Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News ARCHIVE

* Report News


Twin Ports Report

05/31:
Saltie Luckyman has joined Rixta Oldendorf anchored off Duluth. Both vessels are waiting for the Cenex-Harvest States terminal on Tuesday.

Several Canadian vessels were in port May 30 or due in port over the next few days. On May 30, Halifax arrived for Hallett dock and Montrealais arrived at the St. Lawrence Cement terminal. Algomarine is due at BNSF ore dock on May 31, and Frontenac is due at BNSF on June 1 and Louis R. Desmarais is due at the DMIR ore dock in Duluth that day.

Middletown will be making an unusual appearance in the Twin Ports on May 31 when it arrives with stone for the Cutler dock. It will then proceed to Silver Bay to load.

On June 1, Charles M. Beeghly is scheduled to take another load from the BNSF ore dock in Superior. It's made several trips there this season.

Reported by: Al Miller




Enerchem Catalyst is now Algocatalyst

05/31:
The former Enerchem Catalyst as of May 30th, has the name Algocatalyst painted on her bow. While the exact date of the name change is unknown, it did happen within the last two weeks.

Reported by: Viktor Kaczkowski




Today in Great Lakes History - May 31

The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 cleared Manitowoc in 1973 in tow of the tug HELEN M. McALLISTER, this was the first leg of her tow to the cutters torch

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Marquette Update

05/30:
Recent visitors to Marquette included the Kaye E. Barker and the Algosoo visiting Marquette's Upper Harbor. The H. Lee White is scheduled to arrive Marquette's Lower Harbor today and then move up to the Upper Harbor after unloading it's cargo. The Algosoo is scheduled to arrive Marquette's Upper Harbor early Monday morning.

Reported by: Art Pickering




Today in Great Lakes History - May 30

The Columbia Star began her maiden voyage in 1981 from Sturgeon Bay to load iron ore pellets at Silver Bay, MN for Lorain, OH. She was the last of the 1000 footers to enter service and, excluding tug-barge units or conversions, was the last new Great Lakes vessel on the American side.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Vessel Detained in Detroit

05/29:
On Thursday morning the Cyprus flag vessel ISA was detained at the port of Detroit, Nicholson Terminal, due to repetitive failure of fire drill (3 times).

The vessel master explained that the crew was performing poorly because they were fatigued. Master stated he had not slept in the past 48 hours and the chief mate had only slept 10 hours in the past week.

Based on this information, The U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Office Detroit detained the vessel for violations of standards of watchkeeping and crew proficiency.

The vessel had intended to depart port at Thursday evening. Marine Safety Office boarding officers and ABS were to observe drills yesterday morning.




Twin Ports Report

05/29:
Kinsman Independent was loading at the General Mills Elevator S in Superior on the afternoon of May 28. This elevator is more than 100 years old and, in past two years, seems to be handling mostly Canadian grain. A Canadian laker -- probably Canadian Venture -- loaded there May 27. That boat was finishing off at Concourse grain elevator before departing. After finishing at Elevator S, Kinsman Independent is supposed to shift to Cenex-Harvest States Rixta Oldendorff is still anchored on the lake. Olga was loading yesterday at Cargill B1.

Reported by: Al Miller




Taconite Plant to Remain Idle

05/29:
A production line at the Minntac taconite plant in northern Minnesota will remain idle for at least another month, according to a story in the May 28 Duluth News-Tribune.

Minntac shut down the line last fall because of declining demand for taconite. Plant officials had hoped to re-start the line in May, but now say it will remain idle through June and, after that, will be re-considered on a month-by-month basis.

Minntac mainly produces pellets for U.S. Steel. Most of its product is shipped from Two Harbors, although some goes through Duluth.

Meanwhile, labor negotiations involving U.S. Steel, Bethlehem Steel Corp. and the United Steelworkers of America continue in Pittsburgh. Contracts affecting about 5,500 Steelworkers at six Northeastern Minnesota taconite plants expire July 31.

The talks began late in April. The parties had hoped to reach a contract agreement by the end of May. Whenever U.S. Steel, Bethlehem and the Steelworkers reach an agreement, that deal is expected to set the pattern for agreements with other steelmakers.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - May 29

ROBERT S. McNAMARA was Launched in 1909 as a) STADACONA (1)

JAMES R. BARKER was Float launched in 1976

TADOUSSAC (2) Prematurely launched herself on this day in 1969

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

05/28:
The spring rush of salties has tailed off, so it was good to see the big Rixta Oldendorff anchored off Duluth on the morning of May 27 apparently undergoing inspection of its cargo hold. The vessel is scheduled to enter Duluth later in the day and proceed to Cenex-Harvest States to load.

Joe Block was loading at its usual spot on the DMIR ore dock -- its first trip into port with new stack markings. It looked odd without its billboard lettering.

Another change of plans: John G. Munson apparently is skipping Silver Bay and is now announced for the DMIR ore dock in Duluth. However, Indiana Harbor is due in Silver Bay on May 27 with coal from Midwest Energy Terminal.

Charles M. Beeghly called at the BNSF ore dock in Superior on May 26. Due in May 27 are regulars Stewart J. Cort and George A. Stinson.

