Great Lakes NEWS & RUMOR Archive

* Report News


Today in Great Lakes History - March 31

Christening ceremonies took place on March 31, 1979 for the d) CANADIAN PROSPECTOR.

ROGER M. KYES (Renamed b) ADAM E. CORNELIUS) was launched March 31, 1973.

WILLIAM R. ROESCH was renamed b) DAVID Z. NORTON (2) in christening ceremonies at Cleveland on March 31, 1995. The PAUL THAYER was also renamed, EARL W. OGLEBAY, during the same ceremonies.

JOSEPH S. WOOD was sold to the Ford Motor Co. and towed from her winter lay-up berth at Ashtabula, OH on March 31, 1966 to the American Ship Building's Toledo, OH yard for her five-year inspection. A 900 hp bow thruster was installed at this time. She would be rechristened as the c) JOHN DYKSTRA (1) two months later.

J. CLARE MILLER was launched March 31, 1906 as a) HARVEY D. GOULDER. On March 31, 1927, the William McLauchlan (later Samuel Mather (5), Joan M. McCullough, and finally Birchglen) entered service, departing Sandusky, Ohio for Superior, Wisconsin on her maiden trip.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Troubled Waters for the S.S. City of Milwaukee

03/30:
In January of 1998, the Society for the Preservation of the S.S. City of Milwaukee (SPCM) received a new proposed lease from the village of Elberta, to replace the lease which we had from the state which had expired.

Due to the fact that the lease was presented to the SPCM board in a non-negotiable manner--take it or leave it--the board unanimously turned it down.

The SPCM has since been served an eviction notice stating that the S.S. City of Milwaukee, a National Historic Landmark, must be moved by the 10th of April of this year. As a practical matter, the S.S. City of Milwaukee cannot be moved from it's present location by that date.

The SPCM is prepared to move the S.S. City of Milwaukee to the west slip at Elberta, but we need the approval of the Michigan Transportation Commission and MDOT to accomplish this. The endorsement of the Elberta village council would greatly expedite such approval.

In order to move the Elberta village council toward this endorsement, we urge everyone who is committed to preserving this National Historic Landmark to write a letter in support of the SPCM to:
The Elberta City Council
151 Pearson
Elberta, MI 49628
or call:
Gregory Jenks at (616) 352-6325.

Please Visit the Society's home page for more information




Toledo Round up

03/30:
The barge PATHFINDER and tug JOYCE VAN ENKEVORT arrived at the CSX Coal Dock in Toledo at 11:00 AM Saturday. She appeared to have come from Ashtabula, as she approached Toledo Harbor Light from the east. It took her nearly 1-1/2 hours to make the short trip from the Harbor Light to CSX. There was a 40+ mph headwind out of the west and probably some newness on the part of her skipper.

Oglebay Norton's RESERVE began the season by leaving the Torco Docks, up bound, prior to PATHFINDER's arrival. JOSPEH H. FRANTZ is the last boat in winter storage at Torco. Her shutters are still on the pilothouse windows.

BUCKEYE and WOLVERINE are still tied up at the Hocking Valley Dock, but appear about ready to start the season.

AMERICAN MARINER is up on blocks in the Toledo Shipyard drydock. The tug MARY E. HANNAH it tied up outside the dry dock. CANADIAN PROGRESS was the first lake vessel into Toledo this season. She arrived on Monday, March 23 and loaded 30,000 tons of coal at the CSC Docks for delivery to Hamilton, Ontario. MANITOULIN arrived the next day to load grain.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Pathfinder in Cleveland

03/30:
Last week the Pathfinder became the longest vessel to make a trip up the Cuyahoga measuring in at 710'-2" LOA. Last summer the Elton Hoyt 2nd set the record at 698 feet.
Click here for pictures


Reported by: The Interlake Steamship Company




James Norris takes a trip up above

03/30:
The James Norris delivered a load of salt to Soo, Ontario early on the 28th. She delivered the cargo above the locks, at the Avery dock. She then proceeded upbound for cargo. She is not heading for the lakehead, so possibly Thunder Bay. This was her first trip on the upper lakes in quite some time.

Reported by: Dan Sweeley




Twin Ports First Grain Boat

03/30:
The Canadian Leader arrived Duluth March 28th to open the 1998 grain shipping season. The Leader is at Cargill B-1 in Duluth. The Leader is about 2 1/2 weeks earlier than last years first grain boat that arrived on April 14th.

Reported by: Gary A. Putney and Al Miller



Ziema Tarnowska arrives

03/30:
Ziema Tarnowska-POL arrived in Cleveland yesterday at 1404hrs. First Salty of 1998 season.

Reported by: John Whitehead




First Ship arrives in Goderich

03/30:
The CANADIAN OLYMPIC arrived in Goderich on Monday, March 23rd at 10:00 a.m. to open the 1998 shipping season. Captain Austin Peckford was presented with the traditional town`s top hat as the first ship to arrive in the Port of Goderich. This tradition has taken place since 1936. The Olympic arrived from Fisher Harbour and loaded a cargo of salt for Duluth.

Reported by: Philip Nash




First Ship arrives in Thunderbay

03/30:
As reported last week the M/V WINDOC was the first upbound vessel to load a cargo in the Port of Thunder Bay for the 1998 shipping season. Harbour commission board member Jack Masters presented Captain Pitt Schroter,with the ceremonial top hat commemorating the opening of the 1998 navigational season in the Port of Thunder Bay.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Stinson arrives in Duluth

03/30:
George A. Stinson paid a rare call to the Duluth DMIR ore dock March 29. The vessel usually is dedicated to hauling pellets out of Superior.

Other boats scheduled for unusual calls so far this spring include Halifax, due into BNSF ore dock March 31 and Edwin H. Gott, due into DMIR Duluth on April 1.

As mentioned before in the news she is sporting a new paint job in A.S.C.'S colors but she has no stack markings except the painted over lines from her Interlake paint job. The Stinson was headed to the D.M.&I.R. dock to load taconite. She arrived at about 1:30 P.M. and was scheduled to depart at around 11:00 P.M. that same day.

Reported by: Al Miller and Dscout




George A. Sloan fitting out

03/30:
There are still two lay-upees at Frasier Shipyards in Superior. USSGLF'S George A. Sloan and ASC'S John J. Boland. The Sloan although in drydock is showing some life.There is smoke coming from her stack,the shutters are off her pilothouse and some crewmembers are walking her deck. While there is no activity on the Boland. She appears to have no intentions of leaving soon.

Reported by: Dscout and Al Miller




Possible new look for the Mighty Mac

03/30:
Coast Guard Icebreaker Mackinaw made its usual spring appearance in Duluth, arriving March 28 to an appreciative crowd of about 200 people. Docking went well, except for the embarrassed young deckhand who threw a heaving line that wasn't tied to another line. With no ice in the harbor or the western end of the lake, it was a short stay for Mackinaw. The vessel departed March 29.

Dscout reports that while aboard touring the vessel, he was showed a computer renedition of the Mac, but there was something different about it. Sometime this year the Mac will have her hull painted red.This will be the case for all C.G. Icebreakers

Reported by: Al Miller and Dscout




Too Much Water or Too Little Water

03/30:
In October of last year, ships were held up in the Seaway at Massena, N.Y. due to lack of water. The International St. Lawrence River Board of Control's decision to compensate for high water in Lake Ontario left Lake St Lawrence and the St Lawrence River with less and less and an east wind at that time further reduced levels making it necessary for ship traffic to be halted. Now, the Canadian Seaway Authority says high water is slowing ships. The International Joint Commission has refused to reduce water and is maintaining a high outflow which is interfering with shipping. The outflow at Massena is at 361,000 cubic feet per second. 80,000 cfs above normal for late March. When the Seaway was put in, it was designed for an outflow of 310,000 cfs. The IJC's decision to maintain high outflow is based on an emergency measure which has been in effect since early February to reduce the potential for flooding. This measure, criteria [K] can give more consideration to shoreline property owners on Lake Ontario but creates powerful cross currents and water velocity in the channel at Snell locks and makes navigation extremely difficult. Jim Perkins, Chief of Canadian St Lawrence Seaway Authority at Cornwall, Ontario, feels that this criteria should be invoked only when the level of the Lake is near flood stage which he says it is not. Now shipping has had to be restricted to only the most powerful vessels and until the flows are cut, no tankers or ships carrying hazardous materials will be allowed thru and the St Lawrence Seaway Authority is assessing each ship and moving only those felt to be powerful and maneuverable.

The Canadian Seaway may sue IJC if it is held liable by shipping companies for the delays and cancellations. Shippers can assess penalties of up to $1,000 an hour according to Mr Perkins of the Canadian Seaway Authority. Because of the mild winter,the construction industry has been very active and steel plants are running out of iron ore. There is a desperate shortage of raw materials in the Great Lakes states and it is imperative that carge vessels reach their destination. A steel plant in Cleveland, Ohio has had to shut down because of a shortage of materials, Mr Perkins said.

The 1st ship thru the Snell and Eisenhower locks [Canadian Laker ALGOBAY] reported strong currents Thursday but according to Paul Yu, a hydrogeolist with the U.S.Army Corps of Engineers Water Control Section in Buffalo, N.Y., "It was a new ship and had it been an older ship there may have been problems". The IJC plans to cut the outflow to about 325,000 cfs at midnight on Tuesday which is still in excess of the rate considered safe for shipping according to Mr Perkins. [Watertown Times. Friday, March 27th] One cannot help but wonder why the Seaway was opened a week earlier than in previous years when the outflow was not to be reduced until this coming week.[JB].

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




New Wisconsin Maritime Museum exhibit

03/30:
"Wisconsin Shipbuilders: 150 Years," a new exhibit marking the state's sesquicentennial at the Wisconsin Maritime Museum in Manitowoc, Wis., opens 4 April. It will run through 1999. For information, telephone 920-684-0218.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Station to Close

03/30:
After 130 years in Escanaba, Michigan, the Coast Guard will bid farewell Wednesday with a decommissioning ceremony at its local station.

The Coast Guard went to the area in 1867 to maintain the Sand Point Lighthouse. Its mission as a ship guide ended in 1939, when a crib light was installed.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Today in Great Lakes History - March 30

The CHEMICAL MAR arrived at Brownsville, TX on March 30, 1983 in tow of the tug FORT LIBERTE to be scrapped there. The ERINDALE was pressed into service after the LEADALE (2) sank in the Welland Canal. She was towed out of Toronto on March 30, 1983 by the tugs G.W. ROGERS and BAGOTVILLE for repairs at Port Weller Dry Docks. The ERINDALE re-entered service two months later.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - March 29

The PRINDOC (3) was sold off-lakes during the week of March 29, 1982 to the Southern Steamship Co., Georgetown, Cayman Islands and was renamed b) HANKEY.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports offical opening

03/28:
Interlake's James R. Barker "officially" opened navigation at the Twin Ports on March 26 when it arrived light to load taconite pellets at the DMIR dock in Duluth. The ship is bound for Nanticoke, Ontario, with 57,000 tons of pellets made at Evtac (formerly Eveleth Taconite).

Reported by: Al Miller




First Vessel to Thunder Bay

03/28:
On March 26th, the M/V WINDOC was the first upbound vessel to load a cargo in the Port of Thunder Bay for the 1998 shipping season. She tied up at 3:42 pm at the Cargrill Elevator. Captian Pit Schroter and Chief Engineer Bill Keng were to receive honors from the city yesterday. The Paterson was second heading to load at the Richardson's Elevator about 4:30 pm. She was followed by the Agawa Canyon loading potash at Valley Camp. Last of the days visitors was the tug W.N. Twolan and barge McAllister 132, they tied up at the Great western Timber dock and will load lumber.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Regulars return

03/28:
Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior is seeing a return of its most regular callers this season. Columbia Star was due in March 26; followed by Canadian Enterprise and Paul R. Tregurtha, March 28; Walter J. McCarthy jr., March 29; and Columbia Star again March 31.

Reported by: Al Miller




Tug King's Pointer's Pilot House Removed

03/28:
As part of the renovation of the World War II Navy tug, which is to be used with the former carferry City of Midland, her pilot house was removed yesterday. A new raised pilot house will be installed at Ludington.

The engines were being removed from the former City of Midland this past week. As of yesterday, the cylinders and pistons have been removed.

Also, the C&O freight yard control tower was torn down today.

Reported by: Max S. Hanley




Joseph L. Block has Boom Problem

03/28:
On March 11, JOSEPH L. BLOCK, of the Inland Steel Co. fleet, arrived at Escanaba at 9:05 pm and loaded 6,000 gross tons of fluxed pellets produced at Minorca Mine in Minnesota and shipped to Escanaba via the Duluth, Missabe & Ieon Range Ry. and Wisconsin Central, but experienced problems with its conveyor boom and proceeded at 6 am on March 12 to bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon bay, WI. On March 13 the BLOCK returned to Escanaba at 1:35 am, and received the remainder of its cargo totaling 33,500 tons of pellets. At 9:05 am, on March 13, BLOCK departed for Inland's Indiana Harbor steel works.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Proposed Look of the Transfer

03/28:
The March 14 issue of Skilling's Mining Review has proposed side and top views of CANADIAN TRANSFER. The side view shows that CANADIAN EXPLORER's wheelhouse will be removed giving the vessel a "traditional" pilothouse foward, stack aft view.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




High Water

03/28:
St Lawrence water Levels High water levels and strong (dangerous) current flows are creating a need to inspect all vessels in the St Lawrence Seaway system for sufficient power to cope with the flow situation. American interests failed to get the opening of the Seaway put back for a week to reduce chances of flood damage on Lake Ontario. The St Lawrence Seaway Authority is threatening legal action to get the Joint Water Control Commission to reduce water flow levels that are interfering with St Lawrence River shipping.(Montreal Gazette March 27/98).

Reported by: John Whitehead




SSAM Loads 141,006 GT in First Week of Season

03/28:
During the week ended March 14, 1998, the Sault Ste. Marie Bridge Co. (SSAM) loaded 141,006 gross tons of iron ore pellets into four vessels at its Ecanaba facility. Vessels loaded as follows:

JOSEPH L. BLOCK - 33,553 for Indiana Harbor
LEE A, TREGURTHA - 28,334 for Indiana Harbor
JOSEPH H. THOMPSON - 21,351 for Indiana Harbor
JAMES R. BARKER - 57,768 for Ashtabula

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Interlake Annouces Fleet Officers for 1998

03/28:
The assignments of captains and chief engineers to the ships of the Interlake fleet (except PATHFINDER) are as follows:
JAMES R. BARKER -Capt. B. LeffeyCh. Eng. E. Weise
MESABI MINER -Capt. T. DaytonCh. Eng. B. Boehm
PAUL R. TREGURTHA -Capt. M. HallinCh. Eng. R. Liimatta
CHARLES M. BEEGHLEY -Capt. S. BriggsCh. Eng. B. Stambaugh
HERBERT C. JACKSON -Capt. D. BeauvaisCh. Eng. D. Guay
ELTON HOYT II -Capt. J. RuchCh. Eng. R. Cole
KAYE E. BARKER -Capt. A. TeilkeCh. Eng. M. Early
LEE A. TREGURTHA-Capt. J. NuzzoCh. Eng. G. Woods III


Reported by: Dave Wobser




Acomarit to manage six bulk carriers

03/28:
The Glasgow, Scotland, office of Acomarit (United Kingdom) Ltd. has received a technical management contract for six ships affiliated with Canada Steamship Lines Inc.

