Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News ARCHIVE

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Eagle Update

11/30:
The Millenium Eagle departed the Marinette Fuel Dock Monday afternoon after an underwater inspection showed no damage from her grounding last week. The vessel had finished unloading her cargo of pig iron Saturday evening.

The 625-foot Cayman-flagged vessel went aground last Wednesday in 20 feet of water in the entrance to the Marinette/Menominee Channel. The master states the vessel was drawing 23 feet at the time the starboard aft section touched the soft sand bottom. After offloading approximately 200 tons of cargo, the vessel was able to get underway and safely moor.

Click here for an image of the vessel unloading.


Reported by: Scott Best




Twin Ports Update

11/30:
Twin Ports grain elevators had another full house on the morning of Nov. 29 as grain loading continued under clear skies and relatively mild temperatures. In Duluth, Sarah Spencer was at General Mills, Anna Oldendorff was at Cargill and Canadian Venture was at AGP - an unusual occurrence because AGP usually loads salties. In Superior, Paterson was at Peavey Connors Point; Kinsman Independent and Wana Naari were at Harvest States; and Inviken was at General Mills. Several more vessels were anchored out or due to arrive in the next few days for Harvest States, AGP and Peavey.

The DMIR's Duluth ore dock presently has vessels scheduled through Dec. 16. Mild temperatures have kept ice from forming in any of the loading slips. The line-up for the ore dock includes: Indiana Harbor, Dec. 1; James R. Barker and Joe Block, Dec. 4; Mesabi Miner, Dec. 5; Indiana Harbor, Dec. 7; Frontenac, Dec. 9; Edwin H. Gott, Dec. 11; Buckeye, Dec. 12; Indiana Harbor, Dec. 13; Courtney Burton, Dec. 15; Louis R. Desmarais, Dec. 16.

Reported by: Al Miller




Close Call in the Maumee River

11/30:
On Sunday the tug Rebecca Lynn and her barge were departing the TWI dock in the Maumee River in Toledo, OH. The vessel Antalina who was also docked at TWI began turning directly in the path of the outgoing tug/barge. The skillful master of the Rebecca Lynn was able to hold his tow in check and allowed the salt water vessel to clear outbound with out incident.




More on the Desmarais Engine room Fire

11/30:
Friday afternoon when the Louis R. Desmarais hailed mayday due to an engine room fire a small armada raced to their aid Northeast of Niagara, NY on Lake Ontario. Coast Guard Rescue Coordination Center Trenton launched a helicopter, fixed wing aircraft and the Canadian Coast Guard Cutter Advent. On the U.S. side a rescue boat from Coast Guard Station Niagara was sent, a motor lifeboat from Station Rochester, and a helicopter from Air Station Detroit all joined in the operation.

The fire was put out by the vessel's crew with no injuries and the Desmarais proceeded to the Welland canal where it was inspected by both U.S. and Canadian investigators. No significant damage was noted and the vessel was allowed to proceed.

The fire was caused by a hydraulic oil line breaking and spraying onto the engine.

Reported by: Ron Konkol and Ron Ladue




Duden Update

11/30:
The U.S. Coast Guard reported Sunday that the 538-foot Duden remains moored at the lower wall of Snell Lock. The Turkish flagged vessel lost power in the Seaway on November 23 and Technical assistance with the vessel's air start distribution system is being rendered.




CSL Niagara - Correction

11/30:
It was reported last week that the CSL Niagara was making her first trip to the upper lakes. This was incorrect, the Niagara passed upbound through the Detroit/St. Clair River system on October 10 to an unknown destination.




Today in Great Lakes History - November 30

The CANADIAN PIONEER suffered a major engine room fire on November 30, 1987 at Nanticoke.

On November 30, 1981 the A.H. FERBERT (2) was laid up for the last time at the Hallett Dock #5, Duluth, MN.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 passed down the Welland Canal on November 30, 1973 in tow of the tugs JOHN PURVES and YVON SIMARD en route to Sorel, Que. where she was cut down to a barge for off-Lakes use.

In 1967 the City of Flint 32 was laid up, never to run again.

On 30 November 1910, ATHABASKA (steel propeller passenger steamer, 263', 1774 gt, built in 1883 in Scotland) collided with the tug GENERAL and sank near Lonely Island in Georgian bay. No lives were lost. She was later recovered and rebuilt as a bulk freighter and lasted until she was broken up in 1948.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




CSL Niagara Sets New Wheat Record In Thunder Bay

11/29:
On Saturday the CSL Niagara loaded 29,707 metric tons of wheat or 1,091,545.00 bushels at the Saskatuwan Pool - 7A grain elevator in Thunder Bay. This load beats the old record set by Paterson of 29,016 metric tons of wheat.

The vessel called the Coast Guard saying she was ready to depart at 1403hrs, the Niagara cleared the piers at 1435hrs, bound for Montreal, Quebec.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Twin Ports Update

11/29:
The past several weekends have been slow in the Twin Ports as the salties try to clear during weekdays to avoid paying overtime to load. This weekend, as the grain season nears its end, was different. Canadian Miner and Wana Naree were at Harvest States; Inviken was at the General Mills elevator in Superior and Kinsman Independent was at Peavey. Anchored in a line on Lake Superior were Anna Oldendorff, Atlantis Spirit and Nogatt. Many vessels were due in Nov. 28 and 29, including Canadian Prospector for Harvest States; Cheremkhovo for Peavey; Ziemia Zamojska for Harvest States; and a rare visit for Paterson, due at Peavey.

Myron C. Taylor is due to load at Toledo and Sandusky with cargo for Manistee. In an unusual line-up these days, Arthur M. Anderson, Philip R. Clarke and Cason J. Callaway are due at Conneaut with ore within a few days of each other: Anderson loaded on the 27th; Clarke arrived on the 28th and Callaway was due on the 29th.

Reported by: Al Miller




Sarnia Update

11/29:
On Sunday work continued on the Saginaw at the Government Dock in Sarnia. The Saginaw can now be seen with smoke coming out of the stack and it appears that it is from the main engines. Also in port was the Nanticoke, she was at the Sarnia Elevators and departed at about 16:20.

Reported by: Jamie Kerwin




Hamilton Report

11/29:
On Saturday the Canadian Provider was the only ship in the entire harbour. The vessel took her time approaching Dofasco's ore dock as a very stiff wind was making for difficult handling. Of greater note at Dofasco is the completion and entry into service of a third shore-based crane within the last week. Erection of the crane began early in the summer.

The McNally Marine dredge is tied up at Pier 25, in front of the former hull of the Canadian Explorer. The hull has been at the dock since she was cut apart (minus two weeks at Pier 8), it would be news if she moved. One of the tugs was put ashore and it is unclear whether the Explorer is being used to hold the spoils and whether the dredging of the approaches to the Burlington Bay ship canal is complete. This operation has been ongoing since August.

Also in Pier 25 area is a new stone operation which has already been used to load the Canadian Olympic and additional railroad spurs (CN/IC) have recently been completed along the JRI/Agrico complex in order to increase the grain traffic to the pier.

Reported by: Marc Ouellette




Busy Day in Two Harbors

11/29:
Saturday November 27th was a brisk day in Two Harbors, the Arthur M. Anderson was in loading ore. On the other side of the dock the Edgar B. Speer was loading for Gary IN. The Anderson was sporting some Christmas lights around her pilothouse as well as five large red lights on top of her boom. It appeared the Speer had no lights. Both vessels departed shortly after dusk.

Reported by: David French




New Captain at the Westcott

11/29:
The J.W. Westcott Company in Detroit, operators of the U.S. mail boat, would like to congratulate L. Tanner on receiving his original Coast Guard license. Captain Tanner will now be filling in as relief master of the Mailboat.

Congratulations Captain Tanner, we salute you.




Today in Great Lakes History - November 29

On November 29, 1966, the Daniel J. Morrell sank approximately 20 miles north of Harbor Beach in Lake Huron. Her nearly identical sistership, the Edward Y. Townsend, was travelling about 20 miles behind the Morrell and made it to the Lime Island Fuel Dock in the St. Mary's River where cracks were found in her deck; the Townsend proceeded to Sault Ste. Marie where she was taken out of service. The Townsend sank in the Atlantic on October 7, 1968, while being towed overseas for scrap.

E.B. BARBER was laid up for the last time at Toronto, Ont. on November 29, 1984.

On November 29, 1903 snow and stormy seas drove the two-and-a-half year old J.T. HUTCHINSON onto an uncharted rock (now known as Eagle River Reef) one-half mile off shore and 10 miles west of Eagle Harbor, MI near the northwestern coast of the Keweenaw Peninsula.

On November 29, 1974 the PERE MARQUETTE 21 was loaded with remnants of Port Huron's Peerless Cement Dock, which reportedly were bound for Saudi Arabia, and cleared there in tow of the GLT tugs AMERICA and OHIO.

The SYLVANIA was in a collision with the DIAMOND ALKALI in the Fighting Island Channel of the Detroit River on November 29, 1968 during a snow squall and received a new bow as a result.

The propeller BURLINGTON had barges in tow upbound on Lake Erie when she was damaged by the ice and sank in the Pelee Passage.

On 29 November 1856, ARABIAN (3-mast wooden bark, 116', 350 t, built in 1853 at Niagara, Ontario) had stranded on Goose Island Shoal, 10 miles ENE of Mackinac Island ten days earlier. She was relieved of her cargo and was being towed to Chicago by the propeller OGONTZ when a gale blew in and the tow line parted. ARABIAN made for shore, her pumps working full force and OGONTZ following. During the night they were separated and ARABIAN sank off Point Betsey in Lake Michigan. Her crew escaped in her yawl.

In 1903 the Pere Marquette 19 arrived Ludington on her maiden voyage. Captain John J. Doyle in command.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Fire Department Called to Barge

11/28:
The Milwaukee Fire Department responded to a call from the tug Barbara Andrie Saturday afternoon. The tug and barge A-390 were tied up in Milwaukee's inner harbor at the time. The furnace and boiler needed to keep the barge's cargo of asphalt in suspension had overheated. Dark smoke could be seen coming out of one of the barges two stacks. The Fire Department had things under control in a short period of time.

Reported by: Andy Laborde




Busy Day in Cleveland

11/28:
Cleveland was a busy international port Saturday. The small salty Dintelborg was berthed at the Ceres docks. The Hea was unloading steel coils during the day at the Port of Cleveland docks. The salty Ziemia Suwalska arrived at the Ceres docks at 1pm and was assisted by two Great Lakes tugs.

The lakes trade was also very busy with the American Republic running the LTV shuttle and departing at 3pm. The Earl W. Oglebay left Cleveland at 9am for points west. The St. Marys cement barge and tug Triton were berthed at the Blue Circle cement dock. The Agawa Canyon arrived later in the afternoon and entered the Cuyahoga at 3:30pm.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - November 28

On November 28, 1905, the Pittsburgh Steamship Company vessel Mataafa was wrecked as it tried to re-enter the Duluth Ship Canal in a severe storm. The Mataafa had departed Duluth earlier but had decided to return to safety. After dropping her barge in the lake, the vessel was picked up by waves, was slammed against the north pier and was swung around to rest just hundreds of feet offshore north of the north pier, where it broke in two. Much of the crew froze to death in the cold snap that followed the storm, as there was no quick way to get out to the broken vessel for rescue. The Mataafa was repaired prior to the 1906 season; she ultimately ended her career as an automobile carrier for the T.J. McCarthy Steamship Company and was sold for scrap in 1965.

The CANADIAN OLYMPIC's maiden voyage was November 28,1976 to load coal at Conneaut, Ohio for Nanticoke, Ont.

On November 28, 1983 while upbound after leaving the Poe Lock the INDIANA HARBOR was in a collision, caused by high winds, with the downbound Greek salty ANANGEL SPIRIT resulting in a 10 foot gash in the laker's port bow.

LANCASHIRE was launched November 28, 1942 she would be renamed b) SEWELL AVERY

The CATHY B. towed the GOVERNOR MILLER to Vigo, Spain on November 28, 1980 where she was broken up.

The BENSON FORD (2) was renamed e) US.265808 and departed River Rouge on November 28, 1986 towed by the Sandrin tugs TUSKER and GLENADA bound for Ramey's Bend in the Welland Canal.

FRONTENAC (4) arrived at the Fraser Shipyard, Superior, WI on November 28, 1979. Her keel, which had hogged four feet, was declared a constructive total loss.

The BRANSFORD stranded on a reef off Isle Royal in Lake Superior during a major storm on November 28, 1905 (the same storm that claimed the steamer MATAAFA).

On her third trip in 1892 the Ann Arbor #1 again ran aground, this time three miles north of Ahnapee (now called Algoma). There was $15,000 damage to her cargo.

In 1906 the Ann Arbor #4 left Cleveland bound for Frankfort on her maiden voyage.

The Ann Arbor #4 ran aground off Kewaunee in 1924.

On 28 November 1905, AMBOY (2-mast wooden schooner-barge, 209', 894 gt, formerly HELENA) was carrying coal in tow of the wooden propeller GEORGE SPENCER in a gale on Lake Superior. In an effort to save both vessels, AMBOY was cut loose. The SPENCER was disabled quickly and was driven ashore near Little Marais, MN. AMBOY struggled against the gale for a full day before finally going ashore near Thomasville, Ontario on 29 November. No lives were lost from either vessel.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Louis R.Desmarais Suffers Engine room Fire

11/27:
During the early afternoon Friday the Louis R. Desmarais suffered an engine room fire while sailing in the western section of Lake Ontario at Point Breeze.

A mayday was sent out from the ship and the Canadian Coast Guard sent out a Labrador helicopter to the scene. Three unidentified vessels also raced to the scene to offer assistance. The fire was caused by a hydraulic oil line breaking and spraying onto the engine.

Crews onboard the Desmarais put out the fire and restarted her engines. The vessel then proceeded to anchor near Breeze Point, New York to vent out the smoke.

It is believed that the Desmarais was able to resume her trip later in the day, she is carrying a cargo of cement from Quebec to Detroit. There were no injuries reported.

Reported by: Ron Konkol and Ron Ladue




Update on the Alcor

11/27:
Transports Desgagné reported at a press conference Thursday in Quebec City that work to refloat the grounded Maltese ship was proceeding on schedule and the target dates to refloat the Alcor remains between Dec 7 and 12th. 80 workers are assigned to the task with three shifts at work 24 hours a day. Special shelters were set-up to protect the welders from adverse weather.

It was reported that an equivalent of 6km of welding will be require to strengthen the hull by welding over the cracks huge steel plates 4 feet x 80 feet. Six Ukrainian crew members remaining on board were hired by Transport Desgagné because of their knowledge of the ship.

Two Desgagné ships have started removing part of the cargo intended for St-Lawrence Cement via the port of Trois-Rivières. A first load went to a Levis warf (across from Quebec City) so that experts can test the cargo for possible traces of contamination by water. If the cargo is ok then further shipments will go to Trois-Rivières.

Because of the mild weather no ice is expected in the River before mid-December and by then the Alcor should have been refloated if work goes as planned.

The Alcor ran aground on November 9 in the St. Lawrence River and cracks developed on both sides of the hull, running down to the water line in a V shape and across the deck from starboard to port.

Reported by: Frédérick Fréchette




Eagle Update

11/27:
The Millenium Eagle will be remain in Marinette until at least Monday so that divers can inspect the hull after Wednesday’s grounding.

Meanwhile the remainder of the cargo of Pig Iron is being unloaded.

Click here for an image of the vessel unloading yesterday.


Reported by: Scott Best




Lake Michigan Cruises

11/27:
Thursday's Holland Sentinel reports that the 175-foot Niagara Prince, owned by the American Canadian Caribbean Line of Warren, RI., plans stops in Holland Michigan on August 6, 13 and 20 next summer during excursions on Lake Michigan. The Niagara Prince, with cruises originating in Chicago, will also stop at Manistee, Beaver Island, Petosky and Mackinac Island. Elderhostel Inc., an organization that coordinates educational tours for people age 55 and older, is chartering the vessel from American Canadian Caribbean for the seven-day cruises.

Holland is the latest local community to land a port of call from the revived Great Lakes cruising industry. The French liner Le Levant visited Saugatuck six times last summer while cruising from Chicago to Toronto and back, and plans to make eight ports of calls next year.

For next summer, the operators of six vessels have booked 20 Great Lakes cruises, 17 of which involve stops at Lake Michigan port communities, according to Cruising the Great Lakes, a Cambridge, Ontario, company that coordinates itineraries and promotes trips for cruise companies. This compares with 18 separate cruises by five cruise lines this past summer, and just eight excursions by three lines in 1998.

Reported by: Steve Vanden Bosch




Even More Thanksgiving Menu Ideas

11/27:
The Southdown Challenger arrived in Milwaukee under sunny skies early Thursday afternoon. The Thanksgiving meal was served later that afternoon. Here is their 1999 holiday menu:
APPETIZERS: oyster & shrimp cocktail, assorted olives & vegetables, apple cider, stuffed celery, chefs salad, jello. SOUPS: oyster stew & chicken noodle.
ENTREE: roast tom turkey w/sage dressing & wild rice, lobster tail w/butter sauce, baked virginia ham w/pineapple rings, mashed potatoes, buttered peas, sweet potatoes, cooked squash, giblet gravy, hot dinner rolls, cranberry sauce.
DESSERTS: mince meat, apple, peach and pumpkin pie, whipped cream, ice cream, fruitcake, mint chocolate, plain & sugared dates. REFRESHMENTS: coffee, tea, milk, hot chocolate, soft drinks, cigarettes, candy, gum.

Reported by: Andy Laborde




Dennis Hale to Appear in Milwaukee

11/27:
On the frigid night of Nov. 29, 1966, the Daniel J. Morrell broke in half during a Lake Huron storm and foundered before her crew could send an SOS Of the 29 men aboard the Morrell that terrible night, only one survived: a 26-year-old watchman named Dennis Hale. Flung into the freezing black water as the ship plunged beneath his feet, Hale clung to life for 38 desperate hours aboard an open raft clad in his undershorts, a life jacket and a navy peacoat. Thirty-three years after the disaster, Hale is finally sharing his harrowing experience with audiences around the Great Lakes, including a recent appearance on the Oprah Winfrey Show.

Prior to the evening show, noted maritime artists and authors will be present to display and sell their work. Featured will be the work of Milwaukee artist Chris Winters, whose dramatic canvases depict Great Lakes ghost ships above and below the water's surface. Hale will be present before and after the program to sign copies of his book, "Sole Survivor." This inspiring tale of shipwreck and survival is being presented by the Wisconsin Lake Schooner Education Association and the Wisconsin Marine Historical Society.

