were owned by Le Group Ocean Inc., from Quebec City. The McAllister was reported to be sold Heritage Harbour Marine Ltd. of London, Ont and was being towed to Goderich.

Reported by: Ron Walsh and Brian Johnson




Jumbo Vision Upbound

11/03
Jumbo Vision passed the pilot station at Les Escoumins shortly after noon Saturday. After taking on fuel in Montreal Sunday, she will leave for Duluth. This will be on her first trip up the Seaway. The vessel was built two years ago in Turkey.

A fleet mate, the Jumbo Spirit is expected in Montreal on Nov. 5. Her subsequent destination is unknown but it will be probably a port on the Great Lakes. Her last trip up the Seaway was in May 1997 when she went to Hamilton.

Reported by: René Beauchamp.




Busy Day for Milwaukee

11/03
The Port of Milwaukee almost needed a traffic cop on Saturday, November 2. Things got started early Saturday when the Jacklyn M and barge Integrity arrived with a load of cement for Lafarge. Before sunrise the Susan Hanna and barge Southdown Conquest gave an outbound security call from Cemex Cement. They were met outside the breakwall by the Peter Cresswell, inbound with a cargo of salt. Following behind the Cresswell were 2 salt water vessels, both headed for berths in the outer harbor.

Just after sunset the Charles M. Beeghly arrived with a load of coal. As the departing Cresswell cleared the outer breakwall Saturday night they were met by the inbound Alpena.

Inport were the salties Makeebka and Sabina. The following fish tugs were also in on Saturday D&S, Dawn, Jolene, Ida S., Ritter Bros and the new Alaska. The Alaska is the former Ernie C. The Ida S. and Ritter Bros. are relocated from Kewaunee, Wi., owned by Anderson Fisheries.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde and Wendell Wilke




Alpena News

11/03
The Sam Laud brought coal into Lafarge early Saturday morning and left before noon heading for Stoneport. The J.A.W Iglehart is due into port on Sunday afternoon to load cement.

The Alpena is in Milwaukee and the Jacklyn M barge Integrity is heading for St. Joseph.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Today in Great Lakes History - November 03

The B A PEERLESS sailed on her maiden voyage November 3, 1952 bound for Superior, WI where 110,291 bbl of crude oil were loaded destined for British-American's refinery at Clarkson, Ont. The PEERLESS was built for the express purpose of transporting crude oil from the Interprovincial/Lakehead Pipeline terminus at Superior to B/A's Clarkson refinery. The vessel lasted until 1991 when she was broken up.

On 3 November 1898, PACIFIC (wooden propeller passenger/package freighter, 179'. 918 gt, built in 1883 at Owen Sound, Ontario) caught fire at the Grand Trunk dock at Collingwood, Ontario. She burned to a shell despite a concerted effort to save her. She was later towed out into Georgian Bay and scuttled.

On 3 November 1855, DELAWARE (wooden propeller, 173', 368 t, built in 1846 at Black River, OH) was carrying general merchandise from Chicago to Buffalo with a stop at Milwaukee. She was driven ashore by a gale 8 miles south of Sheboygan, Wisconsin and sank. 10 or 11 of the 18 on board lost their lives. Within a few days, only her arches were visible above the water.

On 3 November 1898, PACIFIC (wooden propeller passenger/package freight steamer, 179'. 918 gt, built in 1883 at Owen Sound, Ontario) caught fire at the Grand Trunk dock at Collingwood, Ontario. She burned to a shell despite a concerted effort to save her. She was later towed out into Georgian Bay and scuttled.

Dismantling of the H. C. HEIMBECKER began on 03 Nov 1981 by Triad Salvage Company at Ashtabula, Ohio and was completed the following year. This vessel was originally named GEORGE W. Perkins (steel bulk freighter, 556', 6553 gt, built in 1905 at Superior, WI.)

On November 3, 1910, ATHABASCA (steel propeller passenger steamer, 263', 1774 gt, built in 1883 in Scotland) collided with the tug GENERAL near Lime Island in the St. Mary's River. As a result of the collision, the GENERAL sank. She was later recovered and rebuilt as a bulk freighter and lasted until she was broken up in 1948.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Salvage Monarch Holds at Cape Vincent

11/02
Tug Salvage Monarch and tug Cathy McAllister were heading for Lake Ontario Friday on the way to Goderich. The Cathy McAllister has been sold to Heritage Harbour Marine Ltd. of London, Ont.

