Great Lakes NEWS & RUMOR Archive

* Report News


Callaway and Clark head for lay-up

12/31:
Cason J. Callaway and Philip R. Clarke are scheduled to begin their winter layup Jan. 1 at Sturgeon Bay.

More updates on the 4th Annual Winter Lay-up page


Reported by: Al Miller




Happy New Year!





Today in Great Lakes History - December 31

Upon suggestion from the U.S. Maritime Commission, surplus World War II cargo vessels, many of which had laid up on the James River, were made available for sale under the Great Lakes Vessel Sales Act of 1950 (enacted September 28, 1950) to be converted for Great Lakes use. The Act allowed Great Lakes fleets to purchase up to 10 surplus ships by December 31, 1951 and receive a 90% cost subsidy to convert and refurbish them for Lakes use. The first such conversion occurred when the Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co. of Cleveland, OH bought the NOTRE DAME VICTORY on December 10, 1950.

The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY was laid up for the last time at the old Great Lakes Engineering Works slip at River Rouge, MI beginning December 31, 1983.

The QUEDOC (2) was laid up for the last time on December 31, 1984 at Toronto, Ont. along side the SENATOR OF CANADA.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes History




Twin Ports news

12/30:
Twin Ports boatwatchers got a late Christmas treat when John J. Boland arrived Dec. 28 to begin winter layup at Fraser Shipyards. The winter fleet apparently is beginning to arrive now. H. Lee White is scheduled to arrive at Hallett dock Dec. 30 for layup.

Traffic remains brisk at Midwest Energy Terminal and the DMIR and BN ore docks. Paul Tregurtha cleared the Midwest Energy dock about 7:30 a.m. Dec. 29 and Charles M. Beeghly and Canadian Enterprise appeared to be waiting for their turns to load. Walter J. McCarthy Jr. is due at the dock Dec. 29 and tentatively scheduled to load again Jan. 4. This would certainly be the longest season in recent memory (and possibly ever) for the terminal. At the DMIR dock, a late rush has developed for Oglebay Norton vessels. Oglebay Norton and Buckeye loaded there Dec. 28, Courtney Burton is due in Dec. 29 and Armco is scheduled for Dec. 30.

Reported by: Al Miller




Final Bells

12/30:
Capt. Aloysius "Al" Bammel, died Dec 17 in St. Clair, Michigan at the age of 101. He started sailing at the age of 13 on lumber hookers out of Marine City. He sailed for Interlake Steamship Co. for 36 years and served his last command on the Str. Elton Hoyt II before leaving the company after a disagreement with management. Some referred to Capt. Al as one of the best skippers on the lakes. During his time as shipmaster he never had a accident.

Reported by: Keith Winn




Today in Great Lakes History - December 30

On December 30, 1987 the THOMAS WILSON under tow in the North Atlantic heading to be scrapped, parted her towline and sunk near position 34_08'N by 61_35'12"W (approximately in line with Cape Hatteras, NC) early the next day.

GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (1) was launched December 30, 1926.

The first steel carferry Pere Marquette was launched on December 30, 1896. She was nearly complete when launched and arrived Ludington, MI on February 13, 1897 commanded by Captain Joseph Russell. The Pere Marquette (renamed Pere Marquette 15 in 1924), once hailed as "A Titan of Size and Power", went into lay-up in 1930 as a result of the depression and the arrival of newer and more powerful carferries. She was scrapped at Manitowoc in 1935.

Data from: Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes History




Marine Community Day

12/28:
The U. S. Coast Guard Ninth District in Cleveland, OH., is hosting their annual Great Lakes Marine Community Day on January 28, 1997. The event will be held at the Radisson Inn, in Beachwood, OH. Further details are available on the Ninth District Homepage. Visit us there, and "Come Aboard".Keith E. Grant

Reported by: Keith E. Grant




The 4th Annual Winter Lay-up - 1997/98 page has been updated





Correction

12/28:
It was reported last week that the Louis R DesMarais experienced some type of damage, this information was incorrect.

Reported by: Lon Morgan




Today in Great Lakes History - December 28

The HENRY FORD II was was laid up in the Rouge Steel slip at Dearborn, MI on December 28, 1988.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes History




Last Salty clears Seaway

12/27:
The Liberian freighter Narragansett (xSteel Flower-96), preceded by the CCG vessel Tracy, cleared the Eastern end of the St Lawrence Seaway at 1837 edt December 26 1997 to close the 1997 Seaway season, and proceeded to Montreal East anchorage on the St Lawrence River.

Seaway East Clearance 12/26 - 1100. The last Canadian coasters cleared the Seaway overnight and were eastbound in the St Lawrence River yesterday. A R FARQUHARSON was headed for Halifax and THALASSA DESGAGNES for Seven Islands.

The CANADIAN MINER was approaching Montreal East from the Gulf and presumably heading to winter layup. The CANADIAN VENTURE was due to leave Port Cartier for Montreal. The SAUNIERE left Montreal for the Magdalen Islands and the ATLANTIC HURON and ATLANTIC ERIE were active in the St Lawrence River and Gulf. The NANTICOKE had departed for Halifax and the Maritimes.

Reported by: John Whitehead's St Lawrence Ships home page




Astabula News

12/27:
Yesterday was a busy day in Ashtabula. The J.W. McGiffin was loading coal at the Conrail dock and the H.M. Griffith was waiting her turn to load. Also, the Charles Wilson and the St.Clair were anchored off the breakwall awaiting weather to get into the Pinney dock and unload.

Reported by: Jeff P.




U.S. Coast Guard publishes final I.S.M. Code rules

12/27:
The U.S. Coast Guard on 24 Dec. published a final rule establishing standards for certain U.S.-registry vessels to comply with the International Safety Management Code of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea of 1974. Starting 1 July, the I.S.M. Code standards will apply to certain vessels on international voyages including vessels that carry more than 12 passengers, tankers, bulk freight vessels and high-speed cargo vessels of at least 500 gross tons. Such vessels without I.S.M. Code certificates will not be allowed to enter U.S. ports after 1 July.

An interim rule published 11 Dec., and effective 26 Jan., states that such vessels, unless they are less than 500 gross tons and carrying more than 12 passengers, will provide their I.S.M. Code certification status 24 hours before entering a U.S. port. Compliance by foreign-registry ships will be through port state control inspections. If a vessel without I.S.M. Code certification is found in a U.S. port, it will be detained, its cargo operations will be restricted, civil penalty action will be taken and its country of registry and classification society will be notified.

On 15 Dec., the Coast Guard began a pre-enforcement inspection campaign. Vessels in I.S.M. Code compliance will be entered into a database and those found lacking certification will be sent a letter stating the requirements.

Beginning 1 July, 2002, the standards will also apply to other cargo vessels and self-propelled mobile offshore drilling units of 500 gross tons or more on international voyages.

In response to the I.S.M. Code Notice of Proposed Rulemaking published 1 May, the Coast Guard received 118 comments.

The Coast Guard also said 24 Dec. that, as final rule to improve the Alternate Compliance Program, it can authorize classification societies to issue international certificates usually issed by the Coast Guard. The program was implemented on 31 July. Under the final rule, the Coast Guard may issue a Certificate of Inspection based upon information from an authorized classification society that a vessel complies with certain international conventions, classification society rules and other requirements. The final rule was made after 17 letters commenting on the interim rule published 27 Dec.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - December 27

The SAVIC (Cliffs Victory) cleared the Welland Canal Christmas night 1985 and finally anchored at Pointe aux Trembles near Montreal, Que. December 27th awaiting another load of scrap. The SAVIC remained there the entire winter, because the underwriters ordered that her hull be re-enforced by welding straps to her stress points for her overseas journey.

The THOMAS LAMONT as a single tow arrived at Aliaga, Turkey on December 27, 1987 where she was scrapped. The LAMONT was one of the last bulkers that retained her telescoping hatch covers to the very end.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes History




Today in Great Lakes History - December 26

In 1981 the ENDERS M. VOORHEES laid up for the last time at Duluth's Hallett Dock #5.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes History




White's last visit to Saginaw

12/25:
M/V Fred R. White Jr. was delivering the last load of stone to Wirt Stone Dock at Crow Island Saginaw. Then it's two loads to the Lakehead to Lorain and one to Lakehead to Toledo.Layup is approximately January 10th in Toledo. For Christmas the Compass "ROSE" [Oglebey/Norton's redesigned logo] the outline on the stack in solid green, real neat, suggest they do it in yellow the rest of the year , much more unique than a flood light on the stack.

Reported by: Dan Maus and Lon Morgan




Seaway Radio Messsage No. 18

12/25:
Mariners are advised that, for the Montreal-Lake Ontario section of the Seaway, the surcharges for December 21st to 24th, 1997, have been waived. Special agreements will be required for vessels calling in at Cape Vincent downbound or CIP 2 upbound after 0001 hour December 25th. Arrangements for written agreements can be made at the Authority'`s St. Lambert, Quebec office. Further details are available in Seaway Notice no. 10.

Mariners are reminded that as of 2400 hours on December 15th, 1997, due to high flows, low water levels and lower than normal water temperatures, the maximum permissible draft in the Montreal-Lake Ontario section is now 79.2 decimeters or 26 feet 0 inches.

Water temperature at St. Lambert on December 23rd, 1997 is 0.3 degrees celsius. Last year's temperature was 1.6 degrees celsius. The ten year average is 0.5 degrees celsius.

Thin ice is present in the navigation channel in the South Shore Canal between Saint-Lambert and Cote Ste-Catherine Locks.

Mariners are advised that the implementation of the power to length ratio restrictions and minimum draft requirements announced to take effect at 0001 hours on December 7th, 1997 have been postponed until further notice.

At midnight December 22nd, the number of ocean vessels above St. Lambert was 10 as compared to 8

in 1996. Above Port Weller the number was 3 as compared to 1 in 1996.

It is important for mariners to note that any vessel which now calls in upbound at CIP2 will be designated a wintering vessel in accordance with all the terms outlined in Seaway Notices number 10 and 12 of 1997.

The thinning of non-essential buoys in the Montreal-Lake Ontario section has been completed. Removal of remaining buoys will commence today, December 23rd. Further information concerning this is available from the appropriate traffic control centre.

The installation of the Galop ice boom is in progress. The Prescott/Ogdensburg ice boom opening has been reduced to 609m and is indicated by flashing green and red buoys.

All closing procedures outlined in Seaway Notices No. 10 and 12 of 1997 remain in effect.

Reported by: St. Lawrence Seayway Authority




Today in Great Lakes History - December 25

The E.G. GRACE carried 14,797 tons of taconite ore on her last trip out of Taconite Harbor, MN bound for South Chicago, IL and then was laid up at Ashtabula, OH on December 25, 1976 with engine trouble which often plagued the six "Al" ships powered with Lentz-Poppet engines. The lay-up of the E.G. GRACE lasted until April, 1984 when she became the first Maritimer to be sold for scrap.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes History




Grain Trade remains busy

12/24:
Despite the departure of the last salties, the Twin Ports grain trade remains active. CSL's Manitoulin, an infrequent visitor here, was unloading grain at the General Mills elevator on Dec. 22-23. Once unloaded she was to shift to the DMIR ore dock to load.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Shipyard drydockings for Winter 1998

12/24:
In addition to the BUFFALO (bow repairs plus 5 year survey). Toledo Shipyard will do 5 year surveys on the FRED R. WHITE JR. and the COURTNEY BURTON. All 3 vessels will be ready to sail for the Spring opening of the shipping season. The Shipyard will also do repair work on several other vessels that are in layup at the various Dock sites around Toledo.

Reported by: J. R. Hoffman




Busy day in Saginaw

12/24:
Tuesday was a busy day for the Saginaw River. The M/V Fred R. White Jr. was outbound to Stoneport, Alpena where she will load one more time for Wirt Stone Dock at Crow Island, Saginaw. Once completed Stoneport will close for the winter.

Also in the river was the Gemini at the Total Oil Dock in Bay City and the Alpena at the LaFarge Cement Dock in Saginaw.

Reported by: Dan Maus and Lon Morgan




Have a safe and happy holiday season!
Smooth sailing to all, thanks for all your support over the past year.





Hamilton Transfer to be converted

12/23:
Inside sources have confirmed that the aft section of the Canadian Explorer will be cut off and joined with the forward section of the Hamilton Transfer. Conversion is expected to begin in March 1998 at the Port Weller Dry Docks . She will be a self unloader but the exact configuration is unkown.

