Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

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* Report News


White Sails

02/29:
The 2000 shipping season for iron ore began on Monday when the Fred R. White Jr. departed her winter berth in Cleveland's Old River Bed and moved over to Cleveland Bulk Terminal to initiate the intraport movement of iron ore pellets to LTV Steel's mill at the end of the commercially-navigable section of the Cuyahoga River.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Fit Out Schedule

02/29:
Across the lakes crews have received their orders to return to fit out their vessels. Crews will report to Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay, WI on March 1 to start the fit out on the Burns Harbor and Stewart J. Cort.

In Superior, crews will report aboard the Reserve on March 6.

The Canadian Enterprise is expected to depart her winter lay-up berth in Port Cloborne March 1.

In Toledo crews on the Middletown will start fit out on March 4 and the fit out on the Columbia Star will begin on March 13. All other vessels in Toledo with the exception of the Joseph H. Frantz are expected to depart winter lay-up some time in March.




Toledo Report

02/29:
The Earl W. Oglebay remains in drydock for her survey. The David Z. Norton is expected to be the next vessel to use the drydock once the Earl W. is finished.

When the Joseph H. Frantz was moved from the dock earlier in the month she was expected to be placed in lay-up at the Hocking Valley Dock (South). Due to low water conditions at the time of the tow, she was forced to the CSX coal dock #4. The Frantz will be the last vessel to sail some time in early April, the coal dock is usually operational by the end of March and it will be necessary to move the Frantz.

So far the only vessel that has been painted for the new season is the Frantz. With the mild weather recently this is expected to change soon.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Montrealis Moved

02/29:
Last week the Montrealis was moved back to the west face of Pier 51 from Redpath Sugar in Toronto Harbor. Only the Canadian Trader remains with a storage load.

The Trader is rumored to be one of the last ULG bulkers that will sail this year.

Reported by: Jim Fitzgerald




Coast Guard Rescues 13 from Ice Floe

02/29:
Warm temperatures combined with gusting winds sent 13 ice fishermen adrift on a 1-mile-by-4-mile ice floe on western Lake St Clair Sunday. The U.S. Coast Guard Station St. Clair Shores responded with their ice skiff working in conjunction with local fire departments. Two U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Detroit helicopters were launched, but all of the ice fishermen were rescued by surface units. After the rescue, units patrolled the shore of Lake St. Clair and warned ice fishermen of deteriorating conditions, convincing over 150 to come off the ice.

This type of rescue is repeated each year costing tens of thousands of dollars as sportsmen ignore the warnings and head out onto the ice. Michigan legislators have proposed a bill that would fine ice fishermen who have to be rescued.




Icebreaking Update

02/29:
On Feb. 25th the Cutter Mackinaw assisted the tanker Gemini in the St. Mary's River. The Cutter Biscayne Bay conducted preventive icebreaking in the Straits of Mackinac on Feb. 25th and 27th.

In Operation Coal Shovel the Cutter Bristol Bay conducted preventive icebreaking and Aids to Navigation work Lake St. Clair.




Proposed Ferry Sinking?

02/29:
A proposed high-speed ferry service from Milwaukee, WI. to Muskegon, MI. may be foundering reports the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. The news article reports that Thomas Rankin, the organizer of the project has yet to identify investors or seek federal money needed to make the project possible.

The latest setback for the proposed operation came in January, when the State of Michigan decided not to give the City of Muskegon a $650,000 grant that would have helped the city build a dock for the ferry. It is expected to cost about $80 million to launch the venture.

Click here for complete details

Reported by: Max Hanley




U.S. 1999 steel imports fall 14 percent from 1998

02/29:
Imports of steel into the United States dropped by 14.1 percent in 1999. The Commerce Department said Friday that steel imports dropped in 1999 to 32.4 million metro tons from 37.7 million metric tons in 1998, a drop of 5.3 million metric tons. This drop is from the record levels of 1998, but levels were the second highest in 25 years.

The drop is credited partially to the threats by the administration to use new U.S. anti-dumping laws to prevent foreign steel makers from dumping their subsidized products in this country. Reuters News Service reports that two weeks ago, President Clinton imposed punitive tariffs on steel imports from major-steel producing nations, including Brazil, Japan, South Korea and the European Union.

The largest commodity decreases for 1999 were in hot rolled sheets, plates in coils and heavy structural shapes. The largest decreases were imports from Russia, Japan and South Korea.

Click here for more information.




Lake Superior Marine Museum Association Entertainment Meeting

02/29:
Free & Open to the Public
Nick, Norm, & Steve, the "Bridge Guys," take you up, around and inside the reconstruction of the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge. Ken, from Duluth Shipping News, will bring his slides and try to keep up with the engineer, ironworker, and operator as they guide you through the project. Remember, these workers will soon be wrapping up their tools and going home. So if you always wanted to holler through the knothole in the fence and get the workers to come-on-over and tell you what's going on, now is your chance.

Satisfy your burning desire to ask "How does one move a 13 ton sheave and set it in place like a delicate china cup?" Or, "What's going on inside that plastic tunnel with the flashing lights?"

Follow the Hardhats into the Lafayette Community Club on Park Point 3056 Minnesota Ave. Duluth, MN. Meeting begins at 7:00 PM, Wednesday March 1, 2000

Visit the Duluth Shipping News for full details.




Blessing of the Fleet

02/29:
The International Ship Masters' Association Twin Sault Lodge # 22 cordially invites mariners to attend the Sixth Annual Blessing of the Fleet on Sunday, March 19, 2000 at 1400 Hours (2:00 PM). The blessing will be held at the First United Presbyterian Church at the corner of Bingham Ave. and Lyon St. next to the Power Canal in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. This is a non-denominational service.

Any mariner having a flag or pennant they wish to have blessed is welcome to present it at this occasion. Uniforms are encouraged to be worn.

There will be a reception in the Church basement following the service. Contact Charlie Lampman for details.




Integrity Ready to Sail

02/28:
The tug Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity were expected to depart the winter lay-up dock in Milwaukee for Waukegan, IL. sometime after midnight. The vessel may sail to Alpena to load and then head for Detroit.

Reported by: Robin Greathouse




Opening of the Seaway

02/28:
The 2000 navigation season for the St. Lawrence Seaway is scheduled to open on March 27 at 8:00am EST. Clearance date for the Montreal-Lake Ontario Section is designated as 2400 hours, December 20, 2000 with closing date no later than December 24, provided that weather and ice conditions permit.

The U.S. Sault Ste. Marie Locks are scheduled to open at mid-night March 25 with the Canadian locks closed to navigation for an indefinite period of time.

Allowable draft in the Montreal - Lake Ontario section will be 26' 0" until the South Shore Canal is ice free at which time the draft will be increased to 26'3", this will occur no later than April 15. Draft for the Welland Canal is 26'3" for the full season.

Reported by: Philip Nash and Ron Walsh.




Ispat Inland Traffic

02/28:
The Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range and Wisconsin Central railroads are in the process of exploring the feasibility of year-round movement of Ispat Inland ore from the Minorca taconite pellet plant located near Virginia, MN to the port of Escanaba. Currently the two railroads cooperate on a seasonal (January-March) movement of Inland pellets from Minorca to Escanaba. Should 100% of Minorca's production move by rail to Escanaba, that would effectively end shipments of Inland ore through Missabe's Dock #6 in Duluth, leaving that facility to handle only outbound pellets produced by EVTAC's Fairlane plant. Minntac pellets will continue to use the railroad's Two Harbors docks. Year-round rail movement to Escanaba could start as early as June 1, 2000.

Reported by: David Schauer




Straits of Mackinac Ice Bridges Broken

02/28:
The unusually warm weather has brought an unusually early end to the ice bridges between Bois Blanc Island and Pries Point north of Cheboygan as well as the crossing between Mackinac Island and St. Ignace. A solid week of rainy weather with temperatures in the 40's and 50's and above freezing night-time temps spelled doom early this year. The cutter Mackinaw was scheduled to break the ice bridges sometime on Sunday.

Reported by: Terry Foley




And the Winner Is..

02/28:
At the International Ship Masters' Association Port Huron Lodge dinner dance Saturday night a winner was drawn for the cruise on an American Steamship Company 1000-footer.
Barbara Ziegler of Marysville, MI. was the lucky winner. Barbara and three friends will enjoy their cruise this summer.

If you would like the chance to win a trip on a working Great Lakes freighter Click here




Great Lakes Lighthouse Courses On the Web

02/28:
For the first time ever, two instructional courses on Great Lakes lighthouses will be offered on the World Wide Web. Maritime historian and author Frederick Stonehouse, adjunct faculty at Northern Michigan University, Marquette, Michigan, will be the instructor for both courses. “No matter where you are in the world, if you can access the Internet, you will be able to take these courses.” Stonehouse said. “While we expect to reach traditional students looking to fill in their programs with an exciting academic elective, we know there are others that would jump at the chance to study the lights.”

HS-295, Great Lakes Lighthouses, (2 credits) will be offered through the Northern Michigan University Continuing Education Department at “www.nmu.edu/ce/independent” Click on web-based, then scroll down to HS-295. Tuition for the credit course $270. All course requirements will be completed via the Internet, eliminating the need to visit the campus or submit material by mail. Credit students can enroll starting with the summer semester.

Lighthouses of the Great Lakes, a non-credit version of the HS-295 course, will be offered through www.learninglighthouses.com at a tuition of $150. Stonehouse explained the difference between the two courses. “The credit course will adhere rigidly to high academic standards consistent with the university environment. The non-credit one will focus on the legion of lighthouse enthusiasts who just want to learn more about lighthouses on the Great Lakes.”

Both courses will help the student understand the role and development of Great Lakes lighthouses. They emphasize the details of their construction, lighting apparatus, daily routine of keepers, general organization and management and significant Great Lakes lights. Students will acquire a thorough understanding of how these lighthouses actually operated and a general knowledge of U.S. lighthouses.

Northern Michigan University and Learninglighthouses.com are leading the way into the new millennium by using the World Wide Web to help students understand this important part of Great Lakes history.

For more information e-mail: Frederick Stonehouse




Invitation

02/28:
Shipping enthusiast living or visiting in southwest Florida are invited to a luncheon meeting of the SunCoast Chapter of the Steamship Historical Society of America at Palmetto, FL at noon on Sat. Mar. 4. Capt. William Hoey of Grosse Ile and Fort Lauderdale will show slides of some of the older ocean liners still operating. For further information and reservations contact Emory Massman by e-mail or at Skyway Village 127, 420 49th St. East, Palmetto, FL 34221-2056 or phone (941) 722-8576.




Storm Video wanted

02/28:
The television program Storm Warning on the Discovery Channel is urgently seeking amateur or professional video of heavy seas. The series deals with extreme weather, the science surrounding it and the dramatic stories of the people it impacts.

Please contact Justine Cooke by e-mail or toll-free 877-808-9313 if you have video that can represent heavy weather on the Great Lakes on this nationally televised program.




Shipboard News

02/28:
Recently I have been contacted by a number of crew members sailing on the Great Lakes who check this page by personal cell phones hooked up to a computer.

For those sailing, if you would like a daily version of this news page sent by e-mail please contact me at the link below. This offers daily news that will down load faster than the web page.

For the time being this offer is only for those sailing. Updates will begin with the first vessel departing winter lay-up.

Click here to E-mail




News Reporters wanted

02/28:
We would like to invite anyone interested in reporting from their area to send in reports for this news page when ever they see anything interesting. Reports can be sent by e-mail or by using a form if the sender does not want credit.

If you would like credit your name (or company name) will be listed on the news page and we can also add links to any web sites you like. This is also a good way to link more traffic to a web site.

If you become a regular contributor we can create an About the Author web page.

Click here to E-mail
Click here to send news using the form.If you would not like to have your name used remember click the "no" button




Weekly e-mail Updates to your Desk Top

02/28:
Receive weekly updates by e-mail when this site is updated. Members also receive previews of new content and special non-public pages. The mailings are normally sent once a week, on Monday mornings.

Enter your e-mail address below

Details and Privacy Policy





Ice Forecast

02/28:
Ice Hazard Bulletin Issued by Environment Canada at 1700 UTC Sunday 27 February 2000.
Ice warning continued for strong ice pressure along parts of the northern shore of Lake Erie ending Sunday evening.

