Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News ARCHIVE

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New ship assist contract for Gaelic Tugboat Company

04/30:
Under the terms of a new five year agreement between Gaelic Tugboat Company of Detroit, and Seaway Self Unloaders of Port Colborne, the Canadian Navigator was safely assisted in and out of the Rouge River in Detroit April 27th. The navigator was delivering a load of stone to the Concrete Mix dock just above the Jefferson Avenue bridge, and assisted in and out by the tugs Patricia Hoey (2,200 hp) and the Shannon (2,000).

On April 28th the Canadian Olympic with a load of coal was assisted inbound the Rouge by the tug Patricia Hoey. The Gaelic veteran captains Mac McCarty and Rich Sibbersen were in command of the tugs, and along with their capable crews showed off their talent on two windy days.

Reported by: D.J. Tugnut




Sunny Blossom update

04/30:
The Diamond Star and two Mcallister tugs from Montreal were to arrive at the Sunny Blossom on the morning of 29 April and lightering was to start by mid-afternoon. A boat from U.S. Coast Guard Station Oswego, N.Y., was to provide security while personnel from Coast Guard Marine Safety Detachment Massena, N.Y., were to monitor salvage. As planned, the Sunny Blossom is to be refloated by the afternoon of 30 April, after which it is to be examined at a local anchorage. If released, it is to sail to Sarnia, Ontario, the next day.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Twin Ports Report

04/30:
Twin Ports grain traffic was heavy April 29 with four berths occupied and two vessels waiting to load. Goviken was loading at Concourse; Kinsman Independent and Algosound were at Cenex; and Sarah Spencer/Atlantic Hickory was at General Mills. Mina Cebi and Mita were anchored on Lake Superior waiting for berths.

Reported by: Al Miller




New Dutchman

04/30:
Entering the Seaway Wednesday were two Dutchman within half an hour, both on their first trip, JOHANNES BOELE and VLISTBORG, both built recently.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




William G. Mather featured for Plain Dealer photo shoot

04/30:
The William G. Mather Museum Ship was featured by the Cleveland Plain Dealer for its spring fashion photo shoot. The Mather was adorned with about a dozen beautiful women posing for the camera aboard the ship. Photos were taken from the smokestack ladder to the engine room and all the way across the deck.

Reported by: Mike Reindel




Number killed at sea, ships lost increase

04/30:
The International Underwriting Association of London's Marine Report and Statistics 1998 states that will the total tonnage of lost ships was down last year, the numbers of individual vessels increased. Ninety-six ships of 546,915 gross tons were written off compared to 89 ot 739,164 gross tons in 1997.

Some 359 peopler were killed, half of them in the Princess of the Orient fire in the Philippines. A total of 263 were killed in 1997.

Bulk and combination carrier losses numbered 13, compared to six the year before. Tonnage increased 33 percent to 183,027 gross tons. Six tankers of 35,891 gross tons were lost, compared to 14 of 308,512 in 1997. Seventy-seven other vessels of 327,997 gross tons were lost in 1998 versus 69 in 1997. General cargo shisp numbered 57 lost, with 16 due to weather including three in the Kandla cyclone off India in June. Two other vessels were also lost in the same storm, and 12 others were damaged.

Ten fishing vessels, each more than 500 gross tons, were lost, three in collisions and three in weather.

By age, all but one of the bulk carriers lost was more than 20 years old, including 38 of 57 cargo vessels.

Twelve ships were registered in Panama, 10 in Belize and six each in the Bahamas, Cyprus and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Commission formed to study U.S. port security

04/30:
President Clinton created the Interagency Commission on Crime and Security in U.S. Seaports on April 27 to study threats to the country's maritime infrastructure. Led by Sen. Bob Graham, D-Fla., the commission will suggest improvements for port security in a year in reports to the president and Congress. The commission will include up to 25 members including Secretary of Transportation Rodney Slater, Secretary of the Treasury Robert Rubin and Attorney General Janet Reno.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Correction

04/30:
Reports from Ontario Northland's Owen Sound office say that the company has not purchased the Prince Nova.




Today in Great Lakes History - April 30

The IRVIN L. CLYMER returned to service April 30, 1988 after a two season lay-up.

HOWARD HINDMAN (2) grounded heavily when her steering cable parted at Little Rapids Cut in the St. Marys River, April 30, 1969. Due to the extensive damage, she was sold later in May of that year to Marine Salvage Ltd., Port Colborne, Ont. for scrap.

The RED WING (2) tow arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan on April 30, 1987 for dismantling.

The steel-hulled bulk carrier SHENANGO was launched on April 30, 1909.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Sunny Blossom update

04/29:
A salvage plan for the Sunny Blossom has been received and is now under review. The Canadian-registry tanker Diamond Star and two Canadian-registry tugs from Montreal have been cleared by the U.S. Customs Service to work on refloating the ship. The Diamond Star was to be examined 28 April in preparation for lightering the morning of 29 April.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Twin Ports Report

04/29:
April 28 was straightdecker day at the Cenex-Harvest States elevator in Superior. Algosound was loading in the gallery berth and Kinsman Independent was on the other side in the No. 2 berth.

Edwin H. Gott apparently is now a regular on the taconite run to Nanticoke. It's scheduled to load at DMIR in Duluth on April 29 and set to arrive Nanticoke May 3.

Reported by: Al Miller




Soo Live Cams Returned


Because of your comments left on the Survey page two of the four live cams have been returned! Thanks to everyone for speaking out and getting the cameras returned!

Click here if you would like to comment on the return of the cameras.
Here you will also find comments from the USACE and a link to the cameras





Today in Great Lakes History - April 29

On April 29, 1975, the Sam Laud entered service.

Launched this date in 1976 was the a) SOODOC (2)

On April 29, 1977 while inbound at Lorain, the IRVING S. OLDS hit a bridge on the Black River which extensively damaged her bow, tying up traffic for several hours.

A fender boom fell on the GEORGE M. HUMPHREY's pilot house in the Poe Lock at the Soo in 1971.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Sunny Blossom update

04/28:
A survey of the Sunny Blossom, aground on Allan Otty Shoal southwest of Tibbets Point, has found no damage or flooding, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. The owner has located two lightering vessels and was to submit a salvage plan to governmental authorities on 27 April.

Reported by: Steve Schultz and Ron Walsh




Cause of Grounding of Sunny Blossom Still Unknown

04/28:
The Sunny Blossom is in sight of the Tibbett's Point lighthouse in the village of Cape Vincent, N.Y. The Watertown Times reports that according to Cmdr. Stephen P. Metruck, executive officer of the U.S.Coast Guard's Marine Safety Office in Buffalo, N.Y., the Coast Guard is still investigating why the tanker went aground on the Allan Otty shoal which is about 8 miles from the eastern end of Lake Ontario and beginning of the St Lawrence River. Cmdr.Metruck said there are navigational aids in the area and the vessel was carrying a shipment of caustic soda, also known as sodium hydroxide which is a hazardous material used in the manufacture of soaps and cleaners.

The ship, a double hulled vessel, does not appear to have suffered any structural damage that would present an immediate danger. Representatives of the U.S. Coast Guard, the Canadian Coast Guard and the St Lawrence Development Corporation are conducting a joint investigation into the incident.

It is to be noted that the Sunny Blossom has a history of incidents and deficiencies over the past 10 years as outlined in the Coast Guard's website http://psix.uscg.mil and according to the Watertown Times, there are two recent incidents in which the vessel was found to have a defective echo depth sounding device.

The first occurred in San Juan, Puerto Rico on January 5th of this year. The Coast Guard requested the repairs to be made to the device at that time.

On January 14th, the vessel was granted permission by the Coast Guard to enter the Port of New Orleans with an inoperative echo depth sounding device. Although Cmdr. Metruck believes that the device was operational at the time of the grounding Saturday and that the vessel was responsible to notify the Coast Guard if there was a problem with any piece of navigational equiptment, the Coast Guard will conduct a through investigation.

The low water levels on the lake and on the St Lawrence River that have plagued commercial shippers of recent were not a factor in the Sunny Blossom's grounding according to Lt. Cmdr. Kevin P. Frost of the Coast Guard's Marine Safety Detachment in Massena, N.Y. Because the vessel is not in any immediate danger and no pollution has been released from the cargo tanks or fuel tanks, the Coast Guard will proceed slowly with removing the vessel from the shoal, Cmdr. Metruck said. The Coast Guard is coordinating a salvage plan with the vessel's owner, Yellowfin Shipping Co. and it will take a few more days before it can be refloated. Part of the ship's cargo likely will have to be moved to another vessel before it can be safely refloated according to Cmdr. Metruck.

Residents of the towns along the St Lawrence River are expressing their concerns that ships carrying chemicals and pollutants thru this narrow, shoal laden stretch of the Seaway need a more through inspection proceedure and tighter regulations. In this instance, it is hoped that the Coast Guard and Seaway Development Corp. will review the list of deficiencies and non-compliances that this tanker has accumulated and require a major overhaul and more frequent inspections with close follow-up of violations before this vessel is permitted to carry chemical cargos in the Seaway.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Twin Ports Report

04/28:
Charles M. Beeghly seems to be a more frequent visitor to the Twin Ports this season. On April 26, it unloaded stone at the CLM dock in Superior, then shifted to load taconite pellets at the BNSF dock in Superior.

Oglebay Norton is making its second recent trip to Superior on April 27 to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal. Another infrequent caller there will be Lee A. Tregurtha. Canadian regulars Canadian Enterprise and Canadian Transport are due there later this week.

Goviken is at the Duluth port terminal's main berth April 27.

The Cenex-Harvest States elevator is hitting stride, with a steady stream of ships now calling there. Algosound was loading in the gallery berth on April 27 and Kinsman Independent is scheduled to load there as well.

Reported by: Al Miller




More Canadian port authorities formed

04/28:
Canadian Transport Minister David Collenette said April 27 that Canada Port Authorities have been formed at Quebec City, Saguenay, Sept-Iles and Trois-Rivieres in Quebec. Under the Canada Marine Act, the Canadian government is working to improve major ports by creating a National Ports System of independently managed port authorities. On the Great Lakes, Canada Ports Corp. remains the administrator of Port Colborne, Ontario, for now.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Today in Great Lakes History - April 28

The 660 ft. forward section of the a) LEWIS WILSON FOY (b) OGLEBAY NORTON) was launched April 28,1977.

LAKE WABUSH (b) CAPT. HENRY JACKMAN) was christened and launched April 28, 1981

On April 28, 1971 while upbound from Sorel, Que. for Muskegon, MI with a load of pig iron, LACHINEDOC (2) struck Rock Shoal off Little Round Island in the St. Lawrence River and was beached.

On April 28, 1906 the J. PIERPONT MORGAN was launched.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Sunny Blossom update

04/27:
The Sunny Blossom is aground on Allan Otty Shoal, about 8 miles west of Cape Vincent, N.Y. According to the U.S. Coast Guard, initial reports are that it may take up to four days before it can be refloated, as a substantial lightering of cargo is planned.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Jean Parisien damaged?

04/27:
The Jean Parisien, upbound in ballast, ran aground the night of April 23 in Michigan's St. Marys River near Johnson Point. The ship reported touching bottom and possibly suffering a crack or hole in one of the forward ballast tanks. The Jean Parisien anchored in Lake Nicolet to wait for a Canadian-registry tug with divers and personnel from U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Office Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Paterson Update

04/27:
The grounding of the Paterson is reported to have been caused by human error. She is now at Les Méchins being repaired by the Verreault Shipyard.

The Paterson ran aground on April 5th off the beach at St-Zotique, on Lake St-Francis.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Name Painting

04/27:
A nameless Southdown Challenger sailed through the Milwaukee breakwall shortly after Noon on April 26. Waiting for them at the Southdown dock was a crew from Midwest Maritime Corp. They immediately set to work painting the new name on both sides of the bow. When a new stack marking is finalized the transformation will be complete.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Commercial vessel assists pleasure craft

04/27:
The night of April 23, U.S. Coast Guard Group Milwaukee received a distress call from a 40-foot recreational vessel, stating it was foundering about 30 nautical miles northeast of Chicago. The vessel left Grand Haven, Mich., earlier in the day with three adults and six children for Chicago. Halfway into the voyage, the vessel started having engine problems in rough weather. A utility boat from Coast Guard Station Calumet Harbor, Ill., and an HH-65A Dolphin helicopter from Coast Guard Air Facility Muskegon, Mich., were sent to the scene, and a 500-foot commercial vessel also diverted. The recreational vessel was later escorted to port.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Name Changes

04/27:
The names of the 5 bulkers ordered last year by Polish SS from a Japanese shipyard are the following ones according to "Fairplay". The first one of these 34,000 dwt vessels to trade in the Great Lakes will be named ISA. She will be followed at two-month intervals by ISOLDA, ISADORA, IRYDA and IRMA. The first of the seven bulkers ordered by Fednav, also in Japan will be named FEDERAL OSHIMA. Oshima is the location in Japan where they are being built.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




More on barge vs. William G. Mather

04/27:
The barge that came close to hitting the museum vessel William G. Mather in Cleveland over the weekend was a dredge barge on contract to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The barge broke loose in high wind and ended up with a 30-degree starboard list. The barge was loaded with spoils and some spilled. It was righted and moored at the Army Corps of Engineers docks.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Chi-Cheeman Anniversary

04/27:
The Chi-Cheeman is coming to Collindwood Ont. on May 3rd 1999 to mark the 25th anniversary of her building. The ship will arrive at Collingwood at 12:30pm with a rededication service and festivities commencing at 1:30pm. The ship will depart Collingwood at 3:00pm and arrive at Owen Sound at 6:00pm. A bus will meet the ship at Owen Sound and return passengers to Collingwood. Round trip to Owen Sound and return is $40.00. One way $25.00.

Reported by: Don Boone




Speaking of the Mather

04/27:
Cleveland: The year 1999 has a lot of 9's in it, including that it is the ninth season for the Steamship William G. Mather Museum. Saturday, May 1 is opening day. A popular floating maritime museum since 1991, visitors get a rare glimpse into the maritime industry and the lifestyle of crew members, when the 618-foot Mather hauled thousands of tons of coal and iron ore between Cleveland and Duluth from 1925 to 1980. One of only four freighter museum ships in existence, the Mather is permanently moored at the end of E. Ninth Street Pier. The Mather was the first new North Coast Harbor museum nine years ago, later joined by the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and the Great Lakes Science Center.

With a dynamic view from the deck of the downtown skyline, the Mather's nickname "The Ship That Built Cleveland" comes into focus. One can only imagine how many of those buildings and bridges are the results of the iron ore brought to the steel mills by the Mather. Despite the ship's industrial role, though, visitors are often surprised by the pleasant accommodations there were for the crew and special guests.

During May, September and October, the Museum is open Fridays and Saturdays (10 AM to 5 PM) and Sundays (Noon to 5 PM). From Memorial Day through Labor Day, the Museum is open everyday from 10 AM to 5 PM, except Sundays, Noon to 5 PM. Admission is $5/adult, $4/senior citizens (age 60 and above), and $3/student (ages 5-18 or with a full-time college ID). Children under 5 years are free. Regular tours average an hour in length, but adults can arrange an extended, more technical "Hard Hat" tour on Saturdays at 1:00 PM, lasting about 2 1/2 hours. Reservations are required and the cost is $10.00 each.

Due to its historic nature, the Museum has limited accessibility.

Click here for more information





Update on the Soo Live Cams


The US Army Corps of Engineers left a message on the Letters to the Editor page requesting comments saying "we are evaluating the possibility of rehooking the cameras and the internet connection as a public service."

Please stop by and help bring back the Soo live cams.





Today in Great Lakes History - April 27

On April 27, 1993 the WOLVERINE (4) ran aground on Surveyors Reef near Port Dolomite near Cedarville, MI and damaged her hull.

The ASHCROFT, upbound on Lake Erie in fog, collided with Interlake's steamer JAMES H. REED on April 27, 1944. The REED, fully loaded with ore, quickly sank off Port Burwell, Ont. with a loss of twelve lives. The ASHCROFT suffered extensive bow damage below the water line and was taken to Ashtabula, OH for repairs.

On April 27, 1973 the bow section of the SIDNEY E. SMITH, JR. was towed to Sarnia by the Malcolm tugs TABOGA and BARBARA ANN. The two sections of the hull were scuttled and land-filled to form a dock facing.

The WILLIAM P. SNYDER, JR. left Ecorse light on her maiden voyage April 27, 1912 for Duluth, MN to load iron ore.

On April 27, 1978 the TROISDOC (3) was downbound with corn for Cardinal, Ont. when she hit the upper end of the tie-up wall above Lock 2.

On April 27, 1980, after loading pellets in Duluth, the ENDERS M. VOORHEES stopped at the Seaway Dock to load a large wooden stairway (three sections) on deck which was taken to the AmShip yard at Lorain. It was used for an open house on the newly built EDWIN H. GOTT in 1979.