As reported on June 24th, 1997, ULS had placed an advertisement in the June 16th edition of Canadian Sailings, announcing she was for hire in 1998. The vessels small size will make her ideal to compete in the same trades as Lower Lake's Cuyahoga.

ULS is no stranger to recycling older vessels. HILDA MARJANNE and CHIMO became CANADIAN RANGER, and NORTHERN VENTURE and CABOT were reconstructed to form CANADIAN EXPLORER. Both of these reconstructions were completed at Port Weller.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss and Mark Jackson




Frantz to the wall

12/23:
The Joseph H. Frantz departed Huron, Ohio at 0730 Monday morning. She headed into Lake Erie for clean out, and proceeded to Toledo Lakefront #2 for lay-up. She layed-up at the Hocking Valley dock in Toledo last year.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak and Sharon Bouchonville.




Townsend enters lay-up

12/23:
The Paul H. Townsend entered winter lay-up in Milwaukee yesterday. The Townsend is moored at the LaFarge Cement tower. Her anchors are down and her pilot house windows are covered. She is loaded with cement for winter storage.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde and James Zeirke.




Midwest Energy Running Strong

12/23:
Midwest Energy Terminal is still running strong a couple weeks after it usually shuts down for the winter. The dock is booked through Christmas, with Courtney Burton and Oglebay Norton due Dec. 22, Paul R. Tregurtha and Walter J. McCarthy loading Dec. 23, Joe Thompson due Dec. 24 and Indiana Harbor expected Dec. 25.

Reported by: Al Miller




Last of the Salties clear the Soo Locks

12/23:
The final 3 salties to visit lake superior this year locked downbound Sunday at Sault Ste. Marie. The Praxitelis logged downbound at Isle Parisienne at 0917, the Lake Ontario logged downbound at Parisienne at 1000 and the Narragansett logged downbound at 1229. The Narragansett was the last salty of the year at the soo.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Upper Lakes Group bulkers starting to lay-up/after busy season

12/23:
SS Canadian Leader, SS Canadian Mariner and M/V Canadian Trader are already at their winter lay-up berths in Toronto. SS Seaway Queen has unloaded its last cargo for the season and she is also underway to Toronto to join her fleet mates. Canadian Explorer has layed up in Hamilton.

It has been a very good year for the Canadian Fleet. Almost all boats were out this year. ULS Group SS Seaway Queen was the last boat out for the fall grain rush.

Paterson's Comeaudoc did not come out this year. Nor did CSL's Tarantau--it was rumored she was through but now this is some talk she may have a make over. Vandoc and Quedoc did not come out as they have been in long term lay-up at the Lakehead.

P and H also had a busy season. In September I spoke to the skipper from the Oakglen while she was stopped for fuel at the Shell Dock in Port Colborne At that time the SS Oakglen was making its its 9th trip of the season from the lakehead to a St. Lawrence Ports in addition to making several shorter runs from Thunder Bay to either Owen Sound or Goderich. and has been down below several times since. Last year it only made 2 and was limited to a much shorter run from Thunder Bay to Owen Sound. (Last year SS Mapleglen was to the wall for 3 weeks in August. While the Oakglen was to the wall for a prolonged period.)

Reported by: J. J. Van Volkenburg




Toronto update

12/23:
In yesterday's report, the ship along side of the Canadian Mariner was the Hamilton Energy not the Hamilton Transfer. Yesterday morning the Gordon C Lietch loaded with sugar, tied up at the Redpath Plant in Toronto harbour . The Canadian Trader, with a load of sugar tied up at pier 51 ,west face. The Seaway Queen tied up at the Cherry St. bridge, light ship. The Algosteel was in port unloading salt. So yesterday the harbour was pretty crowded.

Reported by: Jim Fitzgerald




Quebec ferry workers call off strike

12/23:
Quebec government ferry personnel on the St. Lawrence River have cancelled a three-day strike that was to begin 24 Dec. after their labor union reached a tentative contract with the province early 20 Dec. Talks had lasted 30 months. The personnel work on routes between Quebec and Levis, Matane and Baie-Comeau and Sorel and Saint-Ignace-de-Loyola.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Proposal For Muskegon Naval Memorial Monument

12/23:
The Muskegon Chronicle reported plans for a Naval Memorial Monument on Sunday. The city hopes to bring the WWII submarine, U.S.S. Silversides from the Muskegon channel to the downtown area. With her will come the McLane, a 1927 Coast Guard ship that also saw action in WWII. The Mclane now sits behing the Silversides in the channel. There has been talk of bringing the decommisioned nulear submarine U.S.S. Silversides Nuclear to Muskegon from the west coast but extreme cost make this highly unlikely. With the Silversides and the McLane would be the LST393. The LST393 was a transport trip for troops during WWII that was directly involved with the invasion of Normandy. Some time after the war, the ship was converted into a freighter to carry automobiles from Muskegon to Milwaulkee. It was renamed Highway 16 at that time. It has been inactive and docked at the West Michigan Dock Mart since 1973. They plan to convert it back to the LST393 and make it part of the memorial. The ship is said to be in excellent condition and is said to still be seaworthy. These plans are just talk for now but voting and final decisions should be made soon. The commitees involved also had reportedly talked about joining the Silversides downtown with the S.S. Milwaulkee Clipper but the paper said there was never talk and that is not a part of the future plans. The site where they paln to have this memorial monument is located in a bay in between the Dock Mart and the Lafarge Dock.

Reported by: Scott Golin




Today in Great Lakes History - December 23

The IMPERIAL ST. CLAIR was selected to participate in the three-year winter navigation experiment during which the Soo Locks remained open all year. On December 23, 1976, at the very onset, she ran aground entering ice-jammed Parry Sound on Georgian Bay in a blinding snow squall. One of her cargo tanks ruptured spilling 1,800 barrels of diesel oil.

The SAVIC (Cliffs Victory) was downbound past Detroit, MI December 23, 1985 by-passing a 15,000 ton load of scrap because of the lack of time to clear the Seaway.

CHARLES DICK was sold for scrap to Marine Salvage Ltd., Port Colborne, Ont. on December 23, 1976.

The SIR TREVOR DAWSON was laid up after the War until December 23, 1920 when she was sold to Pioneer Steamship Co. and renamed c) CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON (3).

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Wilfred Sykes makes rare Trip to Duluth

12/22:
The Wilfred Sykes passed upbound at the Soo on Dec. 21 around 4AM. She was headed for the lakehead. She will load at Duluth's DM&IR Ore Dock sometime today. Though exact date is unknown, consensuses is that she has not left her usual trade on the lower lakes for Lake Superior since 1991. She made a late season run that year, and was followed downbound at the Soo on or very near Christmas Day by fleetmate Edward L Ryerson.

Reported by: Dan Sweeley and Andy Hering




Algocape clears Saginaw

12/22:
The Algocape cleared Saginaw yesterday, the striaght decker had started unloading on 12/16 by a shore based crane with a clam bucket. At about 2200 the John Purvis called inbound at the front range so one can assume he probably assisted Algocape out into the bay where she had to turn around. The tug John Purvis then cleared the river with the deck barge holding the unloading crain.

Reported by: Lon Morgan and Dan Maus




Frantz to lay-up

12/22:
The The 72 year old Joseph H. Frantz is due Toledo sometime today for Lay-Up at possibly the Hocking Valley dock. She was unloading a cargo of limestone at Huron, Ohio before making the short trip to Toledo

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak, Sharon Bouchonville, and Andy Hering




Toronto update

12/22:
In port as of yesterday is the Algontario on the face of pier 35, drawing 25 ft. loaded with sugar for Redpath,(Redpath doubled it's capacity to process sugar last year). On the north side of Pier 35 is the Canadian Leader also drawing 25ft. with sugar. The Canadian Mariner is in the "turning basin" channel along side of the hydro "Hearn" plant. She is "light" ship. The Hamilton Energy was along side Saturday & then left. The Seaway Queen is expected in the same channel, where the CSL Sagenay was,(pier 21 I think) at 23:00hrs Sunday the 21st Dec. light ship. The Canadian Trader is expected with sugar; date unknown & the Gordon C. Leitch is expected with sugar; date unknown. If last year was any indication there will probably be some Paterson ships also. All in all a busy port this winter.

Reported by: Jim Fitzgerald




Last Salties depart Twin Ports

12/22:
The final two salties of the 1997 Twin Ports shipping season departed Duluth 12/20 approximately one hour apart. The Praxitelis departed at 9:09 a.m. from Harvest States #2 in Superior. Alittle over an hour later the Lake Ontario cleared the Duluth piers after loading at the AGP elevator on Rice's Point in Duluth.

Reported by: Gary A. Putney




Independent enters lay-up

12/22:
The Kinsman Independent finished unloading at General Mills on the 18th around 5PM. She then went out of the City Ship Canal and back up the Buffalo River with the Mississippi to the Lake and Rail Elevator on Childs St. She then began lay up proceedures that night.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




More Christmas Lights

12/22:
Two more ships are sporting Christmas decorations and lights. The Charles E Wilson has a Christmas Tree on deck and the Edwin H Gott has lights for the season.

Reported by: James Hile




Interesting Split Cargo

12/22:
Passing through Port Huron on Saturday, the AMERICAN MARINER was headed downbound. She had a split cargo, oats for Huron Ohio and taconite pellets for Lorain Ohio.

Reported by: Andrew Severson




Barker loads wheat

12/20:
The Kaye Barker arrived in Milwaukee Dec. 19 to load wheat. She loaded at the Continental Grain elevators, making this her second grain run (see story dated 11/24).

The Barker cleared around 6:00PM for Chicago.The new procedure has been a great success. Continental Grain built a hopper at their Chicago elevator to accept the grain. They can load the Barker in 15 hours and 8 hours later have the cargo in Chicago. It then takes the Barker around 15 hours to unload. This trip they loaded 600,000 bushels of wheat. The cargo of wheat is used locally in Chicago or shipped down river by barge. The main reason for doing it this way is economics and speed. The railroads can't come close to matching the hauling price or speed of unloading that the Barker can provide.

There is a possibility the Barker will make another run like this in January. Otherwise that's it for grain boats this year.

Overseeing the loading procedure was Frosty the Snowman on top of the unloading tower. Also keeping an eye on things was Santa on top of the forward mast. There is a second Santa with sleigh and eight reindeer on the end of the boom. Rudolph was in the lead with his nose glowing bright red. Large lighted candles line the railings behind the pilot house as well as rows of Christmas lights on just about every remaining railing on the boat, both fore and aft.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde and Jim Zeirke




Rumors continue on the future of the Hamilton Transfer

12/20:
Rumors continue to circulate about the future of the HAMILTON TRANSFER ex-CRISPIN OGLEBAY. As reported on June 24th, 1997, that ULS had placed an advertisement in the June 16th edition of Canadian Sailings, announcing she was for hire in 1998. It was widely hoped that she would return to service under her own power, after she completed her duties at Dofasco Steel. However, it now appears that ULS has other plans for her in the future. It is now rumored that the stern section of the HAMILTON TRANSFER will be removed, and be replace with the stern section of the CANADIAN EXPLORER. Apparently the cargo section of the C. EXPLORER is in pretty rough shape. The reconstruction is rumored to produce a stemwinder, but it has not been determined if the new vessel will be a straight-decker or a self-unloader. The future of her gantry crane is also uncertain. It is rumored that the engineering department at Port Weller Dry Docks is looking at the proposal, with a start date slated for later next year.

ULS is no stranger to recycling older vessels. HILDA MARJANNE and CHIMO became CANADIAN RANGER, and NORTHERN VENTURE and CABOT were reconstructed to form CANADIAN EXPLORER. Both of these reconstructions were completed at Port Weller.

Reported by: Mark Jackson




Last of the Salties to clear Twin Ports

12/20:
The Twin Ports will bid farewell this weekend to their final two salties of the season. The 621-foot Praxitelis arrived at the Harvest States grain elevator about 8 a.m. Dec. 19 to load 15,000 metric tons of sunflower seeds for Veracruz, Mexico. It is expected to be the last saltie out of Duluth-Superior when it departs this weekend. The only other saltie still in port is the 730-foot Lake Ontario, loading soybeans and peas for Antwerp at the AGP elevator in Duluth. It is expected to depart late Saturday or Sunday. Whichever vessel is last to leave, it will be the second-latest departure of a saltie since the St. Lawrence Seaway opened in 1959. The latest departure was Dec. 23, 1984.

Laker traffic is expected to continue in the ports until mid-January. There is still little ice in the harbor, and most channels are still open water. Midwest Energy Terminal now expects to load vessels after Christmas, which could be a record for late-season operation.

