Great Lakes NEWS & RUMOR Archive

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Today in Great Lakes History - November 29

On November 29, 1966, the Daniel J. Morrell sank approximately 20 miles north of Harbor Beach in Lake Huron. Her nearly identical sistership, the Edward Y. Townsend, was travelling about 20 miles behind the Morrell and made it to the Lime Island Fuel Dock in the St. Mary's River where cracks were found in her deck; the Townsend proceeded to Sault Ste. Marie where she was taken out of service. The Townsend sank in the Atlantic on October 7, 1968, while being towed overseas for scrap. E.B. BARBER was laid up for the last time at Toronto, Ont. on November 29, 1984.

On November 29, 1903 snow and stormy seas drove the two-and-a-half year old J.T. HUTCHINSON onto an uncharted rock (now known as Eagle River Reef) one-half mile off shore and 10 miles west of Eagle Harbor, MI near the northwestern coast of the Keweenaw Peninsula.

On November 29, 1974 the PERE MARQUETTE 21 was loaded with remnants of Port Huron's Peerless Cement Dock, which reportedly were bound for Saudi Arabia, and cleared there in tow of the GLT tugs AMERICA and OHIO.

The SYLVANIA was in a collision with the DIAMOND ALKALI in the Fighting Island Channel of the Detroit River on November 29, 1968 during a snow squall and received a new bow as a result.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Steamer Buckeye aground in upper St. Mary's River

11/28:
As of Thanksgiving morning, November 27th, the Oglebay Norton steamer Buckeye is aground off of Brimley Michigan. Its location is in t he location of buoy 27. Apparently it was on a downbound run and failed to make a necessary course change. At last check two or three "G"tugs and two other tugs from Purvis Marine were working to free her.

Reported by: Eric LaRoue




Saguenay update

11/28:
A visit to the SAGUENAY on November 26 found the following; she is lisiting to starboard between 10 to 15 degrees. Draft forward is 15'- midship is 20'06" startboard side draft is about 16'. There were men working on her, cannot tell if they are loading any cargo into her.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Welland Canal celebrates 168th anniversary

11/28:
Welland Canal celebrates 168th anniversary (St. Catharines, Ont.) - November 26, 1997 - William Saunderson, Toronto, Chairman, Ontario Interna tional Trade Corporation, will discuss the importance of Ontario's water transportation system at "Merritt Day", Friday, November 28, as the Welland Canal, Canada's oldest continuously operated transportation facility, celebrates its 168th birthday. Rec ent surveys have indicated that the Welland Canal and marine-related services generate $200 million annually in the Niagara region.

Ceremonies beginning at 10 a.m. at the Lock 3 Complex in St. Catharines will recognize an upbound ship re-enacting the schooner the Anne & Jane, the first vessel to transit the canal, doing so over a three-day period, November 27-29, in 1829. The vessel and master to be recognized will be announced by the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority at approximately 8 a.m. Friday.

Since the historic 1829 event pioneered by Canada's Father of Transportation, William Hamilton Merritt, a series of three additional enlarged canals have been built to encourage and accommodate Canada's economic development.

"Long before railways and hard-surface roads existed anywhere in Canada, the Welland Canal which we recognize on Merritt Day, was operating and serving Canada's development, and this ceremony recognizes that legacy," said Harley Smith, President, Welland Canals Foundation. Bulk cargoes ranging from ore to grain economically moved through the canal on 730-foot ships are responsible for creating thousands of jobs a cross Canada.

"There is no other similar facility in Canada which has been in operation for 168 years. This anniversary is unique and a proud occasion for Canada and particularly the Niagara region," he added. "We invite those involved in shipping and all citizens to attend the Welland Canal birthday party."

Prominent marine and government representatives will join high school students and the public for the program organized by the Welland Canals Foundation in association with the St. Lawrence SeawayAuthority, Algoma Central Marine, Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering, and Port Weller Dry Docks, commencing at 10 a.m.

For more information:
Harley Smith
Welland Canals Foundation
(905) 641-1932, ext. 5309

Reported by: Laura Bruce




Today in Great Lakes History - November 28

On November 28, 1905, the Pittsburgh Steamship Company vessel Mataafa was wrecked as it tried to re-enter the Duluth Ship Canal in a severe storm. The Mataafa had departed Duluth earlier but had decided to return to safety. After dropping her barge in the lake, the vessel was picked up by waves, was slammed against the north pier and was swung around to rest just hundreds of feet offshore north of the north pier, where it broke in two. Much of the crew froze to death in the cold snap that followed the storm, as there was no quick way to get out to the broken vessel for rescue. The Mataafa was repaired prior to the 1906 season; she ultimately ended her career as an automobile carrier for the T.J. McCarthy Steamship Company and was sold for scrap in 1965.

The CANADIAN OLYMPIC's maiden voyage was November 28,1976 to load coal at Conneaut, Ohio for Nanticoke, Ont.

On November 28, 1983 while upbound after leaving the Poe Lock the INDIANA HARBOR was in a collision, caused by high winds, with the downbound Greek salty ANANGEL SPIRIT resulting in a 10 foot gash in the laker's port bow.

LANCASHIRE was launched November 28, 1942 she would be renamed b) SEWELL AVERY

The CATHY B. towed the GOVERNOR MILLER to Vigo, Spain on November 28, 1980 where she was broken up.

The BENSON FORD (2) was renamed e) US.265808 and departed River Rouge on November 28, 1986 towed by the Sandrin tugs TUSKER and GLENADA bound for Ramey's Bend in the Welland Canal.

FRONTENAC (4) arrived at the Fraser Shipyard, Superior, WI on November 28, 1979. Her keel, which had hogged four feet, was declared a constructive total loss.

The BRANSFORD stranded on a reef off Isle Royal in Lake Superior during a major storm on November 28, 1905 (the same storm that claimed the steamer MATAAFA).

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Saguenay listing at dock

11/27:
A vessel passing the old C.N. Ore dock in Thunder Bay, the dock where the SAGUENAY is tied up, reported the SAGUENAY had a bad list to starboard. The radio r eport stated that she is in a dangerous condition and could roll over.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Bow thruster erodes dock

11/27:
Tuesday, while the George A. Sloan was departing the Morton Salt Dock in Manistee, MI, the bow thrusters eroded a large part of Morton Salt's unprotected dock. There was no piling around the dock, and the dock was in bad shape. Early on Wednesday officials at Morton Salt noticed that a large portion of their dock had sank in the water, taking a lot of coal with it. This should prompt a new dock for Morton Sal t. The thruster had eroded a 15 ft. section away under the dock.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Detroit

11/27:
The Great Lakes Maritime Academy will have a recruiting representative at the Dossin Museum on Belle Isle Saturday December 6th from 11AM to 1 PM . Also scheduled to attend will be David Hollmeyer, Assistant Director of Personal for The Interlake Steamship Company. This is an excellent opportunity for you to learn more about what it takes to begin a career as an officer aboard a US flag Great Lakes vessel. For further info, call 1-800-748-0566 extension 1200.

Reported by: Gary Schweitzer




Today in Great Lakes History - November 27

The ALGOSEA entered Lake service as a self-unloader for the first time with salt loaded at Goderich, Ont. and passed downbound in the Welland Canal November 27, 1976 for Quebec City.

The AVONDALE (2) was condemned and was not allowed to carry cargo after she arrived at Toledo, OH on November 27, 1975 to load soya beans.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Alpena at Bay Shipbuilding

11/26:
As of 11/25 the Alpena was at the Bay Shipbuilding yards for a short term lay-up according to Inland Lakes Management. This could be for the 5 year survey, o r ILM may just have extra tonnage.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Today in Great Lakes History - November 26

The MESQUITE departed Charlevoix and locked through the Soo on November 26, 1989 to begin SUNDEW's normal buoy tending duties on Lake Superior.

The ELIZABETH HINDMAN was launched November 26, 1920 as a) GLENCLOVA

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - November 25

INCAN SUPERIOR was withdrawn from service after completing 2,386 trips between Thunder Bay and Superior and on November 25, 1992 she passed downbound at Sault Ste. Marie for service on the Canadian West Coast.

On November 25, 1947 the b) CAPTAIN JOHN ROEN was renamed c) ADAM E. CORNELIUS (2).

ROBERT C. STANLEY was laid up for the last time November 25, 1981 at the Tower Bay slip, Superior, WI.

CITY OF MILWAUKEE was launched November 25, 1930

On November 25, 1905, the Joseph G. Butler, Jr. entered service, departing Lorain, Ohio for Duluth on her maiden voyage. The vesselreceived damage in a severe storm on her first crossing of Lake Superior. This vessel was repaired and re-entered service; she was renamed Donald B. Gillies in 1935 and Grovedale in 1963. She was sunk as a dock in Hamilton in 1973 and finally sold for scrap in 1981.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Update on the Pathfinder

11/24:
The former lake freighter J.L. Mauthe, which is undergoing conversion to the tug/ barge Pathfinder is now out of the Bay Shipbuilding drydock and floating on h er own. The Pathfinder's new notch has been installed along with the connection ladders (developed by Bay Engineering for Bark River Towing). Her boom has been complete and they are awaiting delivery of the luffing and slewing cylinders to place the boom in its final installation position. The remaining unloading system components have arrived at the yard and the drives and belt should be ready to install within the next month. The vessel's owner, Interlake Steamship Company is using a state-of-the-art prologic controllers and a video display unit in place of the normal gauge console located in the unloading cubical. This system uses sensors placed throughout the system to monitor both unloading system performance as well as all of the alarm set-point conditions. Shipyard employee's are in the final stages of pulling wires and hooking up all of the sensors. This system also has inputs for eventual installation of unloading gate automation and automatic ballast capability. The new bow thruster installation should be nearing completion as well as all of the equipment in the machinery space. The front end loaders are installed in the cargo holds and the internal modifications to the ship have been complete. The vessel should be completed by March 1 and testing completed by the 25th of March.

Interlake is having a new tug built to push the barge, until the new build tug is completed an interim tug will be used. This interim tug is in the final stages of completion and both units should be ready to m ate up in the spring.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Progress loses Rudder

11/24:
The Canadian Progress had lost one of its 2 rudders at the US Seaway locks last week. The vessel is loaded with ore for Lorain, spotters report the ship upbound in Lock 2 Welland Canal Saturday leading to the conclusion that she is still steerable. Speculation is that they are going to unload and come back to Port Weller DD for repairs.