The program begins at 6:45 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 4, at the Milwaukee Public Library's Centennial Hall, 733 North 8th St., Milwaukee. Tickets for Sole Survivor are $10 for members of WLSEA and/or WMHS or $15 for non-members. Tickets at the door will be $20. For more information, or to register, call Kelly at the Wisconsin Lake Schooner, (414) 276-7700. For detailed directions and parking information, log on to WLSEA's web site: www.wis-schooner.org.




Today in Great Lakes History - November 27

The ALGOSEA entered Lake service as a self-unloader for the first time with salt loaded at Goderich, Ont. and passed downbound in the Welland Canal November 27, 1976 for Quebec City.

The AVONDALE (2) was condemned and was not allowed to carry cargo after she arrived at Toledo, OH on November 27, 1975 to load soya beans.

The steam barge CHAUNCY HURLBUT was launched at the shipyard of Simon Langell at St. Clair, MI on Thanksgiving Day, 27 November 1873. She was built for Chandler Bros. of Detroit.

On 27 November 1886, COMANCHE (wooden schooner, 137', 322 t, built in 1867 at Oswego, NY) was carrying corn in a storm on Lake Ontario when she ran on a shoal and sank near Point Peninsula, NY. A local farmer died while trying to rescue her crew of 8. His was the only death. She was later recovered and rebuilt as THOMAS DOBBIE.

November 27, 1929 - The City of Flint 32 was launched in Manitowoc.

November 27, 1937 - The Pere Marquette 22 collided with the Wabash in heavy fog.

November 27, 1966 - The City of Midland 41 ran aground at Ludington in a storm. Stranded on board were a number of passengers and 56 crewman. Ballast tanks were flooded to hold the steamer on until the storm subsided. She was pulled off four days later by the Roen tug JOHN PURVES.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Eagle Makes Port

11/26:
After spending the night stuck in the mud at the mouth of the Menominee River, the Millenium Eagle finally made it into the harbor about mid-morning Thursday. She is moored alongside the William H. Donner at Marinette Fuel & Dock Co. unloading pig iron.

Crews worked through the night and had to bring the William H. Donner out to the Eagle and off load 200 thousand pounds of the Pig Iron cargo.

Reported by: Scott Best and Dick Lund




First Trip Ends in Damage

11/26:
On November 22, the new Fednav ship FEDERAL OSHIMA arrived at Sorel from South Korea on her maiden trip to unload part of a cargo of steel. However, when docking at Sorel, she sustained severe damage to her forepeak. She entered the Seaway on November 24 bound for Windsor to deliver the remaining steel cargo. From there, she is expected to go to Port Weller for repairs and if time permitting, she will leave for the Lakehead to load grain after the completion of repairs.

Reported by: René Beauchamp.




Seaway Update

11/26:
On November 24, several of the ships downbound in the Seaway were carrying grain, the lakers CANADIAN TRADER with soybean pellets for Port Cartier and CANADIAN RANGER with corn for Quebec City from Duluth and Thunder Bay and the salties ARMONIKOS with wheat from Thunder Bay, MILLENIUM CONDOR with peas feeding from Thunder Bay, LOK RAJESHWARI with sunflower seeds from Duluth and DARYA MA with flaxseed from Thunder Bay.

The new tentative date for the closure of the St.Lawrence Seaway has been set for December 24.

Reported by: René Beauchamp.




More Thanksgiving Menu Ideas

11/26:
Below is the 1997 Thanksgiving menu from the Burns Harbor.
Thursday menu: pea soup, shrimp cocktail, roast turkey & ham, mashed potatoes & gravy, stuffing & yams, apple & pumpkin pie. Friday's menu: beef barley soup, grilled tenderloin, lobster w/drawn butter, asparagus, onion roasted & Italian roasted potatoes, peach & pumpkin pie.

Reported by: Andy Laborde




Today in Great Lakes History - November 26

The MESQUITE departed Charlevoix and locked through the Soo on November 26, 1989 to begin SUNDEW's normal buoy tending duties on Lake Superior.

The ELIZABETH HINDMAN was launched November 26, 1920 as a) GLENCLOVA.

November 26, 1910 - The Ann Arbor #5 was launched. She was the first carferry to be built with a seagate, as a result of the sinking of the Pere Marquette 18 in September of 1910.

On 26 November 1872, the steamer GEO. W. REYNOLDS burned at 1 o'clock in the morning at the dock in Bay City. The fire supposedly originated in the engine room. She was owned by A. English of East Saginaw.

On 26 November 1853, ALBANY (wooden sidewheel passenger/package freight, 202', 669 t, built in 1846 at Detroit, MI) was carrying passengers and miscellaneous cargo in a storm on Lake Huron.. She was making for the shelter of Presque Isle harbor when the gale drove her over a bar. Her crew and 200 passengers came ashore in her boats. Plans were made to haul her back across the bar when another storm wrecked her. Her boiler and most of her machinery were recovered the following year.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Vessel Aground in Menomiee

11/25:
Tuesday afternoon a vessel that appeared to be the Millenium Eagle, was aground at the mouth of the Menominee River in Menominee, Michigan. She was being assisted by two G-tugs, the Texas and the Indiana that were there to guide the vessel into the harbor.

A sand bar has formed causing problems for the larger ships all season. The river was dredged last year and the Army Corps of Engineers did some further dredging in July of this year; however, the problem of lower water levels has shown itself twice this month. Last week, the Millenium Falcon grounded in about the same location. She was finally dragged into port some hours later.

At 7:30 p.m. last night, the two tugs that had been assisting the Eagle were seen moored in the Menominee River harbor at the Marinette Fuel and Dock Company's dock. It appears that they will wait until early this morning to bring her into harbor.

Reported by: Scott Best and Dick Lund




Duden Update

11/25:
Tuesday a representative from Lloyds boarded the vessel at the lower wall of Snell Lock. The initial survey indicates the additional damage may have been done to the vessel's main engine. A technician from Mount Royal Walsh has been summoned from Montreal to assist. The U.S. Coast Guard reports that repairs were expected to be complete Tuesday Morning.

On Monday afternoon the Turkish flagged vessel lost power in the Seaway.




Sarah Spencer Damages Self-Unloading Boom

11/25:
On Saturday November 20, while the barge Sarah Spencer was about to unload her cargo of barley at Duluth's General Mills Elevator her boom became stuck in the up position about 20-feet above the deck.

After a few attempts at moving the boom it suddenly fell to the deck. 20 to 50 feet of the boom’s end was bent out of shape, taking the boom out of service.

The tug and barge departed later in the day sailing for Thunder Bay to have the boom repaired. The pair arrived in Thunder Bay on Sunday the 24th and tied-up at the Keefer Terminal for repairs.

The cause of the boom collapse was reported as broken teeth on the gearbox that lifts and lowers the boom.

Repairs to the boom are expected to be completed by this weekend, barring any unforeseen problems.

Crews worked yesterday in less than ideal conditions as Thunder Bay experienced its first major snowstorm.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Engine Troubles Can't Stop the Mail

11/25:
An engine breakdown on the U.S. mailboat J.W. Westcott II Tuesday morning could not stop the J.W. Westcott company from completing their normal operations servicing vessels on the Detroit River. For the few hours the Westcott II was out of service the company's Joseph J. Hogan handled all deliveries of mail and pilot changes.

The Westcott Company's engineering department handled the repairs and the boat was expected to be back in service yesterday afternoon.

The tentative lay-up date for the Westcott is set for December 21. This date could change depending on ice conditions in the river or the number of salt water vessels remaining in the system.

Reported by: Sam Buchanan




The Port in Port Huron

11/25:
Monday's Times Herald reports that Port Huron, Michigan may lose the "port" in Port Huron, if the City Council decides not to rebuild a burned Port Huron Seaway Terminal warehouse and instead use the site for something else.

A fire destroyed the main storage building at the terminal November 16. Half of the 40,000 square foot warehouse, which stored corn and sugar beet pellets, was destroyed. The event puts in limbo the future of the 40-year old terminal - the city's only port for deep water docking.




Today in Great Lakes History - November 25

INCAN SUPERIOR was withdrawn from service after completing 2,386 trips between Thunder Bay and Superior and on November 25, 1992 she passed downbound at Sault Ste. Marie for service on the Canadian West Coast.

On November 25, 1947 the b) CAPTAIN JOHN ROEN was renamed c) ADAM E. CORNELIUS (2).

ROBERT C. STANLEY was laid up for the last time November 25, 1981 at the Tower Bay slip, Superior, WI.

CITY OF MILWAUKEE was launched November 25, 1930

On November 25, 1905, the Joseph G. Butler, Jr. entered service, departing Lorain, Ohio for Duluth on her maiden voyage. The vesselreceived damage in a severe storm on her first crossing of Lake Superior. This vessel was repaired and re-entered service; she was renamed Donald B. Gillies in 1935 and Grovedale in 1963. She was sunk as a dock in Hamilton in 1973 and finally sold for scrap in 1981.

On 25 November 1866, F. W. BACKUS (wooden propeller, 133', 289 t, built in 1846 at Amherstburg, Ont.) was carrying hay, horses and cattle off Racine, WI. She was run to the beach when it was discovered that she was on fire. Her crew and passengers disembarked. The tug DAISY LEE towed her out while she was still burning, intending to scuttle her, but the towline burned through and she drifted back to shore and burned to the waterline. Her live cargo was pushed overboard while she was still well out and they swam to shore.

November 25, 1930 - The Grand Trunk carferry City of Milwaukee was launched in Manitowoc. She was sponsered by Mrs. Walter J. Wilde, wife of the collector of customs at Milwaukee. She entered service in January of 1931.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Duden Loses Power in Seaway

11/24:
On Monday afternoon the Turkish flagged motor vessel Duden was proceeding upbound in the St. Lawrence River at reduced speed due to unspecified main engine problems. At about 4:30 p.m., while approaching the Snell Lock at Massena, the 538-foot vessel lost main propulsion about 500 feet from the lower lock wall. Both anchors were dropped, blocking the main ship channel and at 5:15 p.m. the Seaway was closed to traffic.

U.S. Coast Guard and Seaway investigators boarded the vessel at anchor, and the tug Robinson Bay was called to assist the vessel to the lock wall.

By 9 p.m., the Duden was moored starboard side to the lower lock wall with no damage to the vessel. The Seaway was reopened at 9:40 that night.

It is reported that the main engine aft camshaft bearing failed, shutting down the engine. Spare parts were on board and repairs were expected to take 24 hours.




Hull 78 Update

11/24:
The second of three newbuildings in Canada Steamship Lines' $100-million hull-replacement program is coming together nicely in the building berth at Port Weller Dry Docks (PWDD). The current issue of CSL World, the company's newsletter, reports that approximately 35 percent of the work had been completed.

The H.M. Griffith will enter dry dock at the end of the shipping season to undergo hull replacement. When delivered next spring, she will join the CSL Niagara as part of CSL's new SeawayMax fleet.

Each hull replacement is expected to add at least 25 years of service life to the respective vessel. The newbuilding program provides work for approximately 300 PWDD employees year-round until the spring of 2001.

Click here for a picture of the hull under construction.

Click here to view the current issue of CSL World online.




Maria Desgagnes Struck Bottom

11/24:
The tanker Maria Desgagnes struck the bottom St. Lawrence Seaway some time on November 10 or 11. After temporary repairs were made, the vessel was cleared to proceed to Hamilton, ONT to discharge its cargo of jet fuel.

A survey of the seaway was completed with no indications as to what caused the vessel to ground.




New Cutter Launched

11/24:
On Saturday morning Marinette Marine Corporation of Marinette, Wis., launched the 175-foot Coast Guard Cutter Henry Blake. The new vessel will be moored at Marinette Marine until early next Spring.

The Blake is one of the "Keeper" Class Coastal Class Buoy Tenders. Each ship in the "Keeper" class is named after a famous American lighthouse keeper. They are the first Coast Guard cutters equipped with Z-Drive propulsion units instead of the standard propeller and rudder configuration. They are designed to independently rotate 360 degrees. Combined with a thruster in the bow, they give the Keeper -class cutters unmatched maneuverability.

With state-of-the-art electronics and navigation systems including Dynamic Positioning System (DPS) which uses a Differential Global Positioning System, and electronic chart displays - these buoy tenders maneuver and position aids more accurately and efficiently with fewer crew. Other improvements have allowed the Coast Guard to decrease its crew from 24-34 on current vessels of similar type to 18 on the Keeper Class.

Reported by: Scott Best




Today in Great Lakes History - November 24

On November 24, 1990, the Kinsman Independent ran hard aground off of Isle Royale. The vessel was on its way to load grain in Thunder Bay when she ended up 25 miles off course. The damage to the vessel was nearly $2 million, and she was repaired at Thunder Bay before the start of the 1991 season.

On November 24, 1950 while bound for South Chicago with iron ore, the ENDERS M. VOORHEES collided with the upbound steamer ELTON HOYT II (l) (now the MEDUSA CHALLENGER) in the Straits of Mackinac during a blinding snow storm. Both vessels received such serious bow damage that they had to be beached near McGulpin Point west of Mackinaw City to avoid sinking.

The ROSEMOUNT (2), stored with coal, inadvertently sank alongside CSL's Century Coal Dock at Montreal on November 24, 1934.
The THOMAS F. PATTON was launched November 24, 1945 as a C4-S-A4 cargo ship for U.S. Maritime Commission (U.S.M.C. Hull #2370) as a) SCOTT E. LAND.

PRINDOC (3) was launched November 24, 1965.

November 24, 1892 - The Ann Arbor #1 ran agound on her first trip just north of the Kewaunee harbor.

November 24, 1931 - The City of Saginaw 31 entered service.

On 24 November 1905, ARGO (steel propeller passenger/package freight, 174', 1089 t, built in 1896 at Detroit, MI) dropped into a trough of a wave, hit bottom and sank in relatively shallow water while approaching the harbor at Holland, MI. 38 passengers and crew were taken off by breeches' buoy in a thrilling rescue by the U.S. Lifesaving Service.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




More on the Alcor

11/23:
At a press conference held Monday in Quebec City, Transports Desgagné outlined a plan to refloat the Alcor. The operation is expected to take three weeks and be completed by December 12th at a cost of 3 million dollars.

Huge steel plates will be welded on the hull and deck at present location to strengthen the ship. All fuel will be removed along with 13,000 tons of cargo, the ship is currently loaded with 25,000 tons.

The Alcor will then be towed to Quebec City. No decision to repair the Alcor has been made by the vessels owners. Several options were raised at the press conference by the owner's spokesperson. The options included scrapping or rebuilding of a new forward section.

The Alcor ran aground on November 9 in the St. Lawrence River and cracks developed on both sides of the hull, running down to the water line in a V shape and across the deck from starboard to port.

Reported by: Frédérick Fréchette




Niagara Enters Lake Huron

11/23:
The CSL Niagara passed Port Huron, MI at 0835 this morning, she is heading to Thunder Bay to load grain. This is her first trip to the upper lakes since the vessel was launched in June.

Reported by: Ed and Catherine Moore and Ron Konkol




Pathfinder Passes Cuyahoga on the Cuyahoga

11/23:
On Sunday afternoon the barge Pathfinder and tug Dorothy Ann passed the Cuyahoga as it was unloading at the Ontario Stone Dock across from Shooters on the Cuyahoga River. What made the passing interesting was the fact that the Pathfinder/Dorothy Ann was moving stern first down the narrow Cuyahoga River without the aid of tugs.

Later that evening the American Republic was spotted passing West Third Street upbound to the LTV Steel Mill.

Reported by: Al Leonard




Town of Goderich Buys Harbor

11/23:
The Goderich Signal Star reports the Town of Goderich purchased the Goderich Harbour from the Canadian Federal Government. The Town took control of the harbour on November 10th after paying $650,000. The harbour generates about $1.8 -million in shipping and lease revenues annually. The money will be used for upkeep and improvements to the harbour.

A major user of the harbour, Sifto Canada were interested in purchasing the harbour but decided to work with the Town. The two sides agreed to the creation of a non-profit Goderich Port Management Corporation.




Charles Conrad memorial

11/23:
The family of Charles Conrad is donating a statue in memory of the late Charles Conrad, founder of Lake Michigan Carferry Inc., the Ludington Daily News reported Monday. The statue is to be a "mariner at the wheel of a ship" and is to be placed at the intersection of Filer and Robert streets in Ludington. The Conrad family is asking the City of Ludington to set up an account so the family can deposit enough money for the statue, up to $80,000.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Web Sightings

11/23:
A search of the web recently turned up the cruise ship S.S. United States for sale. For a mere 35 million dollars (US) the ship can be yours.

The SS United States is the largest passenger vessel ever built in the United States and had sailed on Trans-Atlantic Ocean routes for many years. The vessel has been (according to U.S.C.G. new regulations) cleaned out inside to prepare for a major conversion.

Click here if you are interested in purchasing the vessel. A word of caution, her 990-foot length will make it difficult to bring her onto the lakes.

Reported by: Greg Hayden




Today in Great Lakes History - November 23

The GRAND HAVEN was brought back to the Lakes and locked upbound through the Welland Canal on November 23, 1964. She was intended for roll on/roll off carrier service to haul truck trailers laden with steel coils from Stelco's plant at Hamilton, Ont.

After discharging her cargo, the SAMUEL MATHER (6) proceeded to De Tour, MI laying up for the last time at the Pickands Mather Coal Dock on November 23, 1981.

In 1987 the ROGERS CITY (2) was towed out of Menominee, MI for scrapping in Brazil.

STADACONA (3)'s sea trials were completed on November 23, 1952 and was delivered to CSL the next day.

On 23 November 1872, Capt. W. B. Morley launched the propeller JARVIS Lord at Marine City, MI. Her dimensions were 193' x 33' x 18', 1000 tons. She was the first double decker built at Marine City. Her engine was from Wm. Cowie of Detroit.

On 23 November 1867, S. A. CLARK (wooden propeller tug, 12 t, built in 1863 at Buffalo) was in Buffalo's harbor when her boiler exploded and she sank.

November 23, 1930 - The Ann Arbor carferry Wabash grounded in Betsie Lake. She bent her rudder stock and her steering engine was broken up.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Satly Grounds

11/22:
The Bermuda-flag container ship CANMAR TRIUMPH went aground on the St. Lawrence River Saturday off Varennes about 15 kilometers downstream from Montreal. She is the third vessel to run aground in the St. Lawrence River this fall.