A Canadian straight-decker was docked at the General Mills S elevator in Superior on May 27. It is the first ship of the season for this venerable elevator.

Reported by: Al Miller




Marquette Report

05/28:
Marquette's Upper Harbor had a busy 24 hours. Wednesday morning, the Elton Hoyt 2nd arrived with a load of coal for Wisconsin Electric. After unloading it's cargo, the Hoyt then took on a load of ore and departed during the evening.

Late in the afternoon, the Charles Wilson arrived with a load of stone which had to wait to unload until the Hoyt's departure during the night. The Algosoo made another visit to the Upper Harbor when it arrived late last night.

A local radio station recently reported that shipments of ore out of Marquette is down by 32% while shipments out of Escanaba is at the same level as 1998.

Reported by: Art Pickering




Today in Great Lakes History - May 28

THOMAS W. LAMONT departed Toledo on her maiden voyage May 28, 1930 bound for Duluth, MN where she loaded iron ore.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

05/27:
John G. Munson is due into Silver Bay on May 27.

Saturday is shaping up to be busy at Midwest Energy Terminal. Walter J. McCarthy Jr., Columbia Star, Algobay and Paul R. Tregurtha are all due that day. St. Clair -- once a regular at SMET but now seldom seen there -- is due to load May 30.

Reported by: Al Miller




Boblo boat skipper

05/27:
John A. Sucharski was born a landlubber and raised on a potato farm, but he is best remembered for skippering the Boblo boat Ste. Claire during his 57 years sailing the Great Lakes.

Mr. Sucharski, 86, died Friday of congestive heart failure at Community Memorial Hospital in his hometown of Cheboygan.

Born in Detroit in 1912, Mr. Sucharski was working as a deckhand for the Bradley Line by 1929, eventually rising to second mate. His son, David, said Mr. Sucharski wasn't so much drawn to the water as he was in need of a good job.

But once aboard Great Lakes ships, Mr. Sucharski came to love working afloat. From 1946 to 1957, he was first mate and relief captain on Mackinac Island ferries.

Mr. Sucharski became a first mate on the Boblo boats from 1957 until the early 1970s, when he returned to duty on Great Lakes freighters.

By 1977, Mr. Sucharski was skippering the Ste. Claire, a multi-deck ship carrying crowds between Detroit and the Boblo Island amusement park. It was the last of more than 50 ships on which he sailed.

Services were held yesterday at the St. Mary-St. Charles Church in Cheboygan. Burialwill be in the Mt. Calvary Cemetery in Cheyboygan.

Reported by: S. Buchanan




A Happy And Safe Holiday To All

05/27:
Lake Carriers' Association wishes its readers a happy and safe Memorial Day Weekend. If your plans including boating on the Great Lakes or connecting channels, please be aware that the shipping season is in full swing and lakers and salties are everywhere and anywhere.

Safe navigation is everyone's responsibility. The crews on U.S.-Flag lakers perform their duties only after passing extensive examinations by the United States Coast Guard. Recreational boaters also need to know and obey the Rules of the Road.

Here's a few safety tips from the flier MAKE WAY jointly published by LCA, Lake Erie Marine Trades Association, Ohio Department of Natural Resources - Divsion of Watercraft, and the Greater Cleveland Safe Boating Council

  • Avoid ship channels whenever possible.
  • Be alert. Watch for ship traffic.
  • Be seen, especially at night.
  • Know the whistle signals from ships - 5 or more blasts means DANGER!
  • Listen to VHF Channels 13 and 16 for "SECURITY CALLS" from commercial vessels.
  • Don't call a commercial ship unless absolutely necessary. The folks on the bridge are nice enough, but they are busy.
  • Wear personal flotation devices.
  • When in doubt, always make way. In very simple terms, the bigger ship has the right of way (the "Big Boat" rule).

    For information on a boat handling course conducted near your home, call Toll Free 1-800-336-BOAT.

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




  • Today in Great Lakes History - May 27

    CANADIAN PIONEER was launched May 27,1981

    NANTICOKE was christened in 1980.

    CHARLES DICK was launched in 1922.

    The PETER REISS left Duluth, MN May 27, 1910 on her maiden voyage with iron ore for Ashtabula, OH.

    HENRY STEINBRENNER (4) was towed from Toledo's Lakefront Dock in 1994 for the scrap yard at Port Maitland, Ont.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    CSL Chooses Name for New Vessel

    05/26:
    Montreal, Que.: Canada Steamship Lines (CSL) announced today that the name of its newest vessel will be the CSL Niagara.

    The ship, a maximum-size Seaway self-unloader, is currently under construction at Port Weller Dry Docks (PWDD) in St. Catharines, Ont. When launched, she will be the largest Canadian vessel on the Great Lakes and feature the latest in self-unloading technology.

    CSL President Ray Johnston said that the name was chosen to pay tribute to the Niagara region and the important role it plays in CSL's activities and Canadian shipping as a whole.