Reported by: D. Ocean




News from the Twin Ports

11/24:
Charles M. Beeghly entered Fraser Shipyards in Superior sometime overnight Nov. 21, arriving from Marquette. The vessel appeared to be undergoing repairs to its self-unloader system. It was scheduled to depart the yard Nov. 22 and load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal.

H. Lee White was due to make an unusual appearance in the Twin Ports Nov. 22/23, unloading at C. Reiss coal dock up the St. Louis River, then moving over to BN ore dock to load.

Duluth harbor was busy the morning of Nov. 21 with saltie Lake Superior loading at AGP elevator, Halifax unloading at Cargill B2 and Kinsman Independent tied up at the General Mills layby dock. The KI was idle all day, so it may be waiting for the Peavey elevator to finish loading another vessel.

Reported by: Al Miller




S.S. Badger back in Ludington

11/24:
The S.S. Badger was towed back to Ludington on the morning of Friday, November 21st. According to Lake Michigan Carf erry officals, she passed her 5 year hull inspection with "flying colors", although one propeller had to be replaced.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Update on the Barker loading corn

11/24:
As reported on 11/20, the Kaye E. Barker loaded a cargo of corn in Milwaukee, this was the first time a U.S. self-unloader carried that type of cargo f rom the port since the late 80's. To make this possible it was necessary for the vessel to undergo modifications to her cargo holds and unloading gear. The Barker headed down to Chicago with a load of ore from DM & IR, then to Milwaukee to load corn fo r Continental Grain. This was the first time vessel owner Interlake Steamship Company had loaded and unloaded grain using one of their self unloaders. Reports are that the vessel's owners and Continental seemed to be very pleased with the results. With an exceptional grain harvest in the mid-west and transportaion by rail to Chicago being expensive, we may see more of this type of cargo being hauled by the vessel.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss



Milwaukee Clipper tow to Muskegon

11/24:
Weather may delay the tow of the Milwaukee Clipper back to Muskegon today. Andrie Marine sent their large tug Purves and a barge from Muskegon down to the Clipper on Friday).

Reported by: Mark Howell




Labor contracts set to expire

11/24:
Labor contracts expire in 1999 at steel mills and iron ore mines around the Great Lakes, and some people involved already are predicting a tough round of n egotiations.

Contracts for members of the United Steelworkers of America expire July 31, 1999, at steel plants across the country. For the first time since 1983, contracts will expire simultaneously at Minnesota's six Iron Range taconite plants. O nly Northshore Mining Co. in Silver Bay (formerly Reserve Mining Co.) is nonunion.

Several Iron Range UWSA officials say they expect a tough round of negotiations. Range Steelworkers made concessions and agreed to modest contracts in recent years in hopes of helping their plants remain open and profitable. With the plants operating at or near capacity now, some are saying they'll be asking for increase s in wages, benefits and pensions as well as seeking more capital investments in Range taconite plants and contract language on contracting out work.

Reported by: Al Miller




St. Lawrence Seaway Authority deal

11/24:
Canada's St. Lawrence Seaway Authority has reportedly reached a tentative agreement with a labor union that inlcudes 730 of its employees.

Repo rted by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





M/V Emerald Isle - new Beaver Island ferry

11/24:
Washburn & Doughty Shipyard on the east coast has recently completed a new vehicle and passenger ferry for the Beaver Island Boat Line. It ha s completed trials and is in the precess of being delivered.

Reported by: R.K. Thompson




Today in Great Lakes History - November 24

On November 24, 1990, the Kinsman Independent ran hard aground off of Isle Royale. The vessel was on its way to load grain in Thunder Bay when she ended up 25 miles off course. The damage to the vessel was nearly $2 million, and she was repaired at Thunder Bay before the start of the 1991 season.

On November 24, 1950 while bound for South Chicago with iron ore, the ENDERS M. VOORHEES collided with the upbound steamer ELTON HOYT II (l) (now the MEDUSA CHALLENGER) in the Straits of Mackinac during a blinding snow storm. Both vessels received such se rious bow damage that they had to be beached near McGulpin Point west of Mackinaw City to avoid sinking.

The ROSEMOUNT (2), stored with coal, inadvertently sank alongside CSL's Century Coal Dock at Montreal on November 24, 1934.
The THOMAS F. PATTON was launched November 24, 1945 as a C4-S-A4 cargo ship for U.S. Maritime Commission (U.S.M.C. Hull #2370) as a) SCOTT E. LAND.

PRINDOC (3) was launched November 24, 1965



Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - November 23

The GRAND HAVEN was brought back to the Lakes and locked upbound through the Welland Canal on November 23, 1964. She was intended for roll on/roll off carrier service to haul truck trailers laden with steel coils from Stelco's plant at Hamilton, Ont.

After discharging her cargo, the SAMUEL MATHER (6) proceeded to De Tour, MI laying up for the last time at the Pickands Mather Coal Dock on November 23, 1981.

In 1987 the ROGERS CITY (2) was towed out of Menominee, MI for scrapping in Brazil.

STADACONA (3)'s sea trials were completed on November 23, 1952 and was delivered to CSL the next day.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - November 22

ST. LAWRENCE (3) was launched November 22, 1961 as a) SKAUSTRAND

The FRONTENAC (4) while in ballast sustained major structural damage from grounding on Pellet Reef attempting to enter Silver Bay, MN at 2140 hours on November 22, 1979. Nineteen feet of water flooded her #2 and #4 compartments through cracks which developed in her hull plating and her spar deck caused by six to twelve foot waves slamming into her.

The CITY OF MILWAUKEE was chartered to the Ann Arbor Railroad Co. and started the Frankfort, MI-Kewaunee, WI service for them on November 22, 1978.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




More on Barge losing cargo

11/21:
The barge that took on water and dropped heavy machinery and 4900 tons of steel mill scrap into Lake Michigan Monday, was the Chief Wawatam and tug Avenger IV

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Today in Great Lakes History - November 21

In 1924 the MERTON E.FARR slammed into the Interstate Bridge that linked Superior, WI with Duluth, MN. causing extensive damage to the bridge. The bridge span fell into the water but the FARR received only minor damage to her bow, the repair of which amounted to $5,000. The bridge outage caused an enormous inconvenience to automobile, railway and pedestrian traffic not to mention the high cost to replace the bridge span.

PATERSON (1) was launched November 21, 1953

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Barker loads cargo of corn

11/20:
On November 19 the Kaye E. Barker became the largest boat ever to dock at Milwaukee's Continental Grain elevator when the arrived to load a partial load of co rn. The 767' long Barker will be delivering the grain to Chicago for eventual shipment overseas. The last American selfunloader's to load grain here were the 'Nicolet' and 'George A. Sloan' in the late 80's. (Those cargos were delivered to Port Colborne.) The midwest corn crop this year is excellent. Wisconsin's crop is shaping up to be the third best on record. This could explain why the Barker was in Fraser Shipyards last weekend.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Barge loses cargo in Lake Michigan

11/20:
A barge took on water the morning of 17 Nov. in bad weather, listed and dumped its cargo five kilometers/three miles southeast of the Rawley Point Lighthouse north of Two Rivers, Wis. About 4,900 tons of steel mill scrap, a crane and a front-end loader sank in 46 meters/150 feet of water after the scrap cargo shifted. The bar ge, owned by J.W. Purvis Marine Ltd., has minor damage though not to its hull. After a U.S. Coast Guard investigation, the tow was released at 1800 17 Nov. to continue its voyage.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Clear Majority of the House Favor Jones Act at Recess

11/20:
As Congress begins its mid-term recess, a clear majority of the House of Representatives have endorsed the Jones Act. As of today ( November 14), 237 House members have signed House Continuing Resolution 65, a statement of full support for the Jones Act. (218 signers constitute a simple majority of the House.)

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Ass ociation




Today in Great Lakes History - November 20

EAGLESCLIFFE HALL (2) was launched November 20, 1956

At 2240 hours on November 20, 1974, only her eighth season, the ROY A. JODREY, traveling upbound with Labrador ore for Detroit, MI, ran aground on Pullman Shoal, located at Wellesley Island in the St. Lawrence River near Alexandria Bay, NY. All of the crew were rescued. Early the next morning at 0305 hours she slid off the shoal, rolled on her side and sank in 150 feet of water. Early in 1975 Algoma declared her unsalvageable due in part to swift under water currents and abandoned her there. ROY A. JODREY's register was closed October 7, 1975.

RALPH H. WATSON was launched November 20, 1937

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great LakesShips We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Ice forms while grain is busy

11/19:
The thin layer of ice forming on Duluth-Superior harbor is a reminder that the end of the season is not far away. Yet grain traffic remains strong in the Twin Ports. On Nov. 18, Algontario was loading at Harvest States and Peavey and Ziemia Tarnowska was at Cargill B1. Anchored on Lake Superior waiting for grain cargoes are salties Alpha and Nordic Moor. Due in later this week for grain are Petka, Lake Superior, Island Skipper, Jeannie, and Kinsman Independent.

Reported by: Al Miller




Lakes Stone Trade Closing In On Another Record Season

11/19:
If Great Lakes stone ports ship a mere 3 million tons between November 1 and the close of navigation, they will, for the third consecutive year, set a post-recession record for that trade. With shipments in October totaling 4,910,359 net tons, the stone trade currently stands at 32,109,798 tons. The post recession peak was 1996 when stone loadings totaled 35,099,215.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




New name

11/19:
Hi all, I want to change the name and layout of this page. Any suggestions for a new name? I'm leaning to "Great Lakes News Channel" or "Great Lakes Shipping Channel." When done, users of Microsoft IE 4.0 or Netscape Communicator will be able to subscribe to the page as a channel....thoughts?




Today in Great Lakes History - November 19

SAM LAUD was launched November 19, 1974 by the Bay Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, WI as Hull #712 at a cost of $13.3 million.