She struck bottom on the south shore of the river about an hour after leaving Montreal for Italy. It happened shortly after noon hour and she was refloated by the tugs OCEAN INTREPIDE and OCEAN JUPITER of Groupe Ocean late in the afternoon. Navigation was suspended for several hours affecting at least five vessels which had to go to anchor or delay their departure from the Port of Montreal. This included SAUNIERE and JEAN PARISIEN.

After inspection, she was allowed to go back upriver for further inspection at the Pointe aux Trembles anchorage and before midnight, she tied up at one of the Canmar docks in Montreal.

The Canadian Coast Guard reports that her engines failed for a yet to be determined reason. CBC News reports that the vessel's rudder was damaged in the grounding.

Reported by: René Beauchamp Frédérick Fréchette and Christopher Skelton.




Seaway Update

11/22:
Expected to arrived back in Montreal on Monday from the Lakes will be the RANGINUI under her new name of BBC GERMANY. She will tie up at section 28. She had been renamed at Milwaukee on or about Nov.12.

Entering the Seaway on November 20 was the Liberian-flag ARGUS bound for Thunder Bay in ballast. Strangely, about a week ago, she was anchored in Montreal waiting to go up the Seaway but instead departed for overseas. Obviously, she got new orders in the Atlantic Ocean and headed back to Thunder Bay.

Upbound Sunday at Les Escoumins pilot station is the first of the new class of vessels ordered by Fednav last year from a Japanese shipyard, the FEDERAL OSHIMA bound for Sorel and likely for Great Lakes ports. She is named after the town where she was built in Japan.

Reported by: René Beauchamp.




Alcor update

11/22:
The underwriters and Greek owners of the Alcor, a salty that has been aground since November 9, issued a request for salvage operations to begin last week to unload cargo and refloat the vessel.

Six firms responded and the Journal de Quebec reported Sunday that the contract was granted to Transport Desgagnés of Quebec City. Refloating equipment has already arrived on location while discussions between the Canadian Coast Guard, Transport Canada, Desgagnés Groupe and the ship's owners/underwriters fine tuning the plan to refloat her.

Transport Desgagnés has past experience in the matter having successfully refloated the RIO ORINOCA in 1990 aground on Anticosti Island in the Gulf of St-Lawrence loaded with asphalt tar. The ship was refloated and towed to Quebec City. After reconstruction, the RIO ORINOCA became Desgagnés tanker Thalassa Desgagné.

Transport Desgagnés is to meet the Press on Monday morning to provide details of the plan.

The ALCOR remains hard aground 2.25 miles off the eastern tip of Ile d'Orleans in the St. Lawrence River with a cracked hull and deck.

Reported by: Frédérick Fréchette




Today in Great Lakes History - November 22

Scrapping of the SPRUCEGLEN was completed on November 22, 1986 by Lakehead Scrap Metal Co. at Thunder Bay. The SPRUCEGLEN was the last Canadian coal-fired bulker.

The FRONTENAC (4) while in ballast sustained major structural damage from grounding on Pellet Reef attempting to enter Silver Bay, MN at 2140 hours on November 22, 1979.

On 22 November 1869, CREAM CITY (3-mast wooden bark, 629 t, built in 1862 at Sheboygan, WI) was carrying wheat in a gale when she lost her way and went ashore on Drummond Island. She appeared to be only slightly damaged, but several large pumps were unable to lower the water in her hull. She was finally abandoned as a total wreck on 8 December. She was built as a "steam bark" with an engine capable of pushing her at 5 or 6 mph. After two months of constant minor disasters, this was considered an unsuccessful experiment and the engine was removed.

The CITY OF MILWAUKEE was chartered to the Ann Arbor Railroad Co. and started the Frankfort, MI-Kewaunee, WI service for them on November 22, 1978.

November 22, 1929 - The City of Saginaw 31 went out on her sea trials.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Christening of the Saginaw

11/21:
With the crack of the traditional bottle of champagne, Lower Lakes Towing christened their new ship the Saginaw at a ceremony in Sarnia Saturday. Bonnie Bravener and Wendy Siddall successfully broke the bottle on the vessel's hull with one swing.

The company then generously opened the vessel for tours to all those in the large crowd that had gathered to witness the event. The Saginaw's fleet mate, the Cuyahoga, later passed the dock and saluted the new addition to the fleet.

The Saginaw is a 640-foot self unloading bulk freighter. She was built in 1953 at the Manitowoc shipyards in Wisconsin. The vessel sailed for American Steamship Company as the John J. Boland until her lay-up last winter. The Boland did not see service in 1999 and was purchased by Lower Lakes Towing in October when she was towed from Superior, Wisconsin to the Government Dock in Sarnia.

Since arriving, crews have been hard at work preparing the vessel to begin trading for Lower Lakes Towing. The Saginaw is expected to sail on her maiden voyage December 1.

We salute Lower Lakes Towing and welcome the Saginaw, may she have a long and successful career on the Lakes.

Below are pictures of the event taken by Bill Hoey Sr.
Saginaw at the Government dock in Sarnia Saturday morning.
Bow-on view of the vessel at dock.
Champagne bottle cracks on the Saginaw's hull.
President of Lower Lakes Towing Scott Bravener addresses the crowd.





Niagara Headed for Upper Lakes

11/21:
The CSL Niagara will be heading up the lakes over the next few days in what is sure to be a treat for boat watchers. The vessel has a trip scheduled that will take her to Thunder Bay on Lake Superior to load grain. She is due in Thunder Bay on Wednesday, November 24.

Since her launching last summer the vessel has traded on the Seaway, Lake Ontario and Lake Erie. The closest to the upper lakes the vessel has come is sailing to Toledo for grain.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Salty Loses Power in River

11/21:
On Friday morning the salty Avdeevka lost power while downbound in the Fighting Island Channel of the Detroit river. The incident occurred shortly after leaving the ADM dock in Windsor with a load of corn & soya bean meal for Montreal.

The main engine on the vessel quit while she was abreast of Grassy Island, she began drifting downstream on the red side of the channel. The stern anchor was dropped and then the port side bow anchor.

Sarnia Traffic was notified who then reported the disabled vessel to other traffic in the area. The tug Barbara Andrie and barge were upbound and had to checkdown in Ballards Reef Channel while the Avdeevka drifted downstream. She began swinging towards the middle of the channel with her stern outside the channel when the main engine was restarted and she headed back upstream for the Belle Isle anchorage.

Once in the anchorage a team from the U.S. Coast Guard boarded the vessel to investigate. She was released on Saturday. It is reported that the vessel lost power due to main fuel valve being left closed after routine maintenance during her stay at the ADM dock.

Reported by: Al Jackson




Today in Great Lakes History - November 21

The PATERSON (1) was launched November 21, 1953.

In 1924 the MERTON E. FARR slammed into the Interstate Bridge that linked Superior, WI with Duluth, MN. causing extensive damage to the bridge. The bridge span fell into the water but the FARR received only minor damage to her bow.

On 21 November 1869, the ALLIANCE (wooden passenger sidewheeler, 87', 197 gt, built in 1857 at Buffalo) slipped her moorings at Lower Black Rock in the Niagara River and went over the fall. She had been laid up since the Spring of 1869.

November 21, 1906 - The Pere Marquette 17 encountered one of the worst storms in many years while westbound for the Wisconsin Central slip in Manitowoc. She made port safely, but the wind was so high that she could not hold her course up the river without assistance. The tug Artic assisted, and as they were proceeding through the 10th Street Bridge, a gust of wind from the south drove the ferry and tug against the north pilings of the 10th Street Bridge. The Arctic, pinned between the ferry and the bridge, was not damaged, but she crushed the hull of a fishing tug moored there, sinking her, and inflicted damage of a few hundred dollars to the bridge.

November 21, 1923 - Arthur Stoops, the lookout on the Ann Arbor #6 was drowned while stepping from the apron onto the knuckle to cast off the headline.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Taylor Returns To Service

11/20:
The Myron C. Taylor returned to service on November 19th after departing Bay Shipbuilding Company in Sturgeon Bay WI. She will head to Saginaw to unload her cargo of "egg meal" then on to Stoneport to load stone.

She arrived at Bayship on October 18th for repairs to her self-unloading system.

Reported by: David French and Paul A. Graf




Atlantic Huron Update

11/20:
The Atlantic Huron arrived in Thunder Bay on Tuesday and entered Pascol Engineering's drydock. She is on the dry dock for repairs to her Kort nozzle - propeller blades, it is reported that some of the tips of the propeller are damaged. While the vessel is in dry dock crews will also complete other small repairs. She is expected to be in the dock for approximately ten days.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Seaway Update

11/20:
The LORENA-I entered the Seaway bound for Hamilton Friday after spending a few hours at the anchorage in Montreal for Seaway inspection. Her port of registry is Hamilton and it is reported that McKeil has bought her. Her hull is painted black and her funnel white with a narrow black band on the top.

Twelve vessels transited the St. Lawrence Seaway downbound on November 18 including 7 loaded with grain, five salties and two lakers. NANTICOKE loaded with corn for delivery at Quebec City from Toledo and GORDON C.LEITCH with wheat for also Quebec City but from Thunder Bay. The salties were CONSENSUS MANITOU with wheat from Duluth, FEDERAL OSLO with canola seeds from Thunder Bay, ZIEMIA GNIEZNIENSKA with pea beans from Thunder Bay, ALAM SEJAHTERA with pea beans and wheat from Duluth and MALYOVITZA with soybean pellets from Duluth.

Reported by: René Beauchamp.




Twin Ports Update

11/20:
Burns Harbor departed the Duluth port terminal sometime after 5 p.m. Nov.18 after undergoing repairs. The vessel proceeded to the BNSF ore dock in Superior to load.

Philip R. Clarke anchored off Superior Nov. 18 while waiting for high winds to subside so it could enter Two Harbors.

Reported by: Al Miller




Shift in the Linda E. Investigation

11/20:
The Duluth News Tribune reported on November 19th that the Coast Guard in Milwaukee has turned the Linda E. case into a criminal investigation. The Linda E. was a fishing vessel lost with out a trace on Lake Michigan December 11.

The Coast Guard told family members on Wednesday that they believe the boat collided with another. So far, some 20 boats have been investigated.

Reports from Milwaukee say that one of the vessels under investigation is the tug/barge Michigan-Great Lakes.

The Ozaukee Press in Port Washington, WI. reports that white paint had been found on the bow of the barge Great Lakes just after the sinking and that the tug and barge was in the area of the sinking. Notations in the tugs log report that fish nets were found tangled in the tug/barge.

Reported by: David French




Second LMC Carferry Route

11/20:
Fridays Ludington Daily News featured an article saying that Lake Michigan Carferry has halted talks about running the Spartan from Muskegon, Michigan to Waukegon, Illinois. The conversations stopped, according to the article, when Muskegon two weeks ago decided to continue working with Hydrolink to run two high-speed ferries from Muskegon to Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Interesting Numbers

11/20:

From Skillings Mining Review - November 6, 1999

BNSF Loads 239,696 GT Iron Ore pellets in Week Ending Oct. 31

During the week ending October 31, 1999, Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) loaded 239,696 gross tons of iron ore into five vessels at dock No. 5 of its Allouez taconite facility in Superior, WI. Vessels loaded were as follows:

Date Vessel Tonnage Destination
10/25 Stewart J. Cort 54,311 Bethlehem/Burns
10/26 Algosteel 20,453 Algoma/Soo
10/26 George A. Stinson 53,773 Great Lakes/Detroit
10/29 Burns Harbor 57,727 Bethlehem/Burns
10/31 Stewart J. Cort 53,432 Bethlehem/Burns

  SSAM Loads 87,421 GT Iron Ore Pellets in Week Ending Oct. 30

During the week ended October 30, 1999 the Sault Ste Marie Bridge Company (SSAM) loaded 87,421 gross tons of iron ore pellets into four vessels at its Escanaba ore dock in northern Lake Michigan. Vessels loaded were as follows:

Date Vessel Tonnage Destination
10/24 Wilfred Sykes 19,949 Indiana Harbor
10/27 Kaye E. Barker 23,791 South Chicago
10/28 Joseph L. Block 22,509 Indiana Harbor
10/28 Buffalo 21,172 Lorain

MERC Loads 354,506 GT in Week Ending October 31

During the week October 31, 1999, the Midwest Energy resources co. (MERC) received 29 trains carrying 388,624.55 net tons of low sulfur western coal at its Superior, WI facility. A total of seven vessels loaded 354,506 net tons of coal at the MERC during the latest week. For the year 1999 through October 31 the MERC has loaded 13,547,412 net tons, compared to 12,940,580 net tons in the corresponding period of 1998. The stockpile of western coal remaining at the facility on October 31 totaled 1,720,972 net tons. Vessels loaded were:

Date Vessel Tonnage Destination
10/25 Columbia Star 63,688 St. Clair Power Plant
10/25 American Mariner 27,338 Taconite Harbor
10/26 Paul R. Tregurtha 63,995 St. Clair Power Plant
10/26 Walter J. McCarthy 31,274 Monroe Power Plant
10/26 Walter J. McCarthy 33,188 St. Clair Power Plant
10/30 St. Clair 40,543 Nanticoke
10/31 Columbia Star 64,248 St. Clair Power Plant
10/31 Canadian Transport 30,252 Thunder Bay


Reported by: Dave Wobster




Today in Great Lakes History - November 20

The EAGLESCLIFFE HALL (2) was launched in 1956 at Grangemouth, Scotland.

At 2240 hours on November 20, 1974 the ROY A. JODREY ran aground on Pullman Shoal, located at Wellesley Island in the St. Lawrence River near Alexandria Bay, NY. All of the crew were rescued. Early the next morning at 0305 hours she slid off the shoal, rolled on her side and sank in 150 feet of water.

RALPH H. WATSON was launched 1937.

On 20 November 1872, the sidewheel steamer W. J. SPICER was finally laid up and the crew dismissed. She had served for many years as the Grand Trunk ferry at Fort Gratiot on the St. Clair River.

On 20 November 1880, BAY CITY (wooden barge, 199', 480 t, built in 1852 at Trenton, MI as the sidewheeler FOREST CITY) was carrying coal when she was cast adrift east of Erie, PA by the steamer JAMES P. DONALDSON in a storm. She was driven ashore and wrecked. Her crew was saved by the U.S. Lifesaving Service using breeches' buoy. November 20, 1898 - Ann Arbor #3 left Cleveland for Frankfort on her maiden voyage.

November 20, 1924 - Pere Marquette fleet engineer Finlay MacLaren died after 42 years with the railroad. He was succeeded by his brother Robert until Leland H. Kent was named fleet engineer in 1925.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Saginaw Christening Saturday

11/19:
Lower Lakes Towing (LLT) will christen the Saginaw in Sarnia this Saturday at 1:00pm. The former John J. Boland was purchased by LLT in October and towed from Superior, Wisconsin to the Government Dock in Sarnia.

Since arriving, crews have been hard at work preparing the vessel to begin trading under the LLT colors. The vessel is expected to depart the Government Dock on December 1.

Check back Saturday for Pictures of the Christening.

Bow on view of the Saginaw at dock in Sarnia. 11/13/99.
Stern view 11/13/99.
Port side from across the slip 11/13/99.
Bow view 11/6/99.
New fire-proof wall
Aft state room gutted.




Jackman Arrives in Grand Haven

11/19:
The Capt. Henry Jackman arrive off Grand Haven Michigan on Monday but could not enter the port until Tuesday night. Local news reports say the vessel had gotten a mooring line caught in the bow thruster while at Burns Harbor. As a result, there was flooding in a bow compartment and the bow thruster motor was damaged.

The bow thruster is used to maneuver a vessel in the tight confines of a shipping channel, a channel like the one entering Grand Haven. The Jackman was at anchor off of the Grand Haven pier heads all day Tuesday, finally entering the harbor around 9:00 pm with a cargo of sand.

Reported by: David Swain




Twin Ports Update

11/19:
Burns Harbor arrived in Duluth about 2 a.m. Nov. 18 and proceeded to the Duluth port terminal's general cargo berth for repairs. By 7 a.m. the vessel was riding high with all its ballast pumped out. No word on the type of repairs or how long they would take.

Kinsman Independent was due to arrive Nov. 18 to load at General Mills' Elevator S in Superior.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - November 19

The The SAM LAUD was launched today in1974.

CONGAR (2) was launched November 19, 1945 as a) EMPIRE MALDON.

The keel for the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was laid November 19, 1942.

The MERLE M. McCURDY was laid up for the last time at Buffalo, NY on November 19, 1985.

On 19 November 1842, the wooden schooner BRANDYWINE was carrying flour in a storm on Lake Erie when she capsized and then drifted to the beach near Barcelona, New York. One passenger's body was found in the cabin, but the entire crew of 6 was lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Atlantic Huron Enters Dry Dock

11/18:
The Atlantic Huron arrived in Thunder Bay on Tuesday and entered Pascol Engineering's drydock. It is unknown why she was put on the dry dock. The Huron was helped into the drydock by the tugs Peninsula and Donald Mac.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Twin Ports Update

11/18:
Continued dry, pleasant weather has kept grain loading moving at a steady pace. On Nov. 17, Canadian Trader was loading at General Mills in Duluth, which seems to be loading more vessels this fall than in the past few years. Harvest States was loading a double-header with Lynx on one side and Lok Rajeshwari on the other. Grain vessels expected in the next several days include Kinsman Independent, Federal Mackenzie, Canadian Ranger, Canadian Leader, Montrealais, Algosound, Margarette Green, Atlantis Spirit, Wana Haree and Petka.

Arthur M. Anderson is due to load in South Chicago with cargo for Ashland, Wis.

Reported by: Al Miller




Busy Day in Saginaw

11/18:
Visits by three freighters to the Saginaw River on Wednesday resulted in some rare sights for boatwatchers. The BUFFALO entered the system at about 2:30 p.m. and was met just inside the river's mouth by the outbound WOLVERINE. Both ships maintained headway as they made an unusual underway meet in front of the Consumers Energy coal docks. Normally, along the Saginaw River, one ship will tie up at an available dock to allow the other ship to pass.

The BUFFALO was followed into the system several hours later by its sister vessel, the SAM LAUD. Both ships were bound for docks at Saginaw, just north of the I-75 bridge over the river. The BUFFALO was docked and unloading by early evening when the LAUD passed it and tied up at the dock just ahead. The two vessels, side-by-side with their deck lights on, made an impressive sight for motorists crossing the bridge above them.

Reported by: Stephen Hause




Sundew in Portage Canal

11/18:
The 180 ft. U.S. Coast Guard buoy tender Sundew was tending buoys in the Portage Canal this weekend.