Reported by: Al Miller




Louis R. Desmarais

12/20:
Reports are that the Louis R DesMarais lost her rudder and is done for the season. Details are not available, please e-mail if you can provide any.

Reported by: Lon Morgan




Efficiency can be bad if you are a boat watcher

12/20:
As the shipping season begins to wind down, with some vessels already in winter layup, predictions of this past spring have apparently come true.

Little Port Washington, Wisconsin has experienced perhaps its most dismal boat watching season in years. Although the local electric utility received more coal than in any year in the past 15 years, the ship watching was, as predicted, very poor.

Transfer of the coal contract to Interlake Steamship Co. allowed Wisconsin Electric to receive the majority of their coal in 1000-footers. Only 18 ships called at Port Washington this year, compared with 36 in 1996. With the notable exception of a few Inland Steel boats early in the year, the bulk of the coal came in the holds of the JAMES R. BARKER, MESABI MINER, and PAUL R. TREGURTHA.

Although this was probably good news for WEPCO, it made for very dull and uninteresting boat-watching for the rest of us.

Reported by: Paul Wiening




News From Saginaw

12/20:
According to the Essroc Dock- the hope is that Algocape will be outbound sometime early Saturday morning. The straight decker has been undergoing unload by crain.

Fred R White Jr. is scheduled to make two more trips into the river this year. The White was to load 12/20 for Wirt Dock- Bay City then up to Saginaw, and then go back up and do the same thing again...

Reported by: Lon Morgan




Burns Harbor unloads at Algoma

12/20:
On Thursday, Dec. 18 the thousand foot long Burns Harbor paid their first visit ever to the Algoma Steel mill in Soo, Canada when they arrived with taconite from Superior, WI. Previous thousand footers to call on Algoma have been the George A. Stinson and the Indiana Harbor. She proceeded upbound at 7:30 PM.

Other odd trips include the Columbia Star unloading ore in Ashtabula, then proceeding to Taconite Harbor to load for Cleveland.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak and Andy LaBorde




U.S. Coast Guard to require I.S.M. Code status

12/20:
On 15 Dec., the U.S. Coast Guard announced that it will require relevant vessels on international voyages to include their International Safety Management Code status in arrival messages sent to the Coast Guard's Captain of the Port. The interim rule was published in the U.S. Federal Register on 14 Dec. and a final rule is expected by 1 Jan. As of 1 July, the code will apply to vessels trading internationally that transport more than 12 passengers, tankers, bulk cargo ships and high-speed cargo vessels of 500 gross tons or more. The Coast Guard's interium rule will take effect 26 Jan. but the status of a ship's I.S.M. Code will not be required for those carrying 12 or more passengers that are less than 500 gross tons. I.S.M. Code status will be required 24 hours before ships enter a U.S. port. Comments are being accepted until 12 Dec. through written materials sent to the Executive Secretary, Marine Safety Council (G-LRA/3406) (CGD 97-067), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, 2100 Second Street SW, Washington, D.C. 20593.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Fire aboard Iroquois in Milwaukee

12/20:
The Iroquois (U.S.-registry 18.82-meter/61.75-foot, 149-passenger motor excursion vessel built in 1946, operated by Iroquois Boat Line Co. and homeported at Milwaukee) caught fire 18 Dec. while at its mooring on the Milwaukee River, just north of the Clybourn Ave. bridge. No one was aboard at the time. Damage has been estimated at U.S.$20,000.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Christmas Spirt on the Middletown

12/20:
The Middletown has Christmas lights strung around all the railings and a Christmas tree at the end of the boom. Not only that, they have a beautifully decorated 7 foot tree in the crew's mess for all to enjoy during their meals and the galley is decorated with lights and decorations all around.

Reported by: Sharon Bouchonville




Today in Great Lakes History - December 20

The SAMUEL MATHER (5) was towed from Ashtabula on December 20, 1975 to Port Colborne, Ont. where her boilers were converted to oil-fired burners by Herb Fraser & Associates and renamed c) JOAN M. McCULLOUGH.

The FRONTENAC (4)'s scrapping process was completed there December 20, 1985.

The CRISPIN OGLEBAY (1) hauled her last cargo, a load of salt, into Rochester, NY on December 20, 1973 and then was laid up at Kingston, Ont. for the winter.

The Keel was laid for the PERE MARQUETTE 22 on December 20, 1923.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Two more vessels to the wall

12/19:
Two more vessels entered winter lay-up yesterday.
The only U.S. grain boat to sail this year, the KINSMAN INDEPENDENT tied up in Buffalo.

Algoma's ALGORAIL ended the season when she entered Port Weller Dry Docks, the shipyard will perform a major refit on the vessel over the winter. (see story dated 12/13)

Reported by: the Lake Carriers' Association and Port Weller Drydocks




Wintering in Cleveland

12/19:
Two Oglebay Norton vessels plan to lay up in Cleveland at the end of this season. The David Z Norton and the Earl W.Oglebay will tie up for the winter, no date or dock is known.

Also in the fleet, the Middletown will lay up in Superior and the Oglebay Norton will lay up in Sturgeon Bay.

Reported by: Sharon Bouchonville




November Coal

12/19:
Coal loadings at U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 3,962,898 net tons in November, a slight decrease from the corresponding period last year. However, for the season, the Lakes coal trade stands at 35.5 million tons, an increase of 13.2 percent. Coal shipments from some Erie ports are expected to continue well into January, so 1997 should prove to be the best year for coal since 1990 when the float approached 38 million tons.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers' Association




Medusa Announces Planned Fourth Quarter Charge

12/19:
Medusa Corporation announced last Friday that it will take a fourth quarter pretax charge of approximately $4 million principally related to certain environmental matters at its Charlevoix, Michigan plant. As previously disclosed, the Corporation has been actively evaluating its exposure to various environmental matters and has retained outside environmental consultants to assist in this process. As a part of this evaluation, the Company has concluded that a charge to earnings is appropriate for certain of these matters at this time. Without the charge, 1997 fourth quarter results are currently expected to be slightly below a year ago ($.94 per fully diluted share), a period that benefited from unusually strong sales and low costs.

Medusa Corporation produces and sells portland and masonry cements; mines, processes, and sells aggregates, home & garden and industrial limestone products; and provides construction services for highway safety. Medusa operations are principally in the eastern half of the United States.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




Seaway Radio Messsage No. 15

12/19:
Mariners are advised that, for the Montreal-Lake Ontario section of the Seaway, the surcharges for December 21st to 24th, 1997, have been waived. Special agreements will be required for vessels calling in at Cape Vincent downbound or CIP 2 upbound after 0001 hour December 25th. Arrangements for written agreements can be made at the Authority'`s St. Lambert, Quebec office. Further details are available in Seaway Notice no. 10.

Mariners are reminded that as of 2400 hours on December 15th, 1997, due to high flows, low water levels and lower than normal water temperatures, the maximum permissible draft in the Montreal-Lake Ontario section is now 79.2 decimeters or 26 feet 0 inches.

Water temperature at St. Lambert on December 18th, 1997 is 0.5 degrees celsius. Last year's temperature was 2.9 degrees celsius. The ten year average is 0.8 degrees celsius. An ice cover has formed behind the islands in the South Shore Canal.

Mariners are advised that the implementation of the power to length ratio restrictions and minimum draft requirements announced to take effect at 0001 hours on December 7th, 1997 have been postponed until further notice.

At midnight December 17th, the number of ocean vessels above St. Lambert was 25 as compared to 31 in 1996. Above Port Weller the number was 16 as compared to 21 in 1996.

It is important for mariners to note that any vessel which now calls in upbound at CIP2 will be designated a wintering vessel in accordance with all the terms outlined in Seaway Notices number 10 and 12 of 1997.

The thinning of non-essential aids in the Montreal-Lake Ontario section commenced December 16,1997.

The installation of the Galop ice boom is in progress. The Prescott/Ogdensburg ice boom opening has been reduced to 609m and is indicated by flashing green and red buoys.

All closing procedures outlined in Seaway Notices No. 10 and 12 of 1997 remain in effect.

Reported by: St. Lawrence Seayway Authority




Today in Great Lakes History - December 19

The ASHLAND was launched December 19, 1942 as the L6-S-B1 class bulk carrier a) CLARENCE B. RANDALL (1). She laid up for the last time on the same day in 1979.

The ELMGLEN (2) ran aground December 19, 1989 near Johnson Point in the Munuscong Channel of the St. Marys River. Downbound loaded with grain, she had been diverted to the Munuscong Channel because of difficulties encountered by her fleetmate BEECHGLEN in the ice clogged West Neebish Channel.

Because of the increased demand for iron ore during the Korean conflict more ships were needed and as a consequence the yards on the Great Lakes were operating at capacity. In December 1950 the Republic Steel Corp. bought 70% of Nicholson--Universal stock in order to purchase ships from the surplus fleet.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Canadian Explorer involved in collision

12/18:
The Canadian Explorer was in collision with the salty Island Skipper around midnight Sunday at the Beauharnois Locks. Damage to the Explorer is minor, some bent ribs, two vents, two lights and the gangway destoyed. The Island Skipper apparently went on to hit the bullnose of the lock and was holed as far back as the number two hold.

The Canadian Explorer layed-up on Tuesday at the Dofasco dock #1.

Reported by: Roger Tottman




BUFFALO update and picture

12/18:
On Wednesday it was announced that repairs to the BUFFALO will cost at least $500,000, and take at least six weeks to be spent in drydock before repairs will be completed. An investigation is still ongoing as to the cause of the mishap.

Click here for an image of the damaged vessel


Reported by: J. Hoffman, photo by D. Doright




Midwest Energy takes advantage of weather

12/18:
Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior continues to take advantage of this season's mild weather. It now indicates it will operate into late December, with Indiana Harbor scheduled to load there Dec. 26.

Reported by: Al Miller




Canada Marine Act advances

12/18:
The Canada Marine Act was approved 203 to 58 by the Canadian House of Commons the night of 9 Dec. The Canadian Senate has yet to vote on the bill. Among the provisions of the bill is a plan to transfer control of Canada's operation of the St. Lawrence Seaway to a group of nine users. In addition, most ports, with the exception of some extreme northern locations, will be transferred from governmental control to local administrations. The Canadian government would retain ownership of the port's real estate, however.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Follow the Bramble's Cruise to Caribbean

12/18:
As reported last week, the USCG Cutter BRAMBLE has been deployed to the Caribbean for the winter. The mission will include stops in many of the eastern Caribbean nations; Haiti, Dominican Republic, Venezuala, and Columbia. She is scheduled to return the second week of April. The Public Affairs Office, Ninth Coast Guard District will be maintaining a web page dedicated to the trip. Information will be provided through the page for families, friends and anyone else interested to keep up with what they are doing and where they are doing it. The address of the page is: http://www.dot.gov/dotinfo/uscg/d9/brambletrip.html .

Reported by: Capt. John Rigney




Today in Great Lakes History - December 18

The NANTICOKE was launched December 18, 1979.

GEORGIAN BAY was launched during a snow storm on December 18, 1953

The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was laid up for the last time December 18, 1981 at Cleveland.

On December 18, 1921 gale force winds drove the CARMI A. THOMPSON ashore at Buffalo, NY where she was laid up with grain for winter storage. She ended up wedged between the LOUIS W. HILL and the MERTON E. FARR. The THOMPSON was released on January 5, 1922 but required the replacement of 156 hull plates before her return to service.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




BUFFALO in drydock at Toledo Ohio

12/17:
The BUFFALO entered the drydock at Toledo Shipyard on Sunday 14 December. She entered after unloading what appeared to be a petroleum coke cargo into the AMERICAN REPUBLIC. She will be in the drydock for sometime to repair her badly damaged bow area.

Reported by: J. Hoffman




Grain traffic in Duluth

12/17:
The AGP elevator in Duluth is experiencing a last minute saltie rush for grain. Monday night 12/15 the Spar Jade was at the berth. Anchored directly off the berth in the harbor was the Federal Rhine. Out in the lake awaiting AGP are the Federal Mackenzie and the Lake Ontario. I can't recall ever seeing a line-up like that for AGP. It's very unusual to see one berth have 4 salties either loading at it or awaiting to load at this late in the season, especially AGP.

Reported by: Gary A. Putney and Al Miller




CSX Coal Docks ends season

12/17:
On Tuesday the CSX Coal Docks in Toledo started to load the CSL vessel J. W. McGIFFIN with its final coal cargo of this season. Loading of the vessel was to be completed early today. The Torco Ore Docks are scheduled to remain open until early January 1998.