Lake Ontario... Over the extreme northeastern portion of Lake Ontario 5 to 9 tenths thin with some medium lake ice. Elsewhere open water.

Lake Erie... East of Long Point Bay one tenths thin and medium lake ice except 9 plus to 10 tenths medium and thin lake ice within 30 miles west of Buffalo. West of Long Point Bay 9 plus tenths medium and thin lake ice except mostly open water within 8 to 12 miles from the southern shore. 9 plus tenths medium lake ice In Lake St Clair. Fast ice in Long Point Bay and near Buffalo.

Lake Huron and Georgian Bay... Consolidated medium lake ice over the North Channel and in Saginaw Bay and in St Marys River and in the Strait Of Mackinac and in the entrance to the St Clair River. 5 to 9 tenths thin and medium lake ice in southern Lake Huron except mainly open water along the southern shore. 2 to 6 tenths thin lake ice along the eastern shore of the lake. 5 to 7 tenths medium and thin lake ice north of the entrance to Saginaw Bay. In northeastern Georgian Bay 8 to 9 plus tenths medium and thin lake ice and open water in the southwestern section. Elsewhere open water.

Lake Superior... Consolidated thick lake ice in Black Bay and Nipigon Bay and over northern Thunder Bay and west of Pie Island as well as around the Apostle Islands. 2 to 5 tenths thin lake ice along the north coast of Isle Royale. In Whitefish Bay and along the eastern shore 5 to 8 tenths medium and thin lake ice except for fast ice along the eastern and southern shores. Along the southwestern shore of the lake up to Keweenaw Point 3 to 7 tenths medium and thin lake ice. Southeast of Keweenaw Point 3 to 6 tenths mostly thin lake ice. Mostly open water over the rest of Lake Superior.

Lake Michigan... Green Bay and the Bays De Noc were 70 to 100 percent covered with medium to thick ice. There was generally 100 percent coverage of medium to thick ice in the straits and extending from Seul Choix Pt to Beaver Island to Little Traverse Bay in the western straits to Beaver Tail Pt to Bois Blanc Island to Cheboygan in the eastern straits. There was 10 to 30 percent coverage of medium ice from shore to 10 miles out from Seul Choix Pt to Baileys Harbor.

Click here for the St. Lawrence River Forecast.

Note: this report is offered for entertainment and should not be relied on for navigation. Please consult Canadian Ice Service for current conditions (subscription necessary)

Area coverage is expressed in tenths
1-3/10's---very open drift ice
4-6/10's---open drift ice
7-8/10's---close pack ice
9-9+/10's--very close pack
10/10's---compact
10/10's---frozen together - consolidated

When ice reaches 6/10's or greater, ships can no longer traverse between floes.

Fast ice--ice fastened to the shore (frozen all the way across)

New Lake Ice----recently formed less than 2 inches (5 centimeters) thick.
Thin Lake Ice---2 - 6 inches (5 - 15 centimeters) thick.
Medium Lake Ice- 6 - 12 inches (15 - 30 centimeters) thick.
Thick Lake Ice--12 - 28 inches (30-70 centimeters) thick.
Very Thick Ice--greater than 28 inches (70 centimeters thick).





Correction

02/28:
The reported name of the new Canada Steamship Lines SeawayMax vessel will be Hon. Paul Martin, not Paul Martin as first reported.




Today in Great Lakes History - February 28

INCAN SUPERIOR was launched February 28, 1974

OUTARDE (2) was launched February 28, 1906 as a) ABRAHAM STEARN.

In 1929 the Grand Trunk carferry MADISON, inbound into Grand Haven in fog and ice, collided with the Army dredge General G.G. MEADE, berthed on the south bank of the river for the winter. Damage was minor.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - February 27

GOLDEN SABLE was launched February 27, 1930 as a) ACADIALITE

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

02/26:
Duluth's fickle ice pack has come and gone again in recent days, keeping alive hopes for an easy spring break-out.

A mid-February snowstorm formed an ice field that extended about six miles off the Duluth entry. But several days of temperatures in the 30s and 40s, rain and fog have dispersed the lake ice and left the harbor ice dark and covered with standing water in many spots.

At this time in a normal winter, Duluth and Superior would have an offshore ice pack extending out six to 15 miles or more, and thick enough to safely support legions of fishermen. But this year's ice has come and gone several times and never really established itself. The Duluth ship canal -- often a trouble spot in spring break-out -- has been free of ice most of the winter. The limited amount of lake ice means little threat of ice being packed into this end of the lake and trapping boats once the season starts. Icebreaking will be needed in the harbor, but it should go quickly for the USCGC Sundew.

By the end of Friday, however, much of the broken ice pack had returned to the waters off Duluth.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - February 26

The completed hull of the BELLE RIVER (b) WALTER J. McCARTHY JR.) was floated off the ways February 26, 1977.

JOSEPH L. BLOCK was launched February 26, 1976.

On 26 February 1874, the tug WILLIAM LIVINGSTONE, Jr. was launched at Port Huron Dry Dock. Her dimensions were 151' overall, 25'6" beam, and 13' depth. Her machinery was built by Phillerick & Christy of Detroit and was shipped by rail to Port Huron. She cost $45,000. Her master builder was Alex Stewart.

Data from: Joe Barr, the Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Stolt Aspiration Detained

02/25:
The tanker Stolt Aspiration was detained in Montreal after an unknown amount of the vessel’s cargo was lost overboard. Reuters News Service reports that isononanol and naphtha was spilled from the tanker as the vessel emptied its ballast tanks.

The chemicals leaked into a ballast tank after the vessel sustained a fracture to top plating of a cargo tank. At last report clean-up operations were under way and the vessel would be detained until an investigation had been carried out.

Reported by: Jim Fitzgerald




Conquest Arrives

02/25:
The cement barge Southdown Conquest pushed by the tug Susan Hannah arrived at the Southdown dock in Manitowoc on Wednesday. Ice in the river was broken by a tug earlier in the week. The Conquest and tug departed on Thursday Morning.

Reported by: Al Claflin




Gemini Heads North

02/25:
The tanker Gemini arrived in Sault Ste. Marie, ONT. Wednesday carrying a cargo of fuel oil. The Gemini was assisted through the St. Mary's River by the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw.




Today in Great Lakes History - February 25

CREEK TRANSPORT was launched this day in 1910 as a) SASKATOON (1).

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Seaway Report

02/24:
One of the wintering vessels in Montreal, the roll-on/roll-off, heavy lift ship Aivik sailed for Bull Arm (Trinity Bay), Newfoundland on or about February 18.

The two container ships, MOR EUROPE and MOR U.K. which were under arrest in Montreal since January 26 and January 27 respectively departed for Greece on February 12. They are not expected to come back to Montreal, thus ending the transatlantic service offered by the owner, Morlines of Russia for 20 years or so. A third vessel, MOR CANADA, taken out of service last summer, has found a new chartered since then and has been renamed Zim Liverpool 1 by Zim Israel Nav. Co. Ltd. of Haifa, Israel.

There is strong indications that another shipping firm calling in Montreal, Norasia Shipping is withdrawing its presence on the north Atlantic run between Northern Europe and the Mediterranean. Their last ship or one of their last ships docking in Montreal was Norasia Toronto during the week of Feb.20.

Arriving for late winter lay-up in Montreal on February 4 was Petrolia Desgagnés tying up alongside her fleetmate Amélia Desgagnés at section 44S.

The annual publication "Seaway Ships 1999" is expected to be ready on Monday, February 28. Look for an announcement on this web site.

René Beauchamp




New Pilot House

02/24:
Wintering in the Welland Canal, the tug Petite Forte is being prepared for a new pilot house. The upper pilot house is expected to arrive at the dock and welded in place some time on Friday the 25th.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Icebreaking Update

02/24:
The Cutter Mackinaw was active in Operation Taconite conducting track maintenance in the St. Mary's River enroute to Sault Ste Marie.

In Operation Taconite the Cutter Bristol Bay escorted the tug Mary E. Hannah with a barge from Toledo to Cleveland.




Today in Great Lakes History - February 24

The KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (2) was launched February 24, 1923 as a) RICHARD V. LINDABURY.

The Arnold Transit Co., long-time ferry operators between Mackinac Island and the mainland, marks its centennial in 2000, according to Carferry Heritage newsletter. Founder George T. Arnold filed the Articles of Association on Feb. 24, 1900.

On 24 February 1920, TALLAC (formerly SIMON J. MURPHY and MELVILLE DOLLAR, steel propeller, 235', built in 1895 at W. Bay City, MI) was on a voyage from Colon, Panama to Baltimore, MD, when she stranded and was wrecked 18 miles south of Cape henry, VA.

Data from: Roger LeLievre, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Icebreaking Update

02/23:
The U.S. Coast Guard continues their icebreaking program. Operation Taconite was in action with the Cutter Mackinaw conducting preventive ice-breaking in the lower St. Mary's River.

The Cutter Mobile Bay chopped back to Operation Oil Can after providing assistance to the tug Mary E. Hannah and her barge as she passed eastbound through the Straits of Mackinac. The Cutter Biscayne Bay assisted the tug Michigan and barge westbound through the Straits.

Operation Coal Shovel saw the Cutter Bristol Bay conduct preventive icebreaking in the St. Clair River. The Cutter then escorted the tanker Gemini to Nanticoke and escorted the tug/barge Mary E. Hannah to Toledo. The Bristol Bay also conducted flood control ice breaking in Fairport Harbor.




Algoma Central Reports Reduced Profits

02/23:
Algoma Central Corp. declared a $7.39 million profit for the year Friday, less than half of the previous year's $15.96 million in net income, despite a more than $18-million jump in revenue reports the Sault Star.

The company turned a $105,000 profit for the fourth quarter of 1999, a $4.5-million decrease from the previous 12 months, on $80.95 million in revenue.

In a company press release, President and Chief Executive Officer Peter Cresswell was quoted as saying "The results within the domestic fleet were generally as expected". "The lack of adequate utilization within the bulker fleet because of the declining movement of grain on the St. Lawrence Seaway continues to be a challenge."

The Star reports that the company's nine bulk carriers were only utilized about 55 per cent of the season while its 14-vessel self unloading fleet was utilized about 98 per cent of the year. Cargo volumes moved by the company's tanker division were reduced for the year.

Strong demand for the movement of cargoes by the corporation's fleet of self-unloading bulk carriers was only restrained by the continuing negative effects of low inland water levels and an increase fuel expenses.

Reduced operating earnings of the ocean-going fleet, according to the release, were caused as a result of commissioning problems experienced by two ships recently converted to self-unloaders. A loss of $4.24 million was incurred in the last quarter on the removal and disposal of certain equipment related to the commissioning problems.

Additionally, financing costs increased due to higher borrowings during the year to finance the acquisition of the EnerChem fleet and expansion of the ocean-going fleet the article reported.

The corporation, with headquarters in Sault Ste. Marie and St. Catharines, has 10 petroleum-product tankers, including three acquired in January, 1999, as part of the $19.5-million purchase of EnerChem.

It also has a half-interest in Marbulk Canada Inc., which has seven vessels operating along the east coast of South and North America, northern Europe and Southeast Asia.

Marbulk increased its ocean presence by two vessels last year, accepting delivery of one vessel in November and purchasing another in January.

Reported by: Scott Mclellan




Four People Stranded On Ice Rescued

02/23:
The U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Detroit, Station Marblehead and the Catawba Fire Department responded to a report of four people stranded on an ice flow one mile north of Catawba Island, Lake Erie. An Air Station Detroit helicopter successfully recovered three of the individuals while the Catawba Fire Department recovered the fourth. All four subjects were uninjured and did not require medical treatment.




Oil Spill In Lackawanna Ship Canal

02/23:
On Friday, Feb. 18th, Marine Safety Office (MSO) Buffalo responded to a spill of 50 gallons of Kensol 61 at the Bethlehem Steel plant in Lackawanna, NY. Kensol 61 is a mineral oil like petroleum product that contains benzene and other suspected carcinogens. MSO Buffalo personnel coordinated response efforts with state and local authorities and arranged for on-scene air monitoring with the county HAZMAT Team due to the potential threat of benzene exposure.