On April 27, 1953, the Reserve entered service.

On April 27, 1984, the Charles M. Beeghly struck the breakwall while departing Superior on her first trip since the 1981 season. The vessel returned to Fraser Shipyards in Superior for repairs.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




More on the Sunny Blossom

04/26:
The Sunny Blossom, aground by the starboard bow at 44 04.11 north, 76 26.87 west since April 24, was bound from Saint John, New Brunswick, to Sarnia, Ontario, with calcium chloride. The Bahamian-registry motor chemical tanker was built in 1986 and has weights of 11,598 gross tons and 19,993 deadweight tons. Dimensions are 527 feet 7 inches in length, 74 feet 11 inches in beam and draft of 39 feet 5 inches.

Stop back through out the day for updates on refloating of the vessel.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Southdown Challenger and Paint

04/26:
The Southdown Challenger steamed into Charlevoix and made its dock around 3:00 PM yesterday under a clear sky, mild temperatures and a southerly breeze. She has a fresh paint job in its normal colors with the name Southdown Challenger painted on the stern but without the new name on the bow or over the wheelhouse. After tying up, it was noticed that the stern and the liferings have the new name painted on them, but the smokestack is still sporting the Medusa insignia.

Reported by: David Swain and Steve Vanden Bosch




Kinsman Independent Sails

04/26:
Kinsman Independent departed Buffalo on Saturday starting her first trip of the 1999 season. She steamed out of Buffalo heading for Superior, WI where the boat's expected to load at the Concourse and Cenex-Harvest States elevators.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Today in Great Lakes History - April 26

ALGOWEST was launched April 26, 1982.

Sea trials were conducted April 26, 1984 on Lake Ontario for the CANADIAN RANGER.

An unfortunate incident happened on the SEWELL AVERY as four crew members were injured, one critically, when a lifeboat winch housing exploded shortly after a lifeboat drill in 1978.

CANADOC was launched April 26, 1961.

BENSON FORD (1) was launched in 1924.



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Sunny Blossom Aground

04/25:
4:00pm update:
The divers and inspectors could not work on the Sunny Blossom this afternoon as the waves and wind were too high. The inspectors could not disembark from a small boat to board the vessel. There has been a relief pilot aboard since 1025 this morning. Although the ship is just inside American waters, the Canadian Coast Guard from Kingston has been on scene and is on standby.

It appears that they missed the buoy by quite a bit. The vessel is 3/10 of a mile north of the buoy but went on east of the buoy. Traffic is passing the ship using caution. The tug Performance and the dive ship Captain Alex will return to the ship at dawn tomorrow. The ship is facing North-west and has a 2 degree Port list. No pollution or leakage has been reported .

8:00am update:
The reports this morning indicate the dive team has reached the Sunny Blossom and the inspectors are coming out. There is no leakage from the vessel. The soundings from the double bottom, cargo hold and fuel tanks are unchanged. There is 11cm of water in #2 starboard double bottom tank and 30 cm of water in #4 starboard double bottom tank. These soundings are unchanged since the grounding. No pollution has been reported.

Original Story:
The tanker Sunny Blossom ran aground yesterday, 3/10 mile North of Allan Otty Shoal in Lake Ontario. (44.04N,76.26W) According to reports she is carrying caustic soda. The CCGC Bittern was dispatched to the scene. They are carrying extra air bottles, a fire department training officer and protective suits. ETA on scene was 2150. Apparently they are taking booms out as a precautionary measure. No pollution has been reported at this time.

The vessel is aground on the starboard bow and has a 2 degree list to port. The vessel has made no statement about the possible cause of the grounding

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Close Call for the William G. Mather

04/25:
The Museum ship William G. Mather berthed in Cleveland had a close call with a runaway barge yesterday. A barge operated by the Lake Michigan Contractors dredging company broke loose from its mooring between midnight and 3am yesterday morning. The barge was blown approximately 100 yards and was halted by shallow water just 20 feet from striking the Mather.

The timing of this incident was interesting as this is the volunteer fitout weekend for the museum ship which had about 20 volunteers sleeping over on the Mather that night. After an inspection by the Coast Guard and a long wait for the Cuyahoga River to clear of traffic the Lake Michigan dredging barge #55 arrived at 1:30pm to relieve the severely listing barge of its cargo of river bottom. With about 30 volunteers on the Mather enjoying a ringside seat the dredge transferred the cargo to an empty barge and removed the runaway barge from its unwelcome berth.

The museum ship opens to the public next weekend Click here for more information

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Adam E. Cornelius Returns

04/25:
Making her first appearance on the lower Lakes yesterday, since returning to the American Steam Ship Co. was the Adam E. Cornelius. She past downbound through the Bluewater area (Port Huron) yesterday morning with a fresh coat of paint and looking good.

Reported by: Andrew Severson




Rain in Saginaw

04/25:
The George A. Sloan was outbound from Saginaw at 10 a.m. yesterday morning after turning around at the Sixth Street Turning Basin with an assist from the tug Gregory J. Busch.

Steady rain in the area, followed by strong northeast winds on Friday have, temporarily at least, raised the level of the Saginaw River. On Friday afternoon, the river appeared to be flowing backwards at Saginaw with whitecaps moving upstream. On Saturday morning, in calm weather, the river had a strong outbound current, carrying with it considerable debris, logs and brush washed adrift by the high water.

Reported by: Stephen Hause




Today in Great Lakes History - April 25

The b) PAUL R. TREGURTHA was christened April 25, 1981 as the a) WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY.

On April 25, 1973 the self-unloading boom on the TADOUSSAC (2) collapsed while she was at Sandusky, OH.

In 1925 the Ann Arbor 4 was back in service after running aground on February 13th off Kewaunee, WI.

In 1973 it was announced that the City of Saginaw 31 would be scrapped after a fire which destroyed her cabin deck in 1971.

ENERCHEM LAKER was launched April 25, 1958 as a) ROCKCLIFFE HALL (2).

BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS was launched April 25, 1942.

WILLIAM LIVINGSTONE was launched April 25, 1908.

The PERCIVAL ROBERTS, JR. sailed light on her maiden voyage April 25, 1913 from Lorain to load ore at Two Harbors, MN.

On April 25, 1954, the T.R. McLagan (now Oakglen) entered service. At 714'6", she took the title for longest vessel on the Great Lakes from the Joseph H. Thompson, beating the Thompson by three inches. The Thompson had held the honor since November 4, 1952.

METEOR (2) was launched in 1896 as a) FRANK ROCKEFELLER.

On April 25, 1949, GRAINMOTOR collided with the abutment of the railroad bridge above Lock 2 of the Lachine Canal.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Algontario repairs on hold

04/24:
Reports on a Sault Ste. Marie radio station indicate that after assessing the required repairs due to her recent grounding the Algontario will not be repaired at this time. The company is considering other options.

It was reported the the damage was more extensive than originally believed. The Algontario will be re-assessed this fall but will remain at the wall until then.

Reported by: Scott McLellan




Twin Ports Report

04/24:
The saltie Millennium Eagle used two tugs to enter the Cenex-Harvest States elevator's little-used layby berth April 23. It's apparently next in line for the gallery loading berth once Canadian Leader departs.

Jean Parisien is scheduled to make a rare call April 25 at the Midwest Energy Terminal dock.

Kinsman Independent is due to make its first call of the season in Superior on April 25. The boat's expected to load at the Concourse and Cenex-Harvest States elevators.

Reported by: Al Miller




Continental Grain may close Milwaukee terminal

04/24:
Continental Grain Co. has written two letters to the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development announcing that it may close its terminal in Milwaukee's inner harbor, possibly as early as May 5, according to an April 23 story in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel by Lee Bergquist. As part of its purchase of Continental Grain, Cargill Inc. is reviewing 83 facilities worldwide on a "case-by-case basis," according to spokesperson Lori Johnson.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Frantz opens Holland

04/24:
After a short delay due to wind, the Joseph H. Frantz entered the Holland, MI shipping channel just before 1800 yesterday to open the shipping season at Holland. She was loaded to 20'. She proceeded slowly to the east end of Lake Macatawa and tied up at Brewer's Dock at 1930.

Reported by: Bob VandeVusse




Empress of Ireland now protected

04/24:
The Empress of Ireland was declared a protected historic and archeological site by Quebec on April 22. The vessel, part of Canadian Pacific's fleet, sank early May 29, 1914, in the St. Lawrence River, 20 kilometers/12 miles from Rimouski, Quebec, near Ste. Luce-ser-Mer. The Empress of Ireland was sailing from Quebec City to Liverpool, England, and collided with another ship. Of its 1,500 passengers and crew, 1,012 were killed as the ship foundered in 14 minutes. It was the largest maritime disaster in Canadian history.

Quebec declared the wreck a protected area after plans were announced by a Canadian company last year to destroy it with explosives in order to recover nickel ingots that were being carried as cargo. The ingots have a value of Canadian $1 million.

The 169-meter/554-foot ship is in 26 meters/85 feet of water and parts of the teak deck have been removed and sold in the past. Though a protected site, Quebec said that it would remain accessible to divers.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




USS Great Lakes Fleet Assigns Captains/Chief Engineers

04/24:
During the fourth week of March USS Great Lakes Fleet Inc. entered the 1999 navigation season by starting th efirst members of its fleet of 11 self-unloaders including standard vessels plus the tug/barge unit PRESQUE ISLE.

Captains and Chief Engineers assigned to the fleet are as follows
Captain Chief Engineer
EDGAR B. SPEER Larry Stolz Joseph Kolenda
EDWIN H. GOTT Elden Brege Wally Donajkkowski
PRESQUE ISLE Steve Kelley Tim Knapp
ROGER BLOUGH Bill Craig Al Brand
ARTHUR ANDERSON Jim Dietlin Leo Gajewski
CASON J. CALLAWAY Paul Dubbs Ed Lalonde
PHILIP R. CLARKE Roger Hein Robert Hutton
JOHN J. MUNSON Ralph Lewendowski Jack Thompson
GEORGE A. SLOAN Richard Sobeck Robert Lijewski
MYRON TAYLOR Ed Berge Gerald Lalonde
CALCITE II Mike Gapczynski Jim Haske


Reported by: Dave Wobser




Oglebay Norton Operating Fleet of 12 Self-Unloaders

04/24:
In February, Oglebay Norton entered the advanced 1999 navigation season with its M/V DAVID Z. NORTON moving stockpiled Aurora pellets up the Cuyahoga River to the upper dock serving LTV Steel Co.'s Cleveland plant.

Captains and Chief Engineers assigned to the 12 self-unloaders are as follows:
Captain Chief Engineer
OGLEBAY NORTON Constantine Markakis Robert Calder
COLUMBIA STAR Alan Gintz Andrew Sturgess
FRED R. WHITE Ralph Yanik Joseph Zdankowski
WOLVERINE Patrick Nelson Dale Schartner
DAVID Z. NORTON Alan Ward Jay McElroy
EARL W. OGELBAY Eric Lindgren Michael Aten
JOSEPH H. FRANTZ John Vonsprecken Jerry Zorsch
MIDDLETOWN Ted Olm Charles Able
COURTNEY BURTON Gary Mielke Steven Hess
BUCKEYE Joseph Jaworski Robert Kohler
ARMCO Robert Noffze Jerry Mach
RESERVE Edward Walters William Keyes


Reported by: Dave Wobser




1999 c Columbus cruise ship sailing schedule


August
24 Toronto 25 -at sea- 26 Windsor Ont 27 Tobermory
28 Parry Sound 29 Sault Ste. Marie 30 Sault Ste. Marie 31 Mackinac Is.Beaver Island
September
1 Milwaukee 2 Chicago * 3 Milwaukee 4 Traverse City
5 Mackinac Is. 7 Duluth 8 Thunder Bay 9 Sault Ste. Marie
14 Port Colborne* 15 Cleveland 16 Detroit 17 Tobermory
18 Sault Ste. Marie 19 Thunder Bay 20 Marquette 21 Mackinac Is.Beaver Is.
22 Milwaukee 23 Chicago* 24 Grand Haven 25 Traverse City
26 Sault Ste. Marie 27 Thunder Bay 28 -at sea- 29 Little Current (?)
30 Parry Sound
October
1 Tobermory 2 Windsor* 3 Little Current 4 Mackinac Island
5 Detroit* 6 Mackinac Island 7 Chicago 8 Chicago
9 Milwaukee 10 Beaver Island 11 Sault Ste. Marie 12 Parry Sound(?)
13 Tobermory 14 Windsor 15 -at sea- 16 Toronto
(* end of cruise - start of cruise)

The August 24 - September 9, September 14 - 23, and October 2 - 5 cruises were available to North Americans.

Tours of the ship will not be available when the ship is docked.

Amenities on the ship include: single seating dining, modern multi-media show lounge, wine bar, card room, library, boutique, buffet restaurant, palm garden with live music, exercise room with electronic workout equipment, television, radio, in-room movies, safe in every room, refrigerator in every room, some cabins with veranda, beauty salon, photographers store, and entertainment every evening. A good sized swimming pool and a unusually large amount of sun deck space.




New Raffle

04/24:
This is the third year that, thanks to Algoma Central and Upper Lakes Group, the Children's Aid Society of Huron County is able to raffle off two trips for two on one of their freighters. The money raised goes to send needy children to summer camp through the Sifto Summer Camp for Kids program.

Last year one of the lucky couples took an eight-day trip through the locks and up the St. Lawrence to Quebec. The other couple took a seven-day trip that took them over to Lake Michigan.

The cost of the tickets are $5 (Cnd.) each and the drawing is June 14.

Lakes Freighter Trip
Children's Aid Society of Huron County
R.R. 4 Goderich, Ontario N7A 3Y1
Phone 519-524-7356 or in Ontario 800-265-5198




Today in Great Lakes History - April 24

The ONTADOC (2) (b) MELISSA DESGAGNES) sailed from Collingwood on her maiden voyage April 24, 1975 for Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. to load steel for Duluth, MN.

The D.M. CLEMSON (2) departed Lorain on her maiden voyage April 24, 1917 to load iron ore at Duluth, MN.

The B.F. JONES (2) left Quebec April 24, 1973 in tandem with her former fleetmate EDWARD S. KENDRICK towed by the Polish tug KORAL heading for scrapping in Spain.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




3,000 hp Tug Makes 15 MPH in Testing

04/23:
The Gaelic Tugboat Company's 3,000 hp tugboat Roger Stahl returned to the water Wednesday morning, April 21 at the Nicholson Terminal Drydock at Ecorse Michigan.

Under the command of Capt. Roger Stahl, and Chief Engineer Jim Storen the tug departed directly from the drydock into Lake Erie to test the operation of the twin screw tug's new propellers. The performance was outstanding with the big tug obtaining its engineered speed of 15 mph. Later the tug was tested under full load conditions, with only a slight loss of engine rpms. The vessel then returned to the Gaelic yard on the Rouge River for installation of a new rubber fender system.

Gaelic Tugboat has announced that the tug will be assigned the tug Shannon's towing duties, pairing her with the double skin oil barge Marysville. This will allow the 2,000 hp Shannon to be deployed in the ship assistance department of Gaelic for which it was originally designed.

Reported by: D.J. Tugnut




Twin Ports Report

04/23:
The Cenex Harvest States grain elevator was loading Canadian Leader and Canadian Ranger on April 22. It's been unusual lately to see two vessels at the elevator this early in the season.

General Mills in Duluth began loading its first vessel of the season April 22 when Margborg arrived to take on beet pellets.

Kinsman Independent reportedly is due into the Twin Ports around April 25.

Calcite II is due at Carrollton, Mich.,on April 24. John G. Munson is set to call at Escanaba on April 24.

Reported by: Al Miller




LaFarge workers likely to strike

04/23:
Workers at the LaFarge Cleveland Terminal cement facility on Elm. St. in the Flats authorized a strike in a bargaining dispute over pension increases. The six LaFarge workers unload cement from ships and then load it onto customer trucks. The union declined to say when or if it would strike LaFarge, an international maker of building materials. Gary Tiboni, president of Teamsters Local 436, said the dispute centers on managment's refusal to shift a portion if the wage increase it has offered into pensions. Dennis Roese, director of industrial relations for LaFarge's U.S. cement region, declined to comment.

Reported by: Mike Reindel




Single-hull tank phase-out clarified

04/23:
The U.S. Coast Guard said 22 April it will not grant extensions of phase-out dates for single-hull tank vessels that have been converted to a double bottom or double sides unless the work was done before Aug. 18, 1990. The U.S. Oil Pollution Act of 1990 calls for eliminating single-hull tank vessels carrying oil in bulk and permits tank vessels with double sides or a double bottoms to continue to operate for up to five additional years based on their hull configuration. No single-hull tank vessels carrying oil in bulk will be permitted to operate in the United States after Jan. 1, 2015. The announcement clarifies a potential problem identified by the maritime industry.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Today in Great Lakes History - April 23

In 1953 the 1953 Pere Marquette 22 was cut in half, then pulled apart and lengthened by 40 feet, as part of a major refit at Manitowoc, WI. Also during this refit, her triple expansion engines were replaced with Skinner Unaflow, and her double stacks were replaced with a single, tapered stack. The refit was completed August 28, 1953.