Reported by: J. Hoffman




USCG Acacia working Saginaw

12/17:
Winter shipping season has finally arrived in Saginaw. The Cutter Acacia has been removing the"Aids to Navigation" (lighted buoys) and installing winter markers in the channel of the Saginaw River from the mouth to the Sixth St. turning Basin. Completion of this task is likely to be December 17,1997

Reported by: Dan Maus




Unloading progresses on the Algocape

12/17:
As of 2345 on Monday evening the straight decker Algocape continues to be unloaded at Essroc Cement Dock in Essexville. This process had started at 2305 Sunday night (See story dated 12/16). The crane being used was brought in on a deck barge pushed by the tug John Purvis.

Reported by: Lon Morgan




Beeghly in the Christmas Spirt

12/17:
The Charles M. Beeghly, decked out for the season, arrived in Milwaukee at dusk Tuesday, Dec. 16 with a load of coal. The first thing to catch your eye is a lighted, waving Santa below the pilot house, There are rows of colored lights both fore and aft lining every railing as well as the unloading tower. Behind the pilot house is the outline of a Christmas tree 3 levels high made from strings of green lights. The lights on the boom have been changed to red, gold and blue. At the end of the boom there is a real Christmas tree with blue lights on it. A very impressive sight.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Today in Great Lakes History - December 17

C.L. AUSTIN was launched December 17, 1910 as a) WILLIS L. KING

With an inexperienced Taiwanese crew, boiler problems and the collapse of Lock 7's west wall in the Welland Canal, SAVIC's (CLIFFS VICTORY) departure was delayed until December 17, 1985 when she departed Chicago under her own power.

The NEW QUEDOC sank at her winter moorings at Midland, Ont. December 17, 1961 with a load of storage grain. The sinking was caused by the automatic sea valves that were accidentally opened.

The ROGERS CITY (2) was laid up for the last time at Calcite, MI on December 17, 1981.

On December 17, 1955, in heavy fog, the B.F. AFFLECK collided head-on with her fleetmate HENRY PHIPPS in the Straits of Mackinac. Both vessels were damaged but were able to sail under their own power for repairs.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Straight decker visits Bay City

12/16:
The M/V ALGOCAPE arrived about 2200 yesterday as a first time caller to Bay City, she is loaded with 19000 metric tonnes of clinker material from Trois Rivier (Three River) Que. The 730',75' beam ship is a straight deck vessel and is being unloaded with a shore based crane with a clam bucket, the loading of the bucket is being relayed to the crane operator via two way radio using a spotter on the deck to direct the operator. Unloading will take all of three days to complete the process. The Algocape is owned by Algoma Central Marine and chartered by Seaway Bulk Carriers.

Reported by: Dan Maus and Lon Morgan




Middeltown makes unusual visit

12/16:
Middletown paid an unusual visit to Duluth Dec. 15 when it called at the Cutler-Magner dock to unload stone. It pulled into the dock soon after Algoway finished unloading its cargo there.

Reported by: Al Miller




Seaway Radio Messsage No. 12

12/16:
Mariners are advised that, for the Montreal-Lake Ontario section of the Seaway, the surcharges for December 21st, 22nd and 23rd, 1997, have been waived.

Mariners are reminded that as of 2400 hours on December 15th, 1997, due to high flows, low water levels and lower than normal water temperatures, the maximum permissible draft in the Montreal-Lake Ontario section will be 79.2 decimeters or 26 feet 0 inches.

Water temperature at St. Lambert on December 15th, 1997 is 0.1 degrees celsius. Last year's temperature was 2.5 degrees celsius. The ten year average is 0.8 degrees celsius.

An ice cover has formed behind the islands in the South Shore Canal.

Mariners are advised that the implementation of the power to length ratio restrictions and minimum draft requirements announced to take effect at 0001 hours on December 7th, 1997 have been postponed until further notice.

At midnight December 14th, the number of ocean vessels above St. Lambert was 38 as compared to 45 in 1996. Above Port Weller the number was 24 as compared to 37 in 1996.

It is important for mariners to note that any vessel which now calls in upbound at CIP2 will be designated a wintering vessel in accordance with all the terms outlined in Seaway Notices number 10 and 12 of 1997.

The installation of the Galop ice boom is in progress. The Prescott/Ogdensburg ice boom opening has been reduced to 609m and is indicated by flashing green and red buoys.

All closing procedures outlined in Seaway Notices No. 10 and 12 of 1997 remain in effect.

Reported by: St. Lawrence Seayway Authority




Today in Great Lakes History - December 16

On December 16, 1973, the Presque Isle entered service.

On December 16, 1966 while loading at Montreal, the CABOT ( b CANADIAN EXPLORER) rolled over on her side and sank with a loss of two lives. She was refloated on January 18, 1967.

On December 16, 1983 HILDA MARJANNE's forward section, which included a bow thruster, was moved to the building berth at Port Weller Dry Docks where it was joined to CHIMO's stern. The joined sections would later emerge from the dry dock as the b) CANADIAN RANGER.

The IMPERIAL BEDFORD was launched December 16,1968.

J.W. McGIFFIN was launched December 16, 1971

.The tug/barge PRESQUE ISLE departed light from Erie December 16,1973 on its maiden voyage bound for Two Harbors, MN. (This was the latest maiden voyage date at that time.) There the PRESQUE ISLE loaded 51,038 long tons of taconite pellets for delivery to Gary, IN. After this ice covered trip, the vessel returned to Erie for winter lay-up. The PRESQUE ISLE was the second thousand foot vessel on the Great Lakes (the Erie-built STEWART CORT which came out in 1972 was the first) and was the last large vessel built at the Erie shipyard.

While in tandem tow on the way to scrapping with the former Ford Motor Co. steamer ROBERT S. McNAMARA, the BUCKEYE MONITOR developed a crack in her deck amidships. The crack extended down her sides to below the waterline and she sank at 0145 hours on December 16, 1973 at position 43°30'N x 30°15'W in the North Atlantic Ocean.

BENSON FORD (2) made her last trip to the Rouge where she was laid up on December 16, 1984.

The PIC RIVER was the last to use the old Welland City Canal on December 16, 1972 as the new Welland by-pass opened the following spring.

The WILLIAM A. IRVIN sustained bottom damage in Lake Erie and laid up December 16, 1978 at Duluth, MN.

THOMAS WILSON operated until December 16, 1979, when she tied up at Toledo. During that final year, the vessel carried only thirty cargoes and all were ore.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Calcite II enters lay-up

12/15:
Calcite II arrived in Sturgeon Bay Dec. 14 for winter layup.

Visit the 1997-98 winter Lay-up list for more information


Reported by: Al Miller




Unusual runs for the Great Lakes Fleet

12/15:
Several ships of Great Lakes Fleet are making unusual port calls this week. Edwin H. Gott departed Duluth on the morning of Dec. 15 with ore for Nanticoke. Arthur M. Anderson was due into Silver Bay Dec. 14 to load, followed by Roger Blough on Dec. 18.

Reported by: Al Miller




Frontenac Light Show in Essexville

12/15:
CSL self-unloader FRONTENAC discharged a cargo of cement clinker for Essroc in Essexville Saturday December 13. The FRONTENAC was a special sight to behold in all her Christmas Spirit! Multi-colored lights were ablaze from stem to stern as she waited to depart Sunday morning (for winds to subside and daylight). A snowman stood watch on her port side deck, constructed from a winter storm on her upbound passage through the canal last Wednesday. The FRONTENAC departed the Essroc dock and proceeded stern first out of the river system (12/14 7:30am). A rare caller due at the Essroc dock in Essexville Sunday evening is the Algoma straight-decker ALGOCAPE with load of clinker from Lake Ontario. This is believed to be her first visit to the Essroc dock.

Reported by: Todd L. Davidson




Saltie Traffic in Duluth

12/15:
Saltie traffic in Duluth remains brisk but work is taking on added urgency as the end of the Seaway season nears. Spar Jade arrived Dec. 14 and Federal Mackenzie also was due in that day. Federal Rhine is scheduled to arrive Dec. 15, anchor inside the harbor for inspection and then go to the elevator to begin loading in the evening. Also due in Dec. 15 are Lake Ontario and Great Laker.

Duluth's AGP grain elevator is experiencing its own last-minute vessel rush. Spar Jade is loading there Dec. 15 and scheduled to finished at 1800 hours. As soon as it clears the berth, Federal Rhine is scheduled to enter the berth and load through the evening until midnight. The plan is to finish loading Dec. 16 and clear port that evening.

Reported by: Al Miller




Montreal plans dredging

12/15:
The Port of Montreal has reportedly made plans to dredge sections of the St. Lawrence River.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - December 15

The ROBERT KOCH went hard aground December 15, 1985 on Sheldon Point off Oswego, NY loaded with 2000 tons of cement when her towline parted from the tug R. & L. NO.1. Dragging her anchors in heavy weather, she fetched up on a rocky shelf in 16 feet of water 300 yards off shore.

The NORTHCLIFFE HALL (2) departed Kingston on December 15, 1974 headed for Colombia with a load of newsprint. She traded briefly in the Caribbean and then laid up at Houston, TX. later to return to the lakes.

On December 15, 1972 the GEORGIAN BAY was reported as the last ship to pass through the city of Welland as the new $8.3 million by-pass channel was to be ready for the beginning of the 1973 shipping season. (Actually two other ships, the TADOUSSAC and PIC RIVER, followed her through.)

The JOHN E.F. MISENER (2) was laid up for the last time on December 15, 1982 at Port McNicoll, Ont.

JOE S. MORROW was launched December 15, 1906.

The RED WING (2) was laid up for the last time at Toronto on December 15, 1984 due in part to the uneconomical operation of her steam turbine power plant.

The ROGERS CITY (2) cleared Lauzon on December 15, 1987 in tow of the Maltese tug PHOCEEN on the first leg of her tow to the cutters torch.

On December 15, 1988, Purvis Marine's ANGLIAN LADY departed Mackinaw City with the CHIEF WAWATAM under tow, arriving at the Canadian Soo the next day. During the winter of 1988-89, Purvis removed items tagged by the State (including the pilot house) and began converting her into a barge.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - December 14

On December 14, 1984, the William Clay Ford (1) laid up for the final time at the Rouge Steel plant in Dearborn.

The JIIMAAN was towed out of dry dock on December 14, 1992 by the tugs JAMES E. McGRATH and LAC VANCOUVER to the fitout dock for completion.

The CHICAGO TRIBUNE was sold for scrap in 1988 and was towed up the Welland Canal on December 14, 1988 by the tugs THUNDER CAPE and MICHAEL D. MISNER to Port Colborne, Ont.

On December 14, 1926, the W.E. FITZGERALD was caught in heavy seas and suffered damaged frames and hull plating. Repairs consisted of replacing nearly 25,000 rivets and numerous hull plates.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Calcite II refloated

12/13:
The Calcite II has been freed and the M/V Wolverine is now (as of 8:30A.M.) downbound, the Tug John Pervis which was working near the mouth of the Saginaw River was dispatched and did a great job. The wind has subsided and all seems normal again.

Reported by: Dan Maus




Buffalo suffers 25 -foot gash across bow

12/13:
According to a story in today's Toledo Blade, The American Steamship Company freighter BUFFALO struck the Detroit River Lighthouse early Friday. No injuries or pollutant spillage were reported in the incident that occurred about 5:20 am, The Detroit River light is located in Lake Erie to mark the entrance into the Detroit River.

The 635-foot BUFFALO was headed from Detroit to Cleveland (reporters note-where she usually winters) At the time of the collision, the visibility was clear and waves measured two to three feet, coast guard officials said. The collision caused a 25-foot gash across the bow of the freighter which took on water, but was considered seaworthy enough to proceed to the CSX coal dock in Toledo.

Yesterday afternoon, Detroit Coast Guard safety inspectors reported that damage to the lighthouse was minimal, involving only the structure's rock and stone foundation. The lighthouse continues to function,

The BUFFALO, a self-unloader which frequently travels across Lake Erie is owned by American Steamship Company of Williamsville NY, near Buffalo. Company officials declined to reveal the vessel's cargo. (Note: She was only drawing 14-feet forward after the accident, and was obviously in ballast.)

Lt. Neil Shoemaker, a Coast Guard safety inspector in Toledo, said that a joint investigation will be conducted by his office and coast guard investigators in Detroit to determine the cause of the crash.

The picture that accompanied the story shows a deep dent, in BUFFALO's bow, below the starboard anchor. It runs from the 24-foot depth marker to below the waterline.

