Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

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* Report News


Low Water at the Soo

11/30
Weekend water levels slowed and stopped downbound river traffic due to record breaking lows recorded at lower pool readings of -18 and Rock Cut at -12 inches. The Wagenborg vessel Keizersborg was able to lock through while Edgar B Speer and Algolake went to anchor west of Gros Cap Light. Early morning water flows are scheduled to increase after 8 a.m. allowing water tables to return. Upbound traffic included Saginaw, Algonova and James R Barker. Agawa Canyon went to anchor overnight near Squaw Island, then enter the Turkey Trail during daylight hours.

Reported by: Jerry Masson


Cleveland Traffic

11/30
Tug Prairie State surfing through the underbrush on the west bank of the Cuyahoga River near the I 490 overpass.
Fire Boat Anthony J. Celebreeze taken by Cleveland’s only waterfront firehouse at Collision Bend.
Tug Mary E. Hannah with Barge at Collision Bend.
Tug Ranger on the east bank of the Cuyahoga just south of the Columbus Road lift bridge, being loaded with welding equipment.
Tug Champion at Cleveland Water Treatment Plant construction project stern view.

Reported by: Munroe Copper


Welland Traffic

11/30
Vessels in the Welland Canal Saturday was the tanker Jade Star upbound above Lock 6, with the tug Jerry G following behind in Lock 5, while the Federal Rhine was downbound on the other side. Doug McKeil and Ocean Hauler were waiting for the winds to die down below Lock 1 at Wharf 1. The saltie Fret Meuse was tied up at the front wall at Port Weller for unknown repairs, in front of Everlast.

Jade Star.
Close up.
Stern view.
Jerry G.
Stern view.
Fret Meuse and Everlast.
Meuse with McGrath.
Doug McKeil and Ocean Hauler.
Another view.

Reported by: Alex Howard


Busy day for Green Bay

11/30
Saturday was a busy day for the port of Green Bay. The John G. Munson arrived at 4:00 AM with a load of 10,000 tons of stone from Calcite for Great Lakes Calcium. The Petite Forte departed Green Bay for Bayship in Sturgeon Bay at 9:30 AM after unloading at St. Mary's Cement. The Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder arrived in Green Bay at 11:45 but had to wait mid river south of the slip for the John G. Munson to depart. The Munson departed after noon for Meldrum Bay. The Pathfinder made its way into the Fox River Dock to unload 9,900 tons of coal. The Alpena was the last vessel to arrive around 2:30. The Alpena was unable to make it past the Tower Drive Br. due to water levels 3' below normal and 27 MPH winds out of the south. As of 4:00 the Pathfinder reported to be on the bottom of the Fox River Dock and unable to continue unloading. The Alpena was also in the mud on the bottom of the river just out of the main channel. Both vessels will remain as is until winds die down and water levels return to normal. The next vessel due in port will be the Mark Hannah with a load of Calcium Chloride for the US Oil dock on Monday.

John G. Munson unloading
Stern View
Departing Green Bay
Inbound at buoy 30
Waiting for the John G. Munson
Backing to the slip
Tug Dorothy Ann
Barge Pathfinder
Wide View
Unloading
Alpena inbound at buoy 30
Stuck in the river
Sterns of Alpena and Dorothy Ann
Alpena unloads at Lafarge
Sterns of the Alpena and the S.T. Crapo

Reported by: Jason Leino


Reserve in Silver Bay

11/30
The Reserve paid Silver Bay a visit last Friday. She tied up to the dock with the sun behind her around 3pm and began taking on a load of pellets.

The Reserve glides into Silver Bay on a beautiful Friday afternoon.
Another view, almost at the dock.

Reported by: Tom Anderson


Today in Great Lakes History - November 30

The CANADIAN PIONEER suffered a major engine room fire on 30 Nov 1987 at Nanticoke.

On November 30, 1981 the A.H. FERBERT (2) was laid up for the last time at the Hallett Dock #5, Duluth, MN.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 passed down the Welland Canal on November 30, 1973 in tow of the tugs JOHN PURVES and YVON SIMARD en route to Sorel, Que. where she was cut down to a barge for off-Lakes use.

On 30 Nov 1967, the CITY OF FLINT 32 was laid up, never to run again.

On 30 Nov 1900, ALMERON THOMAS (2-mast wooden schooner, 50', 35 gt, built in 1891 at Bay City, MI) was carrying gravel in a storm on Lake Huron when she sprang a leak and ran for the beach. She struck bottom and then capsized. She broke up in twenty feet of water near Point Lookout in Saginaw Bay, No lives were lost.

The schooner S. J. HOLLY came into the harbor at Oswego, New York on 30 November 1867 after a hard crossing of Lake Ontario. The previous day she left the Welland Canal and encountered a growing gale. Capt. Oscar Haynes sought calm water along the north shore, but the heavy seas and freezing winds made sailing perilous, The ropes and chains froze stiff and the schooner was almost unmanageable. The only canvas out was a two reef foresail and it was frozen in place. With great skill, the skipper managed to limp into port, having lost the yawl and sustained serious damage to the cargo. Fortunately no lives were lost.

On 30 Nov 1910, ATHABASKA (steel propeller passenger steamer, 263', 1774 gt, built in 1883 in Scotland) collided with the tug GENERAL and sank near Lonely Island in Georgian Bay. No lives were lost. She was later recovered and rebuilt as a bulk freighter and lasted until she was broken up in 1948.
Painting of the Athabaska by Father Dowling.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series





ISG plans stock offering

11/29
International Steel Group Inc., which operates the former LTV and Bethlehem steel mills, hopes to raise up to $414 million through a public stock offering.

ISG said in a filing Wednesday with the Securities and Exchange Commission that it will use the proceeds of the sale to pay down debt. The company said it hopes to sell the shares at $22 to $24 a share.

ISG was formed when a bankruptcy judge approved New York-based WL Ross & Co. LLC's purchase of Cleveland-based LTV Corp.'s steel assets. The company acquired bankrupt Bethlehem Steel last April for $1.5 billion.

Reported by: Al Miller


Tugs and Barges in Green Bay

11/29
Green Bay received visits from two tugs and barges on Friday. The tug Petite Forte and barge St. Mary's II arrived at the St. Mary's Cement dock to unload powdered cement. The Karen Andrie and barge A-397 arrived with liquid asphalt for the Koch Materials dock. A third tug-barge, the Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder was expected on Saturday with coal for the Fox River Dock. The John G. Munson is due back in Green Bay early next week with a load of stone from Calcite, Mich. for Great Lakes Calcium.

The Petite Forte
Barge St. Mary's II offloading into the St Mary's III
Cement transfer and storage barge St. Mary's III
Stern View unloading
Close Up
The Karen Andrie
Barge A-397
Wide View

Reported by: Jason Leino


Alpena Update

11/29
The Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity arrived at Lafarge early Friday morning to load cement. It departed before 7 a.m., heading for South Chicago.

The Steamer Alpena was also in port Friday morning taking on cargo. It left by early afternoon for Green Bay, Wisc. The J.A.W Iglehart is expected to be back in port sometime on Saturday, depending on weather.

The Cason J. Calloway and the Great Lakes Trader were both waiting on weather at the Stoneport dock Friday evening.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain


Saginaw River News

11/29
The James Norris paid a rare visit to the Saginaw River on Friday to deliver a load of salt from Goderich, Ontario, to the Sargent dock at Zilwaukee. The Norris entered the river at about 7 a.m. in rainy and foggy weather, arriving at its dock about noon. This is the first visit to Saginaw by the Norris since October 1998.

The vessel departed the dock about 7 p.m. Friday to continue up to Sixth Street in Saginaw to turn. The Norris was waiting on weather before departing, northern gales force winds were forecast. The James Norris was expected to tie up at the Buena Vista Dock.

Due to weather conditions, however, it was uncertain if the Norris was to depart the river after turning or wait for more favorable weather.

The Norris' cargo was the second load of salt from Goderich to be delivered in as many days to the Sargent dock by a Canadian vessel. On Thursday the Algoway unloaded salt at the same dock. The Algoway departed the Sargent dock after unloading early on Thursday afternoon. However, the vessel was delayed while attempting to turn at Sixth Street and was not outbound until late Thursday evening.

The Canadian Transfer was inbound on the Saginaw River about 6 p.m. on Friday. The Transfer lightered at the Sargent Dock in Essexville before continuing upriver to the Sargent Dock in Zilwaukee to finish unloading. Last night the Canadian Transfer remained at the Sargent Dock waiting on weather.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
James Norris upbound at Lafayette Bridge
Another view at Cass Avenue
Close up of the bow
Stern view

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey


Recent Cleveland Traffic

11/29
The Dredging Barge Ojibway with the Tug Empire State
Algoway on the Cuyahoga River at Collision Bend being escorted by the Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Tugs Mississippi (bow) and the California (stern)
Laurentian and tug Mississippi moored in front of Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Yards
Tug Curly B backing down the Cuyahoga River with barge from the LTV/ISG Steel Yards

Reported by: Munroe Copper


Onboard the Algoport

11/29
Group Ocean tug and barge in Gulf of St Lawrence off Pte Cloridorme
Tug and barge push on
Another choppy day in the gulf
Another view
Wave breaking
Saguenay River entrance, cruise ship outbound
Clearing the river entrance
Shorline near Cap Saumon
Closeup of the lighthouse at Cap Saumon
The cruise ship Hanseatic off Cap aux Oies
Close behind, the Algolake (rare visitor down below)

Reported by: Ken Hamilton


Today in Great Lakes History - November 29

On November 29, 1966, the Daniel J. Morrell sank approximately 20 miles north of Harbor Beach in Lake Huron. Her nearly identical sistership, the Edward Y. Townsend, was traveling about 20 miles behind the Morrell and made it to the Lime Island Fuel Dock in the St. Mary's River where cracks were found in her deck; the Townsend proceeded to Sault Ste. Marie where she was taken out of service. The Townsend sank in the Atlantic on October 7, 1968, while being towed overseas for scrap.

E. B. BARBER was laid up for the last time at Toronto, Ont. on 29 Nov 1984.

On November 29, 1903 snow and stormy seas drove the two-and-a-half year old J.T. HUTCHINSON onto an uncharted rock (now known as Eagle River Reef) one-half mile off shore and 10 miles west of Eagle Harbor, MI near the northwestern coast of the Keweenaw Peninsula.

On November 29, 1974 the PERE MARQUETTE 21 was loaded with remnants of Port Huron's Peerless Cement Dock, which reportedly were bound for Saudi Arabia, and cleared there in tow of the GLT tugs AMERICA and OHIO.

The SYLVANIA was in a collision with the DIAMOND ALKALI in the Fighting Island Channel of the Detroit River on 29 Nov 1968 during a snow squall. SYLVANIA's bow was severely damaged.

The propeller BURLINGTON had barges in tow upbound on Lake Erie when she was damaged by the ice and sank in the Pelee Passage.

On 29 November 1856, ARABIAN (3-mast wooden bark, 116', 350 t, built in 1853 at Niagara, Ontario) had stranded on Goose Island Shoal, 10 miles ENE of Mackinac Island ten days earlier. She was relieved of her cargo and was being towed to Chicago by the propeller OGONTZ when a gale blew in and the towline parted. ARABIAN made for shore, her pumps working full force and OGONTZ following. During the night they were separated and ARABIAN sank off Point Betsey in Lake Michigan. Her crew escaped in her yawl.

In 1903 the Pere Marquette 19 arrived Ludington on her maiden voyage. Captain John J. Doyle in command.

On 29 November 1881, the 149' wooden propeller NORTHERN QUEEN, which had been involved in a collision with the 136' wooden propeller canaller LAKE ERIE just five days before, struck the pier at Manistique so hard that she was wrecked. Besides her own crew, she also had LAKE ERIE's crew on board.

On 29 Nov 1902, BAY CITY (1-mast wood schooner-barge, 140', 306 gt, built in 1857 at Saginaw as a brig) was left at anchor in Thunder Bay by the steamer HURON CITY during a storm. BAY CITY's anchor chain parted and the vessel was driven against the Gilchrist dock at Alpena, Michigan and wrecked. Her crew managed to escape with much difficulty.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Wood-burning Steamer Pumper For Sale on eBay

11/28
An item listed on the Internet auction site eBay Motors is a slice of Great Lakes history.

The S.S. Pumper, a 60-foot former fish tug and tugboat based at Niagara-On-the-Lake, Ont. and lately operated as an excursion vessel on the Niagara River by the Niagara Steamship Co., is for sale. Asking price: $400,000 (U.S.).

Pumper, built in 1903 at Buffalo, is powered by a restored, wood-fired 1895 Doty steam engine and is the only known wood-burner on the lakes. She spent much of her career on Georgian Bay, and sailed under the names Planet, Paul Evans (for the once-familiar Hindman family of Owen Sound) and Racey.

According to the seller, Pumper is in pristine working and operational condition and is available to a town, or historic society that will protect and promote her marine heritage. She is also available for a private collector. As yet there have been no bids for the vessel.

For a look at Pumper¹s very interesting history, as well as a statement from the current owner on why the historic vessel is for sale, visit: www.pumper.ca/content

Pumper leaves her dock in 2002.
Engineers load fuel aboard.
The Pumper's two-cylinder steam engine.
Pumper as Paul Evans sometime after 1957.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre


St. Lawrence Seaway Closing Dates Listed

11/28
If weather conditions allow, the St. Lawrence Seaway will stay open until at least Dec. 24, and possibly longer.

Conditions and vessel demand will be reviewed again in early December. However, due to winter maintenance requirements, navigation will not be extended beyond Dec. 29 at 2400 hours, according to an announcement made this week by Seaway authorities.

Mariners are advised that the closing of the Welland Canal is scheduled to take place at 0800 hours on Dec. 24. The final closing date and time will be announced no later than Dec. 15, and any transits allowed beyond this date, depending on demand and operating conditions, will be subject to written agreements.


Fleet Mates in Green Bay

11/28
Wednesday night was busy for the port of Green Bay. The Arthur M. Anderson arrived in port around 5:30 p.m. with a load of 17,000 tons of stone for Great Lakes Calcium from Stoneport, Mich. Shortly after the Anderson was tied up the John G. Munson arrived with a load of 17,800 tons of coal for the Fox River dock which shares the same slip as Great Lakes Calcium.

When the Anderson completes unloading it will wait for the Munson to finish. Then the Munson will shift out of the slip allowing the Anderson to back out and depart. The Munson will follow after the Anderson has cleared the slip.

A U.S. Coast Guard boat was in the bay Wednesday working on navigation markers. The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder is due at the Fox River Dock Friday morning with a load of 9,900 tons of coal.

Stern View of the Anderson
Bow View
Another View
Sterns
John G. Munson
Munson on the left Anderson in the slip at right

Reported by: Jason Leino


Coast Guard Port Security members return home

11/28
Last weekend twenty-one members of Port Security Unit 309, out of Port Clinton, Ohio, arrived at the Cleveland Hopkins Airport on Saturday.

PSU 309 was deployed to the Persian Gulf in February in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Port security units are self-sustainable units capable of deploying within 96 hours of notification and are able to establish operations within 24 hours of arrival in theater. The mission of a port security unit is to provide waterborne and limited land-based protection for shipping and critical port facilities.

Reported by: USCG


Recent Cleveland Traffic

11/28
Federal Hudson unloading steel plate and bar stock.
Wolverine at the Cleveland Bulk Terminal November 11.
James Palladino and barge Kellstone I in the central Cleveland Flats

Reported by: Munroe Copper


Onboard the Algoport

11/28
Raising anchor in the Madeleine Islands
Another view
Monitoring the progress
Anchor's aweigh!
Madeleine Islands, approaching Grande Entreé
A closer view
Inbound the channel
Another close up of coastline
Grande Entreé Harbour
Heading up the channel
Closeup of abandoned house
Salt dock in sight

Reported by: Ken Hamilton


Today in Great Lakes History - November 28

On November 28, 1905, the Pittsburgh Steamship Company vessel Mataafa was wrecked as it tried to re-enter the Duluth Ship Canal in a severe storm. The Mataafa had departed Duluth earlier but had decided to return to safety. After dropping her barge in the lake, the vessel was picked up by waves, was slammed against the north pier and was swung around to rest just hundreds of feet offshore north of the north pier, where it broke in two. Much of the crew froze to death in the cold snap that followed the storm, as there was no quick way to get out to the broken vessel for rescue. The Mataafa was repaired prior to the 1906 season; she ultimately ended her career as an automobile carrier for the T.J. McCarthy Steamship Company and was sold for scrap in 1965.

The CANADIAN OLYMPIC's maiden voyage was 28 Nov 1976 to load coal at Conneaut, Ohio for Nanticoke, Ont. Her name honors the Olympic Games that were held at Montreal that year.

On November 28, 1983 while upbound after leaving the Poe Lock the INDIANA HARBOR was in a collision, caused by high winds, with the downbound Greek salty ANANGEL SPIRIT resulting in a 10 foot gash in the laker's port bow.

LANCASHIRE was launched November 28, 1942 she would be renamed b) SEWELL AVERY

The CATHY B. towed the GOVERNOR MILLER to Vigo, Spain on November 28, 1980 where she was broken up.

The BENSON FORD (2) was renamed e) US.265808 and departed River Rouge on November 28, 1986 towed by the Sandrin tugs TUSKER and GLENADA bound for Ramey's Bend in the Welland Canal.

FRONTENAC (4) arrived at the Fraser Shipyard, Superior, WI on November 28, 1979. Her keel, which had hogged four feet, was declared a constructive total loss.

The BRANSFORD stranded on a reef off Isle Royal in Lake Superior during a major storm on 28 Nov 1905 (the same storm that claimed the steamer MATAAFA). She was recovered.

On her third trip in 1892 the Ann Arbor #1 again ran aground, this time three miles north of Ahnapee (now called Algoma). There was $15,000 damage to her cargo.

In 1906 the Ann Arbor #4 left Cleveland bound for Frankfort on her maiden voyage.

The Ann Arbor #4 ran aground off Kewaunee in 1924.

On 28 November 1905, AMBOY (2-mast wooden schooner-barge, 209', 894 gt, formerly HELENA) was carrying coal in tow of the wooden propeller GEORGE SPENCER in a gale on Lake Superior. In an effort to save both vessels, AMBOY was cut loose. The SPENCER was disabled quickly and was driven ashore near Little Marais, MN. AMBOY struggled against the gale for a full day before finally going ashore near Thomasville, Ontario on 29 November. No lives were lost from either vessel.

On 28 November 1872, W. O. BROWN (wooden schooner, 140', 306 t, built in 1862 at Buffalo) was carrying wheat in a storm on Lake Superior when she was driven ashore near Point Maimanse, Ontario and pounded to pieces. Six lives were lost. Three survivors struggled through a terrible cold spell and finally made it to the Soo on Christmas Day.

On 28 Nov 1874, the propeller JOHN PRIDGEON JR. was launched at Clark's shipyard in Detroit, Michigan. She was built for Capt. John Pridgeon. Her dimensions were 235' x 36' x 17'. The engines of the B. F. WADE were installed in her.

On 28 Nov 1923, the Detroit & Windsor Ferry Company and Bob-Lo docks were destroyed by a fire cause by an overheated stove in the ferry dock waiting room. The blaze started at 3:00 AM.

CANADIAN TRANSFER underwent repairs most of Tuesday, 28 Nov 2000 at the Algoma Steel dock at Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. She had run aground the previous night in the Canadian channel approaching Algoma Steel. Canadian Transfer was freed by two Purvis Marine tugs. The vessel suffered a crack or hole in the hull plating about 10 feet from the bottom along its port side.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Arthur K. Atkinson Departs Ludington

11/27
The long idle carferry Arthur K. Atkinson was towed from Ludington Wednesday, heading north onto Lake Michigan. The tugs David J. Kadinger and Jake M. Kadinger took the carferry out after waiting several days for the weather to improve. The tow is headed for the St. Ignace, Mich. area.

The Ludington Daily News reports that the former ferry was purchased by a private individual and will be used as a personal yacht. No other details were available.

Tow departing.
Passing.
Onto the lake.
Stern view.
Another view.
Good by Ludington.

Reported by: Max Hanley


Algoisle Moved

11/27
The Algoisle was moved from its lay-up dock in Toronto's turning basin near the Cherry Street Bridge Wednesday. The Algobay was then shifted from the dry dock area to the Cherry Street dock. It is unclear if this move was made to make room for the Algobay or if the Algoisle will be moved from Toronto. The wall where the Algobay was docked is under construction for a new Hydro One sub-station.

Algoisle has been in lay-up Since December 21, 2001.

Reported by: Owen Schneider


Maumee Visit Grand Haven

11/27
The Maumee visited Grand Haven, Mich. Wednesday unloading a cargo of stone. She was backing out of port by Wednesday afternoon.

Unloading.
Backing down the channel.

Reported by: Jim Lindholm and Thomas Virro


Owen Sound Update

11/27
The Cedarglen departed Owen Sound Wednesday after unloading at the Great Lakes Grain Elevator.

Turning in Owen Sound Bay to depart at 3:45 p.m. Wednesday.

Reported by: Ed Saliwonchyk


Toledo Update

11/27
The Tug Mary E. Hannah and barge were working her way up the Maumee River on Wednesday afternoon bound for one of the refinery docks to load cargo. The Federal Maas was at the T. W. I. Dock unloading cargo.

The American Mariner was due into the CSX Docks late Wednesday evening to load coal. The revised CSX Coal Dock update is as follows. The Lee A. Tregurtha and Herbert C. Jackson are due on Thursday. The Charles M. Beeghly and the tug Integrity/ barge McKee Sons on Friday. The Atlantic Erie and Maumee on Sunday, followed by the Philip R. Clarke on Monday.

The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the Frontenac and John B. Aird on Monday. The Peter R. Creswell is due into the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock on Friday to unload stone.

There are no vessels in at the Shipyard at this time. the Armco, Buckeye, and Courtney Burton remain in lay-up at their respective dock sites.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Onboard the Algoport

11/27
Cape-class ore carrier Front Leader loading at IOC dock Sept Iles
Old Desgagnes ship laid up just above Goose Cape, St Lawrence River.
Lake Michigan downbound off Cap Maillard
Mercy Wisdom right behind her
Cruise liner Crystal Symphony downbound just below Quebec City
Passing
Stern view
Canmar Pride downbound at section 74 Montreal
Canadian Prospector not far behind
CTMA Vacancier upbound
Canmar Venture on approach to container docks
Busy Day in harbor
Turned downriver
Letting go from the tug
Watchman Melton Keeping watch
Algoport tunnel forward, looking aft

Reported by: Ken Hamilton


Thanksgiving Day Dinner Menu

11/27
Southdown Challenger November 28, 2002
Appetizers
Oyster Cocktail, Shrimp Cocktail, Assorted Olives & Raw Vegetables

Soups
Oyster Stew & Chicken Noodle Soup

Entree
Roast Tom Turkey w/Sage Dressing & Wild Rice
Lobster Tail w/Butter Sauce
Baked Virginia Ham w/Pineapple Rings
Mashed & Sweet Potatoes, Buttered Peas, Squash, Giblet Gravy, Hot Dinner Rolls, Cranberry Sauce

Desserts
Mincemeat, Apple, Peach & Pumpkin Pie Whipped Cream, Fruit Cake, Ice Cream, Chocolate Mints, Sugared Dates

Refreshments
Coffee, Tea, Milk, Hot Chocolate, Soft Drinks, Egg No, Cigars, Cigarettes, Hard Candy, Gum

Below are images of the Indiana Harbor's 2001 menu.
Covers.
Inside pages.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde


Today in Great Lakes History - November 27

The ALGOSEA entered Lake service as a self-unloader for the first time with salt loaded at Goderich, Ont. and passed downbound in the Welland Canal November 27, 1976 for Quebec City.

The AVONDALE (2) was condemned and was not allowed to carry cargo after she arrived at Toledo, OH on November 27, 1975 to load soybeans.

The steam barge CHAUNCY HURLBUT was launched at the shipyard of Simon Langell at St. Clair, MI on Thanksgiving Day, 27 November 1873. She was built for Chandler Bros. of Detroit.

On 27 November 1886, COMANCHE (wooden schooner, 137', 322 t, built in 1867 at Oswego, NY) was carrying corn in a storm on Lake Ontario when she ran on a shoal and sank near Point Peninsula, NY. A local farmer died while trying to rescue her crew of 8. His was the only death. She was later recovered and rebuilt as THOMAS DOBBIE.

The Pere Marquette 22 collided with the Wabash in heavy fog in 1937.

In 1966 the City of Midland 41 ran aground at Ludington in a storm. Stranded on board were a number of passengers and 56 crewman. Ballast tanks were flooded to hold the steamer on until the storm subsided. She was pulled off four days later by the Roen tug JOHN PURVES.

The propeller MONTGOMERY, which burned in June 1878, was raised on 27 November 1878. Her engine and boiler were removed and she was converted to a barge. She was rebuilt at Algonac, Michigan in the summer of 1879.

On 27 November 1866, the Oswego Advertiser & Times reported that the schooner HENRY FITZHUGH arrived at Oswego, New York with 17,700 bushels of wheat from Milwaukee. Her skipper was Captain Cal Becker. The round trip took 23 days which was considered "pretty fast sailing."

The CITY OF FLINT 32 was launched in Manitowoc on 27 Nov 1929.
Image of the City Of Flint 32 from the Father Dowling Collection

On Monday, 27 Nov 1996, the MALLARD up bound apparently bounce off the wall in the Welland canal below Lock 1 and into the path of the CANADIAN ENTERPRISE. It was a sideswipe rather than a head on collision. The ENTERPRISE was repaired at Port Weller Dry Docks. The repairs to the gangway and ballast vent pipes took six hours. The MALLARD proceeded to Port Colborne to be repaired there.

At 10:20 p.m. on Monday, 27 NOV 2000, the CANADIAN TRANSFER radioed Soo Traffic to report that the vessel was aground off Algoma Steel and "taking on water but in no danger." The crew reported that they had two anchors down and one line on the dock. Purvis Marine was contacted.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Cliffs wins bidding for EVTAC, plant to reopen

11/26
Pellet production at bankrupt EVTAC Mining Co. is expected to resume in a couple of weeks after a bankruptcy court judge ruled that Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. and Laiwu Steel Group should become EVTAC's new owners.

The judge's ruling came a day after a committee of EVTAC's creditors recommended that Cliffs and its Chinese partner be allowed to purchase the plant instead of rival bidder Gerald Metals.

To win the bidding battle over rival Gerald Metals, Cliffs and Laiwu had to increase their purchase offer from $500,000 to $3 million. That, along with a willingness to assume about $40 million worth of environmental liabilities and a lengthy contract to sell pellets, won the bidding. The additional money from Cliffs is expected to go toward EVTAC's back taxes.

Cleveland-Cliffs wants to close the sale Monday and have the taconite plant operating by mid-December. EVTAC will operate under the name United Taconite LLC. The 4.3-million-ton-per-year taconite plant will provide pellets to Cliffs, and Laiwu Steel would buy about 4 million tons of pellets from Cliffs through 2012.

EVTAC previously was a major shipper of taconite pellets through the DMIR ore dock in Duluth. Since the plant's inventory ran out, little ore has been shipped through the dock. It's unclear whether EVTAC's revival will mean more business for the ore dock, however, because there's been talk of switching the shipments to the idled shipping facility in Taconite Harbor.

Reported by: Phil Tatum


Ranger Returns

11/26
The Canadian Ranger was upbound in the Seaway Tuesday after spending more than a year as a storage vessel at Trois-Rivières. The vessel first entered lay-up in Montreal on Dec. 31, 2000. She returned to service Monday night departing Trois-Rivières for Toronto.

The Barge Laviolette remains in Montreal with no date of departure scheduled. On Monday no lightering of its cargo of sugar had been done. The barge used to be the forepart section of Canadian Explorer built in 1961 in West Germany by Schlieker-Werft.

Upbound at Montreal on Tuesday. Kent Malo

Reported by: Kent Malo and René Beauchamp


Marquette Update

11/26
The John J. Boland brought a load of stone to the lower harbor Tuesday. The Herbert Jackson and Charles Beeghly came in for ore. Wednesday will see the Middletown and the Michipicoten.

The John J. Boland unloading stone. Note the truck hauling away some of that stone.

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Soo Traffic

11/26
The ferry Ranger III is expected to depart the Carbide Dock shortly after midnight. The vessel has been docked in the harbor waiting for weather conditions to improve before crossing Lake Superior to her home dock. The ferry is headed to Houghton, Michigan.

Upbound traffic Tuesday night included the Charles M. Beeghly, Anglian Lady & barge, Middletown, George A Stinson, Edgar B Speer, Michipicoten, Keizerborg, Vancouverborg, Ranger III and Enviken.

Downbound included the Walter J McCathy Jr., Presque Isle, Burns Harbor, Joseph L. Block, BBC Russia, Lake Erie, Columbia Star, Joyce L Van Enkevort & Great Lakes Trader, Canadian Enterprise, Canadian Provider, Lee A Tregurtha, Edwin H Gott, Herbert C Jackson, Alpena, James R. Barker, Wolverine and Victoriaborg.

Reported by: Scott Best


Green Bay Update

11/26
The Earl W. Oglebay arrived in Green Bay Tuesday morning with a load of limestone from Port Inland, Mich. for the Western Lime dock. After unloading the Earl W. Oglebay shifted to the North Leicht dock to take on 15,000 gallons of diesel fuel. With wind gusts up to 30 mph the Earl W. Oglebay was not due to depart Green Bay until early Wednesday morning at the earliest. The Earl W. Oglebay will head for Port Inland to load stone for Superior, Wisc. when they depart.

The Arthur M. Anderson is due in Green Bay with a load of stone from Calcite sometime mid morning Wednesday. The Anderson was due in on the Monday but has been delayed due to weather. Once they depart Green Bay they are expected to load at Stoneport, Mich.

The John G. Munson was anchored in the straits of Mackinaw Tuesday night waiting weather. When they get underway they will proceed to the Fox River dock with 17,000 tons of coal.

Unloading at Western Lime
Icy Bow
View from WPS
View from Main Street bridge
Refueling at the North Leicht dock
Stern view from the dock
Pilot house at night
Earl W. Oglebay at night
Bow view
Wide view at night

Reported by: Jason Leino


Saginaw River News

11/26
The Agawa Canyon arrived in Saginaw on Tuesday after a two-day weather delay.

The vessel carried a split load from Meldrum Bay for the Burroughs dock near the I-75 Bridge and the old General Motors dock in Saginaw. It had been due on Sunday, but was forced to wait out strong winds and low water levels before entering the river. On Monday afternoon, water levels at Essexville were 26 inches below datum.

The Agawa Canyon is expected to depart Saginaw about midnight Tuesday. Also arriving on Tuesday was the tug Rebecca Lynn with a barge. The vessel docked early in the morning at the Bit-Mat terminal in Bangor Township.

Reported by: Stephen Hause


Toledo Report

11/26
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers tug Kozoil departed from the Shipyard drydock Tuesday afternoon and was outbound the Maumee River bound for her homeport.

The Cuyahoga was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator and was expected to depart late Tuesday afternoon or evening. The Federal Maas was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The Armco, Buckeye, Courtney Burton remain in layup at their respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will be the Lee A. Tregurtha, H. Lee White, Herbert C. Jackson, and Atlantic Erie on Thursday. The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons, and Charles M. Beeghly on Friday, followed by the Philip R. Clarke on Monday. The Peter R. Creswell is due into the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock on Thursday.

The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Docks will be the John B. Aird on Sunday, followed by the Frontenac on Monday.

Classic view of Toledo Shipping
The Hennepin at Hans Hansen Dock in temporary lay-up.
The Hochelaga at the City Dock waiting to load a grain cargo at one of the Elevators when they become available.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


174th Anniversary for the Welland Canal

11/26
The 174th anniversary of the opening of the first Welland Canal will be celebrated Thursday morning at 10 a.m. at Lock 3.

Upbound in the Canal Tuesday evening was a new heavy lift saltie, the Fret Meuse. The ships is headed for W10, the Welland Dock.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt


Roman in Rochester

11/26
The cement carrier Stephen B. Roman was inbound at the Charlotte piers late Tuesday morning. She arrived to unload a cargo of cement at Essroc.

Reported by: Scott Killenbeck


Onboard the Algoport

11/26
Loading rig at Lower Cove, Nfld
Access to the shore and the conveyor
Looking along the dolphins
One of the few sections of beach near the dock
Remember the transfer load? this is what it looked like after compression in holds.
1st mate Kash Rao and deckhand Dave Buckland checking the draft in the dorie used by the dock (only way to check the draft here)
Finishing the trim
Closeup of one of the caves along the coastline
Interesting rock formation on the point

Reported by: Ken Hamilton


Trip Auction Helps Raise Funds

11/26
Jackson Lumen Christi High School would like to thank those who participated in the trip auction for 4 adults on an American Steamship vessel.

The winning bid was submitted by a Cleveland area couple and represented the single largest amount ever raised for an individual auction item during the history of the previous 28 auctions. A special thanks to American Steamship for allowing the 2004 summer trip to be auctioned.

Reported by: Jackson Lumen Christi High School.


Today in Great Lakes History - November 26

The MESQUITE departed Charlevoix and locked through the Soo on November 26, 1989 to begin SUNDEW's normal buoy tending duties on Lake Superior.

The ELIZABETH HINDMAN was launched November 26, 1920 as a) GLENCLOVA.

November 26, 1910 - The Ann Arbor #5 was launched. She was the first carferry to be built with a seagate, as a result of the sinking of the Pere Marquette 18 in September of 1910.

On 26 November 1872, the steamer GEO. W. REYNOLDS burned at 1 o'clock in the morning at the dock in Bay City. The fire supposedly originated in the engine room. She was owned by A. English of East Saginaw.