On April 23, 1966 the JOSEPH S. WOOD was towed to the Ford Rouge complex at Dearborn, MI by her new owners, the Ford Motor Company.

The FORT YORK was commissioned April 23, 1958.

On April 23, 1980 the ARTHUR B. HOMER's bow thruster failed while maneuvering through ice at Taconite Harbor, MN, resulting in a grounding which damaged her bow and one ballast tank.

The JOSEPH S. SCOBELL was launched April 23, 1891 as a) GRIFFIN (1).

On April 23, 1972, PAUL H. CARNAHAN arrived at the Burlington Northern Docks at Superior, Wisconsin to load 22,402 gross tons of iron ore bound for Detroit, opening the 1972 shipping season at Superior.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Algorail grounds in Green Bay

04/22:
The Algorail ran aground in the Fox River Turning Basin in Green Bay, Wis., on 20 April. Normally, the ship's bow is intentionally grounded to enable the vessel to turn in the basin before backing up the river to a berth. This time, the Algorail required two tugs to refloat. The ship was not damaged, but two City of Green Bay docks were damaged and need repairs as a result of the tugs' propeller wash. A Canadian class surveyor will board the Algorail at its next call in Ontario and report back to U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Detachment Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Twin Ports Report

04/22:
The morning of April 21 was the busiest so far this season for Twin Ports grain elevators. Four ships were loading: Lake Superior at AGP; Perelik at Cargill; Canadian Ranger at Cenex-Harvest States; and Peonia at Peavey-Concourse. Peonia is the first ship of the season for the Concourse elevator.

Other interesting vessel traffic: Fred R. White arrived at Taconite Harbor April 21 and George A. Sloan is venturing into Carrollton on April 23. Columbia Star usually handles the coal run for Oglebay Norton Co., but on April 22 the 1,000-foot Oglebay Norton is scheduled to arrive at Midwest Energy Terminal. St. Clair has become a semi-regular in the Twin Ports again. On April 22 it's due to unload at the Reiss Inland dock up the St. Louis River, then load over at BNSF ore dock in Superior.

Presque Isle departed Duluth's port terminal shortly before 1 p.m. April 21 after undergoing repairs.

Reported by: Al Miller




Signs of Life on Independent

04/22:
The Kinsman Independent was showing signs of life yesterday in Buffalo, she has been tied up there since December 21, 1998. Her overboard discharge vents where letting out steam and her radars were occasionally turning on and off. She may depart as early as the 22nd.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Boland in the News

04/22:
Unconfirmed reports from Superior, WI. were that personel from American Steamship Company have been on board the John J. Boland removing many items from the ship this week and three "buyers" were on board her Monday to look the ship over. It is unknown what company the buyers were from or if their thoughts were to buy her for scap or something else. Also unknown is if the Boland has actually been sold or not. Reports are that the cargo holds and the unloading system are in an extream state of decay.

It is sad to say but it looks like another classic boat from the 50's is about to go for scrap.

Reported by: Glenn Blaszkiewicz




Sluggish Iron Ore Start Mars March U.S.-Flag Float

04/22:
A 17 percent decrease in iron ore cargos produced an overall deficit in cargo movement in U.S.-Flag lakers in March. Loadings of dry-bulk cargos in U.S. bottoms totaled 3.1 million net tons in March, a decrease of 14.1 percent compared to a year ago.

As noted, iron ore loadings decreased 17.1 percent to 2.1 million tons. While demand for steel has never waivered, dumped foreign steel has severely distorted the market. Steel imports to the United States set an all-time record in 1998 - 42 million tons and forced a number of U.S.-Flag lakers to conclude the 1998 navigation season prematurely and delay their 1999 sailing date.

Although some major steel producing nations have reduced their exports to the United States, other countries have increased their shipments to America, so the situation remains unclear as the 1999 navigation season begins.

Thanks to an early start at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wisconsin, the U.S.-Flag coal float in March increased by 80,000 tons.

March stone loadings in U.S.-Flag lakers totaled 265,000 tons. While technically a decrease of 41.9 percent, the weather a year ago was extremely mild and permitted one of the earliest resumptions of the stone trade in recent years. In reality, the March 1999 total is one of the best on record.

The cement trade resumed in a positive manner, with shipments increasing 25 percent to 178,000 tons.

As of April 1, 1999, the major U.S.-Flag Great Lakes carriers had 51 of their 69 vessels in operation, a decrease of nine hulls compared to a year ago. As of this writing, four vessels are not scheduled to see service in 1999. Those ships are the EDWARD L. RYERSON (Central Marine Logistics); JOHN J. BOLAND (American Steamship Company); the cement carrier E. M. FORD (Inland Lakes Mgt.); and the straight-decker KINSMAN ENTERPRISE. The latter two vessels have not seen service since 1996.

Visit the Lake Carriers' Association for complete details





Weekend Events

04/22:
Marine Historical Society of Detroit 1999 Annual Dinner and Program - St. Clair, MI
Annual Dinner Meeting: Please reserve Saturday, April 24, 1999 for our Annual Dinner Meeting to be held at the St. Clair Inn along the St. Clair River. We are pleased to present as our speaker Captain Al Nelson, who will share his experiences over his long career with U.S. Steel, including his stint as captain of the 1,000-foot EDWIN H. GOTT. Early reservations are suggested.

Click here for more information

Great Lakes Maritime Institute Maritime Artists Show
A special show and sale by two Great Lakes Marine Artists in DeRoy Hall. Mr. Leo Kuschel will be showing his painting of Great Lakes lighthouses and Mr. Harvey Nissley will have on exhibit his detailed ship models.Fee: $2.00 non-members, G.L.M.I. Members Free.

Great Lakes Maritime Institute USS Grayfox Visit New Member Cruise 11:00 a.m.-12:00p.m.
Docked at Dossin Great Lakes Museum 12-4 p.m.
Museum visitors may tour the boat at no charge.
Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Isle - 313.852.4051
Visit the Great Lakes Maritime Institute for more information




Today in Great Lakes History - April 22

ST.CLAIR (2) was christened April 22, 1976 at Bayship.

The CHICAGO TRIBUNE laid up for the last time at Toronto on April 22, 1986.

HOCHELAGA (2) lost her self-unloading boom during a wind storm at Windsor, Ont. on April 22, 1980. As a consequence she made ten trips hauling grain as a "straight decker".

CHARLES M. WHITE was commissioned April 22, 1952 at South Chicago. She was soon recognized as one of the fastest ships on the Great Lakes because of her ability to reach speeds in excess of 17 knots (19.6 mph).

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

04/21:
Presque Isle was in the Duluth port terminal's "steel berth" April 20, ballasted down by the stern. A crane was positioned near the bow, so the vessel's repairs may involve its bowthruster.

Much of the headhouse for the former Cargill C elevator in Duluth was demolished overnight April 19-20. The work is part of ongoing demolition of the site.

Reported by: Al Miller




Busy Day in Cleveland

04/21:
At 8:00pm yesterday evening the American Republic was downbound at the Columbus Street bridge after unloading ore at LTV. It is reported that the vessel will be doing the Lorain shuttle run for at least 9 more trips. The American Republic is making the Lorain to Cleveland shuttle in 19 to 22 hours so they will be doing this run for the rest of the month.

The Medusa/Southdown Conquest was berthed at the cement dock on Columbus Street. The tug and barge had recently arrived and were reported to have touched the bottom near their berth. As of last night the ship was removing water ballast to bring the barge fully against the dock. The Medusa portion of the name has been removed from the bow and there is no word on when the renaming will be completed.

Dredging is being done on the Cuyahoga, currently the shovel is midriver at the LTV works. The dredge is operating 24/7 and one tug and barge had to slip carefully by the American Republic on its way up river.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Three more Sail

04/21:
Andrew Torrence reports that Algoma's Algocen is fitting out at Montreal. She is due to depart on the 22nd for a St. Lawrence port to load ore for Hamilton. Nice to see another "classic" Canadian laker come out for the grain trade.

A check with the Lake Carriers' Association home page had the Indiana Harbor sailing yesterday for her first trip in 1999 from Sturgeon Bay to Escanaba. The Paul H. Townsend also sailed yesterday from Milwaukee to Alpena.




What happened to the Soo Locks Live web cams?

04/21:
Many have sent e-mail to me with talk about e-mailing their representatives in Washington and asked that I spread the word, this post from the search page sums up the e-mail I have been receiving:

T V cameras down at Soo
I am going to write to the congressman and senator [federal] that represent us in Washington, and would invite all who are interested in attempting to replace the live web Camera's at the Soo Locks. The boatwatchers and schools that can use this tool to help explain the purpose and function of the Locks at Sault Ste Marie, Michigan. I invite and urge all people that read this to send an E -Mail to these gentlemen asking their help in returning this medium.

U.S. House
http://www.house.gov/house/MemberWWW.html
U.S. Senate
http://www.senate.gov/contacting/index_by_state.cfm

so lets get the letters and cards going to ask that this be again granted to the people. Draft a nice letter explaining the pleasure you get from seeing the great ships passing through the Locks and also point out the educational value to educators and to the many students that may never actually see this As well as to the many tourists that would go and see this in person, we can make a difference if we speak out, so lets do this .

You may also Click here to post your comments






Today in Great Lakes History - April 21

The EDWIN H. GOTT cleared Two Harbors with her first cargo, 59,375 tons of iron ore, on April 21, 1979 bound for Gary, IN.

The WILLIS L. KING (b) C.L. AUSTIN) departed on her maiden voyage with a load of coal from Toledo on April 21, 1911 bound for Superior, WI.

On April 21, 1988 the BIRCHGLEN was towed off the Great Lakes by the tugs ELMORE M. MISNER and ATOMIC bound for Sydney N.S. to be scrapped.

OAKGLEN (1) was launched April 21, 1923 as a) WILLIAM H. WARNER.

HOMER D. WILLIAMS was launched in 1917.



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Tug Roger Stahl on Drydock at Nicholsons Detroit

04/20:
Gaelic Tugboat Company's 3,000 hp twin screw icebreaking tugboat Roger Stahl entered Nicholsons Drydock on April 12. The tug has been transformed from single to twin screw, and repowered with a pair of General Motors EMD engines at the Gaelic Yard on the Rouge River over the past two years. Trial propellers were installed on the vessel last October at Nicholsons, with a pair of 4 blade stainless steal wheels now being installed. These propellers should give the tug a service speed of about 15 miles per hour for escort and ice breaking service. The vessel's new keel cooling system allows operation of the tug in all kinds of ice without concern for ice entering the cooling system.

Reported by: D.J.Tugnut




First Load of Season for Tug Barge

04/20:
The articulated tug barge PERE MARQUETIE 41, after a 2 hour shakedown cruise on Friday, April 16, departed Ludington at at 9:00 AM on Sunday, April 18 for her first trip of the 1999 shipping season. The tug barge, which is owned by Pere Marquette Shipping Company of Ludington, headed for Marinette, Wisconsin to pick up a load of cargo bound for Chicago, ILL.

Captain Richard Oldow is in command of the vessel. A graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, New York, he joined Pere Marquette Shipping in March. He has over 20 years of experience sailing tugs in Alaska, the Pacific Northwest, Gulf of Mexico, and the Great Lakes.

During the winter lay up, upgrades were made to the water ballast system and safety equipment on the PERE MARQUETIE 41. Steel replacement in the tank top plating was also completed, and a major over-haul was performed on the tug UNDAUNTED's starboard main engine.

The PERE MARQUETIE41 is the former car ferry CITY OF MlDLAND 41, and was converted to an articulated tug barge in 1998.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Elton Hoyt II crewmember evacuated

04/20:
U.S. Coast Guard Group Detroit received a call from the Elton Hoyt II over the weekend requesting the evacuation of a 46-year-old crewmember suffering from chest pains. A Coast Guard Station St. Clair Shores boat came alongside the ship in Michigan's St. Clair River about 40 minutes later and took the man to emergency medical personnel in Algonac, Mich.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Twin Ports Report

04/20:
American Mariner put in an unusual appearance April 19 at the DMIR ore dock. It was loading in the spot usually used by Inland Steel boats.

Inland Lakes Management opened its season in the Twin Ports April 18 when Alpena arrived to unload at the Superior and Duluth cement terminals.

Charles M. Beeghly is scheduled to make an unusual call April 19 to the BNSF ore dock in Superior.

Canadian Ranger made its first appearance of the season in the Twin Ports on April 18 when it arrived at the Cenex-Harvest States terminal to load grain. ULS boats Canadian Enterprise and Canadian Transport were due in to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal.

The cargo unloaded at Duluth's port terminal over the weekend by saltie Lake Superior consists of several large steel cylinders similar in size and appearance to those brought into the terminal in recent years for various paper mill construction projects. The cylinders are lined up alongside the terminal's "steel berth" awaiting shipment by rail.

Finally, James R. Barker is steadily employed in the Lake Superior ore run this season. She was due into Taconite Harbor on April 19, which will be followed by a trip to the DMIR ore dock in Duluth.

Reported by: Al Miller




Fednav closes deal with Logistec

04/20:
Fednav Ltd. and Logistec Corp. announced the closing 19 April of the sale of all assets and activities of Federal Marine Terminals at the Quebec ports of Montreal and Sorel to Logistec. Also, Logistec has signed a long-term contract with Fednav to serve the terminal and stevedoring needs of its vessels at Montreal.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Today in Great Lakes History - April 20

On April 20, 1960, the Arthur B. Homer entered service. She was the last vessel built by the Great Lakes Engineering Works.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Interesting Trips for the USS Fleet

04/19:
Edwin H. Gott is making another run to Nanticoke with pellets. Presque Isle is scheduled to stop in Duluth on April 20 to make unspecified repairs before proceeding to Two Harbors on April 21.

Several GLF boats are making calls this week at smaller ports: Cason J. Callaway loads coal at Toledo April 20 for delivery to Escanaba; Myron C. Taylor is due at Saginaw on April 19; and Philip R. Clarke is due at Gladstone on April 20.

Reported by: Al Miller




Door County to offer shipyard, lighthouse tours in May

04/19:
As part of the annual Door County Festival of Blossoms in Wisconsin, tours will be given of Bay Shipbuilding Co. and Palmer Johnson Inc. in Sturgeon Bay, Wis., on 8 May. The self-guided tours are sponsored by the Sturgeon Bay Rotary Club. The tours will start at 9 a.m. and end at 1 p.m. The cost is $5 for adults and $2 for children. Tickets will be available the day of the tour at the two yards or in advance at the Door County Maritime Museum, which will offer a reduced entry fee for those taking the tour.

According to promotional material, visitors to Bay Shipbuilding will be able to see rehabilitation work underway on the Southdown Challenger and construction of Mobil Corp.'s new tank barge. The Edward L. Ryerson will also be at the facility, along with the possibility of U.S. Coast Guard vessels.

At Palmer Johnson, four vessels are under construction, including an 27-meter/88-foot yacht and two 36.9-meter/121-foot yachts. The builder currently has orders for seven vessels and employs 254.

The Festival of Blossoms will also include the Lighthouse Walk on 15 and 16 May, covering the grounds of Sherwood Point, the grounds of the Canal Station, the Range Lights, the Cana Island Lighthouse (by bus from Baileys Harbor), the Eagle Bluff Lighthouse and, by boat, Chambers Island, Pilot Island, Plum Island and the Pottawatomie Lighthouse on Rock Island.

The lighthouses will be open for self-guided tours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day and the cost is $10 for adults and $5 for children. Tickets can be purchased at the Door County Maritime Museum, which is sponsoring the event, or at the lighthouses. The cost of boat tours is extra.

For information, call 920-743-5959 or view www.dcmm.org.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Lake Ontario Ferry Update

04/19:
Two Ferry companies are returning for the upcoming season, and plans are being circulated to "ressurect" a former cross-lake Ferry.

Hydrofoil Lake Jet Lines will return later this month and provide service between Toronto and Queenston, on the Niagara River, with daily scheduled service and group Charters. Two Russian-built but Canadian Flagged Hydrofoils will again provide service between the two ports in just over an hour. Visit their website at www.hydrofoil.on.ca

Waterways Transportation Services will be offering cross-lake Service on their 300-passenger Catamaran operating between Toronto and Niagara-on-the-Lake, and plans a Water Taxi service between Lewiston, New York and Niagara-on-the-Lake. For more information visit their Website at www.waterways.on.ca

Reported by: Peter Green




Welland Canal Tour Planned

04/19:
A unique Tour opportunity, entitled the "Living History" Tour, is being proposed for Port Dalhousie and the Welland Canal. Pending approval from the City of St. Catharines, the new owner of the Captain Tenbroeck (a 12-passenger historic tour boat) intends upon offering a Tour that provides a 45-minute narrated historic water tour of Port Dalhousie (entrance to the first three Canals) where mighty locks are still intact 150 years later, and historic buildings that were once Chundlery's and Sailor's Hotels are now wonderful restaurants.