Reported by: Dave Wobser and Frank Bell




Sloan enters lay-up

12/13:
George A. Sloan entered Fraser Shipyards in Superior on Dec. 12 to begin laying up for the winter.

Visit the 1997-98 winter Lay-up list for more information


Reported by: Al Miller




Kinsman Independent loading

12/13:
Kinsman Independent was loading at the Cargill elevator in Duluth on Dec. 12, a departure from its usual practice of loading almost exclusively at Peavey in Superior.

Reported by: Al Miller




Medusa Challenger sporting Christmas decorations

12/13:
The Medusa Challenger recently spent 36 hours in Milwaukee waiting weather as well as giving anyone who passed their dock a Christmas light show. The entire after end is lined with colored lights. Two life rings are also outlined in lights. There is a Santa Claus below the stack as well as a second Santa and a Christmas tree on their unloading boom. The forward end is also decked out in lights as well.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




More on the refit of the Algorail

12/13:
The November issue of the Detroit Marine Historian offers an expanded (see original story dated October '97) report on the refit of the Algorail. Algoma Central Marine has awarded a $5.5 million contract to Port Weller Dry Docks for a major refit of their self-unloader Algorail. Scheduled to arrive at Port Weller on December 15, Algorail will have a new, patent-pending gate, designed by Algoma in cooperation with EMS-Tech Inc. of Belleville, Ont., installed, making her the first ship in the Algoma fleet with this unique innovation. Her self-unloading boom cable-hoisting system will be replaced with a new hydraulic hoisting system, offering increased reliability and ease of maintenance. Major components in the cargo holds will be replaced, the hydraulic and electrical systems in the tunnels renewed, and a Garland roller system installed. She will also be fitted with wash water holding tanks, which offer both environmental and economical advantages. Algorail will be delivered April 3, 1998 to Coincide with the beginning of the Great Lakes shipping season. This is the second modernization of this type for Algoma as part of a $85 million modernization program for its 23 vessel fleet. Last year Algoway underwent a similar mid-life refit at Port Weller.

Reported by: Detroit Marine Historian




Another Banner Year for Stone trade

12/13:
With shipments of 4.1 million net tons in November, the Great Lakes stone trade has again set a new post-recession record. As of the end of November, shipments of aggregate and fluxstone from U.S. and Canadian ports stand at 36,297,731 tons, the highest level achieved since the recession of the early and mid-1980s forced dramatic restructuring in the Great Lakes industrial basin.

This is the fourth year in a row that the Lakes stone trade has established a modern-day benchmark. Last year's total was 35.1 million tons. The all-time peak for the trade was in 1974 when 43.1 million tons were shipped.

Stone will continuing shipping until approximately December 20, so the final tally should top 38 million tons. Given stone's higher moisture content and the fact that some stone is "washed" before loading into vessels, the trade is much more sensitive to freezing temperatures and generally is the first to conclude. The iron ore and coal trades will continue well into January.

Reported by:Lake Carriers' Association




John Wildhagen dies at 77

12/13:
John H. "Jeep" Wildhagen Sr. died of a heart attack on 9 Dec. at St. Mary's Hospital Ozaukee in Mequon, Wis., He was 77, according to an article by Eldon Knoche in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel on 12 Dec.

Wildhagen was born in Hamburg, Germany, on 1 Nov., 1920. He emigrated to the United States with his mother when he was 3 and they settled in Milwaukee where she cleaned houses and operated a rooming house. A 16-year-old student at Marquette University High School in the city when his mother died, Wildhagen moved to Port Washington, Wis., to live with a relative and finish school.

At first, he worked as a commercial fisherman from Port Washington and sold most of his catch to Smith Bros., later hauling his catch and gear in the family's pink 1958 Cadillac. He worked aboard tugs, painted barns and ran a taxi service in the 1940s, in one case destroying a transmission while winning a bet he could not drive backwards from Saukville, Wis., to Port Washington. He also hired children to sell products door-to-door in Chicago and Milwaukee that were manufactured by local disabled residents and was known to ring doorbells at midnight selling Electrolux vacuum cleaners with the announcement that if he didn't sell his stock, he'd be fired.

Wildhagen also sold used cars in Milwaukee and sold one lot and all its cars for U.S.$1.

Later, he operated a used appliance store near Teutonia and W. North Ave. in Milwaukee and operated a scrap business in Bay View, Wis., as Wrecker John. He also owned a semi-trailer and loaded whatever cargo he could.

On the water, Wildhagen towed boats out the St. Lawrence Seaway and in the 1960s, was hired by Erwin Uihlein, president of Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co., to be the master of his yacht, the Elena. Wildhagen will be buried 13 Dec. in the captain's uniform Uihlein bought for him.

Wildhagen was also one of the organizers of Port Washington's Fish Day, which now brings tens of thousands of visitors annually with music, arts and crafts, displays, food, a carnival, fireworks and a parade. Wildhagen was grand marshal in 1994.

In the 1960s, he wrote "Seagull's Lookout," a column in the weekly Ozaukee Press known for factured spelling and political commentary.

In 1980, Wildhagen stopped fishing to operate Port Recycling, a scrap business owned by one of his sons, Mark. He retired a few months ago.

Wildhagen's wife, Mary, died in 1993. He is survived by sons John Jr. and Mark of Port Washington and Walter of Anaheim, Calif.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - December 13

The CANADIAN ENTERPRISE entered service on December 13, 1979.

On December 13, 1989 the HENRY STEINBRENNER (4) was laid up at Toledo's Lakefront Dock.

The G.A. TOMLINSON (2) arrived under her own power at Triad Salvage Inc., Ashtabula, OH on December 13, 1979 to be scrapped.

The THOMAS WILSON ran aground in the St. Marys River on December 13, 1976. The accident required lightering before she would float free.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Calcite II aground in Saginaw update

12/12:
For the second time in less than a week a vessel has grounded in the Saginaw River.

The Calcite II is still aground at 9:30 P.M. In a conversation with the Woverine, the capitan of the Calcite II reported difficulty making the curve. Seems the bow went right on her own. The Wolverine reported difficulties in navigating the river earlier in the day (11:00AM), reporting high currents. The Wolverine also offered to assist the Calcite II in any way. The Calcite turned down the assistance. The Calcite is south of the Zilwaukee bridge, immediatly under the high tension wires that cross the river. Closest buoy is 68. The Calcite II attempted to free herself by using the winch lines and full astern but made no progress and has stopped efforts. A tug is being requested. The Wolverine suggested calling the Manitou as she had assisted the Frantz earlier and reportedly would be staying about the Saginaw River area just in case she was needed again. The Zilwaukee park at the east end of the Tittabawassee is an excellent viewing area for those so inclined.
Reported by: Dale Stephan

At around 5:30P.M.today, the Calcite II was seen aground under the I-75 Zilwaukee Bridge. It appears that a combination of currents and possibly fierce winds may have caused the grounding. Currently the ship has it's mooring lines extended to shore hoping to utilize deck winches to assist in freeing herself. She is reported to be "fully blocking the channel." The vessel is still loaded with limestone and is not in ballast.

The M/V Wolverine is stuck in the River due to the grounding. Once the Wolverine finished unloaded they headed to the Sixth St. turning basin and then returned to the Wirts dock to tie up until they can safely pass the stranded Calcite II. More to come!

Reported by: Dan Maus




Jean Parisien loses rudder and damages prop

12/12:
Reports are that the Jean Parisien got into some trouble below Quebec City earlier this week. The accident caused the vessel to wrecked her prop and tore the rudder off. She was towed back to Quebec City and CSL has laid her up for the year.

Reported by: Mark Jackson




Ships waiting to load grain

12/12:
A number of ships were waiting at the Twin Ports for a chance to load at the Peavey Connors Point grain elevator in Superior yesterday. Algoisle was under the spouts there and due to depart on the evening of Dec. 11. Anchored on Lake Superior and waiting to load at PV are salties Holck Larsen, Mecta C and Mitza. In addition, Kinsman Independent was due in overnight Dec. 11. The vessel usually loads at PV.

Reported by: Al Miller




ULS vessels sailing into February

12/12:
Reports out of ULS indicate that CANADIAN TRANSPORT, CANADIAN OLYMPIC and the CANADIAN ENTERPRISE will continue to operate into February 1998. Early reports indicate they will continue to operate on the coal and salt runs on Lake Erie.

Reported by: Mark Jackson




Today in Great Lakes History - December 12

The push tug a) PRESQUE ISLE (2) was launched December 12, 1972 as Hull #322 by the Halter Marine Services, Inc., New Orleans, LA.

The SPINDLETOP (e BADGER STATE) was launched December 12, 1942 for the United States Maritime Commission.

The WHEAT KING returned to Port Weller Dry Docks on December 12, 1975 for lengthening to the maximum Seaway size of 730 feet overall for the iron ore and grain trade thus ending her salt water activities.

One unusual trip for the WOODLAND occurred when she arrived at Toronto, Ont. on December 12, 1987 to load a 155 foot, 135-ton self-unloading unit for delivery to the Verolme Shipyard in Brazil where the Govan-built Panamax bulk carrier CSL INNOVATOR was being converted to a self-unloader.

On Monday December 12, 1898, the AURORA was fast in the ice at Amherstburg, Ontario, when a watchman smelled smoke. The crew tried to put out the fire, but to no avail. They were taken off the burning vessel by the tug C.A. LORMAN. The ship burned to the water's edge.

On December 12, 1956, the once proud vessel EASTERN STATES was taken out onto Lake St. Clair where she was set afire. All her superstructure was burned off and the hull was taken to Hamilton, Ontario, where she was scrapped in 1957.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Snow delays fleet

12/11:
The winter storm crossing Illinois, Indiana and Michigan has sent several boats to anchor yesterday. Great Lakes Fleet reported the Gott, Anderson, Callaway, Clarke, Munson, Sloan and Calcite II dropped their hooks while waiting for weather. The Sloan's next destination is Superior, so it sounds like it may be going into layup.

Reported by: Al Miller




Mail boat ready to end season

12/11:
The U.S. Mailboat J.W. Westcott II is scheduled to lay-up on the morning of December 19th. This will mark the end of the 102nd season of mid-river mail delivery for the Westcott Company.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Midwest Energy still loading vessels

12/11:
Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior is taking advantage of this winter's mild start by handling vessels well into mid-December. In past years, the dock often has closed by Dec. 12. This year's vessel schedule includes Joe Thompson and Columbia Star on Dec. 12 as well as Oglebay Norton Dec. 16 and Canadian Olympic Dec. 17.

Reported by: Al Miller




New trade development director at Duluth

12/11:
Ronald L. Johnson will become the trade development director at the Port Authority of Duluth, Minn., on 1 Jan., when Sam L. Browman retires. Johnson, 48, is now customer relations manager at USG Interiors and has been with the company since 1987 when it was Conwed Corp. He graduated from the University of Minnesota and worked at Cargill Inc. as well. Browman, 61, has been with the port since 1978. With the personnel change, the title of marketing director will become trade development director.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Seaway Radio Messsage No. 8

12/11:
Mariners are advised that, for the Montreal-Lake Ontario section of the Seaway, the surcharges for December 21st and 22nd have been waived. Weather and traffic conditions will continue to be monitored and, as per Seaway notice number 10, the decision for the remaining days will be announced prior to December 15th, 1997.

Mariners are reminded that as of 2400 hours on December 15th, 1997, due to high flows, low water levels and lower than normal water temperatures, the maximum permissible draft in the Montreal-Lake Ontario section will be 79.2 decimeters or 26 feet 0 inches.

Water temperature at St. Lambert on December 9th, 1997 is 1.0 degrees celsius. Last year's temperature was 2.7 degrees celsius. The ten year average is 1.4 degrees celsius.

Mariners are advised that the implementation of the power to length ratio restrictions and minimum draft requirements announced to take effect at 0001 hours on December 7th, 1997 is postponed until further notice.

At midnight December 8th, the number of ocean vessels above St. Lambert was 45 as compared to 65 in 1996. Above Port Weller the number was 33 as compared to 50 in 1996.

It is important for mariners to note that any vessel which enters the Seaway upbound at CIP2 after 2400 hours on December 9th shall be designated a wintering vessel in accordance with all the terms outlined in Seaway Notices number 10 and 12 of 1997.

The installation of the Galop ice boom is in progress. The Prescott/Ogdensburg ice boom opening has been reduced to 609m and is indicated by flashing green and red buoys.

Reported by: St. Lawrence Seayway Authority




Today in Great Lakes History - December 11

TEXACO CHIEF (2) was launched December 11, 1968.