The pair stopped and tied up to the Cape Vincent breakwall about 2:30 p.m. Friday, likely holding for weather.

Reported by: René Beauchamp and Ron Walsh.




Cuyahoga in Buffalo

11/02
The Cuyahoga made her second trip up the river to the ADM Standard Elevator late Thursday evening. This is the second trip by a Canadian ship to ADM since the sailing days of the Willowglen and it also the first time in recent memory a boat has been towed this far upriver backwards.

Cuyahoga unloading.
Stern view.
Close up.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Coast Guard's newest ship visits Chicago

11/02
The Coast Guard's newest ship will be arriving at Chicago's Navy Pier at 1:50 p.m. on Sunday, November 3.

The Coast Guard Cutter Oak, a 225-foot buoy tender, is the newest addition to the Coast Guard's fleet and will be in Chicago while the crew conducts training.

The Oak has a crew of 40 and is replacing one of the Coast Guard's 40's era, 180-foot buoy tenders. The cutter will be stationed in Charleston, S.C., where it will maintain buoys and other aids to navigation.

The cutter will be open for public tours on November 4, 6 and 8 in the evening from 6-8 p.m.

Reported by: Paul Roszkowski




Seaway News

11/02
Spotted at Trois-Rivières last week was the Lady Hamilton unloading pitch, also called tar. She was still registered at Hong Kong but the stack markings were not Fednav anymore. It was a white with a huge number 7 painted on in blue. After unloading, she went to Halifax. The registered owner which was Pacific Queen Ltd. is now Pioneer Queen Ltd.

New ship in the Seaway, expected in Montreal this coming weekend for bunkers and stores will be the Dutch-flag heavy-load carrier Jumbo Vision. She will then depart for Duluth and will be on her first transit of the Seaway.

Salties broken up: the following vessels, all visitors to Great Lakes ports under at least one name, were sold a few months ago to be broken up according to the Sept. edition of "Marine News" published by the World Ship Society. In brackets next to the name of the vessel is the year the ship transited the St. Lawrence Seaway for the first time bound for the Lakes.

The fish carrier Alexandere was sold to Chinese breakers and arrived at Xinhui previous to 31-12-2001. In the Seaway as Kashirskoye (1993)
The Fortune type Anna S. was sold to Bangladesh breakers and arrived at Chittagong previous to 30-6-2002. In the Seaway as Sea Tiger (1976)
The 36L type Dane was beached at Alang, India 1-5-2002. In the Seaway as Sunset (1983) and Stefanos (1990).
Express Hercules arrived at Mumbai, India 16-7-2002. In the Seaway as Volta River (1994).
Farahan arrived Alang 6-7-2002. In the Seaway as Carlo Porr (1970).

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Junior ROTC students to visit Cleveland Coast Guard

11/02
On November 4 a group of over 60 Junior ROTC students from Daton, Ohio will visit the U.S. Coast Guard at the Cleveland Moorings from 8 a.m. until 3:30 p.m.

The students will be separated into three groups and will rotate between tours of the Marine Safety Office, the Coast Guard Cutter Neah Bay and Station Cleveland Harbor. Included in the day’s activities will be a tour of a 41-foot and 47-foot rescue boat, a heaving line toss and trips underway aboard Neah Bay.

There will also be a search and rescue demonstration with a helicopter from Air Station Detroit. After the demonstration, the helicopter will be on display along with a boat from Port Security Unit 309. Coast Guard recruiters will give a presentation and hold a question and answer session.

Reported by: Paul Roszkowski




Twin Ports Report

11/02
Laker traffic in the Twin Ports on Friday included Arthur M. Anderson doing a double-dip: The vessel unloaded part of its stone cargo at the DMIR ore dock and then shifted to Hallett 5 to unload the remainder. J.A.W. Iglehart, once an infrequent caller, was back in port for the third time in recent weeks. At Midwest Energy Terminal, Oglebay Norton was loading coal for the short trip to Silver Bay. Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was due at the coal dock late at night.

