Great Lakes News & Rumor ARCHIVE

Great Lakes NEWS & RUMOR Archive

* Report News


U.S.C.G.C. Mackinaw to get new color

05/21:
The U.S. Coast Guard Icebreaker U.S.C.G.C. Mackinaw (WAGB 83), homeported at Cheboygan, Mich., for operations on the U.S. Great Lakes, will lose its white hull following work that will begin the last week of this month. When repainting is done in mid-June, the ship will have a bright red hull. In addition to making icebreaking safer, since the red will visually stand out from ice fields better the the white, the the new paint will be easier to maintain and will not show as much wear.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





More on the Tadoussac

05/21:
The Tadoussac (Canadian-registry 20,634-gt, 29,727-dwt, 14,560-nt, 222.50-meter/730.00-foot motor bulk carrier built in 1969 by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd. at Collingwood, Ontario; operated by Canada Steamship Lines Inc.) had propulsion problems 13 May at the Cargill Ltd. grain terminal at Thunder Bay, Ontario. It was to sail for Port-Cartier, Quebec. Three tugs moved the vessel to another location where repairs were made and the Tadoussac sailed on 18 May.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





St. Lawrence Seaway figures through 30 April

05/21:
As of 30 April, the number of vessels that had transited the Montreal-LakeOntario section of the St. Lawrence Seaway was up 43 percent from last year to 109 ships, according to St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. Iron and steel cargoes were up 62 percent and U.S. grain was up 82 percent while Canadian grain was down 17.7 percent. In total, grain cargoes were up 3.1 percent. General cargo was up 39 percent and overall by 5 percent. In the Welland Canal, grain was up 6.6 percent at 866,000 metric tons and ore increased 2.4 perecnt for 652,000 metric tons. Other bulk cargoes increased 11.9 percent for 1.325 million metric tons.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





A Tale of Two Ships Update

05/21:
The new web page covering the creation of the Canadian Transfer has been updated with many new pictures.

Click here for more




New U.S. Coast Guard lifeboat on the Great Lakes

05/21:
U.S. Coast Guard 47220, a 14.61-meter/47.93-foot motor lifeboat, has arrived at Coast Guard Station Portage in Dollar Bay, Mich. It is the first of its type on the U.S. Great Lakes and was built by Textron Marine Systems in New Orleans. Fully loaded, the lifeboat displaces 18.1 tons and has a beam of 4.27 meters/14.0 feet and a draft of 1.32 meters/4.33 feet. The vessel is built of aluminum in a deep-vee hull form and can right itself from a capsized state in 30 seconds. It can sail at 25 knots using two General Motors-Detroit Diesel 6V92TA diesel engines with two propellers for 662 kilowatts/900 brake horsepower. The vessel has a range of 370 kilometers/230 miles at top speed with a crew of four and can also tow a vessel of up to 150 tons. In trials, the class was able to maintain 20 knots in 0.6-meter/two-foot seas. Other equipment includes a Raytheon 41X navigation radar and a Motorola MCX1000 very high frequency radio.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Great Lakes Ports Off To A Fast Start

05/21:
Shipments of iron ore, coal and stone from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 15.9 million net tons in April, an increase of 16.1 percent compared to a year ago. For the season, shipments of these commodities stand at 20.2 million tons, an increase of 27.3 percent.

While demand for cargo is driving these totals, the system obviously benefited from the mild spring. The stone trade was in full swing weeks ahead of schedule. Vessels in the ore trade were not delayed by ice as is normally the case until mid April or so.

Reported by: The Lake Carriers' Association




More on new Norasia Shipping Services route

05/21:
Norasia Shipping Services S.A. is deploying five containerships on a new weekly trans-Atlantic service that begins next month. The Canada-Europe Express will be operated by a subsidiary, (N)XPRESS. The five are the first of 10 new 1,400-TEU containerships being built by Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft AG in Kiel, Germany. The first, the Norasia Samantha, will be christened on 5 June and will enter service soon after. Weekly calls will be made at Antwerp, Belgium; Felixstowe, England; and Montreal once the Norasia Savannah and three others are delivered in July. Transit from Felixstowe to Montreal will take six days. The ships will sail at 25 knots and are classified by Germanischer Lloyd. They are hatchless and not ice-strengthened.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - May 21

Sixty years ago today, on May 21, 1938, the steam turbine era began on the Great Lakes when the John Hulst sailed on her maiden voyage. She became the first Great Lakes vessel with a steam turbine plant with a direct drive to the propeller via reduction gear, although the turbo-electric plants were in use on a few vessels before the Hulst.

The AMERICAN REPUBLIC's maiden voyage was on May 21, 1981 from Sturgeon Bay light to Escanaba, Mich. to load ore pellets for Cleveland, Ohio. This ship was specially designed and constructed to be the main shuttle for the movement of iron ore pellets between Lorain, Ohio and Republic Steel's docks five miles up the Cuyahoga River at Cleveland, Ohio.

The HENRY G. DALTON's maiden voyage on May 21, 1916 commenced with a load of coal from Toledo, OH bound for Duluth, MN.

UNITED STATES GYPSUM (2) in tow of the German tug FAIRPLAY X. was lost in heavy weather on May 21, 1973 near Syndey, Nova Scotia. The GYPSUM was in tow to Vado, Italy for scrapping.

The JOHN HULST entered service on May 21, 1938 sailing from River Rouge to Duluth, MN to load ore.

The G.A. TOMLINSON (2) stranded near Buffalo, NY on Lake Erie May 21, 1974 suffering an estimated $150,000 in damage.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

05/20:
Canadian Ranger arrived May 18 at the AGP grain elevator in Duluth. This is the first ULS boat to visit that elevator in recent memory -- another sign that this once nearly dormant elevator is being revived.

As announced, Edward L. Ryerson arrived in Duluth a few minutes before 3 p.m. May 17. Local boatwatchers were out in force, with 10 carloads at the Duluth port terminal to watch the boat turn up St. Louis Bay, and half a dozen more on the nearby fishing pier to catch the boat as it passed under the Blatnik Bridge. Although its paint job was a bit uneven, the boat looked fine with the Inland Steel houseflag flying from the forward mast, and several other unidentfiable flags flying below it. Inland's other Duluth regulars also are coming here, with Joe Block arriving May 19 and the Adam E. Cornelius due again later in the week.

Reported by: Al Miller




Seaway News

05/20:
On May 15, the cement barge St. Mary`s Cement II transited the Seaway for the first time since 1990 pushed by Sea Eagle II to which she is linked. Both were on their delivery then. This time, the duo was heading for Quebec City from Toronto to load for Detroit. Expected in the Seaway later on this week will be the bulker Broompark making also her first trip since 1990. Dating back to 1982 when she completed her first voyage to the Great Lakes, she always kept the same name.

Arriving in Montreal on May 18 were six naval vessels belonging to the NATO fleet. It is the first time since 1983 that NATO units are coming in Montreal. Their respective names and pennant numbers are the following ones: German BAYERN: F217, British MANCHESTER : D95, American ROBERT G. BRADLEY: 49, Dutch JAKOB VAN HEEMSKERCK: F812, Portuguese ALVARES CABRAL : F331, Canadian CHARLOTTETOWN: 339. All of them are expected to leave on Friday May 22 for the east coast.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




No April Showers On Jones Act Float

05/20:
The major U.S.-Flag carriers hauled more than 12 million net tons of dry- and liquid-bulk cargo on the Great Lakes in April, an increase of 4.6 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. Thanks to the mild weather in March, the season-to-date total for U.S.-Flag carriage stands at 16.3 million tons, an increase of 11.1 percent. Although it is doubtful that such a percentage increase can extend the entire season, the Lakes Jones Act fleet certainly has picked up right where the record-setting 1997 season left off -Full Ahead!