    "The Niagara region and its people, from our customers to our employees to our suppliers, are vital to both our industry and the North American economy," said Johnston. "We wanted to recognize this and felt that naming the new vessel the CSL Niagara was a good way of doing so. We feel that we've given her the best name she can have."

    The name was selected from more than 500 entries that were submitted in a company-wide naming contest. Captain Ken Ford, fittingly, of Niagara Falls, Ont., had the winning entry. The name will be officially unveiled in a ceremony at Port Weller Dry Docks on June 15.

    The ship will enter service shortly after the ceremony, putting her impressive dimensions and state-of-the-art technology to use for CSL customers along the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Waterway.

    At 740 feet in length, 78 feet in width and 48 feet in depth, the CSL Niagara will take advantage of the Seaway's new size allowances. Her self-unloading system will feature automated cargo-handling and load-sensing technology, among other innovations.

    The CSL Niagara will be the first of three ships delivered in CSL's $100-million hull-replacement program. The program involves replacing the forebody sections (the entire hull forward of the engine room and accommodation block) on existing company ships with entirely new sections.

    The two other vessels are scheduled for delivery in 2000 and 2001. All three will be built at PWDD, ensuring work for approximately 300 shipyard employees on a year-round basis for the duration of the contract. CSL holds options on two other ships with PWDD for delivery in 2002 and 2003.

    CSL controls the largest fleet of self-unloading vessels in the world and handles annual bulk cargo movements totaling 30 million tonnes.

    Click here to visit the Canada Steamship Lines web site, offering pictures of the new vessel





    Canadian Mariner enters service

    05/26:
    Another Canadian bulk-carrier has entered service. Canadian Mariner was upbound at the Soo Locks on Saturday, May 22, headed for Thunder Bay and a grain cargo. Only Canadian Trader and Seaway Queen remain inactive for ULS.

    Reported by: Rod Burdick




    Twin Ports Report

    05/26:
    Mesabi Miner departed Duluth about 7:30 a.m. May 25, well-laden with taconite pellets from DMIR ore dock. The vessel is an uncommon visitor here. It usually makes its calls to the North Shore ports.

    Oglebay Norton boats continue their regular trade to the North Shore ports. Reserve called at Taconite Harbor on May 24, followed by Middletown on the 25th. Armco called at Silver Bay on the 25th.

    Boats in unusual places: Philip R. Clarke is scheduled to make a rare call to Silver Bay on May 25, and Lee A. Tregurtha is putting in another unusual appearance at the Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior the same day. After loading grain in Duluth, saltie Lake Carling is departing for Thunder Bay.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Strong Winds Continue to delay Shipping

    05/26:
    Strong winds on Monday and Tuesday continued to delay shipping on the lower Lakes.

    Just a few of the vessels delayed are: Myron C Taylor anchored in Saginaw Bay waiting to enter the River and the Calcite II was still at anchored off of Port Huron. The Halifax was tied up in Sandusky yesterday afternoon awaiting weather, she had arrived on Monday morning and completed loading that evening.




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 26

    In 1979 the FRED R. WHITE, JR. departed the shipyard on her maiden voyage to load iron ore pellets at Escanaba, MI for Cleveland.

    The J.A.W. Iglehart began its maiden Great Lakes voyage in 1965

    The Halifax (former Frankcliffe Hall) began its maiden voyage in 1963

    SCOTT MISENER (3) was launched in 1954

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Twin Ports Report

    05/25:
    May 24 is another busy day at Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior. At 7:30 a.m., a 1,000-footer was loading at the dock and two more - apparently Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and Paul R. Tregurtha - were waiting for their turn to load.

    Also busy was Cenex-Harvest States elevator. Tugs were assisting saltie Lake Carling into the No. 2 berth while Orsula occupied the gallery berth.

    St. Clair is set to make another trip to the BNSF ore dock in Superior on May 24. The vessel is becoming a semi-regular on that run. It will be arriving shortly before Burns Harbor, a fixture at that dock. Also back on the ore run is Mesabi Miner, which is making another trip to the DMIR ore dock in Duluth.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Strong Winds drop Water Levels

    05/25:
    Strong winds on Monday made a bad situation worse dropping water levels from lower Lake Huron to Lake Erie. Last night the Adam E. Cornelius was at anchor waiting for water levels in the lower Detroit River to return to normal. The Calcite II, due for Detroit, was at anchored off Port Huron also waiting for water levels in river system to rise.

    Reported by: Linda Stoetzer




    Trip back to the Lakes

    05/25:
    The LEGACEY, a 58 foot Grandbanks Trawler is heading North from Florida up the Eastern Seaboard via the intercostal waterway, Hudson River, Erie Barge Canal, Oswego Canal to Lake Ontario then up the Welland Canal to Lake Erie then home to Chicago.

    At the end of every day the daily trip is download onto their web page with pictures from the boat and airplane shots. The trip will take about 4 weeks. The trip south last fall down the Mississippi River is also still available on the web site.

    Visit Lakeland Boating and click on Captains Log




    What's your favorite vessel?

    05/25:
    New question on the Letters to the Editor - Cyber Survey page, What is your all time favorite vessel and why?