The CSL Cabo (Liberian-registry 31,364-dwt motor bulk carrier built in 1971) and the CSL Trailblazer (26,608-dwt bulk carrier) are now handled by the New Orleans office of Barber Ship Management Ltd. The CSL Atlas (Bahamian-registry 68,178-dwt, 227.8-meter/747.4-foot motor bulk carrier built in 1990 ) and the Melvyn H. Baker III (38,900-dwt bulk carrier) are managed in-house. The last two ships involved are 71,000-dwt bulk carriers being built in China.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Correction

03/28:
The former name of A.G.Farquharson was Texaco Chief, not Eastern Shell.

Reported by: René Beauchamp and Scott McLellan




St. Mary's River Closed due to fog (updated)

03/27:
The River opened up around 01:30 this morning. But they said it is still somewhat foggy (9a.m.). Visibility was pretty low West of the locks. The Burns Harbor is heading for Whitefish Point this morning.

Reported by: Jill Lucy




Seaway Opens

03/27:
At 6:00 P.M. last night, the Ziemia Tarnowska was heading out of the St.Lambert lock. She had been slow down by thick ice accumulating between the two upper walls. She was helped by the Seaway tug La Prairie. The second ship of the year, Enerchem Refiner was dropping anchor for the night at Pointe-aux Trembles anchorage because of thick fog. She will entering the Seaway once the fog lifts. The Refiner is bound for Sarnia from Sorel in ballast.. Algoeast passed Les Escoumins pilot station last night bound for Nanticoke, Ont. Ziemia Tarnowska is bound for Cleveland and Burns Harbor to unload 18 033 m.t. of steel coils loaded at Ijmuiden, Netherlands. Her agent in Mtl. is Scandia Shipping Agencies.

The first new saltie of the year will be the Bahamas-flag Tecam Sea on the weekend. She did several trips in the Lakes under former names. The first downbound vessel will be Algobay tomorrow. She cleared Eisenhower lock around noon today and is bound for Sept-Iles from Hamilton where she was wintering.

Reported by: René Beauchamp and John Whitehead




Algontario unloading

03/27:
The Algontario, under Captain Richard Whyte, is presently unloading sugar at the Redpath Plant in Toronto. She was taken by tug last week from her Winter layup in Toronto Harbour where she held her sugar cargo in reserve for Redpath.

This Friday she is due to depart for Clarkson to load Cement, then proceed upbound to Duluth. Meanwhile, she is undergoing routine inspections in preparation for the season.

Reported by: Corner House Imaginations




Block to visit lower lakes (update)

03/27:
As reported earlier in the week the Joe Block is due to arrive in Astabula late on the 30th. This will be the first in a series of scheduled visits to the lower lakes. Reports are that the Block and the Wilfred Sykes will make a half dozen or more trips over the season.

Reported by: Danny Ocean




Queen of the Lakes visits Marquette

03/27:
Interlake's PAUL R. TREGURTHA, visited Marquette on Monday with coal from Superior's Midwest Energy Terminal. This trip was most likely her first to Marquette. She was due back yesterday with another load from Superior.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Other Marquette Movements

03/27:
USCG Mackinaw arrived at Marquette lower harbor 3pm yesterday. The Algomarine was loading at the LS & I dock.

Reported by: Gregg Beukema




What will happen to the forebody of the Explorer?

03/27:
When the engine room portion of the M.V. Canadian Explorer is joined to the M.V. Hamilton Transfer the new vessel Canadian Transfer is born (see story dated 3/03). But what will happen to the forebody? Reports are that the Explorer's forebody will be used as a storage barge for Upper Lakes Group.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Algoma Tankers Latest Purchase

03/27:
Algoma Tankers has purchased the M/T A.G.Farquarson formally the Eastern Shell. Her new name will be the M/T Algonova.

Reported by: Danny Ocean




Today in Great Lakes History - March 27

EDWARD S. KENDRICK was launched March 27, 1907 as a) H.P. McINTOSH for the Gilchrist Transportation Co., Cleveland, OH.

Nipigon Transport Ltd. (Carryore Ltd., mgr., Montreal, Que.) operations came to an end when the fleet was sold on March 27, 1986 to Algoma Central's Marine Division at Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




St. Mary's River Closed due to fog (updated)

03/26:
Latest update -- 19:33. Soo Control just permitted the Stewart J. Cort, Canadian Enterprise, and the Presque Isle to proceed to Nine Mile Point. They are moving three boats at this time. Reports are two mile visibility. Soo Control informed the rest of the boats that they will move them as soon as they can. They didn't want all of them to move at same time in case the fog got worse. If the first three got to Nine mile ok, they would let the rest of them move also.

Stewart J. Cort, Cason J. Callaway, Burns Harbor, Canadian Leader, George Stinson, Canadian Provider, Canadian Enterprise, and the Presque Isle are the eight ships affected.

Soo Control closed the St. Mary's River from the locks down to Lime Island in the lower river just shortly before 0930 today due to fog. Stewart J. Cort, Burns Harbor, George A. Stinson, are among several ships that will anchor in the lower river.

Sarnia Traffic (controls traffic in the St. Clair and Detroit River) is informing vessels that the River is closed

Reported by: Jill Lucy and David M. Hall




Pathfinder downbound

03/26:
The PATHFINDER and tug JOYCE VAN ENKEVORT were downbound on the Detroit River with an ETA of 19:38 for Grassy Island, no word on her destination

She is due in Toledo this Saturday for the CSX #4 Coal machine

Sunny and 72 degrees today, too bad I didn't get pictures.

Reported by: Neil Schultheiss and Andrew Severson




Update on the Pathfinder

03/26:
The PATHFINDER did not go to the Beemsterboer Dock for repairs as originally reported, but did arrive at LTV Steel on 3/23 to unload her cargo. Then she shuttled eastward to Bethlehem Steel, Burns Harbor, IN. to take on a load headed for Cleveland. Reports are that most of her trips will take place on that side of the lakes. A tour of the tug JOYCE VAN ENKEVORT at Burns Harbor revels a very nice vessel. Although the crew is constantly busy working out the kinks, she is lacking a fresh coat of paint. She is however outfitted with beautiful crews quarters, lounge area with satellite television, a roomy and clean galley, etc. She has slightly more than 10,000 horsepower, variable pitched wheels and did 14 knots, pushing a load on her maiden voyage.

Click here for a picture of the Pathfinder loading at Escanaba.


Reported by: Kevin Kelley




Joseph L. Block to Ashtabula

03/26:
It is interesting to note that the Block's upcoming trip to Ashtabula is the first time an Inland Steel boat has been down this way since the RYERSON made a few trips to Detroit back in 1989. The WILFRED SYKES also made a trip to Detroit in the fall of 1986.

This is not the first trip to Ashtabula for the JOSEPH L. BLOCK, an old issue of Inland Seas has photographs of her unloading at that port in the late1970s. The Block is scheduled to load at Escanaba on Mar. 28th and arrive in Ashtabula late on Mar. 30th.

Reported by: Ray Bawal Jr.




Bethlehem's Fleet Sails

03/26:
The Burns Harbor departed Milwaukee at 6:00 AM yesterday morning with the Stewart J. Cort following close behind. Both boats are sporting a fresh coat of paint this spring.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Mackinaw Working Portage Lake

03/26:
Houghton, MI - The US Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw will be breaking ice on Portage Lake to the Portage Coast Guard Station at Dollar Bay on Thursday morning, March 26. The Mackinaw will enter Portage Lake via the lower entry, proceed to the station, and then turn around and head back out, the time should be around 0700 to 0830. Ice on the lake is still about l2 inches thick in some places. The public is invited to come to the station and watch the procedure, this by Chief Brian Williams, of the US Coast Guard.

The station's 44' can't get to the lake northbound due to the Portage Lake Lift Bridge being refurbished. This track will allow the 44' to get to the Lake in an emergency.

Reported by: Jim Grill




That's a lot of coal

03/26:
The M/V Paul Tregurtha is scheduled to deliver 61,000 tons of Decker/Spring Creek coal from the Midwest Energy Terminal at Superior, Wisconsin, to Detroit Edison's St. Clair and Belle River Power Plants on Monday, March 30. This will be the first delivery of the 1998 season.

The M/V Walter J. McCarthy is scheduled to deliver 63,000 tons of Decker/Spring Creek coal to the same plants on Tuesday, March 31.

The M/V Columbia Star is scheduled to deliver 63,000 tons to the plants on Thursday, April 2.

Reported by: D. Ocean




Algobay First through Seaway

03/26:
At 7:40 last night the Algobay reported downbound the American Narrows at Rock Island light. Being the first ship of the new season, all residents of Fishers Landing, NY were very excited. A sure sign of spring!!

Reported by: Nancy Heberger




News from the Seaway

03/26:
Ziemia Tarnowska tied up at the lower wall of the St. Lambert lock the night of March 24 instead of going to the anchorage as reported previously by the Port of Montreal. A bit of history on ZIEMIA TARNOWSKA. She is a regular visitor to Great Lakes ports since she was built in l985. Last year, she completed three trips. She is owned by Polish Steamship Co. of Szczecin, Poland and is managed by Polsteam Oceantramp Ltd. She was launched as Pomorze Zachodnie. More details in "Seaway Ships 1997".

For the opening of the Seaway today, rain is forecast. Reports are that the buoy tender Tracy has postponed its trip up the Seaway until this morning.

The new tanker acquired by Desganes/Petro-Nav is on her way to Quebec City with her new name of Petrolia Desgagnes. She was renamed at Goteborg, Sweden.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




U.S. Coast Guard seeking committee members

03/26:
The U.S. Coast Guard is seeking applicants to serve on its Merchant Marine Personnel Advisory Committee, a 19-member group that studies training, qualification and licensing requirements for U.S. maritime industry personnel. The deadline is 6 April. Telephone 800-842-8740 extension 7-6890 or 202-267-0214 or fax 202-267-4570.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Emergency spill response firms to co-ordinate

03/26:
Marine Response Alliance and Marine Spill Response Corp. have signed a memorandum of understanding to co-ordinate emergency spill response services for clients of the two businesses. Marine Response Alliance provides emergency towing, salvage, firefighting and environmental response around the continental United States including the Great Lakes, Alaska, Hawaii and the Carribean by serving as a central point for Crowley Marine Services Inc., Marine Pollution Control, Moran Services Corp., Williams Fire and Hazard Control and others. Marine Spill Reponse provides petroleum spill response along the U.S. coastline, Hawaii and the Carribean.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Davie Industries said to reject offer

03/26:
Davie Industries Inc. has reportedly responded to an offer by Royal Millennia Group Ltd. by stating that the company is not for sale on its own. Rumors have suggested that this may be because its parent, Dominion Bridge Corp., is to be sold soon. Royal Millennia Group offered U.S.$10 million in cash for Davie Industries at Levis, Quebec.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Biggest contract CSL has awarded in its 152-year history

03/26:
(St. Catharines, Ont.) – March 24, 1998 – Canada Steamship Lines Inc., Montreal, Que. is embarking on a major fleet revitalization program, and has awarded a contract valued at approximately $100 million to Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd., St. Catharines, Ont. for the construction of up to five new forebodies for their existing fleet of Great Lakes vessels. The announcement was made today by Canada Steamship Lines President Ray Johnston.

This major ship-rebuilding project involves constructing a complete new forward end of each vessel, from forward of the engine room to the bow, and joining the existing aft-end, which includes the engine room and accommodation block. The vessels will be constructed at the Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering shipyard, Port Weller Dry Docks, St. Catharines, Ont. This contract will ensure work for approximately 300 employees on a year-round basis at Port Weller Dry Docks for the next three years, and potentially for five years.

The project will be a firm contract for three vessels for delivery in the spring of 1999, 2000, and 2001, and will allow for an option for two further vessels for delivery in 2002 and 2003. The CSL vessels targeted for replacement forebodies are all self-unloaders, the first of which will be the J. W. McGiffin.

Describing the $100 million project as one of the most significant investments the 152-year-old company has ever made, Johnston said that it demonstrates "CSL's firm commitment to our customers, our employees, and the Great Lakes trade as a whole. We believe that it will give us a competitive edge for the foreseeable future." Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering, through its Port Weller facility, won the contract over rival Canadian and American shipyards, said the CSL president. "CSE offered the best package," said Johnston. "Their price, their ability to meet delivery dates, their commitment to quality standards, and the existence of a labor agreement at the shipyard for the entire length of the project were all contributing factors."

Johnston's comments were endorsed by Alan Thoms, President, Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering, who explained, "This contract could not have been possible without the recent five-year agreement between Port Weller and its unionized employees, Local 680 of the Boilermakers and Local 303 of the Electrical Workers unions, and our $5 million investment in state-of-the-art technology. These, together with ISO 9002 quality certification, continuous trade training, self-directed work teams, and unprecedented co-operation between management, staff and unionized employees made this contract possible." All five vessels in the CSL fleet renewal program are 222.5 metres (730-feet) in overall length with a beam of 23.12 metres (76 feet). As part of the restructuring program, the self-unloaders will be extended to 225.5 metres (740 feet) long and 23.8 metres (78 feet) wide.

The new forebody was designed by CSE Marine Services, in conjunction with Canal Marine and Port Weller Dry Docks. While design and engineering have been underway for some time, actual forebody building on the J. W. McGiffin is scheduled to commence in June.

The new hull will be fabricated in the Port Weller assembly shops and erected in the building dock. When completed, it will be towed to the tie-up wall adjacent to the dry dock. The J. W. McGiffin will then be floated into the dock and the forebody separated from the stern, and floated out of the dock. The new hull will then be brought into the dock and joined to the stern.

"This ship restructuring program will successfully bring together what the CSE organization has been preparing for in recent years, and reflects the new teamwork, skill, efficiency, and technology of our company," said Thoms. "We are now better equipped to continue to serve the shipping companies on the Great Lakes who have consistently supported the dry docks at Port Weller and Pascol Engineering, and our industrial fabrication division, which is available for additional contract work."

Established in 1946, Port Weller Dry Docks is a division of Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd., and is the only Canadian shipbuilder on the Great Lakes.

Reported by: Roger Tottman and James Neumiller




Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Green Bay

03/26:
A recruiting representative from the Great Lakes Maritime Academy will be in Green Bay, Wisconsin on Thursday, April 2nd. Anyone interested in learning more more about the Academy and a career as a Great Lakes ship's officer is invited to attend an informational seminar at the Days Inn Downtown-City Centre from 7-9pm. Call 1-800-748-0566 ext. 1200 for more information.

Reported by: Gary Schweitzer




Lake Champlain is no Great Lake

03/26:
There are again 5 Great Lakes....not six. The U.S Senate conceded Tuesday undoing a recent vote that flew in the face of what every schoolkid knows. Senator Patrick Leahy, Democrat from Vermont who engineered the elevation of Lake Champlain to a Great Lake last month in order to obtain maritime grants underestimated the controversy that hit after President signed it into law March 6th. Lawmakers from the States that border the Great Lakes saw red. Senator Carl Levin, Democrat from Michigan said "This is not just a tempest in a teapot for those of us who live on the Great Lakes, this is a matter of our identity". This issue has been on the front pages of newspapers and editorials across the Great Lakes states for weeks. The Senate yesterday agreed by voice vote to strike the designation of Champlain. The repel is subject to approval by the House and President Clinton. A compromise to this repel will however, permit the University of Vermont to seek money for research on problems it shares with the Great Lakes such as zebra mussel infestation, fish-killing sea lamprey and pollution thru the National Sea Grant program. This, Senator Leahy maintains, was the whole purpose of his original aim and efforts.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




1998 Opening of the Soo Locks (update)

03/25:
The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was first through the locks. She locked through early this moring heading downbound. The Mackinaw actually was allowed through yesterday afternoon before the official opening. She was working the upper river.