On 26 November 1853, ALBANY (wooden sidewheel passenger/package freight, 202', 669 t, built in 1846 at Detroit, MI) was carrying passengers and miscellaneous cargo in a storm on Lake Huron.. She was making for the shelter of Presque Isle harbor when the gale drove her over a bar. Her crew and 200 passengers came ashore in her boats. Plans were made to haul her back across the bar when another storm wrecked her. Her boiler and most of her machinery were recovered the following year.

LAKE BREEZE (wooden propeller, 122', 301 gc, built in 1868 at Toledo, OH) burned at her dock in Leamington, Ontario on 26 November 1878. One man perished in the flames. She was raised in 1880 but the hull was deemed worthless. Her machinery and metal gear were removed in 1881 and sold to an American company.

The ANN ARBOR No. 5 (steel carferry, 359', 2988 gt) was launched by the Toledo Ship Building Company (hull #118) on 26 Nov 1910. She was the first carferry to be built with a seagate, as a result of the sinking of the PERE MARQUETTE 18 in September of 1910.

On 26 Nov 1881, JANE MILLER (wooden propeller passenger-package freight "coaster", 78', 210 gc, built in 1878 at Little Current, ON) departed Meaford, Ontario for Wiarton-- sailing out into the teeth of a gale and was never seen again. All 30 aboard were lost. She probably sank near the mouth of Colpoy's Bay in Georgian Bay. She had serviced the many small ports on the inside coast of the Bruce Peninsula.

HIRAM W. SIBLEY (wooden propeller freighter, 221', 1419 gt, built in 1890 at E. Saginaw, MI) was carrying 70,000 bushels of corn from Chicago for Detroit. On 26 Nov 1898, she stranded on the northwest corner of South Manitou Island in Lake Michigan during blizzard. (Some sources say this occurred on 27 November.) The tugs PROTECTOR and SWEEPSTAKES were dispatched for assistance but the SIBLEY re-floated herself during the following night and then began to sink again. She was put ashore on South Fox Island to save her but she broke in half; then completely broke up during a gale on 7 December 1898.

During the early afternoon of 26 Nov 1999, the LOUIS R. DESMARAIS suffered an engine room fire while sailing in the western section of Lake Ontario. Crews onboard the DESMARAIS put out the fire and restarted her engines. The DESMARAIS proceeded to the Welland canal where she was inspected by both U.S. and Canadian investigators. No significant damage was noted and the vessel was allowed to proceed.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history.





Iroquois Lock Incident

11/25
More details are available on last week’s incident at the Iroquois Lock when the salt water ship Kopalnia Borynia struck the arrestor cable.

On Friday the Kopalnia Borynia damaged the Iroquois lock arresting cables, closing the lock for over nine hours while crews repaired the cables. While maneuvering into the lock, Kopalnia Borynia was unable to back down and was halted by arresting cables. The cables are in place to stop a vessel in this type of situation, they halt a vessel before it can strike the lock gate and do much greater damage.

No damage was caused to the Kopalnia Borynia, however the lock's arresting cables suffered damage while stopping the vessel. Two vessels were delayed, the upbound Rega and downbound Gordon C. Leitch.

The problem onboard the Kopalnia Borynia was reported to be inadequately charged start air tanks. The lack of start air prevented the vessel's direct-drive diesel engine from restarting in the astern propulsion mode.

The arresting cables were brought back into proper working order at 3 a.m. Saturday, allowing the lock to reopen to all traffic.

Reported by: Kevin Garling and Erik Wood


Wintry Weather, Low Water Delays Vessels

11/25
Plunging temperatures that turned rain in some areas Sunday to snow by Monday sent vessels to shelter all around the Great Lakes.

Heavy wind gusts and snow/rain storms were predicted for Monday, with visibility reduced to less than one nautical mile in some areas. The storms are expected to move out of the Great Lakes area by early morning Tuesday. Duluth received 6.5 inches of snow over the weekend.

Low water was also a problem in some areas due to wind, Monday afternoon that the water gauge at Gibralter (lower Detroit River) had dropped to -15 inches below datum. Among vessels delayed in the area Monday were the downbound Atlantic Superior, H. Lee White and Ziemia Cieszynska.

At 10:45 p.m. Monday, another low water advisory was issued, reporting water levels in Saginaw Bay at -14.3 inches and -25 inches in the Western Lake Erie basin.

Meanwhile, the upbound Southdown Challenger was awaiting better weather on Lake Huron at her usual Detroit dock.

Picture by Glenn Terbush
Joseph H. Frantz anchored in the St. Clair River Monday evening.
Another view.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre, Angie Williams and Dave Wobser


Lake Ontario Ferry Loses Power

11/25
Monday the Amherst Island car ferry Quinte Loyalist lost all power while approaching its Millhaven terminal with nine passengers aboard. The Quinte Loyalist was replacing the Frontenac II on the Amherst Island run while the Frontenac is in Kingston for maintenance.

The ferry was 1/8 mile off shore and was being blown towards shore, the anchor was down but not holding. The Canadian Coast Guard Ship Bittern was dispatched from Kingston and a Labrador Helicopter was dispatched from Trenton. The ferry dropped a second anchor and were able to hold position.

The wind was gale force and the waves were approaching five feet. The Bittern arrived and stopped at the dock to pick up an engineer for the ferry.

The Bittern put a line aboard the ferry and used the towing wire to help keep the ferry from grounding. The tow line held the ferry but one anchor let go, the second anchor grabbed and the Bittern held firm. The ship was quite close to shore as the anchor let go.

The engineer was able to restart one engine and the ferry raised its anchors and along with the Bittern, claw off the shore. The crew was faced with a tricky maneuvering situation to get the ferry near the dock on one engine in heavy seas. The Bittern showed great skill as they used the tow line to swing the ferry parallel to the dock so she could tie up.

The helicopter was then released from station and the Bittern returned to Kingston.

Reported by: Ron Walsh


Tug Forney Departs Army Yard

11/25
The historic WWII U.S. Army ST tug Forney departed the Corps of Engineers yard in Detroit Monday under tow of the Gaelic tug Carolyn Hoey. The Forney is most likely the best preserved and possibly the last of this class of ST tugs in original condition. Her direct reversing main engine and generators are in good running condition. The vessel was laid up after her last operation in 2001 so the vessel was towed to her new owners dock on the Rouge River next to Gaelic's yard.

Forney under tow of the Carolyn Hoey
Another view.
Forney at her dock on the Rouge River next to the Shannon.

Reported by: Bill Hoey


New Cross-lake Ferry Takes Shape at Alabama Shipyard

11/25
The new, 192-foot, aluminum-hulled catamaran due to enter service this coming June on a run from Muskegon to Milwaukee is about half-finished at Astal USA shipbuilding in Mobile, Ala.

The ship should be named by Lake Express LLC officials in the coming months and a schedule and fares for next summer should be announced by the end of the year, according to an article Nov. 23 in the Muskegon Chronicle.

Launching is set for mid-March. The $19 million vessel is expected to be able to carry 250 passengers and 46 cars, and will operate June through December in 2004, and May through December beginning in 2005. It will make three round trips daily in June through September and two trips daily in May, October, November and December. The vessel will feature stern- and bow-loading and unloading of vehicles. Passengers will drive on and off without having to turn around.

Diesel-powered engines will drive four water jets to propel the catamaran. It's expected to travel at 34 nautical miles per hour, or about 39 miles per hour, and cross the lake in 2 1/2 hours.

The trip from Mobile to Milwaukee will be made through the Intercoastal Waterway of the Gulf Coast and then the East Coast. Once in New York, the vessel will enter the Hudson River and the canal system that will take it into the Great Lakes.

A formal christening ceremony is expected to take place in Milwaukee.

Reported by: Steve Ryan


Deal to Sell Rouge Steel to Russians Moves Ahead; Fight Expected

11/25
Rouge Industries Inc. has signed a deal to sell all its assets to Russian steelmaker OAO Severstal for $215 million.

The agreement calls for an undisclosed assumption of debt and sets the stage for what could be a contentious hearing Monday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Del. A bankruptcy Court judge must decide if she should name Severstal the lead company, in acquiring the Dearborn, Mich., steelmaker, based on its offer and Rouge's sale plan. The designation would mean any company interested in bidding for Rouge during the auction portion of the bankruptcy process would have to beat Severstal's offer by $1 million.

At least 10 parties have filed objections to Rouge's sale plan, including U.S. Steel Corp., the United Auto Workers and the City of Dearborn. The UAW represents 1,900 of the 2,600 workers at the plant.

Most objectors claim Rouge's plan and selling price don't take into account money creditors are owed. Rouge wants to complete the transaction by January. That means workers would have to wait until after the New Year to learn about their fate.

Rouge would become the first steelmaker in the United States to be acquired by a Russian competitor if Severstal buys it. The firm filed for bankruptcy in October after it posted combined losses of $360.3 million since 1999.

Reported by: Frank Frisk and Roger LeLievre


Twin Ports Report

11/25
Alpena paid a late-season call to the Twin Ports. It was unloading at the Lafarge terminal in Duluth on Monday morning. Also in port was Victoriaborg, loading at General Mills in Duluth and Irma, loading at AGP elevator in Duluth. Indiana Harbor was due later in the day at Midwest Energy Terminal.

Reported by: Al Miller


Owen Sound Update

11/25
The Cedarglen arrived shortly after midnight Monday morning and was unloading at the Great Lakes Grain Elevator in Owen Sound.

The Chi Cheemaun is brightly lit with Christmas lights contributing to the "Festival of Northern Lights" display on the banks of the Sydenham River in downtown Owen Sound.

Pictures by Ed Saliwonchyk
Chi Cheemaun.
Decorated dining room windows.

Reported by: Ed Saliwonchyk and Torben Hawksbridge


St. Lawrence River Traffic at Verchères

11/25
Bow view of Lykes Winner downbound off Verchères from Montréal on a particularly calm morning, Nov. 21.
Stern view.
MSC Brianna with a new paint job upbound off Verchères to Montréal, Nov. 22.
Maersk Rugen, a new caller in our parts, upbound off Verchères to Montréal, Nov. 22.
Bow view of Fret Meuse, the former Scan Partner, upbound off Verchères to Montréal and ultimately the Seaway, Nov. 23.
Stern view of Fret Meuse, Nov. 23.
Fret Meuse in a higher angle view off Varennes, Nov. 23.
John D. Leitch meets Fret Meuse off Varennes; quite a difference in size, Nov. 23.
John D. Leitch downbound off Varennes from the Seaway, Nov. 23.
Pilica upbound off Verchères to the Seaway, Nov. 23.
Algosteel downbound off Verchères from the Seaway, Nov. 24.
Maersk Rugen shown passing very close to shore at Cap St. Michel (Varennes) in this stern view while downbound from Montréal, Nov. 24.
OOCL Belgium upbound off Cap St. Michel to Montréal in one of her monthly calls on the North Atlantic run, Nov. 24.
CSL's Frontenac downbound off Cap St. Michel from the Seaway, Nov. 24.

Pictures by René Beauchamp via Marc Piché
Seaways-5 shown underway in the Port of Montréal on October 11.
Weston is the former Tranquillity sold at an auction last September to Marathon Marine and put under the Belize flag, Montréal, berth 25 (where she was laid up for nearly 6 months), Oct. 7.
A last glimpse of Saturn shown as Centenario Trader at Sorel-Tracy being readied for her trip to Panama, Nov. 6.

Reported by: Marc Piché


Onboard the Algoport

11/25
Rock Island Tower just above the American Narrows
In the narrows, just below 1000 Island Bridge
looking back the other way as the tourists go by.
Heart Island as we sail past
Entering St Lambert lock downbound
Passing the centreline
Traffic waiting to come upbound; the old Woodland in tow in Desgagnes colors with a CSL self unloader behind
Jean Parisien in Montreal
Salty in Montreal Harbour with the Olympic Stadium in the background
Another view of the Jean Parisien
Saltie Lykes Inspirer
The old boats waiting for the last trip
Lady Hamilton, a former Misener boat.
Cast Prospect at the container docks
Saltie Orsula at Contrecoeur ore dock
Tracy Hydro Station
Some welding being done on the Algoville
Lake Michigan in Sorel
Coast Guard sweep vessel at work off Sorel elevator
Holland America Line's Rotterdam in the lower St Lawrence river off Matane
Overtaking rapidly , she doing 24 knots+.

Reported by: Ken Hamilton


Today in Great Lakes History - November 25

INCAN SUPERIOR was withdrawn from service after completing 2,386 trips between Thunder Bay and Superior and on November 25, 1992 she passed downbound at Sault Ste. Marie for service on the Canadian West Coast.

ROBERT C. STANLEY was laid up for the last time November 25, 1981 at the Tower Bay slip, Superior, WI.

CITY OF MILWAUKEE was launched November 25, 1930

On 25 November 1866, F. W. BACKUS (wooden propeller, 133', 289 t, built in 1846 at Amherstburg, Ont.) was carrying hay, horses and cattle off Racine, WI. She was run to the beach when it was discovered that she was on fire. Her crew and passengers disembarked. The tug DAISY LEE towed her out while she was still burning, intending to scuttle her, but the towline burned through and she drifted back to shore and burned to the waterline. Her live cargo was pushed overboard while she was still well out and they swam to shore.

November 25, 1930 - The Grand Trunk carferry City of Milwaukee was launched in Manitowoc. She was sponsored by Mrs. Walter J. Wilde, wife of the collector of customs at Milwaukee. She entered service in January of 1931.

On 25 November 1874, WILLIAM SANDERSON (wooden schooner, 136', 385 gt, built in 1853 at Oswego, NY) was carrying wheat in a storm on Lake Michigan when she foundered. The broken wreck washed ashore off Empire, Michigan near Sleeping Bear. She was owned by Scott & Brown of Detroit.

During a storm on 25 November 1895, MATTIE C. BELL (wooden schooner, 181', 769 gt, built in 1882 at E. Saginaw, MI) was in tow of the steamer JIM SHERRIFS on Lake Michigan. The schooner stranded at Big Summer Island, was abandoned in place and later broke up. No lives were lost.

On 25 Nov 1947, the CAPTAIN JOHN ROEN was renamed ADAM E. CORNELIUS.

On 25 Nov 1905, the JOSEPH G. BUTLER, JR. (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 525', 6588 gt) entered service, departing Lorain, Ohio for Duluth on her maiden voyage. The vessel was damaged in a severe storm on that first crossing of Lake Superior, but she was repaired and had a long career. She was renamed DONALD B. GILLIES in 1935 and GROVEDALE in 1963. She was sunk as a dock in Hamilton in 1973 and finally sold for scrap in 1981.
Photo of the Butler from the Father Dowling Collection.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Frantz Waits on Weather

11/24
The Joseph H. Frantz anchored in the St. Clair River Sunday morning South of Recor Point. She is expecting to remain at anchor through Monday as gale warnings are posted on Lake Huron. She is traveling unloaded, upbound for Superior, Wisconsin to load wheat.

Reported by: Craig S. Zimmerman


Marquette Update

11/24
The American Mariner departed Marquette with a load of taconite on Sunday. She left at a time of heavy wave action outside the breakwater. The Michipicoten remained tied up at the dock.

American Mariner, bow view, at the dock
Departing
Michipicoten tied up at dock

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Toledo Update

11/24
On Saturday evening the Southdown Challenger and J.A.W. Iglehart arrived at the Cemex and Lafarge Docks respectively to unload cement. On Sunday evening the Cason J. Callaway arrived at the CSX Docks to load coal. The saltwater vessel Federal Maas was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo.

The Armco, Buckeye, and Courtney Burton remain in layup at their respective dock sites. There is a U.S. Army Corps. of Engineers tug in the large drydock at the Shipyard.

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will now be the Lee A. Tregurtha, Herbert C. Jackson, and Atlantic Erie on Wednesday, The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons and H. Lee White on Thursday, followed by the Charles M. Beeghly on Friday.

The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Docks will now be the Frontenac and John B. Aird on Sunday (30 Nov.). Gale warnings are posted throughout the Great Lakes region from Sunday afternoon thru Tuesday. Several vessels may be delayed in arriving at the various dock sites due to the strong westerly winds and low water conditions on Western Lake Erie.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Avondale with the "G" tug Pennsylvania upbound the Maumee River bound for one of the Elevators to load a grain cargo.
Adam E. Cornelius in temporary layup at the C&O Coal Docks. She presently sails as the barge Sarah Spencer under tow of the tug Jane Ann IV.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Reserve Now for DeTour Lighthouse Group Cruise in 2004

11/24
Although the sailing date is not until next June 13, the DeTour Reef Light Preservation Society is now taking reservations for its annual St. Marys River Cruise.

The trip, which uses one of the Soo Locks Boat Tours' vessels, boards in DeTour Village, and offers a close-up view of DeTour Reef Lighthouse and the restoration now in progress before continuing its trip up the St. Marys River and through the locks. Passengers return to DeTour Village by bus from Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.

Tickets are $80 per person (children 5 and under free). Lunch and snacks are included. To reserve a seat, contact the DeTour Reef Light Preservation Society, PO Box 519, DeTour Village, MI 49725 or view the group's webpage at www.drlps.com.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre


Weekly Updates

11/24
The weekly updates have been uploaded.
Click here to view


Today in Great Lakes History - November 24

On November 24, 1990, the Kinsman Independent ran hard aground off of Isle Royale. The vessel was on its way to load grain in Thunder Bay when she ended up 25 miles off course. The damage to the vessel was nearly $2 million, and she was repaired at Thunder Bay before the start of the 1991 season.

On November 24, 1950 while bound for South Chicago with iron ore, the ENDERS M. VOORHEES collided with the upbound steamer ELTON HOYT II (l) (now the MEDUSA CHALLENGER) in the Straits of Mackinac during a blinding snow storm. Both vessels received such serious bow damage that they had to be beached near McGulpin Point west of Mackinaw City to avoid sinking.

The ROSEMOUNT (2), stored with coal, inadvertently sank alongside CSL's Century Coal Dock at Montreal on November 24, 1934.
The THOMAS F. PATTON was launched November 24, 1945 as a C4-S-A4 cargo ship for U.S. Maritime Commission (U.S.M.C. Hull #2370) as a) SCOTT E. LAND.

PRINDOC (3) was launched November 24, 1965.

November 24, 1892 - The Ann Arbor #1 ran aground on her first trip just north of the Kewaunee harbor.

On 24 Nov 1881, LAKE ERIE (wooden propeller canaller, 136', 464 gc, built in 1873 at St, Catharine's, ON) collided with the steamer NORTHERN QUEEN in fog and a blizzard near Poverty Island by the mouth of Green Bay. LAKE ERIE sank in one hour 40 minutes. NORTHERN QUEEN took aboard the crew but one man was scalded and died before reaching Manistique.

The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 entered service in 1931.

On 24 November 1905, ARGO (steel propeller passenger/package freight, 174', 1089 t, built in 1896 at Detroit, MI) dropped into a trough of a wave, hit bottom and sank in relatively shallow water while approaching the harbor at Holland, MI. 38 passengers and crew were taken off by breeches' buoy in a thrilling rescue by the U.S. Lifesaving Service.

NEPTUNE (wooden propeller, 185', 774 gt, built in 1856 at Buffalo) was laid up at East Saginaw, Michigan on 24 November 1874 when she was discovered to be on fire at about 4:00 AM. She burned to a total loss.

The ANN ARBOR NO. 1 left Frankfort for Kewaunee on November 24, 1892. Because of the reluctance of shippers to trust their products on this new kind of ferry it was difficult to find cargo for this first trip. Finally, a fuel company which sold coal to the railroad routed four cars to Kewaunee via the ferry.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series





Second Suitor Interested in EVTAC Mining

11/23
A second bid has been made for bankrupt EVTAC Mining Co. Gerald Metals Inc., a Connecticut-based metals trader, bid $950,000 for the Iron Range taconite plant on Thursday.

The bid was a required $450,000 above a $500,000 opening offer made in early October by Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. and Laiwu Steel Group, a Chinese steelmaker. The taconite plant would operate under Central Financial Corp., a newly created Delaware-based corporation.

The bid sets up a showdown next week in front of a U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge in St. Paul. Minn. On Oct. 8, Cleveland-Cliffs and partner Laiwu Steel Group bid $500,000 cash and offered to assume $40 million in long-term liabilities for the taconite plant.

An auction for the taconite plant is Monday in St. Paul. The sale, in which either Cleveland-Cliffs and Laiwu Steel or Gerald Steel is declared the new owner, is Tuesday.

Cleveland-Cliffs and Laiwu Steel have secured a labor agreement with United Steelworkers of America, hold a pellet contract through 2012 and have agreements with transportation and energy providers. Gerald Metals is still working on similar agreements.

Cleveland-Cliffs wants to have the taconite plant open by mid-December and operate at the plant's 4.3 million ton-per-year capacity.

EVTAC is spending about $5.9 million to repair the taconite plant in anticipation of a startup. If the taconite plant does not re-start within weeks, it's likely EVTAC would run out of money and face Chapter 7 liquidation. Without pellet orders for 2003, EVTAC filed bankruptcy on May 1. On May 14, the 38-year-old taconite plant made its final pellets of the year. The shutdown has affected more than 400 workers.

Reported by: Frank Frisk and Roger LeLievre


Ranger III Waits on Weather

11/23
The National Park Service passenger ferry Ranger III docked in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan Saturday as the vessels makes its way back to Houghton, Michigan after spending several weeks at Bay Ship in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.

She was at the shipyard for a regularly scheduled 5-year dry docking. The Ranger III is expected to wait at the Soo until weather conditions improve for her crossing of Lake Superior.

Scott Best
Bow view at Carbide Dock
Stern view at Carbide Dock

B. Barnes
At the Carbide Dock
Another view
Edwin H. Gott passing behind

Steve Haverty
Ranger III upbound at Mission Point
Other traffic on Saturday included:
Algocape downbound clearing the Mac Lock
Edgar B Speer downbound passing the Edison Sault Plant
Fleetmates passing below the locks
Edwin H Gott upbound
Stewart J Cort downbound at Big Point Scott Best
Herbert C. Jackson going up to turn at Big Point to head down the Canadian Canal to Algoma Steel. Scott Best
Edgar B Speer and Algocape clearing the locks downbound. Scott Best
Ira and tug Missouri downbound at Big Point. Scott Best

Reported by: Scott Best and B. Barnes


Marquette Update

11/23
The H. Lee White brought stone to the Shiras dock on Saturday, then moved to the ore dock where she was joined by her fleet mate American Mariner. The Michipicoten is expected on Sunday, weather permitting.

H Lee White bow view, American Mariner visible through the dock.
Wide view.
Loading chutes down.
American Mariner bow view, H. Lee White visible through dock.

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Toledo Update

11/23
The RT. Hon. Paul J. Martin departed from Andersons "K" Elevator Friday evening. As the Martin departed the Canadian Transport shifted over from Andersons "E" Elevator to the "K" Elevator to finish loading grain. She was expected to depart Saturday evening. There are no other vessels in port at this time.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Soo Scrappings

11/23
Scrapping of the Quedoc continues slowly as crews finish off the engine spaces. Once the engine spaces are removed, scrapping will continue at a faster pace.

The Lewis G Harriman fares better at least for now. She remains mostly intact aside from the general missing artifacts from years of plundering while laid up in Green Bay. The cabins are mostly intact while the carpet has been removed as well as several of the bunk beds in the crew cabins. The Engine spaces are intact and look as if were ready to be used another season with a good clean up.

Pictures by Scott Best
Harriman docked at Purvis West Dock
Close up of her stack
Another view of pilot house
Looking forward on deck
Looking aft on deck
Inside Pilot House
Scrapping underway on engine spaces
Looking aft on deck
Close up of Paterson logo on pilot house
Inside the pilot house
View of a cargo hold
Hatch crane, hatches from the Vandoc, Quedoc lifeboat davit
Passenger lounge
Disembodied prop
Another view of engine room bulkhead

Steve Haverty
Harriman midship view astern
Quedoc ground level view of engine room

Reported by: Scott Best and Steve Haverty


Today in Great Lakes History - November 23

After discharging her cargo, the SAMUEL MATHER (6) proceeded to De Tour, MI laying up for the last time at the Pickands Mather Coal Dock on November 23, 1981.

In 1987 the ROGERS CITY (2) was towed out of Menominee, MI for scrapping in Brazil.

STADACONA (3)'s sea trials were completed on November 23, 1952 and was delivered to CSL the next day.

On 23 November 1872, Capt. W. B. Morley launched the propeller JARVIS Lord at Marine City, MI. Her dimensions were 193' x 33' x 18', 1000 tons. She was the first double decker built at Marine City. Her engine was from Wm. Cowie of Detroit.

On 23 November 1867, S. A. CLARK (wooden propeller tug, 12 t, built in 1863 at Buffalo) was in Buffalo's harbor when her boiler exploded and she sank.

November 23, 1930 - The Ann Arbor carferry Wabash grounded in Betsie Lake. She bent her rudder stock and her steering engine was broken up.

On 23 November 1853, the wooden schooner PALESTINE was bound from Kingston to Cleveland with railroad iron at about the same time as the like-laden schooner ONTONAGON. Eight miles west of Rochester, New York, both vessels ran ashore, were pounded heavily by the waves and sank. Both vessels reported erratic variations in their compasses. The cargoes were removed and ONTONAGON was pulled free on 7 December, but PALESTINE was abandoned. A similar event happened with two other iron-laden vessels a few years previously at the same place.

On 23 November 1853, the Ward Line's wooden side-wheeler HURON struck an unseen obstruction in the Saginaw River and sank. She was raised on 12 December 1853, towed to Detroit and repaired at a cost of $12,000. She was then transferred to Lake Michigan to handle the cross-lake traffic given the Ward Line by the Michigan Central Railroad.
Photo of the Huron from the Father Dowling Collection.

The carferry GRAND HAVEN was sold to the West India Fruit & Steamship Co., Norfolk, VA in 1946 and was brought down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, LA for reconditioning before reaching Port Everglades and the Port of Palm Beach, FL. She was brought back to the Lakes and locked upbound through the Welland Canal on 23 Nov 1964. She was intended for roll on/roll off carrier service to haul truck trailers laden with steel coils from Stelco's plant at Hamilton, Ont.

The CSL NIAGARA passed Port Huron, MI on 23 Nov 1999 on her way to Thunder Bay to load grain. This was her first trip to the upper lakes since the vessel was relaunced as a SeawayMax carrier in June 1999.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Navigation in Seaway Stopped

11/22
Friday afternoon the Maltese-flag, Polish-owned Kopalnia Borynia hit the arrestor boom at the Iroquois Lock while upbound for Thunder Bay. The extent of damage was unknown but navigation was suspended in the area and expected to resume Saturday.

The barge Laviolette was in Montreal unloading part of her cargo of sugar. The barge will be towed up the Seaway as soon as a partial cargo is unloaded. It was reported that the barge was not easy to handle by the tugs fully loaded and it was decided to lighten it in Montreal.

Reported by: René Beauchamp


State of Michigan Returns to Home Dock

11/22
The Great Lakes Maritime Academy's training ship State of Michigan was expected to leave the dry dock at Bay Ship in Sturgeon Bay Friday evening. While at Bay Ship over the last month the ship has had many projects accomplished including new anti-foul bottom paint, complete sandblast and repaint of entire hull, New laser cut lettering of the name STATE OF MICHIGAN welded to the hull, five large antennas removed, new stack art and lighting installed, a good number of pipes and valves replaced regarding fuel and ballast tanks, a 5 year hull inspection, props pulled and serviced, prop shaft seals replaced, installed new gangway systems to board ship more safely, and general repair of miscellaneous items.

The ship is expected to arrive back home at the academy early Saturday Morning.

In addition the State of Michigan is scheduled to return to a shipyard for conversion work in June ( after a 3 week sea project and tour of the Great Lakes). This work will include renovating space aboard for a classroom, a sewage treatment system, increasing berthing capacity to 80, among a number of other important projects.

State of Michigan on the dry dock.
Name.
New stack logo.
Close up.
Another view.

Reported by: John Berck


Duluth port seeks state aid for crane updates

11/22
Duluth port officials plan to seek $1 million from the state to update the two landmark gantry cranes that do the heavy lifting at its port terminal.

The cranes are 44 years old and their electrical systems contain "1930s technology, " said Jim Sharrow, Duluth Seaway Port Authority facilities manager.

Sharrow told port commissioners this week that replacing the cranes' electrical and mechanical systems and painting them will cost $1.25 million. The port authority plans to ask state lawmakers to provide about 80 percent of the cost from the Minnesota Port Assistance Grant Program. That could leave the port authority to pay about $250,000.

The two 90-ton, rail-mounted cranes can lift up to 150 tons in tandem. They were built in Duluth and installed at the terminal when the St. Lawrence Seaway opened.

Reported by: Mark Miller


Twin Ports Report

11/22
Friday was relatively quiet in the Twin Ports, with vessel action primarily the Ziemia Cieszynska loading at Cargill B1 in Duluth and Ziemia Gnieznienska loading at neighboring AGP.

Columbia Star and Canadian Enterprise are expected in port today to load at Midwest Energy Terminal. With a winter storm expected in the region Sunday and Monday, arrival times for the next couple days are uncertain. Walter J. McCarthy Jr., Paul R. Tregurtha, Indiana Harbor and Oglebay Norton are expected at SMET on Sunday and Monday, but their schedules will depend on the weather.

Midwest Energy Terminal typically closes for the season in mid-December. Its last vessel currently scheduled is now the Indiana Harbor, due to load Dec. 12 for Nanticoke.

It's possible Great Lakes Fleet is adjusting its plan to have the chartered George A. Stinson load only at the DMIR dock in Duluth. Friday's schedule for the DMIR docks has the Stinson due to load in Two Harbors on Nov. 26 and Roger Blough due to load in Duluth on Nov. 24. The Great Lakes Fleet schedule has the Blough unloading in Gary on Friday and then proceeding directly to Duluth by Nov. 24.

Speaking of Great Lakes Fleet, Arthur M. Anderson was scheduled to make a rare call Friday in Marine City to unload stone. Edwin H. Gott and Presque Isle were both bound for Two Harbors on Friday after unloading at Detroit.

The DMIR's Two Harbors ore dock has several vessels scheduled over the next few days: Joe Block is due today; Presque Isle and Edwin H. Gott are both due Sunday; John J. Boland is due Nov. 24 and, as mentioned, the Stinson is due there Nov. 26

Reported by: Al Miller


Soo Traffic

11/22
The Lee A Tregurtha was downbound at the Soo Thursday afternoon with a cargo of ore from Marquette for Rouge Steel in Dearborn, MI. The Lee A is still missing its anchor and its unknown when it will be retrieved. Meanwhile construction on the West Center Pier continues and crews estimate they will finish the job in about a month, weather permitting.

Downbound off West Pier
Close up of bow showing missing anchor
Stern view heading to the locks
Tug Rochelle Kaye still overseeing construction and repairs to the West Center Pier.

Pictures Taken Friday
Canadian Provider moves toward the Mac Lock
Another view
Canadian Leader entering the Mac Lock.
Fleetmates Canadian Leader and Canadian Provider pass below the Mac Lock.
Mesabi Miner downbound above the Locks
Canadian Leader downbound above the Locks
Entering the Mac Lock upbound
Upbound above the Locks passing under International Bridge.

Reported by: Scott Best


Detroit Traffic

11/22
Flinterspirit (Holland) downbound off Great Lakes Steel Works
Stern view

Reported by: Mike Nicholls


Toledo News

11/22
The Canadian Transport was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator. The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The CSL Laurentien was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore. There is a U.S. Army Corps. of Engineers tug in the large drydock at the Shipyard. The Armco, Buckeye, and Courtney Burton remain in layup.

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will now be the Cason J. Callaway on Sunday. The Herbert C. Jackson, Lee A. Tregurtha, Atlantic Erie, H. Lee White, and the tug/barge combo Invincible/McKee Sons on Weds., followed by the Charles M. Beeghly on Thursday. The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the John B. Aird on Thursday, followed by the Frontenac on Sunday (30 Nov.)

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Welland Canal Traffic

11/22
Welland Canal Traffic taken late afternoon on Friday.

CSL Tadoussac clear of Lock one downbound.
CSL Tadoussac heading towards Lake Ontario
Federal Kivalina approaching the wall above Lock 7
Dobrush exiting Lock 7
Keewatin with barge Stone Merchant approaching Lock 2.
Closeup of Keewatin

Reported by: Bill Bird


Maritime artist visits Alpena, Michigan

11/22
Maritime artist Steve Witucki will be at Riverside Gallery in Alpena on December 7, 2003 from 1pm to 4pm. He will be remarquing purchases and discussing what motivated him to paint his pictures. Select originals will be on display. Refreshments will be served.

Steve is a Wheelsman on board the Edwin H. Gott and does all of his painting on the ship. Steve has many murals throughout the former Great Lakes Fleet and has sailed on many vessels in his 29 year career. Steve has a talent with water that is unmatched, after all, who better to paint water than a sailor.

Reported by: Robert Doyle


Today in Great Lakes History - November 22

Scrapping of the SPRUCEGLEN was completed on November 22, 1986 by Lake head Scrap Metal Co. at Thunder Bay. The SPRUCEGLEN was the last Canadian coal-fired bulker.

The FRONTENAC (4) while in ballast sustained major structural damage from grounding on Pellet Reef attempting to enter Silver Bay, MN at 2140 hours on November 22, 1979.

On 22 November 1869, CREAM CITY (3-mast wooden bark, 629 t, built in 1862 at Sheboygan, WI) was carrying wheat in a gale when she lost her way and went ashore on Drummond Island. She appeared to be only slightly damaged, but several large pumps were unable to lower the water in her hull. She was finally abandoned as a total wreck on 8 December. She was built as a "steam bark" with an engine capable of pushing her at 5 or 6 mph. After two months of constant minor disasters, this was considered an unsuccessful experiment and the engine was removed.

The CITY OF MILWAUKEE was chartered to the Ann Arbor Railroad Co. and started the Frankfort, MI-Kewaunee, WI service for them on November 22, 1978.