    Click here to leave your comments




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 25

    On May 25, 1898, the Presque Isle was launched at the Cleveland Shipbuilding Company in Cleveland. The vessel is much better known as the cement carrier E.M. Ford, celebrating her 101st birthday.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Salty Loses Power

    05/24:
    On Friday, May 21 , at approximately 1400, the salty Moore Laker reported that she had overtaken the Federal Fuji. Shortly thereafter she reported a mechanical failure with the main engine. The vessel reported that they were not sure what the problem was as they were still removing the inspection ports.

    The ship was dead in the water and drifting in the psoition 53 52 N, 76 51.5W

    Reported by: Ron Walsh




    Great Lakes Maritime Exhibits

    05/24:
    The maritime history of the Saginaw River is the subject of an exhibit by the Saginaw River Marine Historical Society currently on display at the Historical Museum of Bay County, in Bay City, Michigan. The exhibit includes a ship's wheel and Chadburn engine order telegraph, which visitors can handle, as well as other items from a ship's pilot house and engine room. Also on display are house flags representing different shipping companies that serve the Saginaw River, a model of the James E. Davidson Shipyard of West Bay City, a display of tools used in wooden shipbuilding, and photographs of ships which have navigated the Saginaw River in the past and present. In addition, the exhibit features a radio direction finder from the mast of the tanker JUPITER, a complete ship's radar system, and the ship-to-shore radio from the tug FREDERICK T. KELLERS.

    The exhibit runs until October. The museum is located at 321 Washington Ave., next to Bay City city hall. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays and noon to 4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. The museum is closed on holidays. There is no admission charge, but donations are welcome.

    Also on exhibit at the museum until June 15 is "The Donald Duck Navy, Patrol Craft Sailors, Defoe and WWII," presented by the Patrol Craft Sailors Association. This exhibit features models, paintings and photographs of Navy patrol craft and a display on the history of the Defoe Shipbuilding Company of Bay City.




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 24

    In 1980 the M/V BURNS HARBOR was christened for the Wilmington Trust Co., (Bethlehem Steel Co., Mgr.) Wilmington, DE.

    The CANADIAN OLYMPIC was launched in 1976

    CHICAGO TRADER arrived at Ashtabula, OH on May 24, 1977 for scrapping (scrapping did not begin until May 1, 1978 by Triad Salvage Inc.)

    The CLIFFS VICTORY set a record (by 2 minutes) for the fastest time from Sault Ste. Marie to Duluth, in 1953. She logged a time of 17 hours and 50 minutes. The CHARLES M. WHITE had been declared the fastest earlier that year by the Cleveland papers.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Jean Parisien Now off Drydock

    05/23:
    M/V Jean Parisien was removed from Pascol's drydock Friday evening in Thunder Bay. She was moved by the tugs Peninsula & George N. Carleton. The tugs towed her deadship out of the North entrance and went to anchor off the North piers for ballast tank testing and start up of her engines.

    The Parisien was on the drydock for 25 days from April 27th to May 21st.

    Reported by: Ron Konkol




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 23

    The WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY was re-christened on May 23,1990 as b) PAUL R. TREGURTHA. She is the largest ship on the Great Lakes and also the last Great Lakes ship built at AmShip, Lorain.

    H. LEE WHITE completed sea trials on May 23, 1974

    The FRED R. WHITE Jr. completed her two day sea trials in 1979.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    New Gaelic Tug Delivers Oil

    05/22:
    Gaelic Tugboat Company's new twin screw tug ROGER STAHL was paired with its first barge tow, the oil barge LSC 236. The Stahl first towed the barge empty to the Mobil Oil Company dock in Trenton Michigan Thursday and waited for the barge to be loaded with 400,000 gallons of diesel oil. The loaded barge was then towed to the Detroit Edison Company's St. Clair plant where the tug waited while the barge was unloaded. This has been one of the regular tows of the tug Shannon. The Stahl and the barge returned to Detroit early yesterday. The 3,000 hp ROGER STAHL is proving itself to be a very effective tugboat.

    Reported by: D.J. Tugnut




    Carferry S.S. City of Milwaukee Opening for Tours

    05/22:
    The Elberta Village Council approved a special land use permit Thursday night and the carferry City of Milwaukee will be opening for tours starting on Memorial Day (May 31) from noon to 5 PM. The first tour will start at noon, and the last one will start at 5.

    The SPCM tour committee will be formalizing a schedule soon for the rest of the summer. Cost for the tour is $5 for ages 7 through adult, and children under 7 are free. Groups such as Cub Scouts can tour for $1 each with a minimum of $25.

    Reported by: Max Hanley




    Kroeger to work on changes to Canadian grain handling

    05/22:
    Arthur Kroeger has been appointed by Canadian Transport Minister David Collenette to work with industry representatives in preparing recommendations on how to make changes to grain handling and transportation in the country. The recommendations are due on Sept. 30 and changes will be made by the 2000-01 crop year.

    Kroeger was deputy minister of six federal departments between 1974 and 1992. He was deputy minister of transport when the Western Grain Transport Act was passed in 1983.

    Work on the recommendations will start next month. Discussion will center on a report developed by Justice Willard Estey, who was named in December 1997 to do a review of Canadian transport and handling of grain.