The Arthur M. Anderson and James R. Barker were the first upbound vessels to clear the locks.

Downbound through the locks over night was the Elton Hoyt 2nd and Frontenac. This comes from Radio traffic heard on the scanner, there could have been others.

Canadian Olympic cleared locks upbound at 09:00 while the Edgar B. Speer cleared downbound around 10:30.

Twolan & McAllister 132 were also upbound this morning.

Reported by: Scott McLellan




1998 Opening of the Soo Locks

03/25:
As of 11:30 P.M. last night the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was waiting to lock down and open the Locks for the 1998 shipping season. Waiting upbound was the Philip R. Clarke and Cutter Mackinaw. Confirmations and update to follow this morning.




More vessels headed to the locks

03/25:
The Arthur Anderson and the James R. Barker were inbound at DeTour at the mouth of the St. Marys River headed for the Soo locks. They entered the river at approximately 3:15 pm Tuesday.

Reported by: Jill Lucy




1998 Opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway

03/25:
The Ziemia Tarnowska will be the first ship of the season upbound in the Seaway. She enters the Seaway today and will tie up at the lower wall of the St. Lambert lock to wait for official opening Thursday. The second vessel will be Enerchem Refiner if there is no last minute change of plan. The icebreaker Martha L. Black was already out of the Seaway early yesterday morning and was heading for Quebec City in the afternoon. Also scheduled to enter the Seaway this morning was the CCGS Tracy, a buoy tender.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Cuyahoga begins 1998

03/25:
S.S. Cayahoga cleared Port Stanley Lighthouse at 9:30PM March 23/98 bound for Nanticoke, ending winter lay up. The crew reports that they have 123 loads allready booked for the season

Reported by: Ted Coombs




Block to visit lower lakes

03/25:
The Joseph L. Block is scheduled to load at Escanaba on Mar. 28th and to arrive in Ashtabula, Ohio late on Mar. 30th.

Reported by: John Belliveau and Robert Cioletti




Windoc Underway

03/25:
Paterson's Windoc was seen upbound in the St Clair River at Algonac yesterday at 1440 hours. She appeared to be in ballast.

Reported by: Ron Black




Port Weller Drydock lands contract

03/25:
The Port Weller Dry docks received a $100 million contract from Canada Steamship Lines to replace the forebody's on three CSL ships. Reconstruction entails building a complete new forebody from the engine room forward, with options on two more forebody's. The M.V. J.W. McGIFFIN will enter drydock this fall for the reconstruction

Reported by: D. Ocean




First ship into Port Washington

03/25:
The 1998 shipping season at Port Washington, Wisconsin got underway yesterday, with the arrival shortly after noon of the FRED R. WHITE JR. The arrival is one day earlier than 1997, and is only the third time since the early 1950's that a load of coal arrived in March to open the season.

In 1997, there were no vessels from the Oglebay Norton fleet to dock the entire year in Port Washington, one of the smaller coal receiving ports on Lake Michigan. Although Port Washington received over 750,000 tons of coal in 1997, it was not a good season for boat watchers, since most of the cargo came via 1000-footers.

Reported by: Paul Wiening




Marblehead opens Season

03/25:
Marblehead's shipping season opened yesterday morning with the arrival of the David Z. Norton.

In Sandusky, the J. W. McGiffin was expected at 1200 and the American Mariner at 2200 yesterday.

Reported by: Brian McCune




Corrections

03/25:
Last week a story reported that the Atlantic Huron went into a shuttle service between Sorel and Port Cartier after she left her wintering dock at Sorel. She is in fact running between Contrecoeur (not Sorel) and Port Cartier. She arrived againat Contrecoeur earlier yesterday and has to make another trip to Port Cartier as she is behind schedule. Accordingly, she will not be the first canadian vessel in the Seaway in two days. According to sources, the first Canadian vessel will be Enerchem Refiner in ballast from Sorel where she is still "wintering". Look for confirmation sometime today.

The laker which is running between Havre St. Pierre and Sorel is Canadian Prospector, not Canadian Navigator.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Today in Great Lakes History - March 25

HENRY G. DALTON was launched March 25, 1916 for the Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH, the company's first 600 footer.

FRANK R. DENTON was launched March 25, 1911 as a) THOMAS WALTERS.

On March 25, 1927 heavy ice caused the MAITLAND NO.1 to run off course and she grounded on Tecumseh Shoal on her way to Port Maitland. Eighteen hull plates were damaged which required repairs at Ashtabula.

The ENDERS M. VOORHEES participated in U.S. Steel's winter-long navigation feasibility study during the 1974-75 season, allowing only one month to lay up from March 25th to April 24th.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Line up at Soo Locks (updated)

03/24:
The WALTER J McCARTHY JR arrived at the Soo Locks at noon today she will wait at the locks until they open at midnight tonight.

The USCG MACKINAW is upbound in the St. Mary's River, reporting upbound at Mud Lake Junction at 12:15. Coast Guard officials state little ice is in the river and the cutters will be used on as required basis.

The Mackinaw escorted the Philip R Clarke upbound, the Clarke arrived at the lower Poe Lock Pier at 14:50. Both vessels are scheduled to lock through at midnight while the Mackinaw will proceed to lock through into Whitfish Bay. First vessel to lock through and and start the 98 navigational season will be the McCarthy Jr.( to be confirmed)

Reported by: Scott McLellan, Jerry Masson and Lou Lundquist




Season underway in the Twin Ports

03/24:
Shipping on western Lake Superior got under way in earnest March 23, and Superior Midwest Energy Terminal and Taconite Harbor are shaping up as busy ports during the season's first days.

Here's the lineup for Twin Ports vessel movement:
March 23: Edgar B. Speer departing layup for Two Harbors; John G. Munson departing Fraser Shipyards to fuel in Two Harbors, then proceed to Taconite Harbor; Elton Hoyt II depart Fraser Shipyards for Taconite Harbor; Charles M. Beeghly depart Fraser Shipyards for Taconite Harbor.

March 24: Edwin H. Gott depart layup for DMIR ore dock in Duluth. Herbert C. Jackson depart drydock at Fraser Shipyards for Taconite Harbor; Middletown depart Fraser Shipyards to load at Midwest Energy Terminal, then to Taconite Harbor; Paul R. Tregurtha arriving for coal.

March 25: H. Lee White departing layup in Duluth for BNSF ore dock; Roger Blough departing for Two Harbors.

Midwest Energy Terminal has a steady lineup of vessels already scheduled:
Paul R. Tregurtha, March 25, Middletown, March 25, Columbia Star, March 26, Canadian Enterprise, March 27, Paul R. Tregurtha, March 28

Reported by: Al Miller




Fontenac clears Thunder Bay

03/24:
the second vessel of the 1998 shipping season in the Port of Thunder Bay has left port. The M.V. Frontenac departed the Keefer Terminal (her winter layup berth) and went out the South entrance and was heading up the lake to Superior, Wisconsin to load ore. She cleared the South entrance Piers at 2005hrs Sunday evening.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Gemini enters Buffalo

03/24:
The Gemini was spotted out on the lake just off the Buffalo Traffic Buoy at 9AM yesterday. She was heading for the North Entrance and was heading up the Buffalo River to the Mobil docks. It takes about 3 hours to get there with the tug Mississippi in the lead. She is due to start her departure tow at 5 AM today.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Risley working upper St. Mary's River

03/24:
The CCGC Samuel Risley departed her berth at the Roberta Bondar Marina and passed upbound through the MacArthur Lock at 08:45 yesterday and began placing navigation aids in the upper St. Mary's River.

USCGC Kat MAI Bay was underway downbound in the lower St. Mary's River on track maintence

Tug WN Twolin picked up her barge McAllister #132 (wintered at the carbide dock in Soo Mich.)and moved across the river to the Government dock at the Canadian Soo.

Algomarine arrived back at Algoma Steel with another load of ore from Marquette.

Reported by: Scott McLellan and Jerry Masson




Southern Lake Michigan News

03/24:
The JOESPH H. THOMPSON unloaded their third cargo on Friday 3/22 at LTV Steel in Indiana Harbor. The MESABI MINER also discharged her cargo on Sunday at LTV. The PATHFINDER was due on Sunday 3/22, however she went to the Beemsterboer dock in the Calumet River for repairs. The unknown repairs were to take anywhere from 8 to 40 hours to complete, then shuttle over to LTV in Indiana Harbor. Finally the OGELBAY NORTON is due on 3/24 pm. at LTV.

Reported by: Kevin Kelley




Simco working Aids to Navigation

03/24:
The Canadian Coast Guard ship "Simcoe" was busy today replacing winter spar buoys with lighted buoys, in the Brockville area of the Seaway.

According to a recent report in the Brockville Recorder and Times (Ontario's oldest newspaper), Simcoe will be laid up after completion of the spring buoy changeover, until late fall, when she will be activated again to reverse the process. Apparently she is a victim of government cutbacks - smaller vessels can do the buoy maintenance must cheaper.

Reported by: Bob Dingle




Cross Lake Woes

03/24:
Waterways 1, the Maltese-flagged Catamaran owned by Waterways Transportation Services Corp. of Toronto, was confirmed to be in the Verrault Dry Dock in Les Mechins, Quebec.

According to sources who work on the Great Lakes in various capacities, Waterways 1 was delivered to Halifax (instead of directly to Quebec City, as was believed to be originally intended) in early December by a Freighter which was diverted to Lagos, Africa.

The owners attempted to move Waterways 1 from Halifax to the St. Lawrence Seaway in December with the hope of clearing the Seaway prior to the Christmas closure. The ship ingested ice into her water jets, causing severe damage. The ship was salvaged by Verrault Dry Dock and has been there ever since. The Dry Docks Facility confirms the ship being stored there, and states that it is expected to leave when the Seaway opens in the spring.

Waterways Transportation Services Corp. (Waterways) was denied a Coasting License for a foreign-flagged vessel to operate on Lake Ontario. In Decision 57-W-1998 (available on the CTA Website - www.cta-otc.gc.ca) the Canadian Transportation Agency ruled that there was already a service operated under Canadian Flag by Shaker Cruise Lines of Toronto. Waterways proposed operating between Toronto Harbour and the Beacon Inn in Jordan Harbour, near St. Catharines.

Rumours persist that Waterways 1 has accumulated significant charges for use/storage in the Verrault Facility. Waterways is already faced with the required payment of duty and other costs associated with flagging Waterways 1 Canadian, if that is their desired course of action.

The alternative may be to attempt to identify an international Port (U.S. Port) for which a coasting license is not required (but US Coast Guard inspection and approval is required) and Waterways has already made application to the United States Department of Justice, Immigration & Naturalization Service, for permission to operate a service in and out of a U.S. Port. Waterways is following in the wake of Shaker Cruise Lines who have already secured permission and local Office approvals from US Customs, Immigration and the United States Coast Guard (pending) to introduce their service to and from Lewiston, New York.

Waterways had hoped, as was expressed in their original application to the CTA, to introduce service on December 7, 1997. It is unknown when this company will become a cross-lake operator on Lake Ontario and participate in the resurgence of cross-lake ferry travel in that Region started last year by Shaker Cruise Lines.

Reported by: Corner House Imaginations




Today in Great Lakes History - March 24

ALPENA (1) was launched on March 24, 1909 as a) ALPENA (1).

IRVIN L. CLYMER was launched March 24, 1917 as a) CARL D. BRADLEY (1), the third self-unloader in the Bradley Transportation Co. fleet.

The SAMUEL MATHER (4) was transferred on March 24, 1965 to the newly formed Pickands Mather subsidiary Labrador Steamship Co. Ltd. (Sutcliffe Shipping Co. Ltd., operating agents), Montreal, Que. to carry iron ore from their recently opened Wabush Mines ore dock at Pointe Noire, Que. to U.S. blast furnaces on Lakes Erie and Michigan.

PETER ROBERTSON (2) was launched March 24, 1906 as a) HARRY COULBY (1)

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Pathfinder loads first cargo

03/23:
On Saturday, March 21, PATHFINDER arrived in Escanaba on her maiden voyage and loaded taconite for Indiana Harbor. During loading, her tug, JOYCE VAN ENKEVORT, disconnected from the barge and headed to the North Reiss Coal dock for work.

The PATHFINDER was due in South Chicago on Sunday 3/22, however she went to the Beemsterboer dock in the Calumet River for repairs. The unknown repairs were to take anywhere from 8 to 40 hours to complete, then shuttle over to LTV in Indiana Harbor.

Reported by: Rod Burdick and Kevin Kelley




Crews sent home

03/23:
The after end crew of the Medusa Challenger stopped fitout work Friday and were sent home for at least 2 weeks. Major engine work was approximately 80% done when they received word to stop. No doubt the sale of Medusa to Southdown Inc. last week is the reason.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




New Cross Lakes Service

03/23:
Shaker Cruise Lines of Toronto has announced that approvals are in place for the operation of a cross-border, cross-lake service between Toronto and Lewiston, New York. Service will commence in May of 1998 with trips on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays to and from Lewiston.

US Customs, US Immigration and the United States Coast Guard have been nothing short of exceptional, states Shaker spokesman Peter Green. "They have worked with us from the planning stages to ensure our service met all of their requirements. We very much appreciate their input and assistance". Equally helpful have been Canada Customs and Immigration - who have been working with SCL to advise on the development of Shaker's passenger terminal at the foot of Yonge Street in Toronto Harbour.

Service will be launched during the U.S. Memorial Day Weekend and continue on regular schedule until Labour Day.

Shaker also provides service to Port Dalhousie (year-round) and, with town Approval, Niagara-on-the-Lake (Victoria Day to Labour Day).

Shaker Cruise Lines operates The Lakerunner, a 275-passenger converted Marine Atlantic Ferry that can run in all weather. Shaker launches the Toronto-Port Dalhousie service on April 14.

Reported by: Corner House Imaginations




Integrity opens Milwaukee

03/23:
Integrity and Jacklyn M arrived 3/21 to open the port of Milwaukee for the 1998 shipping season.

Also in Milwaukee, the Bethlehem lay-up fleet will be out by Wednesday.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Port of Toledo Vessel Arrivals

03/23:
The first coal boat of the season will be the CANADIAN PROGRESS due at the CSX Docks this morning at 0800. The first grain boat scheduled in will be the MANITOULIN. She was to be headed upriver Sunday evening bound for the Andersons Elevator. The first ore boat due in at the Torco Ore Dock is tentatively scheduled for Thursday 26 March and that will be the JOHN G. MUNSON. The first saltie is due in during the first full week of April.

Reported by: J.R. Hoffman




Algomarine at Algoma Steel

03/23:
The Capt. Henry Jackman departed Sarnia yesterday at 18:00 hours. After a brief stop at Imperial oil, she was headed for Toronto.