November 22, 1929 - The City of Saginaw 31 went out on her sea trials.

On 22 November 1860, CIRCASSIAN (wooden schooner, 135', 366 t, built in 1856 at Irving, NY) was carrying grain in a gale and blizzard on Lake Michigan when she stranded on White Shoals near Beaver Island. She sank to her decks and then broke in two. Her crew was presumed lost, but actually made it to Hog Island in the blizzard and they were not rescued from there for two weeks.

A final note from the Big Gale of 1879. On 22 November 1879, the Port Huron Times reported, "The barge DALTON is still high and dry on the beach at Point Edward."

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series




Barge Headed for Toronto

11/21
Leaving Trois-Rivières Wednesday under tow for Toronto was the barge Barge Laviolette. That barge is the fore body of the Canadian Explorer.

The tug Ocean Intrepide is towing the barge assisted by Ocean Hercule on the stern. Thursday morning the tow was at anchor in Montreal waiting for Seaway clearance. The barge is loaded, but I do not know what cargo it is carrying. Possibly sugar.

Reported by: René Beauchamp


Long Time Corps Vessels Heading South

11/21
Thursday the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers survey vessel James M. Bray ended another of her several careers, as she was gently pulled from her moorings at the Corps of Engineers boat basin at Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.

Since her original building in Green Bay, Wisconsin, in 1924, as Barge # 20, she served the Corps of Engineers many years as a general purpose, deck cargo barge. When her life was nearly over, she was resurrected at Sturgeon Bay Shipbuilding, in 1984 as a prototype, Automated Hydrographic, Survey Vessel. Self propulsion was added as well as a 28-foot mid-section, to house the equipment that would bring her back to life. Her re-construction was completed in 1985, by many people at the Soo Area Office, and served the Detroit District, in the St. Marys River for the next 17 years as the primary vessel to conduct hydrographic surveys of the River.

The Bray was one of the best vessels a captain could ever hope to have the chance to maneuver and one of the worst when it came to troubleshooting her electronic, propulsion, control system. She and her sister ship, the PAJ, out of Detroit, could literally, be turned on a dime. They invented parallel parking alongside a wharf or pier.

The PAJ and the Bray have both been sold, through the Internet to Cary Construction of Point Comfort, Texas, their new home after nearly 80 years on the Great Lakes. Both have been replaced by smaller, but more versatile and accurate survey launches, the Wheeler, at Detroit, and the Bufe at the Soo. Hopefully, they too will see a long career on the Lakes as the latest, "state-of-the-art", equipment available.

The PAJ is currently being prepared, in Detroit, for her long journey to Texas, via the Mississippi, River. She will depart within a week, under tow of one of Holly Marine's tugs, stopping briefly in Mackinaw City, to await the arrival of the Bray from the Soo, also under tow.

The Bray was taken to the MCM Marine yard at the Soo, today, for similar preparations, for the cross-lake trip, to Calumet Harbor, IL, where both vessels will be prepared for their trip down the Inland Waterways. ACBL will tow them in a barge consist, from Calumet Harbor to Galveston, where they will begin their new careers as "self-propelled construction barges", servicing the oil and gas drilling industry in the area. Bray at the Soo in March, 2003. Carmen Paris

Reported by: Capt. Charlie Lampman


Michipicoten Visits Marquette

11/21
The Michipicoten made another quick trip to load ore in Marquette on Thursday and will return late Friday.

Michipicoten at the dock, bow view
Michipicoten, wide view
Loading
Another view

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Victoriaborg in Menominee

11/21
On Thursday afternoon, the Victoriaborg entered the Menominee River. It turned around out in the bay and proceeded to back in through the piers and finally through the Ogden Street Bridge. She came to a stop before entering the bridge opening to make a slight course adjustment, then backed through the bridge and to the dock at a local warehouse. This may be the first time a Wagenborg ship has backed through the Ogden Street Bridge without assistance. Last week the Prinsenborg backed into Menominee with the help of two tugs. The Victoriaborg appears to be unloading steel product.

Victoriaborg backing in past the Menominee North Pier Lighthouse
Close-up
Inside the piers
Entering the inner harbor
Making the turn into the harbor
Close-up in the inner harbor
Passing the crane ship, William H. Donner
Putting on the "brakes"
Prop wash
Lined up with the bridge and ready to proceed
Through the bridge
Joining (from L to R) the Varnebank, Viking I and Manitowoc at the dock
Close-up at dock
(From L to R): Victoriaborg, William H. Donner, Viking I and Varnebank
A load of steel is lifted from the Victoriaborg

Reported by: Dick Lund


Toledo Update

11/21
The Canadian Transfer finished unloading potash at Andersons "K" Elevator and departed late Thursday morning. When the Transfer departed the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin then shifted over from Andersons "E" Elevator to Andersons "K" Elevator to finish loading grain. The Federal Kivalina was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark elevator. Both vessels are expected to depart late Thursday afternoon or evening depending on how the loading process goes.

The Frontenac was unloading ore at the Torco Ore Dock. The Algolake finished loading coal at the CSX Docks and departed Thursday morning. The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons was unloading coke breeze at the T.W.I. Dock. The Gemini left her lay-up berth at Toledo several days ago and is now out sailing. The Armco, Buckeye, Courtney Burton remain in lay-up at their respective dock sites. There is a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers tug in the large drydock at the Shipyard.

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will now be the Arthur M. Anderson on Saturday. The Herbert C. Jackson, Lee A. Tregurtha, tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons, H. Lee White, and Atlantic Erie are all due on Wednesday, Nov. 26 followed by the Charles M. Beeghly on Thursday, Nov. 27.

The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the CSL Laurentien on Friday, followed by The John B. Aird on Thursday

Classic Views of Toledo Shipping
Mckee Sons from American Steamship Company inbound Maumee Bay bound for the C&O Coal Docks to load coal.
Thomas Wilson in layup at the C&O Docks "Frog Pond" area awaiting her tow for the scrap yard.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Today in Great Lakes History - November 21

The PATERSON (1) was launched November 21, 1953.

In 1924 the MERTON E. FARR slammed into the Interstate Bridge that linked Superior, WI with Duluth, MN. causing extensive damage to the bridge. The bridge span fell into the water but the FARR received only minor damage to her bow.

On 21 November 1869, the ALLIANCE (wooden passenger sidewheeler, 87', 197 gt, built in 1857 at Buffalo) slipped her moorings at Lower Black Rock in the Niagara River and went over the fall. She had been laid up since the spring of 1869.

November 21, 1906 - The Pere Marquette 17 encountered one of the worst storms in many years while westbound for the Wisconsin Central slip in Manitowoc. She made port safely, but the wind was so high that she could not hold her course up the river without assistance. The tug Artic assisted, and as they were proceeding through the 10th Street Bridge, a gust of wind from the south drove the ferry and tug against the north pilings of the 10th Street Bridge. The Arctic, pinned between the ferry and the bridge, was not damaged, but she crushed the hull of a fishing tug moored there, sinking her, and inflicted damage of a few hundred dollars to the bridge.

November 21, 1923 - Arthur Stoops, the lookout on the Ann Arbor #6 was drowned while stepping from the apron onto the knuckle to cast off the headline.

On the night of 21 November 1870, C. W. ARMSTRONG (wooden propeller steam tug, 57', 33 t, built in 1856 at Albany, NY) burned at her dock at Bay City, Michigan. No lives were lost.

More incidents from the Big Gale of 1879. On 21 November 1879, the Port Huron Times reported, "The schooner MERCURY is ashore at Pentwater. The schooner LUCKY is high and dry at Manistee; the schooner WAUBASHENE is on the beach east of Port Colborne. The schooner SUMATRA is on the beach at Cleveland; the large river tug J. P. Clark capsized and sunk at Belle Isle in the Detroit River on Wednesday [19 Nov.] and sank in 15 minutes. On e drowned. The schooner PINTO of Oakville, Ontario, stone laden, went down in 30 feet of water about one mile down from Oakville. At Sand beach the barge PRAIRIE STATE is rapidly going to pieces.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history


More Bayship Traffic

11/20
The Charles M. Beeghly arrived at Bayship in Sturgeon Bay early Wednesday afternoon from Green Bay. The ship was placed at Berth #8 South Yard assisted by the tug Bayship and a tug from Selvick Marine.

It is unknown what type of repairs the ship is in for but it is not expected to stay long.

Stern View and name
Wide view

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle


Marquette Update

11/20
The Michipicoten, Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder, and Lee A. Tregurtha all made stops at Marquette's ore dock on Wednesday. The Lee A. arrived after dark, and was not yet sporting the starboard anchor.

Bow view, no anchor
Wide view at the dock

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Busy Day in Menominee & Marinette

11/20
The Menominee River was bustling with activity on Wednesday. The Varnebank made her first ever appearance in Menominee, bringing a load of pulp from Finland to a local warehouse. Meanwhile, the Pere Marquette 41/Undaunted arrived at Marinette Fuel & Dock with a load of stone. The Victoriaborg is expected in port sometime today.

Stern view of Varnebank at dock
Close-up of stern
From right to left - Varnebank, Manitowoc, and Viking I
Bow view at dock from across Menominee River
Stern view of PM-41/Undaunted unloading
Bow view at dock
Bow close-up with a ragged old flag in background
Viking I at dock, it is much more accessible for photos from across Menominee River
Pilothouse close-up

Reported by: Dick Lund


Saginaw River News

11/20
The Sam Laud was inbound the Saginaw River late Wednesday morning. She called on the Bay Aggregates dock where she unloaded during the afternoon. The Laud was outbound by late afternoon headed for the lake.

The J.A.W. Iglehart was inbound passing through Bay City around 9 p.m. Wednesday night. She was headed upriver to the Lafarge Terminal in Carrollton to unload. It is expected that the Iglehart will be outbound late Thursday afternoon.

Reported by: Todd Shorkey


Steamship William G. Mather Museum Participates in Ohio Memory Project

11/20
Historical collections from the SS Mather Museum have been added to the Ohio Memory Online Scrapbook, available at http://www.ohiomemory.org. The Ohio Memory Project, which is administered by the Ohio Historical Society, was begun in June 2000. A second phase of the project was launched in October 2002. In July 2003, the American Association for State and Local History honored the project with its Award of Merit, the most prestigious recognition for achievement in the preservation and interpretation of local, state, and regional history.

The online scrapbook brings together primary source materials from more than 325 archives, historical societies, libraries, and museums around the state. Included are letters, diaries, government records, government records, artwork, clothing, furniture, natural history specimens, and prehistoric artifacts. The scrapbook provides convenient access to historical collections that document state and local history. It contains more than 4,000 collections, which total more than 24,000 images.

Users can search or browse by institution name, resource type, title, subject, creator, or place. A noteworthy feature of the Ohio Memory web site is "My Scrapbook," which allows users to store favorite items and add captions or notes, and then share with others.

Items submitted for Phase 2 by the SS Mather Museum include photos of the Mather from her launching in 1925 through the Tall Ships Harborfest and signing of a long-term lease with the City of Cleveland this summer. The collection shows the evolution of the Mather from a working ore boat, carrying a total of almost 50 million tons of cargo, to a premiere maritime museum and lakefront attraction.

The Ohio Memory Project is a cooperative effort supported by the Institute for Museum and Library Services, the State Library of Ohio, the Ohio Bicentennial Commission, OhioLINK (the library consortium for higher education), the Ohio Public Library Information Network, INFOhio (the library network for K-12 schools), the Ohio Library Council, and the Ohio Historical Records Advisory Board.

"Ohio Memory is a valuable resource for students and teachers as well as the general public," Ohio Memory Project Manager Angela O'Neal says, “it is the only place on the Web where users can view collections from more than 300 Ohio cultural institutions.”

Historian Andrew Cayton, author of the new book Ohio: The History of a People, says "this project is a terrific example of the enduring legacy of the Ohio bicentennial celebration. Thousands of citizens will be using this virtual scrapbook of the state’s history long after the birthday revelries have themselves become parts of Ohio’s past.”

Reported by: Rex Cassidy


Algoway in Detroit

11/20
Algoway unloaded salt at Morton Salt and left the dock at 10:30 p.m.

Port side boom swung in.
Bow
Getting ready to Depart

Reported by: Jon Paul Kubala


Toronto Update

11/20
The saltie Irma continued unloading at Redpath Sugar Dock Wednesday. On Tuesday at Toronto Drydock the Royal Canadian Yacht Club tender Kwasind was refloated and returned to service. Two small barges and a tug went on the drydock.

Images of the Kwasind entering dry dock.
Heading down the ship channel past Algoisle Heading down the ship channel past Algoisle
Backing into the drydock
Capt. Ryan
Capt. Steve Walkom & Capt. Timothy J. Ryan
Flooding the drydock
Hector Ouderkirk assisting
In the drydock. Algobay behind
Starboard quarter Kwasind
Sten view

Reported by: Art Church


Kingston Report

11/20
The CCGS Caribou Isle was removing buoys from the Kingston Harbor and Wolfe island area this week. They are replaced with winter markers. She departed for Prescott, via the Canadian Middle Channel Wednesday.

The Gemini, Peter R. Cresswell, CSL Laurentien, and Swan Lake were westbound. Eastbound traffic included the Adimon, Nanticoke, and Lykes Winner.

Lake Ontario's water level rose 1.0 cm last week to 43 cm above chart datum. This is 30 cm ( 1 foot) above the level for last year. At last check, the outflow from Lake Ontario was at the regular level.

Reported by: Ron Walsh


St. Lawrence River Traffic at Verchères

11/20
The Canadian Coast Guard hovercraft Wan-Aki departing the Verchères dock after landing CCG personnel, Nov.5.
Groupe Océan tugs Océan Hercule and Océan Echo II towing converted laker to barge Windoc off Verchères upbound to Montréal berth 54 to load grain for storage in that port for the winter, Nov.6.
Woodward's tanker Tuvaq downbound off Verchères from Montréal to Iqaluit, Nov.7.
Federal Franklin at anchor off Sorel-Tracy awaiting a berth at Contrecoeur, Nov.7.
Large Malta flag tanker Sicilia upbound off Verchères to Montréal. Nov.8.
The Canadian navy's patrol frigate, HMCS Halifax (FFH-330), shown downbound off Varennes from Montréal to Halifax on Nov.10 after completing a seven-month refit at Port Weller.
Halifax stern view, Nov.10.
Dutch flag (NA) heavy-lift cargo ship Tramper downbound off Verchères from Seaway, Nov.15.
Japanese owned but Panama flag bulk carrier Guinomar Baraka (blt.2000 - 38,835 grt) about to dock at Contrecoeur, Nov.16.
Arctic shows her unique hull design while downbound off Verchères from Montréal, Nov.16.
Arctic, stern view, Nov.16.
Brand new Panama flag tanker Navitas Quest (delivered on Sept.12, 2003) shown downbound off Verchères from Montréal, Nov.16.
Navitas Quest, stern view, Nov.16.
German flag Wagenborg dry cargo vessel Volmeborg shown downbound off Verchères from Montréal-Seaway, Nov.17.

Reported by: Marc Piché


Trip Auction, Bidding Ends Today

11/20
Jackson Lumen Christi High School is having its annual Auction during the evening Of November 21st. Up for bidding is a trip for four adults on an American Steamship Company vessel during June-September 2004.

Bids will be taken through 4 p.m. Thursday, November 20. A live auction will then be held on Friday evening the 21st amongst Auction attendees to see if anyone will top the highest bid previously received.

Bids can be sent to the Jackson Lumen Christi Development Office through e-mail lcdevoff@hotmail.com or submitted by phone (517)787-5080. Current bid is $5,300.

Reported by: Jim Bearman


Today in Great Lakes History - November 20

The Saginaw was christened at the Government Dock in Sarnia in 1999. Bonnie Bravener and Wendy Siddall broke the traditional bottle of champagne adding the second vessel to Lower Lakes Towing's fleet. The company then generously opened the vessel for tours to all those in the large crowd that had gathered to witness the event.

The EAGLESCLIFFE HALL (2) was launched in 1956 at Grangemouth, Scotland.

The M.S. Wolfe Islander was christened on November 20, 1946 at Marysville, Wolfe Island. The new ferry was the unfinished Ottawa Maybrook which was built to serve the war effort in the south Pacific Ocean. She replaced two landing barges which were pressed quickly into service following the tired, worn out steamer S.S. Wolfe Islander which had served the community for 42 years. Officially christened Wolfe Islander by Mrs. Sarah Russell, it took five tries before the champagne bottle finally broke on her port side.

At 2240 hours on November 20, 1974 the ROY A. JODREY ran aground on Pullman Shoal, located at Wellesley Island in the St. Lawrence River near Alexandria Bay, NY. All of the crew was rescued. Early the next morning at 0305 hours she slid off the shoal, rolled on her side and sank in 150 feet of water.

RALPH H. WATSON was launched 1937.

On 20 November 1872, the sidewheel steamer W. J. SPICER was finally laid up and the crew dismissed. She had served for many years as the Grand Trunk ferry at Fort Gratiot on the St. Clair River.

On 20 November 1880, BAY CITY (wooden barge, 199', 480 t, built in 1852 at Trenton, MI as the sidewheeler FOREST CITY) was carrying coal when she was cast adrift east of Erie, PA by the steamer JAMES P. DONALDSON in a storm. She was driven ashore and wrecked. Her crew was saved by the U.S. Lifesaving Service using breeches' buoy. November 20, 1898 - Ann Arbor #3 left Cleveland for Frankfort on her maiden voyage.

November 20, 1924 - Pere Marquette fleet engineer Finlay MacLaren died after 42 years with the railroad. He was succeeded by his brother Robert until Leland H. Kent was named fleet engineer in 1925.

On 20 Nov 1871, the schooner E. B. ALLEN was sailing from Chicago to Buffalo with a load of corn when she crossed the bow of the bark NEWSBOY about six miles off the Thunder Bay Light on Lake Huron. The NEWSBOY slammed her bow deep into the schooner's hull amidships and the ALLEN sank in about 30 minutes. The crew escaped in the yawl. The NEWSBOY was badly damaged but did not sink.

On 20 Nov 1999, the Bermuda-flag container ship CANMAR TRIUMPH went aground on the St. Lawrence River, off Varennes about 15 kilometers downstream from Montreal. She was the third vessel to run aground in the St. Lawrence River that Autumn. The Canadian Coast Guard reported that she was having engine problems and the CBC News reported that the vessel's rudder was damaged in the grounding.

On Saturday morning. 20 Nov 1999, Marinette Marine Corporation of Marinette, Wisconsin, launched the 175-foot Coast Guard Cutter HENRY BLAKE. The BLAKE was one of the "Keeper" Class Coastal Class Buoy Tenders. Each ship in the "Keeper" class is named after a famous American lighthouse keeper.

Data from: Joe Barr, Brian Johnson, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Bayship Update

11/19
The Reserve arrived at Sherwood Point early Tuesday morning in fog. The tugs Jimmy L. and Sharon M. Selvick were waiting at Sherwood Point to tow the Reserve into the Graving dock at Bayship.

The dock had been blocked for the ship and was ready when the Reserve arrived. As the Reserve pumped out ballast the graving dock gate was opened. The small tug Bay Ship opulled the vessel into the dock stern first. The Reserve is reported to be at Bayship for bow thruster repairs.

Jimmy L. on the Reserve's stern and Sharon on bow at Sherwood Point in fog.
Reserve off the Graving dock
Mighty Tug Bay Ships takes Stern
Lee A. bow shot with out the anchor she will reportedly stop and pick it up, now that the windless is repaired.
Backing out of berth #15
Turning at the end of the berth
Stern disapearing into Fog.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle


Coast Guard Workers Rescued

11/19
Two Canadian Coast Guard workers are home safe and sound after being rescued from the waters of Lake Superior.

The two men were removing a buoy in in the lake when waves swamped their barge on Monday. They managed to climb on top of the overturned barge where they were noticed by a passing boater. A commercial fisherman, who was also nearby, was called and aided in the men's rescue. He also helped prevent the barge from crashing into some rocks until the Coast Guard cutter Thunder Cape arrived on scene.

The barge was towed back to Thunder Bay late Monday night.

Reported by: Andy Severson


Rainy day in Green Bay

11/19
Two vessels visited port Tuesday. The tug Rebecca Lynn and barge A-410 arrived about 7 a.m.. They were due to depart for Detroit around 5 p.m. The Alpena was also in Green Bay Tuesday morning with a load of cement for LaFarge.

Unloading at Koch Materials
Close up of Barge A-410 steaming in the rain
Tug Rebecca Lynn
Alpena and S.T. Crapo at LaFarge
Close up side by side
S.T. Crapo with new paint job
Stern shot at LaFarge

Reported by: Jason Leino


Saginaw River News

11/19
The Calumet was inbound the Saginaw River early Tuesday morning. She traveled upriver to the Wirt Dock in Saginaw where she unloaded during the afternoon. Once finished, the Calumet turned in the Sixth Street Basin and was outbound for the lake, passing through Bay City around 6 p.m.

Reported by: Todd Shorkey


Toledo Update

11/19
The Algomarine finished unloading a grain cargo at the A.R.M.S. Dock and departed early Tuesday morning bound for Huron, Ohio to finish unloading grain there.

The H. Lee White was loading coal at the CSX Docks. The salt water vessel Federal Kivalina was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. The John B. Aird was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator.

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will now be the Catherine Desgagnes, Saginaw, and Algolake on Wednesday, the Lee A. Tregurtha on Friday, followed by the Arthur M. Anderson on Saturday.

The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the CSL Niagara on Wednesday, the Frontenac on Thursday, followed by the CSL Laurentien on Friday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Saginaw River due for dredging

11/19
A Corps of Engineers survey boat has been scanning part of the Saginaw River recently to prepare for dredging that will return the waterway to regulation depth.

A portion of the lower Saginaw, between the river's mouth and Liberty Bridge in Bay City, will be dredged to help ships transitting the waterway. In some areas, channels that are supposed to be 22 feet deep are only 19 feet deep due to silting.

About 150,000 cubic yards of silt will be dredged and deposited at Channel Island, a confined disposal facility in the Saginaw Bay, said Donald D. Holly, operations team leader for the Corps in Detroit. The work, estimated to cost $750,000 to $1 million, will be paid for with federal money.

"The Saginaw is a commercial project, so that's kind of a priority with us," he said.

Holly said his agency is continuing to dredge portions of the lower river annually because there is still room for dredging spoils at Channel Island.

The upper Saginaw River, south from Bay City to Saginaw, hasn't been dredged in years due to the lack of a confined disposal facility. Local officials have been discussing possible upper river disposal sites.

The upper river was last dredged in 1993, to remove some shoals that hampered shipping. The entire river channel hasn't been dredged to its mandated depths for more than 20 years.

Reported by: Chris Winkler


Kingston Update

11/19
Kingston had a rare visitor Tuesday as the James Norris is heading to Bath, Ontario to unload. The English River departed Bath, westbound, early that morning. The Doug Mckeil was westbound and headed for the south shore. Wind gusts up to 37 knots were reported on the east end of Lake Ontario. Seas were already up to 2 metres. The John Spence and barge were eastbound in the Seaway Tuesday.

The end of the season rush seems to be on as the area has seen a lot of traffic on the Seaway. The Keizerborg, CSL Niagara, Frontenac, Vancouverborg, Peter R. Cresswell and CSL Laurentien were all westbound. The eastbound traffic included the Cinnamon, Federal Hudson, Federal Rideau, Capt. Henry Jackman, Menominee, and Canadian Prospector. The CCGS Caribou Isle was working on buoys in the area.

Reported by: Ron Walsh


One Up One Down in the Welland Canal

11/19
The following images were taken aboard two canal assignments on Polsteam’s Polish registered Ziemia Gnie?nie?ska from Port Weller to Lock 7 on Monday. The second assignment was aboard the Greek owned Adimon from Port Colborne to Lock 7 on Tuesday.

Ziemia Gnie?nie?ska clear of Lock 1 in ballast heading for Lock 2 on a dull and dreary but calm November morning.
On finals to the approach wall below Lock 2. Ziemia Gnie?nie?ska is bound for Duluth.
Sliding the wall. Ziemia Gnie?nie?ska was built in 1985 in Buenos Aires, Argentina and is one of six sister ships.
Just about to enter Lock 2. Piloting the Ziemia Gnie?nie?ska is a pleasure as there are no cargo cranes to look through or around.
Approaching Bridge 5 (Glendale Avenue Bridge). The advantages of a clear deck is quite evident.
Raising in Lock 4 the first of the flight locks.
Looking aft in Lock 4 while almost fully raised.
The very familiar Polska ?egluga Morska (Polish Steamship Company) stack logo.
Looking down on deck from the bridge wing.
Lock 6 the third of the flight locks. For more pictures and another look at the Ziemia Gnie?nie?ska check out the June 03, 2003 News Channel.
The 1977 Rijeka, Croatia built Adimon one mile out from Port Colborne Piers.
The bridge deck. If you look closely you can still see the former name Hercegovina on the name board.
The pilot’s view from the conning position as we enter the harbour at Port Colborne. On the left window frame can be seen the revolution indicator at just over 30 RPM giving a speed of 4,5 knots. Take note of the list of the (Kinsman) Enterprise at the scrap yard.
(Kinsman) Enterprise is hard aground! Extremely high water levels were experienced in the eastern end of Lake Erie during last week’s storm. It appears that during the storm the ship worked its way up higher on the beach, as the water levels receded she became firmly entrenched.
Approaching Bridge 21. Adimon is loaded with yellow corn from Toledo, OH.
Going around the knuckle. Interestingly, she is bound for Aqaba (Al ‘Aqabah), Jordan. In over 1000 plus assignments as a pilot this is the first ship I have seen going to Jordan. Looking at an atlas one can see that Jordan has virtually no coastline.
Quite a contrast from yesterday’s Ziemia Gnie?nie?ska. Adimon has forest of cranes to contend with. She is fitted with six cranes each with a SWL of ten M.T.
In Lock 8 we make a quick pit stop and take on a small motor.
Up comes the motor. Another contrast from the 160 M.T. boiler loaded aboard the Tramper last week. See Sunday’s news story “Big Lift for Big Lift” if you missed it.
Landing the motor on deck.
Pit stop complete we exit Lock 8.
Meeting the Orsula (Ex. Federal Calumet) on the long level.
Orsula bound for Cleveland.
Speaking of Croatia, Orsula is registered in Dubrovnik, Croatia.
Double vision! Orsula’s sister Federal Rhine in nearly the same pose, also heading for the south shore of Lake Erie.
Federal Rhine discharged at Wharf-6 in Thorold and is continuing on to Ashtabula, OH with mineral sand.
Only the port of registry is different!
A few hours later we arrive in Lock 7.
Adimon’s immaculate engine room. Power is supplied by a reliable 12000 BHP Sulzer engine. (Photo taken on November 3rd while upbound on Lake Erie).

Reported by: Capt. Alain M. Gindroz


Today in Great Lakes History - November 19

The The SAM LAUD was launched today in1974.

CONGAR (2) was launched November 19, 1945 as a) EMPIRE MALDON.

The keel for the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was laid November 19, 1942.

The MERLE M. McCURDY was laid up for the last time at Buffalo, NY on November 19, 1985.

On 19 November 1842, the wooden schooner BRANDYWINE was carrying flour in a storm on Lake Erie when she capsized and then drifted to the beach near Barcelona, New York. One passenger's body was found in the cabin, but the entire crew of 6 was lost.

More incidents from the terrible storm swept the Lakes in mid-November 1886. On 18-19 November of that year, the Port Huron Times listed the vessels that were known to have foundered in that storm. Here is the list of vessels that foundered as it appeared on 19 November 1886. "The barge EMERALD near Kewaunee, 5 lost. The barge F. M. DICKINSON near Kewaunee, 3 lost. Two unknown schooners (one supposed to be the HELEN) near Port Sherman. One unknown schooner near Hog Island Reef. The barge NORTH STAR near East Tawas, the fate of the crew is unknown." The list then continues with vessels ashore. "The barge WALLACE and consort on Choclay Beach, east of Marquette. The schooner SOUTH HAVEN near Pt. Sherman. The schooner MARY near Blenheim, Ontario. The schooner PATHFINDER near Two Rivers, the cargo and vessel are a total loss. The schooner Cuyahoga and two scows in North Bay. The schooner P. S. MARSH and an unknown schooner at St. Ignace. The schooner HARVEY BISSELL near Alpena. The propeller CITY OF NEW YORK near Cheboygan. The schooner KOLFAGE near Goderich, Ontario has broken up. The propeller NASHUA on Grass Island, Green Bay. The barge BISSELL near Kewaunee. The schooner GOLDEN below China Beach. The propeller BELLE CROSS and barges across from China Beach. The schooner FLORIDA on Marquette Beach is a total loss. And the barges BUCKOUT, McDOUGALL, BAKER, GOLDEN HARVEST near East Tawas.

The schooner HATTIE JOHNSTON sailed from Milwaukee loaded with 26,000 bushels of wheat on the night of 19 November 1879 and then a severe gale swept Lake Michigan. After two weeks, she was presumed lost with all hands. Aboard were Capt. D. D. Prouty, his wife and 8 crewmen.

On 19 Nov 1886, the steamer MANISTIQUE was towing the schooner-barges MARINETTE and MENEKAUNEE, all loaded with lumber, in a NW gale on Lake Michigan. The gale lasted three days. The barges broke loose after a long fight against the elements and both were wrecked near Frankfort, Michigan. 6 of the 7 aboard the MARINETTE were lost including the woman cook and her 13-year old daughter. The MENEKAUNEE broke up before the Lifesaving Service could get to her and all seven aboard died. When the Lifesaving Service arrived on the beach, they found a jumbled mass of lumber and gear and the ship's dog keeping watch over the dead bodies. The dog also died soon after the Lifesaving crew arrived.

EMPIRE MALDON (steel tanker, 343', 3734 gt) was launched on 19 Nov 1945 by Sir James Laing & Sons, Ltd., at Sunderland, UK for the British Ministry of War Transport She was sold to Imperial Oil Co. of Canada in 1946 and renamed IMPERIAL HALIFAX and served on the Maritime Provinces-East Coast trade. In 1969, she was purchased by Johnstone Shipping, Ltd. of Toronto and served on the Great Lakes. She lasted until 1977 when she was scrapped by United Metals, Ltd. in Hamilton, Ontario.
Images as the IMPERIAL HALIFAX from the Father Dowling Collection

On Friday morning, 19 Nov 1999, shortly after leaving the ADM dock in Windsor, the salty AVDEEVKA lost power in the Fighting Island Channel of the Detroit River. The main engine on the vessel quit while she was abreast of Grassy Island and she began drifting downstream. The stern anchor was dropped and then the port side bow anchor. She began swinging towards the middle of the channel with her stern outside the channel when the main engine was restarted and she headed back upstream for the Belle Isle anchorage. Once in the anchorage a team from the U.S. Coast Guard boarded the vessel to investigate. She was released the next day. It is reported that the vessel lost power due to main fuel valve being left closed after routine maintenance during her stay at the ADM dock.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

11/18
A pair of interesting grain ships arrived in Superior on a foggy Sunday. Montrealais made an unusual call at CHS berth 2 while Joseph H. Frantz was at General Mills' Elevator S. Damp weather and off-and-on rain continued Monday.

Across the harbor, Federal Fuji was at the Duluth port terminal on Monday morning to unload. Elsewhere, CSL Tadoussac and Edwin H. Gott were both scheduled to load at BNSF ore dock while Paul R. Tregurtha was expected late in the day for Midwest Energy Terminal.

Harbor ice began forming last week, although milder temperatures in recent days have melted most of it. However, that's a sign that the harbor water is cold enough to freeze quickly when serious cold weather arrives. Right now, Midwest Energy Terminal has vessel loadings scheduled through Dec. 10, when Oglebay Norton is due. That schedule, of course, is subject to considerable change over the next few weeks.

Reported by: Al Miller


Challenger in Milwaukee

11/18
The Southdown Challenger arrived in Milwaukee Monday noon. Contrary to earlier reports the Challenger is not being renamed. The reported painting out of "Southdown" in Detroit last week was nothing more then touching up the name while waiting weather. The Conquest, may receive the "Cemex" prefix in the future.

The Southdown challenger makes its way up the Kinnickinnic River Monday.
Approaching the Milwaukee Cemex dock.
Third Mate Bill Keshel.
The Challenger's Steward 'Sam' waves hello.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde


Alpena Update

11/18
Steamer Alpena arrived at Lafarge in the early morning hours on Monday to load cement. It departed around 7 a.m., heading for Green Bay.

Agawa Canyon was also in port on a dreary Monday, carefully making its way into the river to tie up at the Alpena Oil Dock before daylight. The Canyon unloaded a cargo of salt from Goderich, ON. It finished unloading after 11 a.m. and then backed out of the river to turn around in the bay.

The J.A.W Iglehart and the Jacklyn M barge Integrity are both due into Lafarge on Tuesday to take on cement.

Fleet mates Maumee and Calumet were loading at Stoneport on Monday.

Agawa Canyon unloading

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain


Saginaw River News

11/18
The Algorail was inbound the Saginaw River Monday afternoon passing the Pump-Out Island around 3pm. She continued upriver to the Buena Vista Dock to unload. She was expected to be outbound early Tuesday morning.

The tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 were outbound from the Bay Aggregates Dock Monday evening after unloading there during the day.

Reported by: Todd Shorkey


Toledo News

11/18
The tug Keewatin with her stone barge was outbound Maumee Bay from Toledo early Monday afternoon. The salt water vessel Federal Kivalina was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. The salt water vessel Adimon moved from Andersons "E" Elevator to Andersons "K" Elevator late Friday to finish loading grain, she is expected to depart Monday afternoon. The Nanticoke was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator. The John B. Aird was tied up at the Kuhlman Dock and is waiting to load a grain cargo at one of the Andersons Elevators when it becomes available.

The Armco, Buckeye, Courtney Burton and Gemini remain in layup at their respective dock sites. There is an unknown vessel in the large drydock at the Shipyard.