The keel was laid November 19, 1942 for the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON

On November 19, 1920 while backing from a dock at Marquette, MI loaded with iron ore, the steering gear failed and the J.H. SHEADLE (e) PIERSON INDEPENDENT) struck rocks tearing away her rudder and badly damaging the hull causing her to settle to the harbor bottom. While in this condition, a storm arose causing considerably more damage. She was raised ten days later on the 29th and laid up for the winter at Marquette. The damage was repaired the following spring at a cost of $150,000.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Taylor loses power update

11/18:
The MYRON C. TAYLOR was a couple of hours out from Detour after loading stone at Drummond Island when she lost power on Sunday. She drifted for 8 hours in upper Lake Huron before the PHILIP H. CLARKE arrived. Reports are that the CLARKE had engine parts the TAYLOR needed to make the repairs. Once completed she was able to continue to Detroit on her own.

Reported by: Randy Johnson and Scott




Barker clears Fraser

11/18:
Interlake's Kaye E. Barker departed Fraser Shipyards sometime over the weekend. Still no word on what type of work she needed.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - November 18

On November 18, 1958, the CARL D. BRADLEY sank approximately 12 miles southwest of Gull Island in northern Lake Michigan in a storm. The Bradley had departed Buffington, Indiana the evening before after unloading her final scheduled cargo of the year, and she was enroute to winter lay-up in Rogers City. Despite numerous distress calls made from the vessel during her final 15 minutes afloat, only two of the crew of 35 survived.

The CANADIAN OLYMPIC's sea trials were conducted on November 18, 1976

The bow and stern of the future Stewart J. Cort were welded together and, given the unofficial name of "STUBBY", which was launched on November 18, 1969. "STUBBY's" dimensions were 184' long x 75' wide which allowed her to travel the Seaway locks.

PROVMAR TERMINAL (serves as a "mother ship" for the bunker service company) was launched November 18, 1958 as a) VARANGNES

The BETHLEHEM (2) on her last trip passed Detroit, MI November 18, 1973 with stone from Stoneport, MI for Buffalo, NY.

SAMUEL MATHER (6) made her last trip when she hauled 14,981 gross tons of iron ore pellets from the Erie Mining Dock at Taconite Harbor, MN to Federal Furnace at South Chicago arriving there on November 18, 1981.

On November 18, 1924, the Gleniffer (later renamed Ashcroft) was launched at Midland, Ontario.

On November 18, 1985, the Greek ocean vessel Socrates blew aground onto Park Point (otherwise known as Minnesota Point) in Duluth in a storm. The vessel was anchored in Lake Superior waiting for a grain elevator when the high winds pulled the vessel away from its anchorage, and the vessel soon grounded hard on Park Point just a few hundred feet offshore. It took six days and the effort of seven tugs to pull the vessel free.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Grain Vessels at Toledo

11/17:
In Toledo, Sunday the ninth of November there were three Canadian grain vessels. First there was a saltie I did not get the name of. Then the CANADIAN MINER left Andersons with ALGOWEST waiting near C.S.X. to be towed up. Finally the CANADIAN TRADER came in later that night.

Reported by: Josh McInerney




Today in Great Lakes History - November 17

While in tow of the Polish tug KORAL, November 15, 1972, bound for Spain, The MICHIPICOTEN (2) broke in two and her forward section sank on November 17th off Anticosti Island during a major fall storm on the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The after section sank the next day.

The RIDGETOWN operated regularly until November 17, 1969 when she was laid up at Toronto with a load of grain.

In the morning of November 17, 1926 the PETER A.B. WIDENER was running upbound in Lake Superior in ballast when it encountered strong Northeasterly winds. When they reached a position six miles Southwest of the Rock of Ages Lighthouse on Isle Royale the captain gave orders to change course for Duluth, MN. There was no response because the WIDENER had lost its rudder.

On November 17, 1887, ARIZONA burst into flames off Marquette when several casks of acid broke, and she ran into the harbor ablaze.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Closing of the 1997 Navigation Season

11/16:
Montreal-Lake Ontario Section
The Seaway entities confirm that the closing procedures outlined in Seaway Notice No. 10 dated August 5, 1997, will be in effect at the end of the 1997 navigation season. Mariners are reminded that the clearance date for the 1997 navigation season is 2400 hours, December 20.

For the Montreal-Lake Ontario Section, vessel demand, weather and ice conditions will dictate the final closing date. It will be announced on December 3, whether or not, based upon operating conditions, vessels will be subject to operational surcharges after December 20.

Welland Canal
Vessels will be accepted to transit the Welland Canal upbound at CIP15 and downbound at CIP16 up to 0800 hours December 24, 1997. The Welland Canal may be kept open beyond this date depending on vessel demand and weather conditions. However, vessel tran sits after 0800 hours December 24, 1997 will be allowed subject to Agents/Owners signing a written agreement with the Authority.

Mariners are reminded that there is always a possibility that severe climatic conditions may occur during the closing period. Should this happen, there is a chance that the above-noted dates, for the Montreal-Lake Ontario Section or the Welland Canal, may not be met.

The Seaway entities will monitor weather conditions and demand, and the final closing dates for both sections will be confirmed ( via Radio Messages ) when better information is available.

Sault Ste. Marie Locks and Canal
1.Canada
The Canadian Sault Ste. Marie Canal is closed to navigation.
2.United States
The official closing date for the Sault Ste. Marie Locks (U.S.A.) is 2400 hours January 15, 1998.

Ports East of Montreal
Vessel owners and operators are advised that there are a number of ports east of the Seaway (St. Lambert Lock) on the St. Lawrence River that remain open to navigation during the winter months.

Reported by: St. Lawrence Seaway System




Barker in Fraser Shipyards

11/15:
The Kaye E. Barker has been in Fraser Shipyards since yesterday apparently undergoing work on its stern. A large crawler crane was alongside the vessel . No word on why the ship is in the yard.

Reported by: Al Miller




Court Ruling a Victory for Seaway Pilots

11/15:
A federal court of appeals has told the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation and its parent U.S. Transportation Department it cannot run the Seaway pilot operation and should give it back to the Coast Guard. A federal district judge in April of 1996 had agreed with the Seaway Corporation's position but the pilots group had argued that the shift from the Coast Guard to the Seaway went beyond the Transportation Department's authority under the law. This new ruling sends sends the case back to the U.S District Court for the District of Columbia "with instructions to vacate" the December 1995 Transportation Dept. order to transfer the pilot operation from the Coast Guard to the Seaway Corp.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Low water halts traffic in the Seaway

11/15:
Lower water yesterday had about ten ships waiting in the Prescott and St. Zotique ancorage in the Seaway. The low water was in the American sector (Eisenhower Lock).

Reported by:




Great Lakes Shipping Tops 100 Million Ton Mark In September

11/14:
Shipments of iron ore, coal and stone from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 17.1 million net tons in September, thus pushing the season-to-date tally over the 100 million ton mark. Through September, shipments of the leading dry-bulk commodities total 101,984,177 net tons, an increase of 7.8 percent compared to 1996.

Iron ore loadings in September totaled 8 million tons, essentially the same as a year ago. Since the resumption of iron ore loadings in early March, the trade stands at 48.2 million tons, an increase of 2.2 percent.

September coal shipments totaled 4,450,973 net tons, an increase of 5.8 percent. For the season, coal loadings have topped 26.6 million tons, an increase of 16.3 percent.

The stone trade continued on its pace toward another post-recession record in September. With loadings of 4.7 million tons in September, the stone trade now stands at 27.2 million tons, an increase of 10.4 percent.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Union warns of labour disruptions on Seaway

11/14:
AThe St. Lawrence Seaway could be hampered by illegal walkouts near the critical end of the season by workers fed up with lagging contract taks, a union official says.

Jean Langevin said a lot depends on whether progress is made at a negotiating session scheduled for Thursday, November 13, with a conciliator.

Relations are strained between the 525 workers, who are represented by the Canadian Auto Workers, who maintain and operate the locks between Montreal and Lake Erie and the federal seaway authority, which is preparing to hand over management to a private group from the shipping industry.

Sporadic strikes or slowdowns would interfere with traffic just as ships are making their schedules to clear the system before it closes around Christmas.

Langevin blames the Seaway for stalling, depriving the union of its only means of pressure because it cannot legally strike until after 90 days of cincilation. By that time, the waterway will be closed for winter.

Union members voted last month 94 per cent in favour of a strike to back contract demands. The workers' contract expired last Dec. 31. The union wants a two-year deal that would run till the end of 1998, the same as the contract for 110 supervisors, also affiliated with the autoworkers union. The Seaway is proposing just one year.

Reported by: Mark Jackson




Melissa Desgagnes refloated

11/14:
The Desgagnes was refloated and docked in Windsor. Still no word on why she grounded.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Oglebay Norton sells coal Reserves

11/14:
Oglebay Norton Company has reached a definitive agreement with Arch Coal, Inc. by which Oglebay Norton will sell its interests in certain coal reserves situated on approximately 12,000 acres in Boone County, West Virginia to Arch Coal. The purchase price will be $6.0 million, and it is expected that the transaction will close on November 24, 1997. The net gain from this sale will improve Oglebay Norton Company's 1997 net income by approximately $0.70 per share.

According to R. Thomas Green, Jr., Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Oglebay Norton, ``The sale of the Rock Creek coal property is the latest in a series of planned divestitures that our company has made over the last several years in exiting the coal business. The proceeds from this transaction will strengthen our ability to pursue growth opportunities in our core business units.''

Reported by: James Neumiller




Name Change

11/14:
The Kinsman Lines Inc. of Cleveland OH have changed their name to Great Lakes Associates, Inc. The company operates the last two remaining American grain ships.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Today in Great Lakes History - November 14

The ALGOBAY departed Collingwood light for Stoneport, Mich. to load stone for Sarnia, Ont. Departing Sept Iles, Que. on November 14, 1978 with an iron ore pellet cargo for Sydney, N.S., she collided with the 90,000 ton Italian-flag ore carrier CIELO BIANCO. The Collingwood-built tug POINTE MARGUERITE, which was towing the big salty, was unfortunately crushed between the two vessels and sank, killing two crew members.

On November 14, 1934 the WILLIAM A. REISS grounded off Sheboygan, she was declared a constructive total loss.