The most dramatic increase in April came in stone cargos. Loadings of the various grades of limestone and gypsum neared 3 million tons, an increase of 22.5 percent. Again, the mild spring has allowed stone docks to resume operations somewhat earlier. Also, the "new" U.S.-Flag laker PATHFINDER has been very active in the stone trade. For the season, U.S.-Flag stone cargos stand at 3.4 million tons, an increase of 40.3 percent.

Iron ore cargos for the steel industry totaled 6.6 million tons in April, an increase of 7.1 percent. Since the ore trade resumed on March 11, U.S.-Flag cargos total 9.3 million tons, an increase of 13.9 percent.

The mild winter has had one negative impact on the Jones Act trades. Power companies did not need to replenish stockpiles of eastern coal quickly, so the coal float through April is down 500,000 tons.

The liquid bulk totals are incomplete for 1998.

Reported by: The Lake Carriers' Association




Today in Great Lakes History - May 20

On May 20, 1909 while lying at the Lackawanna Coal Dock at Buffalo, NY, the LeGRAND S. DEGRAFF was struck by the SONORA which caused $4,000 in damage to the DEGRAFF.

The STANDARD PORTLAND CEMENT sank on Lake Huron two miles above Port Huron, MI in a collision with the steamer AUGUST ZIESING on May 20, 1960 with no loss of life. She was raised three days later and taken to the Great Lakes Engineering Works at River Rouge, MI for repairs and then was laid up at Windsor, Ont.

HENNEPIN (2) was launched May 20, 1905 as a) SOCAPA

On May 20, 1967 during docking maneuvers in the Trenton Channel of the Detroit River, the W.W. HOLLOWAY's KaMeWa propeller shaft sheared off and the propeller reportedly sank to the bottom.

The tanker MERCURY (2) was launched May 20, 1912 as a) RENOWN.

HENRY STEINBRENNER (4) was launched May 20, 1916 as a) WILLIAM A. McGONAGLE (2)



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Norasia Shipping Services to call Montreal

05/19:
Norasia Shipping Services S.A. is deploying its Norasia Samantha and Norasia Savannah on a new service to Montreal that begins next month. The ships are classified by Germanischer Lloyd and are hatchless and not ice-strengthened. They are the first of 10 new 1,400-TEU containerships being built by Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft AG in Kiel, Germany. The Norasia Samantha will be christened on 5 June and will enter service soon after. Weekly calls will be made at Antwerp, Belgium; Felixstowe, England; and Montreal once the Norasia Savannah is delivered in July. The ships will sail at 25 knots.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





More from the 1997 Annual Report

05/19
The Lake Carriers' Association has added new highlights from their 1997 Annual Report. Please stop by for more important information on last season.




Today in Great Lakes History - May 19

The TEMPLE BAR was renamed b) LAKE NIPIGON as she locked upbound in the Welland Canal on May 19, 1977.

The LAKE WINNIPEG arrived at Lisbon, Portugal on May 19, 1985. LAKE WINNIPEG was the largest Canadian laker and the first Seaway sized ship, as of that date, to be scrapped.

SIR THOMAS SHAUGHNESSY was launched May 19, 1906

On May 19, 1973 the METEOR (2) was moved from the Pipeline Tankers dock to a permanent berth on Barkers Island at Superior to serve as a museum ship.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Canadian ports to pay for icebreaking individually

05/18:
Canadian ports will begin paying for icebreaking as of 20 Dec. Under the current system, all Canadian ports pay a fee whether they require icebreaking or not. The new fee is expected to recover about Canadian$13 million out of a total cost of C$76 million for commercial icebreaking across Canada. More than 80 percent of commercial Canadian icebreaking is paid for by Canadian citizens. Also, a three-year cap has been placed on the fees paid by commercial vessels for services provided by the Canadian Coast Guard.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





No Slowdown In Lakes Stone Trade

05/18:
Stone shipments from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 3.9 million net tons in April, an increase of 30 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. The stone trade has greatly benefitted from the mild weather; many ports resumed shipping earlier than normal.

As a result of the mild weather, the season-to-date total for stone stands at 4.4 million tons, an increase of 45.4 percent. While this rate of increase cannot be maintained over an entire season, this start bodes well for another record-breaking season for the Lakes stone trade.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




LCA offers 1997 Annual Report on-line

05/18:
The Lake Carriers' Association has highlights of their 1997 Annual Report available on-line for viewing. Please stop by for important information on last season.




S.S. Badger Sets Sail

05/18:
The S.S. Badger started her 1998 sailing season right on time Friday moring. She made her scheduled 8:30 am departure after a "Sunshine Breakfast" and carferry flag dedication ceremony.

The Badger arrived Ludington just a few minutes late (about 7:30 pm) to a water cannon salute in Pere Marquette Lake. After docking, there was an open house on the carferry for carferry enthusiasts to see the newly remodeled passenger areas.

Reported by: Max S. Hanley




Today in Great Lakes History - May 18

The ATWATER departed Sandusky, OH May 18, 1925 on her maiden voyage loaded with coal bound for Duluth, MN. She was the first freighter on the Great Lakes equipped with a gyro compass and Wilson became the first fleet to be completely so equipped as a result of the ATWATER's success. She also was the first laker to be outfitted with one piece steel hatch covers and a traveling hatch crane (patented by Capt. Joseph S. Wood, fleet captain of the Wilson Transit Co.), and had the first installation of a ship-to-shore radio telephone in 1934.

On May 18, 1903 the MAUNALOA hit and sank the 69 foot wooden tug EDWARD GILLEN at Superior, WI. The GILLEN had been working near the entrance of the harbor in dense fog when the bulker ran the tug down nearly cutting her in half. There was one fatality.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - May 17

BUCKEYE MONITOR was launched May 17, 1913 as a) ALTON C. DUSTIN.

The NORTHCLIFFE HALL (2) was in a collision with the Cuban salty CARLOS MANUEL DE CESPEDES in the St. Lawrence River above the Eisenhower Lock on May 17, 1980.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Ryerson Update

05/16:
The Duluth Shipping News is also reporting the Ryerson will be in Duluth on May 17th. Only now it's expected at 3 P.M.

She'll be upbound at the Soo today (Saturday) about noon.

Reported by: David F.




Ryerson to Layup

05/16:
As rumored at the beginning of this season the Ryerson will enter lay up in the coming weeks.

Reports are that she is scheduled to make three trips to Escanaba followed by another trip to Duluth. After that return trip to the Harbor, she is scheduled for a 3 week lay-up. During that lay-up all Inland Steel logo will be removed. Now is the time to get your last shots of her with the Inland logo.

Reported by: Dan Ocean




Today in Great Lakes History - May 16

The CANADIAN PROSPECTOR passed upbound in the Welland Canal May 16, 1979 on her first trip after reconstruction with Labrador ore bound for Ashtabula, Ohio.

E.J. BLOCK was launched May 16, 1908 as the W.R. WOODFOR

CLYMER departed Superior on May 15, 1981 and went to Duluth, MN to load 11,154 tons of taconite ore for Lorain. On May 16, 1981, having departed Duluth in 35 mph winds and ten foot seas, the IRVIN L. CLYMER began taking on water in her ballast tanks. She returned to Duluth, and was quickly repaired.