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will be the H. Lee White on Tuesday, followed by the Catherine Desgagnes, Saginaw, and Algolake on Wednesday. The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the Frontenac and CSL Niagara on Wednesday, followed by the CSL Laurentien on Friday.

Classic Views of Toledo Shipping
Paul Thayer outbound Maumee Bay she presently sails as the Earl W. Oglebay.
William R. Roesch inbound Maumee Bay, she presently sails as the David Z. Norton.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Today in Great Lakes History - November 18

The CARL D. BRADLEY was lost in a violent storm on Lake Michigan on November 18, 1958.

The CANADIAN OLYMPIC's sea trials were conducted on 18 Nov 1976. Her maiden voyage was on 28 Nov 1976 to load coal at Conneaut, Ohio for Nanticoke, Ont.. Her name honors the Olympic Games that were held at Montreal that year.

The bow and stern sections of the vessel that was to become the STEWART J. CORT were built by Ingalls Shipbuilding Division, Litton Systems, Inc., Pascagoula, MS, as hull 1173. That 182' vessel, known as "STUBBY" was launched on 18 Nov 1969. "STUBBY" sailed under its own power from the Gulf of Mexico through the St. Lawrence Seaway and Welland Canal to Erie, PA where the sections were cut apart by Erie Marine, Inc. and the 818 foot mid section was added -- making the Lakes first thousand footer. The ASHCROFT was launched November 18, 1924 as a) GLENIFFER (2).

On 18 November 1873, the tug CRUSADER was launched at 1:20 p.m. on 18 November 1873 at the Leighton & Dunford yard in Port Huron, MI. Her dimensions were 138' overall, 125' keel, 23' beam, and 12' depth. She was built for Mr. G. E. Brockway of Port Huron.

On 18 November 1842, CHICAGO (wooden passenger & package freight sidewheeler, 105', 166 t, built in 1837 at St. Joseph, MI) was struck by a gale between Ashtabula and Conneaut in lake Erie. She lost both of her stacks and became unmanageable when her fires went out. She was driven ashore about 3 miles east of Silver Creek, New York and was wrecked. About 60 persons were on board and amazingly no lives were lost.

On 18 November 1882, DROMEDARY (wooden propeller, 120', 255 gt, built in 1868 at Port Dalhousie, Ontario) burned to a total loss at the dock at Hamilton, Ontario when her banked fires overheated. She was owned by Burroughs & Co. No lives were lost.

A terrible storm swept the Lakes in mid-November 1886. On 18-19 November of that year, the Port Huron Times listed the vessels that were known to have foundered in that storm. Here is the list as it appeared on 18 November 1886. "The barge CHARLES HINCKLEY is ashore near Alpena. The schooner P. S. MARCH is ashore at St. Ignace. She will probably go to pieces. The schooner THOMAS P. SHELDON is ashore about 10 miles north of Alpena. The crew were rescued by the tug HAND. The schooner NELLIE REDINGTON is reported going to pieces at Two Rivers. Three of her crew reached harbor all right, but the other 7 men on board are in danger of their lives. The coal barges F. M. DICKINSON and EMERALD were driven ashore at Kewaunee Wednesday morning [17 Nov]. Three of the DICKINSON's crew were drowned, the other four floated ashore on a plank. The EMERALD's crew started ashore in the yawl, but 5 were drowned.

On 18 November 1881, the schooner JAMES PLATT left Bay City with a cargo of lumber for Chicago. However, she was wrecked on Lake Michigan during a terrible snow storm during the first week of December and never made it to Chicago. The storm lasted two full days and six of the crew survived but the rest were lost.

The ANN ARBOR No. 4 ran aground on Green Isle, the island in Green Bay to the north of her course between Sturgeon Bay and Menominee on 18 Nov 1913. ANN ARBOR No. 3 pulled her off undamaged after about 2 hours work.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




No October Treat For U.S.-Flag Lakes Fleet

11/17
U.S.-flag vessels moved 10.7 million net tons of cargo on the Great Lakes in October, a decrease of 9.5 percent compared to a year ago and a drop of 8 percent compared to the month's 5-year average.

The iron ore trade struggled again in October. Loadings in U.S. bottoms totaled only 4.2 million net tons, a decrease of more than 18 percent compared to both a year ago and the month's 5-year average. For the year, the U.S.-flag ore float stands at 33.3 million tons, a decline of 12.8 percent compared to the same point in 2002, but an even greater drop - 19.3 percent - compared the 5-year average. With consolidation efforts still ongoing in the steel industry, North American mills are only operating at 81 percent of capacity, so reduced demand for iron ore is inevitable until the restructuring is complete.

Coal cargos in U.S.-flag lakers totaled 2.4 million net tons in October, a decrease of 6.6 percent compared to last year, but essentially on par with the month's 5-year average. The October drop reflects some inventory adjustments in the power generating industry. For the year, the coal trade for U.S.-flag lakers is slightly ahead 2002's pace and basically on track with the 5-year average.

Stone loadings in U.S.-flag lakers were down a boatload or two compared to last October, but even with the month's 5-year average. However, for the year, sluggish demand from the construction industry has left the end-of-October total representing a decrease of 7.6 percent compared to the same point in 2002 and 8.8 percent compared to the 5-year average.

Reported by: Lakes Carriers' Association


Boland Visits the Rouge

11/17
On Sunday the John J Boland made a rare trip to the Rouge Steel Plant. This is an unusual trip for an American Steamship Company boat.

Going Through Dix Street Bridge
Stern of the Boland after going through Dix Street Bridge
Turning around in the Turning Basin to back into the slip.

Reported by: Jon Paul Kubala


Laud in Green Bay

11/17
On Sunday night the Sam Laud arrived in Green Bay to deliver stone to the Western Lime docks. Unloading was completed by 10 p.m. Sam Laud when finished unloading
Sam Laud wide view

Reported by: Steve Giese


Trip Auction

11/17
Jackson Lumen Christi High School is having its annual Auction during the evening Of November 21st. Up for bidding is a trip for four adults on an American Steamship Company vessel during June-September 2004.

Bids will be taken through 4 p.m. Thursday, November 20. A live auction will then be held on Friday evening the 21st amongst Auction attendees to see if anyone will top the highest bid previously received.

Bids can be sent to the Jackson Lumen Christi Development Office through e-mail lcdevoff@hotmail.com or submitted by phone (517)787-5080. Starting bid is $3,000.

Reported by: Jim Bearman


Weekly Updates

11/17
The weekly updates have been uploaded.
Click here to view


Today in Great Lakes History - November 17

On 17 Nov 1969, the RIDGETOWN (steel propeller bulk freighter, 557', 7637 gc, built in 1905 at Chicago, IL) was laid up at Toronto for the last time with a load of grain. In the Spring of 1970, Upper Lakes Shipping, Ltd. sold her to Canadian Dredge & Dock Co., Ltd. of Toronto. She was sunk at Nanticoke, Ontario for use as a temporary breakwater during the construction of harbor facilities in the Summer of 1970. Still later, she was raised and sunk again in the Summer of 1974 as a breakwater to protect marina facilities at Port Credit, Ontario.

On November 17, 1984 the EUGENE P. THOMAS was towed by the TUG MALCOLM to Thunder Bay, Ont. for scrapping by Shearmet.

In the morning of 17 Nov 1926, the PETER A. B. WIDENER (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 580', 7053 gt, built in 1906 at Chicago, IL) was running upbound on Lake Superior in ballast when it encountered strong Northeasterly winds. About six miles Southwest of the Rock of Ages Light on Isle Royale, the captain gave orders to change course for Duluth, MN. There was no response because the wheel chains had parted from the drum, thus disabling the rudder. Repairs cost $4,000.

On 15 Nov 1972, the MICHIPICOTEN (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 549', 6490 gt, built in 1905 at W. Bay City, MI) departed Quebec in tow of Polish tug KORAL for scrapping in Spain. The tow encountered bad weather and the MICHIPICOTEN broke in two during a major fall storm on the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Her forward section sank on 17 Nov off Anticosti Island the after section sank the next day.

The propeller JOHN STUART burned about two miles from Seewaing, MI at 9:00 p.m., 17 November 1872. She had been aground there for some time.

On 17 November 1887, ARIZONA (wooden propeller package freighter, 189', 962 gt, built in 1868 at Cleveland) was carrying oils and acid used in mining operations when her dangerous cargo caught fire as she approached the harbor at Marquette, Michigan in heavy seas. Poisonous fumes drove all of the crew topside, leaving the vessel unmanageable. She ran against the breakwater and the crew jumped off. The burning steamer "chased" the crew down the breakwater toward town with the poisonous fumes blowing ashore. She finally beached herself and burned herself out. She was later recovered and rebuilt.

On 17 November 1873, the wooden 2-mast schooner E. M. CARRINGTON sank in nine feet of water at AuSable, Michigan. She had a load of 500 barrels of flour and 7,000 bushels of grain. She was recovered and lasted another seven years.

On 17 November 1880, GARIBALDI (2-mast wooden schooner, 124’, 209 t, built in 1863 at Port Rowan, Ontario) was carrying coal in a storm on Lake Ontario. She anchored to ride out the storm, but after riding out the gale for 15 hours, her anchor cable parted and her crew was forced to try to bring her into Weller’s Bay. She stranded on the bar. One of the crew froze solid in a standing position and his ghost is supposed to still haunt that area. The vessel was recovered and rebuilt. She lasted until at least 1898.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley, and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series





Lee A. Visits Bayship

11/16
The Lee A. Tregurtha entered Bay Ship Friday evening. The vessel's port anchor was missing and there is no anchor chain coming out of the hull.

Anchor pocket.
Another shot, showing name and Starboard anchor in pocket (behind crane).

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle


Catherine Desgagnes in Green Bay

11/16
The Catherine Desgagnes arrived in Green Bay at 2:30 PM Friday with 1,030 tons of pig iron for the Fox River Dock. They finished up unloading Saturday and departed for Toledo to load coal.

Future traffic due in port includes the Rebecca Lynn A-410 with a load of asphalt cement for Koch Materials 2100 on 11-18-03 and the Karen Andrie A-397 also with Asphalt Cement for Koch Materials due in 1800 on 11-20-03

View from Tower Dr. Bridge.
Starboard View.
Port View.
Stern View.

Reported by: Jason Leino


Former Canaller Scrapped

11/16
The former canaller BV Rayna has been broken up at Matane, QC. Her forepart has been dismantled by late summer.

Built in 1926 at Old Kilpatrick, Scotland by Napier & Miller Ltd. As the canaller Charles R. Huntley, she was converted into a sand sucker at Whitby, Ont. in 1961. From 1936 to 1960, the vessel was owned by Upper Lakes & St. Lawrence Transportation.

Her last owners was listed as BV Maritime Inc. In 1993 she acquired the name BV Rayna and operated briefly under that name and at the end of 1994 season, she began her nine years of lay-up at Matane.

Reported by: René Beauchamp


Welland Traffic

11/16
Downbound on Nov 12 was a small excursion vessel the Eleanor R. from Chicago. After laying over at the small boat dock at Port Weller for weather, she cleared early Saturday morning and is likely headed off the lakes.

Two salties are visiting W6 in Thorold. The Federal Rhine arrived Saturday morning and the second, Grigoriy Aleksandrov is at anchor waiting its turn.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt


Big Lift for Big Lift

11/16
On Saturday November 8th the heavy lift ship Tramper arrived at Wharf-2 at Port Weller, ON to load cargo. Tramper is registered at Willemstad, Netherlands Antilles and commercial management is Big Lift Shipping B.V. of Amsterdam. The 100,50m (329’ 09”) vessel was built in 1999 at Zhonghua Shipyard in Shanghai, China. She is one of a large class identical sister’s of heavy lift ships built at the yard. Engine power is supplied by a 10,510 BHP Wartsila Diesel.

The following images were taken on Saturday morning.

Outbound Port Weller piers on the Port Weller pilot boat Juleen I. International District 2 pilot Capt. Greg Leigh enjoying a cup of good ol’ Tim Hortons coffee, a must before every piloting assignment!
Looks like gramma “Curly” and grandson “Herbie” could use a cup of coffee to kick start their morning!
(Yup – pup Herbie definitely needs a cup of java! Herbie is the newest member of the Port Weller pilot boat crew.
Inbound at C-15 Juleen 1 alongside the Emerald Star.
Capt. Leigh boarding the Emerald Star.
Port bridge wing view of Lake Ontario on the heavy lift ship Tramper while heaving up the anchor.
Front window view as we get underway and head for Port Weller Harbour.
An hour or so later we are alongside Wharf-2 ready to load the cargo.
Deck view aft prior to opening the hatches.
Tramper’s large accommodation block.
Close up of the bridge and company logo.
Number 1 crane with a hoisting capacity of 275 metric tonnes!
Another view.
Looking straight up at Number 1 crane.
Tramper is equipped with two cranes each capable of hoisting 275 metric tonnes. When the cranes are used in tandem they can lift an amazing 550 metric tonnes!
Spaghetti factory on the forecastle.
Friend and fellow Port Dalhousie resident Dave Bull taking a picture of the forecastle.
In front of the camera for a change.
Dave Bull enjoying a bird’s eye view of the proceedings from the bridge wing.
The ship’s crane operator operates the cranes remotely.
The remote control crane hoisting box.
Preparing to lift the hatch cover open.
Hatch cover being swung in place.
Hatch cover in place. Several hatch covers were removed in this fashion to access the cargo hold.
The cargo consists of a boiler weighing in at 160 metric tonnes destined for Port Lisas Harbour, Trinidad.
A weight like this requires a heavy duty trailer and lot’s of tires – in fact 42 of them!
The boiler manufacturer.
Particulars of the boiler. Note the weight 160,000 kilograms (352,500 lbs.)!
View from the main deck of the boiler prior to loading.
Securing the boiler hoisting beam to the Number 2 crane hook.
The ship’s crew securing the hoisting beam to the boiler.
Up she goes! The crane easily lifts this massive weight with plenty of power to spare.
The boiler is swung inboard slowly with great precision.
The open cargo hold is ready to stow the boiler.
Company officials and interested cargo parties watching and recording the operation.
Hoisting such a weight is a complex process that requires precise stability calculations and constant monitoring. The carriage of heavy lift cargoes is very unforgiving if calculations are incorrect. Water ballast is added and/or shifted through out the operation.
The crane operator is in constant communication with the captain and chief mate and follows their orders exclusively.
The boiler is gradually lowered into its new home.
The crew skilfully handles the load.
In about fifteen minutes the boiler is safely in place. The ship’s crew and officers handle all cargo operations. This load was flawless and performed with a high degree of efficiency and professionalism. Another job well done by Big Lift!
Jerry Newberry towing the Reliance in Port Weller Harbour bound for Port Weller Dry Docks. CCGS Simcoe can be seen on the north face of Wharf-1.
Jerry Newberry as seen from the deck of the Tramper.
The impressive and powerful Reliance with Atomic astern.
Atomic operating her engines astern in order to slow the tow as it secures on the approach wall below Lock 1.
Reliance securing ahead the Tramper.
A rare sight theses days - a full house at Port Weller. Tugs Jerry Newberry, Reliance, Atomic, heavy lift ship Tramper and CCGS Simcoe can all be seen in the harbour.
Atomic and the former Atlantic Cedar (Reliance).

Reported by: Capt. Alain M. Gindroz


Today in Great Lakes History - November 16

The tug portion of the Presque Isle was upbound in the Welland Canal on November 16,1973 en route to Erie to join with the barge.

FRED R. WHITE, JR. was launched in 1978.

On 16 Nov 1909 the JAMES S. DUNHAM (steel propeller bulk freighter, 420', 4795 gt, built in 1906 at W. Bay City, MI) encountered heavy seas and began hitting bottom where charts indicated 35 feet of water, even though she was in ballast and only drawing 17 feet of water. Rather than risk tearing the bottom out of her, the captain decided to beach her at Marble Point, just east of the Bad River outlet. After the heavy snow showers cleared, a message in a bottle was floated ashore to an observer.

The steel bulk freighters SIR JAMES DUNN and GEORGIAN BAY in tow of the Panamanian tug McTHUNDER arrived at Aliaga, Turkey for scrapping on 16 Nov 1989, 129 days after departing Thunder Bay.

On 16 November 1887, PACIFIC (wooden propeller freighter, 187', 766 gt, built in 1864 at Cleveland, OH) was loaded with lumber bound from Deer Park, MI for Michigan City, IN. After leaving the dock, she grounded on a shoal due to low water levels. The nearby Lifesaving Service took her crew off and then returned for the captain's dog. She was broken up by a gale on 19 November.

In 1892 the Ann Arbor #1 arrived Frankfort on her maiden trip.

November 16, 1990 - MWT ceased operations, ending more than a century of carferry service. The last run was made by the Badger, with Capt. Bruce Masse in command.

In 1981 the John Sherwin entered lay-up and has not seen service since.

On 16 November 1869, ADELL (2-mast wooden schooner, 48', 25 gt, built in 1860 at Milwaukee, Wisconsin) was driven ashore during a storm about a half mile below Bay View Pier near Milwaukee. Her skipper had every penny he owned sunk into that vessel. He was able to salvage her rigging and spars and left them on the beach overnight. The next day he returned and found that all had been stolen during the night.

On 16 Nov 1883, MANISTEE (wooden side-wheeler, 184’, 677 t, built in 1867 at Cleveland, OH) broke up in a gale west of the Keweenaw Peninsula off of Eagle Harbor, Michigan. This is one of Lake Superior’s worst disasters. Estimates of the number who died range from 23 to 37.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Former Saturn Heads for Columbia

11/15
Friday morning the tanker Centenario Trader left the Port of Sorel heading south for warmer climates. The tanker, now under Panamanian registry, had been in Sorel while her new crew familiarized themselves with the vessel.

The Centenario Trader's destination is Colombia where she is expected to arrive on December 5. Her new owners are reported to be Mar Shipping of Panama City

Saturn upbound above Cote Ste. Catherine lock in Sept. bound for Oswego New York with Asphalt. (Kent Malo)

Reported by: Kent Malo and René Beauchamp


EVTAC proposal includes long-term contract, pellet swaps

11/15
EVTAC Mining Co. would be renamed United Taconite LLC and get contracts to sell taconite pellets for nearly a decade if the Minnesota plant is acquired by Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. and Laiwu Steel Group Ltd.

Under a draft purchase agreement filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in St. Paul, United Taconite would be managed by Cliffs and sell or trade all its pellets to North American buyers. An equivalent amount of pellets produced at other Cliffs facilities would then be shipped to Laiwu Steel in China.

The deal would run through 2012 and provide Laiwu with about 4 million tons of iron ore pellets each year.

Cliffs would own 70 percent of the new company while Laiwu Steel would hold the remaining 30 percent.

Cliffs and Laiwu Steel are offering $500,000 in cash and would assume about $40 million in long-term environment liabilities for the mine and plant. An auction for assets of the taconite plant is Nov. 24 in Minneapolis. A sale of the taconite plant is Nov. 25 in U.S. Bankruptcy Court.

Reported by: Frank Frisk


Tucker in Manistee

11/15
Friday afternoon the Capt. Ralph Tucker was entering Manistee, Mich. While heading up river the Tucker struck a glancing blow to the Memorial St. (US-31) Bridge in Manistee, approximately 30 ft. above the Manistee River.

The vessel was inbound in ballast for the General Chemical Dock to load brine. Several chunks of concrete were loosened from the bridge, exposing the reinforcing beams and the bridge tender reported the bridge rocked a bit. Engineers from the State of Michigan were expected to inspect the bridge that afternoon.

Traffic continued to flow over the bridge after the incident and it is unknown if there was any damage to the ship.

The American Republic is bound for Manistee and it is unknown if the incident will affect her transit through the bridge.

Reported by: Dan Keaser


Viking I Departs Shipyard

11/15
The Viking I departed Bay Ship for the return trip to Marinette, Wisc. under tow of tugs from Selvick Marine.

With the winds dropping off 10 to 15 knots from the North West it was a good day to make the return trip. The dock will now be reblocked for the arrival of the Wilfred Sykes in the first week of December.

The Viking I was on the dry dock for a load line survey. The former carferry was sold to K&K Warehousing of Menominee, Michigan last December. At that time the planned use for the ferry was as a barge to haul wood pulp. In January, 2003 the barge was towed by the tug Olive L. Moore and assisted by the Joyce L. Van Enkevort from Erie, Penn. to Menominee. Prior to the dry docking the ferry had remained docked in Menominee unused.

Out bound to Sherwood Point
Wide view

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle


Traffic Picks up in Marquette

11/15
Friday was a busy day for shipping in Marquette, the calm after the storm. The Charles M. Beeghly came in on a beautiful, sunny day and took a load of taconite. While she was loading, the H. Lee White arrived and tied up on the north side of the dock to wait for the Beeghly to finish.

The White was bringing stone for an unusual load to the upper harbor. After she unloaded the stone, she will take on ore on the south side of the dock. The north side of the dock is filled with a load that the McKee Sons was scheduled to take. The Michipicoten is expected to take the McKee Sons load, but was delayed at the Soo for repairs.

The Beeghly had a slight delay in her loading to have some welding done. When she left, she backed straight out so the White could back out and move to the south side of the dock.

While this was happening, the American Mariner appeared on the horizon moving to the lower harbor with a load of stone.

Charles M. Beeghly unloading, bow view
Beeghley backing away from the dock
H. Lee White tied and waiting, bow view
H. Lee White unloading stone, usually done at the lower harbor dock.
H. Lee White and Charles M. Beeghly backing up, American Mariner passing in the distance.
American Mariner turning to back in to the lower harbor dock.

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Saginaw River News

11/15
The CSL Tadoussac was inbound the Saginaw River Friday morning, calling on the Essroc Terminal in Essexville. She unloaded clinker there during the day and was expected to be outbound later in the day.

The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons unloaded at the Bay Aggregates slip Friday afternoon and was outbound late in the evening.

Reported by: Todd Shorkey


St. Clair River Traffic

11/15
Friday seemed to return conditions to more of normal mode, a cool bright day, on the St. Clair River.

George A. Stinson downbound at Algonac.
Stern view of Stinson heading for Conneaut, Ohio.
Hollyhock at dock in Port Huron.
Birchglen passing under Blue Water Bridges.
Birchglen passing downbound, passing Light Ship Huron and Hollyhock.

Reported by: Tom Welles


Toledo Update

11/15
The salt water vessels Cinnamon was at Andersons "K" Elevator loading grain Friday. The Adimon at Andersons "E" Elevator loading grain and the Federal Hudson loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark elevator. All three vessels were delayed loading grain due to the very low water conditions over the past two days.

Waiting to load grain is the Nanticoke at the T.W.I. Dock. The John B. Aird anchored in western Lake Erie and the salt water vessel Federal Kavelina at anchor in the Ojibway anchorage near Windsor.

The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was able to make it into the Torco Ore Dock to unload ore. She finished unloading ore and departed mid Friday morning. The Canadian Transfer was at the City Dock unloading salt when finished she will finish unloading salt at the Kuhlman Dock further upriver.

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will be the Charles M. Beeghly on Sunday. The Lee A. Tregurtha and H. Lee White on Monday, followed by the Catherine Desgagnes and Algolake on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock will be the CSL Niagara on Tuesday, followed by the Frontenac on Wednesday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Wind Bound

11/15
Because of high winds, a line up of ships bound for the Seaway was beginning to form in Montreal Friday afternoon.

The Cedarglen, Ira and Orla were all waiting in ballast, once the storms clears the trio are destine for Thunder Bay to load grain. The bulker Ira built in 1979 is on her 25th season in the Seaway/Great Lakes trade and always kept the same name. This is her first trip this year and perhaps her last one of her career in the Seaway considering her age.

Reported by: René Beauchamp


Today in Great Lakes History - November 15

The cargo mid-body of the then under construction GEORGE A. STINSON was towed to Lorain in 1977.

PAUL THAYER b) EARL W. OGLEBAY left Lorain on her maiden voyage November 15, 1973 light for Escanaba, MI to load iron ore.

On November 15, 1974 the W.W. HOLLOWAY struck an embankment at Burns Harbor causing extensive damage.

Departing Duluth on November 15, 1909, the BRANSFORD, encountered a gale driven snowstorm. She battled the storm the entire day only to end up on the rocks near Siskiwit Bay on Isle Royal.

On 15 November 1894, ANTELOPE (Wooden Schooner, 56', 32 gt, built in 1878 at Grand Haven, MI) capsized in a storm while trying to make harbor at Grand Haven, MI. 4 lives were lost.

November 15, 1924 - The carferry Pere Marquette was renamed Pere Marquette 15.

On 15 November 1875, the Port Huron Times reported that "there is little doubt but that the scow SUTLER GIRL has been lost with all hands on Lake Erie. She has now been overdue two weeks."

On 15 November 1869, W. W. ARNOLD (wooden schooner, 426 gt, built in 1863 at Buffalo, NY) was carrying iron ore when she was driven ashore near the mouth of the Two Hearted River on Lake Superior during the great gale of November 1869. The violent storm tore the schooner apart and she sank quickly losing all hands (11) including several passengers.

On 15 Nov 1905, the W. K. BIXBY (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 480', 5712 gt, later J. L. REISS, then SIDNEY E. SMITH, JR.) was launched at Wyandotte, MI for the National Steamship Co. (M.B. McMillan). She lasted until 1972 when she was wrecked at Sarnia, Ontario in a collision with the PARKER EVANS.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Traffic Slowly Returns to Normal after Blow

11/14
High winds kept many vessels at anchor or at their docks Wednesday night and most of Thursday. By Thursday night, water levels were returning to normal as winds abated and vessel traffic was slowly getting back to normal.

In the southern Lake Huron anchorage near buoy 11 above the Blue Water bridges, CSL Tadoussac, Mesabi Miner and Federal Oshima waited for weather while Pineglen and the tug Ian Mac tied up in Sarnia. Further down the river, the Algosteel secured at Imperial Oil, the tug Mary E. Hannah and barge 3601 waited for weather at Sunoco and Kaye E. Barker tied up at Shell Oil in Corunna. After unloading, Algolake remained tied up at the Lambton Generating Station in Courtright, with the barge Salty Dog No 1 and tug Carrol C 1 secured at the McKeil brine dock south of there. Across the river in St. Clair, Mich., the Columbia Star and Algoville swung at anchor in the St. Clair River at Recor Point.

Wilfred Sykes rode out the storm anchored off Milwaukee, while Southdown Challenger remained tied at the LaFarge dock in Detroit. Joseph H. Frantz remained at anchor in Superior, Wisc., as did a number of other vessels in the area.

At the snowy, windy Soo, water levels in the Rock Cut dropped dramatically to an amazing 28 inches below datum. The upbound Edgar B Speer was is anchored in Hay Lake as was the downbound Spruceglen. Other vessels delayed by the storm were Volmeborg, George A. Stinson and Edwin H. Gott downbound and Earl W. Oglebay and Algomarine upbound. David Z. Norton, American Mariner and Presque Isle were also delayed.

On Lake Erie, winds drove water levels down by 29.7 inches on the western end of the lake. The Algoeast, Atlantic Superior, James R. Barker, Rt. Hon Paul H. Martin, Algocen, Philip R. Clarke and Isa all sought shelter in the Colchester anchorage. Maria Desgagnes was anchored on the east side of Point Pelee in Lake Erie. The Ojibway anchorage in Windsor played host to Federal Kivalina and Fred R. White Jr., while the Wolverine sought shelter at the Koenig/LaFarge Dock.

Dropping water levels left portions of shoreline normally covered by several feet of water dry. At 9 a.m. Thursday morning the water level in the lower Detroit River had dropped to minus 32 inches. The level at Toledo harbor had fallen to minus 57 inches and the Saginaw River was minus 93 inches at Essexville.

Reported by: Scott Best, Barry Hiscocks, Angie Williams and Roger LeLievre


Marquette Update

11/14
The John J. Boland came in to Marquette on Wednesday and loaded taconite pellets. She remained tied up at the dock Thursday to wait out weather on the lakes.

John J. Boland waiting to load
Waves over breakwater in Marquette's upper harbor on Thursday
Boland tied up waiting out the storm. Notice the breakwater in the distance.

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Kingston Report

11/14
Thursday evening winds were blowing 30 to 40 knots. The Federal Rhine and Irma anchored east of Carelton Island. The Cape Vincent Pilot Boat has been wind bound and not operating as it was too dangerous. They do not expect to return to service until the morning.

The CCGS Caribou Isle headed for Prescott but had a change of plans and secured at Gananoque Thursday morning. A Notice to Mariners has been issued about a two story house aground. The house is blue with a white roof on a 20 by 40-foot barge and grounded near Amateur Island.

Reported by: Ron Walsh


Halifax Traffic

11/14
Tuesday was a beautiful day for a walk around Halifax, Nova Scotia. Some of the ships seen in the harbor that day are included below.

Tugs at their berth in Halifax. Two of those shown are currently for sale, at a very reasonable price.
Off-shore supply boat Jim Kilabuk secured in Halifax waiting for her next job.
A view of the tall ship Larinda being repaired.
Port side damage on the Larinda.
Irving Hemlock pushing a barge under the Angus L MacDonald bridge.

Reported by: Paul Beesley


Today in Great Lakes History - November 14

The ALGOBAY (steel propeller bulk freighter, 719', 22466 gt, built at Collingwood, ON in 1978) departed Sept Iles, Que. on 14 Nov 1978 with an iron ore pellet cargo for Sydney, N.S. when she collided with the 90,000 ton Italian-flag ore carrier CIELO BIANCO. The Collingwood-built tug POINTE MARGUERITE, which was towing the big salty, was unfortunately crushed between the two vessels and sank, killing two crew members.

On November 14, 1934 the WILLIAM A. REISS grounded off Sheboygan, she was declared a constructive total loss.

Cracks across the ENDERS M. VOORHEES' spar deck were first noticed in a storm on Lake Superior November 14, 1942. Her fleetmate NORMAN B. REAM came to her assistance by releasing storm oil which helped calm the seas so the crew of the VOORHEES could run cables the length of her deck and winch them tight to arrest the cracking. She proceeded to the Soo escorted by the REAM and later sailed to the Great Lake Engineering Works for repairs.

The THOMAS WILSON (2) was launched November 14, 1942.

The MESQUITE was launched November 14, 1942 at a cost of $894,000.

On November 14, 1952, the Sparrows Point (now Buckeye) entered service.

On 14 November 1879, C. G. BREED (2 mast wooden schooner, 140', 385 t, built in 1862 at Milwaukee) was carrying 24,000 bushels of wheat from Detroit to Buffalo when she capsized and sank in a sudden squall near Ashtabula, OH in Lake Erie. 5 lives were lost, but 3 were saved. The 3 survivors were rescued by 3 different vessels. In 1940 following the Armistice Day Storm, The PM32 was freed by the tug John F. Cushing assisted by the PM 21.

In 1990 Glen Bowden (of MWT) announced that he would suspend cross-Lake Michigan ferry service indefinitely.

On 14 November 1886, the steamer BELLE WILSON was crossing Lake Ontario with a load of 11,800 bushels of oats when a severe gale and snow storm blew in. The vessel lost her rudder and the crew rigged sails, but these were blown away. Then they rigged a drag made of 600 feet of line and a log to help maneuver the vessel and they headed for Oswego, New York. This lasted for 12 hours, but the chain parted at 3:00 AM and the vessel was driven ashore at Ford's Shoals, 4 miles east of Oswego harbor. No lives were lost.

On 14 November 1892, the 2-mast, 95’ wooden schooner MINNIE DAVIS was rammed on a dark night by the 2-mast, 117’ wooden schooner HUNTER SAVIDGE near Amherstburg, Ontario. The DAVIS sank, but no lives were lost. The wreckage was removed in May, 1893.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Conquest in Milwaukee

11/13
The Southdown Conquest was in Milwaukee Wednesday, tied up at the Cemex dock. They are fully loaded, but no sign of unloading was evident. Interestingly, "Southdown" has been painted out on the bow.

Fleet mate Southdown Challenger is also reported to have the "Southdown" in her name painted out. The two vessel were expected to have their names changed after Southdown Cement was bought by Cemex cement. By the end of the season the vessels should be renamed Cemex Conquest and Cemex Challenger.

Conquest at dock.
Close up of name on the bow.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde


Fewer salties hurting Twin Ports grain trade

11/13
Several factors are reducing the number of salties on the Great Lakes this season, and that's reducing the amount of grain shipped through the seven active grain elevators in Duluth and Superior.

Experts told the Duluth News Tribune that tariffs on foreign steel imports have reduced the number of salties coming to the lakes. Often, a saltie will haul steel into the lakes and then depart with grain.

Another factor affecting the saltwater trade this season is that cargo ships are in high demand and short supply, largely because of China's economic boom and its growing appetite for materials.

Don Willecke, president of the Western Great Lakes Pilots Association, told the newspaper that year-to-date saltwater ship traffic in Lake Superior and Michigan has been only about three-quarters of last year's volume. And last year, salties' visits to the western Great Lakes declined by about 18 percent from 2001.

Statistics from the Minneapolis Grain Exchange reports that the port of Duluth-Superior has loaded 37.4 million bushels of grain and beans into the holds of ships bound for overseas markets. That's 24 percent less than the Twin Ports delivered for export during the same period last year.

Chuck Hilleren, president of Guthrie-Hubner Inc., a Duluth ship agent, said that since steel tariffs went into effect last year, many foreign-flagged ships that once carried steel products into the Great Lakes and backhauled grain have struggled to find non-steel replacement cargoes.

"Having inbound and outbound cargo is what made the whole thing work," he said.

Willecke agreed that steel tariffs have eaten away at the number of salties entering the Great Lakes.

"I certainly understand why steelworkers wanted protection from foreign competitors," Willecke said. "But the tariffs have hurt our business, and a lot of folks don't realize how many people here depend on ocean-going ships for work. There are the tugs, the agents, the line handlers and the stevedores.... It carries all the way through."