    Reported by: Steve Schultz




    Trip for two

    05/22:
    This is the third year that, thanks to Algoma Central and Upper Lakes Group, the Children's Aid Society of Huron County is able to raffle off two trips for two on one of their freighters. The money raised goes to send needy children to summer camp through the Sifto Summer Camp for Kids program.

    Last year one of the lucky couples took an eight-day trip through the locks and up the St. Lawrence to Quebec. The other couple took a seven-day trip that took them over to Lake Michigan.

    The cost of the tickets are $5 (Cnd.) each and the drawing is June 14.

    Lakes Freighter Trip
    Children's Aid Society of Huron County
    R.R. 4 Goderich, Ontario N7A 3Y1
    Phone 519-524-7356 or in Ontario 800-265-5198
    Click here for more information




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 22

    The A.H. FERBERT (2) was launched this day in 1942. May 22nd was the tenth National Maritime Day and on that day 21 other ships were launched nationwide to celebrate the occasion. The "super" IRVING S. OLDS was launched the same day at Lorain, OH. This marked the last of the "Super Carrier" build program. The others were the BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS, LEON FRASER and ENDERS M. VOORHEES.

    The SIR THOMAS SHAUGHNESSY sailed under her own power down the Seaway on May 22, 1969 for the last time and arrived at Quebec City.

    BAYFAIR was launched as the a) COALHAVEN in 1928

    While bound for Escanaba, MI to load ore, the JOSEPH BLOCK grounded at Porte des Morts Passage, on Green Bay, May 22, 1968 and was released the same day by the Roen tug ARROW. The BLOCK's hull damage extended to 100 bottom plates. Surrendered to the under-writers and sold in June that year to Lake Shipping Inc.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Detroit/Wayne County to flying shipping flags

    05/21:
    A story in yesterday's Detroit News reports that the Detroit/Wayne County Port Authority has begun highlighting a different shipping company on the Great Lakes by flying that firm's flag at its headquarters at 8109 E. Jefferson in Detroit.

    The flags began flying weekly April 5 and will continue through July 16.

    Some of the 15 companies participating in the event include:
    Oglebay Norton; Inland Lakes Transportation; Interlake Steamship; Canada Steamship Lines; Southdown Inc. (Medusa Cement Co.); American Steamship; USS Great Lakes Fleet.

    Head of the Port Authority John Jamian is quoted as saying "We try to do it (display the flags) according to who has the most traffic on the river that week, or maybe who is meeting with us, but overall there is no special criteria." He said the program is an effort to "raise public awareness of the Great Lakes Shipping -- educate the public on what the companies are and what we are doing."

    Click here to visit the Port of Detroit.




    U.S. calls for ballast water reporting

    05/21:
    The U.S. Coast Guard said May 20 that effective July 1, vessels that operate outside of U.S. territorial waters will have to report their ballast water management practices to the organization. The decision, implemented as an interim rule, is being taken to fulfill the National Invasive Species Act of 1996, which is meant to limit foreign marine organisms being carried into U.S. waters.

    Under the rule, any vessel with ballast tanks that operates beyond the 200-mile exclusive economic zone will submit information to the National Ballast Water Information Clearinghouse, a joint program of the Coast Guard and the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Md. Vessels will have to fax, mail or use an Internet page with a standardized Coast Guard or International Maritime Organization ballast water reporting form.

    The rule is interim while the Coast Guard collects additional public comments over 60 days. It also establishes voluntary ballast water management guidelines for all U.S. waters.

    Reported by: Steve Schultz




    Upcoming Cruise

    05/21:
    Lake St. Clair & River Cruise Detroit, MI. Saturday, May 30, 1999. The Marine Historical Society of Detroit and Great Lakes Maritime Institute Present the 9th annual Lake St. Clair & River Cruise aboard the Diamond Jack fleet.
    Tickets are $60 per person. For more information contact Diamond Jack's River Tours, Box 114 Grosse Ile, MI 48138-0014 or call 313-843-9376




    Correction

    05/21:
    It was reported last week that the Enerchem Trader may have been sold. Latest reports have the vessel as not being sold.




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 21

    The AMERICAN REPUBLIC’s maiden voyage was on May 21, 1981 from Sturgeon Bay light to Escanaba, Mich. to load ore pellets for Cleveland, Ohio.

    HENRY G. DALTON's maiden voyage was on May 21, 1916.

    UNITED STATES GYPSUM (2) in tow of the German tug FAIRPLAY X was lost in heavy weather on May 21, 1973 near Syndey, Nova Scotia.

    The G.A. TOMLINSON (2) stranded near Buffalo, NY on Lake Erie May 21, 1974 suffering an estimated $150,000 in damage.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Change in Stack

    05/20:
    The Southdown Challenger arrived in Milwaukee Tuesday evening with a new look. The familiar Medusa heads are no more. They were removed from the stack last Saturday in Milwaukee.

    Word has it one is headed to the Great Lakes Historical Society in Vermilion, OH and the other one to the Wisconsin Maritime Museum in Manitowoc, WI.