Shortly after arriving on scene, MSO Buffalo personnel found that three ducks had died after being exposed to the oil and notified the Department of Interior and NY State Department of Environmental Conservation of the dead wildlife. MSO Buffalo will continue to monitor cleanup operations and coordinate removal of the oil remaining in the ship canal.




Today in Great Lakes History - February 23

The e) U.S.S. ROTARY (YO-148) was commissioned on February 23, 1943 at Sullivan's Dry Dock & Repair Co., Brooklyn, NY and assigned duty with the Service Force, Third Naval District, Atlantic Fleet. The tanker was renamed h) DETROIT early in 1955 and traded on the lakes until. Her partially dismantled hull was abandoned in 1985 in the back waters of Lake Calumet.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Duluth Lay-up News

02/22:
In repainting the Philip. R. Clarke the painters uncovered the old Pittsburgh Steamship Company billboard that used to grace the vessel's side. Visible Sunday was one of the large USS markings in a circle along with the partial beginning of the word Pittsburgh.

The Edgar B. Speer is getting a new coat of paint. Sunday the stern had been painted but the name was not yet repainted in white lettering.

There is a large ventilator on the Reserve and it looks like some interior work is being done.

Reported by: Colt Edin




Montrealis Moves

02/22:
Monday morning the Montrealis was moved into position to unload at the Redpath Sugar dock in Toronto. She is the latest vessel to unload her winter storage load of sugar in Toronto.

Once the Montrealis completes her unloading, the Canadian Trader will be the only vessel in Toronto still holding a storage load for Redpath.

Reported by: Jim Fitzgerald




And the Winner is..

02/22:
The International Ship Masters Association Niagara Lodge 20 announced the winners of the Great Lakes cruise on an Algoma Central Marine vessel.

First prize - Great Lakes Cruise won by Dorie Christinas, Port Weller
Second prize - quilt won by Lois Kevin.
Third prize - picnic ensemble won by Isabel Park, Kitchener

You still have the chance to win a cruise on a Great Lakes Freighter this summer , click here for more details.

Reported by: Tom Deming




Open House

02/22:
Arnold's Books of Marine City, MI will be hosting their annual open house Sunday February 27th from 11a.m. - 4p.m. Refreshments will be served, Arnold's sells books and Great Lakes related memoribilia. Please call 810-765-1350 for more information.




Today in Great Lakes History - February 22

February 22, 1925 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 7 made her maiden voyage.

On 22 February 1878, the 156' wooden freighter ROBERT HOLLAND was purchased by Beatty & Co. of Sarnia for $20,000.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, the Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Welcome Paul Martin?

02/21:
According to reports from Port Weller Dry Docks, the new SeawayMax vessel under construction there will be named Paul Martin after the one time president of Canada Steamship Lines and father of the present Canadian Minister of Finance.

The new forebody is almost complete and the vessel will be floated out of the dry dock on March 25.

The H.M. Griffith entered Port Weller Dry Docks on December 24 where the original forebody was cut away. The remaining after section, including engines and accommodations, was fitted to a new hull. Her new dimensions are 740-feet long, 78-feet wide and 48-feet deep.

She is the second of three new buildings in Canada Steamship Lines' $100-million hull-replacement program. When delivered this spring, the Martin will join the CSL Niagara as part of CSL's new SeawayMax fleet. Each hull replacement is expected to add at least 25 years of service life to the respective vessel. The newbuilding program provides work for approximately 300 PWDD employees year-round until the spring of 2001.

Reported by: Roger Tottman




Fresh Paint

02/21:
The Wilfred Sykes is getting a fresh coat of paint during winter lay-up at Bayship in Sturgeon Bay, WI. The "50 Years of Smooth Sailing" banners will remain on the pilot house.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




New Competition for Ferry Service

02/21:
Saturday's Rochester Democrat and Chronicle reports that there is new competition for a proposed fast ferry service between Rochester, NY. and Toronto.

Two local businessmen are proposing a deal similar to the one proposed by a Canadian ferry company. The mayor of Rochester said, "We will chose whoever has the deepest pockets and can put together the best deal that is most beneficial to this community."

The businessmen now face the problem of financing, they need to raise $35 million in cash to secure the loans, including the two vessels which will cost from $50 to $70 million. Rochester has said that they have waited long enough for the Canadian company and opened the service up to anyone who can come up with the costs.

The City of Rochester is putting some $61 million into the improvements to the port to make the new service possible.

Reported by: Ron Ladue




Ghost Ships Festival

02/21:
On Saturday, March 25th, the first annual Ghost Ships Festival will be held at the Milwaukee Public Library's Centennial Hall in Downtown Milwaukee. The one day event will last from 10:00 AM to 9:00 PM and will feature, films, lectures and presentations from noted Great Lakes Marine Historians, divers, wreckhunters and Underwater Archeologists. Tours of the Milwaukee Public Library's Great Lakes Marine Collection and the Wisconsin Lake Schooner will be offered as well. The festival is being presented by the Great Lakes Shipwreck Research Foundation, a 501(c)(3) charitable organization. Proceeds from this year's festival will be used to place mooring buoys on endangered Great Lakes shipwrecks. For tickets and information, visit www.ghost-ships.org

Reported by: Brendon Baillod




Passing of Captain Harold J. Hogan

02/21:
The city of Kingston lost its "ambassador to the Seaway" on Tuesday, Feb. 15. Harold Hogan, former captain of the carferries Wolfe Islander and Wolfe Islander III died at Kingston General Hospital after a short illness. He was 72.

An avid reader and historian, Captain Hogan was sought out continually during his lifetime in Kingston for his expertise in shipping. "His first love was with boats," said his son Mike Hogan. "They were his passion."

Watching the package freighters come and go in Kingston, Harold Hogan signed on with Canada Steamship Lines at 17 and sailed on the Canadian, his first ship. After becoming an officer, his next appointment was on the Acadian as third mate in 1949. The next season he was promoted to second mate on the Mapleheath and in 1952 it was the City of Kingston. In 1954, he was again promoted to first mate back on the Canadian. His successive ships were: City of Toronto - 55, Edmonton - 56, Lethbridge - 57, Penetang - 58, Beaverton - 58 and finally, Glenelg 58 - 65.

In 1960, Harold married Barbara McQueen and in 1963 the couple adopted Mike. A family man, Harold couldn't stand to be away from them so in 1965 he signed on with the Ontario Dept. of Highways as master of the carferry Wolfe Islander. He held this position for the next 27 years retiring as senior captain of the Wolfe Islander III in 1989. From there, he was appointed senior captain of the excursion ships Island Queen and Island Belle.

His last trip was as master, taking the Wolfe Islander III to Hamilton for her major midlife refit at Heddle Marine last October.

Captain Hogan was a member of the Marine Historical Society of Detroit, The Great Lakes Maritime Institute, The Toronto Marine Historical Society and the Marine Museum of the Great Lakes at Kingston. May he rest in peace.

Reported by: Brian Johnson




Shipwreck Files Updated

02/21:
The popular Great Lakes Ship Wreck Files has been updated. Release 4.0 offers more than 600 pieces of new information in this revised edition.

Click here to view





Ice Forecast

02/07:
Ice Hazard Bulletin Issued by Environment Canada at 1700 UTC Sunday 20 February 2000.
No ice warning in effect for the next 36 hours.

Lake Ontario... Over the extreme northeastern portion of Lake Ontario 8 to 9 plus tenths thin with some medium lake ice. Mostly open water elsewhere.

Lake Erie... Within 15 to 20 miles east and south of Long Point 2 to 4 tenths new lake ice. Beyond 15 to 20 miles east and south of Long Point 9 plus tenths thin with some medium lake ice. Fast ice in Long Point Bay and near Buffalo. West of Long Point Bay to Point Pelee within 8 miles of the north shore 4 to 6 tenths new lake ice. Beyond 8 miles of the north shore 9 plus tenths medium with some thin lake ice. West of Point Pelee and in Lake St Clair 9 plus tenths medium lake ice except for some new lake ice within 8 miles of the northern shore south of Detroit River.

Lake Huron and Georgian Bay... Mostly open water. Consolidated medium lake ice over the North Channel and in Saginaw Bay and in St Marys River and in the Strait Of Mackinac. In central Georgian Bay west of Parry Sound 9 tenths medium and thin lake ice. Within 10 miles of the northeastern shore of Georgian Bay 9 plus tenths thin and new lake ice. Along the southern shore of Lake Huron 9 tenths thin and medium lake ice. Within 5 miles of the shores of Lake Huron 8 to 9 plus tenths of new and thin lake ice.

Lake Superior... Consolidated thick lake ice in Black Bay and Nipigon Bay and over Northern Thunder Bay and west of Pie Island as well as around the Apostle Islands. An area of new and thin lake ice forming in the central part of Thunder Bay and within 10 miles of the north shores from Nipigon Bay to Isle Royale. in Whitefish Bay 9 plus tenths medium and thin lake ice except for fast ice along the eastern and southern shores. Along the southwestern shore and along the Keweenaw Peninsula 9 plus tenths medium and new lake ice. Southeast of Keweenaw Peninsula and along the southeastern shore 9 plus tenths mostly thin lake ice. Mostly open water over the rest of Lake Superior.

Lake Michigan... The southern tip of Lake Michigan ranges from 10 percent shore ice coverage from about Calumet Harbor To Burns Waterway Harbor. 30 to 50 percent coverage of shore ice was reported from Burns Waterway Harbor to the Black River. Green Bay remains 100 percent covered with medium to thick fast ice. 90 to 100 percent coverage of medium ice was reported from North and South Fox Islands toward the northeast. 100 percent coverage of light shore ice was reported on the western shore from about Port Washington to Rock and St. Martin passages. The rest of the lake remains ice free.

Click here for the St. Lawrence River Forecast.

Note: this report is offered for entertainment and should not be relied on for navigation. Please consult Canadian Ice Service for current conditions (subscription necessary)

Area coverage is expressed in tenths
1-3/10's---very open drift ice
4-6/10's---open drift ice
7-8/10's---close pack ice
9-9+/10's--very close pack
10/10's---compact
10/10's---frozen together - consolidated

When ice reaches 6/10's or greater, ships can no longer traverse between floes.

Fast ice--ice fastened to the shore (frozen all the way across)

New Lake Ice----recently formed less than 2 inches (5 centimeters) thick.
Thin Lake Ice---2 - 6 inches (5 - 15 centimeters) thick.
Medium Lake Ice- 6 - 12 inches (15 - 30 centimeters) thick.
Thick Lake Ice--12 - 28 inches (30-70 centimeters) thick.
Very Thick Ice--greater than 28 inches (70 centimeters thick).





Today in Great Lakes History - February 21

The EDWIN H. GOTT arrived at Two Harbors (her first trip) February 21, 1979 with the loss of one of her two rudders during her transit of Lake Superior. Also the other rudder post was damaged. She was holed in her bow and some of her cargo hold plating ruptured as a result of frozen ballast tanks. Even the MACKINAW suffered damage to her port propeller shaft on the trip across frozen Lake Superior.

The keel of the new bow section for the HILDA MARJANNE was laid on February 21, 1961 while at the same time the tanker hull forward of her engine room bulkhead was being cut away.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Conquest Continues

02/19:
Visiting the Lake Michigan port of Charlevoix yesterday was the cement barge Southdown Conquest pushed by the tug Susan W. Hannah. The pair arrived at the Southdown Cement Plant Saturday morning to load. By early afternoon the barge was loaded and the pair departed at 1:30p.m.

Reported by: Dustin Sadowski




Today in Great Lakes History - February 20

On February 20, 1959, the Herbert C. Jackson was launched at Great Lakes Engineering Works in River Rouge, Michigan.

The DES GROSEILLIERS was launched February 20, 1982.

On 20 February 1903, G. WATSON FRENCH (steel propeller, 376', 3785 gt) was launched at W. Bay City, MI. She lasted until 1964 when she was scrapped by Lakehead Scrap metal Co. in Fort William, Ontario. The other names she had during her career were HENRY P. WERNER (1924), JOHN J. BOLAN (2)(1937), and ALGOWAY (1947).

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Season Opens for Grand Haven

02/19:
The shipping season for Grand Haven/Ferrysburg began Thursday with the arrival of the barge Southdown Conquest and tug Susan Hannah arriving at the Southdown dock. This is the earliest a tug and barge has arrived in recent memory.