The H. LEE WHITE (2) collided with the Greek salty GEORGIOS on December 11, 1974 near St. Clair, MI and had to return to Nicholson's dock at Detroit, MI for inspection.

On December 11, 1979 while about 11 miles off Manitou Island near the Keweenaw Peninsula, the ASHLAND's engine stalled due to a faulty relay switch. Caught in heavy weather and wallowing in the wave troughs, she put out a distress call. True to Great Lakes tradition four vessels immediately came to her assistance: two thousand footers, LEWIS WILSON FOY and EDWIN H. GOTT, along with WILLIS B. BOYER and U.S.C.G. cutter MESQUITE.

.The WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) loaded her last cargo at Duluth, MN. December 11, 1984.

The PERE MARQUETTE 21 passed down the Welland Canal ( loaded with remnants of Port Huron's Peerless Cement Dock) on December 11, 1974 towed by the tugs SALVAGE MONARCH and DANIEL McALLISTER on the way to Sorel, Que. where she was laid up.

WHEAT KING was laid up for the last time December 11, 1981 .

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




The Beet Boat

12/10:
In Interlake Steamship Company's proud tradition of innovation, they have become the first vessel to carry sugar beets using a self-unloading vessel. The company worked in reviewing the potential cargo and then followed through in its carriage of the sugar beets over the weekend in the Steamer Elton Hoyt 2nd. Their customer, Michigan Sugar Company was very pleased with the results, although quite a mess was made in the initial dropping of the beets into the cargo hold. The vessel successfully carried 1200 tons of beets to Marysville, MI and the Hoyt has been dubiously dubbed the "Beet Boat".

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Sailing into February

12/10:
Reports are that the Algoma fleet is planning to haul Salt from Goderich and coal across Lake Erie into mid February, weather providing.

Reported by: Dan Maus




Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Cleveland

12/10:
The recruiting rep for The Great Lakes Maritime Academy will be in Cleveland, Ohio on Saturday, December 13th. Anyone interested in learning more about the Academy and a career on the Great Lakes is invited to attend. A no-cost informational seminar will begin at 11am at the Cleveland Port Authority, 101 Erie Side Ave. For more information, call the Academy at 1-800-748-0566 extension 1200.

Reported by: Gary Schweitzer




Today in Great Lakes History - December 10

CEDARGLEN loaded her last cargo at Thunder Bay, Ont. on December 10, 1984 carrying grain for Goderich, Ont.

Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co. of Cleveland, OH bought the NOTRE DAME VICTORY on December 10, 1950. She would later become the CLIFFS VICTORY.

The IRVIN L. CLYMER was laid up at Superior, WI on December 10, 1985 for two seasons before returning to service April 30, 1988.

An explosion occurred in the IMPERIAL LEDUC's (b NIPIGON BAY ) forward tanks on December 10, 1951. This happened while her crew was cleaning and butterworthing the tanks. Five crew members were injured with one eventually dying in the hospital. Multiple explosions caused extensive damage in excess of $500,000.

On December 10, 1905 the WILLIAM E.CORY finally was pulled free and refloated after a grounding in late November.

FRANK A. SHERMAN laid up for the last time at Toronto on December 10, 1981.

Donated by Cleveland-Cliffs to the Great Lakes Historical Society on December 10, 1987, the WILLIAM G. MATHER was to become a museum ship at Cleveland's water front.

PAUL H. CARNAHAN and her former fleetmate, GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2), arrived safely under tow at Kaosiung, Taiwan on December 10, 1986 for scrapping.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Great Lakes Ports Up 7.4 Percent Through October

12/09:
Shipments of iron ore, coal and stone from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports stand at 119.2 million tons through October, an increase of 7.4 percent.

Iron ore loadings have increased 9.4 percent. Coal cargos are up 15.5 percent and stone loadings have increased 12.2 percent.

The Lakes stone trade is expected to set its fourth-straight post-recession record. The current post-recession record of 35.1 million tons should have fallen in late November. Another record to fall in 1997 will be shipments of low-sulfur coal from Superior, Wisconsin. At the end of November, coal loadings out of Superior Midwest Energy Terminal were only 600,000 tons short of the 1996 record of 13.6 million tons.

Reported by:Lake Carriers' Association




Christmas Spirit on the Frontenac

12/09:
The Frontenac is heavily lit-up. It was a very pretty site as she approached Bridge 21 in Port Colborne downbound in the canal last night. The wheel house has several sets of lights strung like Christmas trees. Look at the back of the wheel house there are four levels of lights strung. On the unloading gear in the stern of the boat is written Season Greetings. I have never remembered in all my years such a display on a lake boat.

Reported by: J. J. Van Volkenburg




Today in Great Lakes History - December 09

JUPITER (2) was christened December 9, 1975

The JEAN PARISIEN left Quebec City on her maiden voyage December 9, 1977 to load coal at Sandusky, OH for Hamilton, Ont.

While downbound loaded with iron ore, CLIFFS VICTORY ran aground December 9, 1976 near Johnson Point in the ice--laden Munuscong Channel of the St. Marys River. (The downbound West Neebish Channel had been closed the previous day for the season because of its ice filled and restrictive nature.)

The GEORGIAN BAY was laid up for the last time at Thunder Bay, Ont. on December 9, 1982.

The SCOTIACLIFFE HALL was transferred to Nassau in the Bahamas. Her Canadian registry closed December 9, 1974.

SAMUEL MATHER (6) and A.H. FERBERTarrived at Sydney, Nova Scotia on December 9, 1987 under tow of the tug CAPT. IOANNIS S.

On December 9, 1960, the STARBELLE was caught in a late season storm on Lake superior, and suffered cracks to her deck and sides. Despite this severe damage, she reached port safely

Datafrom: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Frantz refloated

12/08:
At approximately 16:40 yesterday afternoon the tug Manitou pulled the Joseph H. Frantz off the bank and back into the channel. Manitou took a stern line and pulled for about 15 or 20 minutes before she broke free of the bank. It was about 5 minutes later that the bow slid back into the channel. Frantz dropped her port anchor, then with the Manitou pulling from the stern the Frantz used her own engine to back off the bank.

A crowd estimated between 150-200 people watched the whole process with the sun setting over the vessel.

The Joe Frantz was outbound thru Bay City at 8:30 last night. They stopped at the Consumers Power Dock to drop off 2 representatives from the US Coast Guard, and then departed heading for the lake.

Reported by: Lon Morgan and Dan Maus




Season recap - Ryerson

12/08:
The Edward L. Ryerson finished their 1997 season when they arrived at Sturgeon Bay, WI for winter lay up Dec. 4. They finished the year with 50 trips, 5 to Escanaba, the balance to Marquette. The Ryerson hauled over 1.3 million tons of taconite this year. The fastest Marquette load was completed in 2:28 at winter marks with a load of 26,600 tons.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Seaway traffic Delayed

12/08:
Sometime before 1025 Sunday morning, traffic was delayed in the Seaway due to an incident at the Iroquois Lock. The delay involved the Sevilla Wave and a problem with their anchor. More information as it becomes available

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Wind Point takes over lighthouse

12/08:
Wind Point, Wis., has acquired a 117-year-old lighthouse in the village. Wind Point received it for free in exchange for a promise to maintain the tower as a historic site. Tours are planned, but U.S.$40,000 will be needed to install a railing on top of the tower. The lighthouse was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1984 and after it was declared surplus by the U.S. Coast Guard, Wind Point secured it through the U.S. General Services Administration.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Clipper Returns after 27 years

12/08:
The SS Milwaukee Clipper has been saved and returned to her former home port of Muskegon. She arrived at the Muskegon breakwall at precisely 3:45pm Tuesday, December 2. The sun came out when she approached the channel and a very large and enthusiastic crowd lined the channel walls the greet the legendary ship. It was the first time in 27 years that the Milwaukee Clipper entered the channel! Currently, the vessel is moored at the old GT trainferry docks in the Lakeside district of Muskegon. The Great Lakes Clipper Preservation Association (GLCPA) is a nonprofit group that will restore and preserve the ship, primarily through the efforts of donations and volunteers. Most of the work will commence in the spring, but a "Welcome Home" fundraising party will take place within a few weeks. The ship is easily visible at numerous locations around Lakeside, but until the GLCPA has installed proper approaches and such for the public, up-close viewing of the ship is extremely limited (contact myself for further details). Once the restoration work is underway, the GLCPA will open the Clipper for tours, banquets, parties, and a bed-and-breakfast facility. She will be a first class museum ship offering a view of passenger service on the Great Lakes from 1905 to 1970.

Here's a short description of her history: 1905-1930s: She was the SS Juniata. As a passenger and freight steamer with a quadruple expansion engine, she carried tourists and pioneers alike from Buffalo, NY to Mackinac Island, Chicago, and Duluth, MN. In 1941 her wooden superstructure was removed and replaced with an all steel (art deco) superstructure. Over a million dollars was spent on the renovation and when she became the Milwaukee Clipper, she was the first streamline luxury liner on the Great Lakes. Her main ports-of-call were Milwaukee, Muskegon, and Chicago. She ceased cross-lake operations in 1970, and was moved to Navy Pier in Chicago in 1980. The owner at that time was Jim Gillon, and he had planned to operate the ship from Chicago for excursions on Lake Michigan. That didn't happen, but he did invest a lot in the ship and brought back the grand luster she once had. Politics changed in Chicago in 1989 and the ship was forced out. She was sold the the Hammond Port Authority in 1990 and became the centerpiece of the new Hammond Marina. In 1995, her dock space was needed for a new gambling boat and the Milwaukee Clipper was moved to a temporary sight on the nearby Calumet River in South Chicago. Unfortunately, numerous items were stolen from the ship at this dock space. Her bell was stolen, some of the stateroom doors were needlessly bashed in, and (we just discovered on her return to Muskegon) a generator had been swiped. The FBI has been notified (the ship is a National Historic Landmark and as such, is protected by the Secretary of the Interior). She was towed to Muskegon by the Andrie tug "John Purves" on December 2. A speical "thanks" to everyone who has encouraged us on to save this vital and irreplacable piece of Great Lakes history. I have some great pics (both aerial and from the channel wall) of the Clipper's return and hope to have them linkedto the Clipper's web page soon. If you'd like to learn more about the Milwaukee Clipper and the efforts of the GLCPA please visit our Web page.

If you live around Grand Rapids and Kalamazoo, tune into WGVU/WGVK TV Monday night (December 8) for the telecast of my documentary "Building the Mighty Mac". I'll give you an update about the Clipper and show some new pictures.

Reported by: Mark Howell




Christmas lights on the lakers

12/08:
Many of the vessels sailing into the winter are decorated with Christams lights, reports are now coming in. At 11:00 PM on December 5 a wonderful Christmas display was seen on Lake Michigan at Port Ulao, WI, about 20 miles north of Milwaukee. The ship, heading north, was decked out in Christmas lights, including green lights in the form of a giant Christmas tree. Perhaps this is how St. Nicholas used to get to the houses of all the kids on the Great Lakes.

Reported by: David Bennett




New Kingston Tourboat

12/08:
The 100' long Catamaran Le Bateau Mouche II arrived in Kingston, at 1600 Thursday, Dec. 4. This was after 35 hour journey from Quebec City. The vessel is capable of sitting 200 people for dinner. The vessel is fully airconditioned and the eating area is glass covered. Power is by four Catapillar engines and jet drives. The vesssel is moored at the Crawford Wharf and will be moved to its winter berth on Monday. No new name has been given as yet for the vessel.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Seaway Radio Messsage No. 6

12/08:
Mariners are advised that, for the Montreal-Lake Ontario section of the Seaway, the surcharges for December 21st and 22nd have been waived. Weather and traffic conditions will continue to be monitored and, as per Seaway notice number 10, the decision for the remaining days will be announced prior to December 15th, 1997.

Mariners are reminded that as of 2400 hours on December 15th, 1997, due to high flows, low water levels and lower than normal water temperatures, the maximum permissible draft in the Montreal-Lake Ontario section will be 79.2 decimeters or 26 feet 0 inches.

Water temperature at St. Lambert on December 5th, 1997 is 0.8 degrees celsius. Last year's temperature was 3.1 degrees celsius. The ten year average is 2.3 degrees celsius.

Mariners are advised that the implementation of the power to length ratio restrictions and minimum draft requirements announced to take effect at 0001 hours on December 7th, 1997 is postponed until further notice.

At midnight December 4th, the number of ocean vessels above St. Lambert was 48 as compared to 74 in 1996. Above Port Weller the number was 38 as compared to 46 in 1996.