    Reported by: Andy LaBorde




    Lake Erie Casino Freighter?

    05/20:
    The Cleveland Plain Dealer reported yesterday that 3 slot machines and 2 video poker machines were seized by the Coast Guard from the David Z. Norton on Saturday. The Coast Guard is investigating who placed the machines on the ship and where they came from. They were found in an electrical storage room and contained money. The Coast Guard is also determining what if any laws were broken and stated the FBI would also be investigating.

    Stuart Theis, president of Oglebay Norton acknowledged the machines had been seized but said he did not think any laws had been broken. Company officials have learned a crew member brought the machines aboard for amusement but did not know when or where they were loaded according to Theis. "It's something that's unfortunate, and it's totally inconsistent with our own policies...Had we known, we would have had them removed." said Theis.

    The ship's captain was aware of the machines and "determined it was benign" to have them on board Theis said. The Norton has been running the Lorain shuttle to the LTV works lately. Theis also stated they company will be checking all other vessels in the fleet and said the company does not plan to fire the crew member because he broke no laws. "We take a great deal of pride in all of our crews, and when something silly like this happens, we deal with it - and try to keep it in perspective," he said.

    Reported by: Rex Cassidy and Sharon Bouchonville




    News From the Seaway

    05/20:
    Being renamed recently at Quebec City was the tug Capt. Ioannis S. becoming Ocean Delta. She is owned by Groupe Ocean Ltd. The renaming was so fresh that her previous name was still painted on her life rings.

    Now back in service since about May 13 is the Paterson. She entered the Seaway on May 15 bound for Chicago.

    Groupe Desgagnés acquired another tanker lately to be named Maria Desgagnés. She was built in China last year and traded very briefly for her original owner before her purchase by Desgagnés. She is reported to make her first Seaway trip on or about June 25. Dimensions: 13 400 t.dwght. 120X20 m. Meanwhile, alterations will be done to Anna Desgagnés to travel up the Seaway. However, she is to go only as far as Cote Ste. Catherine to load cargo for the Arctic during the summer months. She is a roll-on/roll-off vessel. All Desgagnés cargo vessels are to load supplies for the Arctic from Cote Ste.Catherine, not using Montreal anymore.

    Reported by: René Beauchamp




    Former President

    05/20:
    Christian F. Beukema, 81, former president of U.S. Steel's Great Lakes Fleet and an instrumental figure in the push for extended season navigation on the Great Lakes, died May 14 at his home in Fort Myers, Florida.

    Mr. Beukema was employed for more than 30 years with U.S. Steel Corp. He was president of Oliver Iron Mining Division from 1960 through 1964. During this time he was the industry's leader in the successful effort to obtain voter approval of the "taconite amendment" to the Minnesota Constitution which limited for 25 years the rate of increase on certain mining taxes. This amendment cleared the way for extensive development of the state's taconite industry as a replacement to the depleted natural ore mines.

    After transferring to U.S. Steel headquarters in Pittsburgh, Mr. Beukema continued to manage the company's Minnesota mining operations as vice president of raw materials and lake shipping. In this role, he was the shipping industry's leading proponent of extending the navigation season beyond its traditional April-to-December limits. Under his guidance, Great Lakes Fleet always put the most vessels into winter operations during numerous experimental extended seasons in the late 60s and 70s. During two seasons, several Great Lakes Fleet vessels operated year-round. With the cooperation of the Lake Carriers' Association, U.S. government and other fleets, these efforts lead to the Great Lakes shipping season we see today, with vessels routinely running in January and, in some cases, February. In 1974, these efforts prompted the Council on Lake Erie Ports to name Mr. Beukema its Marine Man of the Year.

    Mr. Beukema also lead Great Lakes Fleet during the years it built its 1,000-footers and lengthened the AAA boats -- two moves that proved to be crucial to its successful operations today. Mr. Beukema retired in 1979.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 20

    On May 20, 1909 while lying at the Lackawanna Coal Dock at Buffalo, NY, the LeGRAND S. DEGRAFF was struck by the SONORA which caused $4,000 in damage to the DEGRAFF.

    The STANDARD PORTLAND CEMENT sank on Lake Huron two miles above Port Huron, MI in a collision with the steamer AUGUST ZIESING on May 20, 1960 with no loss of life.

    On May 20, 1967 during docking maneuvers in the Trenton Channel of the Detroit River, the W.W. HOLLOWAY's KaMeWa propeller shaft sheared off and the propeller reportedly sank to the bottom.

    The MERCURY (2) was launched May 20, 1912 as a) RENOWN.

    HENRY STEINBRENNER (4) was launched May 20, 1916 as a) WILLIAM A. McGONAGLE (2)

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Twin Ports Report

    05/19:
    Mackinaw moved under its own power into one of the drydocks at Fraser Shipyards about 7:30 a.m. May 18. It's scheduled to remain in the dock 45 days.

    Minnesota lawmakers have approved $50 million in aid for the proposed Minnesota Iron and Steel plant planned for Minnesota's Iron Range. The plant would produce taconite fines and reduced iron briquets as well as steel. No word on whether any of the products would be shipped by boat.