The grain trade remains brisk. Cenex Harvest States was loading two ships again: Pintail and Olympic Melody. Federal Ems was loading at Cargill B1 and Gunay A. continued to unload oat at Cargill B2.

Elsewhere, John G. Munson is due Nov. 2 at the tiny port of Ontonagon, Mich. From there it will proceed to Two Harbors to load pellets for Lorain.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo News

11/02
The Buckeye finished unloading ore at the Torco Dock and departed late Friday morning. The H. Lee White is now due in at the Torco Ore Dock on Friday evening to unload ore. The Lee A. Tregurtha was loading coal at the CSX Docks. The Cason J. Callaway is expected to arrive at the CSX Docks late Friday evening.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the H. Lee White, Kaye E. Barker, and Algowood on Saturday, followed by the Algobay on Sunday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the John J. Boland on Sunday.

Classic views of Great Lakes Shipping
The South American that once sailed on the Great Lakes. These views in August 1989 at Baltimore, Maryland. The ship was at a scrap yard where the South American was finally several years later as all efforts to bring her back on the Lakes had failed.
Bow view.
Side view.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toledo Traffic on Thursday

11/02
tug Mighty Jake in the BP Slip in Toledo.
Stern view.
Gulls follow the Susan Hoey looking for an easy meal.
Neah Bay outbound the Maumee River approaching the M.L.K. Bridge.
Stern view.
tug Illinois outbound the Maumee at the Anthony Wayne Bridge.
Atlantic Huron with a partial load of barley for Kuhlmans.
She was extremely close to the Canadian Leader.
Canadian Leader loading at Anderson's E Elevator.
tug William Hoey. Engineer Brian Smith and Capt. Dave Jones.
Ste Claire at the City Dock.
Inviken at Toledo World Terminal.
William Hoey at dusk.
Another view.
Canadian Enterprise inbound for Anderson's K Elevator.
dust rising from the Atlantic Huron as she unloads her barley cargo into Kuhlmans hopper.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Cleveland Traffic

11/02
The saltie Rossel Current arrived for Cleveland's Lakefront Dock Friday afternoon with the tugs California and the New York. Loaded with steel, the ship was greeted by winds blowing 40+ with higher gusts. In some of the shots you can see the plus on and off snow and rain.

Pictures by TZ
New York working the bow.
In the back ground 8-foot waves coming over the break wall.
California working the stern.
Off the dock.
Coming along side.
Close up.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Kingston Traffic

11/02
The Metis passed on Friday pushed by the Atlantic Elm. As a canaller, the barge visited Kingston many times and was docked there for several years before conversion to a barge.

The tug Jane Anne IV and barge Sarah Spencer was eastbound. The Stephen B. Roman and English River continue their constant cement trade.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Windoc Special on CBC

11/02
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s 'Fifth Estate' will air a program next Wednesday at 9 PM ET on the Windoc accident. The investigative piece is described on the CBC web site as "And...it seemed like a case of 'boat crashes into bridge', and at the time everybody wondered how people could be so clumsy. The fifth estate has learned what really happened the night the Windoc hit Bridge Number 11".

Reported by: Bill Bird, J. Nelson, Warren Otto and Wayne Sapulski




Weekend Programs

11/02
Shipwrecks Remembered 2002, a day-long exhibition that includes presentations by Great Lakes shipwreck divers, artists, writers and photographers, runs from 1 p.m. today at McMorran Place in Port Huron.
www.greatlakes.net/~divelog

Also taking place today, Lee Murdock performs at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Isle. Please call 313-852-4051 for details.

Nov. 10 Service of Remembrance Yearly ceremony at Detroit's Mariner¹s Church honors those lost on board the Edmund Fitzgerald. Details at http://marinerschurchofdetroit.org




Today in Great Lakes History - November 02

On November 2, 1984 the tugs ATOMIC and ELMORE M. MISNER towed the ERINDALE to the International Marine Salvage scrap dock at Port Colborne where demolition began that month.

The H.C. HEIMBECKER proceeded under her own power to Ashtabula, OH for scrapping, arriving there November 2, 1981.