Reported by: Chris Cooper


Fog Closes River, Storm Sends Ships to Anchor

11/13
The Coast Guard closed the St Marys River Wednesday morning from the Soo Locks to Mud Lake Junction due to fog and resulting low visibility.

Waiting at the Southeast Pier below the locks that morning was the David Z Norton and Birchglen. The tug Anglian Lady and barge 2501 went to anchor in the upper river waiting dock space at Algoma Steel. The McKee Son's was unloading, while the Charles M Beeghly and Saginaw are tied up waiting there turn to unload coal at Algoma Steel.

The Earl W Oglebay was tied up at Lime Island and the H Lee White at loading at Drummond Island while the American Mariner was anchored waiting to dock at Drummond Island.

The river was reopened about 12:30 p.m. and vessels began working there way to one end of the river or the other looking for anchorage from expected gales on Huron and Superior.

Anchored in the lower river Wednesday night was the David Z. Norton, Birchglen, Presque Isle, American Mariner, Edwin H Gott and George A Stinson.

Upbound was the Canadian Transport, Halifax, Montrealais, and the H Lee White. The Saginaw, Michipicoten, and Charles M Beeghly remain at Algoma Steel. The downbound Volmeborg was at anchor in Whitefish Bay.

Pictures by B. Barnes
McKeesons and tug Invincible downbound Wednesday afternoon below Mission Point.
Close up of bow.
Close up of tug.
Stern view.

Reported by: Scott Best


Twin Ports Report

11/13
A fast-moving autumn storm sent many vessels to anchor Wednesday. Most of the ships of Duluth-based Great Lakes Fleet dropped anchor or remained at their dock until the weather moderated. Edgar B. Speer anchored in Whitefish Bay; Edwin H. Gott was in the Detroit River, with its next port to be BNSF ore dock in Superior; Presque Isle was anchored in the St. Marys River; Roger Blough was loading in Two Harbors but its departure for Gary was dependent on the weather; Arthur M. Anderson was anchored in Lake Michigan; Cason J. Callaway dropped anchor in the Straits of Mackinac while en route to Buffington; Philip R. Clarke was downbound in the Detroit River in late afternoon but was expected to anchor in Sandusky Bay until the weather moderated; and John G. Munson was anchored in Meldrum Bay, Ontario, waiting for the loading dock.

Middletown made an unexpected visit to Superior on Wednesday to unload stone at the CLM dock before proceeding to Midwest Energy Terminal to load coal for the Xcel Energy plant in Ashland, Wis. The Middletown is expected to return this week for a second load to Ashland. (Earlier this week, Fred R. White Jr. was on the schedule to make this trip.)

George A. Stinson may be the primary customer for the DMIR ore dock for the rest of this season. It's due there again Nov. 17.

DMIR's Two Harbors dock is busier than the Duluth dock, with several vessels scheduled for this week, although their arrivals likely will change after Wednesday's storm. Columbia Star, which spends much of its time in the coal trade, is scheduled to load there, along with the St. Clair.

Reported by: Al Miller


Saginaw River News

11/13
The Maumee was inbound the Saginaw River Tuesday evening, unloading at the Wirt Stone dock in Saginaw. She departed early Wednesday morning, turning in the Sixth Street basin and proceeding downriver to the Burroughs dock to wait for her upbound fleet mate, the Mississagi, to pass. Once clear, the Maumee continued downriver for the lake.

The Mississagi was inbound for the Saginaw Rock Products dock in Saginaw. She unloaded during the day and was turned and outbound late in the afternoon.

Mississagi upbound clear of the Lafayette Bridge
Bow close up
Stern view
Maumee downbound at the Bay City Wirt Dock
Bow close up
Stern view

Reported by: Todd Shorkey


Windy visit for the Buffalo

11/13
The Buffalo arrived in Green Bay Wednesday morning with a load of 10,300 tons of Western Coal for Georgia Pacific. Unloading was completed about 3:45 p.m. but due to 20 mph winds with gusts up to 50 mph the Buffalo remained tied up at Georgia Pacific waiting for better weather.

The Buffalo is due to load at Port Inland after departing Green Bay. Traffic on Tuesday included the Cason J. Callaway and John G. Munson in with stone, and the tug Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity with cement.

The Catherine Desgagnes is scheduled to arrive early Thursday with 3,010 tons of pig iron for the Fox River Dock. The Great Lakes Trader is due in at noon Thursday with 26,000 tons of limestone for Western Lime. These times may change due to the storm.

Buffalo unloads in windy Green Bay .
At night in the slip waiting weather.

Reported by: Jason Leino


St. Clair, Detroit and Lake Erie Delays

11/13
A number of vessel sought shelter from the storm stopping at available docks or protected anchorage from Sarnia to Long Point.

In the St. Clair River Wednesday evening the Algosteel stopped at Imperial Oil in Sarnia, Kaye E. Barker at Shell Oil in Corunna, tug Mary E. Hannah and barge at Sunoco in Sarnia, the tug Ian Mac and barge tied up at the Government Dock in Sarnia. The Pineglen was expecting to tie up at the North Slip or Government Dock in Sarnia.

The Mesabi Miner was at the Recor Edison Coal Dock in St. Clair, with the Indiana Harbor below in the Recor Anchorage. The Columbia Star was expected to also stop in the Recor Anchorage. The CSL Tadoussac planned to stop in the upper river.

Power was lost at the Jefferson Street Bridge over the Rouge River in Detroit delaying the Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder who were expected to travel up river to Rouge Steel. The tug Karen Andrie and barge A397 were turning in the Rouge Steel turning basin when the bridge lost power, this has the pair trapped above the bridge. There was no estimated time when the bridge would return to service. The downbound Fred R. White Jr. was expected to wait out the weather at the DMT dock on the Detroit River.

On western Lake Erie all vessels went to anchor Wednesday night as winds were reported to reach up to 75 miles per hour.

The low pressure system and accompanying winds dropped the water levels in the lower Detroit River and western basin of Lake Erie. The levels were expected to be plus 13 inches above chart datum in the lower Detroit River but had reached minus 7.8 inches by 11 p.m., dropping almost 18 inches in one hour.

Water levels continued to drop over night. At 9 a.m. Thursday morning the water level in the lower Detroit River had dropped to minus 32 inches. The level at Toledo harbor had fallen to minus 57 inches and the Saginaw River was minus 93 inches at Essexville.

The James R. Barker stopped Wednesday night in the Colchester Anchorage below the Detroit River Light, the Algocen, Philip R. Clarke and salt water ship Isa were also expected to wait out the storm in the anchorage.

The Canadian Transfer was anchored near the Toledo Harbor Light and the west bound John B. Aird was at South East Shoal heading for Toledo and expected to wait out the storm on the western end of the lake.

Seeking shelter in Long Point were the Capt. Henry Jackman, Canadian Progress, Canadian Olympic and the Canadian Enterprise dock in Nanticoke. Crossing Lake Erie was the west bound Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin and Atlantic Superior. The pair reached the Colchester Anchorage overnight and will wait for the water levels to rise.

Reported by: Barry Hiscocks


Capt. Henry Jackman unloads stone in Toronto

11/13
The Capt Henry Jackman arrived in Toronto Tuesday afternoon to unload stone at Innocon Concrete Ready Mix plant located between Cherry St and Leslie St in the Port of Toronto. The stone was loaded in Meldrum Bay on Nov 9. Other ships in the area were laid up self unloader Algobay, laid up bulker Algoisle, tug Glenevis, and the John B Aird unloading sugar into another bulker.

Jackman unloading.
Jackman's 5000 h.p. 6M552AK MaK Main Engines.
Another view.
Another view.
Generator.
Algoisle.
Glenevis.

Reported by: Geoff DeLuca


Today in Great Lakes History - November 13

On November 13, 1976 the TEMPLE BAR (e ALGONORTH) arrived at Singapore where she was lengthened 202 feet.

CONALLISON was laid up for the last time on November 13, 1981.

JAMES DAVIDSON entered service on November 13, 1920 when she loaded 439,000 bushels of wheat at Duluth, MN for delivery to Buffalo, NY.

The GEORGE HINDMAN (2) was in collision with the British salty MANCHESTER EXPLORER on Lake St. Louis, above the Lachine Lock in 1956.

J.P. MORGAN, JR. was launched November 13, 1909.

The HOMER D. WILLIAMS was involved in a collision with the steamer OTTO M. REISS at Duluth November 13, 1917.
In 1984 the WILLIAMS was towed to Thunder Bay, Ont. by the TUG MALCOLM for dismantling.

On 13 November 1870, the schooner E. FITZGERALD left Port Huron on her maiden voyage to load lumber at Au Sable, MI for Chicago. She was commanded by Capt. A. McTavish.

On 13 November 1883, H. C. AKELEY (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 240', 1187 t, built in 1881 at Grand Haven, MI) was carrying corn from Chicago to Buffalo when she encountered a heavy storm off Holland, MI. She took the disabled tug PROTECTOR in tow but let her go when her own rudder broke off. AKELEY anchored but started to sink when she fell into the troughs of the waves. The disabled schooner DRIVER managed to save 12 of the crew who had taken to AKELEY's yawl before she went down. 6 lives were lost.

Captain W.H. Van Dyke was born at Escanaba, MI on November 13, 1871 and spent most of his life on the Great Lakes (he joined the crew of a schooner at the age of 15). He first captained the Pere Marquette Line Steamer No. 8, then in 1916 he joined the Pere Marquette carferry fleet. His first command was the Steamer 15. Then for 10 years he served as master of the Steamer 17, and after the launch of the City of Flint 32 in 1929, he served as master of the Steamer 22.

On 13 November 1865, CLARA PARKER (3-mast wooden schooner, 175', 425 gt, built in 1865 at Detroit) was fighting a losing battle with storm induced leaks, so she was beached 400 yards off shore near the mouth of the Pigeon River, south of Grand Haven, Michigan. The local Lifesaving Service plucked all 9 of the crew from the rigging by breeches buoy after the vessel had gone down to her decks and was breaking up.

On 13 November 1888, LELAND (wooden steam barge, 148’, 366 gt, built in 1873 at New Jerusalem, Ohio) burned at Huron, Ohio. She was valued at $20,000 and insured for $15,000. She was rebuilt and lasted until 1910.

The JAMES DAVIDSON (steel propeller bulk freighter, 587', 8349 gt, built at Wyandotte, MI in 1920) entered service on 13 Nov 1920 for the Globe Steamship Co. (G. A. Tomlinson, mgr.) when she loaded 439,000 bushels of wheat at Duluth, MN for delivery to Buffalo, NY. She was the last ship built at Wyandotte, Michigan
Click here for an image of the Davidson from the Father Dowling Collection.

The unnamed salty (formerly RANGUINI) arrived at Milwaukee's heavy lift dock on Saturday night, 13 Nov 1999 to load a large desalinization filtration system built in Milwaukee for Korea. The vessel entered the Seaway in ballast for Milwaukee on 09 Nov 1999. The following day, the crew rigged scaffolding over the side so the new name BBC GERMANY could be painted on the ship.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history.




Stinson sailing under charter to Great Lakes Transportation

11/12
George A. Stinson, which re-entered service Monday following a six-month layup, is hauling taconite pellets for the rest of the season for Duluth-based Great Lakes Transportation.

The Duluth News Tribune reported that Great Lakes Transportation has chartered the Stinson to carry pellets from the Duluth Missabe and Iron Range Railway ore dock in Duluth to Conneaut. From there, the pellets are being shipped by rail to U.S. Steel's Edgar Thomson Works near Pittsburgh.

Great Lakes Transportation, formerly USS Great Lakes Fleet, has eight vessels and a contract to carry pellets from U.S. Steel's Minntac taconite plant to its mills on the lower lakes. Since U.S. Steel purchased National Steel last spring, vessels from Great Lakes Fleet also have been hauling pellets to the former National mill at Ecorse, Mich. The additional tonnage demand prompted the fleet to charter the Stinson, which for years had carried pellets for National Steel.

"We anticipate a busy closeout of the season, and we had a need for additional cargo," Peter Stephenson, vice president and general manager of the DMIR, told the News Tribune.

In its first trip Monday, the Stinson loaded a special grade of pellets from Minntac. Although most of the DMIR's taconite tonnage is now being shipped through Two Harbors, the company decided to segregate the special pellets at a separate dock this fall.

Stephenson said the railroad is now trying to use just the Two Harbors dock when shipping volume allows. He told the newspaper that Two Harbors has greater through-put capacity than Duluth and offers boats a quicker turnaround.

If taconite production rebounds next season, Stephenson said the Duluth ore dock could be much busier than it was this season.

Reported by: Steve Roper


Scrap Tows Making Progress

11/12
The scrap tow to India of the Oakglen and the Seaway Queen, by the tug Seaways 5, are heading for the South African coast. The tow is taking a more Southerly route rounding the Cape of Good Hope to escape the rough weather the North Atlantic dishes out this time of year. The Seaways 2 with the Mapleglen in tow reportedly took a severe beating in October transiting the North Atlantic. A towing company spokesperson reports it is more economical going this route with the two vessels in tow, the Suez Canal will only allow one vessel per transit.

The Seaways 2 and the Mapleglen transited the Suez Canal last week and are now due to arrive at Alang, India November 30.

The next scrap tow is expected to be the Algosound, departing in early May, 2004.

Mapleglen scrap tow with the McKeil tug Progress on the stern passing Montreal harbor in September.

Reported by: Kent Malo


Storm Expected to Delay Shipping

11/12
An intense storm system moving through the region is expected to delay shipping across the lakes as ships seek shelter from the storm.

Gale warnings are posted for Lakes Superior, Michigan and Huron. The winds are expected to increase to storm force winds of higher than 50 knots Wednesday through Thursday. The storm brings winds, high seas with rain and snow forecast. Seas on Lake Superior are expected to build to 15 - 20 feet on Wednesday night.

Lake Erie will likely have gale warnings posted Wednesday night and Thursday while Lake Ontario will receive gales on Thursday.

Reported by: Dave Atamond


Congress moves to maintain Muskegon air station

11/12
Congress has moved toward maintaining the seasonal Coast Guard helicopter station in Muskegon, Mich.

Last week the House of Representatives passed a bill authorizing the Coast Guard to sign a long-term lease for a new air facility in Muskegon. Local officials are hopeful that the bill will prompt the Coast Guard to sign a 20-year lease.

Local officials say the Muskegon search-and-rescue helicopter is essential for rescuing boaters in distress and monitoring the safety of nuclear power plants along the Great Lakes.

Since 1999, members of Michigan's congressional delegation have fought efforts by the Coast Guard to save money by closing the Muskegon air facility. In the past, the Coast Guard had argued that rescue boats or aircraft located in Traverse City and Detroit could handle any problems in southern Lake Michigan.

Reported by: Chris French


Duluth Seaway Port Authority Commissioner Appointed

11/12
Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty has appointed State Senator Cal Larson to a six-year term as a Duluth Seaway Port Authority commissioner.

Larson, who began his legislative service in the Minnesota House of Representatives in 1966, was elected to the Minnesota Senate in 1986, where he is currently serving his sixth term.

"He has a strong interest in areas which affect the port, including natural resources, economic development and international trade, and for the past twelve years he has represented Minnesota on the Great Lakes Commission," said Governor Pawlenty.

Larson replaces Sharon Clark, Madison, Minn., deputy commissioner of the State Department of Agriculture. She was originally appointed to the board in 1993 by then-Governor Arne Carlson, and was reappointed by then-Governor Jesse Ventura.

A native of Fergus Falls, Minn., Larson received a B.A. degree from Concordia College, Moorhead, and served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War. He is former president of the Fergus Falls Rotary Club and former chair of the Concordia College Board of Regents. Larson and his wife, Loretta, reside in Fergus Falls. They have two children and six grandsons.

The Port Authority's seven-member board is made up of two appointees by the governor, three by the Duluth City Council and two by the St. Louis County Board. Each appointment is for six years.

Other board members are Bill Kron, Duluth, president; Steve Raukar, Hibbing, vice president; Janet E. Nelson, Duluth, secretary; Helena E. Jackson, Duluth, treasurer; Tom Cashman, Mankato, assistant treasurer and Thomas A. Clure, Duluth.

Reported by: Lisa Marciniak


Menominee & Marinette News

11/12
Marinette Marine's newest Coast Guard ship, the USCG Sequoia, was out on Green Bay Tuesday afternoon for some of her first sea trials.

Meanwhile, the Prinsenborg continues to load pulp at a local warehouse. She is still sitting quite high in the water, so it look like she may be here for a little while longer.

USCG Sequoia in the bay of Green Bay.
Another view .
Prinsenborg continues to load. Note her bulbous bow is still well above water.

Reported by: Dick Lund


Saltie Scrapings

11/12
The following vessels, all visitors to Great Lakes ports under at least one name, were sold to be broken up according to the Sept. and Oct. editions of “Marine News” published by the World Ship Society. In brackets, next to the name of the vessels is the year the ship transited the St. Lawrence Seaway for the first time bound for the Lakes.

Dongnama Kwangyang sailed Busan, South Korea 22/2/2003 for Zhoushan, China to be broken up. In the Seaway as La Diosa (1981).
Resbe arrived at Aliaga, Turkey in tow 9/4/2003 to be broken up. In the Seaway as Nancy Melissa (1980).
Cape Moreton sailed from Yangon, Myanmar 17/6/2002 for India to be broken up. In the Seaway as San Nicolas (1986).
The Freedom ship Hernes was broken up in India. Demolition commenced 16/4/2002. In the Seaway as Neptune Iris (1978).
Iktinos arrived at Alang, India 7/8/2003 to be broken up. In the Seaway as Silver Magpie (1981).
Project Femco was beached at Alang, India 13/8/2003 to be broken up. In the Seaway as Project Orient (1985).
The lpg tanker Selma Kosan arrived Alang, India 30/7/2003 to be broken up. In the Seaway as Leikvin (1977) and as Lady (1979). At that time, the vessel was a general cargo ship.
The SD14 Yu Jia reported flooding in a severe storm in the Bay of Bengal and sank 11/8/2003. She was on passage from China for India with 14,300 tonnes of chrome ore. In the Seaway as African Express (1980).
The tug Offshore Supplier, once owned by McKeil Marine Ltd., went aground 31/7/2003 at Preston Bay, Little Cayman and was likely to be broken up “in situ”. She was also known to ship watchers in the Lakes as Elmore M. Misner until 1994. The tug was built by Hike Metal Products of Wheatly, Ont. in 1979.

Reported by: René Beauchamp


Alpena Update

11/12
Steamer Alpena arrived at Lafarge around 8pm on Tuesday. It took on cement and was expected to leave around midnight, likely headed for ports on Lake Superior.

The Jacklyn M barge Integrity is scheduled to be in port before noon on Wednesday. J.A.W Iglehart delivered cargo to Detroit and is heading for Cleveland.

The Great Lakes Trader was loading at Stoneport Tuesday evening. The Maumee is on the list for Wednesday.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain


Port Huron Traffic

11/12
Algoway upbound.
Federal EMS downbound.

Reported by: Clayton Sharrard


Toledo Update

11/12
The salt water vessels Federal Huron was at ADM/ Countrymark Elevator loading grain. The Adimon was at Andersons "E" Elevator loading grain and the Cinnamon was at Andersons "K" Elevator loading grain. The Tony Mackay and barge Norman McLeod were at the Sun Dock while the tug Rebecca Lynn with her barge was at the B-P Dock.

The Southdown Challenger was at the Cemex Dock unloading cement. The John D. Leitch finished unloading ore at the Torco Ore Dock and departed Tuesday morning.

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will now be the H. Lee White and Charles M. Beeghly on Saturday. The Catherine Desgagnes and Algolake on Monday. The Saginaw on Tuesday, followed by the Maumee on Wednesday.

The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Docks will be the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Thursday. The CSL Niagara on Tuesday, followed by the Frontenac and Atlantic Huron on Wednesday.

With strong Westerly gales forecasted for the entire Great Lakes region late Wednesday and Thursday, several vessels scheduled to arrive at the various dock sites will most likely be delayed due to low water conditions in the western basin of Lake Erie.

Ottercliffe Hall loading grain at the Midstates Elevator. She is presently the Canadian Trader For the Upper Lakes Shipping Company Fleet.
Charles Dick inbound Maumee Bay with a load of sand bound for one of the upriver docks.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Welland Canal Traffic

11/12
CSL Laurentien exiting Lock 7 downbound .
CSL Tadoussac upbound approaching Homer Bridge .
Pineglen clear of Lock 7 upbound .
Nanticoke up clear of Lock 6.

Reported by: Bill Bird


Kingston Update

11/12
The western Seaway area was busy with traffic Tuesday. The Stephen B. Roman was waiting Tuesday evening for the CSL Tadoussac to leave the dock in Picton. The Tadoussac is likely loaded with cement clinker for Essexville, Michigan.

The English River departed Bath, Ontario shortly after 8 a.m. The tug Keewatin and the barge Stone Merchant were upbound and have headed for the South shore due to heavy weather. The wind is strong from the east, it is raining. Lake Ontario's level is 22 cm above last year.

Reported by: Ron Walsh


WW II remembered in Quebec City

11/12
. A memorial to the heroism and contribution of thousands of Merchant Mariners of World War II now stands proudly on the shores of the St. Lawrence River in Quebec City.

Unveiled a year ago by the Governor-General of Canada, Her Excellency Madame Adrienne Clarkson, the impressive bronze monument signed by Raoul Hunter, a local artist and mounted on a block of black granite shows a young merchant mariner bidding farewell to his own. The monument stands at Pointe-à-Carcy in Quebec Harbour, near the cruise-ship terminal and in the shadow of HMCS Montcalm, the Canadian Forces Fleet School.

During WW II, 12,000 Canadian Merchant Mariners made over 26,000 Atlantic crossings delivering valuable cargoes of food, fuel, supplies and war material and showed amazing tenacity and courage in the face of danger while encountering fierce U-boats attacks and terrible North-Atlantic winter storms. 1800 countrymen were lost at sea during the war among which 267 were from the Province of Quebec.

Four years after the end of the war, Merchant Marine ships continued to carry supplies across the Atlantic for the rebuilding of a war devastated Europe.

On the black granite base of the monument is carved the names of the 267 Quebecers lost at sea with the following inscription:
''To the memory of the Canadian Merchant Marine Seamen from the Province of Quebec who lost their lives at Sea during World War II''

On the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month on Remembrance Day,… we shall not forget their valiant contribution for the preservation of freedom and democracy.

View of the memorial.
another view.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette


Fitzgerald Webcast, Shipping Video Online

11/11
The memorial service held in Detroit on Monday for those lost on the Edmund Fitzgerald is now available online. Also available are six shipping videos

Click here to view.


Today in Great Lakes History - November 12

On 12 Nov 1964, the THOMAS F. COLE (steel propeller bulk freighter, 580', 7268 gt, built in 1907 at Ecorse, MI) collided with the British motor vessel INVEREWE off the south end of Pipe Island on the lower St. Marys River in foggy conditions. The COLE suffered severe damage to the port bow and was taken to Lorain for repairs.

On 12 Nov 1980, the ALVA C. DINKEY (steel propeller bulk freighter, 580', 7514 gt, built in 1909 at Lorain, OH) and GOVERNOR MILLER (steel propeller bulk freighter, 593', 8240 gt, built in 1938 at Lorain, OH) arrived near El Ferrol del Caudillo, Spain for scrapping in tow of the FedNav tug CATHY B. Demolition by Miguel Partins began on 28 Nov 1980 at Vigo, Spain.

In 1980 the PERE MARQUETTE 21 renamed c) CONSOLIDATOR, foundered in the Caribbean off the coast of Honduras a victim of the hurricane Jean.

On November 12, 1919, the PANAY, upbound on Lake Superior for Duluth, Minnesota in rough weather, was one of the last vessels to see the downbound JOHN OWEN which, apparently later the same day, disappeared with all hands.

November 12, 1980 - The Consolidator, formerly the Pere Marquette 21, sank 17 miles off the coast of Honduras during Hurricane Jean. No lives were lost.

On 12 November 1881, BRUNSWICK (iron propeller bulk freighter, 248', built in 1881 at Wyandotte, MI) was carrying 1500 tons of hard coal in a night of fitful squalls in Lake Erie. CARLINGFORD (wooden schooner, 155', built in 1869 at Port Huron, MI) was also sailing there, loaded with 26,000 bushels of wheat. They collided. After the skipper of BRUNSWICK made sure that the sinking schooner's crew were in their lifeboats, he ran for shore with his sinking vessel, but sank a few miles off Dunkirk, NY. A total of 4 lives were lost.

On 12 November 1835, the "small" wooden schooner ROBERT BRUCE was sailing from Kingston, Ontario to Howell, New York when she was wrecked west of Henderson, New York. Her crew of 4, plus one passenger, were all lost.

On 12 Nov 1886, the tug WM. L. PROCTOR (wooden tug, 104', 117 gt, built in 1883 at Buffalo, NY) left Oswego, New York with the schooner-barges BOLIVIA and E. C. BUCK in tow before a big storm struck. During the snow storm, the tug got lost and the tow line broke. Alone, the PROCTOR finally made it to Charlotte, badly iced up, but there was no word on the barges. They were presumed lost with all onboard.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Stinson re-enters service, loads in Duluth

11/11
The 1,000-foot George A. Stinson, laid up since mid-May by ownership changes at National Steel, re-entered service Monday when it departed its layup berth in Superior, Wis.

The Stinson left its dock at Elevator M in mid-morning and proceeded down the Front Channel to fuel at the Murphy Oil fuel dock. From there it proceeded to the DMIR ore dock in Duluth to load taconite pellets for the lower lakes.

The Stinson's approach to the fuel dock was complicated by the arrival of Oglebay Norton. In a nifty bit of quick work, the Stinson's master pivoted the vessel 180 degrees in the turning basin and then backed past the Federal Rideau, which was docked at the Duluth port terminal's lumber berth, and slid into the fuel dock berth in time for the rapidly approaching Oglebay Norton to enter the turning basin without delay.

The Stinson was laid up in mid-May after U.S. Steel's purchase of National Steel left the vessel without a cargo contract. For years, the Stinson was a fixture at the BNSF ore dock, arriving like clockwork each week to load pellets from National Steel Pellet Co. for delivery to National Steel mills. There's still no word on what brought the Stinson back into service. Although it no longer bears the stylized N of National Steel, it still carries American Steamship stack markings.

Word that the Stinson was to load at Duluth came as a surprise because the vessel originally had been scheduled to load in Two Harbors. Vessel traffic at the DMIR's Duluth dock has dwindled since shipment of Ispat pellets was shifted to Two Harbors and the stockpiled inventory of EVTAC Mining has been used up. The Duluth dock had no pellets on the storage pad until last weekend, when two or more trains from Minntac arrived with pellets.

George A. Stinson back in service, approaching the Duluth port terminal.
Closeup of the freshly painted bow, which no longer bears the stylized N representing National Steel Corp.
Backing past the Federal Rideau, which was unloading lumber at the port terminal.
Backing into the fuel dock.
Oglebay Norton approaching the turning basin just as the Stinson clears it.
Closeup of the Stinson's stern as the vessel approaches the fuel dock. Movie

Reported by: Al Miller


New build for Toledo Shiprepair

11/11
More than a hundred new jobs are headed to Toledo. Toledo Shiprepair Company, a division of Manitowac's Marine Group has announced a major building contract. Toledo Shiprepair will soon build double-hulled heated oil barges for an east coast company at its Toledo shipyard. They’ll be almost 400-feet long, and carry 110,000 barrels.

This is the first building contract Toledo Shiprepair has seen in fifteen years. The first barge will be delivered in a year, and the customer has the option of buying three more. The company will hire about 125 skilled workers.

“We're here on the Maumee River. We're the crossroads of the Great Lakes. We've always been a shipping center, but for a long time we haven't had the ship building and ship repair capacity operating here. It will be restored now,” said US Representative Marcy Kaptur, (D) Toledo.

“Having partners like Lucas County Commissioners and Marcy Kaptur agree to invest money in our facility to create those jobs is rewarding. We're going to have one of the nicest if not the nicest ship repair and ship building facility on the great lakes,” said Brian Schwartz, spokesman for the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority.

The Port Authority will also upgrade the shipyard to make the area better suited for shipbuilding work. The project will expand it, and build a covered dry dock. The entire project will cost about $7 million dollars. Most of that will come from city, county, and federal funds.

Reported by: Alan Baker


Norton uses the Portage Canal

11/11
The David Z. Norton was passing through the Portage Lake Canal through Michigan Upper Peninsula Monday. The Norton passed under the Houghton Lift Bridge about 9:05 a.m.

The Portage Canal was once a busy water way used by smaller ships visiting the numerous docks that once lined the water way or escaping heavy weather on Lake Superior.

Passing off Isle Royal St. in Houghton looking over at Mt. Ripley and Hancock.
Passign beneath the bridge.

Reported by: Glenn Schuldt


Twin Ports Report

11/11
The big news of the day was the George A. Stinson returning to service after a long layup to load taconite pellets at the DMIR dock in Duluth. However, several other vessels were busy in port Monday.

Canadian Prospector was unloading at the St. Lawrence Cement dock, Federal Rideau was unloading lumber at the Duluth port terminal, Spruceglen was loading grain at Peavey, Isa was loading grain at AGP and Birchglen was loading at Cenex Harvest States (now apparently known as CHS.)

Oglebay Norton arrived at midday to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal, with Paul R. Tregurtha expected later in the day. An interesting note is that Fred R. White Jr. is scheduled to take back-to-back loads out of SMET on Wednesday and Thursday. Both cargoes are designated for the Xcel Energy station in Ashland, Wis.

Canadian Prospector unloading at St. Lawrence Cement in Duluth.

Reported by: Al Miller


Marquette Update

11/11
The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder made their first trip to the ore dock in Marquette on Monday. Because the Lee A. Tregurtha had earlier emptied that side of the dock, they had a wait before loading. The Reserve also loaded ore at Marquette on Monday. The Michipicoten is due in on Tuesday.

Reserve at dock
Tug and barge
Pathfinder
Tug Dorothy Ann

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Prinsenborg Loads

11/11
The Prinsenborg arrived in the bay of Green Bay off Menominee around 8 PM Sunday night. They anchored there for the night. Shortly after daybreak Monday morning they picked up anchor and prepared to head into port. On hand to assist them into port were the Selvick tugs Jimmy L and Carla Anne Selvick. The tugs assisted the Prinsenborg as she turned around in the bay and then towed her into harbor stern-first.

The Prinsenborg is only six months old. She comes equipped with a bow thruster, a variable-pitched propeller, and three port-mounted cargo cranes. As with most Wagenborg ships she has re-configurable cargo holds, which make these ships very versatile. At approximately 465-ft. x 72-ft., she is larger than most of the Wagenborg that regularly call on Menominee.

The Prinsenborg came in light, having unloaded in Philadelphia, PA before heading to Menominee. She was towed to the east dock of a local warehouse where she began loading a cargo of pulp using her own cranes. Wagenborg ships have loaded here previously; however on those occasions the ships first unloaded pulp and then loaded a different kind of pulp for export.

Selvick tugs Jimmy L (left) and Carla Anne Selvick (right) arrive off the Menominee North Pier Lighthouse heading for the Prinsenborg
Prinsenborg in the bay with the tugs
Turning around
Turned around and under tow with Jimmy L in the lead
Tow approaches the lighthouse
Passing the lighthouse
In the inner harbor
Stern close-up in inner harbor
Bow view of the tow after passing through the Ogden Street Bridge
Bow close-up past the bridge
Heading for the dock
Another view
Docked
Shore-side view docked
Stern view from across the river. Notice the vertically stacked hatch covers near the front and the back of the ship
Lowering the loading apparatus
Attaching the loader to a bale of pulp
Lifting a bale off the truck
Close-up of loading
Re-configuring the hatches

Reported by: Dick Lund


Saginaw River News

11/11
The barge Great Lakes Trader & tug Joyce L. VanEnkevort called on the Wirt Stone Dock in Bay City Monday afternoon. After lightering, the pair continued upriver to finish unloading at the Wirt Dock in Saginaw. It is expected that the pair will be outbound Tuesday morning.

Great Lakes Trader - Joyce L. VanEnkevort unloading at Bay City Wirt

Reported by: Todd Shorkey


Toledo Update

11/11
The CSL Laurentien finished loading her grain cargo at Andersons "K" Elevator and departed Monday morning she was assisted downriver by the "G" Tugs Idaho and Illinois. When this tow was completed the two "G" Tugs then picked up the salt water vessel Cinnamon which was at the T.W.I. Dock waiting. The tow proceeded upriver bound for the Andersons "K" Elevator.

The Charles M. Beeghly was at the CSX Coal Docks loading coal. The Algosteel was due in at the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock late Monday afternoon to unload stone. The John D. Leitch was due into the Torco Ore Dock on Monday evening to unload ore.

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will be the Lee A. Tregurtha on Wednesday, H. Lee White and Charles M. Beeghly on Saturday, followed by the Catherine Desgagnes on Sunday.

The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore dock will be the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Thursday. The Atlantic Huron on Sunday, followed by the CSL Niagara on Monday.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
William G. Mather and McKee Sons at the CSX Docks "Frog Pond" area. The Mather is now at Cleveland as a museum vessel, while the McKee Sons has been converted to a barge and now sails for the Grand River Fleet.
Woodland outbound from Toledo. she just finished unloading a newsprint cargo at the Toledo Warehousing Dock facility.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Fitzgerald Loss Marked by Ceremony, Webcast

11/11
A memorial service for those lost on the Edmund Fitzgerald was held Monday at 7 p.m. at Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Isle in Detroit.

A lamp lighting ceremony outside next to an anchor from the Fitzgerald honored each of the 29 men who went down with the ship and one additional lamp honored the memory of all sailors lost on the Great Lakes. Retired Great Lakes Capt. Don Erickson, who searched in vain for survivors the night of the tragedy, also participated in a live interview from the pilothouse of his former command, the William Clay Ford, which is now part of the museum. The interview was webcast live and will be available for viewing Tuesday night at www.glmi.org.