The Tour will include a Niagara Airbus Coach shuttling passengers along the present Canal, from below lock 1 in Port Weller, along the Canals drive, stopping at the Lock 3 Viewing Complex and including a wonderful lunch or dinner at Freighters Food Emporium. The Tour will conclude after viewing the Flight Locks (4 through 7), passage through the Thorold Tunnel, then following the route of the old Canal as it wound through St. Catharines.

The tour is being developed, but those interested in receiving an itinerary in early May can e-mail the Marketing Assistant, erindiel@vaxxine.com

Reported by: Peter Green




Today in Great Lakes History - April 19

Sea trials were completed for the CANADIAN TRANSPORT April 19, 1979 and she departed Port Weller on her maiden voyage the next morning.

The GEORGE A. STINSON’s self-unloading boom collapsed onto her deck due to a mechanical failure on the night of April 19, 1983 at Detroit. No injuries were reported. She continued hauling cargoes without a boom most of the year until it was replaced on September 20th of that year.

On April 19, 1951 CLIFFS VICTORY began her much publicized 1,000 mile journey up the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers through the Illinois Waterway pushed by a towboat to Lockport, IL where two GLT tugs took up the tow through the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal.

HUTCHCLIFFE HALL was launched April 19, 1954.

RICHARD TRIMBLE was launched April 19, 1913.

The A.M. BYERS sank in a head-on collision with the upbound steamer E.M. FORD, whose steering gear failed, on the night of April 19, 1956. The collision occurred 2 1/2 miles south of Algonac, MI in the South Channel of the St. Clair River.

On April 19, 1950, the Wilfred Sykes entered service, departing Lorain, Ohio for Toledo, Ohio to load coal on her maiden voyage. The Sykes also became the largest vessel on the Great Lakes, taking the honor from Pittsburgh Steamship Company's Leon Fraser class (the "Supers") which had held it since June 21, 1942.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Port Terminal's First Salty

04/18:
Duluth's port terminal received its first caller April 16 when Lake Superior arrived, apparently to unload steel.

Reported by: Al Miller




New Tug for Hamilton

04/18:
The harbour tug "Alice A" left Arnold's Cove NF Friday and is underway light tug to Hamilton, Ont. She is the latest edition to the McKeil Marine Ltd. fleet. She should be in the River in another day or so.




Milwaukee-Muskegon ferry planned

04/18:
Kenneth J. Szallai, director of the Port of Milwaukee, said 16 April that high-speed passenger ferry service between Milwaukee and Muskegon, Mich., could begin as soon as 18 months from now if arrangements can be finalized by the end of the year.

The service would be operated by Hydrolink L.L.C., a company based in Eau Claire, Wis., that was created by a local physician, Thomas V. Rankin, and several other investors. Rankin has said the company is in negotiations with an investment banker for financing and this week, received permission from Muskegon officials to dock ferries there. A Milwaukee location has not been chosen, though consideration is being given to a site near the U.S. Coast Guard station.

Hydrolink was incorporated in December and has been working on the proposal for three years. Plans by the company call for two new 73.8-meter/242-foot high-speed catamarans that would each carry 325 passengers and 80 vehicles. They would make three round trips daily between May and October and a one-way crossing would take about two hours. Fares will reportedly be comparable to those of the ferry Badger, operated by Lake Michigan Carferry Service Inc., which takes four hours to cross between Ludington, Mich., and Manitowoc, Wis. Round trips are $92 per car and $61 per adult passenger.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Correction

04/18:
It was reported last week the GLT tug Washington in Toledo was 1800 h.p. The tug produces only 1200 h.p.




Today in Great Lakes History - April 18

On her maiden voyage April 18, 1980 the AMERICAN MARINER left Sturgeon Bay light for Escanaba, Mich. to load 31,322 gross tons of taconite pellets for Ashtabula, Ohio and arrived there on April 26th.

The MONTCLIFFE HALL began trading on the Great Lakes on April 18,1978.

The PATERSON (2) was launched April 18, 1985. She was the last straight deck bulk freighter built on the Lakes and was built to the maximum size permitted to lock through the Seaway.

BETHLEHEM (2) was launched April 18, 1917 as a) MIDVALE.

Problems occurred on the ALASTAIR GUTHRIE's first trip of the year on April 18, 1979 when she began taking on water in the engine room while loading grain at the International Multifoods elevator at Duluth, MN. Her stern settled to the bottom of the slip with 12 feet of water in the engine room.

The RED WING (2) was sold for scrap on April 18, 1986.

On April 18, 1960 the ROBERT C. STANLEY struck Vidal Shoal in Whitefish Bay about 1.5 miles above the Soo Locks, and tore a hole in her bottom.

STONEFAX was launched April 18, 1903 as the straight deck Lake Bulk Freighter a) SINALOA.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Busy Day In Saginaw

04/17:
Between noon on Thursday April 15 and noon Friday April 16, There were 3 vessels to visit the Saginaw River. The Earl W. Oglebay delivered a split load to Wirt Stone in Saginaw and Bay City. The Joseph H. Frantz also made the same trip clearing the Veterans Memorial bridge around 12:30pm on Friday. The Sam Laud was unloading in Bay City.

This provided a excellent scene when the Frantz over took the Laud and blew a salute to the Liberty bridge in the process. These were the first trips for the Frantz and Oglebay to Saginaw in 1999. This was the second Saginaw trip for the Laud, which opened the river on April 1st. There have been 17 total vessels to enter the river to date in 1999.

Reported by: Brian Ferguson




Best Start Ever For SMET Coal

04/17:
Coal loadings at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wisconsin, totaled 580,000 tons in March, an increase of 43 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. That tonnage represents the highest March total for SMET in its 23 years of operation.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Today in Great Lakes History - April 17

The 610 foot aft section of the JOHN B. AIRD passed upbound through the Soo Canal April 17, 1983 in tow of the tugs WILFRED M. COHEN and JOHN McLEAN heading for Thunder Bay where it was assembled with the 120 foot bow section.

STADACONA (2) was launched April 17, 1929.

On April 17, 1977, the Algolake entered service.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Tall Ship Aground Again

04/16:
The 135 year old tall ship Anna Kristina ran aground on Lake St-Louis At the Buoy A-4 yesterday morning. At 19:00 yesterday she was reported to be aground out of the shipping channel and is not blocking traffic. She was on her way back home to Norway when the grounding occurred.

The vessel had grounded in the Detroit River last week.

Reported by: G.Belley




Paterson Heading to Dry Dock

04/16:
The grounding of the Paterson is reported to have caused more damage than was first thought and the vessel will be going to dry dock to be repaired. No dry dock has been designated yet.

The Paterson ran aground on April 5th off the beach at St-Zotique, on Lake St-Francis.

Reported by: R. Kennedy




Algoway Opens Season in Goderich

04/16:
On Friday, April 9 at 5:00 a.m. the Algoway with assistance from the tugs Dover, Debbie Lyn and the Donald Bert tied up at the salt dock in Goderich, Ontario to open the 1999 shipping season. She arrived from Marysville, Michigan and loaded 20,833 metric tons of salt for Chicago. Captain Neil Olsen received the traditional Top Hat for the first vessel of the season. This tradition has taken place since 1936.

Reported by: Philip Nash




Twin Ports Report

04/16:
After unloading cement at the St. Lawrence terminal in Duluth, Montrealais opened the grain season in Superior on April 15 when it began loading at the Cenex-Harvest States grain terminal.

After seeing little use for several years, the AGP grain elevator in Duluth was fairly busy again last season. So far in this young season, it's the busiest elevator in the Twin Ports. It's scheduled to receive its third ship April 15 when Lake Superior calls, and its fourth on April 16-17 when Federal St. Laurant arrives. The other busy elevator, Cargill B1, expects its third ship of the season April 15 when Canadian Venture arrives.

GLF's Edwin H. Gott is scheduled to make another trip to the DMIR ore dock in Duluth on April 17. Cason J. Callaway is due at the dock April 16 to unload stone, then take on pellets for Conneaut.

Other smaller ports to be visited by GLF boats include John G. Munson calling at Green Bay April 17 and George A. Sloan due at Buffalo with stone on April 16. Arthur M. Anderson is not mentioned in the fleet's recorded schedule update, so it apparently remains at Bay Shipbuilding for repairs.

Reported by: Al Miller




Two Tugs in Buffalo

04/16:
The J.A.W. Iglehart departed the LaFarge dock in Buffalo at 10PM yesterday. She had 2 tugs with her since the City of Buffalo is now enforcing a rule going back to the 1930's requiring multiple tugs for certain vessel movements. It is reported that the city told the vessel's captain that the Michigan St. Bridge would not be raised unless the required tugs were with the ship.

The Iglehart was heading to Bath, Ontario and the tugs were to wait at the break wall for the English River who was to arrive at 2AM.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Taconite Production

04/16:
Production cuts are possible at Northeastern Minnesota's taconite plant before the end of the year, John Brinzo, president and chief executive officer of Cleveland-Cliffs Inc., told the Duluth News-Tribune Wednesday.

Brinzo made the prediction in an interview after his keynote speech to North American mining executives at the 72nd Minnesota Section, Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration meeting at the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center.

However, an official for the United Steelworkers of America said Brinzo may be posturing as contract talks loom for hourly workers at the plants.

Reported by: Al Miller




Stone Start Better Than It Seems

04/16:
Stone shipments on the Great Lakes totaled 275,000 net tons in March. While that total technically represents a decrease of 44 percent from the same period last year, the winter of 1997/1998 was one of the mildest in recent memory and enabled the stone trade to resume well ahead of schedule. In reality, the March 1999 total is one of the best kick-offs for stone in years.

All March stone shipments originated at U.S. ports.

Another Misleading Total


Coal shipments from Lake Erie ports totaled 307,317 net tons in March, a decrease of 58 percent compared to a year ago. However, the extremely mild weather that prevailed in March 1998 allowed the coal trade to resume at a much quicker pace than is normal. The March 1999 total is in fact one of the highest recorded this decade.

Shipments by port were as follows:
Toledo - 29,125
Sandusky - 82,446
Ashtabula - 179,875
Conneaut - 90,071

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




What happened to the Soo Locks Live web cams?

04/16:
Many have sent e-mail to me with talk about e-mailing their representatives in Washington and asked that I spread the word, this post from the search page sums up the e-mail I have been receiving:

T V cameras down at Soo
I am going to write to the congressman and senator [federal] that represent us in Washington, and would invite all who are interested in attempting to replace the live web Camera's at the Soo Locks. The boatwatchers and schools that can use this tool to help explain the purpose and function of the Locks at Sault Ste Marie, Michigan. I invite and urge all people that read this to send an E -Mail to these gentlemen asking their help in returning this medium.

U.S. House
http://www.house.gov/house/MemberWWW.html
U.S. Senate
http://www.senate.gov/contacting/index_by_state.cfm

so lets get the letters and cards going to ask that this be again granted to the people. Draft a nice letter explaining the pleasure you get from seeing the great ships passing through the Locks and also point out the educational value to educators and to the many students that may never actually see this As well as to the many tourists that would go and see this in person, we can make a difference if we speak out, so lets do this .




Today in Great Lakes History - April 16

ALGOLAKE's sea trials were held April 16, 1977.

ALGOWOOD departed on her maiden voyage April 16, 1981 from Owen Sound, Ont. light for Stoneport, MI taking on stone there for Sarnia, Ont.

The BURNS HARBOR's keel was laid on April 16, 1979.

CEMENTKARRIER was launched April 16, 1930.

The W.K. BIXBY (c) SIDNEY E. SMITH, JR. (2) entered service on April 16, 1906.

On April 16, 1986 the WILLIAM A. IRVIN was sold for $110,000 to the Duluth Convention Center Board.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




M.V. Manitoulin takes first grain cargo out of the Port of Toledo

04/15:
Canada Steamships "Manitoulin" loaded grain out of the ADM/Countrymark elevators April 13th and 14th. She departed under the assistance of two "G" tugs and was outbound on the lake by 2:30 yesterday afternoon. This trip into the ADM/Countrymark Elevator marks the first trip into Toledo this year and with three more possible this spring.

According officials within CSL the demand for self unloading vessels this year will increase markedly for the grain trade due the addition of new hoppers and grain handling equipment at the Seaway area elevators. This will in turn reduce the need for straight deckers and the intensive labor required to unload them.

The "Manitoulin" has been diverted from her Rouge Steel shuttle due too the explosion at Ford's power house this winter.

Reported by: D. Ocean




Medusa Challenger Rename

04/15:
The 'Southdown Challenger' departed Milwaukee lay up April 14. Captain George Herdina nailed it the first time when he gave his first security call for the 'Southdown Challenger.'

Although the boat still bears the 'Medusa Challenger' name on bow, it is now officially the 'Southdown Challenger.' The new name will probably not be painted on the hull until the Challenger arrives in Sturgeon Bay next month for some scheduled work. No word as yet on new stack markings, but the bet among the crew is that it will incorporate the logo and colors of the Southdown Corp., three wide horizontal bands of blue, green and black.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Algontario Enters Dry Dock

04/15:
The Algontario entered Pascol Engineering's Dry Dock in Thunder Bay Tuesday afternoon. She is there to have damaged repaired from a recent grounding in the St. Mary's River.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Great Lakes Towing places 4 tugs in Toledo

04/15:
The Great Lakes Towing Co. has placed a fourth tug in Toledo to better service the Port of Toledo this spring. The Washington, a 1200H.P. harbor tug, will augment the already stalwart presence of the Illinois, Louisiana and the Montana.

Reported by: D. Ocean




1999 edition of the Boatwatchers Bible now Available

04/15:
The 1999 edition of “Know Your Ships,” the popular, annual guide to boats and boatwatching on the Great Lakes and Seaway, launches its 40th anniversary edition today. Besides accurate vessel and fleet listings for all Great Lakes vessels from tugs to 1,000-footers, this year’s “Know Your Ships” - expanded to 144 pages - includes even more listings for international flag vessels trading into the Lakes and Seaway.

To begin this special edition, which also commemorates the 40th anniversary of the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway, marine historian Jody Aho takes a look at important events on the shipping scene during the past four decades. Appropriately, the Canadian bulk carrier Seaway Queen is 1999’s Vessel of the Year. The Vessel Spotlight feature, begun last year, also continues, with profiles of more familiar lakers.

“Know Your Ships” also features handy tips for boatwatchers, including phone numbers to track vessel movements, a guide to Great Lakes marine museums and profiles of the Soo Locks, Welland Canal and St. Lawrence Seaway. As usual, the fine work of many outstanding marine photographers sample the shipping scene from Duluth to Montreal.

For ordering information, visit the Marine Publishing Co, home page at www.knowyourships.com or call (734) 668-4734. Price is $14.95 plus $3% s/h (Michigan residents add 6% tax).




Today in Great Lakes History - April 15

CANADA MARQUIS was launched April 15, 1983.

SAM LAUD was christened April 15, 1975.

On April 15, 1977 the CONALLISON's self-unloading boom collapsed while unloading coal at the Detroit Edison Trenton, MI power plant in the Trenton Channel of the lower Detroit River.

The W.W. HOLLOWAY suffered a fire in the fantail while in dry dock following her re powering at AmShip on April 15, 1963 causing $15,000 damage.

J.P. MORGAN JR. left Lorain light April 15, 1910 on her maiden voyage to load iron ore at Duluth, MN.

The JOE S. MORROW entered service April 15, 1907.

JOHN P. REISS left Lorain on her maiden voyage April 15, 1910 with coal for Escanaba, MI. She was the first of three bulkers built in 1910 for Reiss interests.

The IMPERIAL COLLINGWOOD began service April 15, 1948. On April 15, 1955, the Detroit Edison (2) entered service, departing Manitowoc, Wisconsin for Port Inland, Michigan on her maiden trip.

On April 15, 1985, the William Clay Ford (2) (formerly Walter A. Sterling and presently Lee A. Tregurtha) departed Fraser Shipyards for the D. M. & I. R. ore docks in West Duluth for her first load in Ford Motor Company colors.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Pellet Production Line Still Down

04/14:
U.S. Steel's Minntac Mine in Mountain Iron, Minn., will delay for at least another month the start-up of a pellet production line that has been idled since October.

Minntac blames the delay on steel imports depressing demand for taconite pellets. U.S. Steel officials will examine the market again in May to determine whether to re-start the production line.

"Our inventory levels are not where they should be," Bill Smith, a Minntac Mine spokesman, told the Duluth News-Tribune. "That's a direct result of the imports. We will wait until the third week in May and see what's going on in the pellet market."