On November 2, 1948 the FRANK ARMSTRONG collided head-on with the JOHN J. BOLAND (2) in a heavy fog on Lake Erie near Colchester, Ont. Both vessels were badly damaged and resulted in one fatality on the BOLAND. The ARMSTRONG was towed to Toledo, OH for repairs.

In 1972 the A.E. NETTLETON's towline parted from the OLIVE L. MOORE during a snowstorm with gale force winds 17 miles west of the Keweenaw Peninsula on Lake Superior. The barge developed a 15 degree list when her load of grain shifted. Three of her five member crew were air lifted by a U.S.C.G. helicopter to the MOORE to assist in re-rigging the towline. The NETTLETON was then towed the next day into the Lily Pond on the Keweenaw Waterway to trim her cargo.

The WILLIAM C. MORELAND was abandoned to the underwriters on November 2, 1910 as a constructive total loss, amounting to $445,000. She had stranded on Sawtooth Reef off Eagle Harbor, MI on Lake Superior in mid October.

The keel of the new section, identified as Hull #28, was laid down on November 2, 1959. A new forward pilothouse and a hatch crane were installed and her steam turbine engine and water tube boilers were reconditioned. The vessel was named c) RED WING (2) after the Detroit Red Wing hockey team, honoring a long association with Upper Lakes Shipping and James Norris, the founder of ULS, and his two sons, James D. and Bruce, owners of the National Hockey League team.

In 1971 the Lake Michigan Carferry S.S. Badger was laid up due to a coal strike.

On 2 November 1889, FRANCIS PALMS (wooden schooner, 173', 560t, built in 1868 at Marine City, Michigan as a bark) was sailing from Escanaba to Detroit with a load of iron ore when she was driven ashore near Beaver Island in lake Michigan. Her entire crew was taken off by the tug GLADIATOR that also pulled in vain while trying to free the PALMS. The PALMS was pounded to pieces by the storm waves. November was a bad month for the PALMS since she had previously been wrecked on Long Point in Lake Erie in November 1874 and again at Duluth in November 1872.

During the first week of November 1878, the Port Huron Times reported wrecks and mishaps that occurred during a severe storm that swept over the Lakes on Friday and Saturday , 1-3 November. The information was reported on 2, 4 & 5 November as the reports came in. The same reports will appear here starting today: Port Huron Times of 2 November 1878: "The schooner L. C. WOODRUFF of Cleveland is ashore at the mouth of the White River with her foremast gone. She is loaded with corn. Three schooners went ashore at Grand Haven Friday morning, the AMERICA, MONTPELIER, and AUSTRALIAN. One man was drowned off the AUSTRALIAN. The schooner WORTS is ashore and full of water on Beaver Island. Her cargo consists of pork for Collingwood. The tug LEVIATHAN has gone to her aid. The schooner LAKE FOREST is ashore at Hammond's Bay, Lake Huron, and is full of water. She has a cargo of corn aboard. The tug A. J. SMITH has gone to her rescue. The barge S. C. WOODRUFF has gone down in 13 feet of water off Whitehall and her crew is clinging to the rigging at last accounts. A life boat has been sent to her relief. The barge RUTTER is in 25 feet of water and all the crew are now safe."

On 2 November 1874, PREBLE (2-mast wooden schooner, 98', 166 t, built in 1842 at Buffalo as a brig) was lost in a storm off Long Point on Lake Erie and broke up in the waves. The steamer ST. PAUL rescued her crew.

On 02 Nov 1862, BAY STATE (wooden propeller, 137', 372 t, built in 1852 at Buffalo, NY) was bound for Lake Erie ports from Oswego, New York when she broke up offshore in a terrific gale in the vicinity of Oswego. All 22 onboard, including six passengers, lost their lives. The shoreline was strewn with her wreckage for miles.

The PAUL H. CARNAHAN was christened at the foot of West Grand Boulevard in Detroit, Michigan on 02 Nov 1961. She had been converted from a tanker (ATLANTIC DEALER) to a dry bulk cargo carrier by American Ship Building Co. at Lorain, Ohio and came out on her maiden bulk freighter voyage just two weeks before this christening ceremony.