Cracks across the ENDERS M. VOORHEES' spar deck were first noticed in a storm on Lake Superior November 14, 1942. Her fleetmate NORMAN B. REAM came to her assistance by releasing storm oil which helped calm the seas so the crew of the VOORHEES could run cables the length of her deck and winch them tight to arrest the cracking. She proceeded to the Soo escorted by the REAM and later sailed to the Great Lake Engineering Works for repairs.

The THOMAS WILSON (2) was launched November 14, 1942.

The MESQUITE was launched November 14, 1942 at a cost of $894,000.

On November 14, 1952, the Sparrows Point (now Buckeye) entered service.

Data from: Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Presques Isle's management changed

11/13:
The 1000 foot ITB Presque Isle has been seen sailing with out the Litton stack marking. Earlier this month management of the vessel was taken over by USS.

Reported by: Mark Nowell




More on the Melissa Desgagnes

11/13:
As of 10:30 a.m. EST the Desgagnes is still aground in the Detroit River. Currently personnel from the Marine Safety Office in Detroit are heading to the stranded ship, they are going to check the vessel's draft.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Superior's grain-loading berths busy

11/13:
For the first time this season, all four of Superior's grain-loading berths were active simultaneously on Nov. 12. Grant Carrier was loading at Harvest States 2, Queen was at Harvest States 1, Golden Venture was loading at Peavey Connors Point and El Kef was loading at the seldom-used General Mills elevator, better known as the Great Northern elevator, adjacent to Midwest Energy Terminal.

Harvest States 1 and Peavey have been busy all season. Harvest States 1 only recently was returned to operation and Great Northern has seen only a handful of callers this year.

Reported by: Al Miller




Melissa Desgagnes aground update

11/12:
as of 12:40 a.m. the Melissa Desgagnes is still stuck aground north of Grassy Island in the Detroit River. Sounded like another vessel was on scene trying to lighten her.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Badger at Sturgeon Bay

11/12:
Max Hanley reports that the Badger is on the drydock in Sturgeon Bay. They had 1 prop off, and as of yesterday were getting ready to take the other one off with both anchors down. reports are that things are going pretty well. The Badger is expected to be in drydock into next week.
Visit the Photo Gallery for pictures

Reported by: Max Hanley




Melissa Desgagnes aground in the Detroit River

11/11:
The Melissa Desgagnes grounded yesterday in the Detroit River. She was aground just north of Grassy Island clear of the shipping channel. As of 2:00 a.m. this morning she was still stuck, no word on how it happened.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




More on the Kinsman Enterprise

11/11:
A call to Kinsman has lead to conflicting reports on the activity aboard the Kinsman Enterprise. The company states that they are just buttoning her up for winter.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




News from the Twin Ports

11/11:
After a weeklong lull, grain traffic is picking up again in the Twin Ports. Four salties were in port Nov. 11, including Queen and Yuri Dolgoroky Isp?) loading at Harvest States. Two familiar salties, El Kef and Grant Carrier, are due in later in the week. Kinsman Independent and Algocen also are in port for grain.

Some common callers at western Lake Superior ports are making some unusual calls this week. Adam E. Cornelius was in Two Harbors Nov. 10, Cason J. Callaway was due into Silver Bay Nov. 11, George A. Stinson is scheduled for Taconite Harbor Nov. 12 and St. Clair is scheduled for Two Harbors the same day.

Reported by: Al Miller




Transportation Secretary to Attend Seaway Events

11/11:
U.S.Transportation Secretary Rodney E Slater will be in Massena, New York this week to attend ceremonies honoring the St.Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. Mr. Slater was named to President Clinton's Cabinet in December 1996. The Arkansaw native was appointed transportation secretaty to replace Federico Pena, who left to become head of the Energy Department. Mr. Slater will arrive in Massena at 1:00 p.m. Thursday, November 14th and go to the Seaway Corp's maintenance facility/marine base for the dedication of the Seaway Corp's new workboat. PERFORMANCE is a 50 foot tugboat that will be used in the spring and fall to break up ice. It replaces THE FOURTH COAST, which has been sold, according to Seaway Development Corp. spokeswoman Rhonda M. Worden who said " this new workboat is great for our purposes. It turns on a dime, and it's state-of-the-art. It actually is quite cute" Following the tugboat dedication, Mr. Slater will go to Eisenhower Lock for the dedication of a memorial anchor display honoring William Mitchell, a Seaway Corp. employee who drowned October 1983. Mr Mitchell, a St. Regis Mohawk, became the first and only Seaway Corp. employee to die while performing duties when he slipped and fell from an Eisenhower Lock approach wall.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Goviken visits Superior

11/11:
Loading at Harvest States #2 in Superior on 11/10 was the saltie Goviken. The Goviken (ex. Omisalj) is making her first trip to the Twin Ports since her rename. She was reportedly loading soybeans.

Reported by: Gary A. Putney




Research of Lake Superior current to start

11/11:
Researchers from six universities, including the Michigan Technical University at Houghton, the Large Lakes Observatory at the University of Minnesota at Duluth and the University of Wisconsin at Madison, are beginning a five-year project to track currents, chemistry changes and particulates in Lake Superior. The project has received U.S.$5.3 million from the U.S. National Science Foundation and will focus on a current along Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula. The current is thought to be one of the strongest coastal currents in the world but little is known about how it is formed or its effects. Starting at the Wisconsin border, it continues to the end of the peninsula and transports material from west to east with varying intensity, based on wind velocity.

Shortly after ice begins to break-up in spring, devices to measure current and temperature will be put in place while vessels will take water samples and collect organisms. In its first application on the North American Great Lakes, equipment that will create a moving Doppler profile of lake currents will be used. Satellites will also contribute information and eventually a computer model for predicting coastal currents will be formed.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - November 11

The Armistice Day Storm of November 11, 1940 was one of the worst storms in the recorded history of Lake Michigan. In all, the storm claimed 5 vessels, and 66 lives. The storm hit late Monday afternoon, November 11th, with winds of hurricane proportions. The winds struck suddenly from the southwest at about 2:30 P.M. and were accompanied by drenching rain, which later changed to snow. The winds reached peak velocities of 75 miles per hour, the highest in local maritime history. Some of the vessels affected were:

City of Flint 32: Beached at Ludington, no damage. Jens Vevang, relief captain, in command.Her regular captain, Charles Robertson, was on shore leave.

Pere Marquette 21: Blown into a piling at Ludington, no damage, captained by Arthur Altschwager. She had 5 passengers aboard.

City of Saginaw 31: Arrived Milwaukee 6 hours late with over a foot of water in her hull. The wireless aerial was missing and her seagate was smashed by the waves. She was captained by Ed Cronberg.

Ann Arbor carferry "Wabash": A railcar broke loose from it's moorings on her cardeck and rolled over, nearly crushing a crewman.

The steamer Novadoc: Ran aground at Juniper Beach, South of Pentwater.

Two crewman (cooks) drowned when the ship broke in half. Seventeen crewman, found huddled in the pilot house, were rescued by Captain Clyde Cross and his 2 crewman, Gustave Fisher and Joe Fontane of the fishing tug "Three Brothers".

Conneaut (2) ran hard aground on Lansing Shoal near Manistique, MI. on Lake Michigan. She reportedly had lost her propeller and rudder. Two days later she was pulled off.

The SINALOA had taken on a load of sand near Green Island and was heading for Chicago through Death's Door on Wisconsin's Door Peninsula when the November 11th Armistice Day storm of 1940 struck in upper Lake Michigan. During the storm the SINALOA lost her rudder. The anchor was dropped but her anchor cable parted. In this helpless condition she ran aground at Sac Bay on Michigan's Garden Peninsula. Fortunately the stricken vessel was close to shore where the Coast Guard was able to rescue the entire crew. Declared a constructive total loss, her owner collected the insurance and forfeited the vessel to the Roen Salvage Co.

The tanker MERCURY (1) was banged up. From Ahoy & Farewell II.

Anna C. Minch: Sank South of Pentwater with a loss of 24 lives.

William B. Davock: Sank with the loss of all hands.

The fishing tugs "Indian" and "Richard H.": Lost with all hands off South Haven.

Data from: Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Computer crash

11/10:
My home machine crashed on Saturday, I should have the Monday updates ready tonight




The lights are on and someones home

11/10:
The Kinsman Enterprise may be waking from her three year sleep. The old boat had her lights ablaze the last few nights starting on the 7th. There have been cars parked at her ladder at the old Buffalo Port Terminal for the past few days as well. Reports are that she may go to Toledo for her 5 year and do a few runs before winter. The world wonders..........

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Phoenix to be commemorated

11/10:
On 21 Nov. in Manitowoc, Wis., descendants of survivors of the Phoenix will begin a four-day commemoration. Events include a banquet, a bus tour of Sheboygan, Wis., and a reception with Dutch visitors from 1600 to 2000 at the public library in Oostburg, Wis. The tour, including lunch, is U.S.$30. Telephone 920-459-3023 for information. On 23 Nov., there will be another bus tour of Sheboygan County and the story of the Phoenix will be presented at the local Cedar Grove/Belgium High School at 1900. The tour is U.S.$25 including lunch. Telephone 920-452-9883 for information. The presentation is U.S.$5 for adults, U.S.$3 for those 12 to 18 and free for those under 12. The next day, a commemorative service will be held at 1600 at the Gibbsville Reformed Church at N3145 State Highway 32 in Sheboygan Falls, Wis., including Dutch psalms sung by visitors from the Netherlands and a narrative of the Phoenix featuring the descendants.