Reported by: Al Miller




Tugs in Toledo

04/14:
The Gaelic Towing Company has moved their new tugs the CAROLYN HOEY and WILLIAM A. HOEY to their dock in Toledo. Great Lakes Towing Company has the ILLINOIS, LOUISIANA, and MONTANA stationed in Toledo. Yesterday the "G" tug OHIO was towed out of Toledo by the tug TENNESSEE bound most likely for Cleveland, Ohio.

This year there has been no vessel traffic for the grain trade here in Toledo. With the number of tugboats in Toledo and (so far) a lack of ship traffic for the port, Competition between the two tugboat companies will be interesting.

Reported by: J.R. Hoffman




Marquette Busy

04/14:
Monday morning the Algowest was in Marquette's upper harbor and departed for the Soo about mid day. Tuesday the Algowest returned to the upper harbor for her fourth visit withing the last week. Following the Algowest in to the upper harbor was the Elton Hoyt 2nd.

This was then followed by the H. Lee White which sailed into Marquette's lower harbor to unload at the Board of Light and Power Plant. The Lee will move up to the upper harbor early this morning for a load of ore prior to departing Marquette.

This is the first time this season that both harbors had vessels visiting.

Reported by: Art Pickering




Twin Ports Report

04/14:
For the record, Federal MacKenzie, the Twin Ports' first saltie of the season, arrived in port about 5 p.m. April 10.

Federal MacKenzie remained at the AGP elevator on the morning of April 13. When it clears, Chios Pride is expected to raise anchor on Lake Superior and enter Duluth for the AGP berth. Other salties expected in the next two weeks include Federal Agno, Fossnes, Lake Superior, Federal Vibeke, Markborg, Federal St. Laurent and Goviken.

Coast Guard Cutter Sundew was busy April 13 working aids to navigation on upper St. Louis Bay and the St. Louis River.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - April 14

On April 14, 1961 the FORT CHAMBLY departed Toronto, Ont. on her maiden voyage bound for the Canadian Lakehead.

The COLONEL JAMES PICKANDS sailed on her maiden voyage April 14, 1926 clearing Lorain for Toledo, OH to load coal.

The GLENEAGLES lost her self-unloading boom April 14, 1977 while unloading at the C.S.L. stone dock at Humberstone, Ont.

On April 14, 1984, vessels around the Great Lakes were battling one of the worst season openers for ice in recent memory. The Ernest R. Breech (now Kinsman Independent) and the Herbert C. Jackson spent the entire day battling ice off the Duluth entry, while the St. Clair River was choked with ice.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Top Hat and Cane

04/13:
The Earl W. Oglebay was due in Manistee, MI at 0400 today. The ship will be greeted by Police Chief/Harbor Master David Bachman, and Mr. Steve Harold and Ken Jilbert.

For the first time in Manistee's history, the captain of the Oglebay will be presented with a top hat and a Hackberry cane.

The vessel is due in with 13,800 tons of coal from Toledo, Ohio for the Tondu dock.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Crewman Removed From Vessel

04/13:
At approximately 15:00 April 12, 1999 a crewmember from the ALGOPORT was removed from the vessel by the Canadian Coast Guard Ship SORA near the Detroit River Light.

The crewman, with a cardiac condition was taken to a Windsor hospital. No update on the crewman's condition.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




Ranger III Set to Depart

04/13:
On Tuesday April 13th, the National Park Service vessel, RANGER III will depart Bay Ship Company, Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin bound for her homeport of Houghton, Michigan.

Over the last 5 months, the 40 year old "packet" vessel underwent a main propulsion-engine change and addition of a 250 hp, 36" diameter hydraulic tube-type bow thruster. Other projects included reconditioning of four passenger bathrooms (one wheel chair accessible), sand-blasting and repainting of the exterior hull and a regularly scheduled five year dry-docking.

Reported by: WH




Tug catches fire in Chicago

04/13:
A tug caught fire in Chicago's Calumet River the night of 9 April, south of Conrail's Bridge 5. A boat crew and a mobile unit from U.S. Coast Guard Station Calumet Harbor, Ill., responded and cordoned off the area while the Chicago Fire Department extinguished the fire.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Medusa Name Change

04/13:
Radio scanner traffic in Detroit last night had the tug Susan W. Hannah making a security call heading into the South Down Cement dock. Crews identified the barge as "South Down Conquest." This is the former "Medusa Conquest."




Update on Dorothy Ann

04/13:
Interlake Steamship Company, Richfield, Ohio, has announced its new tug, DOROTHY ANN, built specifically to be paired with its highly automated self-unloader, PATHFINDER.

DOROTHY ANN is a 7200-horsepower twin Ulstein-powered Z-drive tug, 124'-6" by 44' by 19'-6". Together the integrated tug/barge DOROTHY ANN/PATHFINDER will be extraordinarily maneuverable, able not only to handle challenging cargos, but to deliver them to demanding ports on the Great Lakes or St. Lawrence Seaway. The new tug is expected to be dedicated in June.

The 620-foot PATHFINDER was converted from the former str. J. L. MAUTHE and entered service in March 1998. Its self unloading system can discharge cargoes from sand to pig iron, making PATHFINDER one of the more versatile units on the Great Lakes or Seaway. The tug/barge is equipped with Continental Conveyor's HAC system, making it the only such vessel able to handle pig iron.

PATHFINDER's cargo handling efficiency was further improved over the past winter by the installation of new cargo side slope plates, facilitating the carriage of new cargoes in a wider range of sizes than other lakers. The vessel can now unload cargoes faster with its new all-gravity system at 6000 tons per hour, according to James A. Barker, assistant vice president of Interlake Steamship.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Today in Great Lakes History - April 13

The RICHARD REISS lost her boom April 13, 1994 when it collapsed at Fairport, OH.

The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2) struck a shoal in Whitefish Bay, near Gros Cap, April 13, 1956, when forced off channel in a shifting ice pack, and nearly sank.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

04/12:
Federal MacKenzie entered the Duluth ship canal sometime overnight April 10-11 and tied up at the AGP grain elevator. The vessel is the first saltie of the season for the Twin Ports.

Edgar B. Speer was anchored off Duluth on April 11, waiting for wind and waves to subside before entering Two Harbors. The same weather system prompted George A. Sloan to anchor in the Straits of Mackinac before continuing on to Cleveland.

Cason J. Callaway is scheduled to call at Ashtabula, then make a rare trip to Sarnia early this week. Mryon C. Taylor will call at Buffalo on April 12 then proceed to Marblehead to load on April 13.

Reported by: Al Miller




Algorail Sails

04/12:
After completing a series of lifeboat drills, Algoma Central's ALGORAIL left her winter lay-up berth in Sarnia, Ont. The ALGORAIL backed out of her slip at 6:00pm Saturday and proceeded to back down the river to fuel at Imperial. She arrived at Imperial at apprx. 6:30pm and was to depart upbound for Meldrum Bay (Manitoulin Island) at 8:30pm. (she arrived in saginaw, MI. at the Buena Vista Dock on 4/12)The only boat left from Sarnia's lay-up fleet is the ALGONORTH. There is no word at this time on her departure date.

Reported by: John A. Harris




Great Lakes Maritime Academy Announces Open House

04/12:
The Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Traverse City, Michigan will be hosting an open house on Saturday May 1st. The Academy will be open for tours from 10 AM to 2PM. This is an excellent opportunity for anyone interested in pursuing a career as a ship's officer to meet with Academy faculty and current cadets. Find out how a career on the lakes may be right for you. To request an information packet about the Academy call 1-800-748-0566 extension 1200. Classes begin in August.

Reported by: Gary Schweitzer




Today in Great Lakes History - April 12

NANCY ORR GAUCHER was launched April 12, 1967 as the a) LANA.

Fuel Tanker LAKESHELL (3) was launched April 12, 1969.

The A.A AUGUSTUS departed Cleveland on her maiden voyage April 12, 1910 bound for Green Bay, WI with a load of coal.

HUDSON TRANSPORT was launched April 12, 1962.

On April 12, 1955 while upbound from Monroe, MI to load iron ore at Duluth, the ENDERS M. VOORHEES had the honor of opening the second century of navigation through the St. Marys Falls Ship Canal which was celebrated with great pomp and ceremony.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Cleveland Update - Alpena Sails

04/11:
Yesterday the Alpena finally left her lay-up berth for the season. She did a short shakedown cruise including approaching the river entrance then backing out of the harbor entrance under her own power. She left Cleveland heading west at noon.

The American Republic and the Earl W. Oglebay were offloading at the LTV works.

The Lake Superior was busy unloading steel coils at the lake front docks as well.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Twin Ports Report

04/11:
Federal MacKenzie, the Twin Ports' first saltie of the season, appeared to be anchored off Duluth on the afternoon of April 10. There was no word on whether the vessel anchored because of the strong northeasterly winds, or because it was simply waiting to enter port on Monday to begin loading.

Reported by: Al Miller




Algowest Makes First Ever Visit

04/11:
Seaway Self-Unloader, ALGOWEST, made her first ever visit to Marquette on Friday, April 9, loading for Algoma Steel at the Soo.

She is sporting Algoma's centennial bow markings.

ALGOWEST is due back for another trip April 10.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




First Foreign Vessel in Port of Thunder Bay

04/11:
On Friday the M/V Lake Ontario became the first foreign vessel to arrive at the Port of Thunder Bay for the 1999 shipping season. She tied up at U.G.G 'A' elevator shortly after 0900hrs. The vessel will load almost 19,000 metric tons of solin

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Munson opens Gladstone

04/11:
The JOHN G. MUNSON opened the small U.P. port of Gladstone on Friday, April 9, with coal from Toledo.

Down the bay in Escanaba, WILFRED SYKES, was loading a cargo of taconite sporting her new "50 years of smooth sailing" markings on each side of the pilothouse.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Algoma Central Marine Captain & Chief Engineer Assignments for 1999

04/11:
During the last ten days of March, Seaway Self Unloaders, which is owned by Algoma Central Marine and Upper Lakes Group, Inc., began operating on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River its large fleet of self-unloading vessels.

The first departure was the mv. CANADIAN TRANSPORT leaving Nanticoke, ON for Ashtabula to load coal. These vessels will be followed in to operation by the remainder of the fleet, with the AGAWA CANYON continuing at Port Weller shipyard until late April for a complete refurbishment.

Those assigned as captains and chief engineers to the Algoma Central Marine’s 23 bulkers and self-unloaders are:

Captain Chief Engineers
JOHN B. AIRD G. Kendall E. Zielonka
AGAWA CANYON A. Rasmussen O. Gooding
ALGOBAY J. Wilhelm W. Kondratowicz
ALGOCAPE C. Ball B. Broydell
ALGOCEN J. Hougesen D. Kilpatrick
ALGOGULF W. Draenger G. Blagdon
ALGOISLE C. Wheeler R. Rodway
ALGOLAKE J. Carlson P. Stanley
ALGOMARINE B. Sevor B. Adams
ALGONORTH D. Ireland C. D‘Souza
ALGONTARIO R. Whyte H. Wright
ALGOPORT G. Kranenburg K. Mankiewicz
ALGORAIL G. Grattan I. Giles
ALGORIVER B. Wolstenholme A. Mair
ALGOSOO N. Baughner J. Billard
ALGOSOUND D. Taylor M. Patton
ALGOSTEEL C. Williams G. Michailopoulos
ALGOVILLE S. Koutsogiannis S. Van Galen
ALGOWAY N. Olsen S. Smith
ALGOWEST A. Strong S. Danielski
ALGOWOOD G. MacDonald A. Vary
CAPT. HENRY JACKMAN B. Walker T. Clarke
SAUNIERE J. Fraser P. Pennock


Reported by: Dave Wobser




Saltie Renames/Scrappings

04/11:
Many saltwater visitors to the great lakes/Gulf of St. Lawrence have been recently scrapped or renamed. Among the scrapped vessels: SEADANIEL, she was a regular visitor to the great lakes till a few years ago, PENY, this is the ex CVIJETA ZUZORIC, she too was a frequent seaway visitor, PERGAMOS, built in 1978 in Japan, 484' x 75' anothe frequent visitor, The OURIOS, MARSHAL KONEV, MARSHAL ZHUKOV, LACKENBY, and the old tanker LACONIA, which up until recently made several trips to Montreal have all been scrapped. Among the Noteable Renamings, The SNOWROSE has been renamed HARMONY, the SALGIR has been renamed KOS, the PONTOPOROS has been renamed MAR BLUE, the MANILA PROGRESS, the PACIFIC SKY, the Manila Progress, and Salgir were too wide to transit the seaway, and never made an appearance on the Great Lakes.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Today in Great Lakes History - April 11

IMPERIAL ST. CLAIR entered service on April 11, 1974 light for Montreal, Que.

The J.W. McGIFFIN was christened at Collingwood on April 11, 1972.

The PHILIP D. BLOCK sailed on her maiden voyage April 11, 1925 with coal from Huron, OH bound for delivery at Indiana Harbor, IN.

The A.E. NETTLETON was launched April 11, 1908.

On April 11, 1970 in Lake Superior’s Whitefish Bay the STADACONA (3) encountered thick ice and suffered bow damage. She developed a hairline crack in her bow and to alleviate the leakage her cargo was shifted from her forward hold to her after compartments with her self-unloading equipment. This maneuver raised her bow enough to keep her from sinking before she reached safety.

ENDERS M. VOORHEES was launched April 11, 1942 .

On April 11, 1964 while upbound on Whitefish Bay, Lake Superior, a boiler burst on board the WILLIAM A. IRVIN killing one of the crew and injuring two others.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





Paterson Refloated

04/10:
The M.V. Paterson who was aground at St-Zotique on Lake St-Francis was refloated yesterday afternoon with the assistance of the Tugs Ocean Intrepid, Ocean Hercules and Ocean Echo II after discharging a part of her cargo on to the PS Barge. At 1700 yesterday she was at anchor for final inspection and adjusting her draft.

Reported by: G. Belley and R.Gagnon




Tall Ship Aground in River

04/10:
The 135 year old tall ship Anna Kristina ran aground at Grassy Island in the Detroit River yesterday evening. At midnight she is reported to be aground out of the shipping channel and is not blocking traffic. Attempts by the U.S. Coast Guard to pull the vessel free were unsuccessful.

The historic sailing vessel spent Thursday and Friday at the Dossin Museum open for public tours. She was on her way back home to Norway when the grounding occurred.

The grounded vessel was pulled free on Saturday April 10th by the Gaelic Towing Company's tug Patiricia Hoey (2200 hp).




Twin Ports Report

04/10:
After the initial flurry, traffic to the DMIR ore docks is starting to settle into a steady pace. The line-up includes: Two Harbors, Presque Isle, April 9; Edgar B. Speer, April 10; Edwin H. Gott, April 11; Roger Blough and Charles M. Beeghly, April 12; and Phillip R. Clarke, April 14. Duluth, John G. Munson and James R. Barker, April 11; Cason J. Callaway, April 15; and Reserve, April 16.

The St. Clair has been an uncommon site the past few years at the Midwest Energy Terminal. This season, however, the vessel already has made several trips to the dock. Its next is set for April 14.

Algontario is due to arrive at the Duluth ship canal about 10:30 p.m. April 9. It was to dock at the St. Lawrence Cement terminal at the Duluth port terminal.

Reported by: Al Miller




Cleveland Salty Update

04/10:
The Lake Superior was scheduled to arrive at the Port of Cleveland at approximately 4:30 yesterday. The Lake Superior will be carrying super-structured steel beams. These beams will be used to construct a new dock at 26 west in the Port of Cleveland. Construction has already begun on the new dock.




Capt. Henry Jackman in Essexville

04/10:
Thursday night the Capt. Henry Jackman entered the Saginaw River and went to the Star Dock in Essexville with potash. This was the first time the vessel has entered into the Saginaw River system.

Other traffic included: the Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity, the pair came in with cement for the LaFarge Cement dock in Carrolton.
The M.V. Wolverine stopped at both the Wirt dock in Bay City and in Saginaw. Due to very strong winds today the Jackman was unable to back out of the river and turn around in the Bay. She still sits in Essexville. The Wolverine was able to depart the River on Friday, leaving about 1400.

Reported by: Dan McNeil and Lon Morgan




Today in Great Lakes History - April 10

TEXACO CHIEF (2) was christened April 10, 1969.

The GODERICH (1) was sold April 10, 1963 to the Algoma Central & Hudson Bay Railway Co. and renamed e) AGAWA (2).

The keel was laid April 10, 1952 for the WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1)

The SINCLAIR GREAT LAKES was christened on April 10, 1963

On April 10, 1973 the ARTHUR B. HOMER departed the shipyard with a new pilot house. She had suffered extensive damage the previous fall in a head on collision on the Detroit River.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Anderson Heads for Repairs

04/09:
Arthur M. Anderson departed Calcite, Michigan yesterday afternoon. She is heading for Sturgeon Bay for repairs to damage caused by the recent grounding. Reports have the vessel with damaged to four ballast tanks. No word on how long or how much the repairs will cost.