Reported by: Derek Tuoriniemi




Today in Great Lakes History - November 18

The CARL D. BRADLEY was lost in a violent storm on Lake Michigan on November 18, 1958.

Sea trials were conducted on the Canadian Olympic November 18, 1976.

The bow and stern section of the STEWART J. CORT were welded together and launched on November 18, 1969.

The ASHCROFT was launched November 18, 1924 as a) GLENIFFER (2).

On 18 November 1873, the tug CRUSADER was launched at 1:20 p.m. on 18 November 1873 at the Leighton & Dunford yard in Port Huron, MI. Her dimensions were 138' overall, 125' keel, 23' beam, and 12' depth. She was built for Mr. G. E. Brockway of Port Huron.

On 18 November 1842, CHICAGO (wooden passenger & package freight sidewheeler, 105', 166 t, built in 1837 at St. Joseph, MI) was struck by a gale between Ashtabula and Conneaut in lake Erie. She lost both of her stacks and became unmanageable when her fires went out. She was driven ashore about 3 miles east of Silver Creek, New York and was wrecked. About 60 persons were on board and amazingly no lives were lost.

November 18, 1913 - The Ann Arbor #4 ran aground on Green Isle, the island in Green Bay to the north of her course between Sturgeon Bay and Menominee. Ann Arbor #3 pulled her off undamaged after about 2 hours work.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Seaway Update

11/17:
Transiting downbound on November 15 in the St. Lawrence Seaway between St. Lambert and Iroquois locks and carrying grain were the following vessels: the lakers CANADIAN MINER with corn for Baie Comeau from Duluth, MANTADOC with wheat for Montreal from Thunder Bay, JEAN PARISIEN with corn for Baie Comeau from Toledo. MAPLEGLEN with corn from Toledo but for Quebec City, the destination changed to Montreal and ALGOVILLE with soya beans for Port Cartier from Duluth. Salties were LAKE ERIE with soya beans from Milwaukee, DORA with wheat from Duluth and ADIMON with wheat from Thunder Bay.

As of Tuesday morning, BBC GERMANY was still in Milwaukee where she was renamed. Her former name is RANGINUI, not Ranguini as earlier reported. She is the first salty to have been renamed in a Great Lakes port this year. Three salties had been renamed in the Lakes in 1998.

Arriving at Hamilton on November 15 was the McKeil ocean-going tug OCEAN WRESTLER with the barge Salty Dog I, not the barge Levant as earlier reported. She had delivered that barge at Sydney, N.S. on her way from France. This tug is registered at George Town, Cayman Islands and according to Lloyd's Register, her registered owner is Bevis Assets Ltd.

Passing Cabot Strait on Nov 14 and bound for Hamilton is the vessel LORENA I which is Canadian flag according to the Canadian Coast Guard but Belize-flag according to Lloyd's Register. Her interest lies in the fact she was originally the FRENCH RIVER built at Collingwood in 1961. She was also known under the names JENSEN STAR and WOODLAND. It is hard to believe this ship is coming back to the Great Lakes after so many years trading in the international market. There is good indications she was purchased by McKeil.

Reported by: René Beauchamp.




Twin Ports Update

11/17:
Federal St. Laurent unloaded steel coils at the Duluth port terminal November 15, then departed for Thunder Bay to load grain.

Reported by: Al Miller




Corn at Seaway Terminal Catches Fire

11/17:
A story in Tuesday's Port Huron Times Herald reports that a fire fueled by grain forced flames through the roof of the Port Huron Seaway Terminal at 2336 Military St. around 7:30a.m. yesterday. About 8,500 tons of a corn byproduct, valued at $120 a ton was at risk as Port Huron firefighters poured water on the corn gluten that was to be shipped Sunday to Ireland for cattle feed.

Traffic was diverted from Military Street as firefighters battled the blaze. Jerry VanWormer, manager at the terminal, said the terminal has housed and shipped the corn product for years without a fire. Fire Capt. Bob Eick said the grain generates heat as it dries. It is routinely moved around to keep it from igniting.

He said workers noticed steam Monday but, "that's something natural" Capt. Eick said. Panels were chopped off near the roof with an axe so firefighters on a ladder could force water onto the burning pile of pellets, and smoke and flame poured out. The owner of the grain is Casco Co., based in Canada. The company makes corn syrup for Coca-Cola, among other products.




No Treat For U.S.-Flag Fleet In October

11/17:
Cargo movement in U.S.-Flag vessels on the Great Lakes in October fell by nearly 10 percent compared to the same period in 1998. Shipments of dry-bulk cargo in U.S. bottoms totaled 11.9 million net tons, a decrease of nearly 1.3 million tons.

Iron ore cargos decreased more than 10 percent, and for the season, U.S.-Flag carriers have seen their ore float slip by 5.5 million tons. That total is approaching the equivalent of a season's work for two 1,000-foot-long vessels.

Coal loadings in U.S.-Flag lakers declined by nearly 10 percent, but for the season, the trade is not far behind last year's pace. Stone cargos continued their season-long slump, decreasing 8.2 percent. For the season, the stone trade in U.S. bottoms is down by 12 percent.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association Click here for more information




Saginaw Pictures

11/17:
Below are pictures taken Saturday, November 6 of the interior work on the Saginaw. The walls and floors over the engine room are being made fire proof to meet Canadian Coast Guard requirements.
New fire-proof wall
Aft state room gutted.




Today in Great Lakes History - November 17

The RIDGETOWN operated regularly until November 17, 1969 when she was laid up at Toronto with a load of grain.

On November 17, 1984 the EUGENE P. THOMAS was towed by the TUG MALCOLM to Thunder Bay, Ont. for scrapping by Shearmet.

On November 17, 1887, ARIZONA burst into flames off Marquette when several casks of acid broke, and she ran into the harbor ablaze.

In the morning of November 17, 1926 the PETER A.B. WIDENER was running upbound in Lake Superior in ballast when it encountered strong Northeasterly winds. When they reached a position six miles Southwest of the Rock of Ages Lighthouse on Isle Royale the captain gave orders to change course for Duluth, MN. There was no response because the WIDENER had lost its rudder. The captain ordered the ballast tanks pumped out and with the propeller and the wind, brought the ship into the wind and maneuvered it that way until they reached Duluth 115 miles away.

While under tow in 1972 to the Spanish shipbreakers the MICHIPICOTEN (2) broke in two and her forward section sank off Anticosti Island during a major fall storm on the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The after section sank the next day.

The propeller JOHN STUART burned about two miles from Seewaing, MI at 9:00 p.m., 17 November 1872. She had been aground there for some time.

On 17 November 1887, ARIZONA (wooden propeller package freighter, 189', 962 gt, built in 1868 at Cleveland) was carrying oils and acid used in mining operations when her dangerous cargo caught fire as she approached the harbor at Marquette, Michigan in heavy seas. Poisonous fumes drove all of the crew topside, leaving the vessel unmanageable. She ran against the breakwater and the crew jumped off. The burning steamer "chased" the crew down the breakwater toward town with the poisonous fumes blowing ashore. She finally beached herself and burned herself out. She was later recovered and rebuilt.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Barker Departs

11/16:
Kaye E. Barker departed Fraser Shipyards in Superior sometime November 14-15. It loaded taconite pellets at the BNSF ore dock in Superior, departing about 8 a.m. Nov. 15. As soon as it cleared Superior Entry, the Algosteel, which had been anchored on the lake, proceeded into the entry and tied up at the BNSF dock.

Reported by: Al Miller




Green Bay Update

11/16:
The Sam Laud and Buffalo arrived about 15 minutes apart in the Port of Green Bay Monday. The Laud went to the Fort James dock and the Buffalo was unloading coal at the Reiss coal company. The S.S Alpena also made its weekly appearance at the Lafarge dock.

Reported by: Chad Peters.




Muskegon Update

11/16:
Both the Joseph H. Frantz and Wolverine finally made it to Muskegon on Monday, the vessels were delayed on Sunday by weather. The Wolverine entered first unloading at the Verplank dock and was scheduled out around 1300. The Joseph H. Frantz was due in at 1000 to unload coal at the Sappi Paper Mill.

Reported by: Scott Golin.




Busy Day in Oswego

11/16:
Monday saw a busy day in Oswego Harbor, New York, for the first time in recent memory there were four vessels in the harbor at once. At 1400 hours the following vessels were in port: The KIYI - research vessel for the USGS, docked in front of the Best Western Hotel. The English River was discharging cement at The LaFarge terminal. Also discharging cement was the Stephen B. Roman, unloading at the Essroc Terminal.

The Cypriot Registered salty Atlantis Spirit (497 Feet long) was unloading Aluminum Ingots at the main Port Authority terminal. Reports are that the Atlantis Spirit was due to arrive last Wednesday, but was overdraft for the harbor. She was unable to enter until some of her cargo was offloaded at an unknown port. She was still drawing 20 feet yesterday afternoon.

Reported by: Tom Moriarty




No Improvement in Stone Trade in October

11/16:
The season-long slump in Lakes stone shipments continued in October. Stone loadings at U.S. and Canadian ports totaled 4.6 million net tons, a decrease of 6.1 percent. For the season, the Lakes stone trade stands at 31,145,335 tons, a decrease of 7.9 percent.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association Click here for more information




Saginaw Pictures

11/16:
Below are pictures taken of the vessel in Sarnia over the past two weeks.
Bow on view of the Saginaw at dock in Sarnia. 11/13/99.
Stern view 11/13/99.
Port side from across the slip 11/13/99.
Bow view 11/6/99.





Today in Great Lakes History - November 16

The tug portion of the Presque Isle was upbound in the Welland Canal on November 16,1973 en route to Erie to join with the barge.

FRED R. WHITE, JR. was launched in 1978.

In 1909 the JAMES S. DUNHAM encountered heavy seas and began hitting bottom where charts indicated 35 feet of water, even though she was in ballast and only drawing 17 feet of water. Rather than risk tearing the bottom out of her, the captain decided to beach her at Marble Point, just east of the Bad River outlet. After the heavy snow showers cleared, a message in a bottle was floated ashore to an observer.

Steamer SIR JAMES DUNN and GEORGIAN BAY, in tow of the Panamanian tug McTHUNDER arrived at Aliaga, Turkey for scrapping on November 16, 1989, 129 days after departing Thunder Bay.

On 16 November 1887, PACIFIC (wooden propeller freighter, 187', 766 gt, built in 1864 at Cleveland, OH) was loaded with lumber bound from Deer Park, MI for Michigan City, IN. After leaving the dock, she grounded on a shoal due to low water levels. The nearby Lifesaving Service took her crew off and then returned for the captain's dog. She was broken up by a gale on 19 November.

In 1892 the Ann Arbor #1 arrived Frankfort on her maiden trip.

November 16, 1990 - MWT ceased operations, ending more than a century of carferry service. The last run was made by the Badger, with Capt. Bruce Masse in command.

In 1981 the John Sherwin entered lay-up and has not seen service since.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Weather keeps ships from Muskegon

11/15:
The Oglebay Norton ships Joseph H. Frantz and Wolverine were both due in Muskegon Sunday to unload. The Wolverine was to unload stone at the Verplank dock and the Frantz was scheduled to make a return visit to Muskegon with a load of coal for the Sappi Paper Mill after just unloading there on November 12.

The weather delayed these plans, both ships were due into Muskegon in the morning on Sunday but the Frantz was still tied up in South Chicago while the Wolverine was anchored in Lake Michigan. No ETA's were given for the ships.

Reported by: Scott Golin.




Crewman Evacuated From Independent

11/15:
A crewman was evacuated off the Kinsman Independent on Sunday after injuring his finger while handling mooring cables. The J.W. Westcott Company dispatched the U.S. Mailboat J.W. Westcott II to the Sterling Fuel dock on the Detroit River where the Independent was secured. The man was transported to a local hospital for treatment.




Salty Renamed

11/15:
The former salty RANGUINI arrived at Milwaukee's heavy lift dock on Saturday night. A trip to the port Sunday morning found crews reassembling the nameless ship's two cranes and scaffolding was being rigged over the side so the new name BBC GERMANY could be painted on the ship. They will be loading a large desalinization filtration system built in Milwaukee. Final destination is Korea.

The vessel entered the Seaway in ballast for Milwaukee on November 9.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde .




New Fednav Ships

11/15:
Fednav is building a new class of vessels that will see service on Fednav's Federal Atlantic Lakes Line (FALLINE). The FALLine has operated continuously since 1960 providing scheduled sailings from North European ports into the St. Lawrence and Great Lakes carrying steel products, project and breakbulk general cargo. The Line offers several sailings per month from Antwerp, Ghent, Bremen, Brake and Dunkirk to Montreal and all main Canadian and U.S. Lakes ports.

The shipbuilder is Oshima Shipbuilding in Oshima, Japan. The cost per ship in US dollars is reported at $23 Million. The vessels are Lakemax 35,750 DWT, 20,500 GT. Bulk Carriers LOA 191 m, beam 23,50 m, Depth 14,85 m Draft 10,680 m. They are powered by B & W 6S46MC-c engines.

Hull # Vessel Name Christened Est. Delivery Date
10260 FEDERAL OSHIMA Oct. 1999 October, 1999
10261 FEDERAL ASAHI (ii) January, 2000
10262 FEDERAL RIDEAU January, 2000
10263 FEDERAL KIVALINA April, 2000
10264 FEDERAL YUKON May, 2000
Option FEDERAL _______ September, 2000
Option FEDERAL _______ September, 2000

Also noted was the sale of their half interest in Navios Corporation to a West Coast USA based group tied to Foss and also tied to Levantis - Greek Family best known for beverage distribution.

Reported by: Al Jackman.




Today in Great Lakes History - November 15

The cargo mid-body of the then under construction GEORGE A. STINSON was towed to Lorain in 1977.

PAUL THAYER b) EARL W. OGLEBAY left Lorain on her maiden voyage November 15, 1973 light for Escanaba, MI to load iron ore.

On November 15, 1974 the W.W. HOLLOWAY struck an embankment at Burns Harbor causing extensive damage.

Departing Duluth on November 15, 1909, the BRANSFORD, encountered a gale driven snow storm. She battled the storm the entire day only to end up on the rocks near Siskiwit Bay on Isle Royal.

SIDNEY E. SMITH, JR. was launched November 15, 1905 as the straight deck bulk freighter a) W.K. BIXBY.

On 15 November 1894, ANTELOPE (Wooden Schooner, 56', 32 gt, built in 1878 at Grand Haven, MI) capsized in a storm while trying to make harbor at Grand Haven, MI. 4 lives were lost.

November 15, 1924 - The carferry Pere Marquette was renamed Pere Marquette 15.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Saginaw Update

11/14:
Work on the Saginaw in Sarnia Saturday was progressing, the name has been painted on the front of the forward cabin and on both sides of the stern. The bow reads SAGIN which is as far as they got before dark. The upper band of her hull has a fresh coat of white paint and the forward half of her starboard side is painted Lower Lakes Towing gray.

The vessel no longer has the large radar boom on the top of the self unloader A-frame, but rather has two new smaller models on top of the pilot house. Smoke was also seen coming from the stack occasionally, this is most likely from an electrical generator.

Reported by: Jamie Kerwin




Update on the Alcor

11/14:
The Le Soleil, a Quebec newspaper reports that surveyors from Titan Maritime Industries have inspected the Alcor and initial reports say the low value of the vessel would not justify the significant costs of repairing her. Of the many options for refloating the vessel, one includes removing her cargo, then breaking the 22-year old boat into two parts and towing it approximately 200 miles into the Atlantic Ocean and sinking it. The Le Soleil reports that this type of operation could take more than one month and costs could rise to more than one million dollars (Ca).




Seaway Update

11/14:
The small salty RANGUINI (Antigua & Barbuda flag, 3,113 gr.t. and built in 1986) which entered the Seaway in ballast for Milwaukee on Nov. 9 will be renamed at that port. Her new name will not be SUDSTRAND as originally planned according to Lloyd's Shipping Index. She is to be renamed BBC GERMANY while loading a project cargo. Before entering the Seaway, she was in Montreal for a few days where her cranes had to be removed in order to transit. They are lying on her deck.

The salty LYNX, a sister-ship to ALCOR aground about 25 kilometers downstream from Quebec City, had to go to the shipyard at Sturgeon Bay for unknown repairs after unloading steel at Burns Harbor. She is expected to arrive at Duluth on Monday to load grain.

Reported by: René Beauchamp.




Today in Great Lakes History - November 14

The ALGOBAY departed Collingwood light for Stoneport, Mich. to load stone for Sarnia, Ont. Departing Sept Iles, Que. on November 14, 1978 with an iron ore pellet cargo for Sydney, N.S., she collided with the 90,000 ton Italian-flag ore carrier CIELO BIANCO. The Collingwood-built tug POINTE MARGUERITE, which was towing the big salty, was unfortunately crushed between the two vessels and sank, killing two crew members.

On November 14, 1934 the WILLIAM A. REISS grounded off Sheboygan, she was declared a constructive total loss.

Cracks across the ENDERS M. VOORHEES' spar deck were first noticed in a storm on Lake Superior November 14, 1942. Her fleetmate NORMAN B. REAM came to her assistance by releasing storm oil which helped calm the seas so the crew of the VOORHEES could run cables the length of her deck and winch them tight to arrest the cracking. She proceeded to the Soo escorted by the REAM and later sailed to the Great Lake Engineering Works for repairs.

The THOMAS WILSON (2) was launched November 14, 1942.

The MESQUITE was launched November 14, 1942 at a cost of $894,000.

On November 14, 1952, the Sparrows Point (now Buckeye) entered service.

On 14 November 1879, C. G. BREED (2 mast wooden schooner, 140', 385 t, built in 1862 at Milwaukee) was carrying 24,000 bushels of wheat from Detroit to Buffalo when she capsized and sank in a sudden squall near Ashtabula, OH in Lake Erie. 5 lives were lost, but 3 were saved. The 3 survivors were rescued by 3 different vessels. In 1940 following the Armistice Day Storm, The PM32 was freed by the tug John F. Cushing assisted by the PM 21.

In 1990 Glen Bowden (of MWT) announced that he would suspend cross-Lake Michigan ferry service indefinitely.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Update on the Alcor

11/13:
No attempts were made on Friday to refloat the Alcor. Tidal action on the St. Lawrence River did not cause any further damaged to the vessel but the cracks on both sides of the hull run down to the water line in a V shape and across the deck from starboard to port. The hull is in very bad condition and holding together solely by her double bottom.

The Greek owner's representatives met with Transport Canada and Canadian Coast Guard officials Friday responding to an ultimatum to come up with a salvaging plan or pay for an operation by Transport Canada and Canadian Coast Guard. At a press conference held late afternoon Friday, the ship's owners agreed to come up with a plan.