On 11 Nov., 1847, the steamer Phoenix, a 302-ton, 43.9-meter/144-foot vessel built in 1845, sailed from Buffalo, N.Y., on its last voyage of the season. In addition to passengers, the ship carried coffee, hardware, molasses and sugar. The passengers were mostly Dutch immigrants, headed to the eastern and western shores of Lake Michigan as well as Iowa, where friends and relatives had settled starting the previous fall. A reform movement in the Dutch State Church had come under increasing government pressure and seeking religious freedom, many left for the United States where land was available in the Midwest. The Society of Christians for the Holland Emmigration to the United States had lead the way to what would become eastern Wisconsin, where 400 hectares/1,000 acres of land was secured. They had sailed to New York from Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

After several calls along the way, the ship called at Manitowoc to replenish cordwood for its boilers, which had worked to give the ship headway in heavy seas in Lake Michigan. Ten days out of Buffalo, the ship left Manitowoc as the weather improved. At 0400 21 Nov., 24 kilometers/15 miles north of Sheboygan and eight kilometers/five miles offshore, a fire was found above a boiler with flames under the main deck. Despite firefighting efforts, the blaze raced out of control. The hull of the Phoenix came ashore 11 kilometers/seven miles north of Sheboygan where it sank 300 meters/1,000 feet offshore in 6.1 meters/20 feet of water. Some of its cargo was salvaged.

Vessels from Sheboygan rescued 46 people. Between 190 and 250 were killed. It is the worst loss of life by fire on Lake Michigan.

The survivors settled in Cedar Grove, Sheboygan and Milwaukee. Almost 8,000 descendants of the survivors have been traced from almost 20 states and the Netherlands.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Wisconsin fishing amendment partially vetoed

11/10:
Wisconsin Gov. Tommy G. Thompson recently vetoed part of a commercial fishing amendment attached to the state's budget bill by Sen. Alan Lasee, R-DePere. The provision would have expanded commercial alewife and smelt fishing on Lake Michigan by allowing trawling every month except May and for the first three hours after sunrise in Green Bay during the summer. The veto kept the Green Bay portion but eliminated the Lake Michigan trawling. Currently, commercial fishing on the lake is limited to 15 Nov. to 20 April and only night trawling is allowed in Green Bay from 15 June to 30 Sept.

In response, Pete LeClair, a commercial fisherman in Two Rivers, Wis., has proposed in a letter to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel that a task force be formed to study fishing management in Green Bay and Lake Michigan and make recommendations for changes. LeClair has suggested the force include biologists, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, tourism officials and the fishermen.

According to LeClair, Thompson suggested the budget provision but fishermen said the provision would be challenged by the Department of Natural Resources and sport fishermen. Nonetheless, LeClair said Thompson promised to sign the measure. However, 29 assemblymen and three senators were pressured, according to LeClair, and Thompson therefore vetoed the amendment.

The Department of Natural Resources has said that since alewives and smelt are declining, what remains should be reserved for use as food by salmon and trout. A survey last year said the seasonal value of Wisconsin salmon fishing was about U.S.$86 million.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





County board votes to seek lighthouse

11/10:
As expected, the Milwaukee County Board has voted to apply to the U.S. government for ownership of the North Point Light Station, located in a county park.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - November 10

The EDMUND FITZGERALD foundered on Lake Superior during a severe storm November 10, 1975 at approximately 7:10 pm about 17 miles north-northwest of Whitefish Point, MI at position 47_0'N by 85_7'W in Canadian waters.
Click here for a link to other Fitzgerald sites.

IMPERIAL ST. CLAIR was launched November 10, 1973.

The STEELTON (2) sailed on her maiden voyage November 10, 1943.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY, in her first season of operation on November 10, 1943 during a Lake Superior storm, she developed a significant crack across her spar deck and 12 to 14 feet down both sides of her hull. As the hull worked in the heavy seas, the crack widened to as much as three to four inches. The crew ran cables between the fore and aft winches which maintained a force sufficient to hold the hull together.

November 10, 1972 in the vicinity of the entrance to the East Outer Channel near Amherstburg, Ont. the UNITED STATES GYPSUM (2) collided with her towing tug MAINE and as a result her bow was punctured. The GYPSUM was beached to prevent further sinking.

WILLIAM A. IRVIN was launched November 10, 1937.

Data from: Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - November 09

The EDWIN H. GOTT's keel was laid November 9, 1977.

The aft section of the ATLANTIC SUPERIOR was launched November 9, 1981.

In the fall of 1962 the W.F WHITE left the Lakes for coal shuttle service in the Chesapeake Bay area passing down the Welland Canal November 9th.

The keel for the GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2) was laid November 9, 1953.

NORMAN B. REAM was laid up at Duluth, MN on November 9, 1960. In 1965 she would be sold and renamed b) KINSMAN ENTERPRISE (1).

At 10:00 p.m. on November 9, 1913 the HOWARD M. HANNA, JR. was blown broadside onto the Port Austin Reef (off the tip of Michigan's thumb on Lake Huron) by Northerly winds in excess of 60 mph during the Great Storm of 1913. The ship finally lost power and was driven onto the reef where she broke in two at hatch number seven.

On November 9, 1913 while downbound with ore, the The FRED G. HARTWELL (1) encountered very strong southwest winds in Lake Superior. She reached a position one mile east of Iroquois Point, on Whitefish Bay and dropped her anchor to ride out the storm. Her anchor began to drag when the winds shifted to the north and increased to unprecedented gale-force velocity. This was the beginning of the "Great Storm" of 1913 which drove her aground onto a rocky bottom. The seas pounded her until her bottom plates were torn open and she sank the next day in twenty-six feet of water.

On November 9th during the Big Storm of 1913, the MATTHEW ANDREWS (1) was downbound in Lake Huron with a cargo of iron ore. Captain Lempoh decided to drop anchor rather than risk trying to enter the St. Clair River during the fury of the storm. Taking bearings for anchorage from Lightship 61 (stationed at Corsica Shoal), which unknown to him had been blown two miles off station, the MATTHEW ANDREWS (1) grounded heavily on Corsica Shoal.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - November 08

The COLUMBIA STAR was launched November 8, 1980 at Bay Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS and IRVING S. OLDS arrived on November 8, 1988 at Kaohsiung, Taiwan for scrapping by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.

The STADACONA (1) was renamed ROBERT S. McNAMARA by its new owner Ford Motor Company’s Marine Division. The McNAMARA was rescued from potential scrapping when Ford purchased her for $80,000 and spent $15,000 for renovation at AmShip’s Toledo yard.

The J.P. MORGAN, JR. arrived at Avilés, Spain on November 8, 1980.

PETER A.B. WIDENER passed down the Welland Canal November 8, 1986 towed by the tugs TUSKER and GLENADA en route to Lauzon, Que. From there she was towed overseas for scrapping. When built, the PETER A.B. WIDENER and fleetmates J. PIERPONT MORGAN, NORMAN B. REAM and HENRY H. ROGERS were the first 600-footers built for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.;“The Class of 1906.”

On November 8, 1986, the B.F. Affleck, under tow of the tug Thunder Cape, went adrift on Lake Superior in a storm after the tug lost power. The tug Avenger IV was dispatched to pick up the Affleck, which was headed for scrap, and the tanker Eastern Shell towed the Thunder Cape to Thunder Bay for repairs.

Data from: Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News from the Twin Ports

11/07:
The three most frequent callers at the Burlington Northern ore dock in Superior are arriving at nearly the same time this week. George A. Stinson was first in Nov. 6 followed by Burns Harbors, which dropped anchor out on Lake Superior to wait for its turn at the loading berth. Sometime Nov. 7, the Stewart J. Cort -- the dock's steadiest customer -- will arrive to complete the visit.

Reported by: Al Miller




Lake Erie Coal

11/07:
Coal shipments from Lake Erie ports totaled 2,737,335 net tons in October, an increase of 23.4 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. For the season, the coal trade from Lake Erie stands at 17 million tons, an increase of 22.5 percent compared to 1996's end-of-October tally. All indications point to continued strong demand for Lake Erie coal for the remainder of the 1997 season.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Today in Great Lakes History - November 07

The T2 converted laker HILDA MARJANNE's 1961 German-built hull forward of ther engine room, minus her pilot house, was towed by the tugs G.W. ROGERS and BAGOTVILLE to Port Weller Dry Docks arriving there on November 7, 1983. This section was to become part of the CANADIAN RANGER

On November 7, 1989 the SAMUEL MATHER (7) was moved to the Frog Pond on her way to the cutter's torch.

On November 7, 1905 the GRAND HAVEN was purchased by the Grand Trunk-Milwaukee Carferry Line, Milwaukee out of receivership when G.T.C.L. defaulted on its bonds.

The ARTHUR B. HOMER was launched November 7, 1959 for the Bethlehem Steel Corp., Cleveland, OH. She was the last ship built by Great Lakes Engineering at River Rouge.

In 1902 the BRANSFORD rammed and sank the tug RECORD with a loss of a tug crewman in the Portage Lake Ship Canal in Michigan’s Keweenaw Peninsula.

On November 7, 1913, the storm responsible for sinking or damaging more vessels than any other began a six-day assault on the Great Lakes. The "Big Blow" of 1913 struck Lake Superior on November 7 and reached Lake Michigan by November 8, where the Pittsburgh Steamship Company vessel Clarence A. Black was severly damaged by the waves at the dock in Gary.

Data from: Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News from the Twin Ports

11/06:
Duluth-Superior had relatively few boats on the morning of Nov. 5, but every one of them was busy as the workday began. Adam E. Cornelius was loaded and outbound under the Blatnik Bridge, Algolake was unloading salt at the Cutler-Magner dock. It is scheduled to shift to the Midwest Energy Terminal later to load coal. Clipper Spirit was completing its unloading at the port terminal; Island Gem was unloading at Harvest States elevator and Erikousa Wave was loading at the Peavey elevator.

Reported by: Al Miller




Hapag-Lloyd Kreuzfahrten planning more cruises

11/06:
Hapag-Lloyd Kreuzfahrten GmbH is currently planning its 1998 cruises in the North American Great Lakes with its U.S. general agent, U.S. Navigation Inc. A preliminary itinerary currently indicates two calls at Milwaukee. According to Ken Szallai, director of the Port of Milwaukee, Hapag-Lloyd is also examining cruises in 1999. The information was contained in an article by Rick Romell in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel on 5 Nov.

The article also noted a problem that developed shortly before the company's C. Columbus docked in Milwaukee on 30 Sept. The ship was to dock at a pier at the end of North Harbor Drive, near the Wisconsin Lake Schooner Education Association, but the port found out that the ship had a draft 0.76 meters/2.5 feet deeper than they had been told. As a result, the ship had to dock at a pier in the port's outer harbor. A similar problem was noted just before the ship called in Duluth, Minn.