The program marked the 28th Anniversary of the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald on Lake Superior Nov.10, 1975.

Pictures by Roger LeLievre and Chris Winters
Captain Erickson discusses the search for the Fitzgerald.
Speaking from the very pilot house where he searched 28 years ago for the missing ship.
Discussing the log book entries related to the search.
Lamp lighting ceremony, 29 lamps burn surrounding the anchor in memory of the lost crew.
Each lantern was placed on a tile with the crewmember's name and position.
Another view.
Lantern dedicated to all mariners lost at the base of the Fitzgerald's anchor.
Another view.
Inside, the museum's high tech webcast performed beyond expectations to viewers across North America.
View through the pilothouse door.
Dossin Museum Curator John Polacsek interviewed by reporters from Detroit's WDIV Channel 4.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre


Today in Great Lakes History - November 11

The Armistice Day Storm of November 11, 1940 was one of the worst storms in the recorded history of Lake Michigan. In all, the storm claimed 5 vessels, and 66 lives. The storm hit late Monday afternoon, November 11th, with winds of hurricane proportions. The winds struck suddenly from the southwest at about 2:30 P.M. and were accompanied by drenching rain, which later changed to snow. The winds reached peak velocities of 75 miles per hour, the highest in local maritime history. Some of the vessels affected were: City of Flint 32: Beached at Ludington, no damage. Jens Vevang, relief captain, in command. Her regular captain, Charles Robertson, was on shore leave.

Pere Marquette 21: Blown into a piling at Ludington, no damage, captained by Arthur Altschwager. She had 5 passengers aboard.

City of Saginaw 31: Arrived Milwaukee 6 hours late with over a foot of water in her hull. The wireless aerial was missing and her seagate was smashed by the waves. She was captained by Ed Cronberg.

Ann Arbor carferry "Wabash": A railcar broke loose from it's moorings on her cardeck and rolled over, nearly crushing a crewman.

The steamer Novadoc: Ran aground at Juniper Beach, South of Pentwater.

Two crewman (cooks) drowned when the ship broke in half. Seventeen crewman, found huddled in the pilot house, were rescued by Captain Clyde Cross and his 2 crewman, Gustave Fisher and Joe Fontane of the fishing tug "Three Brothers".

Conneaut (2) ran hard aground on Lansing Shoal near Manistique, MI. on Lake Michigan. She reportedly had lost her propeller and rudder. Two days later she was pulled off.

The SINALOA had taken on a load of sand near Green Island and was heading for Chicago through Death's Door on Wisconsin's Door Peninsula when the November 11th Armistice Day storm of 1940 struck in upper Lake Michigan. During the storm the SINALOA lost her rudder. The anchor was dropped but her anchor cable parted. In this helpless condition she ran aground at Sac Bay on Michigan's Garden Peninsula. Fortunately the stricken vessel was close to shore where the Coast Guard was able to rescue the entire crew. Declared a constructive total loss, her owner collected the insurance and forfeited the vessel to the Roen Salvage Co.

Anna C. Minch: Sank South of Pentwater with a loss of 24 lives.

William B. Davock: Sank with the loss of all hands.

The fishing tugs "Indian" and "Richard H.": Lost with all hands off South Haven.

On 11 November 1872, the schooner WILLIS collided with the bark ELIZABETH JOENS on Lake Erie and sank in a few minutes. The crew was saved.

On 11 November 1936, J. OSWALD BOYD (steel propeller fuel tanker, 244', 1806 gt, built in 1913 in Scotland) was carrying 900,000 gallons of gasoline when she stranded on Simmons Reef on the north side of Beaver Island. The U.S. Coast Guard from Beaver Island rescued the entire crew of 20.

On 11 November 1890, BRUNO (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 136'. 475 gc, built in 1863 at Montreal) was carrying coal to Cleveland with the schooner LOUISA in tow when she struck Magnetic Reef, south of Cockburn Island in Georgian Bay and sank in rough weather. No lives were lost.

On 11 November 1835, the 2-mast wooden schooner COMET was carrying iron and ashes on Lake Erie when she foundered in a gale, one mile northwest of Dunkirk, New York. Just her topmasts protruded from the water. All seven on board lost their lives, including a passenger who was a college student bound for Vermont.

In a storm on the night of 11 November 1874, The schooner La PETITE (3-mast wooden schooner, 119', 172 gt, built 1866, J. Ketchum, Huron, OH) was on Lake Michigan carrying a cargo of wheat and corn from Chicago when she sprang a bad leak and tried first to reach Ludington, then Manistee. Before reaching safety, she grounded off Big Point au Sable, eight miles from land, in eight feet of water. Previous to striking, the vessel had lost her bowsprit and foremast. After she struck, her main and mizzenmasts went by the board, and the schooner began to break up rapidly. The crew clung to the forecastle deck, and when that washed away, four men were drowned. Captain O. B. Wood had his arms broken by the falling off a square-sail yard. When he fell into the water, the ship's dog jumped in and kept him afloat until they were rescued by the crew of the steam barge CHARLES REITZ. Of the 10 crewmen, six were saved. The La PETITE was salvaged and repaired and lasted until 1903 when she was lost in another storm.

On 11 November 1936, J. OSWALD BOYD (steel propeller fuel tanker, 244', 1806 gt, built in 1913 in Scotland) was carrying 900,000 gallons of gasoline when she stranded on Simmons Reef on the north side of Beaver Island. The U.S. Coast Guard from Beaver Island rescued the entire crew of 20.

On 11 Nov 1999, the Maltese-flag bulk carrier ALCOR was examined by personnel from Transport Canada, the Canadian Coast Guard, a salvage company and the vessel's owners in hopes of forming a plan to save the vessel. She ran aground on a sand bar off the eastern tip of d'Orléans Island on the St. Lawrence River two days earlier. This vessel did not visited Great Lakes ports under the name ALCOR, but she did so under her two previous names, firstly as PATRICIA V and then as the Soviet flag MEKHANIK DREN. The Groupe Desgagne finally refloated the Alcor on 05 Dec 1999 after part of the cargo of clinker had been removed. The ship was then towed to Quebec City. Later, it was reported that Groupe Desgagne purchased the ALCOR from its Greek owners.

Below is a first hand account of the Storm of 1913 from the journal of John McLaughlin transcribed by his great grandson Hugh McNichol. John was working on an unknown vessel during the Storm of 1913. The boat was captained by John McAlpine and Harry Roberts as Chief Engineer. The boat was loading iron ore in Escanaba when the storm started on November 8th.
Tuesday, November 11, 1913
I got up at 12 a.m. and went on watch. We were above Presque Isle. It is still blowing hard and quite a sea running. Presque Isle at 1:45 a.m., Thunder Bay Island at 4:30 a.m., Harbor Beach at 1:00 p.m., we are about in the River at 7:05p.m. It is fine tonight, wind gone down.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series





Twin Ports Report

11/10
Crew members were aboard the George A. Stinson on Sunday preparing the vessel to depart its layup berth in Superior.

Crewmen were working on deck and dockside, apparently casting off some of the extra lines that have held the vessel in place since mid-May. The bow of the vessel has recently received a new coat of paint, which covered the large, stylized Ns that once symbolized National Steel.

The vessel reportedly is due in Two Harbors this afternoon.

Elsewhere in port, Canadian Prospector was unloading at St. Lawrence Cement, Isa was at AGP elevator and Birchglen arrived in midafternoon, using two tugs en route to Cenex Harvest States elevator.

Canadian Enterprise was completing its load at Midwest Energy Terminal while Mesabi Miner backed slowly past the dock and took up a position in the turning basin off the end of the DMIR ore dock while it waited for the berth to open up. An American Steamship Co. 1,000-footer was docked at Hallett Dock, but there was no indication whether it was waiting for a dock or idle for other reasons.

Reported by: Al Miller


Marquette Update

11/10
The Lee A. Tregurtha brought a load of coal to the WE Presque Isle power plant on Sunday, and then took on a load of ore. The Pathfinder, in her first trip to Marquette, was expected late Sunday, and will be loaded on Monday. The Reserve, delayed by bow thruster problems, will also be in Monday morning for ore.

Lee A. Tregurtha, unloading coal, bow view.
Lee A. Tregurtha wide view.

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Maumee Calls on Essexville

11/10
The Maumee was inbound the Saginaw River early Sunday evening headed upriver to Essexville. She called on the Sargent Dock to unload and was expected to depart late in the evening.

Night view of the Maumee unloading at the Sargent Dock in Essexville
Close up of the stack
Bow view of Maumee unloading
Close up

Reported by: Todd Shorkey


Toledo News

11/10
The CSL Laurentien was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator. The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons was loading coal at the CSX Docks. The Armco, Buckeye, Courtney Burton, and Gemini remain in lay-up

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will be the Charles M. Beeghly on Monday. The Lee A. Tregurtha on Wednesday followed by the H. Lee White and Charles M. Beeghly on Saturday.

The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Docks will be the John D. Leitch on Monday, followed by the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Thursday.

The Algosteel is due into the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock on Monday afternoon.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Wyandotte (Columbia Colors) in layup at the CSX Docks Frog Pond Area.
William Clay Ford (ex Walter A. Sterling) at the C&O #2 Dock getting ready to load coal.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Silent Auction in St. Catharines

11/10
The St. Catharines Museum will host a silent auction on Sunday, November 16 from 1 - 4 p.m. for FRIENDS DAY at Lock 3. Items include
ULS jacket, books, hats, prints and set of glasses, Algoma Centennial Book (not available for sale)
The Welland Ship Canal 1913-1933 book donated by the St. Lawrence Seaway - value $90
Seafarer's International Union binders and folders
Jacket from Canal Marine, a Division of the CSE Group
3 lights from the Comeaudoc
1 brass porthole from the Kinsman Enterprise
Ship's log book from the J.W. McGiffin (collector's item!)
and much more....

There will be special discounts in the shop, light refreshments and tours of the Collection vaults.

For more information contact: Rosemary Harper (info@stcatharineslock3museum.ca) or visit the Museum's web site


The Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway System’s premiere, quarterly news and feature magazines have become one

11/10
Great Lakes/Seaway Review and Great Laker have joined forces under the banner of Harbor House Publishers, Inc., of Boyne City, Mich., according to Harbor House publisher Michelle Cortright. “We have always wanted to cover the historical and cultural tourism side of the Great Lakes region within the pages of Great Lakes/Seaway Review. Merging Great Laker into our magazine will allow us to fulfill that dream,” Cortright said. “Readers of both publications will continue to receive every-thing they now enjoy – and more. Quality editorial content, photography and design of both publications are being enhanced by this move.”

In 2000, Roger LeLievre and Neil Schultheiss founded Great Laker to focus on lighthouses, lake-boats and travel within the Great Lakes region. During that time, the publication has expanded beyond expectations.

“Great Laker has grown beyond our individual capabilities,” LeLievre said. “Having the support of Harbor House Publishers enables the magazine to grow and meet the high standards of our sub-scribers and advertisers.”

Merging Great Laker into the international transportation magazine is representative of a changing atmosphere and business focus being experienced throughout the Great Lakes/Seaway System itself. Subscribers benefit from a more comprehensive view of what’s happening along the water-ways. Advertisers gain significantly from the increased readership and focus.

In order to maintain the integrity of both publications, longtime staff will continue to guide the con-tent of the overall product. For the Great Laker, LeLievre continues as editor and Schultheiss is acting as editorial advisor. Writers such as Dave Wobser, Al Miller and Chris Winters still contribute to the combined publication.

“This is a perfect fit,” LeLievre said. “Together, the two magazines cover a wide span of Great Lakes interests and appeal to readers ranging from industry professionals to lakes enthusiasts.”

LeLievre is also publisher of the annual boatwatchers guide Know Your Ships, while Schultheiss is founder of the Internet web site www.boatnerd.com – Great Lakes and Seaway Shipping On-line.

Harbor House Publishers has been in business since 1969, producing books, visitors guides, annual directories, brochures, newsletters and magazines. Its flagship publication Great Lakes/Seaway Review started with the 10th anniversary of the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Current subscriptions remain active and Harbor House will be contacting subscribers over the next few weeks. The Fall Issue will be mailed later this month.

Harbor House Publishing and Great Laker Magazine


Webcast Marks Loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald

11/10
The Annual memorial service for those lost on the Edmund Fitzgerald will be held outside (weather permitting) at 7 p.m. adjacent to the Fitzgerald anchor next to the Dossin Museum in Detroit. A lamp-lighting ceremony will be followed by a talk from retired Ford Motor Co. Capt. Don Erickson, who searched for the Fitzgerald on Lake Superior the night of the loss.

The program, which marks the 28th Anniversary of the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald on Lake Superior Nov.10, 1975, will be webcast live from the museum grounds. Due to reduced hours at the museum, this program will only be available online through the webcast, the museum is only open weekends due to budget cuts. Capt. Erickson will also take questions from the viewing audience via electronic mail.

To watch, visit www.glmi.org This program will be rebroadcast through out the week if you are unable to connect.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre


Weekly Updates

11/10
The weekly updates have been uploaded.
Click here to view


Today in Great Lakes History - November 10

The EDMUND FITZGERALD foundered on Lake Superior during a severe storm November 10, 1975 at approximately 7:10 pm about 17 miles north-northwest of Whitefish Point, MI at position 47_0'N by 85_7'W in Canadian waters.

IMPERIAL ST. CLAIR was launched November 10, 1973.

The STEELTON (2) sailed on her maiden voyage November 10, 1943.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY, in her first season of operation on November 10, 1943 during a Lake Superior storm, she developed a significant crack across her spar deck and 12 to 14 feet down both sides of her hull. As the hull worked in the heavy seas, the crack widened to as much as three to four inches. The crew ran cables between the fore and aft winches that maintained a force sufficient to hold the hull together.

November 10, 1972 in the vicinity of the entrance to the East Outer Channel near Amherstburg, Ont. the UNITED STATES GYPSUM (2) collided with her towing tug MAINE and as a result her bow was punctured. The GYPSUM was beached to prevent further sinking.

WILLIAM A. IRVIN was launched November 10, 1937.

November 10, 1892 the carferry Ann Arbor #1 left the shipyard in Toledo, bound for Frankfort on her maiden voyage.

In 1895 the first major accident caused by cars coming free on the car deck of a rail ferry happened when the Ann Arbor #1 was on an eastbound voyage. Approaching Frankfort in a northwest gale, she rolled so violently that many of the car fastenings broke and the cargo began to move about on the car deck. None of the early rear-loading car ferries was equipped with a sea gate to protect the stern from the seas, and seven cars of flour and butter went off the deck of the #1 into the lake. Captain Charles Moody resigned from the Ann Arbor as a result of this incident and returned to the Pere Marquette and Goodrich lines.

ATLANTIC (formerly MANITOULIN, wooden propeller passenger/package freight, 147', 683 Gt., built in 1880 at Owen Sound, Ont.) was bound for Byng Inlet with lumber camp supplies when she was caught in a storm and grounded in the lee of Pancake Island in Georgian Bay. Her cargo and aft cabin were thrown overboard to lighten her, but she caught fire and was destroyed. Her passengers and crew took to her boats and survived.

On 10 November 1856, ST. JOSEPH (wooden propeller steam barge, 170’, 460 t, built in 1846 at Buffalo, NY) stranded and was wrecked near Fairport, Ohio. No lives were lost.

November 10, 1911 - The ANN ARBOR No. 4 was back in service after damaging several plates in October.
Image of the Ann Arbor No. 4

The tanker MARIA DESGAGNES struck the bottom St. Lawrence Seaway on 10 Nov 1999. After temporary repairs were made, the vessel was cleared to proceed to Hamilton, ONT to discharge its cargo of jet fuel. A survey of the seaway was completed with no indications as to what caused the vessel to ground.

On 10 November 1887, BLAZING STAR (wooden schooner, 137', 265 t, built in 1873 at Manitowoc, WI) was sailing on Lake Michigan in fine weather with a load of lumber. However, she grounded on Fisherman Shoal near Washington Island, Wisconsin even though the wreck of the steamer I. N. FOSTER was in full view on that reef. The captain was unable to locate a tug to pull the BLAZING STAR off and later she broke up in heavy weather. No lives were lost.

Below is a first hand account of the Storm of 1913 from the journal of John McLaughlin transcribed by his great grandson Hugh McNichol. John was working on an unknown vessel during the Storm of 1913. The boat was captained by John McAlpine and Harry Roberts as Chief Engineer. The boat was loading iron ore in Escanaba when the storm started on November 8th.
Monday, November 10, 1913
I got up at 12 a.m. and went on watch. We were laying at anchor. It was blowing a living gale and kept it up. They hove up the anchor near 10 o'clock but monkeyed around until after dinner. We got under way. We passed the Light Ship about 3, and White Shoal at 5:15.
More entries from the Storm of 1913 tomorrow.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Hollyhock Takes Up Station at Port Huron

11/09
Promised sunshine gave way to snow flurries as the new U.S. Coast Guard cutter Hollyhock (WLB-214) arrived at her new home base, Port Huron, Mich., Saturday afternoon at 3 p.m.

The Hollyhock, escorted by the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet vessel Greyfox, docked without incident to the cheers of about 75 people, many of them family members of the Hollyhock's crew, gathered dockside. The Port Huron High Marching Band provided musical accompaniment as a USCG Dolphin helicopter passed overhead. The St. Clair Allied Veterans Council presented colors. A variety of dignitaries, including Congresswoman Candice Miller, offered comments, as did Lt. Cmdr. Michael T. McBrady of the Hollyhock.

As Hollyhock made her way upbound on the St. Clair River, she passed her decommissioned predecessor, Bramble, docked at the Seaway Terminal, and blew a salute, which was answered by someone aboard the Bramble. Many of the Hollyhock's crew served aboard the Bramble and could be heard cheering their old home as they passed by.

The $29 million, 225-foot Hollyhock was built by Marinette Marine, Marinette, Wis. The high-tech vessel's duties will include tending buoys, breaking ice and law-enforcement patrols.

Pictures by Roger LeLievre
Hollyhock upbound below the Black River.
Passing her predecessor, the now-retired Bramble.
Escort is provided by the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet vessel Greyfox and a USCG helicopter.
Hollyhock just off her new dock
Crewmembers watch the docking process.
Linehandler helps tie Hollyhock at her new home. A sign in the background welcomes the vessel to Port Huron.
Hollyhock moored (bow view). Note the band and other members of the welcoming committee gathered to greet the vessel.
Hollyhock moored (stern view)
Sign at dock.
Honor guard.
The son of a Hollyhock crewmember waves a U.S. flag at his father, somewhere on board the cutter.

Pictures by Andy Severson
Hollyhock mooring sign
Hollyhock, Greyfox and HH65A
Hollyhock full view (Note buoy on deck)
Hollyhock name board.
1 of 2 of Hollyhock's motor launch
Work boat Timberland at Malcolm Marine dock
Tug John Francis from Toledo, Ohio at the Malcolm dock.
Roger Blough downbound. Note snow on decks.
The retired cutter Bramble at Atchison’s dock.
Tall ship Highlander Sea preparing for winter ( Note wooden framework on main deck)
American Mariner upbound at Marysville
David Z Norton a few minutes behind the Mariner.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre and Andy Severson


Hollyhock Aerial Views

11/09
Pilot and photographer Don Coles was flying over Lake St. Clair Saturday and sent in the pictures below. All photographs are available for purchase. Don's company, Great Lakes Aerial Photos, is available for hire for any aerial photography need.

Upbound on Lake St. Clair
Another view
Passing




Stinson scheduled to load to in Two Harbors

11/09
The George A. Stinson, which has been laid up in Superior since mid-May, is scheduled to load Monday at the DMIR's ore dock in Two Harbors, according to the dock's schedule.

The Stinson was a long-time regular at the BNSF ore dock in Superior, carrying pellets from the National Steel Pellet Co. to National Steel mills in Detroit. When U.S. Steel bought National Steel, the Stinson was left out of the deal and sent into layup on the west side of the Elevator M dock.

The Stinson is owned by GATX. That company also owns American Steamship, which was operating the Stinson.

There was no word this weekend on exactly what happened to put the Stinson back in service. However, fleet mate Walter J. McCarthy Jr. made a rare call in Two Harbors on Saturday to load pellets.

Reported by: Al Miller


BBC Russia hits Lock Wall

11/09
Saturday afternoon as the salt water vessel BBC Russia was making its approach to the MacArthur Lock upbound the vessel missed the final turn along the lock wall and bumped into the north side of the Mac approach wall.

After some maneuvering the vessel made another attempt to enter the lock and ended coming in on an odd angle of approach, because of this she was rubbing hard against the protective timbers along the wall and pinched off several feet of the timbers on her way into the lock.

Once she was secure in the lock, the process of inspection and examining possible damage began. The Lockmaster was involved in examining the lock and checking for damage along with the crew. Damage to the ship's bulbous bow is unknown but it is expected that the cement below the water line may be damaged. A diver will inspect the area soon.

Later on the U.S. Coast Guard was called in to give the ship an inspection while in the lock. By 4 p.m. the vessel was allowed to proceed upbound to its destination, the Algoma Steel Export Dock in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. The Soo Evening News reported the Coast Guard likening the event to a car crash, the spokesman said the Saturday afternoon accident was "more like a fender-bender than a collision."

Other vessel traffic that would have used the MacArthur Lock was diverted all afternoon to the Poe Lock, the MacArthur was back in service Saturday evening. The BBC Russia is on its first ever trip to the Great Lakes under that name and will remain in Soo, Ont. for close to a week unloading steel coils before departing for Thunder Bay, Ont. She is the former Atlantic Progress.

Making final approach to the lock
Another view (note bow starting to move away from pier)
Headed for the wall.
Bow hits the wall
Close up of bow against the wall
Just after bumping the lock wall
Using engine to straightening out
Another view using bow thruster.
Close up of bow entering Mac Lock.
Approaching the lock on an angle.
Close up entering the lock
Piece of timbers broken off laying on deck.
Secured in the lock, officials checking the bow for possible damage.
Finally upbound heading to Algoma Steel
Spruceglen was originally given the Mac Lock but after the accident shifted to the Poe to avoid a long delay.

Reported by: Scott Best


Reliance Arrives for Repair

11/09
The tug Reliance arrived at Port Weller harbor about noon on Saturday towed by the tug Jerry Newberry and assisted by the tug Atomic on the stern. After reaching the approach wall, the Newberry maneuvered to the inside of the Reliance for the trip through Lock 1, while the Atomic waited at the wall below.

The type of repairs need to the big tug were unknown but required dry docking, this meant that the Everlast had to be moved to the fit out wall.

Also in port at Wharf 2 was the heavy lift vessel Tramper, in to pick up a boiler for delivery to Trinidad.

Pictures by Alex Howard
Tow passing Tramper 1
Jerry Newberry and Reliance
Reliance approaches wall
securing to wall
tow secure
Reliance nose to the wall
tow ready to depart for lock 1
tow proceeds to lock 1
Atomic waits in front of Tramper
Atomic close up
Tramper bow view
Tramper ready to load
Tramper side view
Tramper begins listing to Port
Lift continuing
Boiler close up

Reported by: Alex Howard and Jimmy Sprunt


Minntac may sell pellets to China, EVTAC deal advances

11/09
Carrying pellets to China seems to dominate Iron Range news these days.

The Duluth News Tribune reported Saturday that U.S. Steel's Minntac taconite plant talking with a Chinese steelmaker about shipping taconite pellets to China. "We are in some very serious discussions with a Chinese company about exporting pellets to the West Coast," Minntac General Manager Jim McConnell told the newspaper.

The Chinese steelmaker involved is not Laiwu Steel Group, which is working with Cleveland-Cliffs to purchase the bankrupt EVTAC Mining Co.

Meanwhile, union workers at EVTAC have tentatively agreed to a labor contract with Cliffs that could result in the reopening of the idled plant and its sale to Cliffs and Laiwu.

Under the agreement, wages and job classifications would remain unchanged and 320 hourly workers would be recalled according to their EVTAC seniority.

The workers, members of the Steelworkers union, will vote whether to ratify the agreement by Nov. 24. On Nov. 25, a federal bankruptcy court will in St. Paul will auction off EVTAC's assets.

Cliffs and Laiwu are the most prominent bidders for EVTAC. They want to purchase the plant, reopen it by December and start sending pellets to Laiwu's mills in China. At least one company, Gerald Metals, has expressed interest in bidding on EVTAC.

The loss of EVTAC's pellets has curtailed taconite shipments through the DMIR's ore dock in Duluth. But EVTAC's reopening may not mean a resumption of shipping there. There's been talk of shipping EVTAC's pellets west by rail. Also, officials of CN, which plans to purchase the DMIR, have visited the idle taconite shipping facility at Taconite Harbor, raising questions about whether that dock could be used to ship EVTAC pellets.

Reported by: Al Miller


Twin Ports Report

11/09
No vessels are currently scheduled to load at the DMIR ore dock in Duluth, raising questions about the dock's future.

For many years, the dock handled pellets from EVTAC Mining Co. and the Ispat (formerly Inland Steel) mine near Virginia, Minn. Now, however, word is that most or all of the EVTAC storage pellets are gone and that pellets from Ispat's mine are being sent to the DMIR dock in Two Harbors.

For now, the Duluth dock will mostly be used to receive stone shipments. However, two trainloads of Minntac pellets reportedly arrived at the Duluth dock on Saturday, further clouding the picture about how the facility will be used.

The Two Harbors dock has a steady lineup for the next few days. As noted in another report, Walter J. McCarthy Jr. paid a rare call to the dock Saturday, while George A. Stinson is listed on the dock's recorded telephone message to load Monday. Also scheduled are Presque Isle and St. Clair, Nov. 11; Roger Blough, Nov. 12; and Edgar B. Speer, Nov. 13.

In Duluth on Saturday, J.A.W. Iglehart unloaded cement at the Lafarge terminal. The vessel, once a regular here in the days before the Alpena, has made only a few of Lake Superior voyages this season.

Elsewhere in port, Isa was at AGP grain elevator, Canadian Enterprise loaded at Midwest Energy Terminal and Stewart J. Cort was at BNSF ore dock.

Reported by: Al Miller


Ceremonies Mark Ships, Shipwrecks

11/09
SUNDAY
DETROIT
The annual Service of Remembrance, at 11 a.m. at Mariner's Church, 170 E. Jefferson Ave., Detroit, honors those lost on board the Edmund Fitzgerald. Information: (313) 259-2206 or www.marinerschurchofdetroit.org

SUNDAY
DETROIT
Great Lakes balladeer Lee Murdock appears in concert at Dossin Great Lakes Museum from 2-4 p.m., offering a selection of sailing and shipwreck songs highlighting vessels and crew that have sailed the inland seas. Ticket prices: GLMI members ­ $10, admission to the Dossin Museum free. Public ­ $12 plus admission to the Dossin Museum. www.glmi.org

SUNDAY
CHICAGO
Underwater Archaeological Society of Chicago Annual Shipwreck Show Sunday at Shedd Aquarium, Chicago; www.chicagosite.org/uasc.htm

MONDAY
DETROIT
Annual memorial service for those lost on the Edmund Fitzgerald will be held outside (weather permnitting) at 7 p.m. adjacent to the Fitzgerald anchor next to the Dossin Museum. A lamp-lighting ceremony will be followed by a talk from retired Ford Motor Co. Capt. Don Erickson, who searched for the Fitzgerald on Lake Superior the night of the loss. The program, which marks the 29th Anniversary of the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald on Lake Superior Nov.10, 1975, will be webcast live from the museum grounds. Due to reduced hours at the museum, this program will only be available online through the webcast, the museum is only open weekends due to budget cuts. To watch, visit www.glmi.org

MONDAY
WHITEFISH POINT
Edmund Fitzgerald Memorial Service Memorial service is held every year on Nov. 10, 7 p.m., at the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum, Whitefish Point. In honor of the Edmund Fitzgerald crew and all sailors lost on Lake Superior. www.shipwreckmuseum.com

Reported by: Roger LeLievre


Today in Great Lakes History - November 09

The EDWIN H. GOTT's keel was laid November 9, 1977.

The aft section of the ATLANTIC SUPERIOR was launched November 9, 1981.

In the fall of 1962 the W.F WHITE left the Lakes for coal shuttle service in the Chesapeake Bay area passing down the Welland Canal November 9th.

The keel for the GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2) was laid November 9, 1953.

NORMAN B. REAM was laid up at Duluth, MN on November 9, 1960. In 1965 she would be sold and renamed b) KINSMAN ENTERPRISE (1).

In 1971 the City of Midland 41 was laid up due to coal strike.

On 9 November 1923, AZTEC (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 180', 835 gt, built in 1889 at Marine City) was destroyed by fire at her home port of Marine City, MI. The wreck lay in the Belle River until dynamited in the 1930s and what was left was placed on the previously raised barge PROVINCE which was then towed up the St. Clair River, into Lake Huron and scuttled.

On 9 November 1877, the Port Huron Times announced that the Lake schooners W. C. GRANT and CITY OF GREEN BAY had left Montreal on a voyage to Europe.

The Big Storm of 1913
On November 7, 1913, the storm responsible for sinking or damaging more vessels than any other began a six-day assault on the Great Lakes. The "Big Blow" of 1913 struck Lake Superior on November 7 and reached Lake Michigan by November 8.

At 10:00 p.m. on November 9, 1913 the HOWARD M. HANNA, JR. was blown broadside onto the Port Austin Reef (off the tip of Michigan's thumb on Lake Huron) by Northerly winds in excess of 60 mph during the Great Storm of 1913. The ship finally lost power and was driven onto the reef where she broke in two at hatch number seven.

On November 9, 1913 while downbound with ore, the FRED G. HARTWELL (1) encountered very strong southwest winds in Lake Superior. She reached a position one mile east of Iroquois Point, on Whitefish Bay and dropped her anchor to ride out the storm. Her anchor began to drag when the winds shifted to the north and increased to unprecedented gale-force velocity. This was the beginning of the "Great Storm" of 1913 which drove her aground onto a rocky bottom. The seas pounded her until her bottom plates were torn open and she sank the next day in twenty-six feet of water.

On November 9th during the Big Storm of 1913, the MATTHEW ANDREWS (1) was downbound in Lake Huron with a cargo of iron ore. Captain Lempoh decided to drop anchor rather than risk trying to enter the St. Clair River during the fury of the storm. Taking bearings for anchorage from Lightship 61 (stationed at Corsica Shoal), which unknown to him had been blown two miles off station, the MATTHEW ANDREWS (1) grounded heavily on Corsica Shoal.

Below is a first hand account of the storm from the journal of John McLaughlin transcribe by his great grandson Hugh McNichol. John was working on an unknown vessel during the Storm of 1913. The boat was captained by John McAlpine and Harry Roberts as Chief Engineer. The boat was loading iron ore in Escanaba when the storm started on November 8th.
Sunday, November 9, 1913
I got up at 12 a.m. and went on watch. They were loading us but awful slow, It is blowing hard and some snow falling and colder. We got away at 11:35 am. There is a heavy sea on and blowing a gale. We ain't making much headway, about 2 miles in 4 hours.
More entries from the Storm of 1913 tomorrow.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




High Winds Cause Delays

11/08
Strong gales on Lake Superior Friday sent many vessels to anchor in Whitefish Bay. As of early Friday evening the following vessels were at anchor: Burns Harbor, Canadian Prospector, Canadian Olympic, Algocen. The Walter J. McCarthy and Canadian Enterprise which locked through Friday afternoon both continued across the lake.

Also hampering navigation Friday were snow squalls which reduced visibility at times to near zero.

Downbound in the river Friday evening were the Goldeneye and Saginaw which is bound for Algoma Steel. Anchored in the lower river is the salty BBC Russia waiting for daylight navigation of the river enroute to the Export Dock with a cargo of steel.

Reported by: Scott Best


Hollyhock Arrives

11/08
The new U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Hollyhock passed her new home base of Port Huron Friday heading downbound for Detroit. The Cutter docked at Group Detroit for the night.

The 225-foot Hollyhock is expected to dock about 3 p.m. in Port Huron, across the street from the water filtration plant at the St. Clair River berth that once was home to the Bramble.

Numerous local companies and groups are preparing to welcome the ship when it arrives. The city will block off Michigan Street in front of the water filtration plant at 11 a.m. Volunteers will set up bleachers to view the festivities. The Port Huron High School marching band also is scheduled to perform.

Passing Port Huron Friday morning.

Reported by: Frank Frisk


Silting Stops Saltie

11/08
On Wednesday morning the Norwegian tanker Visaya loaded with liquid fertilizer from Russia attempted to enter the Port Stanley harbor but was stopped by the depth of the harbor. Other commercial vessels had advised how to approach the entrance, but even with careful instruction the attempt was abandoned.

Two tugs from Nadro Marine were there for assistance but were reassigned when the ship could not enter the harbor.

The Viscaya had delivered fertilizer to three other locations before coming to Port Stanley as its last drop off.

The ship went to anchor off shore and then departed for Hamilton. The cargo is being off loaded and trucked back to Port Stanley.

Reported by: Ted Coombs


Marquette Update

11/08
The Herbert C. Jackson loaded ore in Marquette on a blustery, snowy Friday. Her fleet mate Charles Beeghly remained tied up at the dock after loading to wait out the weather.

Hertbert C. Jackson loading in the snow.
Bow view.
Charles Beeghly tied up, waiting out the weather.

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Hamilton Update

11/08
Early Friday afternoon, the Cuyahoga was unloading soybeans at the CanAmera facilities at Pier 11. The Federal Hudson was docked at Pier 12.