The salvage plan was not revealed to the public but there appear to be several options such as lightening the ship by removing cargo at high tide or braising the damaged hull and attempting to tow to a safe port possibly Quebec City. It may also be necessary to split the ship in two then tow it.

There is doubt that the ship can be repaired because of the cost involved. Preliminary evaluations of structural damages are reported in the 7-8 million dollar (U.S.) range. With a reported value much lower than the estimated repair costs, the 23 year old ship may be at the end of her career.

The vessel's crew are waiting in a Quebec City hotel, Canadian authorities will start extradition procedures if the Alcor cannot be salvaged. The crew also reports that they have not been paid for seven months.

Reported by: J.F.Boutin and Frédérick Fréchette.




USS update and Twin Ports Report

11/13:
Philip R. Clarke is scheduled to load coal at South Chicago on Nov. 12 and then make a rare trip to Ashland, Wis. The Anderson has usually handled this assignment in the past.

Arthur M. Anderson was anchored off Dunkirk on Nov. 11 because of weather. George A. Sloan was anchored off Buffalo because of weather and low water levels.

Courtney Burton will be paying an unusual visit to Midwest Energy Terminal on Nov. 13. Other vessels in the line-up include: Canadian Enterprise and American Mariner, Nov. 13; Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and Presque Isle, Nov. 15; Columbia Star, Nov. 16; and Canadian Olympic, Nov. 18.

Reported by: Al Miller




Busy Day for the Mail Boat

11/13:
The Marine Post Office on the Detroit River had a busy day Friday servicing nine vessels between 7:30a.m. and 11:30a.m. Just some of the vessels included the Canadian Miner, Canadian Mariner and Canadian Provider all working the fall grain rush. The mailboat J.W. Westcott II also serviced Oglebay Norton's Armco and Reserve.

Reported by: Captain Sam Buchanan




Toledo Update

11/13:
Friday the Port of Toledo saw the JEAN PARISIEN loading at Andersons Elevator. She was expected to depart late Friday night or early this morning. The MAPLEGLEN was due off the coal docks around 2300 last night. She will be heading to the ADM Elevator to load grain.

The grain trade has slowed down from the levels the port saw in October. There is still talk of ten more grain boats loading in Toledo before the season ends.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Dock Worker Injured in Buffalo

11/13:
Two Buffalo grain scoopers were injured on the Friday in an accident on board the Kinsman Independent at the ADM elevator on the Buffalo River. Local reports say the scoopers were on the main deck when a cable parted and knocked both men into the cargo hold.

The crew of the ship quickly came to their aid and used the deck crane to get them out of the hold and down to the dock on a stretcher. Thankfully the scooper's injuries were not life threatening.

The incident delayed the ship's move to the General Mills plant until that evening. She will leave General Mills for Duluth later this afternoon.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Towing Company Certified

11/13:
Cleveland, Ohio, November 1999 - The Great Lakes Towing Company, an affiliate of The Great Lakes Group, announced the successful completion of an independent audit of the Company’s Responsible Carrier Program sponsored by the American Waterways Operators (ASO). The audit verifies the Company’s rigorous standards of professional competence, marine experience and ethical conduct, and must be repeated every three years. The Company’s Responsible Carrier Program is approved by the Ninth Coast Guard District as satisfying the requirements of the District’s Cooperative Towing Vessel Examination Program.

The International Safety Management (ISM) code and the AWO Responsible Carrier Program are complementary quality assurance programs designed to raise standards and promote continuous improvement in marine safety and environmental protection. The Program is also a comprehensive safety code of practice that encompasses virtually every aspect of fleet operations, including company management and administration, vessel equipment and inspection, and human factors. The Program is designed specifically for the unique operational environments encountered in the tugboat and barge industry.

Successful completion of the audit demonstrates our commitment to the highest standards of professional service, said Jerry Popiel, Assistant Vice President, Operations, a former Coast Guard officer and the person responsible for the Company’s Program. It is especially noteworthy, as the Company celebrates its 100th anniversary as a leader in the tugboat industry, and distinguishes our tugboat operations from those of the other tugboat operators on the Great Lakes. More information about the Company’s Responsible Carrier Program can be found on the Company’s website www.thegreatlakesgroup.com




Today in Great Lakes History - November 13

On November 13, 1976 the TEMPLE BAR (e ALGONORTH) arrived at Singapore where she was lengthened 202 feet.

CONALLISON was laid up for the last time on November 13, 1981.

JAMES DAVIDSON entered service on November 13, 1920 when she loaded 439,000 bushels of wheat at Duluth, MN for delivery to Buffalo, NY.

The GEORGE HINDMAN (2) was in collision with the British salty MANCHESTER EXPLORER on Lake St. Louis, above the Lachine Lock in 1956.

J.P. MORGAN, JR. was launched November 13, 1909.

The HOMER D. WILLIAMS was involved in a collision with the steamer OTTO M. REISS at Duluth November 13, 1917.
In 1984 the WILLIAMS was towed to Thunder Bay, Ont. by the TUG MALCOLM for dismantling.

On 13 November 1870, the schooner E. FITZGERALD left Port Huron on her maiden voyage to load lumber at Au Sable, MI for Chicago. She was commanded by Capt. A. McTavish.

On 13 November 1883, H. C. AKELEY (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 240', 1187 t, built in 1881 at Grand Haven, MI) was carrying corn from Chicago to Buffalo when she encountered a heavy storm off Holland, MI. She took the disabled tug PROTECTOR in tow but let her go when her own rudder broke off. AKELEY anchored but started to sink when she fell into the troughs of the waves. The disabled schooner DRIVER managed to save 12 of the crew who had taken to AKELEY's yawl before she went down. 6 lives were lost.

Captain W.H. Van Dyke was born at Escanaba, MI on November 13, 1871 and spent most of his life on the Great Lakes (he joined the crew of a schooner at the age of 15). He first captained the Pere Marquette Line Steamer No. 8, then in 1916 he joined the Pere Marquette carferry fleet. His first command was the Steamer 15. Then for 10 years he served as master of the Steamer 17, and after the launch of the City of Flint 32 in 1929, he served as master of the Steamer 22.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Maltese Bulk Carrier Aground

11/12:
The Maltese-flag bulk carrier ALCOR ran aground on a sand bar Tuesday off the eastern tip of d'Orléans Island (Island of Orleans - Cape Tourmente) on the St. Lawrence River approximately 21 miles east of Quebec City. It was reported that the grounding was the result of a steering gear failure and the vessel is out of the shipping channel. The ALCOR, built in 1977 in Japan, was on a voyage from Venezuela to Trois-Rivières with a load of 25,000 tons of cement clinkers. Some of the cargo was lost into the river but it is reported that the cargo is not harmful to the environment.

Attempts to free her at high tide Wednesday night by four Groupe Ocean tugs from Quebec City proved unsuccessful. The crew had to be evacuated as the vessel developed a major crack in her hull in addition to four smaller cracks, it was feared that the vessel may break in two. The Ukrainian crew was removed by the Canadian Coast Guard but the captain remained onboard.

Thursday afternoon the vessel was examined by personnel from Transport Canada, the Canadian Coast Guard, a salvage company and the vessel's owners in hopes of forming a plan to save the vessel. Check back for updates.

Under her present name, this vessel did not visited Great Lakes ports but she did so under her two previous names, firstly as PATRICIA V and then as the Soviet flag MEKHANIK DREN. A sister ship, the LYNX visited Duluth recently to load grain after calling at Cleveland, Detroit and Chicago to deliver steel.

In 1996, when named KAPITAN MEDVEDEV, she was renamed LYNX at the end of July in Duluth. She also visited Great Lakes ports under her original name of LAVINIA V early in her career. ALCOR was shipyard number 947 and LYNX was no. 948.

Reported by: J.F.Boutin, Frédérick Fréchette, Roger Tottman and René Beauchamp.




Twin Ports Report

11/12:
The Canadian Transfer made what is believe to be her first trip to the Twin Ports on November 11. The photo below shows the boat preparing to unload salt at the Cutler-Magner dock in Duluth. Once finished there, the Transfer is expected proceed to BNSF ore dock in Superior to load taconite pellets.
Click here for an image of the vessel in Duluth

Reported by: Al Miller




Seaway Update

11/12:
Nov. 9 was a busy day in the Seaway. A salty, making her first trip, the RANGUINI heading for Milwaukee in ballast is to be renamed SUDSTRAND. It is unknown if she will be renamed while in a Great Lakes port or later on.

Another interesting transit was KIYI bound for Oswego. Other vessels upbound were the lakers JEAN PARISIEN and CANADIAN MARINER in ballast, ALGOISLE, CAPT.HENRY JACKMAN and CANADIAN NAVIGATOR all loaded with iron ore pellets, Algoisle going to Hamilton and the two others to Burns Harbor. In addition to the salty Ranguini, there was also the salties ATLANTIS SPIRIT, ISADORA, FEDERAL MACKENZIE and EGBERT WAGENBORG.

Downbound and loaded with grain were the following vessels: ALGORIVER with corn and soybeans for Quebec City, CATHERINE DESGAGNÉS with the same type of cargo for delivery at Long Pond, Nfld. and CANADIAN VOYAGER with soybeans for Port Cartier.

Salties carrying grain were ISA with wheat from the Lakehead and FEDERAL SCHELDE with soybeans from Duluth.

Reported by: René Beauchamp.




Townsend on the Move

11/12:
On Thursday the Paul H. Townsend was shifted to LaFarge dock in Milwaukee by the G-tugs California and Virginia. The vessel will unload her storage cargo. The Townsend entered lay-up on October 15 with no scheduled departure date.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




New Vessel on Lakes

11/12:
The United States Geological Survey's (USGS) new research vessel KIYI was making her way through the Great Lakes yesterday and was docked in Oswego Harbor. It is reported that the ship had been completed a few weeks ago at the Patti Shipyards in Pensacola, FL and they had come up the eastern seaboard and are now going down the Seaway.

Their eventual assignment will be at Bayfield, WI on Lake Superior. A berth has yet to be completed for her in Bayfield so she will winter in Sheboygan.

The vessel will depart Oswego over the next few days. She is 107 feet long, has one net winch, a crane on her stern and is a deep blue in color with a white superstructure.

Reported by: Tom Moriarty




Edmund Fitzgerald remembered in Cleveland

11/12:
The Great Lakes Brewing Company hosted an evening of remembrance and discussion of the Edmund Fitzgerald tragedy yesterday evening. The program, presented for a crowd of about 100 included an airing of the Discovery channel documentary on the raising of the ships bell and presentations by John McCarthy, son of the Fitzgerald first mate John McCarthy and Chuck Milradt, commander of the Soo Coast Guard Station during the loss of the Fitzgerald.

Mr. McCarthy was accompanied by several members of his family and spoke briefly of the sinking and the loss of his father. Mr. Milradt spoke at length on the search and rescue and possible reasons for the loss of the Fitzgerald. Mr. Milradt favors a combination of striking 6 fathom shoal and hatch cover failure for the sinking. He provided numerous charts describing the area covered by hatch covers and the possibility of leakage causing the sinking. While providing an entertaining evening there are still many unanswered questions. Being in the same room as a crew members family reminded the group of the human toll the Great Lakes can take.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy and Laura Price




Live Cam Update

11/12:
The Soo Area Office Web cams, the live cams overlooking the Soo Locks, will be out of service until after the first of the year. The Administration Building and Control Tower facilities which house the Web-cam equipment are undergoing major interior and exterior renovations. This renovation has required the temporary removal of the Web-cam equipment. We apologize for this and will have the images back as soon as possible.
For more information contact Steven.S.Rose@lre02.usace.army.mil or 906-635-3469

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




New Vessel Feature

11/12:
Due to the popular demand, again this week each day the Fleet Photo Gallery will feature a different Great Lakes vessel. Today we spotlight the history of the Algoway.

Click here to visit the gallery

The beginning of a career and the end of another: Each day this week in the Original Photo Gallery a new picture of the Saginaw tow and the Tarantau scrap tow will be featured.

Click here to visit the gallery





Today in Great Lakes History - November 12

The THOMAS F. COLE was in collision with the British motor vessel INVEREWE off the south end of Pipe Island on the lower St. Marys River in foggy conditions November 12, 1964.

The ALVA C. DINKEY, towed in tandem with her former fleetmate GOVERNOR MILLER arrived near El Ferrol del Caudillo, Spain on November 12, 1980 for scrapping.

In 1980 the PERE MARQUETTE 21 renamed c) CONSOLIDATOR, foundered in the Caribbean off the coast of Honduras a victim of the hurricane Jean.

On November 12, 1919, the PANAY, upbound on Lake Superior for Duluth, Minnesota in rough weather, was one of the last vessels to see the downbound JOHN OWEN which, apparently later the same day, disappeared with all hands.

November 12, 1980 - The Consolidator, formerly the Pere Marquette 21, sank 17 miles off the coast of Honduras during Hurricane Jean. No lives were lost.

On 12 November 1881, BRUNSWICK (iron propeller bulk freighter, 248', built in 1881 at Wyandotte, MI) was carrying 1500 tons of hard coal in a night of fitful squalls in Lake Erie. CARLINGFORD (wooden schooner, 155', built in 1869 at Port Huron, MI) was also sailing there, loaded with 26,000 bushels of wheat. They collided. After the skipper of BRUNSWICK made sure that the sinking schooner's crew were in their lifeboats, he ran for shore with his sinking vessel, but sank a few miles off Dunkirk, NY. A total of 4 lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Seaway Update

11/11:
As expected, ALGOCATALYST tied up at Sorel during the night of Nov.8/9 for lay up once again.

Expected upbound in the Seaway in a few days will be the ocean-going tug OCEAN WRESTLER making her first trip and owned by a McKeil subsidiary and operating under a foreign flag in the international trade. At Hamilton, she will deliver a barge named Levant which the tug picked up in France.

According to the Summer edition of "Steamboat Bill", Blount Industries of Warren, RI is building a sightseeing boat for Shoreline Marine of Chicago for delivery in May via the Erie Canal. Already operating ten other sightseeing vessels, one of them is named CAP STREETER. She was acquired by them from Portland, ME interests in 1991 and had entered the Seaway in July of that year under her previous name of LONGFELLOW II on her delivery voyage to Chicago.

A correction to one of my last reports. On Nov. 4, CANADIAN NAVIGATOR, upbound for Hamilton was not carrying titanium slag but rather blast furnace slag, also known as iron slag for delivery to the St. Lawrence Cement plant at Hamilton.

Reported by: René Beauchamp.




Taylor Repairs

11/11:
Crews will begin fitting out the Myron C. Taylor on Friday and she should be ready to sail next week. The vessel has been in the Sturgeon Bay shipyard for repairs to her unloading system that was damaged when the vessel attempted to unload at Saginaw Rock in late October.

Reported by: Stanley Bandish




Twin Ports Report

11/11:
For a few hours Nov. 10, Twin Ports grain elevators reported a full house, with all active loading berths occupied. In Duluth, Noblesse was at General Mills, Consensus Manitou was at Cargill and Verily was loading at AGP. In Superior, Dora was at Peavey Connors Point, Algoville and Darya Devi were loading at Harvest States and Lake Erie was at Elevator S. Several of these vessels were scheduled to depart during the night, and several more vessels were expected to take their places.

Canadian Transfer is scheduled to make its first trip to the Twin Ports on Nov. 11 to unload salt at the Cutler-Magner dock in Duluth, then shift to the BNSF ore dock to load.

Reported by: Al Miller




Wednesday a Busy day in Milwaukee

11/11:
The Herbert C. Jackson was inbound Milwaukee's inner harbor with a load of coal at approximately 3:30 pm. The Alpena was directly behind her heading for her dock at the LaFarge Cement terminal. The Paul H. Townsend is laid up at the south end of Milwaukee's Inner Harbor turning basin.

Reported by: Michael G. Kickbush




Cypriot boat detained after 7 in crew desert

11/11:
Wednesday's Globe and Mail reports that the Sea Glory, a cargo ship flying a Cypriot flag is sitting half a kilometer offshore in Humber Bay near Toronto after being assessed a $105,000 security deposit because seven crew members jumped ship. Immigration officials are trying to find the crew members, Sri Lankans, who left the ship somewhere between Montreal and Hamilton in the past week.

Giovanna Gatti, a spokeswoman for the Immigration Department is quoted as saying "At some point after entering Canadian waters they were no longer on the ship." Ms. Gatti said the ship will not be allowed to leave until the captain pays the security deposit. Under the Immigration Act, ship owners may be assessed a $15,000 (ca) security deposit for every crew member who deserts a ship in Canadian waters. This is to cover the costs of returning them to their countries of origin.

A spokesman for Toronto Harbour Commission said the ship is lying outside that organization's jurisdiction. He provided the name of the ship's Montreal shipping agent, who referred calls to a shipping company in Greece. There, a person answering the phone referred calls to a Montreal lawyer.

"I hope that the matter will be resolved tomorrow," said Peter Davidson, the lawyer, referring to the payment of the cash security deposit. "In the meantime the ship is in detention."

RMCP Constable Michele Paradis said it is possible the ship jumpers may return voluntarily to the ship. Ms. Gatti said last year 117 people jumped ship in Canadian waters.

The ship's captain, Alexander Kostrikos, a Russian who said he joined the ship in Montreal on Nov. 3, believes the seven Sri Lankans jumped ship in Montreal on Nov. 2. An eighth Sri Lankan man got off with them but returned to the ship in Hamilton and hasn't provided much information, the captain said.

Capt. Kostrikos said he had little information about his missing crew members. "I don't know them," he said over a ship-to-shore telephone call in broken English.

Including the missing members, the ship has a crew of 26, he said. He said the ship finished unloading its cargo of chrome ore, steel and coal in Toronto on Monday.

Reported by: Jim Fitzgerald




500,000

11/11:
Shawn Burgess-Keith of Grand Rapids Michigan was the 500,000th visitor to the main page of this web site.

Tom Moriarty of Syracuse, New York checked in at 500,001.

Thanks to everyone for visiting!




Today in Great Lakes History - November 11

The Armistice Day Storm of November 11, 1940 was one of the worst storms in the recorded history of Lake Michigan. In all, the storm claimed 5 vessels, and 66 lives. The storm hit late Monday afternoon, November 11th, with winds of hurricane proportions. The winds struck suddenly from the southwest at about 2:30 P.M. and were accompanied by drenching rain, which later changed to snow. The winds reached peak velocities of 75 miles per hour, the highest in local maritime history. Some of the vessels affected were:

City of Flint 32: Beached at Ludington, no damage. Jens Vevang, relief captain, in command. Her regular captain, Charles Robertson, was on shore leave.