    American Mariner put in an unusual appearance May 18 at the Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior. The vessel is the first of six expected to line up at the dock over the next few days.

    After the Mariner comes Paul Tregurtha, May 17;; Canadian Progress, May 18; Canadian Olympic, May 19; Joe Thompson, May 19; Oglebay Norton, May 19. When that's done, Canadian Transport is due in May 21.

    GLF boats in interesting places include John G. Munson at Gladstone on May 18 and George A. Sloan making another trip to Carrollton on May 19.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Salty loading at Zug Island

    05/19:
    The salt water vessel Makeevka arrived at the entrance of the old Rouge River to load petcoke from Great Lakes Steel the evening of the 17th of May. She was assisted by the tug Pennsylvania, this is the first time in this decade that a salty has beened loaded at Zug Island.

    Reported by: D. Ocean




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 19

    SIR THOMAS SHAUGHNESSY was launched May 19, 1906.

    On May 19, 1973 the METEOR (2) was moved from the Pipeline Tankers dock to a permanent berth on Barkers Island at Superior to serve as a museum ship.

    B.F. JONES (2) and EDWARD S. KENDRICK towed by the Polish tug KORAL and arrived for scrapping at Castellon, Spain, near Barcelona on the Mediterranean Sea, on May 19, 1973, a trip of over 4,000 miles.

    The LAKE WINNIPEG in tow of the tug IRVING CEDAR arrived in Sacavém, North of Lisbon, Portugal on May 19, 1985. She was the largest Canadian laker and the first Seaway sized ship, as of that date, to be scrapped.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Twin Ports Report

    05/18:
    Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw arrived in the Twin Ports on May 16 for Fraser Shipyards. The vessel will undergo maintenance work on auxiliary propultion equipments such as propellers, shafts, etc.

    The stiff winds that prompted several vessels to anchor off Duluth last week may be felt again in Two Harbors on May 20. Five vessels are due at the ore dock that day: Cason J. Callaway, Edwin H. Gott, Roger Blough, Indiana Harbor and Philip R. Clarke. The Gott, Blough and Indiana Harbor are bunched up because all three anchored for about a day due to weather.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Niagara II Scuttled

    05/18:
    Saturday, May 15 at Tobermory, the former sandsucker NIAGARA II was scuttled by setting off explosive charges set in her hull. She was sunk as a dive attraction in Little Cove a few miles east of Tobermory, in Georgian Bay.

    To add some additional excitement to the affair, 4 gasoline bombs were exploded above decks just before the big blast opened up her hull. The explosions forward were sufficiently large enough to send steel plates flying off both port and starboard bows.

    One of the projectiles skipped across the water more than 200 feet and narrowly missed a man in a kayak. This piece of shrapnell was estimated to be 3' by 4'. She rolled over onto her starboard side and went down bow first into 90 feet of water. After striking her bow on the solid rock bottom, she began to roll back upright again as her stern disappeared below the surface.

    NIAGARA II was built in England in 1930 for Imperial Oil Ltd. and ran on the St. Lawrence and Ottawa rivers originally as RIDEAULITE. Renamed IMPERIAL LACHINE in 1947, she was sold to Holden Sand & Gravel in 1954 and rebuilt into a sandsucker at Toronto. She was then renamed NIAGARA and spent several years dredging and delivering sand on Lake Ontario. There were a series of sales and renamings over the next several years. She became W.M. EDINGTON in 1969 and was converted from steam to diesel in 1972. She was renamed NIAGARA II in 1984. After a grounding on the Niagara River bar in 1990, the engine was removed and she was operated as a barge by McKeil. Sold to Tobermory Heritage Association, she was towed to Tobermory last fall where she was cleaned and prepared for a dive site.

    Reported by: Ron Beaupre




    April Lake Erie Coal Trade Unchanged From A Year Ago

    05/18:
    Coal loadings at Lake Erie ports totaled 2,144,132 net tons in April, an increase of roughly 21,000 tons compared to the corresponding period last year. For the season, the Lake Erie coal trade stands at 2,451,449 net tons, an increase of 150,000 tons.

    April shipments by port were:
    Ashtabula - 515,088
    Conneaut - 529,828
    Sandusky - 488,137
    Toledo - 611,079

    Visit the Lake Carriers' Association for complete details




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 18

    The ATWATER departed Sandusky, OH May 18, 1925 on her maiden voyage loaded with coal bound for Duluth, MN. She was the first freighter on the Great Lakes equipped with a gyro compass.

    The JOHNSTOWN (2) cleared Erie May 18, 1985 for Quebec City under tow bound for Spain for scrapping. This vessel was the first post-war built U.S. laker to be scrapped.

    On May 18, 1903 the MAUNALOA hit and sank the 69 foot wooden tug EDWARD GILLEN at Superior, WI.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Badger Sails

    05/17:
    The Lakes Michigan Carferry Badger departed Ludington on her maiden voyage for 1999 on May 14th under the command of Captains Bruce Masse and Dean Hobbs. Badger left right on time, pulling away from the apron at 8:30 AM.