As expected the Philip R. Clarke is anchored off of Calcite awaiting orders, the vessel will not proceed in due to the low water levels.

Reported by: David French, Steve Schultz and Al Miller




Algontario Departs

04/09:
Dive surveys were conducted on the Algontario yesterday and the vessel was clearded to transit to Duluth to offload her cargo of cement. She will then head to Thunder Bay for repairs.

Damage from Monday's ground is reported to be limited to flooding in one of her starboard ballast tanks near the rear of the vessel.

Reported by: Ninth U.S. Coast Guard District




Twin Ports Report

04/09:
As expected, Algosound arrived in Duluth early April 8 to become the first Seaway transit of the season to arrive in the Twin Ports. The vessel is also the first of the year to load grain here, taking on 25,000 metric tons of corn at Cargill B1 bound for Baie Comeau, Quebec.

Federal Mackenzie is expected to be the Twin Ports' first saltie, arriving Saturday to load 25,000 tons of soybeans for Finland.

Reported by: Al Miller




Dredging in Saginaw

04/09:
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced this week no dredging will take place on the Saginaw River this year beyond the Liberty Bridge in Bay City. This makes an already bad situation even worse. The low water this season has already had a negative impact on the amount of cargo that can enter the river. Now shallow drafts will have to be set even shallower. The Corps of Engineers claims dredging is postponed until they can find a place to dispose of the materials left over. Without routine dredging the Saginaw River could become un-navigable by bulk carriers, leaving several stone docks and silos out of business.

Reported by: Brian Ferguson




Tall Ship Docked at Dossin Wharf on Belle Isle Detroit

04/09:
Yesterday the Dossin Great Lakes Museum dock opened with a spectacular event. A visiting ship the ANNA KRISTINA arrived yesterday morning to christen the brand new dock on Belle Isle. ANNA KRISTINA is a 110' square rig, top sail ketch with approximately 36,000 square feet of sails. Purchased by Hans Hetti and family in 1977, the family has spent the last 10 years restoring her to original condition. Her crew of 6 consists of two of Hans' children, Salo and Rosa. All 3 family members are in Detroit for this special event. ANNA KRISTINA is open to the public 11 a.m.-3 p.m. (call (313) 852-4051 for more information) Visitors may tour this unique vessel and speak with the international crew.

During the last 10 years she has sailed 170,000 miles with the purpose of increasing interest in Maritime History and participating in the Tall Ship Festival along the Great Lakes. Most recently, the ANNA CHRISTINA was docked in South Haven, Michigan. She is on her way back home to Norway where she will be sailed exclusively along the coast of Norway due to vessel restrictions on this aging vessel. Currently a Norwegian school is negotiating to lease the vessel for old world sailing education.

Built in 1889 in Stangcik near Krinsiansund by Martinez Olsen Ansnes and designed by John Borve to serve as a cargo vessel. Specific cargo included salted fish from Northern Norway to Bergen. Later she was assigned to carry wood from Russia to Norway for home building. 135 years ago, ANNA CHRISTINA's sister ship SKGOLDMOEN opened the Norway-American shipping line . Some of her other voyages have included Rio, Cape Town, Sydney, New York, Boston, Malta and the Red Sea. Terrific speed, well designed made the trip from the Canary Islands to Halifax in 21 days.

Visit the Great Lakes Maritime Institute web site




Rest of USS Fleet Sails

04/09:
The George A. Sloan and Myron C. Taylor are set to kick off their seasons.

The Sloan is expected to depart Bay Shipbuilding on the today at 1800. She will head for Port Inland to load.

The Taylor was to depart yesterday 2200. She is heading to Alabaster to load.

The Calcite was delayed a day and she was to leave Bayship yesterday to Stoneport to load.

Reported by: David French and Al Miller




Update On Cleveland's First Salty

04/09:
The Ziemia Tarnowska finished unloading part of her cargo of steel in Cleveland yesterday. She is continuing her journey to other Great Lakes ports to discharge steel and will more than likely load with outbound grain from Duluth.

Reported by: Shane




Schedule Changes for Oglebay Norton

04/09:
The Oglebay Norton fleet has had a very unpredictable week at the head of the lakes.

Wolverine, tentatively scheduled to load at Taconite Harbor April 5 was diverted to off load the Anderson. Reserve, Middletown, Buckeye and Courtney Burton were all scheduled for Silver Bay on April 4 and 5 but became bunched up due to weather. As a result the Armco, which was scheduled for Taconite Harbor, was sent to Silver Bay with the Middletown heading to Taconite Harbor. Finally, the Oglebay Norton which was due in Taconite Harbor April 7, was diverted to Escanaba.

Reported by: Mike Cleary




Fire on the Water Front

04/09:
A fire burned on the Windsor water front yesterday at the old Ramada Inn building. The building has not served as a hotel since 1994.

The U.S. Coast Guard's cutter Bristol Bay and a Station Belle Isle utility boat worked with the City of Detroit fire boat Curtis Randolph (the Randolph was unavailable in the early stages of the fire) helping to battle the huge blaze from the Detroit River.

The fire that gutted the wood-frame building is being called "suspicious" by investigators.




Today in Great Lakes History - April 09

On April 9, 1960, the Murray Bay (1) (now Comeaudoc) entered service as the first Canadian 730-footer.

The LAWRENDOC (2) was christened jointly with her Collingwood-built sister ship MONDOC (3) on April 9, 1962.

The Wilson Marine Transit Co., Cleveland purchased the FINLAND on April 9, 1957 and resold her the same day to the Republic Steel Corp., Cleveland with Wilson Marine acting as manager

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Algontario Refloated

04/08:
0900 update
The Duluth News-Tribune reported April 8 that crewmen aboard Algontario refloated the vessel by removing 130 tons of fuel oil onto a Purvis Marine fuel barge and emptying the vessels ballast tanks. Today, the vessel is undergoing hull inspection and the crew will conduct tests on its engine and steering systems. Earlier reports indicated the vessel sustained damage to one ballast tank.

Once tests are complete, the U.S. and Canadian coast guards and the vessel's owners will decide whether to make additional tests or send the ship on to Duluth. The Corps of Engineers will survey the channel today where Algontario grounded before allowing it to reopen for traffic.

Original Story:
The Algontario floated free at 18:30 yesterday. Several tugs aided in the refloating, Avenger IV on the stern, the Wilfred Cohen on her bow and the Adanac on starboard quarter. Very little assistance was needed and the boat floated free after her fuel tanks were pumped out and ballast shifted.

Yesterday evening she was anchored in the channel for inspection. It appears the vessel was still in the channel but over too far on the red (shallow) side.

She was due at St. Lawrence Cement in Duluth sometime today, at 0830 she was reported to be tied at the Carbide Dock for inspection.

Reported by: Scott McLellan and Al Miller




Anderson Refloated

04/08:
0900 update
The Arthur M. Anderson was refloated Wednesday after she transferred 7,100 short tons of limestone to the M/V Wolverine. She then moored up to the Calcite dock, where the investigation and inspection continues.

Original Story:
A TV report in Duluth April 7 said that the Arthur M. Anderson has damaged to four ballast tanks after grounding at Rogers City.

Reports last night had the Wolverine moored alongside the grounded vessel, the Anderson was off loading cargo into the Wolverine. This is an attempt to unload enough cargo to lighten the vessel and refloat her.



Reported by: Al Miller, John M. Chomniak and Dale D. Schommer




Paterson Update

04/08:
Reports last night had the PATERSON is still aground off buoy D-18 near the St.Zotique anchorage on Lake St.Francis. Groupe Ocean sent three tugs to refloat her in addition to the lightering barge P.S.BARGE No.1 and the barge M.I.L. 401. The tugs are OCEAN HERCULE which entered the Seaway yesterday afternoon towing M.I.L. 401, OCEAN INTREPIDE and OCEAN ECHO II.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Detroit Bridge Stuck

04/08:
Last night the Rouge River Short Cut Bridge across the Rouge River was inoperative. The bridge was stuck in a partially open and unlocked position due to a power outage.




With low water levels taking their toll on shipping around the Lakes, be sure to stay tuned to the G.L.& S.S. News Channel for updates through out the day.
This page with automatically reload every half hour.




McAsphalt 401 Barge In For Repairs

04/08:
McKeil Marine Tug Escort Protector has sat idle in Port Stanley since Monday April 5th, waiting for repairs to be completed on the McAsphalt 401 barge.

The barge has a leak between a cargo hold and ballast tank. It was first planned to degas the cargo hold with liquid asphalt from the McAsphalt holding tanks in Port Stanley but the asphalt was not hot enough and would not pump. This led to the next plan were liquid asphalt was trucked in today and pumped on board. Sometime today it will be pumped off the barge and welding will begin.

The 401 was in Port Stanley for similar repairs last year. It seems the hard years are taking their toll on this barge.

Reported by: Ted Coombs




Seaway Update

04/08:
Still "wintering" in Montreal Tuesday was ENERCHEM TRADER. She was still flying the Enerchem houseflag and no work has been done on her to repaint her in Algoma colours.

Not renamed yet is ENERCHEM CATALYST which entered the Seaway on April 1st bound for Sarnia. Yesterday, she was downbound somewhere in the Lakes for Oakville, Ont.

Also downbound April 7 somewhere on Lake Ontario according to the Canadian Coast Guard was the salty CHIOS PRIDE. She was the first salty on March 31 to enter the Seaway bound for Toronto.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Algosound Due in the Twin Ports

04/08:
Algosound is expected to arrive in Duluth on April 8 to load grain at Cargill B1. It will be the first Seaway transit of the season for the Twin Ports.

Reported by: Al Miller




Barker Delayed - Algowest First Trip

04/08:
Due to the grounding of the Algontario in the St Marys River, the Kaye E. Barker arrived in Marquette's Upper Harbor yesterday afternoon, about a half day later than scheduled.

The Algowest will make her first visit of the year to Marquette's upper harbor early this morning.

Reported by: Art Pickering




Reiss to sail Today

04/08:
The Richard Riess is scheduled to depart her winter lay-up berth in Erie, PA. today. She is scheduled to load stone in Marblehead, Ohio for Erie. The stock plies of stone low, she is expected to make a number of trips to replenish the stock.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Mailboat Starts 1999 Season

04/08:
The J.W. Westcott Company, Detroit River Mailboat, began their season yesterday continuing more than 100 years of mid-river Mail and supply service.




Icebreaking update

04/08:
Operation Taconite was terminted 6 April.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Today in Great Lakes History - April 08

The sea trials for the AMERICAN REPUBLIC were conducted in Green Bay on April 8-10, May 4-11 and 18, 1981.

The J.A. CAMPBELL was the first bulk carrier to load taconite pellets that were shipped from Reverve Minings Davis Works at Silver Bay MN on April 8, 1956.

On April 8, 1957 Great Lakes Steamship stock holders voted to sell the entire 16 ship fleet to four fleets.

On April 8, 1977 at Toledo the G.A. TOMLINSON required an estimated $235,000 to outfit her machinery for the up coming season.

The R.E. WEBSTER was launched April 8, 1905 as a) ELBERT H. GARY.

On April 8, 1969, LEON FALK, JR. entered Duluth harbor to become the first vessel to arrive from the lower lake region opening the 1969 shipping season at the head of the lakes. She loaded almost 20,700 tons of iron ore bound for Great Lakes Steel in Detroit.

The ELBERT H. GARY was launched on April 8, 1905.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Low Water Grounds yet Another Vessel

04/07:
The Arthur M. Anderson ran aground yesterday while inbound Calcite, MI. The vessel was in the channel and on the range approximately 1000 ft from the pier.

No personnel injuries or pollution were reported, however flooding was confirmed in three bottom ballast tanks. The USCGC Biscayne Bay is on scene as are Marine Safety Office Sault St Marie personnel. The group was expecting a refloat plan for the vessel this morning.

It is believed that the Philip R. Clark was re-routed from loading salt at Fairport Harbor Oh. to assist the Anderson.

Reported by: Dale D. Schommer and Greg Stephens




More on the Algontario

04/07:
1300 update:
The Algontario is expected to be refloated later today. A tank barge owned by Purvis Marine is being used to off load the fuel from the vessel in hopes of floating her free.

Environmental concerns led to the decision not to lighter the bulk cement. It was felt the cement powder would cause environmental damage.

0900 update:
A report in the April 7 Duluth News-Tribune about Algontario's grounding said the ship took on water in one of its starboard ballast tanks near the rear of the vessel (described as "No. 5 double-bottom" in paragraph below). Canadian and U.S. Coast Guard officials met with the Algontario's owners Tuesday to devise a plan to salvage the ship. Al Vanagas, general manager of operations for Algoma, said the company hoped to free the boat April 7 by removing ballast in several tanks, thus lightening the vessel and allowing it to float free. That way, none of the cargo would have to be lightered. "We don't see a real particular problem," he said. Vanagas said he wasn't sure what caused the mishap. One theory is that lower than normal water levels in the channel may have affected the ship's ability to make the sharp turn near Neebish Island, he said, adding that the vessel was not having mechanical problems.

Original story:
The Algontario, aground in the St. Marys River near Johnson's Point (in Canadian waters, 200 feet from the international border) is carrying 18,910 metric tons of cement and 167,187 gallons of fuel oil and diesel fuel. The U.S. Coast Guard's lead vessel of the U.S.C.G.C. Katmai Bay (WTGB 101)-class icebreaking seagoing buoy tender has been designated the on-scene commander and the inland buoy tender U.S.C.G.C. Buckthorn (WLI 642) is also in the area.

No pollution or injuries have been reported, though the No. 5 double-bottom is flooded.

The upbound channel in the St. Marys River from Munuscong Lake Junction Buoy to Ninemile Point has been closed. Upbound transits are permitted only through daylight through the West Neebish Channel. Six upbound and two downbound vessels were cleared through the West Neebish Channel on 6 April, following a traffic disruption due to the grounding.

Linda Stoetzer reports that the tugs Avenger IV, Adanac, Osprey, Martin Johnson, and two other Purvis work-tugs are assisting the Algontario. Operations were to get underway at 0600 this morning. The Katmai Bay shuttled Canadian officials to and from the Algontario yesterday.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Paterson Update

04/07:
At 20:00 last night the Paterson was still aground and was waiting for the assistance of the tugs Ocean Echo and Ocean Hercules. The tugs were to depart Quebec City last night to assist in refloating her. They should arrive on scene by 16:00 this afternoon.

The vessel has a Forward draft of 24'06¨ and aft 23'00¨.

The Paterson ran aground on April 5th off the beach at St-Zotique, on Lake St-Francis.

Reported by: G. Belley




Two new harbor tugs in Detroit

04/07:
Two new tugs recently arrived in Detroit from the Chicago area.

Under the command of Capt. John Wellington, a legend on the Great Lakes , the tugs "Katie Ann" and "Laura Lynn" arrived at the Gaelic Tugboat yard this past weekend . These tugs are far superior in horsepower and bollard pull to anything available for ship assist work in the port of Detroit.

According to sources at the Gaelic Tugboat Company these vessels are the most agile and most modern that Detroit has seen this decade, having been modernized at the Holly Marine yard in Chicago with the latest and best equipment available in the marine industry today.

These vessels will offer a great marketing tool as Gaelic strives to regain its dominence in the ship assist market once again.

The Katie Ann will be renamed William Hoey and the Laura Lynn is to be renamed Susan Hoey.

Reported by: D. Ocean




Calcite II off to early start

04/07:
USS's Calcite II will start her season today when she departs Bay Shipbuilding Co. at around 1200. She will then proceed to Stoneport to load arriving sometime in the morning Thursday.

Reported by: David French




Marquette Update

04/07:
Marquette's lower harbor finally received its first cargo vessel of the year yesterday morning when the H. Lee White arrived to unloaded a cargo of limestone for the Iron Ore Mines in Marquette County.

The White then moved up to the upper harbor for a load of ore and was scheduled to depart yesterday evening. The Kaye Barker is due this morning at 4 a.m. at Marquette's upper harbor.

Reported by: Art Pickering




First Salty to Cleveland

04/07:
The Cleveland Cuyahoga County Port Authority received its first ship carrying hot and cold rolled steel coils for the 1999 shipping season yesterday. The steel coils were made in Holland and will be discharged at the port. The Ziemia Tarnowska was tied-up in slip number 24 East in calm waters at approximately 5:30 p.m.

Ceres Terminals and the International Longshoreman's Association will begin discharging at 8:00 a.m. this morning.

Reported by: Shernshane




Yugoslav ships barred from United States

04/07:
The U.S. government said 6 April it has started barring Yugoslav-registry vessels from U.S. territorial waters as the result of airstrikes launched 24 March to halt attacks against ethnic Albanians in the Serbian province of Kosovo. As of 5 April, vessels under the Yugoslav flag or under Yugoslav government control are barred, joining vessels from Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea, Sudan and Syria.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Beetle quarantine expanded

04/07:
The U.S. Department of Agriculture has expanded a quarantine to six more states to prevent the spread of the pine shoot beetle. A native of Europe, the small flying beetle winters inside the bark at the base of living pine trees, then feeds on the shoots from July through October. The beetle is believed to have been imported to the United States aboard cargo vessels and was first found at a Christmas tree farm in Ohio in 1992.