Pere Marquette 21: Blown into a piling at Ludington, no damage, captained by Arthur Altschwager. She had 5 passengers aboard.

City of Saginaw 31: Arrived Milwaukee 6 hours late with over a foot of water in her hull. The wireless aerial was missing and her seagate was smashed by the waves. She was captained by Ed Cronberg.

Ann Arbor carferry "Wabash": A railcar broke loose from it's moorings on her cardeck and rolled over, nearly crushing a crewman.

The steamer Novadoc: Ran aground at Juniper Beach, South of Pentwater.

Two crewman (cooks) drowned when the ship broke in half. Seventeen crewman, found huddled in the pilot house, were rescued by Captain Clyde Cross and his 2 crewman, Gustave Fisher and Joe Fontane of the fishing tug "Three Brothers".

Conneaut (2) ran hard aground on Lansing Shoal near Manistique, MI. on Lake Michigan. She reportedly had lost her propeller and rudder. Two days later she was pulled off.

The SINALOA had taken on a load of sand near Green Island and was heading for Chicago through Death's Door on Wisconsin's Door Peninsula when the November 11th Armistice Day storm of 1940 struck in upper Lake Michigan. During the storm the SINALOA lost her rudder. The anchor was dropped but her anchor cable parted. In this helpless condition she ran aground at Sac Bay on Michigan's Garden Peninsula. Fortunately the stricken vessel was close to shore where the Coast Guard was able to rescue the entire crew. Declared a constructive total loss, her owner collected the insurance and forfeited the vessel to the Roen Salvage Co.

The tanker MERCURY (1) was banged up.

Anna C. Minch: Sank South of Pentwater with a loss of 24 lives.

William B. Davock: Sank with the loss of all hands.

The fishing tugs "Indian" and "Richard H.": Lost with all hands off South Haven.

On 11 November 1872, the schooner WILLIS collided with the bark ELIZABETH JOENS on Lake Erie and sank in a few minutes. The crew was saved.

On 11 November 1936, J. OSWALD BOYD (steel propeller fuel tanker, 244', 1806 gt, built in 1913 in Scotland) was carrying 900,000 gallons of gasoline when she stranded on Simmons Reef on the north side of Beaver Island. The U.S. Coast Guard from Beaver Island rescued the entire crew of 20.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Familiar Saltie Involved in Collision

11/10:
The Bulgarian saltwater vessel SHIPKA, which has made several trips into the Great Lakes since 1979, collided with the Belize ship SEMELE on November 7th. The collision occurred on the western side of Turkey in the Bosphorous Strait.

The Semele was carrying a load of steel products from Nikolayev, Ukraine bound for Algeria. The SEMELE sank, but her crew was rescued.

The SHIPKA sustained damage and anchored at Ahirkapi, Turkey. No word as to if the damage will warrant a shipyard drydocking, which would be done in Istanbul, Turkey.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak and John Meyland




Twin Ports Report

11/10:
The unseasonably warm, dry weather has kept grain-loading proceeding at a steady pace in the Twin Ports. Generally, three to five ships a day are loading, and the lack of weather delays is keeping the traffic from bunching up. On the morning of Nov. 9, Darya Devi was loading at Harvest States, Canadian Miner was at Peavey and Lake Erie was loading at the General Mills elevator in Superior, the latter unusual because generally only lakers load at this venerable structure. In Duluth, Noblesse was loading at General Mills.

Kaye E. Barker remains in drydock at Fraser Shipyards. She is in for stern tube repairs, repairs that are expected to be completed later this week.

Edwin H. Gott was due at DMIR Duluth on Nov. 9 to load for its now-regular run to Nanticoke. Calcite II was due to unload at Manistee and Arthur M. Anderson was scheduled to arrive at Dunkirk. Cason J. Callaway was set to make an unusual trip to Silver Bay on Nov. 11.

Reported by: Al Miller




Busy Day on the St. Clair River

11/10:
Monday afternoon was a beautiful and busy Fall afternoon on the upper St. Clair River. Fleetmates Algorail and Algosteel proceeded downbound out of Lake Huron. The Algorail continued downbound while the Algosteel turned 180 degrees just below the Blue Water Bridge. After her turn she backed down the river and eventually docked in Sarnia. It was an impressive move, particularly with the strong winds blowing upriver.

This turn brought the upbound Columbia Star to dead slow while the Algosteel completed the maneuver. Following the Columbia Star upbound was the tanker Gemini and saltie Millennium Falcon.

Docked at Blue Water Aggregates, the Charles E. Wilson and Canadian Transfer were unloading simultaneously, while a ULS self-unloader was discharging coal at a The Lambton power plant.

Also upbound during the afternoon was the Saltie Federal Oslo which made for a nice sight heading up into Lake Huron with the pilot boat alongside.

Reported by: Ross Ruehle




Refit of car ferry Wolfe Islander III

11/10:
On October 13,1999, the MTO carferry Wolfe Islander III departed Kingston for Hamilton. This will be a major mid-life refit for the ferry which was built at Port Arthur Shipyards in 1975. The smaller ferry, Frontenac II will be in service from Kingston to Wolfe Island until she returns.

She arrived in Hamilton on Thurs. Oct 14 and proceeded to Heddle Marine at Pier 14. Work began immediately to remove all four aqua-master drive propulsion units as well as all four Cummins V12 710 series engines. Work also began on a new walk-around on her bridge deck. Her new engines will be four Caterpillar diesel 3412 series complete with electronic fuel injection and emission control. The new propulsion units will be Aquamaster 901 with an input speed range (RPM) of 700-1950. On Sat. November 6 she was in place in drydock to also undergo her five-year inspection. The work is supervised by Chief Engineer Mike Hawkins.

Reported by: Brian Johnson




500,000 Today

11/10:
The main page of this site will turn 500,000 visits some time early today, please e-mail if you are the one.




Great Lakes Fleets Looking For Mariners

11/10:

The U.S.-Flag fleet on the Great Lakes has a number of job openings right now. While many openings are what are referred to as relief positions (replacing regular crewmembers on vacation), there are also permanent positions available in all ratings (entries, the qualified ratings [AB, QMED] and officers). As such, the length of employment could be for several weeks or until the end of the navigation season in January.

Fleets are seeking both experienced and first-time mariners. Those interested in beginning a career in the maritime industry must first obtain a Merchant Mariner’s Document (MMD) from the U.S. Coast Guard. By law, no one may work on a U.S.-Flag self-propelled vessel without an MMD. Please understand, however, that possession of an MMD is not a guarantee of employment, only the potential for employment. For more information on obtaining an MMD, click here.

For those individuals already possessing a valid MMD and/or license, the following paragraphs explain which unions and companies to contact:

OFFICERS

The vast majority of U.S.-Flag lakers are contracted with American Marine Officers in Toledo, Ohio, to supply licensed officers (Deck, Engine and Galley departments). Individuals possessing an Engine or Deck license should contact Terry Pelfrey, Dispatcher for AMO at 1-800-221-2294. While licensed engineers whose experience is deep sea can use their license on the Great Lakes, deck officers must have Great Lakes Pilotage.

UNLICENSED PERSONNEL

Some companies are contracted with the Seafarers’ International Union (SIU) for their unlicensed personnel. For more information, call Tim Kelley (810-794-4988). The following companies are contracted with Steelworkers Local 5000, but by their contract are allowed to hire unlicensed personnel directly. Contacts at those companies are as follows:

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (2 vessels) – Calvin Durham (219-787-3709)
Central Marine Logistics, Inc. (3 vessels) – Lori Johnston (219) 922-2644
Interlake Steamship (9 vessels) – (800-327-3855, ext. 7140)
Oglebay Norton (12 vessels) – (800-233-8759)
USS Great Lakes Fleet (11 vessels) - Robert Jackson or Dick John (218-723-2413)

Working in the marine industry is a rewarding career, but as with all professions, it has its unique demands. Great Lakes shipping IS NOT a 9 to 5 job! The ships operate constantly, stopping only long enough to load or discharge cargo. If the ship arrives in port at 0130 (1:30 a.m.), that’s when loading or unloading begins. Similarly, if loading/unloading finishes at 2300 (11 p.m.), the vessel is underway minutes later. Crewmembers are aboard ship for weeks on end, with only limited opportunities for going ashore. The pay is competitive and the food is good and plentiful. Meals and rooms are provided free of charge. All members of Lake Carriers’ Association are Equal Opportunity Employers.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association Click here for more information




Great Lakes Maritime Task Force Elects Officers For 2000

11/10:
The Great Lakes Maritime Task Force, the largest coalition of American Great Lakes shipping interests, held its Annual Meeting in Cleveland on November 4. The Task Force reaffirmed its position on several issues, key of which is support of the U.S. Cabotage laws.

Task Force members elected their officers for the year 2000 at the meeting. They are as follows:

James J. Driscoll, Marinette Marine - President
Daniel L. Smith, American Maritime Officers - 1st Vice President
George J. Ryan, Lake Carriers' Association - 2nd Vice President
John D. Baker, ILA Great Lakes District Council, 3rd Vice President
Glen G. Nekvasil, Lake Carriers' Association - Secretary
Ann Pelfrey, American Maritime Officers, Treasurer

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association Click here for more information




Memorial Chat

11/10:
Tonight in the Live Chat room we will hold a memorial chat about the Fitzgerald and her crew at 8pm EST. If anyone has any stories or memories or wishes to remember the many lives lost on the lakes, please join us.

A discussion on the cause of her sinking is scheduled for 9pm EST.

Click here to visit the chat room


Reported by: Ken Boerman




Movie Matinee at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Isle

11/10:
The Dossin museum on Belle Isle in Detroit will feature Hydroplane Racing Movies this weekend. The pre-show starts Saturday, November 13 at 11:00 am with collectors gathering and swapping collectibles and stories.

The movies start at 12:00 and run for the next two hours. Featured will be the contested 1956 Gold Cup Race which was run in Detroit and the hotly contested final between the Thriftway and Miss Pepsi. For more information contact the Dossin Great Lakes Museum - 313.852.4051




12th Annual "Gales of November" Duluth, MN.

11/10:
The Shipwreck & Diving Program will be held at the Holiday Inn in downtown Duluth, Minnesota, on Saturday, November 20th, 1999. The Lake Superior Marine Museum Association of Duluth and the Corps of Engineers' Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center will be hosting this year's event in cooperation with Innerspace Scuba Center of Duluth.

Programs will run throughout the day from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. with a variety of presenters coming from Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, and Ohio. Displays and exhibits on diving equipment, charter operations, publications, etc. will be available throughout the day.

Tickets for the 12th Annual "Gales of November" program are available from the:
Lake Superior Marine Museum Association
P.O. Box 177 Duluth, MN 55801-0177.

Tickets for the day programs are $15.00 each and $25.00 for the dinner and evening program. Dinner and evening program tickets must be ordered in advance not later than November 15th. No evening program tickets will be available at the door. Checks must be payable to the Association in US funds. No credit cards, please.

Click here for more information




Model Contest

11/10:
The Western Lake Erie Historical Society & Museum Ship SS WILLIS B. BOYER plan on having a ship model competition in the year 2000. The dates are Friday, 22 September 2000 & Saturday, 23 September 2000. There are numerous categories for the ship models. So model builders, watch for the date to send in your application. If you would like more information, contact Mr. Edward Goyette, 2829 115th Street, Toledo, OH 43611-2837.

Reported by: Joe Barr




Today in Great Lakes History - November 10

The EDMUND FITZGERALD foundered on Lake Superior during a severe storm November 10, 1975 at approximately 7:10 pm about 17 miles north-northwest of Whitefish Point, MI at position 47_0'N by 85_7'W in Canadian waters.
Click here for a link to other Fitzgerald sites.

IMPERIAL ST. CLAIR was launched November 10, 1973.

The STEELTON (2) sailed on her maiden voyage November 10, 1943.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY, in her first season of operation on November 10, 1943 during a Lake Superior storm, she developed a significant crack across her spar deck and 12 to 14 feet down both sides of her hull. As the hull worked in the heavy seas, the crack widened to as much as three to four inches. The crew ran cables between the fore and aft winches which maintained a force sufficient to hold the hull together.

November 10, 1972 in the vicinity of the entrance to the East Outer Channel near Amherstburg, Ont. the UNITED STATES GYPSUM (2) collided with her towing tug MAINE and as a result her bow was punctured. The GYPSUM was beached to prevent further sinking.

WILLIAM A. IRVIN was launched November 10, 1937.

November 10, 1892 the carferry Ann Arbor #1 left the shipyard in Toledo, bound for Frankfort on her maiden voyage.

In 1895 the first major accident caused by cars coming free on the car deck of a railferry happened when the Ann Arbor #1 was on a eastbound voyage. Approaching Frankfort in a northwest gale, she rolled so violently that many of the car fastenings broke and the cargo began to move about on the car deck. None of the early rear-loading car ferries was equipped with a sea gate to protect the stern from the seas, and seven cars of flour and butter went off the deck of the #1 into the lake. Captain Charles Moody resigned from the Ann Arbor as a result of this incident and returned to the Pere Marquette and Goodrich lines.

November 10, 1911 - The Ann Arbor #4 was back in service after damaging several plates in October.

ATLANTIC (formerly MANITOULIN, wooden propeller passenger/package freight, 147', 683 Gt., built in 1880 at Owen Sound, Ont.) was bound for Byng Inlet with lumber camp supplies when she was caught in a storm and grounded in the lee of Pancake Island in Georgian Bay. Her cargo and aft cabin were thrown overboard to lighten her, but she caught fire and was destroyed. Her passengers and crew took to her boats and survived.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Munson visits St. Ignace

11/09:
The John G. Munson paid what has become her annual fall visit to St. Ignace on Monday. The unusual sight of a steamer unloading brought a throng of curious onlookers. Munson was delivering a partial load of coal on to what is normally a parking area (Dock #3) used for fishing boat trailers in the summer months. After the short unload, the Munson was due next at Gulliver.

Reported by: Terry Foley




Lansdowne in Erie

11/09:
Reports from Erie Pennsylvania on Sunday have the former rail ferry tied up at the Port Authority pier near the Viking. The Lansdowne is reported to be locked and there was no activity around her or the Viking. The pier is open to public making it possible to take pictures.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Cruise Ship Departs

11/09:
The Ottawa Sun reported in their Sunday edition that the passenger vessel Norwegian Sky departed the drydock on Saturday with the assistance of two tugs.

The vessel ran aground in the St. Lawrence River in late September and was repaired at the Davie Shipyard.
Click here for a live cam on the Norwegian Sky




Today in Great Lakes History - November 09

The EDWIN H. GOTT's keel was laid November 9, 1977.

The aft section of the ATLANTIC SUPERIOR was launched November 9, 1981.

In the fall of 1962 the W.F WHITE left the Lakes for coal shuttle service in the Chesapeake Bay area passing down the Welland Canal November 9th.

The keel for the GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2) was laid November 9, 1953.

NORMAN B. REAM was laid up at Duluth, MN on November 9, 1960. In 1965 she would be sold and renamed b) KINSMAN ENTERPRISE (1).

At 10:00 p.m. on November 9, 1913 the HOWARD M. HANNA, JR. was blown broadside onto the Port Austin Reef (off the tip of Michigan's thumb on Lake Huron) by Northerly winds in excess of 60 mph during the Great Storm of 1913. The ship finally lost power and was driven onto the reef where she broke in two at hatch number seven.

On November 9, 1913 while downbound with ore, the The FRED G. HARTWELL (1) encountered very strong southwest winds in Lake Superior. She reached a position one mile east of Iroquois Point, on Whitefish Bay and dropped her anchor to ride out the storm. Her anchor began to drag when the winds shifted to the north and increased to unprecedented gale-force velocity. This was the beginning of the "Great Storm" of 1913 which drove her aground onto a rocky bottom. The seas pounded her until her bottom plates were torn open and she sank the next day in twenty-six feet of water.

On November 9th during the Big Storm of 1913, the MATTHEW ANDREWS (1) was downbound in Lake Huron with a cargo of iron ore. Captain Lempoh decided to drop anchor rather than risk trying to enter the St. Clair River during the fury of the storm. Taking bearings for anchorage from Lightship 61 (stationed at Corsica Shoal), which unknown to him had been blown two miles off station, the MATTHEW ANDREWS (1) grounded heavily on Corsica Shoal.

In 1971 the City of Midland 41 was laid up due to coal stike.

On 9 November 1923, AZTEC (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 180', 835 gt, built in 1889 at Marine City) was destroyed by fire at her home port of Marine City, MI. The wreck lay in the Belle River until dynamited in the 1930s and what was left was placed on the previously raised barge PROVINCE which was then towed up the St. Clair River, into Lake Huron and scuttled.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Seaway Update

11/08:
On November 4, between St. Lambert lock and Iroquois lock, there were much more transits involving vessels upbound than vessels downbound. The salties were SLANO bound for Detroit with general cargo. She docked two days later on the Rouge River, FEDERAL RHINE with pig iron for Hamilton after delivering a part cargo at Contrecoeur on the St. Lawrence River, ADIMON in ballast for Thunder Bay, FEDERAL ST LAURENT with steel for Cleveland and ALAM SEJAHTERA with sand for Port Weller and Ashtabula. The lakers were PATERSON and MANTADOC both in ballast, the PATERSON heading for Windsor from Quebec City, destination changed for Toledo later on and MANTADOC for Thunder Bay after delivering her grain cargo in Montreal, CANADIAN NAVIGATOR with titanium slag loaded at Quebec City for delivery at Clakson and then she left for Quebec City for another cargo and ALGOCAPE with iron ore pellets for Hamilton and Clarkson from Port Cartier.

Transiting also upbound were the tankers DIAMOND STAR and ALGOSAR in addition to the tug ESCORT PROTECTOR pushing the tank barge McAsphalt 401 bound for Oswego.

Downbound were CANADIAN LEADER loaded with corn and soybeans en route for Baie Comeau from Toledo, the tankers ALGOEAST with bunker oil bound for Quebec City from Nanticoke and THALASSA DESGAGNÉS in ballast for Quebec City from Hamilton and the salties RHEA with wheat from Duluth and MILLENIUM RAPTOR with wheat also but from an undisclosed upper Lakes port. The tug LAC VANCOUVER left Valleyfield for Montreal.

Going back in service early this month was ALGOCATALYST which was laid up at Sorel. Ports of call since then were Tracy near Sorel, Montreal and Port Alfred. Her next destination is Sorel meaning she will probably entering lay up once again. Loading operation from trucks for COMEAUDOC in Montreal ended a few days ago. She will probably shifted to another dock within a few days.