Over at Heddle Marine, the tug William J. Moore is in drydock. At Pier 23, the tanker Sichem Baltic was docked. At Dofasco, the Algosoo was unloading coal while the Algonorth was unloading iron ore. The Hamilton Energy was fueling the Algonorth. Shortly before 2 p.m. the Cuyahoga backed out of Pier 11 and made way towards the Burlington Ship Canal which she transited at about 2:20 p.m. into Lake Ontario.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon


St. Lawrence River Traffic at Verchères

11/08
Tugs Seaways-5, Vigilant 1, Progress and Lac Vancouver awaiting clearance to link up to Oakglen and Seaway Queen (in background) for the lakers' final voyage, Montréal section 56, Oct.17.
McKeil tug Progress wired to bow of Seaway Queen awaiting departure time (5 hour-wait) with pilot on board, Oct. 17.
Rotterdam departing Montréal on her last cruise of the season, Oct. 17.
Bulk carrier Sea Banian upbound off Verchères to Montréal on a dull morning, Oct. 20.
Bulk carrier Barbaros Kiran from Istanbul departing the Contrecoeur dock in ballast, Oct. 31.
Another view
Barbaros Kiran shown underway downbound after departing Contrecoeur, Oct. 31.

Heavy lift vessel Tramper upbound off Verchères for the Seaway, Nov. 6.
Another view

Reported by: Marc Piché


Warta Heading to Belgium with Local Ontario Soybeans

11/08
Polska Zegluga Morska’s (Polsteam) M.V. Warta recently loaded soybeans in Goderich and is currently enroute to Ghent, Belgium after bunkering in Port Colborne. The 1992 Szczecin built Warta sailed from Goderich Wednesday afternoon at 1500 hours. This is her second voyage to the Great Lakes this season. Warta is one of four sisters named after rivers in Poland namely: Odra, Nida and Wisla each ship measuring 143,44m x 20,59m (470’ 07” x 67’ 06”) with a deadweight of 13756 M.T. This class is very similar, but slightly larger than the Kopalnia Borynia type. (See related story on July 14, 2003 Archives).

The following images were taken onboard on an assignment from Detroit Pilot Station to Lock 7 on Thursday November 6th.

Starboard bridge wing view on the open lake.
Any guesses as to what her former name was? The vessel was launched as Warta but was subsequently renamed Wartanes while under charter to Jebsen’s. The “nes” suffix is common to all Jebsen owned and chartered vessels. In 1999 when the charter expired she reverted back to her original name.
Inside the spacious bridge.
Warta is a relatively small vessel but is very roomy inside. The bridge is fully carpeted and well maintained.
The chart table.
Heading 069.5 (T) across Lake Erie.
The view from the helm. It can be clearly seen why it is imperative for small craft to stay well clear of geared vessels. Fortunately, in November it’s not too much of an issue.
To see above the cranes we have to go higher.
Higher still! Note the anemometer (wind gauge) on the left side of the image.
The Canadian courtesy flag blowing in the stiff November Northeast breeze.
Looking astern over the stack.
Another view.
Ever wonder what the inside of a stack looks like?
Looking straight up - way up!
Warta is well equipped with lifesaving appliances for the safety of her eighteen crewmembers. Either of these inflatable life rafts can accommodate the entire crew.
Also available is a thirty-two person self-launching motorized lifeboat.
It must be quite a ride to slide down over the stern.
Inside the lifeboat each crewmember is securely fastened with a sophisticated harness system and secured in his or her own bucket seat.
The poop deck directly below the lifeboat.
Looking forward from the poop deck.
Looking ahead.
The main deck. If you look closely along the hatch coamings you can see a few soybeans scattered on deck.
Main deck as seen from the forecastle head.
Forward mooring and anchoring arrangement.
Ever wonder what the inside of the forecastle looks like? This area is used for stowing deck equipment, scaffolding, mooring ropes, etc. Behind the white and green pole is the stem of the vessel.
To paint a ship you need paint and lots of it! The paint locker is located forward in the forecastle. If you look closely between the paint cans you can see the vessels shell plating and framing.
Looking aft from the forecastle through the jungle of cranes.
Believe it or not Warta is a self-unloader - well sort of. She is equipped with clam buckets enabling her discharge cargo (albeit slowly) in primitive ports.
Number 4 & 5 cranes each capable of lifting 16 metric tonnes. Yes, metric tonnes is spelled tonNES (it’s not a Jebsen’s thing!).
The large accommodation block. Every crewmember enjoys a single cabin with private W/C.
Everybody has a view!
With an 11,35m moulded depth and in a loaded condition the climb up the pilot ladder is short with only 11 rungs. The wide rung is called a “spreader”. Its function is to prevent the ladder from twisting as the pilot ascends or descends the ladder.
What does this say? One of the most fascinating aspects of being a pilot is meeting people from around the world and enjoying their culture, hospitality and languages. Polish vessels are among the best.
Luckily, often there is a translation!
Some language’s use a lot of words, letters and accents to convey a simple phrase, in this case “Safety Plan”. You quickly learn to respect children who must learn to spell these words in school. Must be some spelling bee!
Some words don’t need translating.
Passageway on the bridge deck leading to the bridge.
Ship’s deck office.
The sun finally makes an appearance in the waning daylight.
Looking up at the bow of the lifeboat from the poop deck.
At 1643 hours the impending darkness comes early in November.

Reported by: Capt. Alain M. Gindroz


Ceremonies Over Three Days Mark Ships, Shipwrecks

11/08
TODAY
DULUTH
"Gales of November," the annual shipwreck and diving program at the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center in Duluth, continues today from 8 a.m.- 5 p.m. Funds raised benefit the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center. Expect lectures, films, ship tours, a silent auction with artifacts and more. Information: (218) 727-2497 or www.lsmma.com

TODAY
DETROIT
Dossin Great Lakes Museum in Detroit hosts a silent auction from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. of Great Lakes memorabilia. The material includes artwork, a porthole from the S.S. South American, and other unique items including two bottles of 90 year old scotch which were recovered from the shipwreck of the S.S. Regina, which sank in Lake Huron during the Great Storm of 1913. www.glmi.org

From 1:30-2:30 at the museum, well-known diver Dave Trotter talks about the history of the freighter John H. McGean, also lost in Lake Huron during the Storm of 1913. Free to GLMI members or with paid admission to the Dossin Museum

TODAY
PORT HURON
McMorran Place in Port Huron hosts Shipwrecks Remembered 2003, a program during which authors, artists and divers explore the histories of Great Lakes shipwrecks. This year's events, which run from 4:40-9:30 p.m., include a segment commemorating the Great Storm of 1913. Featured speaker is Frank Mays, one of two survivors of the Carl D. Bradley sinking in 1958. Mays is author of the new book "If We Make it Til Morning." Tickets are $14 at the door. www.greatlakes.net/~divelog

SUNDAY
DETROIT
The annual Service of Remembrance, at 11 a.m. at Mariner's Church, 170 E. Jefferson Ave., Detroit, honors those lost on board the Edmund Fitzgerald. Information: (313) 259-2206 or www.marinerschurchofdetroit.org

SUNDAY
DETROIT
Great Lakes balladeer Lee Murdock appears in concert at Dossin Great Lakes Museum from 2-4 p.m., offering a selection of sailing and shipwreck songs highlighting vessels and crew that have sailed the inland seas. Ticket prices: GLMI members ­ $10, admission to the Dossin Museum free. Public ­ $12 plus admission to the Dossin Museum. www.glmi.org

SUNDAY
CHICAGO
Underwater Archaeological Society of Chicago Annual Shipwreck Show Sunday at Shedd Aquarium, Chicago; www.chicagosite.org/uasc.htm

MONDAY
DETROIT
Annual memorial service for those lost on the Edmund Fitzgerald will be held outside at 7 p.m. adjacent to the Fitzgerald anchor next to the Dossin Museum. A lamp-lighting ceremony will be followed by a talk from retired Ford Motor Co. Capt. Don Erickson, who searched for the Fitzgerald on Lake Superior the night of the loss. The program, which marks the 29th Anniversary of the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald on Lake Superior Nov.10, 1975, will be webcast live from the museum grounds. Due to reduced hours at the museum, this program will only be available online through the webcast, the museum is only open weekends due to budget cuts. To watch, visit www.glmi.org

MONDAY
WHITEFISH POINT
Edmund Fitzgerald Memorial Service Memorial service is held every year on Nov. 10, 7 p.m., at the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum, Whitefish Point. In honor of the Edmund Fitzgerald crew and all sailors lost on Lake Superior. www.shipwreckmuseum.com

Reported by: Roger LeLievre


Today in Great Lakes History - November 08

The COLUMBIA STAR (steel propeller bulk freighter, 1000', 35,923 gt) was launched November 8, 1980 at Bay Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wis. She is part of the Oglebay Norton fleet.

The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS and IRVING S. OLDS arrived on November 8, 1988 at Kaohsiung, Taiwan for scrapping by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.

The STADACONA (1) was renamed ROBERT S. McNAMARA by its new owner Ford Motor Company's Marine Division. The McNAMARA was rescued from potential scrapping when Ford purchased her for $80,000 and spent $15,000 for renovation at AmShip's Toledo yard.

The J.P. MORGAN, JR. arrived at Avilés, Spain on November 8, 1980.

PETER A.B. WIDENER passed down the Welland Canal November 8, 1986 towed by the tugs TUSKER and GLENADA en route to Lauzon, Que. From there she was towed overseas for scrapping. When built, the PETER A.B. WIDENER and fleet mates J. PIERPONT MORGAN, NORMAN B. REAM and HENRY H. ROGERS were the first 600-footers built for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.;"The Class of 1906."

On 08 Nov 1986, the B. F. AFFLECK (steel propeller freighter, 588', 7964 gt, built in 1927 at Toledo, OH), under tow of the tug THUNDER CAPE, went adrift on Lake Superior in a storm after the tug lost power. The tug AVENGER IV was dispatched to pick up the AFFLECK, which was headed for scrap, and the tanker EASTERN SHELL towed the THUNDER CAPE to Thunder Bay for repairs.

BEN HUR, a wooden schooner-barge wrecker, 314 t, built in 1874 at Dunville, Ont., had been purchased for the job of salvaging the schooner M. E. TREMNBLE. On 8 November 1890, she was at the job near Port Huron in the St. Clair River when she was rammed and sunk by the schooner-barge SUPERIOR which was being towed by the steamer PASSAIC. BEN HUR settled on top of the schooner she was attempting to salvage and a lighter-scow she was using also went down with her.

On 8 November 1877, the bark GREAT WEST was carrying 262,000 feet of lumber from Caseville to Chicago. Much of it was piled topside. In a big storm on Lake Michigan, she lost her deck load. She then became waterlogged and finally went ashore near Hyde Park, Illinois on 10 November. The crew were all saved.

On 8 November 1877, KATE L. BRUCE (3-mast wooden schooner, 307 t, built in 1872 at Manitowoc, WI) was carrying wheat in tow of the tug JOHNSON when she was let go in heavy weather. She disappeared with all eight of her crew off Alpena, Michigan. A bureau containing her papers washed ashore in August 1878. The sunken wreck was discovered in 6 fathoms of water in Thunder Bay during the Autumn of 1879.

The forebody of the former CANADIAN EXPLORER arrived in Prescott on 05 Nov 2000, under tow of the Trois Rivieres tug DUGA. It remained there for three days. The previous March, it was reported that the hull was undergoing conversion to a 498-foot grain storage barge for Les Elevateurs des Trois Rivieres, Quebec. (The engine room portion of the former CANADIAN EXPLORER was mated to the forward section of the HAMILTON TRANSFER in 1998 and now sails as the CANADIAN TRANSFER.)

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




CN unveils planned job cuts in railroad, fleet purchase

11/07
As anticipated, CN plans to close the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway's historic Proctor shops and cut nearly 100 railroad jobs as part of its purchase of Great Lakes Transportation LLC.

So far, however, CN has revealed few plans for Great Lakes Fleet, which is part of the company and consists of the eight remaining ships of the former USS Great Lakes Fleet.

CN announced in October that it plans to buy the DM&IR as part of a $380 million deal with Great Lakes Transportation LLC, based in Monroeville, Penn. The transaction includes Great Lakes Fleet Inc., the Bessemer and Lake Erie Railroad and the Pittsburgh & Conneaut Dock Co.

CN's plan for the Proctor shops was unveiled Wednesday when the Canadian rail giant -- formerly known as Canadian National Railway -- submitted an operating plan to the federal Surface Transportation Board.

In its filing, CN said it would close the shops and eliminate 94 jobs. The locomotive and car shops in Proctor, Minn., -- a few miles from the DMIR's Duluth ore docks -- were established in 1892 to serve one of the railroad's predecessors. They are considered to be the small city's employment heart.

The anticipated job cuts are based on DM&IR's current operations. If efforts to resume taconite pellet production at EVTAC Mining Co. are successful, its possible additional jobs would be retained.

A CN official said the railroad plans to retain the services of Keystone Shipping Co., based in Bala Cynwyd, Pa., to manage and operate the Great Lakes Fleet. While CN does not anticipate reduced staffing levels aboard the eight vessels in the fleet, the company said detailed operational plans remain in development.

Reported by: Steve Roper


Gravel Barge to Wallaceburg Delayed

11/07
Due to required remedial work future trips to Wallaceburg by the tug Keewatin and gravel barge Stone Merchant are delayed. Protective spiles guarding the narrow passage through the open Walpole Island-mainland bridge are in need of replacing, thus delaying continued transit of gravel to Wallaceburg via the Chenal Ecarte and Sydenham Rivers.

The pilings have been in place since the bridge opened in November of 1969. Four of an expected twelve trips to Wallaceburg this season have been completed for Southwestern Sales, the contracting company.

2003 marks the first commercial shipping to Wallaceburg since 1987 when both the Stella and Eva Desgagnes, bulkers, loaded locally grown corn. Once a active marine location, Wallaceburg was known as "Canada's Inland Deep Water Port."

Reported by: Alan Mann


HMCS Halifax Departs

11/07
The HMCS Halifax departed Port Weller Dry Docks Thursday morning shortly before a.m. After three days of sea trials the ship will be headed for Halifax and more fit out work prior to its reentering active service.

Assisting her from the dry dock were the tugs James E. McGrath, Lac Como, and Lac Manitoba.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt


Fall Brings Fall in Limestone Trade

11/07
Shipments of limestone from U.S. and Canadian ports on the Great Lakes totaled 3,763,116 net tons in September, a decrease of 11 percent from both the same period last year and the month's 5-year average. For the season, the trade stands at 22.9 million net tons, a decrease of 9 percent from both the corresponding point in 2002 and the 5-year average for the end of September.

While the decreases registered in March, April and May of this year reflected to varying degrees the harsh weather conditions that slowed the start of the stone trade, the summer construction season failed to give shipments a much of a boost and demand for fluxstone from the steel industry remains well below the levels of just a few years ago. The September tally is but another in a string of lackluster totals for limestone.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association


Marquette Update

11/07
After suspending sales due to Rouge Steel declaring bankruptcy, CCI resumed shipping to Rouge steel Thursday with the arrival of the Charles M. Beeghly on a cold but sunny day.

She was followed later by the Kaye Barker, which will load on Friday.

Charles M. Beeghly approaches on a sunny afternoon.
First man over
Beeghley at the dock

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Alpena Update

11/07
The Jacklyn M barge Integrity arrived in port on Thursday morning to load cement. It departed by 2 p.m., heading for South Chicago. Also at Lafarge on Thursday was the David Z. Norton , which brought in a bulk cargo that is used for making cement. It left behind the Integrity.

The J.A.W Iglehart took on cement Wednesday evening and is on its way to Superior, WI. The Alpena is due back in port late on Friday after delivering to Green Bay, WI.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain


Toledo Update

11/07
The CSL Niagara was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator, The salt water vessel Spar Opal was loading grain at ADM/Countrymark Elevator. The Atlantic Erie finished loading coal at the CSX Docks and departed Thursday morning, she is bound for Nanticoke, Ontario.

The CSL Laurentien was due into the Torco Ore Dock late Thursday evening to unload ore. The Armco, Buckeye, Courtney Burton, and Gemini remain in layup at their respective dock sites. There are no large vessels in at the Shipyard at this time.

The next scheduled coal boats due into the CSX Docks will be the John J. Boland and Canadian Transport on Friday. The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons on Saturday, followed by the Charles M. Beeghly on Sunday.

The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Docks will be the Nanticoke on Saturday. The John D. Leitch on Monday, followed by the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Thursday.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Stern view of William A. Reiss with the tug Wyoming being towed outbound the Maumee River from the Craig Bridge. The Reiss has a grain cargo onboard and will be towed to Windsor, Ontario where the grain cargo will be unloaded.
Bow view of the William A. Reiss with the tug Nebraska assisting, she has just passed through the Craig Bridge. She has a grain cargo onboard bound for Windsor, Ontario.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman


Toledo Traffic

11/07
Jane Ann IV & Sarah Spencer outbound the Maumee River.
Spar Opal (Norway) assisted by tugs Illinois & Idaho inbound the Maumee River for the ADM Elevator.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls


Chemicals blamed for lake trout decline

11/07
The decline of the Great Lakes' lake trout population was cause more by toxic chemicals than the long-blamed culprits of sea lampreys and commercial fishing, a new study shows.

The collapse of Lake Ontario's lake trout population decades ago was spurred by toxic dioxin, according to a 15-year study published in the Journal of Environmental Science and Technology and released Wednesday by University of Wisconsin Sea Grant program.

The study also suggests that toxic chemicals such as dioxins and PCBs may continue to play a role in hampering fish restoration efforts across the Great Lakes.

Lake trout were once bountiful across much of the Great Lakes, but their numbers began to rapidly decline by the 1940s. Within a few decades, trout nearly disappeared everywhere except in Lake Superior, where their numbers crashed but a remnant population survived. Scientists at the time blamed heavy commercial netting and an assault by the exotic sea lamprey.

Reported by: Dan Rogers


Today in Great Lakes History - November 07

On 7 November 1852, ST. LOUIS (wooden side-wheeler, 190 , 618 t, built in 1844 at Perrysburg, OH) was carrying railroad cars when she capsized and sank in a gale off Kelley s Island on Lake Erie. She was owned by Beer & Samuel Ward.

On 07 Nov 1906, the Grand Trunk carferry GRAND HAVEN (steel carferry, 306', 2320 gt, built in 1903 at Toledo, OH) was put up for sale at a receiver's auction when the Grand Trunk Car Ferry Line defaulted on it's bonds. It was purchased by a new Grand Trunk subsidiary, the Grand Trunk Milwaukee Car Ferry Company. This vessel had a long carrier both on the Lakes and in the Caribbean. She was finally scrapped at Hamilton, Ontario in 1970.
Image of the Grand Haven from the Father Dowling Collection

The T2 converted laker HILDA MARJANNE's 1961 German-built hull forward of the engine room, minus her pilot house, was towed by the tugs G.W. ROGERS and BAGOTVILLE to Port Weller Dry Docks arriving there on November 7, 1983. This section was to become part of the CANADIAN RANGER.

On November 7, 1989 the SAMUEL MATHER (7) was moved to the Frog Pond on her way to the cutter's torch.

The ARTHUR B. HOMER was launched November 7, 1959 for the Bethlehem Steel Corp., Cleveland, OH. She was the last ship built by Great Lakes Engineering at River Rouge.

In 1902 the BRANSFORD rammed and sank the tug RECORD with a loss of a tug crewman in the Portage Lake Ship Canal in Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula.

On November 7, 1913, the storm responsible for sinking or damaging more vessels than any other began a six-day assault on the Great Lakes. The "Big Blow" of 1913 struck Lake Superior on November 7 and reached Lake Michigan by November 8, where the Pittsburgh Steamship Company vessel Clarence A. Black was severely damaged by the waves at the dock in Gary.

On 7 November 1893, ALBANY (steel propeller package freighter, 267', 1918 gt, built in 1884 at Wyandotte, MI) collided with the iron freighter PHILADELPHIA in a think fog. PHILADELPHIA took ALBANY in tow to try to save her, but she sank a few miles off Pointe Aux Barques, MI. Her crew transferred to PHILADELPHIA, but they soon had to abandon her too since she also sank. 8 lives were lost, presumably when one of the lifeboats was run down by the still running, but abandoned, PHILADELPHIA.

On 7 November 1865, LILY DANCEY (2-mast wooden schooner, 92', 132 gc, built in 1856 at Goderich) was carrying grain in a gale on Lake Huron when she was driven ashore near Port Elgin or Kincardine, Ontario. Her cargo was later recovered, but the schooner broke up by 27 November of that year.

The City of Flint 32 ran aground at Manitowoc in 1947.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Windoc barges into Montreal

11/06
The barge Windoc, towed by the tugs Ocean Hercule and Ocean Echo, were scheduled to arrive in Montreal harbor early Thursday morning. The barge expected to load grain at Elevator Four and return to Sec 56 for long term storage.

While transiting the Welland Canal on Aug 11, 2001, the Windoc suffered serious damage when a bridge was lowered on her superstructure and an ensuing fire engulfed her accommodations, miraculously no one was injured in the mishap. Windoc was then towed to Hamilton and later sold to Ocean Group of Quebec City.

Group Ocean planned to operate the Windoc as a barge. In summer 2003 the Windoc was towed to Quebec City where work crews removed her superstructure. According to Group Ocean, her engine is still aboard and no notch was made to accommodate a tug on the stern.

The Windoc taken over the summer.

Reported by: Kent Malo


Western Coal is Lone Bright Spot for U.S.-Flag Lakers in September

11/06
U.S.-flag lakers loaded nearly 2.2 million net tons of western coal in Superior, Wisconsin, and South Chicago in September, an increase of 12 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. For the year, low-sulfur coal shipments in U.S. bottoms stand at 11.9 million tons, an increase of 11 percent and reflect the steady growth in demand for the clean-burning coal from power plants throughout the Great Lakes basin. (Note: LCA did not start tracking U.S.-flag coal by Lake of loading until 2001, so the 5-year average is unavailable.)

However, coal's strong performance could not mask another plummet in iron ore cargos. U.S.-flag lakers saw their ore float slip below 4 million tons in September, a decrease of 23.2 percent compared to a year ago and a drop of 20.8 percent compared to the month's 5-year average. For the year, the U.S.-flag ore float stands at a calamitous 29.1 million tons, a decrease of 12 percent compared to the same point in 2002 and a plunge of nearly 20 percent computed on a 5-year basis. The anemic ore totals confirm that many of America's integrated steelmakers are still struggling to regain market share lost to unfair trade.

There was no change in pace in the limestone trade in September. Lackluster demand for aggregate from the construction industry pulled shipments down by 7.3 percent compared both to last September and the month's 5-year average. For the year, U.S.-flag stone cargos stand at 16.8 million net tons, a decrease of 8.8 percent compared to last year and a drop 10.4 percent compared to the 5-year average for the end of September. The sluggish demand for stone has kept a trio of U.S.-flag lakers idle the entire year.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association


Busy Day in Menominee & Marinette

11/06
Wednesday was a busy day in the Menominee River harbor with two ships plus a tug & barge. At daybreak the saltie Adimon arrived with a load of South American pig iron for Marinette Fuel & Dock. She was assisted into port by the Selvick tugs, Jimmy L and Carla Anne Selvick.

At noon the Erika Kobasic arrived pushing a barge filled with parts and modules for the next Staten Island Ferry from Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay, Wisc. This load was delivered to Marinette Marine. Bay Ship has been building some of the modules for Marinette Marine. The Manitowoc Company owns Bay Shipbuilding and Marinette Marine.

About 3 p.m., the Volmeborg arrived with a load of wood pulp destined for a local warehouse. The next ships due in Menominee are the Prinsenborg, McKee Sons, and Varnebank.

Adimon on the horizon at daybreak
Tug, Jimmy L, approaches the Adimon
Tug, Carla Anne Selvick, joins the group off the Menominee North Pier Lighthouse
The group approaches the lighthouse
Close-up of the procession inside the piers
Stern view close-up
Adimon approaches crane ship, William H. Donner, at Marinette Fuel & Dock
Erika Kobasic with a barge filled with parts for the next Staten Island Ferry passes the Adimon
Close-up of some of the modules aboard the barge, BMI-105
Volmeborg approaches the lighthouse
Passing the lighthouse
Close-up of the Volmeborg
Stern view
Bows of the Volmeborg, Adimon and William H. Donner
Volmeborg passing Adimon, which is being unloaded by the cranes on the William H. Donner

Reported by: Dick Lund


Corps of Engineers Vessels Sold

11/06
On Wednesday evening the bidding closed on three well known US Army Corps of Engineers Vessels. The tug Forney, sounding vessel PAJ, and survey boat Harvey Hodge are now sold to private interests.

Harvey Hodge bow view, built in 1990 and designed to speed along at 35 mph, but due to a design flaw was unable to reach half that speed. The Hodge sold for $102,108.
Harvey Hodge stern view of the jet propulsion units.
Tug Forney, built in 1944 as a typical 85 foot ST tug for the US Army at the Equitable Equipment Company. Many of these tugs are in service today. Forney sold for $26,600.
Tug Forney main engine, direct reversing, which is to say the crankshaft of the engine is attached directly to the propeller shaft. To change from ahead to astern the engine is stopped, then shift the cam and restart the engine.
PAJ, built on the hull of a 1927 riveted barge and converted to self propelled in 1985 with the instillation of two Schottel units powered by 6-92 Detroit Diesels. PAJ sold for $60,050.
PAJ, One of the Schottel power units inside the barge.

Reported by: Bill Hoey


Lake Superior Loop

11/06
Below are images from Duluth, Two Harbors, Split Rock, Thunder Bay and the Soo.

Duluth:
The Algosoo at Murphy Oil Dock
Algowood departing
Oglebay Norton arriving
Oglebay Norton approaching lift bridge
Oblebay Norton backing under Blatnik Bridge (High Bridge)
Pilot boat returning
Pytheas
Joseph Frantz approaching
Frantz cabins
Frantz, stern view
Lake Superior at dock in Duluth
Lake Superior leaving

Two Harbors:
St. Clair at ore dock
John J. Munson approaching
Munson approaching dock, St. Clair behind
Split Rock Light

Thunder Bay
Aegean Sea
Pineglen at elevator
Quebecois at elevator
AlgoOntario, bow view
AlgoOntario and tugs
Fishtug MarionG

The Soo:
Mesabi Miner leaving West Pier
American Mariner at West Pier
Quebecois
Canadian boat, possibly research vessel
Canadian Leader
Wolverine
Middletown

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Place Your Bids, Auction Saturday

11/06
On Saturday, November 8 the Dossin Great Lakes Museum will host a Silent auction of Great Lakes memorabilia including artwork, two portholes from the S.S. South American, and other unique items. The highlight will be two bottles of ninety year old scotch which were recovered from the shipwreck of the S.S. Regina on Lake Huron . This 90th Anniversary of the Storm of 1913 will include these unique artifacts that originally were carried by the Regina past the Dossin Museum on the Detroit River to Lake Huron where they were lost with the crewmembers. Bids will be taken online and the event will be Webcast in real time.

Items will be available to view and bid on Saturday from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. at the Dossin Museum on Belle Isle.

Click here to view items offered in the Silent Auction


Today in Great Lakes History - November 06

The b) US.266029 (WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) was towed from Nicholson's River Rouge dock November 6, 1986 by tugs TUSKER and GLENADA to Port Maitland, Ont. for scrapping there in 1987.

On November 6, 1913 the SHEADLE left Fort William, Ont. bound for Erie, PA with grain and encountered fog, gale winds and a snow blizzard in one of the fiercest storms of the century.

On November 6, 1925 the Northern Navigation passenger steamer HAMONIC lost her propeller 20 miles west of Caribou Island in Lake Superior and was wallowing in gale force winds with gusts to 80 m.p.h. She was later towed to safety by the RICHARD TRIMBLE

On 06 Nov 1985, Desguaces Heme began scrapping the LEON FALK, JR. in Gijon, Spain. This vessel was built in Chester, Pa in 1945 as a tanker (504', 10,534 gt) and then was converted to a bulk freighter in Baltimore, MD in 1960-61 (710', 12,501 gt).

On 6 November 1872, the wooden propeller tug MILDRED, while towing a vessel out of Alpena, had her engine fail. Soon she was in trouble and sank. The crew was saved.

On 6 November 1827, ANN (wooden schooner, 53', 58 t, built in 1819 or 1821 at Black River, Ohio) was carrying salt, general merchandise and passengers when she was driven ashore on Long Point almost opposite Erie, PA. 7 Lives were lost, including 5 passengers. 6 survived.

In 1912 the Pere Marquette Railroad announced plans to build a new roundhouse at Ludington, it still stands today.

On 6 November 1874, the Port Huron Times listed the following vessels lost in the month of October and in the first week of November of that year: Propellers - BROOKLYN, FRANKFORT, NEW YORK; tug DOUGLAS; schooners - CITY OF PAINSVILLE, WANDERER, PREBLE, THOS. S. MOTT; and barges - CLIFTON and SHERMAN.

On 6 November 1883, GUIDING STAR (3-mast wooden schooner, 139’, 324 t, built in 1869 at Oswego, NY) was carrying coal to Milwaukee in fog when she went ashore 12 miles north of Milwaukee. Four of the crew made it to shore in the yawl, but it was wrecked in the process. The rest of the crew was finally rescued by the Milwaukee Lifesavers.

Crews began painting the hull of the SAGINAW (formerly JOHN J. BOLAND) in the colors of Lower Lakes Towing Ltd. (gray) on 06 Nov 1999 at Sarnia, Ontario. The vessel had recently been purchased from American Steamship Co. Inside the vessel, crews were gutting the living quarters to remove asbestos and add fire proof walls and new flooring. The engine room equipment and the unloading gear were also refurbished.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Hollyhock to arrive at homeport Saturday

11/05
The new U.S. Coast Guard cutter Hollyhock and its crew are scheduled to arrive in their home port of Port Huron on Saturday, and the community is planning a celebration to welcome the replacement to the retired USCGC Bramble.

The 225-foot Hollyhock is expected to dock about 3 p.m. in Port Huron, across the street from the water filtration plant at the St. Clair River berth that once was home to the Bramble.

Numerous local companies and groups are preparing to welcome the ship when it arrives. The city will block off Michigan Street in front of the water filtration plant at 11 a.m. Volunteers will set up bleachers to view the festivities. The Port Huron High School marching band also is scheduled to perform.

Reported by: Frank Frisk


Marquette Update

11/05
The John J. Boland loaded ore at Marquette on a snowy, rainy, blustery Tuesday, and was accompanied at the dock by a rare visit from the Fred White Jr. The Mesabi Miner will bring coal on Wednesday.

The H. Lee White brought stone to the lower harbor Shiras dock on Tuesday, and will take on ore at the upper harbor on Wednesday. The next ship is due on Saturday.

Fred White loading on a very rainy day.
John J. Boland, bow view
Boland at the dock.

Reported by: Lee Rowe


Toledo Traffic

11/05
Tug Illinois in the Torco Slip.
Jane Ann IV & Sarah Spencer inbound the Maumee Channel in fog.
Jane Ann IV & Sarah Spencer passing Toledo Harbor Light.
Jane Ann IV & Sarah Spencer.
Another view
Toledo Harbor Light.
U.S.C.G.C. 49424 outbound the Maumee Channel.
Stern view
Sarah Spencer off T.W.I.
Federal Rideau (Hong Kong) at T.W.I.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls


Today in Great Lakes History - November 05

The LOUIS R. DESMARAIS cleared Owen Sound, Ont. on her maiden voyage November 5, 1977 bound for Thunder Bay, Ont. to load 27,117 gross tons of iron ore for Stelco at Hamilton, Ont.

On her final trip, the IRVIN L. CLYMER passed upbound at the Soo on November 5, 1990 and arrived at Duluth two days later to unload limestone at the Hallet Dock #5 after which she moved to her final lay-up berth at Fraser's shipyard and tied up blowing one last three long and two short salute from her whistle. In 1993, she was sold to Arzon Corp. of Duluth, MN for scrapping

The GRAND HAVEN was raised on November 5, 1969 from the Old River Bed where she sank on September 19, 1969. She was raised for scrapping

Mr. J.W. Isherwood visited the Great Lakes Engineering Works ship yard on November 5, 1910 and personally inspected the hull which was being built according to his patented design. This vessel, the WILLIAM P. PALMER (2) was the first vessel on the Great Lakes built to the Isherwood system of longitudinal framing.

On 05 Nov 1917, a foggy and rainy day, the JAMES S. DUNHAM (steel propeller bulk freighter, 420', 4795 gt, built in 1906 at W. Bay City, MI) sank in a collision with the steamer ROBERT FULTON (steel propeller bulk freighter, 424', 4219 gt, built 1896 at Wyandotte, MI) just below Grassy Island on the Detroit River. Repairs for both vessels totaled $125,000.

On 5 November 1896, ACADIA (iron-framed wooden propeller, 176', built in 1867 at Hamilton, Ont.) was driven ashore and broke up in a gle near the mouth of the Michipicoten River in lake Superior. her crew made it to shore and five of them spent more than a week trying to make it to the Soo.

Port Huron Times of 5 November 1878: "The schooner J. P. MARCH is reported lost with all on board. She was lost at Little Traverse Bay on the northern shore of Lake Michigan. The MARCH was a three masted schooner and was owned by Benton & Pierce of Chicago."

On 5 November 1838, TOLEDO (2-mast wooden schooner, 98', 215 t, built in 1836 at Buffalo) was carrying dry goods valued at more than $100,000 up-bound on Lake Erie when she was driven ashore by a gale a half mile east of the mouth of the Grand River. She broke in two. No lives were lost.

On 5 November 1869, TITAN (wooden schooner, 132’, 361 gt, built in 1856 at Oswego, NY) was carrying 17,500 bushels of wheat on Lake Michigan in a terrific gale. She was driven toward shore. Her anchors were dropped as she came close in and they held for about an hour. However, the ship finally dragged ashore, losing both of her masts and breaking up as she struck. Of the nine on board, only one survived and that one was found crawling along the beach in a dazed state. When she was new, TITAN broke the record by completing the trip from Chicago to Oswego in only 8 days and 4 hours. Her record only lasted one day since the schooner SURPRISE broke it by 6 hours the following day.