The CANADIAN EXPLORER (now CANADIAN TRANSFER) entered service on 02 Nov 1983, bound for Duluth, Minn. where she loaded 851,000 bushels of corn. She was originally built as the tanker CABOT in 1965, then was rebuilt as a dry cargo bulk carrier at Port Weller Shipyards, Ltd., St. Catharines, Ontario where she received the bow and mid-body of NORTHERN VENTURE. The rebuilt was completed in 1983. She is currently named CANADIAN TRANSFER.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Salvage Monarch Continues on

11/01
Upbound in the Seaway Thursday was the tug Salvage Monarch and tug Cathy McAllister heading for Goderich. The Cathy McAllister has her name painted out and was being towed "on the hip" of the Monarch.

The pair were locking though the Snell Lock last night about 9:30 p.m. It is unknown why the pair are heading to Goderich but they are believed to have been sold. The tugs are expected to arrive sometime on Sunday.

Reported by: René Beauchamp and Gerry O.




Daniella Delivers

11/01
The heavy lift shift Daniella arrived in Nanticoke early Thursday morning escorted by the tugs L 'Ecosse and Miseford. The saltie dropped off some of the original cargo from the Stellanova which was the ship damaged earlier this month in a collision on the Seaway.

Daniella departed Nanticoke late that afternoon.

Reported by: Dave Otterman




Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum Announces Ceremony for the Edmund Fitzgerald

11/01
The Great Lakes Shipwreck Historical Society will hold its Annual Memorial Ceremony for the sailors who were lost in the wreck of the Great Lakes Steamer Edmund Fitzgerald on Sunday, November 10, 2002. The service will be held inside the museum at Whitefish Point, Michigan.

The Fitzgerald was seeking the shelter of Whitefish Point on November 10, 1975, when about 7:10 p.m. all visual and electronic contact was suddenly lost with the 729 foot ore carrier during one of the worst November storms to strike Lake Superior on record. Still among the most puzzling of Great Lakes shipwrecks, the Fitzgerald's story has become the lakes' most famous legend. The final resting place of the Edmund Fitzgerald lies 17 miles to the Northwest of Whitefish Point, 535 feet below the surface of Lake Superior.

A simple ceremony will include quiet reflections, music, and tolling of the Fitzgerald Bell -- 29 times for each missing crewman and once more in memory of all the mariners who have been lost on the Great Lakes.

The museum complex at Whitefish Point Light Station will be open for visitors Saturday, November 9 from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, November 10 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

The Edmund Fitzgerald Ceremony, Call To The Last Watch, will begin promptly at 7 p.m. on Sunday, November 10. The public is invited. For directions and more information, visit online at www.shipwreckmuseum.com




Volmeborg in Menominee

11/01
The Volmeborg entered the Menominee River around 11:00 a.m. on Thursday with a load of wood pulp for K&K Warehouse in Menominee. This is the 15th visit by a Wagenborg ship this year, and the second visit for the Volmeborg. At least two more Wagenborg ships are expected within the next month.

Volmberg approaches North Pier Lighthouse.
Close-up.
Stern view approaching K&K dock.
Stern close-up.
At K&K dock alongside unloading cranes.

Reported by: Dick Lund




Marquette Update

11/01
The Kaye Barker took on a load of taconite on Thursday. The next ship due in is the Great Lakes Trader on Sunday.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Toledo News

11/01
The Canadian Leader was at Andersons "E" Elevator loading grain. The Atlantic Huron was at Andersons "K" Elevator unloading a partial cargo of oats. The tug Everlast with her barge Norman McLeod was at the Sun Dock loading cargo. The salt water vessel Inviken was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The Fred R. White Jr. was loading coal at the CSX Docks.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will now be the Lee A. Tregurtha, Cason J. Callaway, and Kaye E. Barker on Friday, followed by the H. Lee White, Algowood, and Algobay on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will now be the Buckeye on Friday, followed by the H. Lee White, and John J. Boland on Saturday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Lorain Traffic

11/01
The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder backed in to the Black River Thursday morning. The barge was loaded with a cargo of stone for the Jonick dock. The tug stirred up a breakfast buffet for a large flock of lake gulls while passing under the railroad lift bridge.