Reported by: David Swain




Lake St. Clair traffic

02/19:
The Canadian Coast Guard's Samuel Risley was escorting the tanker Gemini downbound in Lake St. Clair Friday morning. The Gemini was sailing from the Canadian Soo where she was assisted by the U.S. Coast Guard Mackinaw. After assisting Gemini the Risley was heading upbound to assist the tug Mary E. Hannah and barge.

Reported by: Rob Cioletti




Today in Great Lakes History - February 19

The b) TROY H. BROWNING (c. THOMAS F. PATTON) was towed from the James River with two other C4s, the LOUIS McHENRY HOWE (b. TOM M. GIRDLER) and MOUNT MANSFIELD (b. CHARLES M. WHITE), to the Maryland Dry Dock Co., Baltimore, MD, February 1951, to be converted to a Great Lakes bulk carrier according to plans designed by J.J. Henry & Co., New York, NY.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




New Engine set to Arrive

02/18:
The new Caterpillar 3608 that will power the Cuyahoga this season is expected to arrive on February 24. The engine will be lifted directly from the truck into the engine room. Once the gearbox is aligned with the shaft, the engine will be shifted back and bolted up. A new ballast tank has been built in place of the scrapped boiler.

Reported by: George Lee




Southdown Conquest on the Move

02/18:
On Tuesday morning the barge Southdown Conquest arrived in Ludington, MI to wait for weather. She was waiting in the ice in Pere Marquette Lake.

The barge is being pushed by the tug Susan K. Hannah and it is unknown where she is headed. The Conquest entered lay-up on Dec. 17 in Chicago.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Record Year for Duluth-Superior

02/18:
On Monday the Duluth Seaway Port Authority reports that record export cargoes led to a record volume of total international trade in 1999 in the Port of Duluth-Superior.

Western coal shipments to Canada and unexpectedly strong worldwide grain shipments pushed all international commerce to 12.1 million metric tons, three percent above Duluth-Superior's 1978 record of 11.8 million tons and eight percent above 1998's 11.2 million tons.

Including domestic Great Lakes cargo, all waterborne commerce through the port totaled 39.4 million metric tons, about two percent above 1998's final totals and three percent above the port's five-year average.

The surge of exports-a record-setting 11.5 million tons-offset a decline in domestic shipping. Final domestic cargoes totaled 27.3 million tons, a decline of two percent attributable primarily to reduced iron ore demand and a drop in Great Lakes water levels.

The port's export record had been 10.5 million tons in 1998-which was the highest level reached since 1978's 10.3 million tons.

Midwest Energy Resources Company registered its sixth consecutive record-breaking year of low-sulfur coal shipments. Its Superior facility moved 14.7 million metric tons, including 2.9 million tons to Canadian customers. MERC first set a port coal-handling record in 1994 with 12.15 million metric tons, toppling a standard dating back more than seven decades-when all of Duluth-Superior's coal was inbound.

Grain movements of 5.3 million tons were 10 percent ahead of the 4.8 million tons handled in 1998. Exports included 2.9 million tons shipped directly overseas and two million tons transshipped overseas via Canada.

The Pioneer Press reports that the world market has been flooded with grain during the past two years. But unusual circumstances -- including unexpectedly high Mississippi River barge rates -- have sent a large number of vessels into the Great Lakes to pick up wheat, corn and soybeans.

Despite a three percent decline in iron ore shipments (from 16. 3 million tons in 1998 to 15.9 million tons in 1999), Northeastern Minnesota's taconite industry produced 43 million tons of iron ore pellets in 1999. In addition to Duluth-Superior, iron ore is routed to U.S. and Canadian destinations via rail and the Lake Superior ports of Two Harbors, Silver Bay and Taconite Harbor.

Altogether, iron ore represented 40 percent of port commerce, coal 37 percent and grain 14 percent-nearly all outbound. The largest single inbound cargo was limestone at about six percent.

The season's first commercial vessel arrival was Oglebay Norton Company's Columbia Star on March 26. Algoma Central Corporation's Algosound was 1999's first full Seaway transit, arriving April 8.

The season's last vessel to transit the Seaway was the Hong Kong-flag Lady Hamilton which departed on December 20-marking the Port's second-latest departure of an oceangoing vessel since the Seaway opening. The record final Seaway departure was the Liberian-flag Federal Calumet on December 22, 1984.

The last domestic vessel to leave Duluth-Superior was Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Stewart J. Cort, departing January 13. Interlake Steamship Company's Lee A. Tregurtha officially closed the season January 15 with her arrival for winter berthing.

Total vessel arrivals of 1,122 showed an increase of 16 from last year. There were 653 U.S.-flag, 281 Canadian-flag and 188 overseas vessels visiting the Port.




Companies Join

02/18:
Last week Marine Transport Corporation and Mormac Marine Group, Inc. announced that Mormac's ocean bulk transportation businesses will join the MTC group of companies which include Marine Transport Lines, Intrepid Shipping and MTL Petrolink. Mormac operates 10 U.S. flag vessels, including two tankers involved in crude oil transportation for another owner, three product carriers owned by Mormac employed on time charter and contracts of affreightment, and five vessels for the Maritime Administration. The operation of the two tankers trading in crude oil will be combined with Marine Transport Lines' ship management group. The three Mormac product carriers will be bareboat chartered by Marine Transport Lines and traded as a pooled fleet with MTC's three similar product tankers. Mormac's government operation will be maintained as a separate unit with its Baltimore office. The total consideration to be paid by MTC for the Mormac businesses is based on the performance of those businesses over a five-year period. The minimum amount payable is approximately $7 million.

In a company press release, Paul R. Tregurtha, Chairman and Chief Executive of Mormac Marine Group, Inc., commented, "The combination of our ocean tanker transportation businesses with MTC's businesses provides our tanker organization with expanded opportunities for growth and success. Our companies and our people are similar in many ways; with long maritime heritage, excellent service capabilities and reputation, and professionals dedicated to the industry. I am confident that MTC will be successful in its strategy as a leading Jones Act operator and I am happy to see many in our organization joining MTC"

Marine Transport Corporation is a U.S.-based supplier of marine transportation services, and owns and/or manages 35 ships, six work boats and five chartered-in vessels, making it one of the largest U.S. based fleets of ocean going vessels. The Mormac acquisition will add ten vessels to this total. MTC's core business is industrial shipping based on long-term alliances, some as long as 50 years, with leading chemical and energy customers. MTC's Houston-based operation, MTL Petrolink, provides crude oil lightering services in the Gulf of Mexico. MTC, as an operator with International Safety Management (ISM) certification, is able to provide services to support U.S. and international shipping expansion for quality- conscious commercial and U.S. government customers.

The Mormac Group retains its Moran tugs & Interlake Steamship Company divisions.




New Feature Vessel

02/18:
Each day this week we spotlight a new vessel in the Fleet Photo Gallery. Today the history of the Mantadoc is featured.

Click here to view





Today in Great Lakes History - February 18

IMPERIAL ST. CLAIR participated in an historic special convoy with DOAN TRANSPORT, which carried caustic soda, led by CCGS GRIFFON arriving at Thunder Bay, Ont. on February 18, 1977. The journey took one week from Sarnia, Ont. through Lake Superior ice as much as six feet thick, and at one point it took four days to travel 60 miles. The trip was initiated to supply residents of the Canadian Lakehead with 86,000 barrels of heating oil the reserves of which were becoming depleted due to severe weather that winter.

The JOSEPH S. YOUNG (1) was towed to the Great Lakes via the Mississippi River and arrived at the Manitowoc Ship Building Co., Manitowoc, WI on February 18, 1957 where her self unloading equipment was installed. This was the last large vessel to enter the Lakes via the Mississippi. She was the first of seven T2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Icebreaking in Buffalo

02/17:
The Buffalo fire tug Edward M. Cotter was breaking ice yesterday heading through CSX's CP1 or River Bridge at noon on Wednesday. The tug appeared to be heading all the way up the creek to the Mobil Oil docks six miles from the lake.

The ice breaking is done to maintain the proper flow of water and ice. This prevents any type of flooding that can cause accidents such as a vessel being pulled away from their lay-up dock.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Three salties renamed

02/17:
Three salties which transited the Seaway locks for the first time in 1999 have since been renamed. Not one of them went farther than the Welland Canal. Out of the three, Clipper Westoe went only as far as Côte Ste. Catherine in the St. Lawrence Seaway to unload gypsum. She has since been given the new name Industrial Confidence. Helgoland which went to Port Robinson in the Welland Canal was renamed Kimberley and finally, Johannes Boele was renamed Mercosul Uruguay. In April-May 1999, she had delivered a cargo of bauxite at Thorold.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Former McKeil tug renamed

02/17:
A tug that was owned by McKeil Marine of Hamilton but never operated by for the company was renamed Norfolk last year by her new owners, Sea Force Marine Inc. (Bay Gulf Trading Co. Ltd. managers) of Norfolk, VA. She is the former Italian tug Vortice that had been towed to Hamilton in Nov. 1996 all the way from Trieste, Italy. The tug had suffered a fire in June 1993 and had not been repaired. On Dec. 16, 1998, she cleared the Seaway locks under tow of the Offshore Supplier and tied up in Montreal where Pacific Standard took over and delivered the Vortice to Norfolk.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Steel orders continue steady increase

02/17:
The Detroit News reported yesterday that some U.S. steel prices have risen about 25 percent in the past year from 1998, when they were their lowest in at least 15 years. Cheap steel imports flooded the steel market in 1998 as Asian economies suffered tumbling currency valuations and recessions. Steel orders in January reported to rise to 118 percent of the industry's shipping capacity from 95 percent in January 1999. This according to Salomon Smith Barney analyst Michelle Applebaum.




New Feature Vessel

02/17:
Each day this week we spotlight a new vessel in the Fleet Photo Gallery. Today the history of the Louis R. Desmarais is featured.

Click here to view





Today in Great Lakes History - February 17

In heavy weather on February 17, 1981 the WITSUPPLY (b. TRANSTREAM) foundered in the Caribbean Sea off Cabo de la Vela, Colombia. She was being towed to the scrap yard at Cartagena, Columbia when she sank.

February 17, 1977 - The CITY OF MIDLAND 41, shortly after departing Ludington encountered a heavy ridge of ice that snapped all the blades off her starboard propeller. One of the blades ripped a hole two feet long by three inches wide which caused the 41 to take on water, but pumps were able to keep her afloat. SPARTAN came out to free her but also became mired in the ice. On February 18 the cutter MACKINAW freed them.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Gemini Arrives

02/16:
The tanker Gemini arrived in Soo Harbour early afternoon Tuesday carrying a cargo of refined oil. She was escorted through the St. Marys River by the U.S. Coast Guard Ice Breaker Mackinaw. The two were expected to arrive on Monday it is unknown if ice conditions in the river delayed the pair.

Reported by: Scott McLellan




National Steel Announces Dividend

02/16:
On Tuesday National Steel Corporation announced that its Board of Directors declared a cash dividend of $0.07 per common share, payable on March 15, 2000 to stockholders of record at the close of business on March 1, 2000.

This is National Steel’s ninth consecutive quarterly dividend paid on common shares.

Headquartered in Mishawaka, Indiana, National Steel Corporation is one of the nation’s largest producers of carbon flat-rolled steel products, with annual shipments of approximately six million tons. National Steel employs approximately 9,200 employees.

The corporation's Great Lakes Facility is the State of Michigan’s largest steel producer and the largest manufacturing facility of National Steel Corporation. With operations along the Detroit River in the cities of Ecorse and River Rouge, this facility enjoys a superior location to receive raw materials and supply finished steel products to customers throughout the region.

Reported by: National Steel Corporation




New Feature Vessel

02/16:
Each day this week we spotlight a new vessel in the Fleet Photo Gallery. Today the history of the Edgar B. Speer is featured.

Click here to view





Today in Great Lakes History - February 16

The EDWIN H. GOTT sailed on her maiden voyage February 16, 1979 in ballast from Milwaukee, bound for Two Harbors, MN. This was the first maiden voyage of a laker ever in mid-winter. She was in convoy with three of her fleetmates; CASON J. CALLAWAY, PHILIP R. CLARKE and JOHN G. MUNSON, each needing assistance from the U.S.C.G. MACKINAW to break through heavy ice 12 to 14 inches thick the length of Lake Superior. The GOTT took part in a test project, primarily by U.S. Steel, to determine the feasibility of year around navigation.