On May 16, 1972, in dense fog, the ROBERT HOBSON struck the Peerless Cement dock at Port Huron, MI when her bow was caught by the strong current at the mouth of the St. Clair River. Damage to the hull was estimated at to $100,000.

In 1985 PONTIAC (2) was towed down the Welland Canal by the McKeil tugs GLENEVIS, ARGUE MARTIN and STORMONT bound for Quebec City. Shew would later be scrapped in Spain.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Canadian Enterprise Loads Record

05/15:
The Goderich Signal Star reports the CANADIAN ENTERPRISE loaded the largest recorded cargo of salt at Goderich, Ontario on May 7th. The ENTERPRISE loaded 32,366 imperial tonnes of rock salt which surpassed the previous record of 32,292 tonnes set by the ALGOSOO on May 24,1985. The ENTERPRISE arrived on May 6 at 6:38 p.m. and completed loading at 5:10 a.m. on May 7th, departing for Milwaukee,Wisconsin. Record keeping of salt cargoes at Goderich began in 1959.

As a side note, the Captain of the ENTERPRISE, Percy Garrick lives with his family in Goderich and was on duty when the ship arrived.

Reported by: Philip Nash




Block to head South?

05/15:
Reports are of the possibility that the Joseph L. Block will have a trip to TOLEDO in the near future.

Reported by: Dan Ocean




Today in Great Lakes History - May 15

On May 15, 1997, the "This Day in History" feature started on this page.

The Philip R. Clarke--the first of the AAA class of vessel--turns 45. The Clarke began her maiden voyage from Lorain, Ohio on this date in 1952.

After extensive renovation at Fraser Shipyard, the IRVIN L. CLYMER departed Superior on May 15, 1981 and went to Duluth, MN to load 11,154 tons of taconite ore for Lorain.

On May 15, 1971 STONEFAX was sold for scrap.

The HOMER D. WILLIAMS collided with the Canadian steamer WHEAT KING in fog on the St. Marys River May 15, 1968 with no reported significant damage.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Desmaris Update

05/14:
The Desmaris arrived at St Mary's Cement on Saturday afternoon with a load of cement clinckers and have been having a rough time unloading. them as of today (Thursday) it is still there unloading ever so slowly. That makes it 5 days in the Rouge so far.

Reported by: Dave Marcoux




Tadoussac Update

05/14:
Reports are that the Tadoussac suffered from some type of engine room problem and was not stuck. Attempts were made by a single tug to move the vessel, but it took three tugs to move her. A salt water vessel was waiting for her spot at the Cargill Elevator.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Ryerson to Duluth

05/14:
According to the DM&IR ore dock hotline, the Edward L. Ryerson is due to load in Duluth on Sunday, May 17 @ 5pm. Of course this time could change, but let's hope she arrives during the day. This will be the Ryerson's first trip to Lake Superior this year and her first trip to Duluth following her lay-up.

In other DM&IR news, the Lee A. Tregurtha was due in Two Harbors on the 13th. Also, CSL boats are making their presence known at the dock in Duluth. The Jean Parisien was in on the 12th, and the Frontenac, Halifax, and Louis R. Desmaris are all due in the next couple of days.

Reported by: Andy Hering




Desmaris Docked

05/14:
The Louis R. Desmaris has been in the Rouge River at the St. Marys Cement dock since Sunday. As of 12:30 yesterday was still docked. No word on why it has not moved.

Reported by: Dave Marcoux




Seaway News

05/14:
Two new salties belonging to the same bulgarian company transited the Seaway on May 13. They were bulit at Varna, Bulgaria. Perelik was coming back from Toronto and Kom, a sister-ship was heading for that same port. Both are registered at Valletta, Malta. Leaving Mtl. for the Seaway the same day and behind Kom was the Norwegian-owned Nomadic Pollux loaded with aluminium and having as destination Oswego, not a common port of call for the salties.

The Port of Montreal got a good news on May 12. They will still have vessels coming to unload sugar. Lantic Sugar Co. got subsidies from the provincial government and the city of Montreal to keep their industry into operation. As a result, the St. John, N.B. plant will closed as only one plant is needed in Eastern Canada east of Ontario.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Twin Ports News

05/14:
Superior's Harvest States Elevator continues its busy pace, again loading two vessels at once - a practice that has not been widely seen there the past several years. On May 12-13, the salties Nia Doxas and Ziemia Zowalska were both loading there.

Reported by: Al Miller




Pig Iron in Silver Bay

05/14:
Northshore Mining Co. in Silver Bay, Minn., is vital to Cleveland-Cliff's plan to build a plant that produces pig iron, company president and CEO John Brinzo told shareholders Tuesday in Cleveland. The company is evaluating whether to build a plant in Silver Bay that would produce 700,000 metric tons a year of premium grade pig iron for electric furnaces and foundries. A decision is expected early in the third quarter.

"Northshore is one of the lowest cost pellet producers in North America, and an iron-making plant sited at Northshore would enjoy a highly competitive cost position," he said at the company's annual shareholders' meeting.

Cliffs owns Northshore Mining Corp. and has partial interest or management duties in several other taconite operations.

Reported by: Al Miller




Tug "Wisconsin" turns 100 years old

05/14:
The Great Lakes Towing tug "Wisconsin" is 100 years old this summer. She is currently stationed in the Port of Detroit as a lake tug and as a backup tug. Even though she is 100 years old there is not much left thats 100 except her hull. The "Wisconsin" has been repowered from her origonal steam engine to a WW2 era venerable EMD diesel (650 h.p.). With no new tugs in the pipeline for the Great Lakes Towing Co. it is expected that she will last another 100 years !

Reported by: Dan Ocean




U.S.C.G.C. Marcus Hanna commissioned

05/14:
The U.S. Coast Guard's "Keeper"-class Coastal Buoy Tender U.S.C.G.C. Marcus Hanna (WLM 554) was commissioned at 1300 9 May at Coast Guard Group Portland, Maine, its homeport. The vessel, named for a keeper of the Cape Elizabeth Light at Cape Elizabeth, Maine, is commanded by Chief Warrant Officer Richard G. Foy of Cody, Wyo. The tender was ordered in February 1995, laid down in September 1996 and launched at Marinette Marine Corp. in Marinette, Wis., on 23 Aug., 1997.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - May 14

On May 14, 1959, the Charles M. Beeghly and the Herbert C. Jackson both entered service. While the vessels have been fleetmates since 1967, the Beeghly got her start as the Shenango II for the Shenango Furnace Company.

On May 14, 1943, the Thomas Wilson entered service as the first of the sixteen vessels in the "Maritime" class.