In the summer of 1875 the propeller EAST ran down and sank the tug JOE MAC, not even pausing to save her crew from drowning. The following winter Messrs. Seymour & Co., owners of the JOE MAC, obtained a judgement in a U.S. court against the owners of the EAST. Since the EAST was a Canadian vessel, they were unable to seize her because the judgement could only be effected in American waters. On Sunday morning, 05 Nov 1876, the steam tug SEYMOUR, with a United States marshal and posse on board, proceeded up to Allen's (presumably at Ogdensburg, NY), and there lay in wait for the EAST, which went up by the Crossover light channel into American waters. The SEYMOUR ran out and captured the vessel and brought her to Averell's wharf in U.S. waters to await justice.

CALCITE II arrived in Sarnia at 6:00 AM on Sunday, 05 NOV 2000, for lay-up. After leaving Cleveland the previous day, she anchored in Western Lake Erie, so she could arrive at the North Slip in Sarnia when shore side personnel would be on-hand to assist. A chartered bus from Rogers City left about noon to take many of the crew home to Rogers City. Around 4:10 p.m., the downbound MYRON C. TAYLOR passed her fleetmate CALCITE II, perhaps for the last time in USS Great Lakes Fleet colors, and she blew her sister an extended 3 long and 2 short master salute. The TAYLOR was bound for Cleveland with a load of stone.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Bridge Damaged in the Rouge River

11/04
Late last week the Agawa Canyon was delivering a load of salt in the Rouge River when the 647 self-unloader struck the Conrail Bridge while heading outbound and in ballast. Damage to the bridge was estimated at over $100,000 and the Agawa Canyon received damage to its starboard quarter.

There were no reported injuries or pollution and the Agawa Canyon continues to sail. Despite the damage, the bridge has been certified operable and no vessel or railroad traffic has been delayed.

Reported by: Ryan Hope


Tug and Barge Ground

11/04
The tug Jane Ann IV and barge Sarah Spencer grounded on a high spot Monday while transiting upbound below the Detroit River Light. The pair were reported to be upbound for Rouge Steel.

The tug was able to back off the high spot and go to anchor in the East Outer Channel in Western Lake Erie. It is unknown if the tug or barge were damaged in the incident but they are waiting for day light to enter Toledo Tuesday morning.

Reported by: Chris Jackson and Angie Williams


Coast Guard Evacuates Crewman

11/04
On Sunday U.S. Coast Guard Station Marblehead conducted a medevac of a crewmember experiencing chest pains on board the H. Lee White. The White was transiting western Lake Erie when a crew member complained of chest pains and dizziness.

The District Flight Surgeon recommended a medevac using a Coast Guard small boat to transport the man.

The crewmember was transported to a local hospital in Marblehead, OH where he was diagnosed with a mild heart attack and remains in good condition.

Reported by: Dan Evans


Twin Ports Report

11/04
Earl W. Oglebay paid one of its occasional visits to the Twin Ports over the weekend to unload stone at the CLM dock in Superior. The boat was proceeding down the Front Channel at 7 a.m. Monday on its way out of port and bound for Silver Bay, where it loaded taconite pellets for the lower lakes.

Also in port Monday was Walter J. McCarthy Jr., which was completing a load at Midwest Energy Terminal. Mesabi Miner was due at the dock later in the day.

Two vessels from Great Lakes Fleet were in port Monday. Edwin H. Gott was completing a partial load at BNSF in Superior ore dock after loading the first half at the DMIR dock in Duluth. The boat is due at Nanticoke on Nov. 6. Also in port was Arthur M. Anderson, which unloaded stone at the DMIR dock and then was due to proceed to Two Harbors to load.

Other interesting trips by GLF boats this week include Presque Isle, loading at the DMIR dock in Two Harbors and due in Detroit on the 7th; Cason J. Callaway, which unloaded at the Toledo World Terminal before shifting to the coal dock to load for Gladstone, Mich., where it's due on Nov. 4; and Philip R. Clarke, which was due in Marine City on Nov. 3 with stone.

Reported by: Al Miller


Algoway in Goderich

11/04
On Monday the Algoway was departing Goderich, Ontario after loading a cargo of salt for Cleveland. Also in port was the saltwater vessel Warta at the Goderich Elevators.

Algoway departing
Stern view
Warta at the Goderich Elevators

Reported by: Grant Culbert


Toronto Update

11/04
Monday afternoon the tug Tony McKay passed through the Cherry St. Bridge and moved up the ship channel pushing the barge Norman McLeod. They secured around 3:25 p.m. to the North wall of the ship channel at the McAsphalt dock.

The Royal Canadian Yacht Club tender Kwasind was dry docked Monday morning at Toronto Drydock.

Reported by: Art Church


Sailing Memories

11/04
Captain Sipila spent a lifetime sailing on the Great Lakes and took a number of photos during his career. Below are some of his photos. Captain Sipila retired a few years ago after sailing with CCG, Q & O and Upper Lakes.

CCGS Porte Dauphine fighting a fire on board a small boat.
Captain Sipila waving from the wheelhouse of the Iles des Lacs.
Franquelin at the old Canada Malting dock in Toronto.
A view along the deck of the Chicago Tribune.
Looking from the after deck of the Canadian Ranger while in Lock 6 of the Welland canal.

Reported by: Paul Beesley


Today in Great Lakes History - November 04

On 4 November 1875, SWAN (wooden propeller tug, 11 gt, built in 1862 at Buffalo, NY) caught fire while lying out in the Saginaw River near East Saginaw. She was abandoned by the crew and burned to the water’s edge.

The JOSEPH G. BUTLER, JR. (steel bulk freighter, 525', 6588 gt) was launched on 04 Nov 1905 at Lorain, Ohio for the Tonopah Steamship Co. (Hutchinson & Co., mgr.). She lasted until 1971 when she was stripped of her cabins and scuttled, along with HENRY R. PLATT, JR., at Steel Co. of Canada plant, Burlington Bay, Hamilton, Ont., as breakwater and fill.

The CARTIERCLIFFE HALL was registered at Toronto, Ont. on 04 Nov 1977, but didn't enter service until the spring of 1978 because of mechanical difficulties during her sea trials.

On 04 Nov, 1986 the TEXACO CHIEF (2) was renamed A.G. FARQUARSON. She is now the ALGONOVA.

CALCITE II departed Cleveland at 5:30 a.m. Saturday, 04 Nov 2000, on her last trip for USS Great Lakes Fleet. She sailed upbound for Sarnia, Ontario where she spent the winter in lay-up. Grand River Transportation had entered into a sale agreement with USS Great Lakes Fleet, Inc. for the purchase of the CALCITE II, GEORGE A. SLOAN and MYRON C. TAYLOR.

HERON BAY (2) proceeded under her own power to Lauzon, Que. for her final lay-up on November 4, 1978.

NIPIGON BAY was launched November 4, 1950

On November 4, 1986 the TEXACO CHIEF (2) was renamed b) A.G. FARQUARSON.

The CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON (3) developed a sizable leak and almost sank November 4, 1925 during her tow to Superior after she struck a reef a few nights before.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY's keel was laid November 4, 1942.

UNITED STATES GYPSUM (2) grounded at Toledo, OH on November 4, 1972 resulting in damages totaling $125,000. Her propeller was removed and the rudder shaft was locked in position to finish the season as a manned barge on the coal run from Toledo to Detroit, MI.

The Joseph H. Thompson became not only the largest vessel on the Great Lakes but also the longest dry bulk cargo vessel in the world when it entered service on November 4, 1952, departing Chicago on its first trip.

Setting the stage for the fateful storm which followed less than a week later which sank the Edmund Fitzgerald, many locations in Minnesota and Wisconsin were setting all-time record high temperatures for the month of November during the period of November 4-6, 1975. Grand Marais, MN reached 67 on November 5 and Superior reached 74 on November 6, both all-time records for the month. Many other notable Great Lakes storms, including the Armistice Day storm of 1940 and the storm that sank the Henry Steinbrenner in 1953, were proceeded by record-setting warm weather.

On 4 November 1877, MARY BOOTH (wooden scow-schooner, 132 t, built in 1857 at Buffalo) was carrying maple lumber in a storm in Lake Michigan. She became waterlogged but her crew doggedly clung to her until she appeared ready to turn turtle. Then her crew abandoned her and she rolled over. She drifted in the lake for several days. The crew landed at White Lake, Michigan and they were near death.

Port Huron Times of 4 November 1878: "The propeller CITY OF MONTREAL is believed to have gone down on Lake Michigan Friday [1 NOV 1878]. The schooner LIVELY, laden with coal for Bay City, is reported ashore 6 miles above Sand Beach, having gone on at 12 o'clock Sunday night [3 NOV 1878]. The schooner WOODRUFF, ashore at Whitehall, is a total loss. Two men were drowned, one died from injuries received, and Capt. Lingham was saved. The tugs E. M. PECK and MYSTIC, which went from the Sault to the assistance of the propeller QUEBEC, were wrecked near where she lies, one being on the beach and the other sunk below her decks. Both crews were rescued and were taken to St. Joseph Island."

On 4 November 1856, J. W. BROOKS (wooden propeller, 136', 322 t, built in 1851 at Detroit) was carrying provisions and copper ingots to Ogdensburg, New York in a storm when she foundered on Lake Ontario, 8 miles northeast of False Ducks Light. Estimates of the loss of lives range from 22 to 50. In July 1857, she was partially raised and some of her cargo was recovered. She only had a five year career, but besides this final incident, she had her share of disasters. In July 1855, she had a boiler explosion and in May of that same year, she sank in Canadian waters.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Saturn Heads South

11/03
The tanker Saturn was reported to have been reflagged on Friday at Sorel, Quebec. She is now flying the Panamanian flag and has been reportedly renamed Centenario Trader.

Rumors have been circulating since last month the she would be sold off lakes for service in Panama.

Saturn was built in 1974 in Louisiana for the former Cleveland Tankers fleet. She has been operated the last few years by Algoma Tankers. Her departure leaves only the Gemini as the last operating remnant of a once familiar fleet on the lakes (the whaleback museum Meteor, berthed in Superior, Wis., also was a unit of Cleveland Tankers).

Reported by: Kent Malo


Calumet in Port Stanley

11/03
The Calumet arrived in Port Stanley on Saturday morning. She delivered corn from Toledo for shipment to Casco in London. This is the second deliver in just over a week to feed this hungry processing plant that produces high fructose corn syrup, starch, and glucose.

This was believed to be the first visit of the Calumet ever to Port Stanley.

Calumet arrives.
Debbie the cook prepares lunch.
The deck crew poses for a quick photo.
The crew fix a cotter pin on the unloading buckets.
Captain Ed Wiltse tries to have lunch.

Reported by: Ted Coombs


Saginaw River News

11/03
Canadian Transfer was outbound the Saginaw River early Sunday morning after unloading overnight at the GM dock in Saginaw.

CSL Tadoussac was inbound around the same time and stopped at the Essroc terminal in Essexville to unload clinker. She was outbound late Sunday evening, backing out of the river into the Saginaw Bay to turn around and head for the lake.

The Wilfred Sykes was inbound as well, stopping at the Wirt dock in Bay City to lighter before continuing upriver to the Wirt Dock in Saginaw to finish her unload. It is expected that the Sykes will be outbound early Monday morning.

Tug Karen Andrie and her tank barge were inbound late Sunday night. The pair called on the Triple Clean dock in Essexville to unload. They are expected to be outbound late in the day on Monday.

Reported by: Todd Shorkey


Toledo Update

11/03
Sunday the Amelia Desgagnes departed the ADM Elevator in Toledo.

Amelia Desgagnes loaded at ADM Elevator and ready to sail.
Gaelic tug William Hoey.
Amelia Desgagnes under tow of Susan & William Hoey begin pulling away from the elevator.
Another view.
Amelia Desgagnes stopped between the N & S North and the CSX Bridges waiting for a train to cross CSX before it would open.

Arriving Saturday
Amelia Desgagnes inbound the Maumee River approaching the Anthony Wayne Bridge assisted by tugs Susan & William Hoey.
Amelia Desgagnes turning off the ADM Elevator. The Rt Hon Paul J Martin is in the background loading at Anderson's K Elevator.
Susan Hoey pulling the Amelia into the ADM Elevator Dock.
Another view.
Amelia Desgagnes tied up.
Susan Hoey downbound the Maumee returning to the dock.
Close up.
Willis B Boyer at the City Dock.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls


Buffalo News

11/03
The Herbert C. Jackson was discharging grain into the ADM elevator on Sunday morning. She was moored a few hundred feet up from the English River that was unloading at the Lafarge dock.

English River departed Buffalo for the Welland Canal and on to Bath, Ontario.

The Joseph H. Frantz is headed to Buffalo to unload grain. She is expected to arrive early this week, possibly on Monday.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski


Oshawa Report

11/03
The Federal Hudson docked at the Port of Oshawa on Saturday about 3 p.m. She started discharging steel beams on Sunday.

Federal Hudson docked Saturday evening.
Stern view taken on a very rainy dull Sunday.
Bow view.
Daylight starboard view.
Front end loader being dropped into one of the holds.
Steel Beams being unloaded.

Reported by: Jim Gallacher


Hamilton Update

11/03
Sunday morning the refueling ship Hamilton Energy returned to Hamilton from Clarkson, Ontario at 9:30 a.m. She was followed in by the CSL Niagara. Next came the tug Sea Eagle II and her barge at 10 a.m. The Captain Henry Jackman arrived at 10:30 a.m. going to Pier 25.

The tug Anglian Lady and barge PML 2501 arrived at 11 a.m. heading to Pier 23. The Canadian Coast Guard ship Simcoe departed at 1 p.m. for Port Weller.

Saturday morning the James Norris arrived at 10 a.m. The Halifax departed about 12:30 p.m. Next to depart was the Canadian Prospector at 2 p.m. followed by the saltie Golden Eye at 3:30 p.m. heading to the Welland Canal. The Diamond Star departed Hamilton at 9 p.m.

Reported by: Eric Holmes


Coast Guard Exercise to take Place in Erie

11/03
More than 250 responders from 50 different federal, state and local agencies will test Lake Erie contingency plans in a two-day mass casualty and pollution exercise beginning Nov. 5 at the Erie Port Authority Cruise Ship Visitors Terminal.

The exercise, centered around a simulated collision between a cruise ship and an ore carrier, is designed to focus on a broad range of themes including search and rescue, emergency medical care, immigration, law enforcement and environmental response. Participants will run through actual drills such as medical triage, helicopter rescue operations and deployment of pollution equipment, as if the exercise was an actual event. Exercise coordinators will monitor operational and planning methods along with logistics, finance and multi-agency coordination.

Agencies will also test new technology and procedures such as the Coast Guard’s new On Water Recovery System for mass rescue and Side Looking Rader (SLAR) for pollution detection. Participants are being enlisted to portray victims from the simulated ship collision.


Gaelic Cruising

11/03
Below are recent images taken by Mike Nicholls as he worked aboard various Gaelic Tugboat Company tugs. The images show the sites taken during two weeks on the tug Shannon as the crew delivered four barges from White Lake, MI (Lake Michigan) to Detroit.

Toledo 10-18-03
Woody (Greece) unloading at T.W.I.
Barge Pere Marquette 10 in the Frog Pond with the Roanoke and Windsor.
Canadian Provider inbound from Lake Erie to the ADM Elevator.
At the elevator.
Tug Susan Hoey downbound the Maumee River.
Armco at the old Interlake Steel Dock.
Stern view.
Miller Boat Line South Bass at the Toledo Shipyard.

St. Clair River 10-17-03
Capt Ralph Tucker upbound off Marysville.
Barges on short towline.
Paul R Tregurtha departing the St. Clair Edison Plant.
Another view.
Zephyr upbound on Lake St. Clair.
Another view.
Calumet downbound above the St. Clair Crib Light.
Calumet approaching Sterling Fuel.

Rogers City 10-14, 15 & 16
October 15 - tug Shannon in the Calcite Frog Pond waiting for weather.
Close up.
October 16 - Adam E Cornelius loading at Calcite.
Departing Calcite with the barges. On the second trip the butterboard was replaced by an 8 foot piece of PVC pipe cut down the middle and duct taped to the towline. It was much more effective than the butterboard.
Onto the lake.

Poe Reef Light & Muskegon 10-11 & 12
10-11 Poe Reef Light off Cheboygan, MI in Lake Huron.
10-12 Barge Sea Castle in Muskegon.
Another view.
Faust barge 147, with the tug Cormorant aboard at the Mart Dock in Muskegon.
Andrie tug Mari Beth Andrie at the Andrie Dock.
Another view.
10-13 Barge 147 & Comanche in the Manitou Passage.

Another view.

Port Huron 10-10-03
Integrity and Jacklyn M downbound above buoy's 1 & 2.
Passing.
Stern view.
Peonia downbound in the Huron Cut with pilot Capt. Phil Knetchel.
Close up.

St. Clair River 10-09-03
Bramble in Port Huron.
Keewatin at Shell in Corunna.
Canadian Progress upbound.
Stern view.
Barges after shortening the towline for the rivers.
Arthur M Anderson upbound the St. Clair River.
Ferry City of Algonac.
Federal Kumano in Lake St. Clair after sunset.
Barge 141 Lake Michigan
10-07 & 10-08
The tug Shannon picked up two Faust barges off White Lake Michigan on October 7. The picture shows the Faust barge 141, with the barge 148 behind being towed northbound in Lake Michigan. Note the butterboard, a wooden device that keeps the towline from chafing on the rail of the tug.
Gray's Reef Light with White Shoal Light in the background.
Another view.
White Shoal Light.
Poe Reef Light.

Straits of Mackinac - South 10-06-03
Barge Hannah 2901 and tug Mary Page Hannah in the Straits.
Another view.
Barge.
White Shoal Lighthouse.
Buffalo Northbound near Grays Reef.

Mackinaw City 10-06-03
Tug Shannon in Mackinaw City.
Another view.
Shepler's Wyandot departing Mackinaw City for Mackinac Island.
Fish tug Connie J in Mackinaw City.
Another view.
Mackinac Bridge.
Fish tug Kari A in Mackinaw City.
Shepler's Felicity in Mackinaw City.
Shepler's Capt Shepler in Mackinaw City.


St. Clair River 10-05-03
Canadian Provider downbound off Algonac.
Stern view.
Barge KTC 115 and Tony Mackay downbound off Marine City.
Close up.

Back from the barge deliveries, Toledo Traffic on Oct. 20
Rt Hon Paul J Martin loading at Anderson's K Elevator.
Another view.
Canadian Provider loading at the ADM Dock.
William Hoey outbound the Maumee River to assist the Canadian Prospector to Anderson's Elevator.
Another view.
Courtney Burton at Torco.
Canadian Prospector inbound for Anderson's Elevator.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls


Silent Auction and Webcast of Fitzgerald Memorial

11/03
On Saturday, November 8 the Dossin Great Lakes Museum will host a Silent auction of Great Lakes memorabilia including artwork, two portholes from the S.S. South American, and other unique items. The highlight will be two bottles of ninety year old scotch which were recovered from the shipwreck of the S.S. Regina on Lake Huron . This 90th Anniversary of the Storm of 1913 will include these unique artifacts that originally were carried by the Regina past the Dossin Museum on the Detroit River to Lake Huron where they were lost with the crewmembers. Bids will be taken online and the event will be Webcast in real time. Click here to view items up for bid New items added Sunday

Starting Saturday with the Silent Auction the museum will start a series of webcasts. On Monday November 10 a memorial service for the Edmund Fitzgerald will be broadcast at 7 p.m. EDT. Due to reduced hours at the museum this program will only be available online through the webcast, the museum is only open weekends due to budget cuts.

Held at the anchor of the "Fitz" in the yard of the Dossin Museum, this program will be webcast live from the museum grounds. Lamp lighting ceremony followed by a talk from Capt. Don Erickson who searched for the Fitzgerald on Lake Superior the night of the loss. This outside ceremony will mark the 28th Anniversary of the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald on Lake Superior at approx. 7:00 pm November 10, 1975. Viewers may submit questions to the speaker online.

Click here for information on Silent Auction
Bookmark this page for the Webcast


Weekly Updates

11/03
The weekly updates have been uploaded.
Click here to view


Today in Great Lakes History - November 03

The B A PEERLESS sailed on her maiden voyage November 3, 1952 bound for Superior, WI where 110,291 bbl of crude oil were loaded destined for British-American's refinery at Clarkson, Ont. The PEERLESS was built for the express purpose of transporting crude oil from the Interprovincial/Lakehead Pipeline terminus at Superior to B/A's Clarkson refinery. The vessel lasted until 1991 when she was broken up.

On 3 November 1898, PACIFIC (wooden propeller passenger/package freighter, 179'. 918 gt, built in 1883 at Owen Sound, Ontario) caught fire at the Grand Trunk dock at Collingwood, Ontario. She burned to a shell despite a concerted effort to save her. She was later towed out into Georgian Bay and scuttled.

On 3 November 1855, DELAWARE (wooden propeller, 173', 368 t, built in 1846 at Black River, OH) was carrying general merchandise from Chicago to Buffalo with a stop at Milwaukee. She was driven ashore by a gale 8 miles south of Sheboygan, Wisconsin and sank. 10 or 11 of the 18 on board lost their lives. Within a few days, only her arches were visible above the water.

On 3 November 1898, PACIFIC (wooden propeller passenger/package freight steamer, 179'. 918 gt, built in 1883 at Owen Sound, Ontario) caught fire at the Grand Trunk dock at Collingwood, Ontario. She burned to a shell despite a concerted effort to save her. She was later towed out into Georgian Bay and scuttled.

Dismantling of the H. C. HEIMBECKER began on 03 Nov 1981 by Triad Salvage Company at Ashtabula, Ohio and was completed the following year. This vessel was originally named GEORGE W. Perkins (steel bulk freighter, 556', 6553 gt, built in 1905 at Superior, WI.)

On November 3, 1910, ATHABASCA (steel propeller passenger steamer, 263', 1774 gt, built in 1883 in Scotland) collided with the tug GENERAL near Lime Island in the St. Mary's River. As a result of the collision, the GENERAL sank. She was later recovered and rebuilt as a bulk freighter and lasted until she was broken up in 1948.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Viking I Enters Bayship

11/02
On Saturday the Selvick Marine tugs Mary Page Hannah and Jimmy L. placed the former rail ferry Viking l at Berth #15 at Bayship Building. The Viking will remain at Berth #15 over the weekend until the shipyard crews place it into the graving dock early this week. The Viking will under go a 5 year survey and miscellaneous work.

The Viking I was towed from Erie, Penn. last year to Menominee, Mich. where it was planned to be used as a barge for offloading pulpwood. The former rail ferry has sat idle since the tow and its owners have not announced any plans for its use.

Viking being placed at berth
Mary Page Hannah pulling ship up against the dock
At Berth #15

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle


Green Bay Action

11/02
The Philip R. Clarke entered Green Bay about 11 a.m. Saturday. She was bringing a load of coal to the Fox River Dock. Also, the new USCG Hollyhock made a trip into Green Bay and the Fox River that afternoon. There was no action at Lafarge, but the S. T. Crapo is looking good in her new coat of paint.

Pictures by Dick Lund
Philip R. Clarke inbound past Grassy Island
Inbound Fox River at Metro launch
Unloading at Fox River Dock
Under the unloading boom at Fox River Dock
Stern view
A view from upriver
USCG Hollyhock inbound approaching Grassy Island
Bow close-up of newly repainted S. T. Crapo
Full view from astern across the Fox River
Another view
Stern close-up

Pictures by Jason Leino
Calumet inbound at Buoy 30
Passing the Arthur M. Anderson
Stern View
Arthur M. Anderson at C. Reiss Coal Dock
Stern view at C. Reiss Coal Dock
Capt. Henry Jackman engine room
Anchor winches
View on deck at night
View in the stern
Engine room
Generators
The Galley
Pilothouse
Algoma stack at night
Philip R. Clarke inbound at buoy 30
Unloading under Tower Drive bridge
Hatch crane
The Fox River from on deck.

Reported by: Dick Lund and Jason Leino


Saginaw River News

11/02
The Alpena was outbound late Saturday morning after unloading overnight at the Lafarge Terminal in Carrollton.

Inbound on Saturday was the Tug Mary E. Hannah and her tank barge. The pair tied up to unload at the Triple Clean Dock in Essexville. Also inbound was the Canadian Transfer. She entered the river late in the evening and was headed all the way upriver to the GM dock in Saginaw to unload.

Reported by: Todd Shorkey


Today in Great Lakes History - November 02

On November 2, 1984 the tugs ATOMIC and ELMORE M. MISNER towed the ERINDALE to the International Marine Salvage scrap dock at Port Colborne where demolition began that month.

The H.C. HEIMBECKER proceeded under her own power to Ashtabula, OH for scrapping, arriving there November 2, 1981.

On November 2, 1948 the FRANK ARMSTRONG collided head-on with the JOHN J. BOLAND (2) in a heavy fog on Lake Erie near Colchester, Ont. Both vessels were badly damaged and resulted in one fatality on the BOLAND. The ARMSTRONG was towed to Toledo, OH for repairs.

In 1972 the A.E. NETTLETON's towline parted from the OLIVE L. MOORE during a snowstorm with gale force winds 17 miles west of the Keweenaw Peninsula on Lake Superior. The barge developed a 15 degree list when her load of grain shifted. Three of her five member crew were air lifted by a U.S.C.G. helicopter to the MOORE to assist in re-rigging the towline. The NETTLETON was then towed the next day into the Lily Pond on the Keweenaw Waterway to trim her cargo.

The WILLIAM C. MORELAND was abandoned to the underwriters on November 2, 1910 as a constructive total loss, amounting to $445,000. She had stranded on Sawtooth Reef off Eagle Harbor, MI on Lake Superior in mid October.

The keel of the new section, identified as Hull #28, was laid down on November 2, 1959. A new forward pilothouse and a hatch crane were installed and her steam turbine engine and water tube boilers were reconditioned. The vessel was named c) RED WING (2) after the Detroit Red Wing hockey team, honoring a long association with Upper Lakes Shipping and James Norris, the founder of ULS, and his two sons, James D. and Bruce, owners of the National Hockey League team.

In 1971 the Lake Michigan Carferry S.S. Badger was laid up due to a coal strike.

On 2 November 1889, FRANCIS PALMS (wooden schooner, 173', 560t, built in 1868 at Marine City, Michigan as a bark) was sailing from Escanaba to Detroit with a load of iron ore when she was driven ashore near Beaver Island in lake Michigan. Her entire crew was taken off by the tug GLADIATOR that also pulled in vain while trying to free the PALMS. The PALMS was pounded to pieces by the storm waves. November was a bad month for the PALMS since she had previously been wrecked on Long Point in Lake Erie in November 1874 and again at Duluth in November 1872.

During the first week of November 1878, the Port Huron Times reported wrecks and mishaps that occurred during a severe storm that swept over the Lakes on Friday and Saturday , 1-3 November. The information was reported on 2, 4 & 5 November as the reports came in. The same reports will appear here starting today: Port Huron Times of 2 November 1878: "The schooner L. C. WOODRUFF of Cleveland is ashore at the mouth of the White River with her foremast gone. She is loaded with corn. Three schooners went ashore at Grand Haven Friday morning, the AMERICA, MONTPELIER, and AUSTRALIAN. One man was drowned off the AUSTRALIAN. The schooner WORTS is ashore and full of water on Beaver Island. Her cargo consists of pork for Collingwood. The tug LEVIATHAN has gone to her aid. The schooner LAKE FOREST is ashore at Hammond's Bay, Lake Huron, and is full of water. She has a cargo of corn aboard. The tug A. J. SMITH has gone to her rescue. The barge S. C. WOODRUFF has gone down in 13 feet of water off Whitehall and her crew is clinging to the rigging at last accounts. A life boat has been sent to her relief. The barge RUTTER is in 25 feet of water and all the crew are now safe."

On 2 November 1874, PREBLE (2-mast wooden schooner, 98', 166 t, built in 1842 at Buffalo as a brig) was lost in a storm off Long Point on Lake Erie and broke up in the waves. The steamer ST. PAUL rescued her crew.

On 02 Nov 1862, BAY STATE (wooden propeller, 137', 372 t, built in 1852 at Buffalo, NY) was bound for Lake Erie ports from Oswego, New York when she broke up offshore in a terrific gale in the vicinity of Oswego. All 22 onboard, including six passengers, lost their lives. The shoreline was strewn with her wreckage for miles.

The PAUL H. CARNAHAN was christened at the foot of West Grand Boulevard in Detroit, Michigan on 02 Nov 1961. She had been converted from a tanker (ATLANTIC DEALER) to a dry bulk cargo carrier by American Ship Building Co. at Lorain, Ohio and came out on her maiden bulk freighter voyage just two weeks before this christening ceremony.

The CANADIAN EXPLORER (now CANADIAN TRANSFER) entered service on 02 Nov 1983, bound for Duluth, Minn. where she loaded 851,000 bushels of corn. She was originally built as the tanker CABOT in 1965, then was rebuilt as a dry cargo bulk carrier at Port Weller Shipyards, Ltd., St. Catharines, Ontario where she received the bow and mid-body of NORTHERN VENTURE. The rebuilt was completed in 1983. She is currently named CANADIAN TRANSFER.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Low Water at the Soo

11/01
Friday night low water was again sending boats to anchor in the St, Marys River. About 10 p.m. the Rock Cut was at minus 14.4 and at Midnight the water flow was to be reduced by 14,000 Cubic Feet Per Second to allow work at the Edison Sault Power Plant and Construction crews to remove the Old Fort Street Bridge along the Power Canal.

The John G. Munson and Presque Isle anchored in Hay Lake and the St. Clair tied up at the South East Pier. The Paul R Tregurtha docked at the South West Pier.

The Reserve stopped at the Carbide Dock before midnight. After tying up Soo Traffic reported that the water level had risen to minus 11 inches, the Reserve cast off their lines and continued down river. Due to her shallower draft (25'6"), she will continue downriver to Hay Lake should the levels continue to rise.

Reported by: Scott Best


Twin Ports Report

11/01
Boatnerd favorite Joseph H. Frantz spent Friday loading at the Cenex Harvest State grain elevator in Superior. The vessel arrived in port about 730 a.m. Thursday, but loading was slowed by rain that day. Friday was cold but dry, and the Frantz was expected to clear port late in the day.

Other grain traffic Friday included Pytheas loading at Cargill B1 in Duluth and Olympic Mentor, which started the day anchored on the lake but which was expected to enter port later in the day.

Stewart J. Cort loaded at BNSF ore dock.

Midwest Energy Terminal is expecting a busy weekend. Canadian Progress and Canadian Olympic are due today and Canadian Transport and Walter J. McCarthy Jr. are set for Sunday. Next week the dock is expected to load Mesabi Miner with coal for Presque Isle; Fred R. White Jr. with coal for Ashland, Wis.; Mesabi Miner with coal for Taconite Harbor; and Herbert C. Jackson with coal for Marquette. Canadian Olympic, one of today's callers, is hauling its coal to Thunder Bay, Ontario.

Reported by: Al Miller


Saginaw River News

11/01
The Steamer Alpena was inbound the Saginaw River Friday morning passing the Front Range around 11 a.m. She continued upriver to Carrollton to unload at the Lafarge Terminal. It is expected that the Alpena will be outbound early Saturday afternoon.

Alpena upbound at Veteran's Memorial Bridge.
Another view.
Stern view clear of Vet's Bridge.

Reported by: Todd Shorkey


Clarkson Update

11/01
It was a quite week at Clarkson, Ontario. On Wednesday James Norris arrived early in the morning with a cargo of stone for St. Lawrence Cement. Friday Maria Desgagnes was in early to discharge cargo at the Petro Canada refinery dock.

Reported by: Bryan Ridley


Today in Great Lakes History - November 01

The Grand Trunk Western was granted permission by the Interstate Commerce Commission on November 1, 1978 to discontinue its Lake Michigan service between Muskegon, MI and Milwaukee, WI.

The MAITLAND NO.1 made her maiden voyage on November 1, 1916 from Ashtabula to Port Maitland, Ont. transporting rail cars with coal for the steel mills at Hamilton, Ont.

The SCOTT MISENER (3) returned to service in the grain trade on November 1, 1986 after a 3 year lay-up

On 1 November 1917, ALVA B. (wooden steam tug, 74', 84 gt, built in 1890 at Buffalo) apparently mistook amusement park lights for the harbor markers at Avon Lake, Ohio during a storm. She struck bottom in the shallows and was destroyed by waves.

On 1 November 1862, BLACK HAWK (wooden brig, 138', 385 t, built in 1854 at Ohio City, OH) was carrying 19,000 bushels of corn and some stained glass when a gale drove her ashore and wrecked her near Point Betsie. In 1858, this vessel had sailed from Detroit, Michigan to Liverpool, England and back.

On 1 Nov 1862, CHIEF JUSTICE MARSHALL (2-mast wooden schooner, 105', 182 t, built in 1830 at Cape Vincent, NY) was driven aground between Dunkirk and Barcelona, NY during a storm. All hands were lost and the vessel was a total loss.

The Mackinac Bridge was opened to traffic on 01 Nov 1957.

The CITY OF MILWAUKEE (steel propeller carferry, 347', 2988 gt, built in 1931 at Manitowoc, WI) made her last run for Grand Trunk’s rail car ferry service on 01 Nov 1978. In the Fall of 1978 after termination of Grand Trunk's carferry service, she was then chartered to Ann Arbor Railroad. She is currently a museum ship at Manistee, Michigan.

Port Maitland Shipbreaking Ltd. began scrapping the ELMGLEN on 01 Nov 1984. She had a long career, being built in 1909 at Ecorse, Michigan as the SHENANGO (steel propeller bulk freighter, 580'. 8047 gt).

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




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