The JAMES E. FERRIS was launched February 16, 1910 as the ONTARIO (4).

On February 16, 1977 a four hour fire caused major damage to the crews' forward quarters aboard the W.W. HOLLOWAY while at American Ship Building's Chicago yard.

February 16, 1939 - The state ferry CHIEF WAWATAM was fast in the ice in the Straits of Mackinac. She freed herself the next day and proceeded to St. Ignace.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Gemini to Call at Sault Ste. Marie

02/15:
The tanker Gemini was expected to enter the St. Mary's River yesterday afternoon escorted by the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw. She was destined for the Government Dock at Soo, Ontario.

The Gemini has been sailing all winter working on Lake Erie and the Detroit and St. Clair Rivers. Her trips have been from Sarnia to the BP dock in Toledo and across Lake Erie to Nanticoke. Over the weekend the U.S. Coast Guard's Neah Bay and Canadian Coast Guard's Samuel Risley assisted her.

Reported by: Scott McLellan




Frantz Moved from Dry Dock

02/15:
Last week the Joseph H. Frantz was moved from the Toledo Shipyard Dry Dock to the CSX coal dock #4. She is docked underneath the coal loading rig and will probably have to be moved again once the shipping season opens. The Frantz is usually the last boat to sail each Spring for the Oglebay Norton Fleet. She typically departs lay-up in the April 7th - 10th time frame and the coal dock is usually operational by the end of March.

Taking the Frantz's place in the dry dock is Oglebay Norton's Earl W. Oglebay. The David Z. Norton will be the next vessel to use the dry dock once the Earl W. is finished.

The Algonova remains docked in front of both dry docks undergoing some type of repairs.

Reported by: MarcoVallera, Dean J. Frazer and Jim Hoffman




More Ice Breaking

02/15:
The U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Biscayne Bay was working in the Straits of Mackinac over the weekend. She assisted the tug Mary Hannah and barge on Friday and the tug Michigan and barge Great Lakes on Sunday. The U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Katmai Bay conducted preventive icebreaking in the lower St. Marys River on Friday.





Lawsuit Settled

02/15:
Recent newspaper reports say a ferry service has agreed to pay $460,000 to settle a lawsuit filed by an elderly woman's family after she suffocated in a sleeping bunk on her way to Michigan. Edith Lambert of Mount Vernon, Washington, died in July 1997 after her stateroom sleeper malfunctioned and closed on her, causing her to stop breathing, according to the lawsuit. Following the accident Lake Michigan Carferry, Inc. voluntarily secured all the stateroom beds in an open position so that passengers cannot raise or lower them.

Reported by: Steve Sliwka




Coast Guard Called to Assist

02/15:
Saturday afternoon two snowmobilers were reported overdue and missing since Friday night near Tawas Bay, Michigan. A helicopter from Air Station Detroit located the snowmobile under thin ice in approximately 12 feet of water Saturday afternoon. Divers searched the area physically and with a camera but did not find the missing people.

Sunday evening a woman called 911 to report an abandoned ATV and helmet on the ice south of Wigwam Bay, part of Saginaw Bay on Lake Huron. A Michigan Department of Natural Resources officer walked out to investigate and found a large crack in the ice. A helicopter from Air Station Detroit was then launched to search the area for a person in trouble. Nothing was found and there have been no reports of a missing person.




Boat Show Open

02/15:
The 42nd Annual Detroit Boat Show opened to the public on Saturday featuring more than 1000 boats from 10 - 54 feet in length filling 600,000 square feet of exhibition space at Cobo Center. The show is open every day from Noon - 9PM, except Sundays when it is open from Noon - 6PM. Admission is $7 for adults. Children Under 12 are free with an adult. The show runs through Feb. 20, for more information call 800-224-3008.

Be sure to visit the Great Lakes Maritime Institute's booth located in the special exhibits area. Crewmembers working in the Great Lakes commercial fleet will be on hand to answer your questions.




New Feature Vessel

02/15:
Each day this week we spotlight a new vessel in the Fleet Photo Gallery. Today the history of the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. is featured.

Click here to view





Today in Great Lakes History - February 15

In 1961 the D.G. KERR (b. HARRY R. JONES) arrived at her final port of Troon, Scotland where she was cut up for scrap the same year.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Deeper Drafts for the Welland?

02/14:
Last August officials with the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp. began using vessels passing through the Welland Canal to test whether it's possible to increase the canal's draught by three inches reports the St. Catharines Standard. The tests are expected to continue this spring when the canal reopens.

In the Soo Lock system vessels can load as deep as 27-feet (8.5 meters). The maximum draught in the Welland Canal and on the lower seaway is 26-feet 3-inches (8 meters). To increase there would be a number of technical obstacles to overcome, involving safe ship movement, stability and the machinery that operates the locks. The canal draught was last increased in the early 1990s.

The tests have been based on the idea of maintaining current water levels in the canal, but still allowing deeper draughts without dredging.

The Standard reports that for every 1 inch deeper a vessel can be loaded, cargoes on a 730-foot vessel could be increased by about 132 tons. Wayne Smith, vice-president and general manager of Seaway Self-Unloaders said in the article that would mean gaining about 1.4 per cent in efficiency, reducing the number of trips per vessel each year.

Reported by: John Stark




Holland May See Dredging

02/14:
The Holland Sentinel reports that The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is considering dredging Lake Macatawa in Holland's harbor this year.

The Lake Michigan port was scheduled to be dredged in 2001 but surveys taken last fall show that water levels in many places in the upstream half of the lake's shipping channel are below the desired 21-foot depth. In the turning basin between the Louis Padnos yard and Dunton Park, water levels are less than 18 feet at some points, reports the newspaper.

The lower water and silting effecting Holland is not unique among Michigan ports. With record low water levels the Corps reports having received 225 requests for dredging in Michigan alone.




Ice Forecast

02/07:
Ice Hazard Bulletin Issued by Environment Canada at 1700 UTC Sunday 13 February 2000.
Ice Warning issued for moderate to strong ice pressure developing at the northern entrance of the St. Clair River with thicker ice moving in this evening ending Monday afternoon.

Lake Ontario... Over the extreme eastern shores 9 plus tenths thin with some medium lake ice. Within 5 miles of the northeast shore from Prince Edward Point to Brighton 8 to 9 tenths new and thin lake ice. Within 5 miles of the remaining north shore and along the southeast shore 4 to 6 tenths new lake ice. Open water elsewhere.

Lake Erie... Within 15 to 20 miles east and south of Long Point mostly open water. Beyond 15 to 20 miles east and south of Long Point 9 plus tenths thin with some medium lake ice except within 8 miles of the northeastern shore with 4 to 6 tenths new lake ice. Fast ice in Long Point Bay and near Buffalo. West of Long Point Bay to Point Pelee within 5 to 8 miles of the north shores 2 to 4 tenths new lake ice. Beyond 8 miles of the north shore 9 plus tenths thin and medium lake ice. West of Point Pelee and in Lake St Clair 9 plus tenths medium and thin lake ice. However there is an area of new lake ice in the extreme southwestern portion of Lake St Clair and northwestern shore of Lake Erie.

Lake Huron and Georgian Bay... Mostly open water. Consolidated medium lake ice over the North Channel and in Saginaw Bay and in St Marys River and in the Strait Of Mackinac. Within 15 to 25 miles of the northeastern shore of Georgian Bay west of Parry Sound 9 tenths medium and thin lake ice. Within 10 miles of the northeastern shore of Georgian Bay east of Parry Sound and along the southeastern shore of Lake Huron 9 tenths thin and medium lake ice. Within 5 to 10 miles of the remaining shores of Lake Huron 4 to 6 tenths of new and thin lake ice.

Lake Superior... Consolidated Thick lake ice in Black Bay and Nipigon Bay and in most of Thunder Bay and west of Pie Island as well as around the Apostle Islands. Strips of thin and new lake ice in the entrance to Thunder Bay and Between Thunder Bay and Isle Royale. In southern Whitefish Bay 9 plus tenths medium and thin lake ice. Within 15 miles southeast and along the Keweenaw Peninsula and along the southwestern shore 9 plus tenths mostly thin lake ice. Mostly open water over the rest of Lake Superior.

Lake Michigan... 10 tenths coverage of medium to thick fast ice covering all Green Bay. 8 to 10 tenths coverage of ice ranging from thin to thick extended from 6 nautical miles southwest of Lansing Shoal east to the strait. Patches of thin to locally medium shoreline ice extended from the strait south of Charlevoix and from Nauminway south to down the western shore around the southern shore and up to the eastern shore to near Grand Haven.

Click here for the St. Lawrence River Forecast.

Note: this report is offered for entertainment and should not be relied on for navigation. Please consult Canadian Ice Service for current conditions (subscription necessary)

Area coverage is expressed in tenths
1-3/10's---very open drift ice
4-6/10's---open drift ice
7-8/10's---close pack ice
9-9+/10's--very close pack
10/10's---compact
10/10's---frozen together - consolidated

When ice reaches 6/10's or greater, ships can no longer traverse between floes.

Fast ice--ice fastened to the shore (frozen all the way across)

New Lake Ice----recently formed less than 2 inches (5 centimeters) thick.
Thin Lake Ice---2 - 6 inches (5 - 15 centimeters) thick.
Medium Lake Ice- 6 - 12 inches (15 - 30 centimeters) thick.
Thick Lake Ice--12 - 28 inches (30-70 centimeters) thick.
Very Thick Ice--greater than 28 inches (70 centimeters thick).





New Feature Vessel

02/14:
Each day this week we spotlight a new vessel in the Fleet Photo Gallery. Today the history of the Lee A. Tregurtha is featured.

Click here to view





Today in Great Lakes History - February 14

The MESABI MINER was launched on this day in 1977 becoming the fourth thousand foot bulk carrier on the Great Lakes and Interlake's second. She had been built under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970 at a cost of $45.1 million.

Ford Motor Co., looking to expand its fleet, purchased the JOSEPH S. WOOD on February 14, 1966 for $4.3 million

On February 14, 1973 the LEADALE's forward cabins burned during winter lay-up at Hamilton, Ont. and were later repaired.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Great Lakes Maritime Task Force Honors U.S. Coast Guard

02/13:
On January 26, the U.S. Coast Guard held its annual Marine Community Day in Cleveland, Ohio. During the lunch awards ceremonies, the Great Lakes Maritime Task Force presented Ninth District Commander RADM James D. Hull with a resolution honoring the role of the Coast Guard in the success of Great Lakes shipping during the 20th century.

Click here to view the text of the resolution.





New Feature Vessel

02/13:
Each day this week we spotlight a new vessel in the Fleet Photo Gallery. Today the history of the Canadian Progress is featured.

Click here to view





Today in Great Lakes History - February 13

The POINTE NOIRE was launched February 13, 1926 as a) SAMUEL MATHER (4).

February 13, 1897 - The PERE MARQUETTE (later named PERE MARQUETTE 15) arrived in Ludington on her maiden voyage. Captain Joseph "Joe" Russell in command.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Season Totals for Escanaba

02/12:
In 1999 there were 247 total loadings in 25 different vessels in Escanaba. Over 7 millions tons were shipped, and Joseph L. Block and Wilfred Sykes accounted for over 3 million of those tons.

Vessel

Number of visits
Joseph L. Block 64
Wilfred Sykes 53
Joseph H. Thompson 25
Mesabi Miner 12
Elton Hoyt 2nd 12
James R. Barker 11
Kaye E. Barker 11
Mckee Sons 10
Pathfinder 9
Herbert C. Jackson 8
Reserve 6
Lee A. Tregurtha 5
Indiana Harbor 5
Middletown 4
Charles M. Beeghly 2

Vessels making one visit each

Fred R. White Jr.

Oglebay Norton
Columbia Star
American Mariner
Armco
Sam Laud
Buffalo
Burns Harbor
St. Clair
Paul R. Tregurtha


Reported by Rod Burdick




New Feature Vessel

02/12:
Each day this week we spotlight a new vessel in the Fleet Photo Gallery. Today the history of the George A. Sloan is featured.