The HOCHELAGA's self-unloading boom was installed on the RICHARD REISS, which had lost her boom April 13, 1994 when it collapsed at Fairport, OH. The REISS cleared the Port Weller Dry Docks, where her HOCHELAGA boom was installed, on May 14, 1994.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Tadoussac Stuck

05/13:
Reports from Thunder Bay have the M.V.TADOUSSAC stuck on the bottom at the Cargill Elevator. She will need at least three tugs to pull her free. As of 2:20 am she is still stuck fast.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




More E.M. Ford Rumors

05/13:
Reports from Saginaw are that the 100 year old E.M. Ford will definately NOT sail this year, or any time in the future. The vessel would reportedly cost about 1/2 Million dollars to refit for service, and for just a few trips around the lakes, it is not a very cost-worthy project. The vessel looks nice on the outside but is not in ship-shape condition on the inside. The vessel will remain a storage facility until it is either scrapped, or cut down to a barge.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Detroit Steel Corp recieves first vessel

05/13:
On 08 May 1998 the former Mc Clouth Steel Plant, on the Trenton Channel downriver of Detroit, recieved it's first salt water vessel M.V. Federal Bergen. The "Federal Bergen" was assisted by the 3 Great Lakes Towing tugs to unload steel coils at a new Detroit Steel Co. pickling facility. The "Federal Bergen " departed from the old McClouth Steel Mill on 11 May 1998 under the tow of the tugs "Montana" and "Wyoming" at 1800 EST and headed downbound for the lake. The tug "Montana" was dispatched from Toledo to make this tow.

Reported by: Dan Ocean




I.M.O. gets report on crew working hours

05/13:
The International Maritime Organization's Maritime Safety Committee was presented with a report this week from the International Transport Workers' Federation on working hours and crew fatigue aboard vessels. The federation questioned 2,500 crewmembers of 60 countries with the assistance of Numast, the British officer's labor union. Thirty percent reported working days of at least 12 hours, 36 percent did not get a minimum of 10 hours rest and 18 percent said they were regularly unable to rest for six hours. Forty-two percent of masters and 44 percent of chief mates said they worked an average of more than 80 hours each week. Of those questioned, 60 percent said the situation was getting worse and 50 percent said that excessive hours endangered safety.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - May 13

GEMINI was launched May 13, 1978.

The JUPITER made her maiden voyage May 13, 1976 from Smith's Bluff, TX loaded with lube oil bound for Marcus Hooks, PA.

On May 13, 1913 the THOMAS F. COLE collided with the barge IRON CITY on Lake St. Clair. The barge was cut in two.

Delivered May 13, 1943, the THOMAS WILSON departed under the command of Captain Henry Borgen on her maiden voyage from Lorain light bound for Duluth, MN to load iron ore.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports News

05/12:
Calcite II began its season this week, departing Sturgeon Bay bound for Port Inland. The vessel was anchored off Port Inland May 10 waiting for its turn at the loading dock. It's expected to arrive in Milwaukee May 11.

Duluth's port terminal handled an unusual project cargo May 10-11. A disassembled portable oil-drilling rig being shipped from western Canada to Norway was loaded aboard a saltie. The saltie, a Danish vessel, was interesting in itself, measuring only about 300 feet.

Reported by: Al Miller




Coal Remains Strong

05/12:
Lake Erie Coal Loadings Up 9.4 Percent In April
Coal shipments from the ports of Toledo, Sandusky, Ashtabula and Conneaut totaled 2,322,418 net tons in April, an increase of 9.4 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. Since the resumption of loadings in mid-March, the Lake Erie coal trade stands at 3.1 million tons, an increase of 33.4 percent.

Record Month for SMET
April coal loadings at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal totaled 1,634,137 net tons, an increase of 39 percent over the same period last year and most in the month of April since the operation began in 1976. Since resuming loading on March 20, shipments from SMET stand at 2,040,642 tons, an increase of 37.5 percent.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Twin Ports Grain

05/12:
Grain shipping remains strong with the following boats loading on 5/11. Kinsman Independent is at Peavey-Connor's Pt. after first loading at General Mills "S" in Superior. At Harvest States is the United at the gallery dock after loading the first part of its cargo at the #2 dock. At General Mills "S" is the Sea Luck V. Two boats at "S" (old Great Northern elevator) in 3 days is a rarity.

Finally, Goviken is loading at AGP in Duluth. AGP continues to be one of the most active elevators in the Twin Ports.

Reported by: Gary A. Putney




Today in Great Lakes History - May 12

The CANADIAN EXPLORER was launched May 12, 1965 as a) CABOT.

The THOMAS WALTERS entered service on May 12, 1911 with coal from Sandusky, OH to Duluth, MN.

The carferry GRAND HAVEN was sold to the West India Fruit & Steamship Co., Norfolk, VA on May 12, 1946 and was brought down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, LA for reconditioning before reaching Port Everglades and the Port of Palm Beach, FL.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Canada to raise seaway tolls on 1 June

05/11:
Canada's St. Lawrence Seaway Authority announced in the Canada Gazette on 25 April that it will raise tolls for the St. Lawrence Seaway by 2 percent as of 1 June. On the eight-lock Welland Canal, the authority will charge, per lock, Canadian$448/U.S.$312 for loaded ships and C$331/U.S.$230 for empty ships. A charge of C$0.0816/U.S.$0.0568 will be made based on gross tonnage for the Montreal-Lake Ontario section while the corresponding Welland Canal rate will be C$0.1326/U.S.$0.0923. Other charges are: C$0.8466/U.S.$0.5891 per metric ton for bulk cargoes on the Montreal-Lake Ontario section and C$0.561/U.S.$0.390 on the Welland Canal; for general cargo, C$2.04/U.S.$1.42 per metric ton from Montreal to Lake Ontarion and C$0.8976/U.S.$0.6246 on the Welland Canal; for steel, C$1.8462/U.S.$1.2846 Montreal-Lake Ontario and C$0.6426/U.S.$0.4471 on the Welland Canal; containers, C$0.8466/U.S.$0.5891 Montreal-Lake Ontario and C$0.561/U.S.$0.390 Welland Canal; grain, C$0.5202/U.S.$0.3620 Montreal-Lake Ontario and C$0.561/U.S.$0.390 Welland Canal; and coal, C$0.4948/U.S.$0.3443 Montreal-Lake Ontario and C$0.561/U.S.$0.390 Welland Canal. Comments are being accepted until 24 May.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Wilson in Saginaw

05/11:
While outbound thru Bay City on May 7th the CHARLES E WILSON made contact with "a shallow area", between Veterans Memorial and Liberty Bridges at 20:50. Sounded like she sucked mud into the stern thruster and it took her about 45 minutes to get off the bank.

No damage was reported, and she exited into Saginaw Bay with-in an hour of the incident.

Reported by: Lon Morgan




Murphy Oil in 20-Year Lease in Duluth

05/11:
Murphy Oil USA Inc. has signed a long-term property lease with the SeawayPort Authority of Duluth to construct and operate a state-of-the-art ship fueling terminal in the prot of Duluth-Superior. Murphy Oil has been doing business in the Twin Ports region since 1958. The El Dorado, Arkansas-based company, which owns an oil refinery in Superior, WI will build a 560-000-gallon facility at the Port Authority-owned Clure Public Marine terminal in Duluth that will be designed to fuel US and Canadian lake vessels and ocean going ships. The facility is expected to be operational in October. The Port Authority board of commissioners approved a 20-year lease providing Murphy with 1,200 feet of dock space and 2.0 acres of interior property. The Port Authority will invest $150,000 in dock improvements as part of the project and will also reroute an interior roadway. Davis Halberg, Duluth port director, said complete vessel fueling services have been unavailable in the Duluth-Superior harbor since 1996 and interim service is being provided by dockside truck delivery.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




INTERTANKO to suspend non-I.S.M. compliant members

05/11:
The International Association of Independent Tanker Owners (INTERTANKO) said 5 May it would terminate the membership of businesses that do not have International Safety Management Code certification by the 1 July deadline. INTERTANKO said that about 40 of its members do not have the Document of Certification or Safety Management Certificates for each ship. About 67 percent of INTERTANKO member vessels have the Safety Management Certificates.