The installation of the Prescott/Ogdensburg and Galop ice booms is in progress. Booms will be buoyed as they reach the channel.

All closing procedures outlined in Seaway Notices No. 10 and 12 of 1997 remain in effect.

Reported by: St. Lawrence Seayway Authority




Today in Great Lakes History - December 08

CANADIAN ENTERPRISE was christened December 8, 1979.

IMPERIAL DARTMOUTH was downbound on her maiden voyage, December 8, 1970, arriving at Halifax, N.S. December 23rd for bunkering service there.

The SELKIRK SETTLER (c. FEDERAL FRASER) cleared Duluth, MN with grain on December 8, 1983 bound for Limassol, Cyprus.

The SAVIC ( CLIFFS VICTORY) arrived at Inchon, South Korea December 8, 1986 for scrapping.

The JAMES DAVIDSON was laid up for the last time on December 8, 1969 at Toledo, OH.

The MERLE M. McCURDY collided with U.S. Steel's PHILIP R. CLARKE opposite Grosse Pointe Farms, MI on Lake St. Clair, December 8, 1974.

The WILLIAM CLAY FORD (2) arrived at Port Maitland, Ontario on December 8, 1986, after a stormy and difficult passage, towed by tugs TUSKER and GLENADA, and was scrapped during 1987.

On December 7, 1982, the Leadale (formerly John A. Kling) grounded and sank as she was departing a dock in Thorold, Ontario.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Update on the Frantz

12/07:
The Joseph H Frantz remains hard aground in the Saginaw River awaiting tugs.
Click here for a picture of the stranded vessel.


Reported by: Dan Maus




Update on the Frantz

12/06:
The Joseph H Frantz remains hard aground just north of the Cheboyganing Creek Bridge in the Saginaw River, between Bay City and Saginaw. So far this morning there doesn't seem to be much communication by radio, must all be by cell phone.

The vessel is high in the water with most of her bowthruster tube exposed. She appears to have a port list to the center of the river.

As has been the case for the past 3-4 weeks there is no current water level available. It was rumored at 0100 today that the water level, and lack of current readings may have been a contributing factor.

The ship is not and has not caused any problem relative to the channel , ship traffic has been passing without problems. The tug Jacklyn M of the LaFarge Barge "Integrity" has left the area. Using the tug was discussed but apparently was not chosen for her services. More as it becomes available.

Reported by: Lon Morgan and Dan Maus




Frantz hard aground in river

12/06:
The M/V Joseph H. Frantz, while outbound after discharging a cargo at Crow Island is hard aground in the Saginaw River between Buoys 49&53, The vessel is partially blocking the channel. More information to follow as it becomes available.

Reported by: Dan Maus and Greg Brass




Ryerson calls it a season

12/06:
The Edward L. Ryerson ended her 1997 sailing season yesterday. She arrived at Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay for winter lay-up.

See the 4th Annual Lay-up list for more information.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Bramble passes thru 1000 Islands

12/06:
United Coast Guard buoy tender 'Bramble' now in St. Lawrence Seaway and passed buoy 217, three miles east of Clayton, New York at 3:10 pm. today, December 05. See previous reports of 12/01 and 12/03. Inspite of misty rain and snow flurries, crew could be seen on deck viewing the beauty of these islands as they passed under the International bridge, the American span of bridge linking the United States with Canada. span linking the United States with Canada

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Jones Act Lakers Closing in on Another Post-Recession Record

12/06:
With U.S.-Flag lakers moving more than 13.6 million tons of cargo in October, it is all but certain that the Lakes Jones Act fleet will set another post-recession record in 1997. The 60-plus U.S.-Flag ships and large tug/barge units working the Great Lakes need haul just 18.9 million tons of dry- and liquid-bulk cargo between November 1 and the close of 1997 shipping season in late January to surpass the post-recession record of 117 million tons set in 1996.

The strong October float was in part due to continued high demand for fluxstone and aggregate from the steel and construction industries. U.S.-Flag lakers moved 3.8 million tons of stone in October, an increase of 18.8 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. For the season, stone cargos in U.S. bottoms stand at 24.7 million tons, an increase of 10.8 percent.

Coal cargos in U.S.-Flag lakers increased slightly in October. Since the resumption of the coal trade in March, the U.S.-Flag coal float stands at 18.6 million tons, an increase of 12.9 percent.

Although iron ore loadings in U.S. bottoms dipped slightly in October, the season-to-date total of 48 million tons represents an increase of 4.7 percent compared to last year's end-of-October tally.

Total cargo movement in U.S.-Flag lakers stands at 98,154,311 net tons at the end of October, an increase of 7.4 percent compared to 1996.

As of December 5, two U.S.-Flag lakers have arrived at their winter lay-up berths. A few of the smaller, low horsepower self-unloaders will conclude their season before Christmas, but the vast majority of the active fleet will sail into January.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Annual Marine Mart Today!

12/06:
The Dossin Great Lakes Museum annual Marine Mart will be held today from 10-3 P.M. at the Harbor Hill Marina foot of St. Jean St. Detroit, MI (313-331-6880).
Directions to Harbor Hill Marina: from Jefferson Ave. turn south towards the river on St. Jean Ave. Turn right on Freud Ave. and watch for Harbor Hill Marina Gatehouse just a short distance down on the left. A volunteer will meet you at the gate with directions for parking. 35 dealers will be selling books, china, models, photographs, postcards, art work and artifacts. For more information call Dossin Great Lakes Museum 313-852-4051. I highly recommend this show , it's well worth the trip!

Look for me at the Know Your Ships table.

Click here to view the location map





I.M.O. to speed bulk carrier safety amendments

12/06:
The International Maritime Organization voted last week on a new implementation schedule for amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea that pertain to bulk carriers under Chapter XII. Phase-in of required survivability and strengthening for older ships will be accelerated. The changes had been prepared over almost two years by the organization's Maritime Safety Committee and are similar to requirements that the International Association of Classification Societies will bring into effect on 1 July. The basic text was agreed to in June and primarily deals with single-side bulk carriers of at least 150 meters/490 feet carrying high-density solid bulk cargoes. Concern was expressed over ships under that length or those lacking single-side hulls. Ships must withstand flooding of at least one hold, which such ships are not thought capable of. The conference decided to limit the application of SOLAS amendments for structural strength and damage survivability for these ships. Under a conference resolution, the committee will consider further safety issues of bulk carriers at its meeting in May. The amendments are expected to enter into force 1 July, 1999. The committee was also called on to resolve what ships are defined as bulk carriers under SOLAS Chapter IX/6.1. A technical working group defined them as "ships constructed with single deck, top-side tanks and hopper side tanks in cargo spaces and intended primarily to carry dry cargo in bulk, or ore carriers or combination carriers."

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





New COFR option

12/06:
Britannia Steam Ship Insurance Association Ltd. has announced that a new form of certificate of financial responsibility has become available. Under the new method, a licensed bonding company provides a bond to the U.S. Coast Guard on behalf of a vessel operator. There is no requirement for collateral security. Under the U.S. Oil Pollution Act of 1990, operators are required to have a certificate certifying that they are able to pay for clean-up and damages caused by an oil spill in U.S. territorial waters. The new arrangement has been formed by International Sureties with support from U.S. registered bonding firms. It is available only to dry cargo operators who need certification up to U.S.$80 million and for ships up to about 90,000 gross tons. The facility is only available to members of protection and indemnity clubs in the International Group. The cost is U.S.$1,750 per ship per year for vessels under 20,000 gross tons and for larger ships, it is U.S.$2,250. The Coast Guard has approved the new method.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - December 05

On December 6, 1988 the MARTIN was renamed b) ATLANTIC ERIE.

H. LEE WHITE (2) was launched December 6, 1973.

The CONSUMERS POWER (3) was laid up for the last time at Erie, PA on December 6, 1985.

The HALLFAX was towed by the tug IRVING BEACH to Sept Îles, Que. arriving there on December 6, 1980.

On December 6, 1909 while upbound at "Mud" Lake on the St. Marys River in a blinding snow storm, the HARRY A. BERWIND collided with the loaded HENRY STEINBRENNER (1) which received a 70 foot wide hole on her starboard side and sank up to her cabins.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Midwest Energy busy as season heads to a close

12/05:
Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior usually ends it season in mid-December. Until then, however, it has a fairly busy schedule. Oglebay Norton is due Dec. 5; Columbia Star due Dec. 6 at 9 a.m.; Canadian Olympic due Dec. 6 at 7 p.m.; Algolake due Dec. 7 at 1 p.m.; H. Lee White due Dec. 7 at 11 p.m.; and Paul Tregurtha due Dec. 9 at 6 a.m.

Reported by: Al Miller




Clipper arrives

12/05:
The Milwaukee Clipper tow arrived in Muskegon on Tuesday afternoon.
Click here for a view of the tow entering the Muskegon Channel

Reported by: Mark Howell




Port Weller Dry Docks

12/05:
The Port Weller Dry Docks are busy as usual, the Canadian Navy ship Athabaskan left yesterday. Having work done is the Canadian Progress, work should be finished by the 10th. The salt water vessel Narraganette in for emergency repairs due to steering problems, she is scheduled to leave on the 12th. The Algorail is due on the 15th of December to be retro fitted. The Algowest should arrive close to Christmas to be converted to a self unloader and should return to Seaway Self Unloaders in June '98.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




SMET Closing In On Record Season

12/05:
With shipments of 1,438,359 net tons in November, Superior Midwest Energy Terminal now needs load but 665,000 tons in December to set a new record for the dock. The previous peak year from SMET was 1996 when the facility shipped 13.6 million tons of low-sulfur coal.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Today in Great Lakes History - December 05

The LOUIS R. DESMARAIS cleared Owen Sound, Ont. on her maiden voyage November 5, 1977 bound for Thunder Bay, Ont. to load 27,117 gross tons of iron ore for Stelco at Hamilton, Ont.

On the IRVIN L. CLYMER's final trip she passed upbound at the Soo on November 5, 1990 and arrived at Duluth two days later to unload limestone at the Hallet Dock #5 after which she moved to her final lay-up berth at Fraser's shipyard and tied up blowing one last three long and two short salute from her whistle.

The JAMES S. DUNHAM sank in collision with the steamer ROBERT FULTON, on a foggy and rainy November 5, 1917, just below Grassy Island on the Detroit River.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




First of the fleet scheduled to lay-up

12/04:
Myron C. Taylor is scheduled to enter the yard at Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay today for winter layup.

Reported by: Al Miller




With this first report, I have uploaded my 4th Annual Lay-up list. Please contribute any information you find over the winter.




Manistee gets final visitor

12/04:
The Sam Laud arrived Manistee yesterday with Petroleum Coke from Indiana Harbor, Indiana for Seng's Dock #2, the ex Bultema Marine/Great Lakes Dock. This should be the last boat for Manistee this year.
The winners of the most trips in to Manistee this year are, each with 5 trips in are the Joseph H. Frantz, and the David Z. Norton.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Today in Great Lakes History - December 04

At 0210 hours on December 4, 1989 the MESQUITE (U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tender (WAGL-305) ran aground in 12 feet of water at a point one-quarter nautical mile off Keweenau Point, 2.19 nautical miles off Keystone Point and 3.78 nautical miles off Manitou Island. After a struggle to save the ship, the 53 persons aboard abandoned ship at 0830 hours and boarded the Indian salty M/V MANGAL DESAI which was standing by. Deteriorating weather conditions with ten foot waves and 30 knot (34.5 mph) winds over the next week caused the MESQUITE's demise and was declared a constructive total loss.

On December 4, 1974, the Algosoo entered service. She was the last Great Lakes vessel built with her pilothouse at the forward end.

On December 4, 1980 a steering cable parted while the HALLFAX was battling heavy seas and 50 knot winds off Miscou Island, New Brunswick. Seven crew members were air lifted by a Canadian Armed Forces rescue helicopter.

Salvagers returned to the stranded J.T. HUTCHINSON on December 4, 1903 only to find her released from her rocky trap and resting at anchor.

WESTCLIFFE HALL's Canadian registry was closed December 4, 1974 as she was sold for the salt water trade.

LIGHTSHIP 103 completed her sea trials December 4, 1920.