Click here to view





Today in Great Lakes History - February 12

RED WING (2) was launched February 12, 1944 as a) BOUNDBROOK

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Budget Holds 1 Million for Soo Locks

02/11:
Monday's proposed budget for fiscal year 2001 included $1 million dollars for a new Soo Lock. In a press release Tuesday, Rep. Bart Stupak said that the money proposed in the budget would move the project from the planning to the design stage. Of the estimated $350 million cost, Great Lakes States would pay for 35 percent of the cost. Rep. Stupak obtained an extended payback period of 50 years for federal assistance to the states for their portion of the project with no federal interest.

On Tuesday Stupak said the Soo Lock funding proposal, while less significant in terms of actual dollars, was one of the most important budget requests for the Great Lakes region.

“Today I have received assurance from the Great Lakes Commission, representing Great Lakes states, that the states are prepared to commit to their share of the project,” Stupak said. “In addition, “Because so much of the economy of the Great Lakes region is dependent on the shipping that goes through the single, large Poe Lock, I have worked to make construction of a new Poe Lock a reality since I was elected in 1992,” Stupak said.

Pending a final commitment of funding, construction could begin as early as 2002.




Mackinaw Replacement

02/11:
With the proposed $110 million budgeted for a replacement of the icebreaker Mackinaw, the U.S. Coast Guard is planning on awarding first-round contracts by October.

The process will take place in two phases. In late March the Coast Guard will choose up to three contractors capable of designing and constructing a replacement for the 1944 built icebreaker. The second phase will be to design and construct the vessel after a single contractor has been selected.

The replacement will have a primary mission of heavy icebreaking and servicing floating Aids to Navigation. The secondary missions of the vessel will include: search and rescue, maritime environmental response, and maritime law enforcement. Design will be based on the Coast Guard's requirements that the vessel have a forward buoy deck, diesel electric propulsion, 360-degree azumuthing propulsion and no propeller shrouds.

Click here for conceptual drawing of the vessel

For more information visit the Coast Guard's Great Lakes Icebreaking Capability Replacement Project web site

Reported by: David Swain




Shipping Volume Down For St. Joe

02/11:
The volume of commercial shipping at the St. Joseph River Harbor dropped by 27 percent last year. Commodity shipments at the three commercial docks on the Lake Michigan port fell from 759,431 tons in 1998 to 553,019 tons in 1999, according to an annual report prepared by Harbor Master Herb Quade.

The harbor received 49 ships in 1999, down from 59 in 1998, a year that set a record for commodity receipts.

The LaFarge dock received 228,197 tons of cement in 1999. At the Consumers Asphalt dock, stone shipments totaled 180,629 tons. McCoy Docking Co., reported stone receipts of 108,862 tons. Shipments of road salt were up at McCoy from 26,684 tons to 35,331 tons.

On January 19, the barge Integrity pushed by the tug Jacklyn M., ran aground on a sand bar off the North Pier. The tug and barge was freed, but was unable to enter the harbor to deliver the load of cement.

Reported by: Mike Schroeder




Owen Sound Report

02/11:
Work continues on the Algorail and Mapleglen in winter lay-up at Owen Sound. The Mapleglen has had her tanks renewed and her stack extensions, put on a year or so ago, removed. Algorail also has had some tank renewal work and new belting. Work continues on the Capt. Henry Jackman, but does not appear to be to the extent of the others.

Reported by: Peter Bowers




Goderich Salt Mine For Sale

02/11:
The Goderich Signal Star reports the Sifto salt mine in Goderich, Ontario is up for sale. The parent company, IMC Global would like to divest itself of IMC Salt and IMC Chemicals. Goderich is reported to be the largest and lowest cost rock salt producer in the world. The salt shipped from Goderich by freighter is used to control snow and ice through out the Great Lakes region.




New Feature Vessel

02/11:
Each day this week we spotlight a new vessel in the Fleet Photo Gallery. Today the history of the Algolake is featured.

Click here to view





Today in Great Lakes History - February 11

The E.B. BARBER was launched in 1953 at Port Arthur, Ont.

The NIXON BERRY was sold to Marine Salvage for scrap on in 1970, she was the former MERTON E. FARR.

BEN W. CALVIN was launched in 1911.

The keel was laid for the ROY A. JODREY on February 11, 1965.

IMPERIAL CORNWALL was retired on February 11, 1971.

Albert Edgar Goodrich, the founder of the Goodrich Steamboat Line, was born in Hamburg, NY, near Buffalo on 11 February 1826.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




New Budget Proposed

02/10:
Monday President Clinton introduced a proposed budget that could have both a positive and negative impact on Great Lakes Shipping if approved by Congress.

The budget includes $110 million for a replacement of the U.S. Coast Guard’s icebreaker Mackinaw. The Mackinaw was built in 1944 and provides icebreaking services for commercial vessels operating during the winter months. Specifically built for ice breaking she is limited to this duty while other Coast Guard vessels are capable of multiple roles. This limitation combined with her age and high number of crew required to operate makes the replacement necessary.

The new Coast Guard cutter would be a multipurpose design constructed not only for heavy icebreaking but for servicing buoys reports the Toledo Blade. The Coast Guard expects that a multipurpose vessel would allow use to be increased by about 38 per cent over the Mackinaw. The proposed cutter would also be capable of search and rescue operations and deploying a skimming system in case of oil spills.

Current plans call for the Mackinaw to remain in service until 2006 with delivery of the new cutter in late 2005. The total cost of the new vessel is expected to be about $128 million.

In the proposed budget is 50 million dollars for the clean up of 31 contaminated areas around the lakes Attached to the funds is a requirement that local governments contribute 40 percent of cleanup costs, this requirement could inhibit some communities from accepting the money.

The 50 million dollars is criticized by some as not being enough to make a true difference. 50 million dollars spent in a few areas can make a dramatic difference, when divided across the lakes the amount is small compared with the needs of the 31 polluted sites.

Also included in the budget is $2.15 million to review the regulation of water levels and flows in Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River.

An alarming feature of the budget is a proposed harbor tax that could cause great harm to the Great Lakes Shipping industry.

Wednesday’s Cleveland Plain Dealer reported that President Clinton’s new tax on shipping was made in an effort to raise $980 million each year to pay for harbor maintenance work completed by the Army Corps of Engineers. The tax was first proposed in 1998 after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected the constitutionality of a cargo tax that formerly paid for dredging. The proposal to charge a per-voyage fee depending on the size and type of vessel made no progress, but Clinton is promoting it again.

Luckily, the new tax faces stiff opposition from Ohio Rep. Steve LaTourette, Ohio GOP Sen. Mike DeWine and Ohio Sen. George Voinovich.

Rep. LaTourette was quoted in the paper as saying "These fees might not threaten the luxury cruise business or the big oil companies, but they could cripple Great Lakes commerce, and I intend to rally our other Great Lakes lawmakers to put a stop to these unfair and ill-conceived new taxes”.

Sen. Voinovich said in the Plain Dealer that the proposed Harbor Service User Fee would disproportionately hurt bulk shippers of commodities like iron ore, coal and gypsum, and could divert more international shipments to Canadian ports. On Tuesday he wrote a letter urging Clinton to withdraw the "ill-advised" plan.

Lake Carriers' Association president George Ryan said that "Congress has already made it clear there will be no action on this bill, and we expect that will continue this year." The Lake Carriers' Association plans to collaborate with the other opponents.

Reported by: John Whitehead




New Feature Vessel

02/10:
Each day this week we spotlight a new vessel in the Fleet Photo Gallery. Today the history of the Algolake is featured.

Click here to view





Today in Great Lakes History - February 10

UHLMANN BROTHERS (2) was launched February 10, 1906 as a) LOFTUS CUDDY

The MARKHAM (Twin Screw Hopper Suction Dredge ) was delivered February 10, 1960 to the Army Corps of Engineers at Cleveland, OH.

In 1998 the Ludington Daily News reported that a private investment group (later identified as Hydrolink) was planning to start cross-lake ferry service from Muskegon, MI to Milwaukee, WI running two high-speed ferries.

On 10 February 1890, NYANZA (wooden propeller, 280', 1888 gt) was launched at W. Bay City, MI. She was build by F. W. Wheeler (hull #63). In 1917, she was renamed LANDBO.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




U.S.-Flag Carriage Down 5.5 Percent in 1999

02/09:
Dry-bulk cargoes carried by U.S.-Flag lakers during the 1999 navigation season totaled 115.7 million net tons, a decrease of 5.5 percent compared to the 1998 shipping season. As such, the 1999 season represents the first significant fall-off in U.S.-Flag carriage since 1991, but the season did end with an upturn. U.S.-Flag carriage in December 1999 and January 2000 was ahead of the previous season's pace.

Two commodities accounted for the downturn - iron ore and stone. Shipments of iron ore in U.S. bottoms slipped below 60 million tons for the first time since 1995. The reason for this fall-off was simple - more than 32 million tons of steel was imported into the United States in 1999. The production of one ton of steel requires roughly 1.3 tons of iron ore, so each ton of dumped steel had a direct impact on the Lakes ore trade.

The stone trade was also impacted by the steel situation. It takes about 400 pounds of fluxstone (a type of limestone) to produce a ton of steel, so again, the 10.2 percent decrease in stone cargoes relates to the unfair trade in steel. However, the stone trade was also impacted by high inventories at the beginning of the season and then delays in some major construction projects.

Click here to view the complete report





Ice Breaking Update

02/09:
On Monday the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Neah Bay assisted the tanker Gemini through the Pelee Passage on Lake Erie. Once through the passage, the Gemini continued on her trip escorted by the Canadian Coast Guard Cutter Samuel Risley.




Schooner being restored

02/09:
A recent article in the Globe and Mail reports that the three-masted, German-built schooner Kajama is being restored at Toronto's Harbourfront Centre. The group restoring the vessel expects to offer public sailings and charters beginning in May.

Launched in 1930, she was familiar in ports from northwest Spain, through western Europe and as far north as Norway and Russia. The schooner had a long career as a cargo sailing ship that was eventually converted to diesel power. Authentic shipyard drawings are being used to return the ship to its original sailing configuration, while meeting current day safety standards.

Reported by: John Stark




New Feature Vessel

02/09:
Each day this week we spotlight a new vessel in the Fleet Photo Gallery. Today the history of the car ferry Chi-Cheemaun is featured.

Click here to view





Today in Great Lakes History - February 09

EAGLESCLIFFE, loaded with 3,500 tons of grain, sank two miles east of Galveston, TX on February 9, 1983 after the hull had fractured from a grounding the previous day. She began taking on water in her forward end en route to Galveston. To save her the captain ran her into shallow water where she settled on the bottom in 20 feet of water with her bridge and boat deck above water. All 16 crewmembers and one dog were rescued.

The ALEXANDER LESLIE was launched February 9, 1901 as a) J.T. HUTCHINSON

The HOMER D. WILLIAMS suffered extensive fire damage to her side plating and forward lower cabins during her lay-up at Toledo, OH on February 9, 1971.

February 9, 1995 - The founder of Lake Michigan Carferry, Charles Conrad, died at the age of 77.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Body Found

02/08:
The body of a man who disappeared on Lake Michigan last summer following a boat collision was recovered Feb. 3 in the net of a commercial fishing boat operating off Two Rivers, Wis.

The fishing boat Art Swear VII found the body in its nets about 10 miles southeast of Manitowoc, according to the Associated Press. Personal effects on the body indicated it was that of Mark R. Rickert, 47, of Appleton, Wis.

Rickert and three other men were in a 19-foot boat that collided with a 37-foot cruiser last June about two miles off Manitowoc. The operator of the cruiser, Lawrence Hoffman, 46, of Hawthorn Woods, Ill., has been charged with second-degree reckless homicide and three counts of recklessly endangering safety. Hoffman's attorney has argued that the charges should be dismissed because no evidence exists to show his client was operating his boat recklessly.

Survivors of the 19-foot boat said they waved their arms, yelled and blew their boat's horn when it appeared the cruiser was going to hit their boat. They jumped into the water moments before the collision. Rickert was seen floating in the water for about 10 minutes before disappearing.

Reported by: Al Miller




Ice Breaking

02/08:
Over the weekend Operation Taconite was active with the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Biscayne Bay assisting the tug Michigan and her barge Great Lakes through the Straits of Mackinac.