Reported by: René Beauchamp.




Unloading to Begin Today

11/08:
As mentioned in the Seaway report, the Yugoslavian registered Slano arrived in Detroit on Saturday afternoon. She tied up on the Rouge River at the Herridon dock in front of the former passenger vessel, now barge Alabama.

The heavy lift ship will begin unloading today and was expected to block the Rouge River between 1:00p.m. and 7:00p.m. The 480-foot ship is carrying a cargo of generators that will be used in the new power house at Rouge Steel.




Green Bay report

11/08:
The Coast Guard buoy tender Harry Clarbourne was docked in Green Bay over the weekend giving free tours.

The Lewis G. Harriman was moved last week to free up the Anamax dock for the arriving vessel. The Harriman is used to store cement as an unpowered vessel and last operated in 1980.

The tug Jimmy L. was tied to the Harriman on Sunday to tow her back to the Blue Circle Cement dock.

Reported by: Chad Peters




Busy Day on the Upper St. Clair River

11/08:
Sarnia Traffic Control Center was busy on Saturday as eight vessels were snarled at the St. Clair Rivers upper entrance. Many of the vessels were forced to adjust their speed and course to allow for the very labored tugs MANITOU and KURT LUEDKE with three barges to make it out into Lake Huron.

Several of the captains and pilots were noticeably upset with the course and speed changes they were forced to make as they jockeyed for position to enter, or exit the system.

But in the end, the situation was orchestrated with much professionalism and skill from both the vessels and Sarnia Traffic.

Vessels involved downbound: CUYAHOGA, ISA (a salty), and H. LEE WHITE
Upbound: tugs MANITOU, KURT LUEDKE (tied together) with their three barges, ARMONIKOS (salty), FRONTENAC, and JOHN G. MUNSON.

Click here for a photo showing the CUYAHOGA squeezing by the Salty ARMONIKOS as the tugs and barges move off to the right to allow passages of the bigger boats.

Reported by: John A. Harris




By the Numbers

11/08:
Ned Stoltzfus of Whitelake, MI was the 300,000th visitor to the News page. Congratulations Ned and thanks to everyone for viewing and contributing to this page.

The main page of this site will turn 500,000 visits some time Monday or Tuesday, please e-mail if you are the one.




New Trip Raffle

11/08:
USS Great Lakes Fleet has announced that they will be participating in a raffle for three trips aboard one of their footers. Three winners will be drawn on 6 June, 2000 for the, 'Cruise of a Lifetime.' The three winners and one other guest per winner will travel on a USS/GLF thousand-foot vessel. USS/GLF owns three footers, the Edwin H. Gott, Edgar B. Speer, and Presque Isle.

This is in support of the Lake Superior Maritime Visitor's Center in Duluth. Tickets are $10 US each. They are payable via check or money order and can be mailed to :
Lake Superior Marine Museum Association
PO Box 177
Duluth, MN 55802

Click here for more information

Reported by: Steve Sliwka and Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - November 08

The COLUMBIA STAR was launched November 8, 1980 at Bay Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS and IRVING S. OLDS arrived on November 8, 1988 at Kaohsiung, Taiwan for scrapping by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.

The STADACONA (1) was renamed ROBERT S. McNAMARA by its new owner Ford Motor Company's Marine Division. The McNAMARA was rescued from potential scrapping when Ford purchased her for $80,000 and spent $15,000 for renovation at AmShip's Toledo yard.

The J.P. MORGAN, JR. arrived at Avilés, Spain on November 8, 1980.

PETER A.B. WIDENER passed down the Welland Canal November 8, 1986 towed by the tugs TUSKER and GLENADA en route to Lauzon, Que. From there she was towed overseas for scrapping. When built, the PETER A.B. WIDENER and fleetmates J. PIERPONT MORGAN, NORMAN B. REAM and HENRY H. ROGERS were the first 600-footers built for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.;"The Class of 1906."

On November 8, 1986, the B.F. Affleck, under tow of the tug Thunder Cape, went adrift on Lake Superior in a storm after the tug lost power. The tug Avenger IV was dispatched to pick up the Affleck, which was headed for scrap, and the tanker Eastern Shell towed the Thunder Cape to Thunder Bay for repairs.

BEN HUR, a wooden schooner-barge wrecker, 314 t, built in 1874 at Dunville, Ont., had been purchased for the job of salvaging the schooner M. E. TREMNBLE. On 8 November 1890, she was at the job near Port Huron in the St. Clair River when she was rammed and sunk by the schooner-barge SUPERIOR which was being towed by the steamer PASSAIC. BEN HUR settled on top of the schooner she was attempting to salvage and a lighter-scow she was using also went down with her.

Data from: Jody Aho Joe Barr, Dave Swayze and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Saginaw Update

11/07:
Work on the Saginaw in Sarnia Saturday was progressing as crews began to paint her hull in the Lower Lakes Towing Gray. Last night the hull had been painted at the bow on the starboard side.

Inside the vessel crews are hard at work gutting the living quarters, they are removing asbestos and adding fire proof walls and flooring. An impressive operation to watch as a wall is removed and replaced with a new steel wall welded in place.

The engine room is also a busy place with crews working on the vessel's boilers and other equipment. The unloading gear is being refurbished and does not appear to be in as bad of shape as reported when the vessel was last laid-up.

The Saginaw will be christened in late November and is expected to carry her first cargo in early December.




Boats at Anchor

11/07:
The 730-foot Algosteel and the 642-foot Kinsman Independent were anchored in Bete Gris Friday, November 5th, probably due to rough weather. There was a gale warning in effect. An unidentified boat was seen a few miles out but did not anchor.

Reported by: Derek Tuoriniemi




Rumored Name Change

11/07:
The sale of the former John J. Boland to Lower Lakes Towing has sparked rumors that American Steamship Company will rename one of their other vessels John J. Boland. Reports to this web site list the Charles E. Wilson or the Buffalo as likely candidates for a rename.

John J. Boland was chairman of the board of American Steamship Company until his death in 1956.




By the Numbers

11/07:
This news page will turn 300,000 visits Sunday or Monday. Please check the counter at the bottom of this page and e-mail if you are the 300,000th visitor.

The main page of this site will turn 500,000 some time this week, please e-mail if you are the one.




Today in Great Lakes History - November 07

The T2 converted laker HILDA MARJANNE's 1961 German-built hull forward of ther engine room, minus her pilot house, was towed by the tugs G.W. ROGERS and BAGOTVILLE to Port Weller Dry Docks arriving there on November 7, 1983. This section was to become part of the CANADIAN RANGER.

On November 7, 1989 the SAMUEL MATHER (7) was moved to the Frog Pond on her way to the cutter's torch.

On November 7, 1905 the GRAND HAVEN was purchased by the Grand Trunk-Milwaukee Carferry Line, Milwaukee out of receivership when G.T.C.L. defaulted on its bonds.

The ARTHUR B. HOMER was launched November 7, 1959 for the Bethlehem Steel Corp., Cleveland, OH. She was the last ship built by Great Lakes Engineering at River Rouge.

In 1902 the BRANSFORD rammed and sank the tug RECORD with a loss of a tug crewman in the Portage Lake Ship Canal in Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula.

On November 7, 1913, the storm responsible for sinking or damaging more vessels than any other began a six-day assault on the Great Lakes. The "Big Blow" of 1913 struck Lake Superior on November 7 and reached Lake Michigan by November 8, where the Pittsburgh Steamship Company vessel Clarence A. Black was severly damaged by the waves at the dock in Gary.

On 7 November 1893, ALBANY (steel propeller package freighter, 267', 1918 gt, built in 1884 at Wyandotte, MI) collided with the iron freighter PHILADELPHIA in a think fog. PHILADELPHIA took ALBANY in tow to try to save her, but she sank a few miles off Pointe Aux Barques, MI. Her crew transferred to PHILADELPHIA, but they soon had to abandon her too since she also sank. 8 lives were lost, presumably when one of the lifeboats was run down by the still running, but abandoned, PHILADELPHIA.

The City of Flint 32 ran aground at Manitowoc in 1947.

In 1906 the Grand Trunk carferry Grand Haven was put up for sale at a receiver's auction when the Grand Trunk Car Ferry Line defaulted on it's bonds. It was purchased by a new Grand Trunk subsidiary, the Grand Trunk Milwaukee Car Ferry Company.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Max Hanley, Dave Swayze and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News from Muskegon

11/06:
The Oglebay Norton ship Fred R. White arrived in Muskegon Friday at 1600 hours. This is a very rare visit by the White. The last time the White came to Muskegon was just after the New Year in January 1999, when it was anchored with the Algorail due to weather. The ship was loaded on the 3rd in Chicago. Dock and cargo were unknown but the ship was more than likely delivering coal to the Sappi paper mill.

Reported by: Scott Golin




Calcite II Makes Rare Visit

11/06:
Calcite II was scheduled to make a rare call at Port Huron on Nov. 5. From there it proceeds to Sandusky.

Reported by: Al Miller




Algoma Central Corporation's Operating Results

11/06:
Net income for the third quarter of 1999 improved by $374,000 to $5,860,000 from $5,486,000 for the same quarter in 1998. The main reason for the improvement was due to an increase in the number of operating days and operating efficiencies for the self-unloader fleet. Net income for the nine months ended September 30, 1999 declined from $11,357,000 in 1998 to $7,285,000 in 1999. The decrease in earnings for the first nine months of this year occurred for the most part during the first half of the year and was primarily the result of the following factors:
Reduced operating days of the ocean-going fleet as a result of commissioning problems experienced by two vessels which were recently converted to self-loaders/unloaders.
Decrease in the operating profitability of the self-unloader and bulker fleets due mainly to higher fuel prices and the low water levels throughout the Great Lakes.

In other news Algoma Steel announced Friday that its No. 7 Blast Furnace resumed operations yesterday morning as scheduled. The Blast Furnace had been down for repairs since Thursday, October 28th, due to a mechanical failure of the material charging equipment.

Algoma Steel, based in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, is Canada's third largest integrated steel producer. Revenues are derived primarily from the manufacture and sale of rolled steel products, including hot and cold rolled sheet and plate.

Reported by: Jim Fitzgerald




Lee Murdock in Concert Today

11/06:
Today at 2:00p.m. Lee Murdock will perform at the Dossin Museum on Belle Isle in Detroit. Come and hear this Great Lakes balladeer sing about life and adventure on the Great Lakes. Audience participation is a must. There will be a special showing of the new Edmund Fitzgerald video. Fee: $12.00 non-members, GLMI & Historical Society members $10.00.

Click here for more information




UW-Superior offers new program in transportation and logistics management

11/06:
University of Wisconsin-Superior is offering a new bachelor of science degree program in Transportation and Logistics Management that offers career opportunities for anyone interested in Great Lakes shipping and related industries.

Transportation and logistics management is a discipline concerned with the efficient flow of people and materials in the global and domestic economies. Transportation management deals with managing the five modes of transportation in an expanding and changing economic environment. Logistics management assumes a systems approach to managing activities such as materials handling, warehousing, traffic management, inventory control and packaging.

UW-Superior's Transportation and Logistics Management program, the only one of its kind in Wisconsin, prepares students for entry-level management jobs with employers such as cargo terminals, shipping lines, railroads, trucking companies and airlines as well as businesses that purchase transportation services such as product distributors, manufacturers and utilities.

The program combines courses in geography, marketing, economics, finance, law, mathematics and computer information systems with courses that focus specifically on various forms of transportation and logistics. Each student is required to serve an internship with a transportation-related employer.

Superior and neighboring Duluth, Minn., offer students numerous opportunities to observe the latest transportation and logistics techniques as well as to seek internships and employment. The two cities form an important transportation and distribution hub in the upper Midwest. The metro area is home to one of the biggest bulk cargo ports in the United States, including terminals handling iron ore, stone, grain and coal. A major Great Lakes fleet is headquartered in Duluth and the ports of Superior and Duluth serve foreign-flag vessels handling bulk and general cargo. In addition, the cities are the site of major facilities for an international pipeline company, an aircraft manufacturing firm, an airline maintenance operation, a shipyard, six railroads and 26 trucking companies. Major merchandise distribution centers also are located here. In addition, students are within easy driving distance of Minneapolis-St. Paul, home to a major air carrier, Mississippi River barge companies and merchandise distribution facilities.

UW-Superior's Transportation and Logistics Management program is directed by Dr. Richard Stewart, a graduate and former faculty member of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy. He has commanded saltwater merchant ships and served as a shipping company executive. He also has worked as a consultant for national and international transportation companies, law firms and government agencies, including the Port of Singapore.

UW-Superior, located at the northwestern tip of Wisconsin, is a comprehensive university that's part of the University of Wisconsin System. Enrollment is about 2,800 undergraduate and graduate students. It offers the atmosphere of a private college with the services and price of a public university.

Anyone interested in the program can contact the UW-Superior Admissions Office at (715) 394-8230 or by e-mail at admissions@uwsuper.edu
www.uwsuper.edu




New Islands

11/06:
The Detroit News featured a story Friday on new islands that are forming on the Great lakes due to the lower water levels.

Click here to view





Today in Great Lakes History - November 06

The b) US.266029 (WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) was towed from Nicholson's River Rouge dock November 6, 1986 by tugs TUSKER and GLENADA to Port Maitland, Ont. for scrapping there in 1987.

On November 6, 1913 the SHEADLE left Fort William, Ont. bound for Erie, PA with grain and encountered fog, gale winds and a snow blizzard in one of the fiercest storms of the century.

On November 6, 1925 the Northern Navigation passenger steamer HAMONIC lost her propeller 20 miles west of Caribou Island in Lake Superior and was wallowing in gale force winds with gusts to 80 m.p.h. She was later towed to safety by the RICHARD TRIMBLE

On November 6, 1985, scrapping began on the Leon Falk, Jr. in Gijon, Spain.

On 6 November 1872, the wooden propeller tug MILDRED, while towing a vessel out of Alpena, had her engine fail. Soon she was in trouble and sank. The crew was saved.

On 6 November 1827, ANN (wooden schooner, 53', 58 t, built in 1819 or 1821 at Black River, Ohio) was carrying salt, general merchandise and passengers when she was driven ashore on Long Point almost opposite Erie, PA. 7 Lives were lost, including 5 passengers. 6 survived.

In 1912 the Pere Marquette Railroad announced plans to build a new roundhouse at Ludington, it still stands today.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Barker enters Dry Dock

11/05:
Kaye E. Barker arrived at Duluth about 3 p.m. November 4 and immediately entered the large drydock at Fraser Shipyards in Superior. It is reported that she was having problems with the bearings on her shaft.

Reported by: Al Miller and Kent Rengo




Twin Ports Report

11/05:
Several Twin Ports regulars are scheduled to make unusual port calls in the next several days. Joe Block will make a rare visit to the DMIR dock in Two Harbors on the 11th. Arthur M. Anderson was fueling in Duluth on the morning of Nov. 4. After unloading at Hallett 5, it will proceed to Silver Bay to load pellets for Conneaut. After unloading coal at Nanticoke, Presque Isle will return to Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior for another load.

The grain remains steady in the Twin Ports. On the morning of Nov. 4, Cartierdoc was load at General Mills in Duluth and Federal Schelde was at AGP. At Harvest States, Canadian Voyager was making one of its few appearances in the Twin Ports. On the other side of the terminal was the saltie Isa -- certainly one of the few purple-hulled ships to call in the Twin Ports in recent years.

Reported by: Al Miller




Barracks Launched

11/05:
On Tuesday Marinette Marine in Wisconsin launched a barge like housing facility for the U.S. Navy. It is 269 feet long and will be used to house either sailors or repairman when a ship or sub is in a shipyard for repairs.

Marinette Marine built a number of these berthing barges in the 1980's.

Reported by: Scott Best and Andy LaBorde




New Trip Raffle

11/05:
USS Great Lakes Fleet has announced that they will be participating in a raffle for three trips aboard one of their footers. Three winners will be drawn on 6 June, 2000 for the, 'Cruise of a Lifetime.' The three winners and one other guest per winner will travel on a USS/GLF thousand-foot vessel. USS/GLF owns three footers, the Edwin H. Gott, Edgar B. Speer, and Presque Isle.

This is in support of the Lake Superior Maritime Visitor's Center in Duluth. Tickets are $10 US each. They are payable via check or money order and can be mailed to :
Lake Superior Marine Museum Association
PO Box 177
Duluth, MN 55802

Click here for more information

Reported by: Steve Sliwka and Al Miller




New Vessel Feature

11/05:
Due to the popular demand, again this week each day the Fleet Photo Gallery will feature a different Great Lakes vessel. Today we spotlight the history of the Algocape.

Click here to visit the gallery





Today in Great Lakes History - November 05

The LOUIS R. DESMARAIS cleared Owen Sound, Ont. on her maiden voyage November 5, 1977 bound for Thunder Bay, Ont. to load 27,117 gross tons of iron ore for Stelco at Hamilton, Ont.

On her final trip, the IRVIN L. CLYMER passed upbound at the Soo on November 5, 1990 and arrived at Duluth two days later to unload limestone at the Hallet Dock #5 after which she moved to her final lay-up berth at Fraser's shipyard and tied up blowing one last three long and two short salute from her whistle.

The GRAND HAVEN was raised on November 5, 1969 from the Old River Bed where she sank on September 19, 1969. She was raised for scrapping

Mr. J.W. Isherwood visited the Great Lakes Engineering Works ship yard on November 5, 1910 and personally inspected the hull which was being built according to his patented design. This vessel, the WILLIAM P. PALMER (2) was the first vessel on the Great Lakes built to the Isherwood system of longitudinal framing.

The JAMES S. DUNHAM sank in collision with the steamer ROBERT FULTON, on a foggy and rainy November 5, 1917, just below Grassy Island on the Detroit River. Repairs for both vessels totaled $125,000.

On 5 November 1896, ACADIA (iron-framed wooden propeller, 176', built in 1867 at Hamilton, Ont.) was driven ashore and broke up in a gle near the mouth of the Michipicoten River in lake Superior. her crew made it to shore and five of them spent more than a week trying to make it to the Soo.

Port Huron Times of 5 November 1878: "The schooner J. P. MARCH is reported lost with all on board. She was lost at Little Traverse Bay on the northern shore of Lake Michigan. The MARCH was a three masted schooner and was owned by Benton & Pierce of Chicago."