Szallai said the port waived docking fees. In the future, it will charge passenger ships about U.S.$500 in addition to U.S.$5 per passenger.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Former Port of Milwaukee manager dies at 75

11/06:
Robert K. Jorgensen, a retired traffic manager for the Port of Milwaukee, died at St. Francis Hospital in Milwaukee on 1 Nov. after a stroke. He was 75. Jorgensen was born 17 July, 1922, in Milwaukee to Lester and Clara Jorgensen and graduated from the city's Rufus King High School before working in the traffic divisions of Rexnord Corp. and later Heil Co. Inc. Jorgensen was the only member of the port's traffic division when hired in 1953 and became the sales representative. When the division expanded, he became manager. Jorgensen, whom associates said was a tall man "always on the go," was known as "Elbows" by other port personnel. He retired in 1982 and is survived by his wife, Dorothy, and three children, Mark, Mary Ellen Bassette and Patricia Kreil, all of Milwaukee.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - November 06

The b) US.266029 (WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) was towed from Nicholson's River Rouge dock November 6, 1986 by tugs TUSKER and GLENADA to Port Maitland, Ont. for scrapping there in 1987.

On November 6, 1913 the SHEADLE left Fort William, Ont. bound for Erie, PA with grain and encountered fog, gale winds and a snow blizzard in one of the fiercest storms of the century.

On November 6, 1925 the Northern Navigation passenger steamer HAMONIC lost her propeller 20 miles west of Caribou Island in Lake Superior and was wallowing in gale force winds with gusts to 80 m.p.h. She wa later towed to safety by the RICHARD TRIMBLE

On November 6, 1985, scrapping began on the Leon Falk, Jr. in Gijon, Spain.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history



Great Lakes Freeze-Up Outlook

11/05:
The National Weather Service has issued its first forecast of ice conditions on the Lakes this winter. Freeze-up of bays and harbors on the Lakes should be near normal on Lake Erie and the southern areas of Lakes Michigan and Huron, while it should be later than normal on Lake Superior and the northern waters of Lakes Michigan and Huron. A later than normal freeze-up is likely on the open waters of Lake Superior and Lake Huron, near normal on Lake Erie and earlier than normal on most of Lake Michigan. Surface water temperatures at the beginning of November were above normal by a few degrees except on Lake Huron where they were near normal.

Reported by: Lake Carriers Association




News from the Twin Ports

11/05:
Duluth's port terminal has hosted several ships since late summer and fall. The most recent caller was saltie Clipper Spirit, which was unloading in the steel berth Nov 3-4. Its next port-of-call is Thunder Bay.

A couple of interesting port calls for vessels in Great Lakes Fleet. John G. Munson is bound for Silver Bay late Nov. 4 to load pellets for Lorain. Myron C. Taylor is scheduled to arrive in Carrollton Nov. 4.

Duluth's Hallett docks are busy Nov. 4. Adam E. Cornelius is scheduled to unload stone at Hallett 5 while Tadoussac is due at Hallett 6 to load bentonite.

Reported by: Al Miller




SMET Well Ahead of Record Pace

11/05:
With October shipments of 1,763,473 net tons, Superior Midwest Energy Terminal is now 5.4 percent ahead of last year's benchmark season. Through October, coal loadings at SMET stand at 11.6 million tons. During the 1996 navigation season, SMET shipped 13.6 million tons, the most in any year since opening in 1976.

Reported by: Lake Carriers Association




Cleveland Stevedore leaving Port of Cleveland

11/05:
Pacific Great Lakes Corp. announced 3 Nov. it will withdraw its Cleveland Stevedore Co. operations from the Port of Cleveland on 31 Dec. The action is part of efforts by Pacific Great Lakes to focus on its Pacific Great Lakes Logistics Inc. and manufacturing of industrial protective apparel. Cleveland Stevedore has eight full-time employees and each will receive a severance package. Pacific Great Lakes has not announced what will happen to Cleveland Stevedore's assets.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Chicago

11/05:
The Great Lakes Maritime Academy will have a representative in Chicago on Saturday, November 8th. Anyone interested in learning more about the Academy, and a career as a ship's officer on the Great Lakes, is encouraged to attend. This no cost open house will be held at the Holiday Inn Downtown, 300 E. Ohio St. from 10AM-1PM. Please call 1-800-748-0566 X-1200 for more information.

Reported by: Gary Schweitzer




Today in Great Lakes History - November 05

The LOUIS R. DESMARAIS cleared Owen Sound, Ont. on her maiden voyage November 5, 1977 bound for Thunder Bay, Ont. to load 27,117 gross tons of iron ore for Stelco at Hamilton, Ont.

On her final trip, the IRVIN L. CLYMER passed upbound at the Soo on November 5, 1990 and arrived at Duluth two days later to unload limestone at the Hallet Dock #5 after which she moved to her final lay-up berth at Fraser's shipyard and tied up blowing one last three long and two short salute from her whistle.

The GRAND HAVEN was raised on November 5, 1969 from the Old River Bed where she sank on September 19, 1969. She was raised for scrapping

Mr. J.W. Isherwood visited the Great Lakes Engineering Works ship yard on November 5, 1910 and personally inspected the hull which was being built according to his patented design. This vessel, the WILLIAM P. PALMER (2) was the first vessel on the Great Lakes built to the Isherwood system of longitudinal framing.

The JAMES S. DUNHAM sank in collision with the steamer ROBERT FULTON, on a foggy and rainy November 5, 1917, just below Grassy Island on the Detroit River. Repairs for both vessels totaled $125,000.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history



Badger towed to Sturgeon Bay

11/04:
The S.S. Badger was towed out of Ludington last night at 9:00 PM to go to Sturgeon Bay for her 5 year hull inspection. She is expected to be in Sturgeon Bay for about 2 weeks.

Reported by: Max S. Hanley




Reserve delayed by weather

11/04:
The Reserve spent much of Nov. 3 anchored off Duluth waiting for sea and visibility conditions to improve so it could enter the harbor at Silver Bay.

Reported by: Al Miller




Algoway delivers salt

11/04:
The Algoway entered Port Stanley harbour at 12:30 hours on Thursday October 30 with 10,000 tons of salt for Lakes Terminals & Warehousing, which will be loaded on trucks for the city of London Ontario.This is the second year that Lakes Terminals has handled salt, more salt may be scheduled later in the new year.

Reported by: Richard Hill




Area below Lock 1 in Port Weller busy Sunday with Lakers

11/04:
Sunday evening at 1900 hours Algoville was at wharf 2, the Canadian Leader was at the sand dock-just below Lock 1 and in between was Canadian Enterprise. When the Leader entered Lock 1, the Canadian Mariner quickly followed.

Reported by: J J Van Volkenburg




Today in Great Lakes History - November 04

The CARTIERCLIFFE HALL was registered at Toronto, Ont. on November 4, 1977, but didn't enter service until the spring of 1978 because of mechanical difficulties during her sea trials.

The JOSEPH G. BUTLER, JR. was launched November 4, 1905 for the Tonopah Steamship Co. (Hutchinson & Co., mgr.) Cleveland, OH.

HERON BAY (2) proceeded under her own power to Lauzon, Que. for her final lay-up on November 4, 1978.

NIPIGON BAY was launched November 4, 1950

The CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON (3) developed a sizable leak and almost sank November 4, 1925 during her tow to Superior after she struck a reef a few nights before.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY's keel was laid November 4, 1942.

UNITED STATES GYPSUM (2) grounded at Toledo, OH on November 4, 1972 resulting in damages totaling $125,000. Her propeller was removed and the rudder shaft was locked in position to finish the season as a manned barge on the coal run from Toledo to Detroit, MI.

The Joseph H. Thompson became not only the largest vessel on the Great Lakes but also the longest dry bulk cargo vessel in the world when it entered service on November 4, 1952, departing Chicago on its first trip.

Setting the stage for the fateful storm which followed less than a week later which sank the Edmund Fitzgerald, many locations in Minnesota and Wisconsin were setting all-time record high temperatures for the month of November during the period of November 4-6, 1975. Grand Marais, MN reached 67 on November 5 and Superior reached 74 on November 6, both all-time records for the month. Many other notable Great Lakes storms, including the Armistice Day storm of 1940 and the storm which sank the Henry Steinbrenner in 1953, were preceeded by record-setting warm wather.

Data from: Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history



More on the Iglehart at Fraser

11/03:
The J.A.W. Iglehart was at Fraser shipyard October 28-29 for a 20 hour repair after suffering a small puncture in her #5 port ballast tank. The puncture occured on her previous trip while making her dock in Detroit.

Reported by: Dan Ocean




Lakes Shipping into the next Century

11/03:
In a story in the October 18, 1997 edition of Skillings Mining Review, W. E. Bardelmeier, Executive Vice President of Jones, Bardelmeier & Co. Ltd., Nassau, predicts that the close of the 1997 season will see the end of a 15 year period when transport capacity of the US flag Great Lakes fleet has significantly exceeded transport demand. He foresees the shortage continuing until at least the year 2000, because shipyards will not be able to respond any sooner.

His predictions are based upon a study that he has made based upon the assumption that 1998 is a "normal" 295-day shipping season for 1973/1981-built ships, and a 245-day season for Korean War era steamers. He has also based the study on a 4% annual growth in aggregate and fluxstone shipments, a 3% growth in coals and a 1% growth in ores.

His assumptions include several interesting thoughts for boatwatchers, including: in 1999, the conversion of JOHN SHERWIN to an ITB and the scraping of one "Golden Oldie" (JOSEPH H. FRANTZ, MYRON C. TAYLOR, or CALCITE II). The operation of SHERWIN in 2000 and the scrapping of a second Golden Oldie, followed by the scrapping of the third Golden Oldie in 2001. He also predicts that the RYERSON will be converted to a self-unloader or a barge in the next couple of years. His capacity estimates include the view that the owners of the three oldest 13,000-ton (Golden Oldies) will not elect to invest the substantial sums needed to pass another Special Survey interval and will scrap them by 2000.