In the Detroit River system and Lake Erie, Operation Coal Shovel continues with the Cutter Neah Bay providing assistance to the tanker Gemini.




Oglebay Norton Reports Record Revenues and Income

02/08:
On Monday the Oglebay Norton Company reported record revenues for the fourth quarter and full year. They were the highest in company history.

Revenues for the fourth quarter were $76.8 million, up 2.4% over last year's record fourth quarter revenues of $75.0 million. Net income for the fourth quarter was up sharply to $4.4 million from $1.1 million a year ago, and diluted earnings per share rose to $0.88 versus $0.24 for the fourth quarter of last year. Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization increased 19.2% in the fourth quarter to $19.0 million from $15.9 million for the same quarter last year.

Revenues for the twelve months ended December 31, 1999, increased 23.0% to $293.9 million from $238.9 million the previous year. Net income for the full year increased 13.3% to $13.6 million, up from $12.0 million for the same period in 1998.

Oglebay Norton Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer John Lauer reported that the company's Marine Services segment was unable to match its record performance of 1998, it finished the year strongly due to favorable weather conditions that permitted a 12% increase in fourth quarter sailing days. The benefits of the longer operating season were offset by low water levels and higher fuel costs. For the quarter, Marine Services reported a 9.1% increase in revenues and a 3.6% decline in income from operations compared with the record performance in the fourth quarter of 1998.

For the year, revenues declined by 1.0% and income from operations declined by 12.9% from the all- time records set in 1998.

Mr. Lauer will host a conference call with analysts at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time today that will be web-casted live in listen only mode via the Oglebay Norton Company website. It also will be available for replay starting at 2:00 p.m. ET, this afternoon. Choose the conference call button on the home page to listen.

Oglebay Norton home page




Industry Days Conference

02/08:
The Upper Great Lakes Captains Association will be hosting the annual Industry Days Conference February 17, 18 and 19 in Traverse City, Michigan.

For more information click here




1999 Season Report - Cuyahoga River

02/08:
The Lake Carriers' Association has posted the 1999 season report for the Cuyahoga River on their homepage.

Click here to view the report





Today in Great Lakes History - February 08

While in lay-up on February 8, 1984, a fire broke out in the WILLIAM G. MATHER's after accommodations killing a vagrant from Salt Lake City, Utah who had started the fire that caused considerable damage to the galley.

On 8 February 1902, ETRURIA (steel propeller freighter, 414', 4653 gt) was launched at W. Bay City, MI. She was built for the Hawgood Transit Company of Cleveland but only lasted three years. She sank in 1905 after colliding with the steamer AMASA STONE in the fog off Presque Isle Light in Lake Huron.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Low Water Continues

02/07:
The water in lakes Michigan, Huron and Erie fell to their lowest levels in decades last year and this summer may be even worse, according to government forecasters. Forecasters predict the level in the three lakes could drop as much as 10 inches below last year's lows by June.

For shipping, the lower water levels mean less cargo per trip and more trips per vessel. This may seem like a benefit to boatwatchers, but for a competitive shipping industry this means higher costs for moving the same amount of cargo. A 1,000-footer will lose 270 tons of cargo for each 1-inch reduction in draft.

Lower water can also change the way a vessel handles. When loaded, some vessels are forced to reduce their speeds in connecting channels as they pass a few inches above the bottom. To travel at normal speeds a vessel would risk touching the bottom. Masters have also had to learn new navigation routes in some of the rivers and docks. Navigation points used for decades are no longer accurate as levels drop.

The lower lakes aren't likely to get much immediate aid from Lake Superior. Snowfall at the western end of the lake is far below normal, particularly in the Duluth area. That means little runoff this spring to raise lake levels. In Michigan snow accumulations are 15 percent to 40 percent lower than the state's 30-year average.

The warm, dry winter kept ice from forming until recently. Without the ice cover, inches of water can evaporate from lake surfaces in a matter of weeks.

Reported by: Dave Wobster




Cort on the Move

02/07:
The Selvick tugs Jimmy L, Susan L, Mary Page Hanna and Sharon Selvick, along with the Bay Shipbuilding tug Bayship expertly moved the Stewart J. Cort from Bay Ship's graving dock on Sunday. Ice around the shipyard was 8" to 12" thick.

When the Cort was placed alongside the Edwin H. Gott it made for an impressive sight. Tied together side by side were the Burns Harbor, Roger Blough, Gott and Cort.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




St. Lawrence Report

02/07:
Going back into service on Feb. 5 was Algosar which departed Montreal for Halifax. She had been tied up waiting for orders since Jan. 15 at section 32.

Under arrest in Montreal since about ten days are fleetmates and sister-ships Mor Europe and Mor U.K. Both vessels are Cyprus flag and are former Soviet ships that were always in regular service between Montreal and Europe ever since they were built in the late seventies. A third vessel, Mor Canada was taken out of that service on July 28 when she departed Montreal for Piraeus, Greece.

At St. Lawrence River ports at the same time are two identical vessels built for Fednav in 1995, the Federal Baffin and Federal Franklin. Federal Baffin anchored off Sept-Iles on Feb. 6 waiting to dock at section 2 of the Iron Ore Co. dock and Federal Franklin arrived at section 102 at Quebec City on Feb. 3rd, her next destination to be Sorel.

According to two different sources, Manitoulin, which is wintering in Montreal will be sailing her last season this year. It has not been confirmed yet by Canada Steamship Lines.

According to rumors, the Alcor will be converted into a tanker at Les Méchins by the Verreault shipyard. Alcor is at Quebec City and now owned by Groupe Desgagnés.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Gemini on the Move

02/07:
The tanker Gemini and U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Neah Bay arrived in Long Point Bay, Lake Erie Sunday morning at 0800 hours. Gemini continued on into Nanticoke for the Imperial Oil Dock and the Neah Bay headed for Erie PA for a short layover.

The two expect to rendezvous off Long Point sometime late today for the return upbound trip.

Reported by: Dave Otterman




First Sign of Spring?

02/07:
The first advertisement of the 2000 season for ship and shore jobs at Lake Michigan Carferry appeared in Friday's edition of the Ludington Daily News.

If interested, you can apply in person or send resumes' to:
Lake Michigan Carferry
P.O. Box 708
Ludington, MI 49431

Reported by: Max Hanley




What Are You Doing This August?

02/07:
In August you and three friends could be cruising the Great Lakes aboard Interlake's Lee. A. Tregurtha. The International Ship Masters' Association Detroit Lodge #7 is offering the chance to win a trip aboard the largest steam powered vessel on the lakes.

This is a short-term raffle and the drawing will be held on July 4 and the trip will take place in August 2000.

Click here for more information and pictures of what could be your stateroom.





Ice Forecast

02/07:
Ice Hazard Bulletin Issued by Environment Canada at 1700 UTC Sunday 6 February 2000.
No ice warning in effect for the next 36 hours.

Lake Ontario... Over the northeastern and eastern shores 9 to 9 plus tenths thin and new lake ice. Open water elsewhere.

Lake Erie... East of Long Point Bay there is a large area of open water except for 9 plus tenths mostly thin lake ice within 10 miles of the southern shore. Fast ice in Long Point Bay and near Buffalo. West of Long Point Bay to Point Pelee 9 to 9 plus tenths new and thin lake ice within 15 miles of the northern shore and 9 plus tenths thin with some medium lake ice beyond 15 miles of the northern shore. West of Point Pelee and in Lake St Clair 9 plus tenths medium and thin lake ice. However there are large areas of open water which formed south of Point Pelee and south of Detroit River.

Lake Huron and Georgian Bay... Mostly open water. Consolidated medium lake ice over the North Channel and in Saginaw Bay and in St Marys River and in the Strait Of Mackinac. Within 25 to 30 miles of the northern shore of Georgian Bay west of Parry Sound 9 plus tenths medium and thin lake ice except for new lake ice forming within 10 miles of the western shore. Within 5 miles of the eastern shore of Nottawasaga Bay and along the southeastern shore of Lake Huron 9 plus tenths mostly thin lake ice. Within 10 to 15 miles of the western shore of Lake Huron 6 to 8 tenths of new and thin lake ice.

Lake Superior... Consolidated thick lake ice in Black Bay and Nipigon Bay and in most of Thunder Bay and west of Pie Island as well as around the Apostle Islands. Strips of thin and new lake ice in the entrance to Thunder Bay and between Thunder Bay and Isle Royale. In southern Whitefish Bay 9 plus tenths mostly thin lake ice. Within 5 miles southeast of the Keweenaw Peninsula 9 plus tenths mostly thin lake ice along the shore. Mostly open water over the rest of Lake Superior.

Lake Michigan... Ten tenths coverage of medium to thick fast ice covered all of Green Bay. Ten tenths coverage of thick ice also extended from Seul Choix Point to Saint Helena Island through the straights. Medium fast ice extended from Manistique to Beaver Island to Little Traverse Bay. One to three tenths thin ice extended from the south end of Beaver Island to Charlevoix. Ten tenths coverage of thin shore ice was observed from Rock Island to Two Rivers. One to three tenths thin shore ice was observed from Two Rivers to Evanston with five to seven tenths coverage from Evanston to Benton Harbor.

Click here for the St. Lawrence River Forecast.

Note: this report is offered for entertainment and should not be relied on for navigation. Please consult Canadian Ice Service for current conditions (subscription necessary)

Area coverage is expressed in tenths
1-3/10's---very open drift ice
4-6/10's---open drift ice
7-8/10's---close pack ice
9-9+/10's--very close pack
10/10's---compact
10/10's---frozen together - consolidated

When ice reaches 6/10's or greater, ships can no longer traverse between floes.

Fast ice--ice fastened to the shore (frozen all the way across)

New Lake Ice----recently formed less than 2 inches (5 centimeters) thick.
Thin Lake Ice---2 - 6 inches (5 - 15 centimeters) thick.
Medium Lake Ice- 6 - 12 inches (15 - 30 centimeters) thick.
Thick Lake Ice--12 - 28 inches (30-70 centimeters) thick.
Very Thick Ice--greater than 28 inches (70 centimeters thick).





Today in Great Lakes History - February 07

The HURON (4) was launched February 7, 1914

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Cleveland Report

02/06:
On Saturday the Coast Guard Cutter Neah Bay left Cleveland at 10am for points west.

The removal of the Huletts on Whiskey Island continues. Two of the Huletts have been partially disassembled with the buckets and upper arms removed. One of the lower frames has fallen partially into the harbor. It is unknown if this was accidental but the forward support has slipped off the dock and is in the water.

The FRIENDS of the Hulett Ore Unloaders have posted pictures of the removal of the Huletts and sharp criticism for the process on their web site.
Click here to visit the web site

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - February 06

The LORNA P. was damaged by fire ignited by a welder's torch on February 6, 1974.

ALVA C. DINKEY was launched February 6, 1909

The HALLFAX was launched February 6, 1962

On February 6, 1904 the PERE MARQUETTE 19 went aground on Fox Point, WI approaching Milwaukee, WI in fog. Engulfed in ice and fog, she quickly filled with water.

On 6 February 1952, LIMESTONE (steel propeller tug, 87'10") was launched at Bay City, MI. She was built by Defoe (hull #423) for Michigan Limestone & Chemical Company. Later she was sold to U.S. Steel and in 1983 to Gaelic Tugboat Co. who renamed her WICKLOW. She is currently owned by Great Lakes Towing who named her North Carolina.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Cruises for 2000

02/05:
The Great Lakes Cruise Company of Ann Arbor, Michigan is offering a Canadian Maritime Adventure reliving French explorer Jacques Cartier's voyage aboard the 330-foot French cruise ship Le Levant.

This fall, travelers can experience the St. Lawrence and the Atlantic Provinces by choosing from three cruise options. Cruises feature a 5-Day voyage from Toronto to Montreal October 7-12; a 10-Day journey from Montreal to Halifax October 10-20; or a combination of both tours for a 13-Day cruise October 7-20.

Cost for the 5-Day cruise starts at $2,290, the 10-Day cruise starts at $4,845, and the 13-Day cruise starts from $5,860. There is also an optional rail excursion available.

The company will also be offering a cruise on the German cruise ship c. Columbus September 13-22, 2000.
Visit www.greatlakescruiseco.com for more information.