Reported by: Doug Macovis




The Salties are coming

03/23:
The first Salty of 1998 direct from overseas and destined for Great Lakes ports is in The Gulf of St Lawrence. The Polish vessel Ziema Tarnowska reported inbound in Cabot Straits off Newfoundland at 0400 March 22 with destination Cleveland Ohio.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Martha L. Black enters Seaway

03/23:
The icebreaker Martha L. Black entered the Seaway on schedule on March 20 going as far as Cote Ste. Catherine and encountering no difficulties in clearing the ice in the canal between Mtl. and Cote Ste. Catherine. She is expected to go only as far as Beauharnois as there is no ice to speak off beyond the two locks there. She might go back out of the Seaway by Monday.

Reported by: René Beauchamp and John Whitehead




Algomarine at Algoma Steel

03/23:
Algoma Central's ALGOMARINE arrived at Algoma Steel in the early hours of March 21st. By noon she had unloaded and was upbound for another load of of taconite at Marquette

Reported by: Scott McLellan




Andrie Opens 1998 Navigation Season

03/23:
Early in March Andrie. Inc. commenced the 1998 navigation season with its tug JACKLYN , and the barge INTEGRITY loading on March 6. The tug.barge unit will be followed by the steamer ALPENA loading its first cargo at Alpena and the IGLEHART on April 1. The M.V.. PAUL H. TOWNSEND is scheduled later.

Officers announced for 1998 are:
INTEGRITY -Capt. Paul KimbroCh. Eng. Tony Crochet
ALPENA -Capt. Riley WardCh. Eng. Lee Betts
IGLEHART -Capt. Seth LockwoodCh. Eng. Tony Favreau
TOWNSEND -Capt. Joseph MauerCh. Eng. James Finch

No word on the E.M. Ford, if there is demand she will sail.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Upper Lakes Shipping Enters the 1998 Navigation Season

03/23:
ULS commenced the 1998 season on March 16 with CANADIAN NAVIGATOR loading ilmenite ore at Havre-St. Pierre for delivery to Sorel. On March 22, CANADIAN PROGRESS is scheduled to leave winter berth at Port Colborne bound for the Conrail coal dock in Sandusky to load coal for Hamilton. Initially the ULS fleet will include 7 self-unloaders and 8 standard bulk carriers for a total of 15 until September when they will be joined by five additional standard bulkers.

In a project at the Thunder Bay shipyard of Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering, the CANADIAN RANGER is being equipped with a new deck belt in addition to structure work.

Captains and Chief Engineers of the full fleet are anounced as:
C-ENTERPRISE -Capt. P.J.GarrickCh. Eng. S. Jastrzemski
C-TRANSPORT -Capt. K.D.MacKenzieCh. Eng. R.B.Grant
C-OLYMPIC -Capt. A.C.PeckfordCh. Eng. G. Smith
C-PROGRESS -Capt. R.L.ArmstrongCh. Eng. M. Cimon
C-CENTURY -Capt. K.M.AustinCh. Eng. D.L.Pauze
JAMES NORRIS -Capt. A.R.SmithCh. Eng. R.W.Turnbull
C-TRANSFER -Capt. E.C.J.SewardCh. Eng. M.C.Desaulniers
C-NAVIGATOR -Capt. K.B.KellyCh. Eng. J.A.Hoogland
C-LEADER -Capt. M.C.LeaneyCh. Eng. C.J.Tremblay
C-PROSPECTOR -Capt. G.E.DesrochersCh. Eng. M.Cormier
C-TRADER -Capt. E.C.J.SewardCh. Eng. J.H.Kerbrat
C-VENTURE -Capt. W.G.R.WheelerCh. Eng. D. Allan
C-MINER -Capt. G.M.GriegCh. Eng. P.L.Schubert-Lock
GORDON C. LEITCH -Capt. F.R.PenneyCh. Eng. L. DesRosiers
QUEBECOIS -Capt. D.L.HurlburtCh. Eng. W.A.Hankinson
MONTREALAIS -Capt. J.J.WakemanCh. Eng. M.C.J.Beauchamp
C-MARINER -Capt. R.A.SchrempfCh. Eng. M.Brassard
C-PROVIDER -Capt. L.A.HarfieldCh. Eng. A.Giguere
C-RANGER -Capt. K.G.HindmanCh. Eng. Y.ELapointe
SEAWAY QUEEN -Capt. E.R.DewlingCh. Eng. G.Mitchell
C-VOYAGER -Capt. C.S.MisenerCh. Eng. L.Ethier


Reported by: Dave Wobser




News from the Niagara Penninsula

03/23:
1. Canadian Leader presently wintering in Toronto is scheduled to open the Welland Canal on Tuesday. Ceremony as usual will take place at the Lock #3 Facility . Leader will be upbound heading for Duluth for first Cargo.
2. Canadian Progress, Transport and Provider all scheduled to depart Port Colborne lay up berths on March 22,23,and 24 respectively. All vessel heading upbound for Coal and Grain.
3. There are no ice problems and all vessel should have a clear run. They may need to shovel some of the 30cm of snow received over the weekend from their decks.
4. The Canadian Prospector departed Montreal on March 16th and will run iron ore from Harve St. Pierre to Sorel until the Lower Seaway opens.
This is a very early start and again no ice was encountered.

Reported by: D. Ocean




Update on the City of Midland

03/23:
Reports from Muskegon over the weekend show that the rest of her superstructure has been removed, as have the boilers. The engines are going to be disassembled, then removed in pieces. There are some parties interested in some of the engine parts, so they won't be re-assembled.

The tentative date for the towing of the barge to Sturgeon Bay is April 15th, weather permitting.

Reported by: Max S. Hanley




More on the sale of Inland Steel

03/23:
Inland Steel Industries Inc., which has been trying to become part of a larger steelmaker for three years, finally got its wish Tuesday, when Ispat International N.V. said it will spend $1.43 billion to acquire the Chicago-based company's steel-producing operations.

But in becoming a wholly owned subsidiary of Ispat--perhaps the most far-flung steel company in the world--Inland will actually become a bigger entity as Ispat turns Inland into the headquarters of its entire North American steel holdings.

Some workers undoubtedly will be cut loose in the merger. Robert Darnall, Inland's chairman and chief executive, noted that Inland has been eliminating about 1,000 jobs a year and suggested that under Ispat, Inland's payroll probably will keep shrinking by a similar rate, largely through attrition.

But analysts said the takeover will better ensure jobs and production at Inland's 9,500-employee mill in East Chicago than Inland ever could as a freestanding firm.

Indeed, Ispat's chairman and chief executive, Lakshmi N. Mittal, predicted that Inland's output could rise by 15 percent within the next three years as Ispat ships more raw steel and iron to East Chicago for processing from its plants in Mexico, Canada and Trinidad.

The deal also appeared to mollify Inland's peskiest shareholder, Alfred Kingsley of Greenway Partners L.P. Once Ispat buys Inland's steelmaking side, the remainder of the company--Chicago-based Ryerson Tull Inc.--will emerge as an independent company.

Kingsley, who has amassed a 9.2 percent stake in Inland, has been pressing Inland to sell off its controlling interest in Ryerson, the nation's biggest steel distributor, since early 1997, and was preparing another proxy fight at the company's May annual meeting.

"What we wind up with is Ryerson Tull, which is what we wanted, and a pile of cash," Kingsley said, which he calculated to come to $18 a share.

The takeover may mark a further speedup in the consolidation of the American steel industry. Already this year, Bethlehem Steel Corp. agreed to buy Lukens Inc. for $740 million, and Northwestern Steel and Wire Co. of Sterling, Ill., has made plans to merge with Bayou Steel Corp. in a $240 million deal.

And one of the buyers could be Ispat. In an interview in the executive suite of Inland's stainless steel headquarters building in the Loop, Mittal said Ispat has the financing to buy another, albeit smaller, U.S. steel company at almost anytime.

His goal is to become the head of the world's biggest steel company. With Inland, Ispat and its siblings under LNM Group move up to become the fourth-largest steel producer in the world, and Ispat will rank second in tonnage in North America, behind only USX Corp.'s U.S. Steel Group.

For Inland's beleaguered shareholders, the deal is almost a dream come true. Despite the biggest bull market in stocks in history, Inland shares have not gone up in value in a decade and had dropped to just $16 in mid-December. Since that low, however, Inland shares have been steadily going up in price, and they leaped to a 52-week high of $29 Tuesday, before closing at $28 on the New York Stock Exchange, for a one-day gain of 20 percent.

Ispat shares incresaed $1.25 to $26, while Ryerson Tull shares hit a 52-week high of $20.37 before closing up $1.50 at $19.62, both also on the NYSE.
Edited fom a story appearing in the 3/18 Chicago Tribune

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Huron Lightship Reunion

03/23:
The Huron Lightship, WAL 526 was retired in 1970 after serving fifty years as an Aids to Navigation on the Great Lakes. She is now permanently moored as a State and National Historical Site at Port Huron, MI All former crewmembers, relatives of former crewmen are invited to contact Chief Hamilton for further information concerning a Summer 1998 reunion at Port Huron, MI.
ENC Neil C. Hamilton Ret
wa2kaf@webtv.net




Lakes visitor involved in collision

03/23:
A saltie which completed a trip in the Great Lakes last year was involved in a collision with another vessel on March l6 according to a loyd's report. The Netherlands flag FLINTERDAM collided with Baltic Carrier which partly sank in the Kiel Canal. FLINTERDAM went to Toledo in April 1997 to unload zinc. Refer to Seaway Ships 1997, page 5.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Rumor round up

03/23:
Happy spring fit out, as with each new season the rumor mill is churning out some good material. Take each story as a rumor until confirmed.
Ryerson: everyones favorite might run 60, lay up 30, run 60, lay up 30. She will be running very few trips to Marquette, most will be to Escanaba. The Block and Sykes might have outside cargos to Lorain this year (good for the boatnerds on the lower lakes).

Reports are that ASC wants, and will get the Cornielus back soon. (rumor goes that Inland procrastinated on the lease renewal just a little too long). Inland might get Boland in exchange, if they want it. Word on the river is that they might not want it, she's pretty ripe.

The Lake Michigan carferry Badger's environmental waiver expires after this season (speculate here).

As of last week, reports are that the Sherwin will sail as a STEAMBOAT. Word is that she is in great shape, all that's needed is to have the bow thruster motor re-installed and a paint job.

Rounding out the rumors for '98 is word that Inland must decide by Aug. 1 if they want Bayship to put a boom on the Ryerson. They are offering a "2 for 1" sale if they do it the same time as the Sherwin.

Reported by: D. Ocean




Today in Great Lakes History - March 23

The National Transportation Safety Board unanimously voted on March 23, 1978 to reject the U. S. Coast Guard's official report supporting the theory of faulty hatches in their EdmundFitzgerald investigation. Later the N.T.S.B. revised its verdict and reached a majority vote to agree that the sinking was caused by taking on water through one or more hatch covers damaged by the impact of heavy seas over her deck. This is contrary to the Lake Carriers Association's contention that her foundering was caused by flooding through bottom and ballast tank damage resulting from bottoming on the Six Fathom Shoal between Caribou and Michipicoten Islands.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Starting the season on a Friday is considered bad luck

03/22:
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. departed Duluth with coal during the night of March 20/21. Officials of American Steamship Company told the Duluth News-Tribune that they would delay the vessel's departure until after midnight Eastern Time to avoid starting the season and the trip on a Friday. Of course, that would still make it 11 p.m. Central Time, where the ship was actually located. No word yet on whether the Fates actually observe the time zones.

Reported by: Al Miller




New owners and the Jones Act

03/22:
The pending purchase of Inland Steel by ISPAT International is raising questions about ownership of the Inland Steel fleet and how that will be affected by the Jones Act. The Jones Act requires U.S. flag ships to be at least 75 percent American owned if they operate between U.S. ports. That clause has left Inland's operations staff uncertain about the future ownership of the company's three ships.

"It's important in our case that before the ownership of the steel companies actually transfers, the ownership of the vessels must be put squarely in American hands to meet the Jones Act requirements," Dan Cornillie, manager of external logistics for the Inland fleet, told the Duluth News-Tribune.

Inland's options include selling the vessels to another fleet and leasing them back, or setting up a subsidiary that's at least 75 percent American owned.

Cornillie said transferring ownership doesn't necessarily mean the fleet's identity would change. Crews also probably would remain the same, he said.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - March 22

The GULF MACKENZIE sailed light March 22, 1977 on her maiden voyage from Sorel to Montreal, Que.

The Canal Tanker COMET was launched March 22, 1913.

THOMAS W. LAMONT was launched March 22, 1930.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Latest on the Pathfinder

03/21:
An update on the Pathfinder, she is now due in Escanaba on Saturday, March 21 ETA l200.

Reported by: Jim Grill




Twin Ports line-up

03/21:
The latest lineup for the start of vessel traffic in Duluth-Superior shows Walter J. McCarthy Jr. departing early March 21 with coal for Taconite Harbor. The vessel is scheduled to return to the BNSF ore dock on March 22. On March 23, Charles M. Beeghly, Edgar B. Speer and John G. Munson are scheduled to depart and the Frontenac is scheduled to arrive.

Reported by: Al Miller




Marquette Loads First Vessel

03/21:
Seaway Self-Unloader, ALGOMARINE, arrived in Marquette at 7 p.m. on March 19 to become Marquette's first of 1998. According to a dock worker, this is one of Marquette's earliest arrivals. ALGOMARINE loaded taconite for Algoma Soo and is due back on Saturday for another load.



Reported by: Rod Burdick




Cutters at the Soo

03/21:
The CCGC Samuel Risley arrived in Soo Harbour and tied up at the Gov't dock yesterday. USCG cutter Sundew was also in Soo harbour at the Coast Guard Base in Sault Michigan yesterday

Reported by: Jerry Masson




Chicago Board of Trade votes on Toledo

03/21:
The Chicago Board of Trade voted 458-51 on 19 March to eliminate Toledo, Ohio, as a grain delivery point. In order to secure approval from the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the board has added new points along the Illinois River. The plan must now be reviewed by the commission.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Review of U.S. maritime industry planned

03/21:
The U.S. Department of Transportation announced 20 March that in a new effort to ensure U.S. water transportation and intermodal connections meet user needs, public expectations and the need for efficient, safe and environmentally-sound transport, a review will be conducted of the U.S. maritime industry. As part of the review, there will be seven regional "listening sessions" to gather information from the industry. A national conference will then be held in the fall. Agencies involved in the effort are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Minerals Management Service, the U.S. National Imagery and Mapping Agency and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The first session will be from 0900 to 1500 31 March in New Orleans at the 1320 Port of New Orleans Place. Meetings will be held at the same time in Oakland, Calif., on 14 April; New York on 21 April; Cleveland on 29 April; St. Louis on 5 May; Charleston, S.C., on 13 May; and Portland, Ore., on 19 May. A summary of each session will be available at (dms.dot.gov) and comments will also be accepeted by contacting the Docket Management Facility, Department of Transportation, 400 Seventh St., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20590-0001.

Questions should be directed to the U.S. Coast Guard Waterways Management Studies and Program Development Directorate at 202-267-6164 or the U.S. Maritime Administration's Office of Ports and Domestic Shipping at 202-366-4357.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - March 21

The CHEMICAL MAR sustained severe damage when sulfuric acid leaked into the pump room while discharging her cargo at the island of Curacao on March 21, 1982. Flooding occurred later and the vessel was declared a constructive total loss.

CLIFFS VICTORY was floated from the drydock on March 21, 1951, three months and two days after she entered the dock, and was rechristened b) CLIFFS VICTORY.