The next stop was Terminal Ready mix dock just to the north. The pair left early that evening passing the Earl Oglebay loading pellets at the pellet terminal for a trip to ISG steel in Cleveland.

Tug & barge inbound Thursday.
Close up of the bow.
Close up of the tug.
Unloading.

Reported by: Kerry Defer




Toronto News

11/01
Strange Attractor continued unloading raw sugar at Redpath Thursday.

The tug Atlantic Elm arrived with the barge Metis, from Portneuf, Quebec with cement clinkers for Essroc early Thursday morning. That afternoon the cement carrier Stephen B. Roman came in and rafted to the pair.

Work continues on the Glenmont rebuild. Welders were constructing a staircase from the poop deck to the promenade deck today. They must have run out of white paint, as the port side is now 2/3 finished but the starboard side remains rusty from the black hull (painted almost a year ago before refloating) upwards.

The Port Authority tug William Rest, under command of Capt. Keith Fansett, was seen hauling spoils from the Keating Channel this aft. The Port Authority's derrick barge T.H.C. 50 works this area frequently.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Weekend Programs

11/01
Shipwrecks Remembered 2002, a day-long exhibition that includes presentations by Great Lakes shipwreck divers, artists, writers and photographers, runs from 1 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 2 at McMorran Place in Port Huron.
www.greatlakes.net/~divelog

Also Saturday Nov. 2 Lee Murdock performs at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Isle. Please call 313-852-4051 for details.

Nov. 10 Service of Remembrance Yearly ceremony at Detroit's Mariner¹s Church honors those lost on board the Edmund Fitzgerald. Details at http://marinerschurchofdetroit.org




Nautical Nightmare

11/01
The ex Bob-Lo boat Ste. Claire, open to the public in Toledo as a floating "Nautical Nightmare" for the Halloween season. The final nights will be Friday and Saturday. The refurbished steamer is open as the "Nautical Nightmare" on the waterfront in downtown Toledo at International Park.

It is open 7 PM to Mid Night on Fridays and Saturdays. Click here for the Nautical Nightmare web site

Ste. Claire Thursday night.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




Today in Great Lakes History - November 01

The Grand Trunk Western was granted permission by the Interstate Commerce Commission on November 1, 1978 to discontinue its Lake Michigan service between Muskegon, MI and Milwaukee, WI.

The MAITLAND NO.1 made her maiden voyage on November 1, 1916 from Ashtabula to Port Maitland, Ont. transporting rail cars with coal for the steel mills at Hamilton, Ont.

The SCOTT MISENER (3) returned to service in the grain trade on November 1, 1986 after a 3 year lay-up

On 1 November 1917, ALVA B. (wooden steam tug, 74', 84 gt, built in 1890 at Buffalo) apparently mistook amusement park lights for the harbor markers at Avon Lake, Ohio during a storm. She struck bottom in the shallows and was destroyed by waves.

On 1 November 1862, BLACK HAWK (wooden brig, 138', 385 t, built in 1854 at Ohio City, OH) was carrying 19,000 bushels of corn and some stained glass when a gale drove her ashore and wrecked her near Point Betsie. In 1858, this vessel had sailed from Detroit, Michigan to Liverpool, England and back.

On 1 Nov 1862, CHIEF JUSTICE MARSHALL (2-mast wooden schooner, 105', 182 t, built in 1830 at Cape Vincent, NY) was driven aground between Dunkirk and Barcelona, NY during a storm. All hands were lost and the vessel was a total loss.

The Mackinac Bridge was opened to traffic on 01 Nov 1957.

The CITY OF MILWAUKEE (steel propeller carferry, 347', 2988 gt, built in 1931 at Manitowoc, WI) made her last run for Grand Trunk’s rail car ferry service on 01 Nov 1978. In the Fall of 1978 after termination of Grand Trunk's carferry service, she was then chartered to Ann Arbor Railroad. She is currently a museum ship at Manistee, Michigan.

Port Maitland Shipbreaking Ltd. began scrapping the ELMGLEN on 01 Nov 1984. She had a long career, being built in 1909 at Ecorse, Michigan as the SHENANGO (steel propeller bulk freighter, 580'. 8047 gt).

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




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