Reported by: Tom Gerger




Marquette considers preserving old dock

02/05:
The Marquette City Commission was reported to be forming a committee to consider uses for the smallest of the two partially submerged wooden docks south of the Wisconsin Central Railroad ore dock in Marquette's Lower Harbor, the Detroit News reported Friday. The commission voted to form the committee after several people recommended the docks be preserved. The larger of the two docks, the Spears Merchandise Dock, is south of the ore dock. Using a matching $15,000 Michigan Department of Natural Resources Coastal Management grant, the city has asked engineering firms for reuse proposals. Plans are due at city hall Feb. 14.




Rouge loses $10.5 Million for 4th Quarter

02/05:
Rouge Industries Inc. lost $10.5 million, or 47 cents a share, in the fourth quarter of 1999, reflecting ongoing costs from a Feb. 1, 1999, explosion at a power-generating station. Fourth-quarter sales at the steel maker climbed 11.5 percent to $299.3 million on a 20 percent increase in steel shipments. Rouge said the explosion at the Rouge Powerhouse cost the company $221.4 million in 1999, with insurers advancing the steel maker $159 million last year. For all of 1999, Rouge Industries lost $47.8 million, or $2.16 a share, compared to 1998 profits of $23.4 million, or $1.06 a share. Revenues in 1999 fell to $967.6 million from $1.2 billion in 1998, reflecting an 11.8-percent dip in steel shipments and price reductions on steel shipments.

Raw materials for the Rouge Steel facility are delivered mainly by vessels sailing for the Interlake Steamship Company.

Reported by the Detroit News and Rouge Industries




Today in Great Lakes History - February 05

The ASHLAND in a critically leaking condition barely made Mamonel Colombia on February 5, 1988 where she was scrapped.

February 5, 1870 - Captain William H. LeFleur of the Pere Marquette carferry fleet, know as "the Bear" was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Number of Vessels Drop

02/04:
Compared to 1998, fewer new vessels (ocean-going foreign-flag ships under their present names) transited the Seaway locks in 1999, 82 of them vs. 105 in 1998, a drop of 23 ships. 18 of them did not go beyond Lake Ontario ports and 62 of them never transited the Seaway under any previous names. There was a drop in the number of regular callers. Author, photographer and historian René Beauchamp of Montreal reports logging at least 210 names compared to 221 in 1998.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Venture Unloading

02/04:
The Canadian Venture was pulled by McKeil tugs from the north face of Pier 51 in Toronto to the Redpath Sugar dock in Toronto on Friday Jan. 28th to begin unloading her storage load of sugar. Initially docked stern first at Redpath she was turned around on Tuesday Feb. 1 (bow first).

The current Great Lakes ships are too long for the dock as it was originally designed with pre St. Lawrence Seaway "canallers" in service. The unloading cranes can only unload half of a modern day ship at a time.

Reported by: Jim Fitzgerald




Salties to the Breakers

02/04:
According to the January edition of "Marine News" published by the World Ship Society, the following salties are reported as having arrived at shipbreaking yards. They all called at Great Lakes ports under at least one name. Alam arrived at Alang, India on Oct.14, 1999. She sailed the inland seas as Koiteli. Brandenburg arrived at Alang on Oct.26, 1999 having been on the Lakes as Piti Metz and the SD 14 Delight Glory arrived at Calcutta, India on Sept. 12. She visited Great Lakes ports under her two previous names of Splendid Fortune and Catharina Oldendorff. The laker Tarantau is also listed and there a picture of her taken by well-known ship historian Skip Gillham.

Also reported as having been sold to be broken up was the Marindus class Ochimos which was built by Marine Industries at Sorel in 1976 as Poitiers for French owners. She arrived at Alang on Oct.13, 1999. In her career, she had been renamed no less than eleven times and never entered the St. Lawrence Seaway.

In the casualties section of the same publication, there is a fantastic view of Alcor with her back broken on Nov.26, 1999 off Cap Tourmente, QC where she went aground on Nov.9. on the St. Lawrence River. The picture was taken by marine photographer Willem Van Maanen from his vessel, the self-unloader Manitoulin. Alcor called at Great Lakes ports under her former names of Mekhanik Dren and Patricia V.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Today in Great Lakes History - February 04

The two sections of the a) WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY (b PAUL R. TREGURTHA) were joined at Lorain and float-launched on February 4, 1981 as Hull #909.

February 4, 1904 - Captain Russell of the PERE MARQUETTE 17 reported that Lake Michigan was frozen all the way to Manitowoc.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Strike Ends

02/03:
Workers for the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway were expected to return to work Feb. 2 after striking maintenance of way employees and the company agreed to settle their dispute in court.

Maintenance of way employees went on strike Jan. 31 in a dispute over employee time off, and members of other unions honored their picket line. Supervisory workers continued to operate trains during the walkout.

The DMIR serves several taconite plants on Minnesota's Iron Range as well as ore docks at Duluth and Two Harbors.

Reported by: Al Miller




Letter of Intent

02/03:
Monday's St. Catharines Standard reports that CSL Group Inc. has singed a "Letter of Intent" to purchase the Upper Lakes Group's 50% share of Marbulk Canada Inc. Marbulk had been jointly owned by Upper Lakes and Algoma and is based in Salem, MA. They operate a fleet of 8 self-unloading bulk carriers in international trades on the East Coast of North America and in South America, Europe and Asia. The transaction is subject to Board of Directors and regulatory approval.

Reported by: Skip Gillham




Davie Industries Future Uncertain

02/03:
Desgagné Transport, Groupe Ocean and Syntek announced Tuesday in Quebec City that they were withdrawing their bid to purchase the Lévis shipyards. The group had set a deadline of January 31st to reach an agreement with the unions representing the shipyard's workers.

At a meeting held January 9th proposed changes were submitted to the worker's collective agreements. The changes were rejected and it is reported that in a symbolic gesture the documents were burnt in trashcans outside the meeting hall.

The spokesperson for the group indicated that their decision to withdraw the offer to purchase Davie Industries was the failure of an agreement with the unions.

The Shipyards requested legislative protection from bankruptcy at the end of 1999 and this protection expires at the end of April. Unless new interests become available the shipyards will shut down and liquidated.

Reported by: Frédérick Fréchette




Merchant Navy Vets to Share $50M

02/03:
The Canadian Federal Government approved a plan Tuesday that will provide a $50-million tax-free compensation package to merchant navy veterans. The plan will compensate surviving merchant seamen vets or their spouses for benefits they were denied after serving in World War II or the Korean War. The Toronto Sun reports that vets who served more than 24 months will get $20,000; those who served from six to 24 months will get $10,000; and $5,000 will be awarded for one to six months of ship-bound service or less than one month if captured, killed or disabled. Prisoners of war will get an additional 20%.

The article reports that veterans affairs estimates there are at most 7,300 vets and surviving spouses eligible for the package, but veterans' organizations believe the number is higher. To make sure all vets receive a portion of the 50-million , the first checks will only be 80% of the amount owed. If more than the predicted 7,300 vets and widows come forward, then the second checks will be proportionately less.

A toll-free phone line for merchant navy veterans has been set up at 1-800-228-7441.

Reported by: John Stark




Today in Great Lakes History - February 03

In 1960 the Ludington Daily News reported that the S.S. AVALON, formerly the S.S. VIRGINIA, had been sold to Everett J. Stotts of Artesia, Calif.

Data from: Max Hanley



Cuyahoga Engine at the Scrap Yard

02/02:
The 4-cylinder Lentz-Poppet engine that has powered the Cuyahoga since her launch in 1943 is now ready for scrapping at the International Marine Salvage yard in Port Colborne. The engine was removed from the Cuyahoga as a new diesel engine is being installed.

The vessels owner, Lower Lakes Towing of Port Dover, Ontario, had arranged for the classic engine to be preserved. The engine was to be given to a historical organization in New York but a lack of funding to transport the engine by the historical organization saw the end of this arrangement. Left with no other option, Lower Lakes Towing was forced to send the engine to International Marine Salvage.

The Cuyahoga was the last vessel on the Great Lakes with a Lentz-Poppet engine. Her new Caterpillar diesel engine will offer more power, increased efficiency and reliability. This will guarantee the future of the Cuyahoga, a favorite vessel of many boat watchers.

Below are pictures of the Cuyahoga and Saginaw taken last week by Matt Miner

Top of the engine room from the Cuyahoga on the dock.
A crane working at the engine room door of the Saginaw.
View of fleetmates Cuyahoga and Saginaw at dock in Sarnia




Strike at DMIR

02/02:
Unionized maintenance of way workers went on strike Jan. 31 against the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway, a move that threatens to shut down of rail service to three taconite mines on Minnesota's Iron Range.

The dispute centers on employee medical and family leave. It involves 180 employees who maintain tracks, bridges and docks. Members of 15 other unions honored the strikers' picket lines, but DMIR supervisors were continuing to operate trains, the Duluth News-Tribune reported Feb. 1.

The DMIR serves EVTAC, Ispat Inland Mining Co. and the USX Minntac mine. It carries ore 12 miles from EVTAC's mine to its processing plant, and it carries taconite pellets from the three mining companies to ore docks in Two Harbors, Duluth and Superior.

DMIR is owned by Transtar Inc., which also owns USS Great Lakes Fleet.

Reported by: Al Miller




Work on the Clarke

02/02:
Philip R. Clarke, docked at Duluth's port terminal, has been the site of considerable activity since lay-up. On Feb. 1, workers took advantage of mild weather to paint the vessel -- a big job that's been under way for a couple days. Work also appears to be under way in the vessel's engine room -- two temporary ventilation pipes are rigged through deadlights and quite a few workers' vehicles have been parked near the stern in recent weeks.

1) The Clarke's bow gleams in the sun with its fresh coat of paint.
2) Painters push a scaffolding over the ice as they prepare to paint the Clarke's port side.
3) The painters' trucks and a crane are visible in this stern view of the Clarke. Two tin ventilation pipes can be seen rigged through the deadlights just forward of the gangway. It appeared the two trucks at right may have been supplying ventilation and sand for sandblasting inside the vessel.

Reported by: Al Miller




Comeaudoc Unloads Storage Cargo

02/02:
The Comeaudoc began unloading its storage cargo of corn and soya beans Monday morning at Elevator 4 in Montreal and was expect to be finished sometime late Tuesday. The tugs Ocean Jupiter and Ocean Intrepide were expected Wednesday morning to shift the vessel to Jetty 1 where she will be rafted to the Algonorth.

The Quebecois was rafted to the Comeaudoc and will be shifted to take the Comeaudoc's place to have her storage cargo unloaded.

Reported by: Mark G. Morphet




Today in Great Lakes History - February 02

On February 2, 1981 ARTHUR SIMARD grounded in the St. Lawrence River on her way from Montreal to Sept Iles, Que. with a cargo of diesel oil and suffered extensive bottom damage.

The SAMUEL MATHER (6) (a) PILOT KNOB (1) had her keel laid February 2, 1942.

February 2, 1939 - The CHIEF WAWATAM went to the shipyard to have a new forward shaft and propeller placed.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Gemini Heading Upbound

02/01:
The tanker Gemini, owned by Cleveland Tankers, was loaded and upbound in Ballards Reef channel of the Detroit River shortly after noon on Monday. She was escorted by the Canadian Coast Guard's Samuel Risley. The Gemini had loaded at the BP Oil Company dock in Toledo on Sunday.

Reported by: Al Jackson and Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - February 01

On February 1, 1990 the MESQUITE was officially decommissioned.

In February 1951 the b) CHARLES M. WHITE was towed from the James River with two other C4s, LOUIS McHENRY HOWE and SCOTT E. LAND, to the Maryland Dry Dock Co., Baltimore, MD to be converted to a Great Lakes bulk carrier according to plans designed by J.J. Henry & Co., New York, NY.

The steamer R. J. GORDON was sold to M. K. Muir of Detroit on 1 February 1883.

In 1904 the ANN ARBOR NO. 1 found the rest of the fleet stuck in the ice outside Manitowoc. She made several attempts to break them loose, she became stuck there herself with the others for 29 days.

In 1917 the ANN ARBOR NO. 6 (later ARTHUR K. ATKINSON) arrived Frankfort on her maiden voyage. The entire town turned out to welcome her.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




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