Mr. Bardelmeier noted that after the newbuilding wave ended in the early 1980's (COLUMBIA STAR and PAUL R. TREGURTHA were the last built in 1981), the three US Great Lakes shipbuilders foresaw the coming "dry spell" and shrank their new building capacity. American Ship Building (Lorain and Toledo), and Litton Corp. in Erie PA shrank into oblivion. Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay valiantly hung-in for several years by building three high quality ocean vessels for SeaLand, but in due course retrenched to building a few fine, large 30,000-ton barges. It is not entirely clear whether there will be Great Lakes yards ready to take orders for new ships once the coming shortage of capacity becomes appearant.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Study says ships major factor in air pollution

11/03:
A study by two Carnegie Mellon University engineers states that ships are a major factor in world air pollution, especially in the Scandinavian countries, which are near shipping routes. The study says ships are responsible for about 15 perecnt of the nitrogen and sulfur emissions from fossil fuels. Using propulsion system characteristics, exhaust information and fuel consumption data, the two state that three million metric tons of nitrogen and more than four million metric tons of sulfur are put into the atmosphere from ships each year.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Oglebay Norton dividend

11/03:
The Directors of Oglebay Norton Company at a meeting held on October 29, 1997, declared a cash dividend of $0.20 per share of Common Stock to be paid on December 19, 1997, to stockholders of record on December 2, 1997. The dividend amount was adjusted from the prior $.40 per share amount to reflect the two-for-one split of the Company's stock that became effective October 30, 1997.

Reported by: James Neumiller




Court to rule on harbor tax

11/03:
The U.S. Supreme Court said 31 Oct. it will decide whether a U.S. harbor tax used to fund channel maintenance imposes an unconstitutional tax on exports. The court will hear a U.S. Justice Department appeal defending the tax, which imposes a fee of 0.125 percent on the value of any cargo loaded or unloaded from a commercial vessel at any U.S. port. The tax was adopted in 1986 and was raised to its current level in 1990. About 4,000 cases have been filed in the U.S. Court of International Trade challenging the tax and seeking refunds. A case involving U.S. Shoe Corp. became the test case. The Court of International Trade and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit said the tax was unconstitutional. Oral arguments will be heard early next year with a ruling by the end of June.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Salty Finnfighter departs Port Stanley

11/03:
The ocean vessel Finnfighter registered in Helsinki, departed Port Stanley at 1900 hrs after loading 4000 tons of beans from Topnotch. She had assistance from the towtugs Miseford and Progress.

Reported by: Wayne Hopper




Lawsuits filed in Lake Superior log recovery

11/03:
Superior Water-Logged Lumber Co., the Ashland, Wis., company recovering sunken 19th century logs from Lake Superior, has withdrawn its threat to leave Wisconsin but has now been named in a lawsuit filed by a competitor. Scott Mitchen, a co-founder of Superior Water-Logged Lumber, announced the intention to remain in the state at a ceremony in Madison, Wis., this week to dedicate a new building for the Wisconsin Department of Commerce. The building's lobby and some offices have wood recovered by the company.

Superior Resources Inc. filed a lawsuit 31 Oct. in the Wisconsin's Dane County Circuit Court to revoke Superior Water-Logged Lumber's permits. Also named is the Wisconsin Board of Commissioners of Public Lands, which issues the permits. The suit claims that Superior Water-Logged Lumber no longer meets a residency requirement for ownership after a merger involving firms based in Florida and Texas. Superior Water-Logged Lumber has denied the charge.

Superior Water-Logged Lumber has more than 400 permits pending, while Superior Resources has 48 permits but is seeking 100 from Superior Water-Logged Lumber.

The president of Superior Resources, Richard Loppnow, is a former investor at Superior Water-Logged Lumber and vice president Christopher Pilot left a management job at the competitor this summer. On 24 Oct., Superior Water-Logged Lumber filed a lawsuit against Pilot in Ashland County Circuit Court contending that he copied computer files, customer contacts and other information before leaving the company. It also accuses Pilot of defamation by spreading false allegations of misspending and fraud at Superior Water-Logged Lumber. Pilot has denied taking information but stood by claims of financial problems.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Boatnerd turns two years old

11/03:
November 1995 was when I launched the boatnerd web site. The site has continued to grow with more than 60,000 visits in the second year. My sincere thanks to all the readers and contributors, you folks make the page happen and keep me going. Lots of new material to come over the next year and an overhaul of the site, keep watching for these changes.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Today in Great Lakes History - November 3

The B A PEERLESS sailed on her maiden voyage November 3, 1952 bound for Superior, WI where 110,291 bbl of crude oil were loaded destined for British-American's refinery at Clarkson, Ont. The PEERLESS was built for the express purpose of transporting crude oil from the Interprovincial/Lakehead Pipeline terminus at Superior to B/A's Clarkson refinery.

Dismantling of the H.C. HEIMBECKER began on November 3, 1981 by Triad at Ashtabula and was completed the following year.

On November 4, 1986 the TEXACO CHIEF (2) was renamed b) A.G. FARQUARSON.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY was launched June 19, 1943.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history



Today in Great Lakes History - November 2

The JAMES R.BARKER arrived November 2, 1986 lashed side-by-side to the thousand-foot WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY in Sturgeon Bay, Wis. for repairs.

CANADIAN EXPLORER entered service on November 2, 1983 bound for Duluth, Minn. where she loaded 851,000 bushels of corn.

PAUL H. CARNAHAN was christened on November 2, 1961 at the foot of West Grand Boulevard in Detroit, MI.

On November 2, 1984 the tugs ATOMIC and ELMORE M. MISNER towed the ERINDALE to the International Marine Salvage scrap dock at Port Colborne where demolition began that month.

The H.C. HEIMBECKER proceeded under her own power to Ashtabula, OH for scrapping, arriving there November 2, 1981.

On November 2, 1948 the FRANK ARMSTRONG collided head-on with the JOHN J. BOLAND (2) in a heavy fog on Lake Erie near Colchester, Ont. Both vessels were badly damaged and resulted in one fatality on the BOLAND. The ARMSTRONG was towed to Toledo, OH for repairs.

In 1972 the A.E. NETTLETON's towline parted from the OLIVE L. MOORE during a snow storm with gale force winds 17 miles west of the Keweenaw Peninsula on Lake Superior. The barge developed a 15 degree list when her load of grain shifted. Three of her five member crew were air lifted by a U.S.C.G. helicopter to the MOORE to assist in re-rigging the towline. The NETTLETON was then towed the next day into the Lily Pond on the Keweenaw Waterway to trim her cargo.

The WILLIAM C. MORELAND was abandoned to the underwriters on November 2, 1910 as a constructive total loss, amounting to $445,000. She had stranded on Sawtooth Reef off Eagle Harbor, MI on Lake Superior in mid October.

The keel of the new section, identified as Hull #28, was laid down on November 2, 1959. A new forward pilothouse and a hatch crane were installed and her steam turbine engine and water tube boilers were reconditioned. The vessel was named c) RED WING (2) after the Detroit Red Wing hockey team, honoring a long association with Upper Lakes Shipping and James Norris, the founder of ULS, and his two sons, James D. and Bruce, owners of the National Hockey League team.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history



Today in Great Lakes History - November 1

Scrapping began November 1, 1984 on the ELMGLEN.

The Grand Trunk Western was granted permission by the Interstate Commerce Commission on November 1, 1978 to discontinue its Lake Michigan service between Muskegon, MI and Milwaukee, WI.

The MAITLAND NO.1 made her maiden voyage on November 1, 1916 from Ashtabula to Port Maitland, Ont. transporting rail cars with coal for the steel mills at Hamilton, Ont.

The SCOTT MISENER (3) returned to service in the grain trade on November 1, 1986 after a 3 year lay-up

The CITY OF MILWAUKEE made her last run for Grand Trunk’s rail car ferry service on November 1, 1978. BARKER was lashed side-by-side to the thousand-foot WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY and taken to Sturgeon Bay, Wis. arriving there November 2nd for repairs. In service as of 1995.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history



Badger towed to Sturgeon Bay

11/04:
The S.S. Badger was towed out of Ludington last night at 9:00 PM to go to Sturgeon Bay for her 5 year hull inspection. She is expected to be in Sturgeon Bay for about 2 weeks.

Reported by: Max S. Hanley




Reserve delayed by weather

11/04:
The Reserve spent much of Nov. 3 anchored off Duluth waiting for sea and visibility conditions to improve so it could enter the harbor at Silver Bay.

Reported by: Al Miller




Algoway delivers salt

11/04:
The Algoway entered Port Stanley harbour at 12:30 hours on Thursday October 30 with 10,000 tons of salt for Lakes Terminals & Warehousing, which will be loaded on trucks for the city of London Ontario.This is the second year that Lakes Terminals has handled salt, more salt may be scheduled later in the new year.

Reported by: Richard Hill




Area below Lock 1 in Port Weller busy Sunday with Lakers

11/04:
Sunday evening at 1900 hours Algoville was at wharf 2, the Canadian Leader was at the sand dock-just below Lock 1 and in between was Canadian Enterprise. When the Leader entered Lock 1, the Canadian Mariner quickly followed.

Reported by: J J Van Volkenburg




Today in Great Lakes History- November 04

The CARTIERCLIFFE HALL was registered at Toronto, Ont. on November 4, 1977, but didn't enter service until the spring of 1978 because of mechanical difficulties during her sea trials.

The JOSEPH G. BUTLER, JR. was launched November 4, 1905 for the Tonopah Steamship Co. (Hutchinson & Co., mgr.) Cleveland, OH.

HERON BAY (2) proceeded under her own power to Lauzon, Que. for her final lay-up on November 4, 1978.

NIPIGON BAY was launched November 4, 1950

The CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON (3) developed a sizable leak and almost sank November 4, 1925 during her tow to Superior after she struck a reef a few nights before.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY's keel was laid November 4, 1942.

UNITED STATES GYPSUM (2) grounded at Toledo, OH on November 4, 1972 resulting in damages totaling $125,000. Her propeller was removed and the rudder shaft was locked in position to finish the season as a manned barge on the coal run from Toledo to Detroit, MI.

The Joseph H. Thompson became not only the largest vessel on the Great Lakes but also the longest dry bulk cargo vessel in the world when it entered service on November 4, 1952, departing Chicago on its first trip.