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history



Salty Loses Power in Seaway

11/04:
The 595-foot motor vessel VERILY, a Cypriot flagged titanium slag carrier enroute to Ashtabula, OH, lost power for eight minutes in the St. Lawrence Seaway at Richards Point, near Massena, NY. The cause was determined to be an unexplained tripping of the emergency fuel shut off valve.

Investigators from the U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Detachment Massena and the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation boarded the vessel. While investigating it was found that the generator emergency shut-off valve had been wired open and the ships personnel unsure why. The vessel was required to continuously man both valves until proper operation could be verified at the next port of call.




Marquette Update

11/04:
Due in Marquette yesterday was the Canadian Transfer, Lee A. Tregurtha, Kaye E. Barker, and the Elton Hoyt 2nd. Strong winds, high seas, and winter like conditions kept the Transfer, Tregurtha, and the Barker all at the Soo waiting out the storm. There was no update on the position of the Elton Hoyt 2nd.

Weather conditions were expected to greatly improve throughout the day yesterday allowing the three vessels at the Soo to sail for Marquette.

Reported by: Art Pickering.




Today in Great Lakes History - November 04

The CARTIERCLIFFE HALL was registered at Toronto, Ont. on November 4, 1977, but didn't enter service until the spring of 1978 because of mechanical difficulties during her sea trials.

The JOSEPH G. BUTLER, JR. was launched November 4, 1905 for the Tonopah Steamship Co. (Hutchinson & Co., mgr.) Cleveland, OH.

HERON BAY (2) proceeded under her own power to Lauzon, Que. for her final lay-up on November 4, 1978.

NIPIGON BAY was launched November 4, 1950

The CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON (3) developed a sizable leak and almost sank November 4, 1925 during her tow to Superior after she struck a reef a few nights before.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY's keel was laid November 4, 1942.

UNITED STATES GYPSUM (2) grounded at Toledo, OH on November 4, 1972 resulting in damages totaling $125,000. Her propeller was removed and the rudder shaft was locked in position to finish the season as a manned barge on the coal run from Toledo to Detroit, MI.

The Joseph H. Thompson became not only the largest vessel on the Great Lakes but also the longest dry bulk cargo vessel in the world when it entered service on November 4, 1952, departing Chicago on its first trip.

Setting the stage for the fateful storm which followed less than a week later which sank the Edmund Fitzgerald, many locations in Minnesota and Wisconsin were setting all-time record high temperatures for the month of November during the period of November 4-6, 1975. Grand Marais, MN reached 67 on November 5 and Superior reached 74 on November 6, both all-time records for the month. Many other notable Great Lakes storms, including the Armistice Day storm of 1940 and the storm which sank the Henry Steinbrenner in 1953, were preceeded by record-setting warm wather.

On 4 November 1877, MARY BOOTH (wooden scow-schooner, 132 t, built in 1857 at Buffalo) was carrying maple lumber in a storm in Lake Michigan. She became waterlogged but her crew doggedly clung to her until she appeared ready to turn turtle. Then her crew abandoned her and she rolled over. She drifted in the lake for several days. The crew landed at White lake, Michigan after being adrift for 48 hours in frigid weather and they were near death.

Port Huron Times of 4 November 1878: "The propeller CITY OF MONTREAL is believed to have gone down on Lake Michigan Friday [1 NOV 1878]. The schooner LIVELY, laden with coal for Bay City, is reported ashore 6 miles above Sand Beach, having gone on at 12 o'clock Sunday night [3 NOV 1878]. The schooner WOODRUFF, ashore at Whitehall, is a total loss. Two men were drowned, one died from injuries received, and Capt. Lingham was saved. The tugs E. M. PECK and MYSTIC, which went from the Sault to the assistance of the propeller QUEBEC, were wrecked near where she lies, one being on the beach and the other sunk below her decks. Both crews were rescued and were taken to St. Joseph Island."

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history



Seaway Update

11/03:
27 vessels transited the Seaway on Nov.1st. Upbound were seven salties and four lakers. The lakers were CANADIAN PROGRESS and ALGOBAY with iron ore from Pointe Noire for delivery respectively at Lorain and Hamilton, QUEBECOIS in ballast for Thunder Bay from Baie Comeau and ATLANTIC HURON with gypsum for Côte Ste.Catherine from Halifax. After unloading, she left for Hamilton the next day.

The salties were all regular visitors to Great Lakes ports. MOUNTAIN BLOSSOM with caustic soda for Sarnia, LYNX with steel for Cleveland, REGINA OLDENDORFF with sugar for Toronto, NOMADIC PATRIA with gypsum for Erie, JAKOV SVERDLOV with lube oil additives for Hamilton, MENOMINEE with steel bands for Cleveland and VERILY with titanium slag for Ashtabula.

The lakers downbound, as many as eight of them, were SEAWAY QUEEN with wheat for Port Cartier from Thunder Bay, CSL NIAGARA with corn for Baie Comeau from Toledo, CANADIAN VENTURE and MANTADOC with wheat for Montreal from Thunder Bay, ALGOSOO with salt for Valleyfield and Quebec City from Goderich, CANADIAN PROVIDER with soybeans for Baie Comeau from the lakehead, CANADIAN NAVIGATOR with mill scale scrap for Côte Ste. Catherine from Hamilton. After unloading, she departed in ballast for Quebec City to load for the Great Lakes. And finally LOUIS R. DESMARAIS in ballast for Quebec City from Picton.

The following salties were coming back from the Lakes, RACHEL B., CARO, MARION GREEN, GRANT CARRIER and KASTOR P loaded respectively with coal tar, soybeans, wheat, pea beans and corn. In addition, there was the inland tanker SATURN bound for Montreal in ballast from Oswego.

Reported by: René Beauchamp.




Mapleglen in Duluth

11/03:
The fall grain rush has brought several straight-deckers to the Twin Ports. Among them is the Mapleglen, shown here loading Nov. 2 at the General Mills elevator in Duluth.

Reported by: Al Miller




Busy Day in Green Bay

11/03:
Tuesday was a busy day in Green Bay, the Stolt Aspiration arrived with a load of tallow for the Anamax Corp. She was headed out of the river at 6:00pm. The Alpena arrived at the LaFarge plant at about 5:00p.m. The Buffalo was due to arrive at the Fort James dock at about 8:00 p.m. last night, a busy day on the Fox river.

Reported by: Chad Peters




Weather Delay in Buffalo

11/03:
The tug Karen Andrie and barge 397 went down the Black Rock Canal to the Marathon dock on the night of the 2nd. She will head out around noon today, weather permitting.

The J.A.W. Iglehart was heard on the radio last night off Buffalo issuing a weather report to the Buffalo Coast Guard Base. The vessel reported 50 mph gusts and 12 foot seas.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




November 1 Vessel Report

11/03:
U.S.-Flag Lakes lines had 62 of their 68 vessels in service on November 1, a decrease of 4 ships compared to a year ago. The decrease in the total number of vessels available for service reflects the sale of the John J. Boland to Lower Lakes Towing, a Canadian operator. he decrease in the number of dry-bulk carriers reflects the season-long lay-up of the Edward L. Ryerson and Kinsman Enterprise. Additionally, the Myron C. Taylor is undergoing repairs in a shipyard.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association Click here for more information




Slight Dip In October Loadings Doesn't Stop SMET's Drive Toward Record

11/03:
Loadings of western, low sulfur coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in October slipped by about 57,000 net tons in comparison to the same period last year, but the season-to-date total remains on course to set a new record for the terminal. Through October, coal loadings at SMET stand at 13,390,251 net tons, an increase of 5.4 percent compared to last year.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association Click here for more information




Improvements to Dock

11/03:
The Door County Circuit Court has held that the Washington Island Ferry Line can go ahead with improvements to its Northport docking facility at the tip of Door County without making provision for and allowing sport fishing on the pier or breakwater. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources had attempted to hold up the project, which included dredging and a breakwater extension, unless the ferry line allowed access for fishing. Citing safety concerns, the ferry line declined and appealed the DNR decision.

Unless the DNR appeals the circuit judge's decision, the way has been cleared for the improvements to take place.

Reported by: Lew Clarke




New Vessel Feature

11/03:
Due to the popular demand, again this week each day the Fleet Photo Gallery will feature a different Great Lakes vessel. Today we spotlight the history of the Algoisle.

Click here to visit the gallery





Today in Great Lakes History - November 03

The B A PEERLESS sailed on her maiden voyage November 3, 1952 bound for Superior, WI where 110,291 bbl of crude oil were loaded destined for British-American's refinery at Clarkson, Ont. The PEERLESS was built for the express purpose of transporting crude oil from the Interprovincial/Lakehead Pipeline terminus at Superior to B/A's Clarkson refinery.

Dismantling of the H.C. HEIMBECKER began on November 3, 1981 by Triad at Ashtabula and was completed the following year.

On November 4, 1986 the TEXACO CHIEF (2) was renamed b) A.G. FARQUARSON.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY was launched June 19, 1943.

On 3 November 1898, PACIFIC (wooden propeller passenger/package freighter, 179'. 918 gt, built in 1883 at Owen Sound, Ontario) caught fire at the Grand Trunk dock at Collingwood, Ontario. She burned to a shell despite a concerted effort to save her. She was later towed out into Georgian Bay and scuttled.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Lansdowne Arrives in Erie

11/02:
The former rail ferry Lansdowne was towed to Erie, Pennsylvania sometime Monday morning by tug Manitou. It is rumored that she may be converted to a restaurant and used in Erie.

The Lansdowne was towed from Buffalo on Sunday.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Twin Ports Report

11/02:
With the pleasant weather about to change for the worse, Twin Ports elevators were busy early Nov. 1 loading vessels. Tadoussac, which spent the weekend unloading at the General Mills elevator in Duluth, was heading up the St. Louis River to load at the Hallett dock above the Bong Bridge. Its place at the elevator was taken by Mapleglen. Over in Superior, Algocen was completing its load at the General Mills Elevator S next to Midwest Energy Terminal. Montrealais was loading soybeans on one side of the Harvest States elevator while Peonia was starting its load on the other side. Once Montrealais departs, the saltie Apt Mariner is scheduled to take its place. Panay R, anchored on the lake for several days, is due at the Cargill elevator in Duluth on the 1st.

Both DMIR docks have interesting line-ups in the coming weeks.
The Two Harbors dock is loading mostly larger vessels for the next week or so. The line-up includes Edgar Speer, Nov. 2; Edwin H. Gott, Nov. 3; St. Clair, Nov. 6; Roger Blough Nov. 7; Edgar. B. Speer, Nov. 8; and Edwin H. Gott, Nov. 9. John G. Munson is due in on the 11th and the Philip R. Clarke on the 12th.

The Duluth dock is scheduled to load Indiana Harbor and James R. Barker on Nov. 3; Buckeye, Nov. 5; Roger Blough arrives again with stone on Nov. 6; Indiana Harbor, Nov. 9; James R. Barker, Nov. 10; Buckeye, Nov. 11; Edwin H. Gott, Nov. 15; and Frontenac, Nov. 21.

Reported by: Al Miller




Transfer Continues Shuttles

11/02:
Seaway Self-Unloader, Canadian Transfer, visited Marquette for the fifth time in seven days on Halloween Sunday, Oct 31, loading taconite for Algoma Steel at the Soo. Her visit was a "treat".

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Today in Great Lakes History - November 02

CANADIAN EXPLORER entered service on November 2, 1983 bound for Duluth, Minn. where she loaded 851,000 bushels of corn.

PAUL H. CARNAHAN was christened on November 2, 1961 at the foot of West Grand Boulevard in Detroit, MI.

On November 2, 1984 the tugs ATOMIC and ELMORE M. MISNER towed the ERINDALE to the International Marine Salvage scrap dock at Port Colborne where demolition began that month.

The H.C. HEIMBECKER proceeded under her own power to Ashtabula, OH for scrapping, arriving there November 2, 1981.

On November 2, 1948 the FRANK ARMSTRONG collided head-on with the JOHN J. BOLAND (2) in a heavy fog on Lake Erie near Colchester, Ont. Both vessels were badly damaged and resulted in one fatality on the BOLAND. The ARMSTRONG was towed to Toledo, OH for repairs.

In 1972 the A.E. NETTLETON's towline parted from the OLIVE L. MOORE during a snow storm with gale force winds 17 miles west of the Keweenaw Peninsula on Lake Superior. The barge developed a 15 degree list when her load of grain shifted. Three of her five member crew were air lifted by a U.S.C.G. helicopter to the MOORE to assist in re-rigging the towline. The NETTLETON was then towed the next day into the Lily Pond on the Keweenaw Waterway to trim her cargo.

The WILLIAM C. MORELAND was abandoned to the underwriters on November 2, 1910 as a constructive total loss, amounting to $445,000. She had stranded on Sawtooth Reef off Eagle Harbor, MI on Lake Superior in mid October.

The keel of the new section, identified as Hull #28, was laid down on November 2, 1959. A new forward pilothouse and a hatch crane were installed and her steam turbine engine and water tube boilers were reconditioned. The vessel was named c) RED WING (2) after the Detroit Red Wing hockey team, honoring a long association with Upper Lakes Shipping and James Norris, the founder of ULS, and his two sons, James D. and Bruce, owners of the National Hockey League team.

In 1971 the Lake Michigan Carferry S.S. Badger was laid up due to a coal strike.

On 2 November 1889, FRANCIS PALMS (wooden schooner, 173', 560t, built in 1868 at Marine City, Michigan as a bark) was sailing from Escanaba to Detroit with a load of iron ore when she was driven ashore near Beaver Island in lake Michigan. Her entire crew was taken off by the tug GLADIATOR which also pulled in vain while trying to free the PALMS. The PALMS was pounded to pieces by the storm waves. November was a bad month for the PALMS since she had previously been wrecked on Long Point in Lake Erie in November 1874 and again at Duluth in November 1872.

During the first week of November 1878, the Port Huron Times reported wrecks and mishaps that occurred during a severe storm that swept over the Lakes on Friday and Saturday , 1-3 November. The information was reported on 2, 4 & 5 November as the reports came in. The same reports will appear here starting today: Port Huron Times of 2 November 1878: "The schooner L. C. WOODRUFF of Cleveland is ashore at the mouth of the White River with her foremast gone. She is loaded with corn. Three schooners went ashore at Grand Haven Friday morning, the AMERICA, MONTPELIER, and AUSTRALIAN. One man was drowned off the AUSTRALIAN. The schooner WORTS is ashore and full of water on Beaver Island. Her cargo consists of pork for Collingwood. The tug LEVIATHAN has gone to her aid. The schooner LAKE FOREST is ashore at Hammond's Bay, Lake Huron, and is full of water. She has a cargo of corn aboard. The tug A. J. SMITH has gone to her rescue. The barge S. C. WOODRUFF has gone down in 13 feet of water off Whitehall and her crew is clinging to the rigging at last accounts. A life boat has been sent to her relief. The barge RUTTER is in 25 feet of water and all the crew are now safe."

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Tug Departs With Lansdowne From Buffalo

11/01:
Yesterday the tug Manitou entered Buffalo and tied up to the 1884 built rail ferry Lansdowne at the old Union Furnace dock on the Buffalo River.

The Manitou began towing the Lansdowne out of the Buffalo River at 9:40 PM. The tug Rochelle Kaye was at the stern to assist the vessel through the dangerous Ohio St. turn and Lift bridge. The Kaye has been in Buffalo for a few months doing construction repairs on the Black Rock Lock. She will probably help take the Lansdowne to the Outer Harbor and then head back to the construction area. No word on where the Lansdowne will be moved.

The vintage rail ferry has turned into a hard luck vessel in recent years. Last operating as a ferry in 1974, she was later opened on Detroit's river front as a restaurant then bar. After these failed ventures she was towed to Lorain Ohio and then Buffalo.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Toledo Update

11/01:
The Canadian Leader arrived at Anderson's "E" Elevator very early this morning (well before sunrise). She will load a partial cargo there before shifting over to Anderson's "K" Elevator later on this evening (around midnight).

When this shift happens the Windoc will arrive at Anderson's "E" Elevator to load her grain cargo ( her arrival will be well before sunrise as well). According to recent reports it looks like the grain trade will be cooling off at this port during the weeks ahead, however all three elevators are still jammed with semi trucks bringing the grain in.

At the Toledo Shipyard the tug James Palladino remains in the large drydock, while there is a large crane barge in the small drydock (possibly Corps of Engineers vessel) A small carferry called the Charlotte is at the dock near the shipyard for unknown repairs. The tanker Gemini is in temporary lay-up at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Hulett Court Hearing in Cleveland Today

11/01:
Today at 9:00 a.m. in Courtroom 19A of the Cuyahoga County Justice Center (Ontario & Lakeside in Cleveland), Judge Janet Burnside presiding, a hearing will be held to determine a portion of the Lawsuit filed by Ed Hauser, a member of the Committee to Save Cleveland's Huletts, against the Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Port.

The evening of Friday, October 29th, 1999 a group of heritage and Hulett enthusiasts got together and lit up the Hulett Ore Unloaders from a boat. There was both still and video recording of the spectacular sight.

Reported by: Ray Saikus




Edmund Fitzgerald Page

11/01:
The annual Fitzgerald Remembrance page is again open this year. Click here to visit the page




Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping Turns Four

11/01:
November 1995 marked the launch of this web site.
Launched as Great Lakes Vessel Passage, it was a small site with only four sections and less than a dozen pictures in the single Photo Gallery.

Today it has grown into the most comprehensive resource for Great lakes Shipping online with almost half a million visits. My thanks go to all who have contributed to the web site, you have made the site what it is today.

Keep the suggestion coming for what you would like to see in the future.

I salute you all and say thank you once again!
Neil




Today in Great Lakes History - November 01

Scrapping began November 1, 1984 on the ELMGLEN.

The Grand Trunk Western was granted permission by the Interstate Commerce Commission on November 1, 1978 to discontinue its Lake Michigan service between Muskegon, MI and Milwaukee, WI.

The MAITLAND NO.1 made her maiden voyage on November 1, 1916 from Ashtabula to Port Maitland, Ont. transporting rail cars with coal for the steel mills at Hamilton, Ont.

The SCOTT MISENER (3) returned to service in the grain trade on November 1, 1986 after a 3 year lay-up

The CITY OF MILWAUKEE made her last run for Grand Trunk’s rail car ferry service on November 1, 1978.

On 1 November 1917, ALVA B. (wooden steam tug, 74', 84 gt, built in 1890 at Buffalo) apparently mistook amusement park lights for the harbor markers at Avon Lake, Ohio during a storm. She struck bottom in the shallows and was destroyed by waves.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





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Comments, news, and suggestions to: ncschult@oakland.edu