The IMPERIAL QUEBEC entered service on December 4, 1957.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Bramble sails for the Caribbean

12/03:
Port Huron's U.S. Coast Guard buoy tender "Bramble" sailed yesterday morning downbound enroute to the Caribbean Sea and/or South America region. She will be off lakes for about four months. (See story dated 12/01)

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




December 1 Vessel Report

12/03:
On December 1, the leading U.S.-Flag carriers working the Great Lakes had 64 of their 69 ships and tug/barge units in service, an increase of three vessels compared to a year ago. Initial projections call for a typical lay-up of the fleet. Several smaller self-unloaders will conclude their season before Christmas, but the vast majority of the active fleet will sail well into January.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Oglebay Norton to Sell Metallurgical Treatments Business

12/03:
Oglebay Norton Company has reached an agreement in principle to sell substantially all the assets of the metallurgical treatments business and certain other assets of its Engineered Materials business unit to an as-yet undisclosed buyer. The parties intend to reach a definitive agreement and complete thesale in December 1997. These segments of Oglebay Norton Company's business posted revenues of $22,239,000 in 1996 and $18,531,000 in the first three quarters of 1997. Additional details regarding this transaction will follow.

Reported by: James Neumiller




Annual Marine Mart update

12/03:
The Dossin Great Lakes Museum annual Marine Mart will be held this Saturday from 10-3 P.M. at the Harbor Hill Marina foot of St. Jean St. Detroit, MI (313-331-6880).
Directions to Harbor Hill Marina: from Jefferson Ave. turn south towards the river on St. Jean Ave. Turn right on Freud Ave. and watch for Harbor Hill Marina Gatehouse just a short distance down on the left. A volunteer will meet you at the gate with directions for parking. 35 dealers will be selling books, china, models, photographs, postcards, art work and artifacts. For more information call Dossin Great Lakes Museum 313-852-4051. I highly recommend this show if you can make it, it's well worth the trip!

Look for me at the Know Your Ships table.

Click here to view the location map





Today in Great Lakes History - December 03

On December 3, 1995, the Rimouski and the Canadian Pathfinder (originally Baie St. Paul) sank in a storm in the North Atlantic as they were being towed overseas for scrap. The towline to the Rimouski parted first, and later on the Canadian Pathfinder broke away from the tug. Both vessels became excess tonnage after the 1993 season when CanadaSteamship Lines sold its straight deck bulk freighter fleet as part of a large shuffling of Canadian vessels.

CANADIAN AMBASSADOR was launched December 3, 1982 by the Port Weller Dry Docks Ltd.

AMOCO MICHIGAN was launched December 3, 1927

On December 3, 1909, while downbound in the Detroit River in fog, the LeGRAND S. DEGRAFF collided with the steamer HARVARD incurring damage estimated at $1,500 to the DEGRAFF and $2,000 to the HARVARD.

The SAMUEL MATHER (6) in tandem with the A.H. FERBERT (2) departed Lauzon on December 3, 1987 behind the Canadian tug CAPT. IOANNIS S headed for Aliaga, Turkey for scrapping

The IRVING S. OLDS was laid up for the final time on December 3, 1981 at the Hallett Dock #5, Duluth, MN due to market conditions and her inability to compete with the 60,000 ton carrying capacity of the self-unloading thousand foot bulk freighters.

On December 3, 1952, FLEURUS was reported sinking in Quebec harbor. Subsequently towed into the St. Charles River, she was beached and, after repairs, returned to service.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Clipper underway

12/02:
The Milwaukee Clipper exited the Calumet River into the open waters of Lake Michigan at 11:57pm Monday night on her way back to Muskegon. The ETA at Muskegon is 3:45pm. Check back for updates and pictures.

Reported by: Mark Howell




Twin Ports grain-loading berths busy

12/02:
After a brief lull, grain traffic is brisk again in the Twin Ports, with five ships anchored on Lake Superior waiting to load.

On Monday, Utivken was loading at Harvest States berth 1, Golden D at Harvest STates berth 2 and Regina Oldendorff at Peavey. Anchored on the lake were Lake Champlain waiting for Harvest States 1, Kalisti and Canadian Trader, both waiting for Harvest States 2 and Island Skipper waiting for orders.

Due in later Dec. 1 was Algocen for General Mills. Due in Dec. 2 are Kinsman Independent, Metka and Fasness.

Reported by: Al Miller




Canadian Progress in dry dock

12/02:
Canadian Progress went into the dry dock at Port Weller at 1900 on Friday, 11/28. She was being assisted by two tugs.

Reported by: Len VanDerLyke




Bulk carrier flees pending arrest in Montreal

12/02:
The Queen (Cypriot-registry 19,297-dwt bulk carrier built in 1968, operated by Ships Management & Consultancy Inc.) sailed from Montreal recently in advance of an arrest warrant. Loaded with grain, the ship had been held under port state control detention since 20 Nov. for safety problems. Following the detention, the crew began legal action to get unpaid wages with support from the International Transport Workers' Federation and secured an arrest warrant. However, the detention was lifted before the ship could be arrested and it sailed.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - December 02

On December 2, 1987 McKiel's tugs W.N. TWOLAN and GLENBROOK along with Purvis Marine's AVENGER IV arrived at the Welland Dock in the Welland Canal with the CANADIAN PIONEER. A crew from Port Weller Dry Docks repaired the PIONEER's electrical system which was damaged in a major engine room fire that had occurred on November 30th at Nanticoke.

The OTTERCLIFFE HALL was launched December 2, 1968. she sails today as the CANADIAN TRADER.

GOVERNOR MILLER was launched December 2, 1937 for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.

NIPIGON BAY last ran in 1982 and was laid up at Montreal on December 2nd that year.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Boat nearly misses bridge

12/01:
As the Joseph H. Frantz was departing Manistee, around 1630 Saturday, she ran into some problems. 1200 ft. from the Memorial Highway bridge in Manistee she bl ew for the bridge to open. No one was on duty at the bridge. The vessel proceded to blow continuos warning blasts, as the captain, who was a relief captain from Canada dropped the stern anchor and reversed the ship. She docked the Frantz against the Ma nistee Railroad Bridge, and stopped 45 ft. from the bridge. The vessel waited for 3 minutes till the bridge was raised. She had unloaded a cargo of stone at the Seng dock.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak and Marc & Jill Vander Meulen




Alpena at Bay Ship For Reduction Gear Problems

12/01:
The Steamer Alpena arrived at Bay Ship last week for reduction gear repairs on her 4,400 HP DeLaval main turbine engine. She is reported to have rumbling noises in her engine when under way, indicating misalignment within the engine.

Reported by: Dan Ocean




Steamer Buckeye update

12/01:
Just a follow up on the Buckeye grounding. The evening of November 28th or 29th the Steamer Buckeye was freed and as of 10:30a.m. November 29th it has cleared th e soo locks downbound.

Reported by: Eric LaRoue




Annual Marine Mart to be held

12/01:
The Dossin Great Lakes Museum annual Marine Mart will be held this Saturday at the Harbor Hill Marina foot of St. Jean St. Detroit, MI (313-331-6880). De alers will be selling books, photographs, postcards, art work and artifacts. For more information call Dossin Great Lakes Museum 313-852-4051. I highly recommend this show if you can make it, it's well worth the trip!

Look for me at the Know Your Ships table.

Click here to view the location map





Barker visits ship yard

12/01:
The mid-November visit by Kaye E. Barker to Fraser Shipyards was to perform unloading boom modifications needed to handle grain cargoes. While the ship was in the yard, workers also began performing some of the inspections slated for winter layup.

Reported by: Al Miller




Possible new cargo for Manistee

12/01:
Recently talks between Manistee's Seng dock, and the employees at Kalium Potash corporation have come up with some interesting plans for Manistee. This plans are in the developmental stage, but possibly in 1 year Manistee could be loading out 30,000 tons of potash every 2 weeks on lake ships. Kalium would build a loading facility on the old Manistee Iron Works property, and load the potash mined in Hers ey Michigan. Manistee could see 3 Canadian ships every 2 weeks.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Last 1000 Footer Into Muskegon For The Year

12/01:
The 1000 foot freighter, Oglebay Norton made a final appearance for all 1000 footers in Muskegon on Saturday. It docked at the B.C. Cobb Plan t at about 1:30pm Saturday and unloaded until 11:30. I was lucky enough to be at the channel and to see it leave Muskegon. There are more loads of coal expected but as of now that will be the last 1000 footer for the year. Muskegon got to see the Oglebay Norton once already this year in early June and also saw the Columbia Star 4 times during the months of September and October.

Reported by: Scott Golin




Bramble headed to Caribbean

12/01:
The Coast Guard Cutter BRAMBLE, a 180-foot buoy tender homeported in Port Huron, Mich., will migrate to the Caribbean at 8:30 a.m. Dec. 1, departing for OPER ATION SNOWBIRD, an international initiative aimed at developing effective, multi-mission maritime organizations throughout the Caribbean.

BRAMBLE will conduct extensive training and a number of exercises with the Caribbean organizations between December and April to prepare them for increased opportunities in combined maritime operations. BRAMBLE’s main goals are to build up operational capabilities and develop strong partnerships with the United States’ Carib bean neighbors. Throughout the winter, BRAMBLE’s crew will support the military exchange program, Visit in Support of Technical Assistance, a program designed to aid foreign maritime services in any of the Coast Guard’s missions. Training under the VISTA program will include maritime law enforcement, search and rescue, and damage control.

Reported by: Al Miller




Seaway Radio Messsage No. 1

12/01:
This is the first radio message for the closing of the 1997 navigation season. Messages will be issued Monday through Friday. As the need arises, weekends wi ll be included. The purpose of this message is to provide Seaway users with information that may facilitate the planning of vessel transits throughout the remainder of the navigation season.

Water temperature at St. Lambert on November 28, 1997 is 1.5 degrees celsius. Last year's temperature was 1.6 degrees celsius. The ten year average is 2.7 degrees celsius.

At midnight November 27, the number of ocean vessels above St. Lambert was 52 as compared to 77 in 1996. Above Port Weller the number was 36 as compared to 52 in 1996.

At 0700 hours November 28, 1997 the total number of vessels in transit and in ports between CIP 2 (St.Lambert) and CIP16 (Lake Erie) was approximately 50.

At 0700 hours November 28th, 1997 vessel queues exist at the Well and Canal due mainly to adverse weather conditions and are as follows:
5 upbound ocean vessels queued at Port Weller .
1 upbound ocean vessels queued at Port Colborne.

The installation of the Prescott/Ogdensburg ice boom is in progress. The booms will be marked with flashing buoys when they reach the navigation channel.

All closing procedures outlined in Seaway Notices No. 10 and 12 of 1997 remain in effect.

Reported by: St. Lawrence Seayway Authority




Collective Agreement for Seaway Workers

12/01:
The St. Lawrence Seaway Authority announced today that a new collective agreement has been ratified by the majority of its 525 operational and maintenance workers who operate the series of locks and bridges between Montreal and Lake Erie.

The two-year agreement, which expires on December 31, 1998, gives employees a 2% wage increase in 1997 and again in 1998. The deal also contains changes to the drug and medical administrative provisions resulting in decreased costs for employees.

The parties also agreed that the National Automobile Aerospace Transportation and General Workers Union of Canada would be consulted on the provisions of a new pension plan which will apply once a not-for-profit corporation is created. It is expected that the enabling legislation, Bill C-9, will come into force during the term of this agreement.

Both parties also agreed to embark on the development of a new employee classification plan due to new initiatives taking place at the Seaway in the areas of quality service and service teams.

"With this ratification, the Seaway will continue to operate without interruption, which is great news for our customers as the end of the navigation season approaches," says Mr. Michel Fournier, Acting President of The St. Lawrence Seaway Authority. "This navigation season is shaping up to be as successful as the past three years."

Reported by: St. Lawrence Seayway Authority




Today in Great Lakes History - December 01

On December 1, 1974 the JENNIFER on her first trip for Algoma was bound for Milwaukee, WI with 1400 tons of steel when she was caught in a storm on Lake Michigan. Her steel cargo apparently shifted and she foundered 24 miles southwest of Charlevoix, MI.

The FRED G. HARTWELL (2), the last boat built for Franklin S.S., was delivered to her owners on December 1, 1922 but her maiden voyage didn't occur until early 1923 because of unfavorable weather conditions.

The SASKATOON's ownership was transferred to the Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., Montreal on December 1, 1913 when the company was formed and all six vessels of the Merchants Mutual Line were absorbed by CSL in 1914.

On December 1, 1974 the VENUS (2) was one of several vessels that took part in rescuing the crew of the Canadian motor vessel JENNIFER.

The ARIZONA was destroyed by fire at Cape Vincent, New York on December 1, 1922.

On December 1, 1934, ESCANABA was involved in the rescue of the crew of the whaleback HENRY CORT off the piers at Muskegon, Michigan; also that winter, she delivered food to the residents of Beaver Island, who were isolated due to the bad weather.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





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