MARLHILL was launched on March 21, 1908 as a) HARRY A. BERWIND.

The GEORGE F. BAKER was sold to the Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland on March 21, 1965, and was renamed b) HENRY STEINBRENNER (3).

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Pathfinder Continues Pioneering Tradition

03/20:
CLEVELAND--When the U.S.-flag self-unloading barge PATHFINDER takes on her first cargo in Escanaba, Michigan, on March 20, the vessel will become the newest generation in a long line of American self-unloaders serving the Great Lakes. The self-unloading vessel was invented for the Lakes stone trade in 1908 and has become the backbone of shipping on the nation’s Fourth Seacoast.

Self-unloading vessels are designed to discharge cargo without any assistance from shoreside personnel or equipment. A series of conveyor belts take cargo from the holds to an unloading boom on deck. The boom is then positioned over the receiving dock and cargo is discharged at rates up to 10,000 tons per hours. Self-unloading vessels permit virtually any waterfront property to become a working dock on the Great Lakes. The PATHFINDER is expected to carry approximately 23,800 net tons of cargo on each of her 100-plus voyages this season.

The 67 self-unloaders flying the U.S. Flag on the Great Lakes make the United States the world leader in this technology. Last year, the U.S.-Flag Great Lakes fleet moved more than 125 million tons of dry- and liquid-bulk cargo, mostly between U.S. ports, or what is commonly referred to as the Jones Act trades. That total easily represents a new post-recession peak for the Lakes Jones Act fleet.

The 606-foot-long PATHFINDER is the former J. L. MAUTHE. Christened in 1952, the ship was designed to carry iron ore to Great Lakes steel mills. At that time, iron ore was shipped in its natural, clay-like state and its sticky composition did not lend itself to self-unloading. The MAUTHE and other "straight-deckers" were unloaded with shoreside equipment. The introduction of pelletized iron ore in the late 1950s permitted application of self-unloading to this, the Lakes predominant trade. Eventually dwarfed by the 13 U.S.-flag 1,000-foot-long self-unloaders built between 1972-1981, the MAUTHE switched to the grain trade, but population shifts and unit trains have so reduced demand for grain on the Great Lakes that the MAUTHE was withdrawn from service in 1993.

Since the Great Lakes are fresh water, a properly maintained hull can have an almost indefinite lifespan. Cleveland-based Interlake Steamship, the MAUTHE’s operator, maintained the ship to await increased demand for grain or other cargos. During the past four shipping seasons, the Lakes stone trade has consistently grown and now approaches 40 million tons a year. In 1997, Interlake awarded a contract to Bay Shipbuilding Company in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, to convert the MAUTHE into a self-unloading barge.

The $13 million project included installation of self-unloading equipment in the cargo hold and on deck and fashioning a notch in the ship’s stern to accommodate the tug that pushes the PATHFINDER. The conversion has transformed a 1952 hull into a vessel technologically equal to a newly-constructed ship at a significantly lower cost.

Until the PATHFINDER, self-unloading vessels have utilized a somewhat V-shaped cargo hold so gravity can feed cargo onto conveyor belts. The bottom of the PATHFINDER’s hold is flat to increase carrying capacity, but since dry-bulk cargos have an angle of repose of roughly 30 degrees, front-end loaders will push the cargo that remains onto the conveyor belts.

The first self-unloading vessel in the world was the U.S.-flag laker WYANDOTTE. Built in 1908, the pioneering unloading system was invented by George B. Palmer, Chief Engineer for Wyandotte Chemicals Corp. in Wyandotte, Michigan. So successful was the system that the 364-foot-long ship was lengthened 60 feet just two years later and remained in service until 1966.

Vessel size on the Great Lakes has increased as technology has permitted. In the 1950s, vessels of 700 feet in length and per-trip capacities of 30,000 tons came to dominate the trade. The opening of the Poe Lock at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan in 1969 ushered in the era of the 1,000-foot-long laker. Eventually 13 of these Lakes behemoths were built. With per-trip capacities of nearly 70,000 tons, a 1,000-footer can haul as much as 3.3 million tons of cargo each season. In terms of efficiency, each 1,000-footer equals the seasonal hauling power of seven 1920’s vintage lakers or a quartet of 1960s-type lakers.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Southdown to acquire Medusa for U.S.$1 billion

03/20:
Southdown Inc. announced 18 March it will buy rival cement manufacturer Medusa Corp. for U.S.$1 billion in stock to form the second largest U.S. cement company. The deal values Medusa at U.S.$61.22 per share. Clarence Comer, currently president and chief executive officer of Southdown, will retain his positions in the new company, which will keep the Southdown name and its Houston headquarters. Comer said that there will not be any plant closings of personnel layoffs in the production area of the company. General and administrative costs will be cut at the corporate level by U.S.$10 million with some personnel reductions.

Southdown will have a strong market in the southeastern United States, according to industry analysts, and will also get Medusa's water transport unit.

The new firm will have a market capitalization of about U.S.$2.7 billion, combined 1997 revenues of U.S.$1.1 billion and net income of U.S.$154 million, excluding one-time charges directly related to the deal.

Under the terms of the definitive agreement 0.88 shares of Southdown will be exchanged for one share of Medusa. The deal will be completed by late June.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Welland Canal Top Hat ceremony Tuesday

03/20:
The annual Top Hat ceremony will officially open the Welland Canal for the 1998 navigation season Tuesday, March 24. St. Lawrence Seaway Authority Acting President Michel Fournier will declare the Welland Canal section of the St. Lawrence Seaway officially open during the 10:30 a.m. ceremony at Lock 3.

The captain of Tuesday's first up-bound ship will be presented with the traditional top hat at a public ceremony at Lock 3 on the Welland Canal in St. Catharines. This marks the 52nd consecutive presentation of the ceremonial Top Hat since its reintroduction after World War II. Following the ceremony, the public is invited to tour the St. Catharines Museum located adjacent to Lock 3. Tuesday's ceremony marks the earliest opening of the Canal since World War II, tying records set in 1980 and 1995.

The 3,700-kilometre St. Lawrence Seaway opened in 1959 and provides uninterrupted navigation nine months each year from Duluth, Minn. and Thunder Bay, Ont. to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The inaugural transit of the original Welland Canal was made in 1829 by the schooner Anne and Jane. March 24th marks the beginning of the canal's 170th consecutive navigation season.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Lee A Tregurtha Departing Rouge

03/20:
Lee A. Tregurtha was departing Rouge Steel about 1:00 A.M. this morning. She is heading upbound to Escanaba for another load.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Canadian Olympic unloads in Detroit

03/20:
ULS CANADIAN OLYMPIC was unloading a cargo of salt in Detroit as of 4:30 PM Thursday. The vessel docked behind the J.A.W. IGLEHART which is still layed up at Lafarge Detroit Terminal.

Reported by: Dan Bora




Season starts in Thunder Bay

03/20:
The first vessel movement of the 1998 shipping season started Wednesday with the departure of M.V. Algomarine from Pascol Engineering (her winter lay-up berth). She was assisted out the North entrance by the tugs French River & George N. Carleton. Algomarine called at 11:15p.m. saying she was raising anchor and heading downbound the lake for Marquette, Michigan to load ore.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Pathfinder now due on Friday

03/19:
An update on the Pathfinder, she is due in Escanaba on Friday, March 20 at 0400 hours. Weather permitting.

Reported by: Jim Grill




Threat of Strike Continues

03/19:
The threat of a strike continues against USS Great Lakes Fleet and Interlake Steamship Company. The agent for USW Local 5000 told a Duluth TV station March 18 that pickets would go up March 23 in Duluth if the fleets go ahead with plans to reduce crew sizes on their 1,000-footers.

According to the TV report, both fleets apparently want to reduce engine room crews to one person. The Coast Guard has authorized the reduction on the GLF boats and has approved a one-year trial aboard the Interlake boats. A Coast Guard spokesman said the vessels could be operated safely with one crewman in the engine room. A proposal to reduce the size of deck crews was rejected by the Coast Guard for safety reasons.

GLF has the Gott and Speer wintering in Duluth while Interlake has Paul R. Tregurtha here.

Reported by: Al Miller




Ashtabula Ships First Coal Cargo of '98 Season

03/19:
Yesterday, the Canadian-flag laker L. R. DEMARAIS was expected to arrive in Ashtabula, Ohio, to load the first coal cargo of the 1998 navigation season.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Vessels Gear Up for Start of Season

03/19:
Coast Guard Cutter Sundew is ready to depart Duluth to work buoys on the lower lakes for the next two weeks.

Algomarine, scheduled to be the first ship into the Twin Ports on March 19, has been canceled. Walter J. McCarthy Jr. is scheduled to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal starting about 9 a.m. March 20, then depart for Taconite Harbor. It's scheduled to return to Superior March 22 to load taconite at the BNSF ore dock. Once McCarthy clears the SMET berth, Paul R. Tregurtha is scheduled to leave its layup berth to load coal, then depart for Marquette. A look at the harbor yesterday shows that steam is up on the John G.Munson, Elton Hoyt 2nd and Middletown.

Reported by: Al Miller




McKeil buys Montreal Boatman

03/19:
It is now official. McKeil Marine of Hamilton recently bought Montreal Boatman Ltd. This company established at least 40 years ago was mostly operating small boats bringing pilots, Seaway inspectors and other workers to ships at anchor at Pointe-aux-Trembles anchorage and other anchorages in the Montreal area. Another company sold at about the same time and operating from the same dock in Montreal at section 115 is MTL Marine Tug Inc. They were operating the tug Escorte formerly named Menasha when owned by the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. of Massena, N. Y. MTL Marine Tug Inc. was sold to Three Rivers Boatman of Trois-Rivières, Québec and last month, Escorte went there, her new base.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Today in Great Lakes History - March 19

CARTIERCLIFFE HALL was launched March 19, 1960 as a) RUHR ORE.

INDIANA HARBOR was launched March 19, 1979.

CITY OF GREEN BAY (2) was launched March 19, 1927 as a) WABASH.

ALFRED CYTACKI was launched March 19, 1932 as a) LAKESHELL (1).

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Ispat International to Acquire Inland Steel Company From Inland Steel Industries

03/18:
Ispat International N.V. announced 17 March it will buy Inland Steel Co. for U.S.$888.2 million in cash. Inland Steel, a division of Inland Steel Industries Inc., is the sixth-largest U.S. steelmaker and combined with Ispat International, a Dutch company, will create the world's eighth-largest steel producer with more than 12.5 million tons manufactured annually. The combined firm will have a revenue of more than U.S.$4.6 billion. Ispat International plans U.S.$100 million in cost savings through increased volume, although job losses and facility closures have not been ruled out.

The United Steelworkers of America, under a labor union contract provision, will get the right to make its own offer to buy Inland Steel.

In late 1996, Inland Steel held merger talks with USX Corp.'s U.S. Steel Group but no agreement was reched. Since then, a major shareholder, Alfred D. Kingsley of Greenway Partners L.P., has pressured Inland Steel to put itself up for sale. Greenway owns about 9 percent of Inland Steel's 48.8 million shares of common stock.

After the deal is completed, Inland Steel Industries plans to merge with Ryerson Tull Inc., a subsidiary in which it owns 87 percent. Ryerson Tull is the largest U.S. metals and industrial plastics service center.

The deal is expected to close by fall with Ispat International paying U.S.$650 million for outstanding stock and U.S.$238.2 million for preferred stock held by the company. It will assume debt including U.S.$230.7 billion to Inland Steel Industries and U.S.$307.9 million in third party debt, for a total value of U.S.$1.43 billion.

It is unclear what the transaction means for Inland Steel's fleet.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Pathfinder due in Escanaba

03/18:
The barge Pathfinder and tug Joyce van Enkevort are due to load in Escanaba some time tomorrow morning. More details as the information becomes available.
Note: I would like images of her first trip for the Photo Gallery if any happens to shoot her.

Reported by: Jim Grill




Canadian Olympic to sail today

03/18:
The Canadian Olympic is to leave winter layup at Sarnia Ontario today, March 18th. She will be the first ship to leave Sarnia this year.

Reported by: Bruce Hurd




Alpena shows signs of life

03/18:
On sunday, the cement carrier Alpena appeared to be getting ready for the season. The shutters were off the windows, the radar was turning and the power plant was running. She is still docked at the Lafarge terminal.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Work Progresses on Tug

03/18:
The tug that will push the City of Midland barge, the King's Pointer is being renovated in Ludington. Among the things they are doing is replacing the pilot house with a raised pilot house, fixing up the crew's quarters (each crew member will have his own room), and work in the engine room. They expect to complete the work in Ludington by the 1st of June. After that, it is going to the shipyard for the rest of the renovation. The tug will be renamed "City of Ludington" and have a crew of 8. The current name of the tug is "King's Pointer" but it says "Krystal K" on her bow.

Reported by: Max S. Hanley




Refit for the Carferry Badger

03/18:
Crews aboard the carferry Badger are repainting all the passenger areas, the lounge and the Upper Deck Cafe' and the staterooms. They are replacing the teal color with a white that really brightens things up. They are putting in new carpeting and tiles, and are permanently fastening down the berths in the staterooms. It looks like every detail is being attended to. Even the coat hooks were removed an polished!

They are very excited about the work they are doing because this is the first major work they have done to the interior since LMC took over.

Reported by: Max S. Hanley




Niagara River Ice Boom being removed

03/18:
The New York State Power Ath. tug Breaker has been making trips back and forth between the Niagara River Ice Boom and the Seaway Pier docks in Buffalo. She pushes a derrick barge containing one section of the boom at a time. There is almost no ice to speak of in Buffalo Harbor.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Seaway Ships 1997 now available!

03/18:
Noted researcher and photographer René Beauchamp announces the 1997 edition of his popular annual Seaway Ships publication. Now in it's 15th year of publication, this is the only publication listing all salties visiting the St. Lawrence Seaway. The book is a wealth of data offering each vessel's dimensions, owners, when and where built, former names, destinations in the Lakes, dates entering the Seaway and type of commodity carried. There is a second list giving a complete report of all the other salties which visited the Lakes in l997. A third list details the Canadian Great Lakes fleets and finally a list with miscellaneous vessels having transited the Seaway is provided. That includes tugs, coast guard ships, naval vessels, sailing ships, passenger ships and several others. All those ships are described. Also included is data giving the names of the first and last transits of the year in the Seaway since 1959, both salties and inland vessels... something not seen in any other publication. 52 pages, 15 photos, 9 in color. Price is $11.80 U.S. including postage.

Click here for more information and ordering instructions





American Steamship buys barge for ocean operations

03/18:
American Steamship Co. has purchased a 168-meter/550-foot covered hopper barge for its first operations outside the North American Great Lakes. The 33,700-deadweight-ton barge, last named the American Gulf V, was built in 1981 and has been laid-up since 1996. It is now being repaired and will enter service in a few months. There are no plans at present to bring the barge into the Great Lakes.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - March 18

ARSENE SIMARD was launched March 18, 1972.

PERE MARQUETTE 21 was launched March 18, 1924.