Under the quarantine, importers must have their products inspected, fumigated, cold-treated or certified for special permits.

Nineteen counties in Indiana, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia were added to the quarantine on 2 April.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Today in Great Lakes History - April 07

The CANADIAN TRANSPORT (2) was christened April 7, 1979.

The tanker ROBERT W. STEWART (b AMOCO MICHIGAN) was delivered to Standard Oil Co. on April 7, 1928 as the second largest tanker in service at the time of her launch.

JAMES LAUGHLIN was launched April 7, 1906.

The EMORY L. FORD was sold on April 7, 1965 to the Reiss Steamship Co. and renamed b) RAYMOND H. REISS, the last boat purchased by Reiss.

TEXACO BRAVE (1) arriyerdayat Ramey's Bend from Toronto April 7, 1975 in tow of tugs G.W. ROGERS and BAGOTVILLE for scrapping.

In 1974 the THOMAS W. LAMONT loaded the initial shipment of ore for the season at the D.M. & I.R. ore docks in Duluth.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Algontario Update

04/06:
Reports on Tuesday afternoon have the vessel with a slight list to starboard and she is reported to be holed. The Yankcanuck was towed to the site yesterday by the Avenger IV and the Wilfred M. Cohen for lightering. At last report the Yankcanuck was tied up at the Bondar Marina dock, it is unclear if any cargo was offloaded.

The Algontario ran aground in the St. Marys River yesterday morning about a quarter mile north of Johnson's Point in the upbound channel, she was bound for Duluth with 18,910 metric tons cement from Clarkson, Ont. Water Levels are reported to be 3 to 4 feet lower than normal.

No vessels are being allowed to use the upbound channel (Middle Neebish Channel). Upbound vessels were being diverted to the downbound channel but only during daylight hours. There are few details about damage, but news reports say the vessel was holed. No injuries were reported to her crew.

A Coast Guard helicopter, which flew over the area Monday morning, reported no pollution coming from the grounded vessel.

Reported by: Scott McLellan, Al Miller and Mike Cleary




Ranger III Sea Trials

04/06:
The U.S National Park Service RANGER III was out on sea-trials this past week making adjustments to engine and CPP propeller control systems.

The vessel expects to make further adjustments this week and get underway for her home port of Houghton, Michigan on Monday, April 12th.

The season opener for Isle Royale is tentatively scheduled for Tuesday, April 27th.

Reported by: WH




New Pictures of Conversion

04/06:
New pictures of the conversion of the J.W. McGiffin are available on Canada Steamship Lines' home page.




The Future of ULS

04/06:
In an interview in the January March 1999 issue of Seaway Review, Upper Lakes Group Chairman Jack Leitch had some interesting comments to make about his firm's future plans.

In response to a question regarding the uncertain market at present for bulk carriers, and whether the fleet plans to reduce this capacity or convert more ships to self-unloaders, Leitch responded: "We don't plan any more conversions. I believe the Canadian self-unloader market is saturated for the moment. It might be sensible for us to consider letting a few more bulk carriers go out of class because the market is pretty skinny for them. We may go as far as scrapping them."

When asked if he thought there would ever be any Canadian flag 1,000-footers, Leitch said if that were to come to pass it might be through the purchase of a current US flag vessel. "It is a big leap to spend $80-$90 million to build one these days. I am pretty sure we would not do it. I think business for the industry have reached a plateau, so we will likely continue to use the assets we have as efficiently as we can," he said.

Leitch also said that Upper Lakes Group has no plans to convert any of its vessels to tub/barge combinations. "We concentrate mostly on long haul movement and quick discharge, That does not lend itself to tug/barge. We believe ships give us a better return than tug/barges."

He also said one of the biggest challenges shippers face is that of efficiency, especially in the face of increasing competition from railroads. "The problem is that we cannot get much more efficiency into our operations. Our ships are as big as they can get and are as fast as we can make them. Most of them are diesel powered now and fairly efficient in that regard. Whereas railroads are significantly increasing productivity and reducing costs, we find that we are not able to increase productivity and our costs are increasing because we are now getting user fees loaded on us, plus the icebreaking tolls, plus Seaway tolls and so forth.

"There are a lot of forces working against us," he said.

Reported by: Roger LeLevre




New tugs for GLT Update

04/06:
In February, Tugz International L.L.C., an affiliate of The Great Lakes Group, announced the christening of three “Z” Class multi-purpose reverse tractor tugs at MARCO Shipyard, Seattle, Washington, completing the second phase of the Company’s fleet expansion and upgrade program which now exceeds US$30,000,000. The historic christening ceremony marks the 100th year anniversary of The Great Lakes Towing Company, whose early shareholders included John D. Rockefeller, James R. Sinclair, and other well-known industrialists of the day.

The next phase of the Company’s expansion program involves the development and construction of a new prototype tractor tug for Great Lakes service, as well as an anticipated follow-on order for an additional three “Z” class tractor tugs. The Company’s new construction program is part of the Great Lakes Group’s plan to diversify its marine operations and holdings beyond the Great Lakes region. Last year, another affiliate, Puerto Rico Towing & Barge Co., commenced towing operations in San Juan and other Caribbean ports.

The Z-THREE, the Z-FOUR, and the Z-FIVE, as the tugs are called, will be operated under a U.S. Navy contract to provide harbor towing services at the U. S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

Designed by Jensen Maritime Consultants, Inc., Seattle, Washington, the 95' long x 32' wide tractor tugs have 4,000 hp with a bollard pull in excess of 110,000 lbs. and operate at a design speed of 14 knots with a 3-man crew. The Z-class design was developed to accommodate an entire range of towing services, including ship handling duties, salvage, firefighting, oil recovery, tanker escort; and ocean and coastal towing of vessels and barges. The new tugs have been modified to meet the special needs of the Navy and include special above and below-water fendering systems to accommodate assistance to submarines.

Reverse tractor tugs are technically advanced towing vessels in which the conventional propeller and rudder is replaced by an integrated unit, known as a Z-drive, which performs both propulsion and steering, enabling the tug to push or pull in any direction. Thus, the “Z” in the name of the tugs. With a Z-drive, tug maneuverability is greatly improved allowing the tug to turn on its own axis, stop within its own length when running at full speed, and hold its position and maneuver into dock in adverse conditions.

The Great Lakes Group, headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio, owns and operates over 50 tugboats, is the largest U.S.-flag tugboat company engaged in towing on the Great Lakes, and operates across the United States in more than 35 U.S. ports; in all 8 U.S. Great Lakes’ states, including Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York and the St. Lawrence Seaway. What is not so widely known, is that the Group’s tugboat operations now also extend from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands to Hawaii, and further, that Company tugs are chartered to other companies worldwide.

Reported by: George L. Sogor




Demolition Continues

04/06:
Demolition continues at the former Cargill C elevator site in Duluth. Sometime Friday night or Saturday, explosives were set off on the landward side of the headhouse blowing out the lower portion of the walls and shattering windows throughout the structure. The structure remains standing. The concrete walls of this structure are reportedly to be several feet thick, so it's expected to be one of the most difficult portions of the complex to demolish.

Reported by: Al Miller




Fishing vessel casualty report released

04/06:
The Fishing Vessel Casualty Task Force of the U.S. Coast Guard has released its report at www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/moa/docs/fishing.htm.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Today in Great Lakes History - April 06

ALGOLAKE was christened April 6, 1977, she was the first maximum-sized ship of this type in Algoma's fleet with all cabins aft.

The HON. PAUL MARTIN departed Collingwood April 6, 1985 on her maiden voyage to load grain at Thunder Bay, Ont. bound for Quebec City, Que. She was the largest vessel built at Collingwood as a result of the new Seaway egulations that allowed increased hull lengths beyond the previous maximum overall of 730' to transit the lock systems.

PRAIRIE HARVEST (c) MELVIN H. BAKER II) sailed on her maiden voyage in 1984.

On April 6, 1990 CANADOC (2) was laid up at Montreal, Que. never to sail again.

NOTRE DAME VICTORY (b CLIFFS VICTORY) was delivered to Interocean Steamship Co. on April 6, 1945 under charter from the U.S.M.C.

FERNDALE (2) was launched April 6, 1912 as a) LOUIS R. DAVIDSON



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Paterson Aground

04/05:
This morning the M.V. Paterson ran aground just below D-18, off the beach at St-Zotique, on Lake St-Francis. Earlier this afternoon the vessel was still there, apparently waiting for tug assistance.

The Paterson is the second vessel to experience trouble on the Lake St-Francis since the 1999 Seaway opening. The Atlantic Hickory had a problem last week at the Lancaster Bar light between D-40 and D-42. She ran out of the channel and struck bottom. In both cases no mechanical reason was reported and no other reason given.

Reported by: G. Belley




Low Water Levels Ground Freighter

04/05:
The Algontario ran aground in the St. Marys River at 0500 this morning about a quarter mile north of Johnson's Point.

At 1030 there were two Coast Guard cutters/tenders and an inflatable assessing the damage and whether the ship is taking on water. The north bound channel is completely blocked off. Water Levels are reported to be 3 to 4 feet lower than normal.

Reported by: David M Hall




Fog Closes River

04/05:
Fog closed down the St. Marys River from about 7:00 P.M. Friday night until 9:15 A.M. Saturday morning from the Soo Locks to Mud Lake. Four ships were anchored above the locks for the night. 10 ships were waiting to go upbound.

The last one in line to go up was the Edgar B. Speer, she was anchored at Detour and it was almost dark when she came through the locks late Saturday.

For a time the ships were coming through Mission Point about every half hour to forty-five minutes.

The wind and the fog was so great there was more ship to ship talk after the ships started upbound and some dropped anchor above the locks at Gros Cap because of up to 14 foot waves in Superior.

Reported by: Larry Leverenz




Twin Ports Report

04/05:
The Twin Ports grain season got underway April 3-4 when Halifax arrived at the General Mills elevator in Duluth to unload. The season's first load of cement is expected to arrive aboard Algontario when it arrives at the St. Lawrence Cement dock in Duluth on April 6. Wolverine reportedly will call at one of the North Shore ports; possibly Taconite Harbor. St. Clair is scheduled to return April 6 with cargo for the Reiss Inland Dock up the St. Louis River. After unloading, the boat will load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal for the power plant at Taconite Harbor.

High winds and waves the night of April 3 prompted several vessels to anchor on Lake Superior. Among them: Middletown, Courtney Burton, Reserve and Buckeye, all bound for Silver Bay, and Armco bound for Taconite Harbor.

Reported by: Al Miller




Catalyst has Mechanical Trouble

04/05:
On April 3 , the Enerchem Catalyst had some kind of mechanical failure in the Seaway. She anchored east of Carelton Island for repairs.

It is reported she was asked to fax a list of the repairs to authorities and was asked if the ship was safe to continue its voyage. She got underway again about 1030.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Upper Lakes Enters 1999 Season

04/05:
Upper Lakes Group Inc. commenced the 1999 navigation season on the Great Lakes with its str. STEPHEN B. ROMAN departing Toronto for a full cargo of cement at the port of Picton on eastern Lake Ontario delivered to Essroc Canada Inc. in Toronto. On March 20, the season’s first self-unloader is the mv. CANADIAN TRANSPORT loaded coal at a Lake Erie port for one Ontario Hydro’s generating plants. By April 1, the rest of the Upper Lakes self-unloading fleet plus two bulkers are scheduled, with eight bulkers remaining laidup.

Captains and Chief Engineers appointed to the 22 members of the Upper Lakes fleet for the 1999 season are:

Captain Chief Engineer
CANADIAN ENTERPRISE A. C. Peckford S. Jastremski
CANADIAN TRANSPORT K. D. Mackenzie R. B. Grant
CANADIAN OLYMPIC A. C. Peckford D. L. Pauze
CANADIAN PROGRESS R. L. Armstrong M. Cimon
CANADIAN CENTURY K. B. Kelly D. Leblanc
JAMES NORRIS E. C. J. Seward R. W. Turnbell
CANADIAN NAVIGATOR M. W. Young J. A. Hoogland
CANADIAN TRANSFER A. R. Smith M. C. Desaulniers
CANADIAN LEADER W. G. R. Wheeler C. J. Tremblay
CANADIAN PROSPECTOR G. E. Desrochers J. M. Cormier
CANADIAN TRADER R. A. Wheeler E. J. Boland
CANADIAN VENTURE E. A. Wojtecki D. Allan
CANADIAN MINER G. M. Greig P. L. Schubert-Lock
GORDON C. LEITCH F. R. Penney L. Des Rosiers
QUEBECOIS R. A. Schrempf W. A. Hankinson
MONTREALAIS D. L. Hurlbut M. C. J. Beauchamp
CANADIAN MARINER W. J. Robinson M. Brassard
CANADIAN PROVIDER C. S. Misener A. Giguere
CANADIAN RANGER K. G. Hindman Y. E. lapointe
SEAWAY QUEEN S. C. Moore G. Mitchell
CANADIAN VOYAGER E. R. Dewling L. Ethier
STEPHAN B. ROMAN D. W. Bielby J. H. Kerbrat
Fleet Captain - W. B. Longe
Fleet Chief Engineer - M. C. Almeida


Reported by: Dave Wobser




Today in Great Lakes History - April 05

On April 5, 1984 the joined sections of the HILDA MARJANNE and CHIMO's emerged from the Port Weller Dry Dock as the b) CANADIAN RANGER.

Sea trials for the PRAIRIE HARVEST (c) MELVIN H. BAKER II) were complete on April 5, 1984.

The G.G. POST was launched April 5, 1902 as a) LUZON

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports and USS Report

04/04:
Edwin H. Gott spent a windy April 3 snugged up to the shiploader at the DMIR ore dock in Duluth, taking on pellets for Nanticoke. Making its first call of the new season to the Twin Ports was Halifax, also on April 3.

Arthur M. Anderson is busy on the lower lakes. After several trips carrying salt to Buffalo, it's now scheduled to load coal in Conneaut for Wyandotte. After delivering its cargo of taconite pellets to Conneaut, John G. Munson will head to Toledo to load coal.

Reported by: Al Miller




Hamilton Report

04/04:
The Paterson spent the Saturday at Agrico in Hamilton loading corn and left her berth at 11:00pm.

Hamilton's lay-up fleet has mostly departed, remaining are the Canadian Provider, the James Norris and the Algoriver.

Reported by: M. Ouellette




Preview the 1999 edition of the Boatwatchers Bible

04/04:
The 1999 of “Know Your Ships,” the popular, annual guide to boats and boatwatching on the Great Lakes and Seaway, launches its 40th anniversary edition on April 15. Besides accurate vessel and fleet listings for all Great Lakes vessels from tugs to 1,000-footers, this year’s “Know Your Ships” - expanded to 144 pages - includes even more listings for international flag vessels trading into the Lakes and Seaway.

To begin this special edition, which also commemorates the 40th anniversary of the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway, marine historian Jody Aho takes a look at important events on the shipping scene during the past four decades. Appropriately, the Canadian bulk carrier Seaway Queen is 1999’s Vessel of the Year. The Vessel Spotlight feature, begun last year, also continues, with profiles of more familiar lakers.

“Know Your Ships” also features handy tips for boatwatchers, including phone numbers to track vessel movements, a guide to Great Lakes marine museums and profiles of the Soo Locks, Welland Canal and St. Lawrence Seaway. As usual, the fine work of many outstanding marine photographers sample the shipping scene from Duluth to Montreal.

For ordering information, visit the Marine Publishing Co, home page at www.knowyourships.com or call (734) 668-4734. Price is $14.95 plus $3% s/h (Michigan residents add 6% tax).




Today in Great Lakes History - April 04

The keel was laid April 4, 1978 for the Fred R. White Jr.

Sea trials of the tanker ROBERT W. STEWART were run on April 4, 1928

CEDARGLEN was launched on April 4, 1925 as a) WILLIAM C. ATWATER

HARRY W. CROFT was launched April 4, 1908 as a) FRED G. HARTWELL (1)

The E.G. GRACE became the first Maritimer to be sold for scrap when she was sold to Marine Salvage April 4, 1984.

JEAN-TALON was launched April 4, 1936 as a) FRANQUELIN (1)

The Harbor Tug and Fire Boat EDNA G. was launched April 4, 1896

On April 4, 1983 and on April 4, 1984, the William Clay Ford (1) opened the inter-lake shipping season at Duluth. While the William Clay Ford was traditionally among the first vessels to visit Duluth-Superior, it was coincidence that she opened the port on the same day during her last two seasons in service.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

04/03:
John G. Munson is scheduled to go into service April 2 when it arrives at the Duluth DMIR ore dock at 2 p.m. Cason J. Callaway is due to start the season with a trip to Two Harbors, arriving April 4. Edwin H. Gott is making its first trip of the season to Nanticoke; it's due April 6. Roger Blough is becoming an early season regular at the DMIR ore dock in Duluth. It's due there again April 6.