Also, the organization has approved applications to join by 15 companies with 63 tankers of 4.09 million deadweight tons. There are now 274 members with 1,698 tankers of 172 million deadweight tons, up 220 ships from last year. INTERTANKO has about 75 percent of independently-owned tanker tonnage.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Sound Off!!!

05/11:
As reported last month the classic Carferry S.S. City of Milwaukee is looking at being evicted by the City of Elberta. The Traverse City Record-Eagle News paper is conducting an on-line survey. Please stop by and cast your vote in favor of the City of Milwaukee.

The question reads "Should the Village of Elberta remove the 350-foot S.S. City of Milwaukee car ferry boat to facilitate development of the village waterfront"? A no vote supports the car ferry remaining at Elberta.

Record-Eagle Voting Booth


Reported by: Society for the Preservation of the S.S. City of Milwaukee



A Toronto-to-Rochester Ferry Proposed

05/11:
A Canadian company,the Toronto based Lake Ontario Fast Ferry Corp., is floating the prospect of a 2 hour ferry ride between Toronto and Rochester...a trip that takes twice as long by car to travel between the two cities. Two 300 foot catamarans, similiar to vessels that ply the English Channel between Britain and France, would leave U.S and Canadian sides every three hours each carrying up to 1000 passengers, 176 cars and several buses across Lake Ontario. The company hopes to wrap up its $200 million deal and present its plan within two months with the opening next year or early in 2000. The fare has been tentatively set at $100 Canadian-equal to $66 U.S today-for a family of four traveling with car. They feel shoppers and tourists would likely be the biggest users of the line. The caramarans each cost between $60 million and $70 million and would operate throughout the year and travel at 55 mph completing the crossing in 2 hours. Over the last decade, a variety of proposals to start a service have floundered because of lack of financing. Lake Ontario Fast Ferry plans to tap private funds to pay for the ferries which are manufactured in Europe and Australia and according to Bill Jackson, an official with the Toronto Harbor Commission,--this venture appears to be "very will-financed".

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




P & H Officers

05/11:
On April 8, P & H, a division of Parrish & Heimbecker Ltd., placed into grain carrying service the first of two ships, the str. MAPLEGLEN, left its winter berth in Owen Sound under the command of Captain Richard Samson and Chief Engineer Larry Bagley.

The other ship, OAKGLEN, is expected out from its lay up berth in Owne Sound at a later date under the command of Captain John Manner and Chief Engineer Bhajani Riar.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




More Officers

05/11:
In mid-March, Canada Steamship Lines entered the 1998 navigation season on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River with the mv. FERBEC departing from Montreal bound for Havre St-Pierre. FERBEC established the earliest arrival at this lower St. Lawrence port in 49 years by loading the first 1998 cargo of ilmenite for delivery to Sorel. The captains and chief engineers assigned to the 14 vessels of the CSL fleet for 1998 are:

FERBEC -- A. Deschenes; G. Boiin
JEAN PARISIAN -- W. Livingstone; R. Stockman
LOUIS R. DESMARAIS -- C. Roibinson; M. Menzes
H. M. GRIFFITH -- L. Bouman; D. Mellor
TADOUSSAC -- D. Vickers; T. taylor
MANITOULIN -- G. Hacquoil; M. Juffs
FRONTENAC -- K. Ford; T. Cook
J. W. McGIFFIN -- L. Bouman; D. Mellor
HALIFAX -- B. Hudson; B. Turkington
NANTICOKE -- T. Poste; H. Hansen
ATLANTIC ERIE -- P. Scales; W. Kay
ENGLISH RIVER -- R. Richard; K. Renault
S. B. ROMAN -- B. Powell; G. Stemmler
ATLANTIC HURON -- W. Hatcher; J. Kennedy


SEAWAY BULK CARRIERS OPENS SEASON MARCH 15

On March 15, Seaway Bulk Carriers (SBC) opened the 1998 navigation season with the departure of mv. CANADIAN PROSPECTOR from Montreal to load a cargo of ilmenite ore for delivery to Sorel. By April 10, all units of the SBC fleet were in operation. SBC, with its head office in Winnipeg, was established in 1990, a aprtnership between Upper Lakes Group, Inc. and Algoma Central Corp. to manage the marketing and traffic of the two fleets.
Captains and Chief Engineers for the 1998 season are appointed as follows:

ALGOVILLE -- Steve Koutsogiannis; S. Van Galen
CANADIAN LEADER -- Mark Leaney; C. Tremblay
ALGOCEN -- Jens Hougesen; D. Kilpatrick
CANADIAN TRADER -- George Wheeler; J. Kerbrat
ALGOCAPE -- Craig Ball; B. Broydell
CANADIAN PROSPECTOR -- Gaston Derochers; J. Cormier
CANADIAN MINER -- Gerald Greig; P. Schubert-Lock
ALGONTARIO -- Rick Whyte; H. Wright
CANADIAN VENTURE -- Ed Wojtecki; D. Allan
GORDON C. LEITCH -- Fred Penney; L. Desrosiers
CANADIAN PROVIDER -- Laurie Hatfield; A. Giguere
CANADIAN RANGER -- Kevin Hindman; Y. Lapointe
MONTREALAIS -- John Wakeham; M. Beauchamp
QUEBECOIS -- Don Hurlbut; W. Hankinson
ALGOSOUND -- Doug Taylor; M. Patton
CANADIAN VOYAGER -- Cameron Misener; L. Either
ALGONORTH -- Doug Ireland; C. D'Souza
CANADIAN MARINER -- Ray Schrempf; M. Bassard
ALGOGULF -- Andy Rasmussen; G. Blagdon
ALGOISLE -- Charlie Wheeler; R. Miller
ALGORIVER -- Warner Draenger; A. Mair
SEAWAY QUEEN -- Ed Dewling; G. Mitchell


Reported by: Dave Wobser




Today in Great Lakes History - May 11

On May 11, 1953, the Henry Steinbrenner went down in Lake Superior near Isle Royale with 17 of her 31 crewmembers. The storm followed an unseasonably warm and humid stretch of weather in northern Minnesota for that time of year which fueled the storm's fast growth. The high temperature of 87 degrees set in Grand Marais, Minnesota on May 8, 1953, still stands as that town's all-time record high for the month of May, and it is just eight degrees shy of the town's all-time record for any month.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - May 10

On May 10, 1981, the Paul R. Tregurtha entered service. She became the largest vessel on the Great Lakes at that time, and at least in the last 130 years, she has held the honor of being the largest vessel on the Great Lakes longer than any other vessel.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - May 09

On May 9, 1951 the CLIFFS VICTORY arrived at the South Chicago yard of the American Ship Building Co. completing her 37 day, 3,000 mile journey from Baltimore. There her deck houses, stack, masts, deck machinery, rudder and propeller were installed and the floatation pontoons removed.

JOHN J. BOLAND was launched May 9, 1953 making way for the keel of the DETROIT EDISON (2) to be laid.

The ROBERT C. NORTON (2) was laid up on May 9, 1980 for the last time at the Hans Hansen Dock at Toledo.

PETER REISS was launched May 9, 1910.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - May 08

COLUMBIA STAR was christened May 8, 1981.

EDGAR B. SPEER was launched May 8, 1980, after long delay because of labor strife.

The FRED R. WHITE, JR. was christened May 8, 1979 and was named for Oglebay Norton's then vice-chairman of the board.