SYLVANIA was launched March 18, 1905.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Seaway ready to Open

03/17:
The St. Lawrence Seaway will start operation on Thursday March 26. The first vessel expected will be Atlantic Huron owned by CSL. She departed Sorel earlier today after spending the winter months there and having a big overhaul. Until opening day of the Seaway, she will be used in service between Sorel and Port Cartier. Earlier today, March 16, another laker left her wintering dock. That was Canadian Prospector leaving Montreal for Havre St. Pierre.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Hamilton Transfer Moved to Pier 12

03/17:
HAMILTON TRANSFER (Ex-CRISPIN OGELBAY) is presently docked at Pier 12 in Hamilton, Ontario. She shows no signs of the her previous deck cranes. There are several rubber-tired cranes located near her on the pier. It appears that work is about to begin to prepare her for marriage to CANADIAN EXPLORER. Meanwhile, CANADIAN EXPLORER has taken up residence at the steel mill unloading bridge, which was the former home of HAMILTON TRANSFER.

Port Weller Dry Docks currently has ALGORAIL and ALGOWEST in her drydocks. They will need to be cleared prior to the marriage of HAMILTON TRANSFER and CANADIAN EXPLORER.

The question remains, what will happen to the forebody of CANADIAN EXPLORER?

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Minerals to sell limestone unit to Oglebay

03/17:
As story from the March 10th Reuters news page reports specialty mineral producer Minerals Technologies Inc said it would sell its limestone operations in Port Inland, Mich., to mining company Oglebay Norton Co for $30-35 million.

Minerals, which signed a memorandum of understanding with Oglebay, said the companies will determine the final sale price at the deal's closing. The estimated price equals the operation's net book value, it added.

The facility, located on the upper peninsula of Lake Michigan, ships high-grade crushed limestone and aggregate to the construction industry and to lime and steel producers. It booked about $21 million in sales last year.

``This high volume commodity operation no longer complements our long-term strategic vision at MTI, said Minerals' chief executive, Jean-Paul Valles, in a statement. ''It will be a better fit with Oglebay Norton.``

Reported by: James Neumiller




Today in Great Lakes History - March 17

The tanker LAKESHELL (3) reportedly leaked over 21,000 gallons of Bunker C oil into the St. Lawrence River on March 17, 1982 after suffering a crack in her cargo compartment caused by striking an ice floe.

GEORGE R. FINK was launched March 17, 1923 as a) WORRELL CLARKSON.

The PATERSON (1) suffered considerable stern damage during the weekend of March 17-18, 1973 during a gale when the MONDOC tore loose from her winter moorings at Goderich, Ont. and struck her.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Ice cooperating in the Twin Ports

03/16:
Unusually mild conditions caused by El Nino are getting credit for an almost ice-free start to the 1998 shipping season.

"The spring break-out ... is largely a nonevent this year," Lt. Mike McBrady, operations officer of the Coast Guard icebreaker Mackinaw, told the Duluth News-Tribune. "It seems like everyone you talk to cannot remember a year when conditions were this light."

Coast Guard officials report little or no ice in the St. Marys River or on any of the Great Lakes. A recent cold snap has resulted in just a thin layer of ice in the Duluth-Superior harbor.

In contrast, an aerial survey made March 12, 1996, showed Lake Superior almost totally covered with ice.

This year's favorable conditions are expected to mean a fast start to this year's navigation season. "We will see more early traffic because there will not be the delays due to ice, and we should see a faster turn-around depending on the weather," George Ryan, president of the Lake Carriers' Association, told the newspaper.

Algomarine is expected to be the first ship arriving at the Twin Ports on March 19. That will be the earliest start of intra-lake shipping on Lake Superior since 1987.

The first of 14 vessels laid up in the Twin Ports is scheduled to get under way March 20, when Walter J. McCarthy will load at its layup berth of Midwest Energy Terminal with coal bound for Taconite Harbor. After it departs, Paul R. Tregurtha will leave the Duluth port terminal to load at the coal dock with cargo bound for Marquette. It will return to Midwest Energy Resources March 24 for another cargo. The remaining vessels are due to depart between March 23 and April 8.

Reported by: Al Miller




U.S. Seaway pilotage control transferred

03/16:
U.S. Secretary of Transportation Rodney Slater has transferred regulation of U.S. pilots in the St. Lawrence Seaway from St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp., a U.S. government organization, to the U.S. Coast Guard. To make the transfer, Slater revoked the corporation's authority to carry out functions under the U.S. Great Lakes Pilotage Act of 1960 and instead place them with the Coast Guard. Slater also transferred authority to form or modify agreements with Canada under the bilateral Memorandum of Arrangements signed in 1977. On 11 Dec., 1995, regulation of U.S. seaway pilots was transferred from the Coast Guard to the corporation. But on 12 Nov. of last year, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit said the transfer was illegal because U.S. law stated that the secretary could only retain pilotage regulation powers or delegate them to the Coast Guard. With the recent transfer, the Coast Guard will again handle relavant pilotage regulations including rate setting.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Earl W. Oglebay transfer

03/16:
The Earl W. Oglebay has finished her short transfer from the Osborne dock to the LTV plant. At 6am yesterday morning she was upbound on the Cuyahoga and was later seen unloading at the LTV plant. I appears she was returning from Lorain.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Another sign of Spring

03/16:
A recent trip to Duluth over the March Seventh weekend yielded another sign of spring. Locomotives from D.M.I.&R. Railway were busy moving trains of taconite to the end of the dock.

Reported by: Dscout




Today in Great Lakes History - March 16

BUFFALO (3) was launched March 16, 1978.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - March 15

WESTCLIFFE HALL (2) was launched March 15, 1956.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




First Trip for Pathfinder Scheduled

03/14:
Interlake's new barge Pathfinder will be mated with tug Joyce van Enkevort on 3/18/98. Pending successful sea trials the combo will depart for Escanaba week of 3/16/98. Safe sailing!

Reported by: The Interlake Steamship Company




Other Interlake Fitouts

03/14:
James R. Barker - due @ Escanaba 2215 on 3/13/98 Captain Brian Laffey/Chief Engineer Eric Wiese

Mesabi Miner - due to leave drydock 3/17/98 (freshly painted top to bottom) for Escanaba Captain Tim Dayton/Chief Engineer Bruce Boehm

Paul R. Tregurtha - due to depart for SMET on 3/21 Captain Mitch Hallin/Chief Engineer Bob Liimatta

Charles M. Beeghly - due to depart for Tac Hrbor on 3/23 Captain Scott Briggs/Chief Engineer Bryce Stambaugh

Herbert C. Jackson - due to depart for Tac Hrbor on 3/23 (will follow CMB) Captain Dick Beauvais/Chief Engineer Dave Guay. This pending successful sea trials of new stern thruster installation - motor due 3/16/98 at Fraser. (If anyone should photograph the vessel doing donuts, please e-mail)

Elton Hoyt 2nd - due to depart for Tac Hrbor on 3/23 (will follow CMB/HCJ) Captain Joe Ruch/Chief Engineer Bob Cole

Kaye E. Barker - due @ Burns Harbor PM 3/16/98 Captain Al Tielke/Chief Engineer Mike Early

Lee A. Tregurtha - Escanaba, expect depart for Ind. Hrbr 1700 3/13/98 (loading as of 1420 3/13) Captain Jim Nuzzo/Chief Engineer Skip Woods

Reported by: The Interlake Steamship Company




Algomarine scheduled to open Twin Ports

03/14:
Algomarine is scheduled to be the first ship to arrive in the Twin Ports when it comes down from Thunder Bay on March 19 to load at Burlington Northern ore dock.

Reported by: Al Miller




Barker Spotted on St. Clair River

03/14:
As predicted, the James R. Barker was seen upbound in the St. Clair River on Thursday, March 12, 1998 in the early afternoon. She was headed for Escanaba.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Demolition complete

03/14:
Reported broken up lately in Marine News was the Russian-flag FRANK H. BROWN, an unusual name indeed for a Russian ship. She had been built under that name in Montreal in 1965 by Canadian Vickers for the British Yukon Ocean sevices of Vancouver but was registered in Montreal. Upon delivery, she made her only trip ever in the Great Lakes before going to the west coast. She had entered the Seaway on Sept. 12, l965, coming back five days later. It can be assumed she went only af as a Lake Ontario port, probably Toronto or Hamilton. In 1978, her propeller was removed and she was used as a barge. About 1985, was back in service as a ship when operated by the White Pass Transportation Ltd. In l993, removed from regular service and sold to Portofino Ltd. of Panama for operation by JSC "Okeanrybflot" Joint Stock Co. for operation in Russia under the Panamanian flag. About the end of 1994, reflagged to Russia, but again no change of name. On July 21, l997, she arrived at Chittagong, Bangladesh for demolition.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Inland Steel Fleet Schedule

03/13:
JOSEPH L. BLOCK was scheduled by Inland Steel to load 34,000 tons of Empire pellets at Escanaba on March 10. The ADAM E. CORNELIUS is scheduled out on March 24, followed by WILFRED SYKES on March 31. On April 1, EDWARD L. RYERSON, which is one of few standard bulk carriers on the Great Lakes, will enter service for the Empire pellet trade out of the Presque Isle dock in Marquette.

The captains and chief engineers appointed by Inland Steel to its four vessel fleet for the 1998 navigation season are:
JOSEPH L. BLOCK - Capt. Michael Miller, Chief Eng. Robert Baxter
ADAM E. CORNELIUS - Capt. Thomas Martineau, Chief Eng. Basil Friend
WILFRED SYKES - Capt. Raymond Sheldon, Chief Eng. Jerald Berg
EDWARD L. RYERSON - Capt. Ronald Brezinski, Chief Eng. Peter Ilacqua

Reported by: Dave Wobser




News from the Twin Ports

03/13:
Coast Guard Cutter Sundew made its first foray of the new season March 11 to check ice thickness and to limber up its newly refurbished engines.

A recent cold spell has left a thin layer of ice in much of Duluth-Superior harbor, but it isn't expected to last long. Work continues on laid-up vessels. Roger Blough, Edgar B. Speer and John G. Munson are being painted over the winter. The first of the Twin Ports layup fleet is expected to depart March 20.

Reported by: Al Miller




Seafarers sign Inland Lake's crews top to bottom

03/13:
The Seafarers International Union has signed the crews of ILM, top to bottom. Excluded are the Captain, 1st mate, Chief Enginer. The vote was 21-4 for ratification. A complete story to come later as details become available.

Reported by: Dan Ocean




Barker sailing

03/13:
The Kaye E. Barker departed her lay-up dock in the Rouge River yesterday afternoon. Updates to follow today.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Gemini on the Move

03/13:
The tanker Gemini cleared Detour yesterday at 1827 Bound for Toledo Ohio.

Reported by: Dan Ocean




Today in Great Lakes History - March 13

The keel for the IMPERIAL REDWATER was laid March 13, 1950.

On March 13, 1989 the Rouge Steel Co. announced the sale of its marine operations to Lakes Shipping, Cleveland (Interlake Steamship, mgr.).

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




First Vessel at the Soo

03/12:
The Columbia Star is scheduled to arrive at the Soo locks on March 23rd to wait for the opening of the Soo Locks. If she is the first, this will be one of the few times that she has opened the locks.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Wednesday Sailings

03/12:
Three vessels headed out yesterday on their first trips of the season sailing for Escanaba.
J. L. Block from Sturgeon Bay
James R. Barker from Ashtabula
Lee A. Tregurtha from River Rouge (Detroit) She was upbound in the St. Clair River as of Midnight.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Maiden voyage of the S.S. City of Midland

03/12:
The S.S. City of Midland 41 made her maiden voyage to Ludington on March 12, 1941 with 30 carloads of evaporated milk. She was under the command of Captain Charles E. Robertson. She was the flagship of the Pere Marquette carferry fleet, and later the Chesapeake & Ohio fleet until the fall of 1952, when the S.S. Spartan entered service. The City of Midland was removed from service in the fall of 1988 because her boiler mounts were in need of extensive repair, estimated at $250,000. In October of 1997, she was towed to Muskegon, MI were work was started for her conversion to a barge.

Reported by: Max S. Hanley




Work Sessions and Meetings

03/12:

S.S. MILWAUKEE CLIPPER

Several events are planned to raise funds for restoration of the S.S. MILWAUKEE CLIPPER. The first event will our volunteer sign-up this Friday, March 13 at the Muskegon YFCA. From 5:00 to 7:00, volunteers may sign up for various projects and committees. Fundraising items will be available for purchase, including buttons, t-shirts, videos, drawings, and a laminated copy of the ships deck plans.

Our second fundraising event will be Cosmic Bowling at Carousel Lanes. Held in cooperation with the U.S.S. SILVERSIDES & Maritime Museum, this event will take place on Saturday, March 28 from 12:00 noon until 3:00 p.m.. Cost is $15.00 per person (tax-deductible), and proceeds will benefit preservation of both of Muskegon's National Historic Landmarks. Prizes will be drawn, and Clipper fundraising items will be available for purchase. Tickets may be purchased at the U.S.S. SILVERSIDES & Maritime Museum (616-755-1230) or Walt Plant Appliances (616-722-1611).

Our third event will be held in cooperation with the Muskegon YFCA Evening Mens Club. It is a Roast Beef dinner at the Muskegon YFCA, catered by Carlson's Catering. The date is Friday, April 17 from 4:30 p.m.to 7:00 p.m. Cost is $7.00 per person. Clipper fundraising items will be available for purchase. Tickets will be available at Walt Plant Appliances, or from Muskegon YFCA Evening Y's Mens Club members.

S.S. MILWAUKEE CLIPPER postcards should be available this spring. Cards of the S.S. AQUARAMA, S.S. CITY OF MILWAUKEE, S.S. CITY OF MIDLAND, S.S. CHIEF WAWATAM, U.S.S. SILVERSIDES, and other ships will also be available soon.

S.S. CITY OF MILWAUKEE

The Society for the Preservation of the S.S. CITY OF MILWAUKEE has tentatively scheduled two work week sessions for this summer. The first work week will be held from Tuesday, May 5 through Sunday, May 10. The second work week will be held June 30 to July 5. During the work weeks, volunteers will work on various projects aboard the 350 foot railroad carferry. Volunteers must be members of the S.P.C.M., and may stay overnight aboard the carferry during work sessions. This is a unique opportunity to work aboard a historic ship. S.P.C.M. membership begins at $10.00 a year (individual) and $25.00 a year (family). Last year, over 70 members attended our Fourth of July fireworks event. The S.S. CITY OF MILWAUKEE is a National Historic Landmark.




Today in Great Lakes History - March 12

RUTH HINDMAN (2) was launched March 12, 1910 as a) NORWAY.

G.A. TOMLINSON (2) was launched March 12, 1907 as a) D.O. MILLS.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Block to sail today

03/11:
The Inland Steel Motor Vessel Joseph L. Block, is scheduled to depart Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin this morning. She will be bound for Escanaba to open their l998/99 shipping season.

The James R. Barker and Lee A. Tregurtha are both due in Escanaba on Friday, March 13th.

Reported by: Jim Grill




News from the Seaway

03/11:
Latest news about the Seaway opening is that it will be on March 26, depending on water levels above Iroquois lock. As of last year, it will be again the icebreaker MARTHA L. BLACK which will have as duty to clear the ice above St. Lambert lock beginning on March 20. Last year, it was on March 24 that her job in the Seaway began.

According to a newspaper report in today's "La Presse" published in Montréal, the Soulanges Canal might be re-opened to pleasure crafts navigation only , on Oct. 9, l999 to celebrate its official opening in Oct. 1899. It will cost approximately $ 25 millions to repair the locks and lock walls as well as dredging, cleaning ond so on. This waterway is 23 kilometres long and links Lake St. Francois with Lake St. Louis. Four municipalities are bordering it. It is not in operation since 1959 when the St. Lawrence Seaway opened. As you probably know, the Lachine Canal is to re-open for boaters in 2002.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Integrity waits on weather

03/11:
Reports from Muskegon yesterday have the Integrity/Jacklin M. delayed at the Lafarge dock due to the snowstorm. She will wait it out in Muskegon until the weather breaks.