Setting the stage for the fateful storm which followed less than a week later which sank the Edmund Fitzgerald, many locations in Minnesota and Wisconsin were setting all-time record high temperatures for the month of November during the period of November 4-6, 1975. Grand Marais, MN reached 67 on November 5 and Superior reached 74 on November 6, both all-time records for the month. Many other notable Great Lakes storms, including the Armistice Day storm of 1940 and the storm which sank the Henry Steinbrenner in 1953, were preceeded by record-setting warm wather.

Data from: Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history



More on the Iglehart at Fraser

11/03:
The J.A.W. Iglehart was at Fraser shipyard October 28-29 for a 20 hour repair after suffering a small puncture in her #5 port ballast tank. The puncture occured on her previous trip while making her dock in Detroit.

Reported by: Dan Ocean




Lakes Shipping into the next Century

11/03:
In a story in the October 18, 1997 edition of Skillings Mining Review, W. E. Bardelmeier, Executive Vice President of Jones, Bardelmeier & Co. Ltd., Nassau, predicts that the close of the 1997 season will see the end of a 15 year period when transport capacity of the US flag Great Lakes fleet has significantly exceeded transport demand. He foresees the shortage continuing until at least the year 2000, because shipyards will not be able to respond any sooner.

His predictions are based upon a study that he has made based upon the assumption that 1998 is a "normal" 295-day shipping season for 1973/1981-built ships, and a 245-day season for Korean War era steamers. He has also based the study on a 4% annual growth in aggregate and fluxstone shipments, a 3% growth in coals and a 1% growth in ores.

His assumptions include several interesting thoughts for boatwatchers, including: in 1999, the conversion of JOHN SHERWIN to an ITB and the scraping of one "Golden Oldie" (JOSEPH H. FRANTZ, MYRON C. TAYLOR, or CALCITE II). The operation of SHERWIN in 2000 and the scrapping of a second Golden Oldie, followed by the scrapping of the third Golden Oldie in 2001. He also predicts that the RYERSON will be converted to a self-unloader or a barge in the next couple of years. His capacity estimates include the view that the owners of the three oldest 13,000-ton (Golden Oldies) will not elect to invest the substantial sums needed to pass another Special Survey interval and will scrap them by 2000.

Mr. Bardelmeier noted that after the newbuilding wave ended in the early 1980's (COLUMBIA STAR and PAUL R. TREGURTHA were the last built in 1981), the three US Great Lakes shipbuilders foresaw the coming "dry spell" and shrank their new building capacity. American Ship Building (Lorain and Toledo), and Litton Corp. in Erie PA shrank into oblivion. Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay valiantly hung-in for several years by building three high quality ocean vessels for SeaLand, but in due course retrenched to building a few fine, large 30,000-ton barges. It is not entirely clear whether there will be Great Lakes yards ready to take orders for new ships once the coming shortage of capacity becomes appearant.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Study says ships major factor in air pollution

11/03:
A study by two Carnegie Mellon University engineers states that ships are a major factor in world air pollution, especially in the Scandinavian countries, which are near shipping routes. The study says ships are responsible for about 15 perecnt of the nitrogen and sulfur emissions from fossil fuels. Using propulsion system characteristics, exhaust information and fuel consumption data, the two state that three million metric tons of nitrogen and more than four million metric tons of sulfur are put into the atmosphere from ships each year.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Oglebay Norton dividend

11/03:
The Directors of Oglebay Norton Company at a meeting held on October 29, 1997, declared a cash dividend of $0.20 per share of Common Stock to be paid on December 19, 1997, to stockholders of record on December 2, 1997. The dividend amount was adjusted from the prior $.40 per share amount to reflect the two-for-one split of the Company's stock that became effective October 30, 1997.

Reported by: James Neumiller




Court to rule on harbor tax

11/03:
The U.S. Supreme Court said 31 Oct. it will decide whether a U.S. harbor tax used to fund channel maintenance imposes an unconstitutional tax on exports. The court will hear a U.S. Justice Department appeal defending the tax, which imposes a fee of 0.125 percent on the value of any cargo loaded or unloaded from a commercial vessel at any U.S. port. The tax was adopted in 1986 and was raised to its current level in 1990. About 4,000 cases have been filed in the U.S. Court of International Trade challenging the tax and seeking refunds. A case involving U.S. Shoe Corp. became the test case. The Court of International Trade and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit said the tax was unconstitutional. Oral arguments will be heard early next year with a ruling by the end of June.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Salty Finnfighter departs Port Stanley

11/03:
The ocean vessel Finnfighter registered in Helsinki, departed Port Stanley at 1900 hrs after loading 4000 tons of beans from Topnotch. She had assistance from the towtugs Miseford and Progress.

Reported by: Wayne Hopper




Lawsuits filed in Lake Superior log recovery

11/03:
Superior Water-Logged Lumber Co., the Ashland, Wis., company recovering sunken 19th century logs from Lake Superior, has withdrawn its threat to leave Wisconsin but has now been named in a lawsuit filed by a competitor. Scott Mitchen, a co-founder of Superior Water-Logged Lumber, announced the intention to remain in the state at a ceremony in Madison, Wis., this week to dedicate a new building for the Wisconsin Department of Commerce. The building's lobby and some offices have wood recovered by the company.

Superior Resources Inc. filed a lawsuit 31 Oct. in the Wisconsin's Dane County Circuit Court to revoke Superior Water-Logged Lumber's permits. Also named is the Wisconsin Board of Commissioners of Public Lands, which issues the permits. The suit claims that Superior Water-Logged Lumber no longer meets a residency requirement for ownership after a merger involving firms based in Florida and Texas. Superior Water-Logged Lumber has denied the charge.

Superior Water-Logged Lumber has more than 400 permits pending, while Superior Resources has 48 permits but is seeking 100 from Superior Water-Logged Lumber.

The president of Superior Resources, Richard Loppnow, is a former investor at Superior Water-Logged Lumber and vice president Christopher Pilot left a management job at the competitor this summer. On 24 Oct., Superior Water-Logged Lumber filed a lawsuit against Pilot in Ashland County Circuit Court contending that he copied computer files, customer contacts and other information before leaving the company. It also accuses Pilot of defamation by spreading false allegations of misspending and fraud at Superior Water-Logged Lumber. Pilot has denied taking information but stood by claims of financial problems.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Boatnerd turns two years old

11/03:
November 1995 was when I launched the boatnerd web site. The site has continued to grow with more than 60,000 visits in the second year. My sincere thanks to all the readers and contributors, you folks make the page happen and keep me going. Lots of new material to come over the next year and an overhaul of the site, keep watching for these changes.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Today in Great Lakes History - November 3

The B A PEERLESS sailed on her maiden voyage November 3, 1952 bound for Superior, WI where 110,291 bbl of crude oil were loaded destined for British-American's refinery at Clarkson, Ont. The PEERLESS was built for the express purpose of transporting crude oil from the Interprovincial/Lakehead Pipeline terminus at Superior to B/A's Clarkson refinery.

Dismantling of the H.C. HEIMBECKER began on November 3, 1981 by Triad at Ashtabula and was completed the following year.

On November 4, 1986 the TEXACO CHIEF (2) was renamed b) A.G. FARQUARSON.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY was launched June 19, 1943.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history



Today in Great Lakes History - November 2

The JAMES R.BARKER arrived November 2, 1986 lashed side-by-side to the thousand-foot WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY in Sturgeon Bay, Wis. for repairs.

CANADIAN EXPLORER entered service on November 2, 1983 bound for Duluth, Minn. where she loaded 851,000 bushels of corn.

PAUL H. CARNAHAN was christened on November 2, 1961 at the foot of West Grand Boulevard in Detroit, MI.

On November 2, 1984 the tugs ATOMIC and ELMORE M. MISNER towed the ERINDALE to the International Marine Salvage scrap dock at Port Colborne where demolition began that month.

The H.C. HEIMBECKER proceeded under her own power to Ashtabula, OH for scrapping, arriving there November 2, 1981.

On November 2, 1948 the FRANK ARMSTRONG collided head-on with the JOHN J. BOLAND (2) in a heavy fog on Lake Erie near Colchester, Ont. Both vessels were badly damaged and resulted in one fatality on the BOLAND. The ARMSTRONG was towed to Toledo, OH for repairs.

In 1972 the A.E. NETTLETON's towline parted from the OLIVE L. MOORE during a snow storm with gale force winds 17 miles west of the Keweenaw Peninsula on Lake Superior. The barge developed a 15 degree list when her load of grain shifted. Three of her five member crew were air lifted by a U.S.C.G. helicopter to the MOORE to assist in re-rigging the towline. The NETTLETON was then towed the next day into the Lily Pond on the Keweenaw Waterway to trim her cargo.

The WILLIAM C. MORELAND was abandoned to the underwriters on November 2, 1910 as a constructive total loss, amounting to $445,000. She had stranded on Sawtooth Reef off Eagle Harbor, MI on Lake Superior in mid October.

The keel of the new section, identified as Hull #28, was laid down on November 2, 1959. A new forward pilothouse and a hatch crane were installed and her steam turbine engine and water tube boilers were reconditioned. The vessel was named c) RED WING (2) after the Detroit Red Wing hockey team, honoring a long association with Upper Lakes Shipping and James Norris, the founder of ULS, and his two sons, James D. and Bruce, owners of the National Hockey League team.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history



Today in Great Lakes History - November 1

Scrapping began November 1, 1984 on the ELMGLEN.

The Grand Trunk Western was granted permission by the Interstate Commerce Commission on November 1, 1978 to discontinue its Lake Michigan service between Muskegon, MI and Milwaukee, WI.

The MAITLAND NO.1 made her maiden voyage on November 1, 1916 from Ashtabula to Port Maitland, Ont. transporting rail cars with coal for the steel mills at Hamilton, Ont.

The SCOTT MISENER (3) returned to service in the grain trade on November 1, 1986 after a 3 year lay-up

The CITY OF MILWAUKEE made her last run for Grand Trunk’s rail car ferry service on November 1, 1978. BARKER was lashed side-by-side to the thousand-foot WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY and taken to Sturgeon Bay, Wis. arriving there November 2nd for repairs. In service as of 1995.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




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