On May 8, 1979 the ASHLAND struck the north entry pier of the Duluth Ship Canal while outbound loaded. Thick ice blowing in from Lake Superior had interfered with her maneuverability. She dropped her anchor to lessen the impact but drifted over the flukes ripping a two by five foot hole in her bottom port side forward. She was inspected and repaired at the Duluth Port Terminal. One anchor was lost.

The CHAMPLAIN's starboard side was damaged when she side swiped the Swedish steamer BROLAND near the lower end of the St. Clair River cut-off, May 8, 1963.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

05/07:
Harvest States grain elevator in Superior is loading two ships May 6-7, the first time this season this has occurred. The saltie United is at Harvest States 2 while Olympic Miracle is at Harvest States 1.

Saltie traffic in the Twin Ports picked up this week. Along with these two vessels, Pintail was loading at Cargill B1 and Olympic Merit was at Peavey Connors Point on May 6, and Sea Luck 5 was due to arrive May 7.

Reported by: Al Miller




Mantadoc Moved

05/07:
It appears that the Mantadoc won't be fitting out anytime soon. On April 30, 1998 she was moved from her winter lay-up at Wharf 19 East (ADM formerly Maple Leaf Mills) unloading leg to Wharf 19 West which is the slip between the mill and the former government elevator now operated by Goderich Elevator. The slip has not been used for commercial vessels in many years and there is no sign of activity around the vessel. Windoc arrived shortly after to unload at ADM. This run to ADM has been served almost exclusively by Mantadoc over the last few years with a winter storage cargo provided by one of her sisterships as well.

Reported by: Chris Wilson




Reinauer and Morris

05/07:
The Reinauer and barge morris left N.Y.,N.Y. [ her winter lay-up ] about two weeks ago and was loading in Nanticoke ,Ont and will be making the the Mobil dock in Buffalo, N.Y. her first Great Lakes port of the year. She was expected in port on either 5/6 or 5/7.

Reported by: Tom Coonly




Michigan Senator Fighting To Stop New Tax On Waterborne Commerce

05/07:
CLEVELAND--Michigan Senator Spencer Abraham is urging his fellow legislators to oppose the Administration’s proposal to institute a new tax on waterborne commerce in the United States. The so-called Navigational Assistance Tax (NAT) would charge commercial navigation $176 million a year for such Coast Guard and NOAA functions as Aids to Navigation, Icebreaking and charts. The icebreaking portion of the tax would be borne almost entirely by Great Lakes basin industries as the U.S. Coast Guard performs the vast majority of its icebreaking missions on the Great Lakes.

While the whole Great Lakes basin would suffer from the icebreaking tax, Michigan interests would be particularly hard hit. Michigan boasts more commercial ports (39) than the other seven Great Lakes states combined. The icebreaking tax would greatly increase the cost of moving Michigan-mined iron ore from the ports of Marquette and Escanaba and Michigan-produced cement from Alpena and Charlevoix. These trades extend well into the Lakes ice season (mid-December to mid-April).

The tax for Aids to Navigation would likewise impact Michigan’s limestone-mining industry. Seven of the eight U.S. stone loading ports are located in Michigan and thus generate the vast majority of the 40 million tons of stone moving on the Lakes..

In letters to the Chairs of key Senate committees, Senator Abraham has stressed that the NAT "will fall almost exclusively upon commercial shipping, and will place Lake transit of goods and materials, as well as the goods themselves, at relative disadvantage to other modes of shipping, and to other regions’ goods."

Under the Constitution, only Congress has the power to levy taxes. The NAT would be instituted as part of the Coast Guard’s FY99 budget. "I believe is it highly inappropriate to consider fees for Navigational services through the appropriations process," the Senator wrote his colleagues, "and ask that you reject such a proposal."

To prevent institution of the NAT, Senator Abraham is asking his fellow senators to support an amendment to current law that would prohibit the collection of a fee or charge for any navigational assistance service including icebreaking.

Similar efforts to stop the NAT are underway in the House of Representatives. Minnesota Congressman James L. Oberstar has introduced legislation in the House that would preclude any tax for navigational assistance services.

The NAT marks the second time in two years the Administration has tried to institute an icebreaking tax. In 1997, the Administration proposed a $.67 tax per ton of cargo carried on the Great Lakes during the ice season. Senator Abraham was one of 50 Great Lakes legislators in both the House and Senator would opposed the tax. In the face of such opposition, the Administration allowed the proposal to fade away.

"Lake Carriers’ Association deeply appreciates Senator Abraham’s’ commitment to the continued vitality of Great Lakes shipping," said George J. Ryan, President of the organization representing U.S.-Flag ship operators on the Great Lakes. "The NAT will increase the cost of moving vital raw materials and either lead to cargo diversions to ports in Canada or a switch to less environmentally-friendly modes of transportation. The NAT is bad public and environmental policy."

Click here to write your Senator and encourage them support an amendment to the current law that would prohibit the collection of a fee or charge for any navigational assistance service




New Oglebay Norton Website

05/07:
Cleveland based marine transportation company Oglebay Norton has created a new website. The site is full of vessel photos, company info, employment and much more! http://www.oglebaynorton.com.

Reported by: Todd L. Davidson




Welland Canal Busy upbound

05/07:
There were 13 boats listed upbound in the canal on the Seaway Tape Tues 5 May 98. The MV Canadian Century, MV Algosoo and MV J.W. Griffith at the wall below Lock 1. With Several more at Port Weller ancorage. Among them was SS Canadian Leader.

At PW Drydock just above Lock 1
The Canadian Transfer provides a intresting photo op. It looks from a far like a boat w/ 2 wheel houses. Eventually of course the front wheel house will remain & the aft one will go.

Reported by: J. J. Van Volkenburg




Today in Great Lakes History - May 07

On May 7, 1965, the Cedarville was struck by the ocean vessel Topdalsfjord in the Straits of Mackinac during dense fog. The Cedarville sank about forty minutes after the collision with the loss of ten crewmembers.

ALGOPORT was launched May 7, 1979

The HUTCHCLIFFE HALL entered service on May 7, 1954.

A.M. BYERS was launched May 7, 1910.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - May 06

On May 6, 1984 the CANADIAN RANGER sailed from Port Weller on her maiden voyage to load coal at Toledo, OH.

In 1944 the HILDA (2) and the barge MAITLAND NO.1 started the rescue operation of freighter GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (1) which sank in a collision with the D.M. CLEMSON (2) in the Straits of Mackinac.

This day in 1923 the EDWIN E. SLICK was struck by the steamer J. LEONARD REPLOGLE in the ice on Whitefish Bay, Lake Superior.

The HARVEY D. GOULDER entered service on May 6, 1906.

On May 6, 1934 the ROYALTON (1) helped rescue the steamer TEN which had lost power in a Lake Superior ice field and required a tow to safety.

On May 6, 1975 while unloading iron ore at Conneaut, OH, a leg and bucket from no.2 Hulett gave way and fell into the RALPH H. WATSON's cargo hold. A crane was rigged to remove the wreckage. A nine by twelve foot patch was required on her port side tank which was holed in the accident.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Bow Arrives

05/05:
The bow of the Hamilton Transfer was towed into Port Weller Dry Dock from Hamilton by tugs, Florence Mckiel and Argue Martin this yesterday morning. The tow began Sunday evening and they arrived off Port Weller Piers at 5:00 Hours. By 11:00 Hours the bow of the Transfer had been pushed into the dry dock up to the stern of the Canadian Explorer.