On Monday, weather buoys on Lake Michigan recorded winds sustained at 37 knots and waves reaching 13.1 feet. As of Tuesday night the wind and waves have subsided to around 20 knots and 3-5 foot seas.

Reported by: Scott Golin




New St. Lawerence Canaller model

03/11:
Sylvan Scale Models has just released an HO Scale cast polyurethane resin water line kit of a St. Lawerence Canaller. The kit comes complete with all fittings, and detail parts, and includes etched brass stanchions. There is also a separate mid section for those who may wish to "stretch" their model just like the real ones were after the seaway opened. The company will be releasing a line of Great Lakes Tugboats in HO by the summer, andthey have an HO scale barge available.

Reported by: Sylvan Scale Models




Today in Great Lakes History - March 11

The Keel was laid March 11, 1976 for the 660 ft. forward section of the Walter J. McCarthy Jr.

L'AIGLE was launched March 11, 1982 as a) ERRIA PILOT.

Sea trials were conducted on March 11, 1956 on the LACHINEDOC (2)

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News from Montreal

03/10:
The Canadian Coast Guard hovercraft Waban Aki broke the ice at the entrance of the Seaway. So now, the canal is free of ice from Montreal up to the lock at St. Lambert. Algoeast completed a second trip up the St. Lawrence River last week going as far as Tracy (near Sorel) again docking at the Hydro Quebec plant there. Oddly enough, this dock which is situated near the border of the Port of Sorel is in fact situated within the Port of Montreal limits. Vessels docking there are listed in the Port of Montreal report published on weekdays.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Integrity visits Muskegon

03/10:
The Lafarge ship Integrity/Jacklin M. arrived in Muskegon at 11:00pm on the 8th. The tug/barge docked at Lafarge and is expected to be there through today. Departure times are tentative because of a huge snow storm passing through Muskegon.

Reported by: Scott Golin




Norris to open Canal

03/10:
"The Lightship", the news letter of the Lake Huron Lore Marine Society, reports that the James Norris is scheduled to open the Welland Canal for 1998. This information could change as it gets closer to the March 24th opening date.

Reported by: Lake Huron Lore Marine Society




GOA Report

03/10:
Lake Carriers' Association is joining with other pro-Jones Act interests to praise a General Accounting Office (GAO) Report on the ITC's 1995 study on the Jones Act that claimed the Cabotage law "cost" the U.S. economy $2.8 billion a year. "The ITC study has been a cornerstone of efforts to repeal the Jones Act, but the GAO's findings illustrate the many flaws that make the 1995 study a useless document. Equally important, the GAO's analysis correctly points out that the ITC's failure to include the cost of compliance with U.S. laws were foreign-flag vessels allowed in our domestic trades itself undermines the entire study. Jones Act opponents had hoped that the GAO would reaffirm the ITC findings, but the exact opposite is true."

For more information on the GAO Report, read the news release issued by the Maritime Cabotage Task Force

Reported by: The Lake Carriers' Association




Today in Great Lakes History - March 10

CHARLES E. WILSON was launched March 10, 1973.

The ADAM E. CORNELIUS (1) was renamed b) DETROIT EDISON (1) on March 10, 1948.

FORT HENRY was launched March 10, 1955.

KINSMAN VENTURE was launched March 10, 1906 as a) JOHN SHERWIN (1).

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Opening of Taconite Harbor

03/09:
The first boat of the 1998 season is due at Taconite Harbor on March 21 to unload coal. It will then depart light to load at another Lake Superior port. The first boat to load pellets is scheduled to arrive on March 23 and will be quickly followed by three more boats. All of these vessels will be arriving from winter layup in Duluth/Superior.

Reported by: Mike Cleary




Ferrysburg begings 1998 season

03/09:
Medusa Conquest and Susan W Hannah were in Medusa Cement in Ferrysburg, MI at 1:30pm Friday to open up the season.

Reported by: Steve Vanden Bosch




Activity in Thunder Bay

03/09:
The tugs Point Valor and Glenada broke ice yesterday at their slip and went over to the Keefer Terminal. There the two tugs continued breaking ice and then later in the day turned The M/V Frontenac around at the Keefer Terminal. She is now facing bow out.

Reported by: Ron Konkol Bosch




Laurentian arrives in Muskegon

03/09:
The University of Michigan- Center for Great Lakes/ Aquatic Services- research vessel Laurentian, was docked at the Muskegon Coast Guard Station. The 80 foot vessel looked to be docked with no signs of immediate movement. No arrival time was given but it was sometime after sunset on Friday.

Reported by: Scott Golin




Today in Great Lakes History - March 09

AMOCO ILLINOIS was launched March 9, 1918 as a) WILLIAM P. COWAN.

NOTRE DAME VICTORY (CLIFFS VICTORY) was launched on March 9, 1945, just 42 days after her keel was laid.

WIARTON (2) was launched March 9, 1907 as a) THOMAS LYNCH.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - March 08

EUGENE P. THOMAS was launched March 8, 1930.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - March 07

The ALGOSOO suffered a serious fire at her winter mooring on the west wall above Lock 8 at Port Colborne, Ont. on March 7, 1986 when a conveyor belt ignited possibly caused by welding operations in the vicinity. The blaze spread to the stern gutting the aft accommodations.

TEXACO BRAVE (1) was launched March 7, 1929 as a) JOHN IRWIN (1).

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




First Sign of Spring

03/06:
For the past several days the U.S.C.G. Cutter Bristol Bay and her barge have been replacing lighted aids to navigation in Lake St. Clair. Sure sign spring and the shipping season is coming.

Reported by: Andrew Severson




Port Notes

03/06:
Thunder Bay, Ontario, increased its wheat handling last year by 33 percent from 1996 to 10.2 million tons. Duluth, Minn., handled 4.05 million tons of grain, up from 3.67 million in 1996. Wheat dropped, however, from 2.72million tons to 2.02 million tons. Finally, the Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wis., handled a record 14.8 million tons of coal last year, up from 13.5 million the year before. It has booked 16.5 million tons for this year and is considering adding a second rotary railcar dumper. The terminal would then be able to unload 8,000 tons per hour.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





OSHA seeking committee members

03/06:
The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration is renewing its Maritime Advisory Committee for Occupational Safety and Health. Fifteen members are needed. For information, contact Bonnie Friedman at 202-219-8151.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Recent Vessel Movements

03/06:
Fitting out in recently was the MEDUSA CONQUEST on February 28th, she made a run from Chicago to Detroit. As reported last week, the EARL W. OGLEBAY began shuttling iron ore on the Cuyahoga River February 20th

Reported by: The Lake Carriers' Association




News round-up

03/06:
Lloyd's reported the sinking of the tug Florida Seahorse a few miles off-shore in the vicinity of Atchafalaya Bay, Louisiana on Feb. 26. My researches revealed she had been built in l938 at Sorel by Marine Industries as NIPIGON for Abitibi Power & paper of Toronto. Two sisters had been built at the same time, Magpie and Orient Bay. She was used in the logging industry in the Great Lakes. At some stage in her career, she was sold to McNamara Corp. Ltd., a dredging company based in Toronto. There was no change of name. She was sold foreign in Dec. 1988, again no name change. It was as recently as 1996 she acquired the name Florida Seahorse. Last owners : A & J Towing Inc. Panamanian registry.

The Cyprus-flag bulker Flare which foundered of the coast of coast of St. Pierre & Miquelon in January had been detained at Newport, England for four days in October. There was 13 deficencies according to Port State Control, one of them, port and starboard lifeboat davit blocks badly corroded.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




LCA Testifies In Opposition To Navigational Assistance Tax

03/06:
The following is Testimony given by Mr. Glen G. Nekvasil Communications Director, Lake Carriers’ Association.

SUBCOMMITTEE ON COAST GUARD AND MARITIME TRANSPORTATION HEARING ON FY99 UNITED STATES COAST GUARD BUDGET MARCH 4, 1998.

Thank you very much for the opportunity to address this subcommittee. Lake Carriers’ Association represents 11 American corporations operating 58 U.S.-Flag vessels exclusively on the Great Lakes. During the recently concluded 1997 navigation season, our members and other Jones Act carriers on the Lakes moved more than 125 million tons of dry- and liquid- bulk cargo, the most in any single navigation season since the early 1980s. To put it another way, the 67 ships and large tug/barge units in service on the Lakes last year carried the equivalent of 1/2 ton of cargo for every man, woman, and child in this country in a 328-day shipping season.

To meet the needs of commerce, U.S.-Flag carriers on the Great Lakes have assembled what is incontestably the world’s most efficient fleet of self-unloading vessels. Our largest ships discharge 70,000 tons of iron ore or coal in 8 hours or less without any assistance from shoreside personnel or equipment. To meet the needs of customers who require cargo in smaller quantities, we offer other self-unloading vessels with per-trip capacities ranging from 12,000 to 44,000 tons.

While our members earn their living carrying cargo, the value of Jones Act shipping on the Great Lakes extends far beyond the 67 or so large hulls and 2,500 shipboard billets. The efficient movement of Minnesota and Michigan iron ore supports more than 100,000 steel mill jobs and 8,000 miners in the Great Lakes Basin. The low-cost delivery of low-sulfur coal mined in Montana and Wyoming and shipped from Superior, Wisconsin, keeps industrial and residential electric bills as low as possible. Likewise, the efficient carriage of limestone and cement keeps our construction industry vibrant.

We have many partners in accomplishing this transportation marvel called Great Lakes shipping, but none is more important than the United States Coast Guard. At the beginning and end of the navigation season, it’s U.S. Coast Guard icebreakers that keep the shipping lanes open to commerce. Once the ice clears, it’s the U.S. Coast Guard that places and maintains the Aids to Navigation that keep the ships on a safe course. It’s the U.S. Coast Guard that ensures the safety of navigation by inspecting our vessels and licensing and documenting our shipboard personnel to standards without equal in the international maritime industry. And although our members have not had need of this service for more than two decades, and hopefully never will again, it will be U.S. Coast Guard vessels and helicopters that come to the aid of a foundering ship or crew members who have abandoned a stricken vessel.

As this Subcommittee well knows, the budgetary realities of recent years have forced the U.S. Coast Guard to do more with less. I can assure you that the Ninth Coast Guard District personnel have performed their many missions with the same high level of commitment and expertise, even though their ranks and resources have been reduced in size. In fact, these budgetary pressures may be one of the reasons for the excellent communication between industry and the U.S. Coast Guard — finding new efficiencies is the order of the day in industry as well. We are all now truly in the same boat. Lake Carriers’ Association is deeply concerned that the preceding glowing report will be dimmed in the not-too-distant future by the Administration’s ill-conceived proposal to institute a Navigation Assistance Tax. Although the Office of Management and Budget terms these new taxes User Fees, let’s not kid ourselves. Our industry, and therefore our customers and their employees, will be burdened with additional taxes if this proposal becomes law.

The Navigation Assistance Tax is like the iceberg that sank the TITANIC. At first sighting, it seems small and potentially harmless, but it’s what lies below the waterline that could damage or even sink waterborne commerce on the Great Lakes and other U.S. waterways. In its first full year, the Navigation Assistance Tax would raise $176 million, but what will the next year or years hold? Look at the tax that funds the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund. It tripled overnight and has never come down, even though it is generating a surplus year after year.

The Navigation Assistance Tax should be rejected as poor public policy to start with for it takes too narrow a view of U.S. Coast Guard functions. Earlier, I stated that Aids to Navigation help keep ships on a safe course, but a safe transit protects the marine and surrounding environment. And why must commercial navigation bear all the pain? Aids to Navigation are used by fishermen, pleasure boaters, cruise and gaming vessels, ferries... as well as by government ships, including U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Navy. Since not all the users are included, this new tax doesn’t even comply with the theoretical model for a user fee.

The Navigation Assistance Tax will be applied to icebreaking in FY2000. Again, while U.S. Coast Guard icebreakers do what their name implies, the icebreaking mission is not solely related to commercial navigation. The U.S. Coast Guard also performs icebreaking to prevent flooding, but where’s the bill for riparian dwellers? Again, commercial navigation would be footing the bill for all beneficiaries.

What will be the impacts of this foot-in-the-door tax on Aids to Navigation and Icebreaking? Higher costs for American industry competing on a global basis. Our customers will likely react in one of two ways. They will either switch to Canadian ports to avoid the tax, or switch to a land-based mode of transportation. Yet, let’s not forget that these options are presently available, but remain unused. Why? Because waterborne commerce via American ports is the most cost-effective means of transportation. No matter what option industry pursues, the result is a higher delivered cost for raw materials and goods. That benefits no one.

Our environment will suffer too from these modal and source shifts. Vessels are the greenest form of transportation. Their powerplants burn significantly less fuel and produce much less emissions than trains or trucks. Just to give you an example from the Lakes, were a steel company to switch from vessels to trains, it would take six 100-car unit trains to equal one trip in a 1,000-foot-long self-unloader.

There are legal grounds for rejecting the Navigation Assistance Tax. As my examples illustrated, the tax is not specifically targeted to all users of a requested service, something the Supreme Court has ruled unconstitutional. Nor will the revenue generated be applied to the cost of those services, again a violation of a valid tax or user fee.

But let’s not engage a team of lawyers to debate these points. It boils down to this. Waterborne commerce directly or indirectly impacts the economic livelihood of nearly every man, woman, and child in this nation. That’s why the vast majority of U.S. Coast Guard functions have been funded from general revenues. This Subcommittee and this Congress must retain the policy of funding U.S. Coast Guard missions from general revenues and amend our laws to state that there will be no taxes on Aids to Navigation or Icebreaking. These are services to the entire nation. As our logo says ... NO NAT!

If, for some reason, these arguments have failed to persuade you, then Congress must consider making the Navigational Assistance Tax a fair one. You should direct the U.S. Coast Guard to establish a cost accounting system which determines costs directly attributable to the services commercial navigation needs, and you should direct the U.S. Coast Guard to only provide services the commercial navigation interests ask for. You then should direct the U.S. Coast Guard to develop a means to recover costs from recreational boaters, fisherman, and other beneficiaries of these functions. Somehow, I don’t think these steps will be necessary. I trust this Congress will continue to recognize that U.S. Coast Guard functions are services to the entire nation. All the funds for U.S. Coast Guard services and equipment should be drawn from general revenues. We ask Congress to appropriate full funding to the Acquisition Construction & Improvements Account.

This Subcommittee and Congress can perform another service to the Nation by including $6 million in the U.S. Coast Guard’s budget to develop detailed design proposals for a multi-purpose vessel with heavy icebreaking capabilities to replace the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter MACKINAW. The MACKINAW is the only heavy icebreaker stationed on the Lakes and for 53 years she has kept commerce moving through the harshest conditions. While her hull is still sound, she is technologically outdated and, thus, expensive to operate. The U.S. Coast Guard has concluded that the cost of modernizing the MACKINAW nearly equals the cost of a new build. Furthermore, a new build would be a multi-mission vessel, something no amount of modernization can achieve with the MACKINAW.