Reported by: Al Miller




Drummond Islander II gets an assist

04/03:
A 2,000-horsepower tug was contracted 1 April to assist the Drummond Islander II, a work barge and 330 meters/1,000 feet of partially submerged pipe from Marysville, Mich., to Lake Huron On 31 March, the Drummond Islander II and the tow were spotted sailing up the St. Clair River. Observers in Sarnia, Ontario, noted that the vessel was moving at a very slow speed against a 5-knot current. The captain of the port at U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Office Detroit issued an order requiring that a tow plan be created and a vessel with more horsepower be found before the tow is taken past the Bluewater Bridge.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Work at Port Weller

04/03:
The Agawa Canyon is now out of the Port Weller Dry Dock and on the fitout wall.

The Canadian Transfer is to enter the dry dock today for her rudder replacement.

The old forebody of the J.W. McGiffin is on its way to be scrapped in Port Colborne.

Reported by: Roger Tottman




Detroit/Wayne County to fly shipping flags

04/03:
The Detroit/Wayne County Port Authority will highlight a different shipping company on the North American Great Lakes each month by flying that firm's flag at its headquarters at 8109 E. Jefferson in Detroit. Several companies have been asked to donate their house flags.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




USS Update

04/03:
USS nears close to full operations today after the John G. Munson and Cason J. Callaway started their 1999 seasons. The Munson got underway from Fraser on the 2nd and shifted to DMIR in Duluth. Her first load will be taken to Conneaut. The Callaway sailed from Bayship late on the 1st. She will be heading to Two Harbors to load. She will also head to Conneaut to unload. Check the USS updates for dates and times

Reported by: David French




Comments sought on passenger vessel proposals

04/03:
The U.S. Coast Guard is seeking comments on proposed regulations that will implement the U.S. Passenger Vessel Safety Act of 1993. The act created a new class of uninspected passenger vessels that are at least 100 gross tons and do not carry more than 12 passengers.

An Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking was published in the Federal Register on 1 April to gather comments on operational and equipment requirements for the class. Comments are due 30 June. A copy of the notice is at dms.dot.gov, docket number USCG-1999-5040.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Segwun Resumes Cruises

04/03:
The Segwun resumes cruises for 1999 on May 28th. about a week earlier than usual and is offering three overnight cruises this season on the June 13-14 and September 12-13 weekends and then again over Labour day September 6-7. Passengers enjoy two days of cruising on Segwun through the Muskoka lakes and stay overnight at the classic Clevelands House and have a luncheon at the new Windermere House. The fare is only $275 Canadian. Please phone Cathy at 705-687-6667 or 6668 for reservations and more details. Phone 905-889-6972 Fax 905-8899-7914

Reported by: Gordon C. Shaw




Upcoming Event in Detroit

04/03:
USS Grayfox will be docked at the Dossin Museum on Belle Isle April 24th. The Greyfox will be open for museum visitors to tour.

New members may come aboard the USS Grayfox for an exclusive trip for new Great Lakes Maritime Institute members only. Space limited to 50 new members.

New Member Cruise 11:00 a.m.-12:00p.m. The vessel will be docked at Dossin Great Lakes Museum 12-4 p.m.

Click here for more information





Today in Great Lakes History - April 03

On April 3, 1991 the pilothouse of the WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) was moved by barge towed by Gaelic tug's CAROLYN HOEY and placed on a specially built foundation at the Dossin Museum for display facing the Detroit River as a fully equipped pilot house.

LIQUILASSIE was launched April 3, 1943 as a) TEMBLADOR.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Canadian Miner Opens Seaway

04/02:
At 2 PM on Wednesday the CANADIAN MINER, under control of Captain Gerry Greig, passed downbound through the Iroquois Lock.

She loaded corn at Hamilton for delivery to Quebec City. From there she will proceed to Port Cartier to load ore for Indiana Harbor. The CANADIAN MINER was to spend the night tied up above Eisenhower Lock because the American sector of the Seaway is not ready for night-time navigation. Not only are the floating aids to navigation not yet in place, but the Wiley Dondero Ship Canal is choked with ice.

The CCGS SIMCOE was sent into the canal between Eisenhower and Snell to help break up the ice and push it into the Snell to be "locked through" and flushed down the river. This channel had ice 2 feet thick just last Monday.

The first upbounder is reported to be the ATLANTIC HURON.

Reported by: Ron Beaupre




White Sails

04/02:
H. Lee White began its season when it departed from the BNSF ore dock in Superior early on April 1.

Reported by: Al Miller




More Vessels Start 1999 Season

04/02:
The Elton Hoyt 2nd departed yesterday from River Rouge heading to Marquette.
McKee Sons also departed yesterday, leaving Escanaba for South Chicago.

Reported by: Lake Carriers'Association




Drummond Islander II, with tow, stopped

04/02:
The Drummond Islander II attempted to tow a work barge and 330 meters/1,000 feet of partially submerged pipe up the St. Clair River in Michigan on 31 March. Observers in Sarnia, Ontario, noted that the vessel was moving at a very slow speed against a 5-knot current. The captain of the port at U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Office Detroit issued an order requiring that a tow plan be created and a vessel with more horsepower be found before the tow is taken past the Bluewater Bridge.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Icebreaking update

04/02:
Operation Taconite:
The U.S. Coast Guard's Katmai Bay-class icebreaking seagoing buoy tenders U.S.C.G.C. Biscayne Bay (WTGB 104) and U.S.C.G.C. Neah Bay (WTGB 105) did track maintenance in Michigan's lower St. Clair River on 31 March.

Also, Operation Oil Can and Operation Coal Shovel were terminated 31 March.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Algontario Arrives

04/02:
Algontario arrived at St. Lawrence Cement Mississauga evening of 3/31, to load cement bound for Duluth, MN.; first load of the season for St. Lawrence. Apparently Hamilton Lift bridge had to be operated by management due to a labour strike.

Reported by: Brian Harrison




Low Water

04/01:
In yesterday's Detroit News, in an article on lower water levels on the Great Lakes for the upcoming season, these interesting statistics were given (according to the Lake Carriers Association):

Lower water, higher costs
Effects on a typical 1,000-foot iron ore carrier:
The loss of 1 foot of water means 3,240 tons less cargo per trip (270 tons per inch)
The ship would have to make 2.5 extra trips to make up the difference over the season
This would cost the shiping company an estimated $121,000 per ship over the course of the season.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




Today in Great Lakes History - April 02

On April 2, 1951 CLIFFS VICTORY was towed, bound for New Orleans, LA, with her deck houses, stack, propeller, rudder and above deck fittings stored on or below her spar deck for bridge clearance. She was outfitted with two 120 foot pontoons, which were built at the Baltimore yard, that were attached to her hull at the stern to reduce her draft to eight feet for passage in the shallow sections of the river/canal system.

LEON FALK, JR was launched April 2, 1945 as a) WINTER HILL, a T2-SE-Al World War II single screw fuel tanker for U.S. Maritime Commission.

CLIFFORD F. HOOD was launched April 2, 1902 as the straight deck Bulk Freighter a) BRANSFORD.

The SENATOR OF CANADA sailed under her own power on April 2, 1985 to Toronto, Ont. where she was put into ordinary next to her fleetmate the QUEDOC (2). She was later scrapped in Venezuela.

The WHEAT KING was lengthened by an addition of a 172'6" mid-section (Hull #61) and received a 1000 hp bowthruster. This work reportedly cost $3.8 million Cdn and was completed on April 2, 1976.

On April 2, 1953, the J.L. Mauthe (now Pathfinder (3) entered service.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




New Cable Network Announced

04/01:
NEW YORK -- Soar Pointe Broadcasting Corp. (SPBC) today unveiled "The Boatnerd Network," a cable television venture that will broadcast programming about Great Lakes ships 24 hours a day.

"This is our latest entry in the growing field of cable television niche networks," said Ben Dover, Soar Pointe's president and chief executive officer. "Because we're based in New York, we  initially didn't know where the Great Lakes were located. But when we found out they were in the fashionable heartland, we knew right away we had a hot concept. After researching the growing popularity of so-called 'boatnerd' pages on the World Wide Web, we realized boatnerds were finally  ready for full-scale commercial exploitation."

The Boatnerd Network will broadcast from studios atop Terminal Tower in Cleveland. This will enable the network's producers to work at the center of the Great Lakes shipping industry, Dover said.

Programming for the new network will focus heavily on existing videos, talk shows and live camera shots. "A vast number of boat videos are now on the market," he said. "Some are interesting, some are bad enough to insult my dog's intelligence. We'll show them all. We figure if Geraldo can make a two-hour live special about digging under a sidewalk, we can get away with this."

Dover said BNN also will launch new initiatives in live programming, such as having crewmen aboard Great Lakes ships wear cameras similar to those worn in recent years by professional baseball players.

"We envision having a whole watch wearing cameras, enabling our studio technicians to constantly switch among live shots in the pilothouse, engine room and galley," Dover said. "Boatnerds with insomnia will be able watch hour after hour of 'wheelsman cam' as the wheelsman monitors the autopilot in the middle of the night on Lake Superior."

Boatnerd Network also will borrow techniques that have proven successful in the growing Internet pornography industry and television shows such as those featuring "personality" Howard Stern, said Dot Matrix, the network's creative director.

"For instance, we'll have a live camera at the Soo Locks that will be monitored by a studio technician. Viewers can contact us by e-mail to ask the technician to focus the camera on particular ships, or zoom in for close-ups on certain arousing parts of those ships," Matrix said.

"We'll also have talk shows hosted by leading personalities in the Great Lakes boatnerd industry. I'm envisioning programs where these hosts are having frank discussions with celebrity boatnerds, ship masters and sailors and coercing the guests into taking off their clothes. It will be hot," she said.

Boatnerd Network also anticipates producing original programming, often with the help of boatnerds around the lakes. Viewers will be able to contribute video for programs such as "World's Scariest Overtaking Situations in the Rivers," "World's Hottest Self-Unloaders" and "When Canadian Straightdeckers Attack."

Dover urged all boatnerds to immediately contact their local cable television provider to request the Boatnerd Network.

Click here to visit BNN




Top Hat ceremony opens Welland Canal for 1999 season

04/01:
(St. Catharines, Ont.) - March 31, 1999 - Captain Almer Strong of the M/V Algowest was presented with the traditional top hat yesterday morning as the Welland Canal officially re-opened for its 170th consecutive season.

Camille Trepanier, vice-president, Niagara Region, St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation, declared the Welland Canal officially open. 1999 marks the 40th anniversary of the Seaway, as well as its first full year of operation by the commercialized St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation.

Owned and operated by Algoma Central Corporation, which this year celebrates its centennial anniversary, the M/V Algowest wintered in Hamilton, Ont. and proceeded through the Welland Canal this morning, en route to Windsor. There, she will load approximately 27,000 metric tonnes of salt for shipment to Milwaukee, Wisc. The Algowest was built at Collingwood Shipyard in 1982, and was converted to a self-unloader in 1998 at Port Weller Dry Docks in St. Catharines. She has crew of twenty-four, including Capt. Strong, and Chief Engineer Stefan Danielski.

"We are looking forward to operating in our first full year as the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp.," said Mr. Trepanier. "We have a five-year business plan, and are focusing our efforts on customer service, and maintaining our facilities."

"Last year, more than 40 million tonnes of cargo traveled through the Welland Canal," said Mr. Trepanier. "This figure includes a 41 per cent increase in general cargo, incorporating steel slabs and products mostly from Europe. In addition, ocean vessel transits increased by more than 35 per cent, and at $80 million, toll revenue was the highest in Seaway history."

Opened in 1959, the 3,700-kilometre St. Lawrence Seaway provides uninterrupted navigation nine months each year from Duluth, Minn. and Thunder Bay, Ont. to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The schooner Anne and Jane made the first transit of the original Welland Canal, which links Lake Ontario and Lake Erie, in 1829.

Reported by: St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp.




Gaelic Tugboat Company to return to ship assist work in 1999 season

04/01:
After a ten year lull in the ship assist business Gaelic Tugboat is back.

For the 1999 season Gaelic will have retained all the Canadian Laker traffic requiring tug assistance in the Ports of Detroit , Toledo and Cleveland . Business could increase with the signing of contracts for salt water vessels later this spring . It will be a pleasant sight to have the Orange Shamrock flying over Lake Erie again.

Reported by: D. Ocean




Twin Ports Report

04/01:
Traffic to Taconite Harbor is brisk so far this season. Kaye E. Barker is due there April 1, followed by Lee A. Tregurtha and Mesabi Miner on April 2.

John G. Munson is scheduled to depart Fraser Shipyards on April 2 to load at the DMIR ore dock in Duluth.

Presque Isle reportedly was undergoing some sort of repairs March 30 in Gary.

Reported by: Al Miller




Cutters to be Replaced

04/01:
Three 180-foot, 1940s-built U.S. Coast Guard cutters - the Bramble, Acacia and Sundew - could be replaced by two new vessels as early as 2004, according to an article that appeared recently in various Michigan newspapers written by the Booth News Service.

The article, which focused on the commissioning of the new cutter Walnut recently at Marinette, states the following:
"Walnut is the fifth in the Juniper class of Coast Guard cutters. The service intends to build 16 of the vessels - at a cost of more than $24 million each - to replace 26, 180-foot ships that date from the 1940s.

"Three Great Lakes cutters - Acacia at Charlevoix, Bramble at Port Huron and Sundew at Duluth - are scheduled to be replaced by a pair of Juniper-class cutters that would be built in 2004.

"A Coast Guard study recommends basing the Hollyhock at Port huron and the Alder at Charlevoix Spokesmen say that leaves a void in Lake Superior, and base assignments could change."

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




Risley In Portage Canal

04/01:
Houghton, Michigan - The Canadian Coast Guard Cutter Samuel Risley is scheduled to return Houghton today, April lst, around mid morning. She will dock at Lake Avenue in Houghton and will be open for public tours from 1-4 PM.

Additional information can be obtained from the Portage Coast Guard Station by calling 482-1520. A wonderful opportunity to tour a very fine vessel.

Reported by: Jim Grill




Coal in Marquette

04/01:
The first shipment of coal for the Wisconsin Electric Power Company from below the Soo arrived early yesterday morning in Marquette's Upper Harbor with the arrival of the Kaye E Barker.

Once unloaded, the Barker was to receive a load of ore and depart later in the day. The Algomarine was due into Marquette's Upper Harbor around 3 p.m. yesterday afternoon.

Reported by: Art Pickering




Anderson opens Buffalo

04/01:
The Arthur M. Anderson became the first cargo vessel to unload in Buffalo for the 1999 season on the 31st of March. She docked in the Lackawanna Canal and unloaded salt from Fairport at 4AM. This was the first time I've seen a boat unload on the Coke Oven side of the Steel Mill. This dock has not seen a cargo in many years.

There was absolutely no activity aboard either Kinsman Independent or Enterprise on the 31st. No cars in the lot, no ladders down, and no steam or fumes seen.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Icebreaking update

04/01:
Operation Taconite:
The U.S. Coast Guard's lead vessel of the U.S.C.G.C. Katmai Bay (WTGB 101)-class icebreaking seagoing buoy tender, the U.S.C.G.C. Biscayne Bay (WTGB 104), the U.S.C.G.C. Neah Bay (WTGB 105) and the icebreaker U.S.C.G.C. Mackinaw (WAGB 83) did track maintenance in Michigan's St. Marys River on 30 March. The U.S.C.G.C. Biscayne Bay assisted the Canadian Transport near Winter Point Turn.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Straits Area Season Firsts

04/01:
The Straits of Mackinac came to life last week. Passenger service between Mackinac Island and St. Ignace began as Arnold Line completed the repowering of it's old fashioned workhorse, the Huron.

Meanwhile, Michigan Limestone Operation's Port Dolomite loaded it's first cargo of flux limestone into the holds of the tug/barge Joseph H. Thompson (Jr.) also last week.

Reported by: Terry Foley




Today in Great Lakes History - April 01

The a) STEWART J. CORT was commissioned on April 1,1972.

In April 1965, the J.A. CAMPBELL was renamed c) BUCKEYE MONITOR.

Realizing that the bulk trades were too competitive, Captain John Roen's Roen Transportation Co. sold the CAPTAIN JOHN ROEN to the American Steamship Co. (Boland & Cornelius, mgr.) on April 1, 1947 for $915,000.

The ROY A. JODREY started her first full season opening navigation at the Soo Locks April 1, 1966 with a load of stone for Algoma Steel.

Dismantling of the G.A. TOMLINSON (2) began on April 1, 1980 and was completed eight months later in December.



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





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