The name Canadian Transfer was already on the bow and a U.L.S. flag flying. The process of welding the two pieces into one ship will begin shortly.

Reported by: Marcia Foster and Dave Wobster




Seaway News

05/05:
Along the Seaway yesterday morning, several ships had to tie up in account of fog. That includes the Canadian tanker JADE STAR and the foreign-flags MECTA SEA and POMORZE ZACHODNIE. Expected to go up the Seaway later on this week will be the Indian vessel SAMRAT RUCAKA making her first trip under that name. Contrary to most of the Indian ships visiting Great Lakes ports, this one is not registered at Bombay but at Mumbai. She did several trips in past years under the name Baronia.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Photo Contest

05/05:
Announcement: an upcoming photo contest, the format - BOATS! It is to be held on Saturday, September 16, 1998.
CATEGORIES:
Great Lakes Vessel (must feature a GL vessel in some capacity - u/w photog. accepted)
Maritime Related (any photo relating to the Great Lakes Maritime Industry, i.e., lighthouse, scenery, ports, harbours, etc.)
Black & White any Great Lakes Maritime photo in B/W
Overall (This catagory combines ALL entries)

AWARDS:
Overall winner; $50.00 plus plaque or ribbon
2nd place; Plaque
3rd place; Ribbon

Vessel Catagory: Top three winners to receive awards and/or prizes
B/W Catagory: Top three winners to receive awards and/or prizes
Maritime General: Top three winners to receive awards and/or prizes
All winners will also have there photo(s) displayed on various participating websites.

Please Contact John A. Harris for more information: (517)394-2358, or by e-mail JHarris217@aol.com




SPCM Work Sessions

05/05:
The SPCM will be hosting a week-long work session May 5-May 10 aboard their 360 foot long carferry, S.S. CITY OF MILWAUKEE. Society members and guests are invited to work aboard the vessel performing various duties such as painting, electrical, steelwork, etc. Highlights will be replacement of steel plate in the aft pilot house, repair of gang plank, painting and cleaning. The carferry faces a May 11 hearing in Benzie County Circuit Court, so this may be the last time to photograph the ship at it's present location. For more information visit www.carferry.com www.carferry.com




j.clary maritime antique show

05/05:
June 12-14, 1998 st. clair mi FEATURING: Treasures of the Atocha exhibition & sale; Tashmoo whistle blowing; Simulated Coast Guard Rescue; Bagpipe band; sea chanters; Sea songs by Dan Hall; seafood tasting; diving safety; collectibles, memorabilia, books, photographs, videos, tableware, ship models, maritime museum booths, tattoos, pig roast. Dealers and vendors with maritime related collectibles are welcome.

For more information contact jim clary 810-329-7744 marineart@jclary.com




Today in Great Lakes History - May 05

WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) was launched May 5, 1953.

The MERCURY (2) collided with the bulker ERNEST T. WEIR on May 5, 1964 near the mouth of the St. Clair River. The tanker suffered severe bow damage, the result of her faulty steering gear.

On May 5, 1980 the SHARON grounded in the Trenton Channel of the Detroit River. She was freed on May 7th and proceeded to Monroe, MI and was laid up there on May 8, 1980. No repairs were made and she never sailed again.

On May 5, 1914 the GEORGE F. BAKER was traveling downbound in Lake Superior in dense fog with 10,500 tons of iron ore from Ashland, WI. She ran hard aground on Sawtooth Reef off Eagle River, on Upper Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




S.S. Badger Comes Back to Life

05/04:
Another sure sign of the coming sailing season for the S.S. Badger as she came back to life Saturday when her boilers were lit for her annual boiler inspection. The Badger's Lake Michigan service starts the '98 season on May15th.

Reported by: Max S. Hanley




Lansdowne to Buffalo

05/04:
The 1884 built rail ferry Lansdowne was brought to Buffalo by the tug Ohio sometime late on the 30th or early on May 1st. She was tied up at the Seaway Pier #2 on the Outer Harbor. The barge was supposed to go through the Black Rock Lock to the foot of Austin St. but it was too wide to go through the lock. They are not sure what they will do now.

The vessel spent may years on the Detroit water front as a resturant, she was towed to Lorain Ohio a few years ago and has been in lay up there since.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




New Tug

05/04:
The Tug Escort Protector, newly arrived after purchase in Vancouver (followed by a one month stint Supplying off Sable Island) departed Hamilton Saturday with the Tank Barge "Ocean Hauler". The pair are were upbound to load Calcium Chloride in Amherstburg. The Ocean Hauler was converted over the winter from a Deck Barge to a dual purpose tank/deck barge.The conversion work was completed in McKeil's yard in Hamilton. She is a sister to the Salty Dog, but had not been set up to operate in the tank trade. The barge will eventually be paired up wth the Tug "Doug McKeil" ex- Frankie D when her refit work is completed.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Canada to raise St. Lawrence Seaway toll

05/04:
The Canadian government announced in its Canada Gazette on 18 April that it will unilaterally raise St. Lawrence Seaway tolls by 2 percent, ignoring a provision of its 1959 founding agreement that states any toll increases must be approved by Canada and the United States. The increase will reportedly be 2 percent per year for five years and performance-based adjustments may be made. Some Canadian$29 million/U.S.$20 million will be raised over the five years, the government said, roughly at C$0.03/U.S.$0.02 per ton. In order to raise tolls, Canada will repeal its Cabinet Order 1959-373. Seaway tolls were frozen in 1993. Comments are being accepted for 30 days.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





New colors for Medusa Challenger

05/04:
Reports are that the news owners of Medusa Cement, Southdown Inc. are planning to change the fleet color scheme. The Medusa Challenger should be wearing new colors in the next 30 to 60 days. The CHALLENGER will also be heading to the ship yards in Superior in the next 30 days to replace some hull plating - possibly a good time to reveal her new look?

Reported by: John A. Harris




U.S. Seaway Port Pacesetter Awards presented

05/04:
St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. has awarded its 1997 U.S. Seaway Port Pacesetter Award to four U.S. ports. They are the Brown County Port in Green Bay, Wis.; the Detroit/Wayne County Port Authority, the Erie-Western Pennsylvania Port Authority and the Port of Oswego Authority in New York. The award was given to ports that increased the amount of cargo they moved via the St. Lawrence Seaway from 1996 to 1997.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Board members re-elected in Duluth

05/04:
The Seaway Port Authority of Duluth, Minn., has re-elected Thomas E. Grosser as president of its board of commissioners. Grosser is safety and compliance coordinator for AGP Grain Ltd. and is operations manager of its facilities in Duluth and Nerstrand, Minn. Sharon Clark has been re-elected to her third term as vice president of the board. She is a deputy commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Agriculture and operates a corn and soybean farm with her husband as well as a hog finishing facility near Madison, Minn.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





U.S. Supreme Court rules in shipwreck case

05/04:
In a unanimous decision 22 April, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that federal courts have jurisdiction to resolve disputes between states and discoverers over rights to sunken vessels. California v. Deep Sea Research Inc., No. 96-1400, was sent back to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco in a dispute over who owns the Brother Jonathan, a ship that sank six kilometers/four miles off Crescent City, Calif., in 1865. It was sailing from San Francisco to Puget Sound, Wash., and only 19 of 250 aboard survived. The wooden paddle ship was located in 76 meters/250 feet of water and claimed by the Deep Sea Research in 1991 after 20 years of work. The company contacted the two insurers who paid most of the claims and bought the ship's title and contents. The insurers said they never abandoned the ship, which California disputed.