I cannot stress the importance of maintaining heavy icebreaking capability on the Great Lakes. During the winters of 1994-96, more than 45 million tons of dry-bulk cargo moved during the ice season. Although this past December and January were virtually ice-free — thanks, we gather to El Nino, this is an aberration. Great Lakes steel mills account for more than 70 percent of our nation’s steelmaking capacity and they cannot be operated efficiently unless they receive iron ore from early March until late January. The requested $6 million will move forward the process of maintaining the icebreaking capability needed on the Great Lakes, and in the long term, reduce Federal expenditures, as the replacement vessel(s) will require less crew and be much more fuel efficient.

Thank you for this opportunity to appear before this Subcommittee. I will be pleased to try to answer any questions you may have.

Reported by: The Lake Carriers' Association




Today in Great Lakes History

EUGENE J. BUFFINGTON was launched March 6, 1909.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Earl W. Oglebay making short run

03/05:
The Earl Oglebay is spending a lot of time in Cleveland. On Monday the 2nd she returned with another load of ore from Lorain. Since Monday afternoon she has been transferring ore from a winter storage area on the Cuyahoga across from the St. Marys Cement dock upriver to the LTV plant. She has made 2 trips so far and runs upriver under her own power and is towed back downriver by a Great Lakes tug. At about 1 mile each direction this may be the shortest delivery run on the lakes.

See for your self, visit the Live CuyahogaCam.


Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Yankcanuck - New Profile

03/05:
When Purvis Marine's Yankcanuck enters service this spring, her familiar profile will be changed. The deck crane installed on the ship when she was built at Collingwood has been removed and is being replaced by a crane recently purchased by Purvis.

Reported by: Scott McLellan




Today in Great Lakes History - March 05

HARRY L. ALLEN was launched March 5, 1910 as a) JOHN B. COWLE (2).

LEADALE (1) was launched March 5, 1910 as a) HARRY YATES (1).

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Escanaba to load March 10

03/04:
ESCANABA: The Escanaba Ore Dock is ready to receive the MV Joseph L. Block, on March l0, at l800 hours to open their l998/l999 shipping season. Scheduled to follow on March l2, is the MV James R. Barker, and the Str. Lee A. Tregurtha. Please check Vessel Passage (Escanaba) for up to date reports.

Reported by: Jim Grill




Offer made for Davie Industries

03/04:
Royal Millennia Group Ltd. has offered to acquire all shares of Davie Industries Inc. from Dominion Bridge Corp. for U.S.$10 million in cash. Davie Industries, founded in 1825, has 1,500 employees and offers vessel and marine structure construction and repair at Levis, Quebec. It has built more than 700 vessels.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





March Entertainment Meeting

03/03:
The Marine Historical Society of Detroit is pleased to announce their second joint meeting with the Lake huron Lore Marine Society to be held on Saturday March 14 at the Port Huron Museum, 1115 Sixth Street, Port Huron, MI; (810) 982-0891. The program for the evening will be presented by Bob Campbell and is entitled "The Soo Secretary with a camera - Ruth Stevens 1954 - 1984". Included will be photo's from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Office in the Control Room/Administrative Building above the Soo Locks. Preceding the program will be a Social Hour, beginning at 6:00 p.m., then dinner will be served by members of the Museum Guild. The program will follow dinner. Tickets can be purchased for $10.00 (U.S.) with checks or money orders payable to "Museum Guild" and sent to the Lake Huron Lore Marine Society at the Port Huron Museum, 1115 Sixth Street, Port Huron, MI 48060-5346. Your canceled check will be your receipt, and deadline for reservations is March 11. While this meeting includes dinner, it does not replace the Society's Annual Dinner Meeting, which will be held Saturday, April 25, 1998 at the St. Clair Inn. Details will follow in the next week.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Today in Great Lakes History - March 04

CECILIA DESGAGNES departed Sorel, Que. March 4, 1985 bound for Baie Comeau, Que. on her first trip in Desgagnes colors.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




More on the Fire aboard Algosoo

03/03:
Statement issued by Tim Dool, Vice President, Algoma Central – Marine Group, 12:30 p.m. March 2, 1997, regarding a fire aboard the M.V. Algosoo March 1:

The cause of a fire aboard the M.V. Algosoo, which was extinguished yesterday, is under investigation. Thankfully, there were no injuries as a result of the fire. No delay is expected regarding the ship's scheduled return to navigation April 1.

Painting contractors were the only people working onboard the ship at the time of the fire. The fire was contained to the self-unloading equipment under the ship's cargo holds. Damage to the ship is limited to two conveyor belts, which are part of the ship's self-unloading equipment, to cabling, and to the lining of the cargo holds. A preliminary estimate of the damage to the Algosoo is approximately $500,000.

The Welland Fire Department and other regional fire departments are to be commended for their excellent work. Their co-ordinated efforts and expertise contained the fire to mid-ship, and then extinguished the fire, which, inside a ship, is a very challenging task.

The fire took place at the Welland Canal Dock #10, where winter work to the ship was underway. The Algosoo is chartered to the Seaway Self Unloaders, St. Catharines, Ont. fleet.

Established in 1899, and with offices in St. Catharines and Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., Algoma Central Corporation (TSE:ALC) owns and operates the largest Canadian fleet on the Great Lakes.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Speculation Over, Contract Awarded

03/03:
(St. Catharines, Ont.) – March 2, 1998 – Port Weller Dry Docks has been awarded a major contract by Upper Lakes Group Inc., Toronto, Ont., to combine two Upper Lakes Group ships into one self-unloading vessel, Upper Lakes Group Inc. President Marcel Rivard announced today. This contract, along with others already underway, will ensure work for 400 Port Weller employees through the end of July. When completed, the newly created vessel will be named M.V. Canadian Transfer.

"Port Weller Dry Docks was selected because of their experience, the excellent quality of their work, and their highly-skilled workforce. They have done conversions like this for us and for other shipping companies before," said Upper Lakes Group Inc. General Manager, Engineering, Eric McKenzie. Port Weller Dry Docks was awarded ISO 9002 certification in early 1997.

According to Port Weller Dry Docks General Manager Charles Payne, in the course of this major renovation, the engine room portion of the M.V. Canadian Explorer, a 730-foot straight deck bulk carrier, will be joined to the M.V. Hamilton Transfer, a 620-foot self-unloading vessel. The cargo hold, wheelhouse, and self-loading system of the Hamilton Transfer will be retained. A new, 24-foot section will be built to join the two ships.

"Comprehensive engineering and steel-cutting work for the merging of these ships will begin immediately," said Mr. Payne. The M.V. Canadian Explorer will arrive at Port Weller Dry Docks April 10, while the forward section of the M.V. Hamilton Transfer will arrive approximately April 20. Work will continue through spring and summer, and the new ship will be completed in August.

The new M.V. Canadian Transfer will be 650-feet in length, with a cargo capacity of 16,000 tonnes, a breadth of 60 feet, and a draught of 26 feet. The ship, which will be owned and operated by Upper Lakes Group Inc., will be recommissioned at a ceremony at Port Weller in mid-August, and will be chartered to the Seaway Self Unloaders, St. Catharines, Ont. fleet.

A division of Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering, Port Weller Dry Docks was established in 1946, and is the only Canadian shipyard on the Great Lakes.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Manistee River Being Dredged

03/03:
The tug Carol Ann of the King Company of Holland Michigan arrived in Manistee on Sunday. The tug arrived with a dredge and 4000 ft. of pipe. The Manistee river was last dredged in 1996 by the Luedtke Marine Co. Dredging should take more than a week. It is rumoured that with this dredging Manistee will possibly load ocean ships with magnesite, which is produced by Martin Marietta Inc. of Manistee. The average depth of the Manistee river is 21' ft. and they are expected to remove another 3 ft. of silt from the river. usually dredging takes place in the summer, but now they will get it done before the shipping season starts.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Today in Great Lakes History - March 03

The keel was laid on March 3, 1980 for the Columbia Star.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Fire aboard Algosoo

03/02:
A fire did extensive interior damage before fire crews from Welland and Port Colborne were succesful in bringing it under control . The fire was reported at approx. 2230 hours February 28th and took several hours to bring under control

This comes almost 12 years after a similar fire aboard the vessel gutted the aft accommodations. On March 7, 1986 a conveyor belt ignited possibly caused by welding operations in the vicinity.

Reported by: T Deming




Possible strike against USS and Interlake

03/02:
Members of Steelworkers' Local 5000 are considering a strike in response to efforts by USS Great Lakes Fleet and Interlake Steamship Co. to reduce crew size aboard their 1,000-footers, according to a story in the Feb. 28 Duluth News-Tribune.

GLF is cutting five positions from the Edwin H. Gott and Edgar B. Speer while Interlake is cutting three positions from the James R. Barker, Mesabi Miner and Paul R. Tregurtha. The story did not report which positions would be cut. Both fleets maintain that advances in technology enable them to cut the positions without compromising safety.

James Mayhew, president of Local 5000, told the News-Tribune that the crew cuts violate basic safety tenets as well as both fleets' contracts with the union.

Mayhew said union members support a strike. The ships are expected to get under way in just a couple of weeks. The Gott, Speer and Tregurtha are all berthed at Duluth's port terminal.

Mayhew was in Duluth to meet with union members and to negotiate with GLF. Although there was little progress, Mayhew told the newspaper that he is hopeful a settlement can be reached. Officials from GLF and Interlake were not available to comment.

Reported by: Al Miller




Port of Toledo update

03/02:
Recently the COURTNEY BURTON was removed from the drydock and was towed back to her layup site at the Lakefront Docks. On Saturday 28 Feb. 98 the FRED R. WHITE JR. entered the Drydock for her 5 year survey,and misc. repairs. She will be in drydock for several weeks. The tanker SATURN remains in the small drydock undergoing misc. repairs. The BUFFALO is still undergoing bow repairs yet,this will be completed in several weeks just in time for her scheduled departure later on in March. Painting crews are presently working on several of the Oglebay Norton vessels around the various dock sites.

Reported by: J.R. Hoffman




Report from Thunder Bay

03/02:
M.V.Algonorth was removed from Pascol's drydock last week. She was assisted off the dock by the tugs George N. Carleton & French River. She was placed at the fit-out dock next to the Canadian Ranger. The S.S. Halifax is now on Pascol's drydock for repairs & inspection. Assisted on the dock by the tugs George N. Carleton & French River.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




King's Pointer arrives

03/02:
The tug that is to be mated with the former City of Midland 41 arrived Ludington early Wednesday morning. The design calls for a raised pilot house to be installed, it is not clear if this will be completed in Ludington or some where else.

Work is continuing on the barge in Muskegon, and they plan on taking it to Sturgeon Bay around the 1st of April. The asbestos removal should be completed by about Wednesday of this week, after which crews will take the rest of her state room off. After that, they are going to remove her boilers and perhaps her engines. This may take place in Ludington if the crain can handle the weight, if not it will happen in Sturgeon Bay.

click here for images


Reported by: Max Hanley




Montreal Port appointment

03/02:
Canadian Transport Minister David Collenette announced 24 Feb. that he has appointed Louise le Bel-Chevalier of Westmount, Quebec, to the board of directors of Montreal Port Corp. Le Bel-Chevalier received a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Montreal and a law degree from McGill University. She retired in 1996 as director of public affairs and customer service for la Commission des Valeurs mobilieres du Commission Quebec after almost 25 years of service. Le Bel-Chevalier has served as a director of la Fondation de l'Hopital Sainte-Justine and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Chicago grain handling in 1997

03/02:
Chicago handled 10 percent less grain last year for 2.279 million tons. But shipments went from 227,541 tons in 1996 to almost none last year due to a dispute with the Chicago Board of Trade and the U.S. Federal Grain Commission that would change shipping points for trading goods.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





U.S.C.G.C. White Lupine decommissioned

03/02:
The U.S. Coast Guard's "White"-class Coastal Buoy Tender U.S.C.G.C. White Lupine (WLM 546) was decommissioned at 1100 27 Feb. at Coast Guard Station Rockland, Maine. It was laid down 28 April, 1943, and launched 28 July, 1943, by Eire Concrete & Steel Supply Co. in Erie, Pa., for the U.S. Navy as the self-propelled covered lighter YF 446. It was commissioned 31 May, 1944, and transferred to the Coast Guard on 3 Sept., 1947. The ship was assigned to Detroit followed by Ogdensburg, N.Y., and was sent to Rockland on 17 Nov., 1967. The vessel will be transferred to a foreign government.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Oglebay Norton announces new CFO

03/02:
Oglebay Norton Company announced that David H. Kelsey, 46, former Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Host Communications, Inc., Lexington, KY and previously Senior Vice President & Director of GE Capital Services Equity Funding Group, Stamford, CT, has joined the Company as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. Kelsey succeeds Richard J. Kessler, Vice President of Finance and Planning and Chief Financial Officer, who has announced his plans to retire. Kelsey will report to President and Chief Executive Officer John N. Lauer, who assumed his position in January.

``David Kelsey brings a well-rounded record of experience and knowledge to our management team,'' stated Lauer. ``His extensive involvement with capital markets, as well as mergers and acquisitions, adds significant strength as we start to grow Oglebay Norton.''

Richard J. Kessler will retire after nearly 30 years with Oglebay Norton. He began his employment as Manager - Financial Analysis in October 1969, and became Chief Financial Officer and Vice President of Finance and Treasurer in 198l. As CFO, he was elected to his current position of Vice President - Finance and Planning in 1995.

Reported by: James Neumiller




Comments sought on incident reporting system

03/02:
The U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Maritime Administration have signed a memorandum to cooperate with the maritime industry in developing a voluntary and confidential incident reporting system. The system will allow the agencies to analyze and disseminate information in an effort to reduce the frequency of casualties, the extent of injuries and property damage and to create a safer and more efficient shipping system and work environment. The two agencies are now seeking individuals and organizations willing to participate in forming the system. At the Coast Guard, contact Lt. Cmdr. Scott J. Ferguson, Commandant (G-MOA), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, Office of Investigations and Analysis, 2100 Second St., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20593. His telephone number is 202-267-0715, facsimile 202-267-1416 and electronic mail address (sferguson@comdt.uscg.mil). Or contact Alexander C. Landsburg, Program Manager for Systems Safety and Human Factors, Office of Maritime Labor, Training, and Safety, U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration, MAR-250, Room 7302, 400 Seventh St., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20590. His telephone number is 202-366-1923, facsimile is 202-493-2288 and his address is (alex.landsburg@marad.dot.gov).

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Emergency passenger vessel plans possible

03/02:
The U.S. Coast Guard announced 26 Feb. that it is considering rules that will require emergency response plans for U.S.-registry inspected commercial passenger vessels operating domestically. The regulations would address emergencies, evacuation, crew training and resources available for response and rescue both on vessels and in their operating areas. The Coast Guard is seeking comments to USCG-1998-3473, as published in the U.S. Federal Register. The notice is available at www.access.gpo.gov/su_docs/aces/aces140.html. Written comments should be sent by 26 June to the Docket Management Facility (USCG-1998-3473), U.S. Department of Transportation, Room PL-401, 400 Seventh Street S.W., Washington D.C., 20590-0001. For additional information, contact Coast Guard Lt. John G. White, project manager, at 202-267-6885 or the Office of Standards Evaluation and Development (G-MSR-2), 2100 Second Street S.W., Washington, D.C. 20593-0001.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - March 01

HENRY FORD II was launched March 1, 1924

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





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