Deep Sea Research said it has recovered more than 1,000 gold coins and hundreds of artifacts in a U.S.$1 million operation.

California claimed constitutonal immunity from the lawsuit brought by the finders to establish title, but the Supreme Court said that constitutional protections for states against being sued in federal courts do not apply when state officials do not have possession of the ship or its cargo. California had said that any lawsuit to determine title to a sunken ship is a lawsuit against the state and must be filed in state court due to the Constitution's 11th Amendment, which immunizes states from federal lawsuits. The court's 16-page opinion was written by Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.

California's claim was supported by a brief submitted by 17 states: Alabama, Alaska, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, Nevada, North Carolina, South Carolina, Vermont and Virginia.

Remaining to be resolved is whether the shipwreck is legally abandoned. Under the U.S. Abandoned Shipwreck Act, the state can take title if it is abandoned and is required to protect the site.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





INTERTANKO, U.S. Coast Guard to cooperate

05/04:
The International Association of Independent Tanker Owners (INTERTANKO) and the U.S. Coast Guard have signed an agreement in which member vessels will help to identify structures in U.S. territorial waters that could hamper navigation.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Taylor Aground Correction

05/04:
It was reported on April 18th that the Myron C. Taylor ran aground in the Saginaw River. The master of the vessel has contacted me and stated that this report is incorrect, the vessel did not ground. Apparently this is some type of turn that is used.

Click here for pictures of the vessel making the turn


Reported by: John A. Harris




Today in Great Lakes History - May 04

On May 4, 1958, the John Sherwin entered service. If the Sherwin remains laid up until May 28, 2005, not counting the winter lay-ups the vessel has experienced, she will have been in lay-up for half of her life on the Great Lakes. She last sailed on November 16, 1981.

On her maiden voyage May 4, 1976, the ST. CLAIR (2) departed Sturgeon Bay for Escanaba, MI to load 39,803 gross tons of iron ore pellets for Indiana Harbor, IN arriving there on May 5th.

The OREFAX ran aground on May 4, 1963 way off course near Manistique, MI. She was lightered and pulled off by the Roen Salvage Co. and made her way to Toronto, Ont. where she discharged her cargo and left for repairs.

The tanker VENUS (2) suffered an explosion on May 4, 1972 when the crew were cleaning tanks while at anchor waiting for the fog to lift about seven miles west of the Eisenhower Lock in the Seaway. Two explosions rocked the ship killing her skipper, Captain Stanley, and injuring three crewmen.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - May 03

On May 3, 1959, the first large saltwater vessel to transit the new St. Lawrence Seaway arrived at Duluth. The Ramon de Larrinaga took the honors as the first saltie, passing under Duluth's Aerial Bridge at 1:16 p.m., followed by a saltie named the Herald sixteen minutes later.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - May 02

The CORT created a sensation as she passed Detroit/Windsor on mid-day on May 2, 1972 amid throngs of people lining both sides of the Detroit and St. Clair Rivers, whistling acknowledging salutes on her upbound maiden run.

ADAM E. CORNELIUS (1) was launched May 2, 1908.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

05/01:
J.A.W. Iglehart departed the Fraser Shipyards on April 29. It had been drydocked for more than a week undergoing its 5-year inspection.

The parade of ships continues at Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, and Canadian vessels this season are a steady part of the dock's traffic. The line-up includes: Canadian Enterprise and Joseph H. Thompson, April 30; Mesabi Miner and Walter J. McCarthy Jr., May 1; Paul Tregurtha, May 2; Oglebay Norton and Canadian Transport, May 3; Columbia Star May 5.

Reported by: Al Miller




Ohio DNR to obtain Marblehead lighthouse

05/01:
The Columbus Dispatch reports the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) will assume ownership of the famous lighthouse at Marblehead, Ohio. The lighthouse is the oldest continuously operating light on the Great Lakes, built in 1822 and listed on the National Register of Historic Buildings. It was one of 5 Great Lakes lighthouses commermorated on U.S. postage stamps and is featured on Ohio's "Lake Erie" auto license plates. The 67-foot-tall lighthouse was declared surplus federal property last year, and approval of Ohio's application to assume ownership was announced earlier in April. The Coast Guard will continue to operate the navigational beacon by agreement with ODNR. The State of Ohio already owns the keeper's house, picnic areas and a parking lot adjacent to the lighthouse. ODNR plans up to $1 million in spending over the next several years to protect the lighthouse from erosion, building restroom facilities, increasing guided tours of the light and for other rehabilitation work.

Reported by: Steven Myers




USS 1998 Season

05/01:
On March 23, the USS Great Lakes Fleet, Inc., a Transtar company, entered the 1998 navigation season with the first movement, which was the 1000-ft. mv. EDGAR SPEER from its winter lay up berth in Duluth bound for Two Harbors to load a cargo of Minntac pellets for US Steel's Gary works. The final fleet vessel, CALCITE II, is scheduled to begin service from the shipyard in Sturgeon Bay, WI on May 8.

In 1998, the USS Great Lakes Fleet has expanded it fleet to 11 self-unloaders with the purchase late last year of Litton Great Lakes Corp., which owns the 1000-ft tug/barge PRESQUE ISLE. This vessel is now owned by GLF Great Lakes Corp., a wholly-owned unit of USS Great Lakes Fleet. Since being built in 1973, the tug/barge had been operated on long term charter to USS Lakes Fleet.
Captains and Chief Engineers for 1998 are assigned as follows: SPEER - Capt. Larry Stolz; Chief Eng. Joe Kolenda
GOTT - Capt. Elden Brege; Chief Eng. Wally Donajkowski
PRESQUE ISLE - Capt. Bill Craid; Chief Eng. Al Brand
MUNSON - Capt. Ralph Lewandowski; Chief Eng. Jack Thompson
ANDERSON - Capt. Jim Dietlin; Chief Eng. Leo Gajewski
CALLAWAY - Capt. Jim Reed; Chief Eng. Ed LaLonde
CLARKE - Capt. Roger Hein; Chief Eng. Robert Hutton
SLOAN - Capt. Richard Sobeck; Chief Eng. Bob Lijewski
TAYLOR - Capt. Paul Dubbs; Chief Eng. Jerry LaLonde
CALCITE II - Capt. Ed Berge; Chief Eng. Jim Haske


Reported by: Dave Wobser




Today in Great Lakes History - May 01

The EDMUND FITZGERALD collided with the Canadian steamer HOCHELAGA at the mouth of the Detroit River, May 1, 1970, suffering slight damage at hatches 18 and 19.

The STEWART J. CORT departed Erie on her maiden voyage at 0400 May 1, 1972. She was delayed by fog in western Lake Erie and then created a sensation as she passed Detroit/Windsor mid-day on May 2nd amid throngs of people lining both sides of the Detroit and St. Clair Rivers, whistling acknowledging salutes on her upbound maiden run.

Scrapping began on the CHICAGO TRADER May 1, 1978.

JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was launched May 1, 1943.

The IRVING S. OLDS sustained an eight foot long crack across her spar deck and eight inches down one side in a storm on Lake Huron May 1, 1963.

LIGHTSHIP 103 (HURON) was launched May 1, 1920.

SOO RIVER TRADER brought the first shipment of bulk cement to open the $18 million St. Lawrence Cement distribution dock at Duluth on May 1, 1982.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





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