    Hoisted from her mast, the new LMC flag was flying along with the flag of the Grand President of the International Shipmaster's Association. Captain Hobbs is the first carferry captain to be a I.S.M.A. Grand President.

    Because the engines were rebuilt during the winter layup, the Badger only ran at 3/4 of her normal speed to Manitowoc. The Badger was greeting in Manitowoc by the mayor, holding a big sign which read "Welcome Back Badger!"

    Another treat--while in Manitowoc a Coast Guard test of the starboard lifeboats was done. The test caused an additional delay, and the Badger arrived back in Ludington at 9:00 PM.

    Reported by: Max Hanley




    Great Lakes levels decreasing

    05/17:
    The International Joint Commission said May 14 that the warm winter of 1997-98 has caused current low water levels in the North American Great Lakes that are expected to decrease further. According to the commission, the El Nino effect allowed extra water to evaporate from the warmer-than-average lakes. Lake Superior has dropped 8 inches to its lowest level for May since 1990, Lakes Huron and Michigan has fallen about 26 inches to the lowest since 1990, Lake Erie's average level fell 22 inches, the lowest since 1990, and Lake Ontario level dropped by 29 inches, the lowest since 1965. Lake St. Clair is 21 inches below year-ago levels, comparable to 1961.

    Reported by: Steve Schultz




    Busy Days ahead for Conneaut

    05/17:
    The P&C dock in Conneaut OH should see brisk traffic over the next two days. Today May 17th the Roger Blough and Arthur M. Anderson will arrive to unload. After the Blough unloads it's back to Two Harbors for more ore.

    The Anderson will then unload and then load 2 coal cargos for Dunkirk NY. On May 19th the Edgar B. Speer will make her first call there this season arriving to unload ore.

    Reported by: David French




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 17

    BUCKEYE MONITOR was launched May 17, 1913 as a) ALTON C. DUSTIN.

    NORTHCLIFFE HALL (2) collided with the Cuban salty CARLOS MANUEL DE CESPEDES in the St. Lawrence River above the Eisenhower Lock on May 17, 1980.

    The E.G. GRACE arrived at Ramey's Bend May 17, 1984 in tow of the tugs GLENEVIS and GLENSIDE for scrapping.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Busy Day in Milwaukee

    05/16:
    It was a busy day in the port of Milwaukee May 15. The Canadian Transfer made it's first ever trip to Milwaukee when it arrived with a load of salt. Also arriving Saturday was the Southdown Challenger and the Charles M. Beeghly with a load of coal.

    Reported by: Andy LaBorde




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 16

    The CANADIAN PROSPECTOR passed upbound in the Welland Canal May 16, 1979 on her first trip after reconstruction with Labrador ore bound for Ashtabula, Ohio.

    E.J. BLOCK was launched May 16, 1908 as the W.R. WOODFOR

    CLYMER departed Superior on May 15, 1981 and went to Duluth, MN to load 11,154 tons of taconite ore for Lorain. On May 16, 1981, having departed Duluth in 35 mph winds and ten foot seas, the IRVIN L. CLYMER began taking on water in her ballast tanks. She returned to Duluth, and was quickly repaired.

    On May 16, 1972, in dense fog, the ROBERT HOBSON struck the Peerless Cement dock at Port Huron, MI when her bow was caught by the strong current at the mouth of the St. Clair River. Damage to the hull was estimated at to $100,000.

    In 1985 PONTIAC (2) was towed down the Welland Canal by the McKeil tugs GLENEVIS, ARGUE MARTIN and STORMONT bound for Quebec City. Shew would later be scrapped in Spain.

    Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    First trip to Milwaukee

    05/15:
    The Joyce Van Enkevort and barge Pathfinder made there first ever appearance in Milwaukee May 14 when they delivered coal from Chicago.

    It appears that Oglebay Norton has lost the coal hauling contract into Milwaukee to Interlake. Interlake has been a regular caller at Milwaukee this spring with coal.

    Reported by: Andy LaBorde




    Low Water, Sluggish Demand Weigh Down April Stone Trade

    05/15:
    A combination of reduced loading draft and a sluggish start to the construction season produced an 18 percent decrease in the stone trade in April. Loadings at U.S. and Canadian ports totaled 3.2 million net tons, a fall-off of more than 700,000 tons compared to a year ago. Also impacting the stone trade is the continued lower level of steel production (fluxstone is used as a purifying agent in the steelmaking process) which has followed the record level of steel imports in 1998.

    Visit the Lake Carriers' Association for complete details




    Cresswell Advocates use of Seaway

    05/15:
    In the third of a series of public speeches, Peter Cresswell, president and chief executive officer of Algoma Central Corp., delivered another warning about the economic future of the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway waterway and called on the people of the Niagara area to deliver a strong message to the federal government.

    Mr. Cresswell told an audience in St. Catharine's that user fees and cost-recovery plans, applied unfairly from region to region and country to country, will result in the world-class transportation infrastructure deteriorating, and over time, would no longer be able to respond to new shifts and opportunities in export markets.

    Of particular concern to Mr. Cresswell is the loss of grain shipments through the Waterway as a result not only of shifting markets but a decade of public policies favoring western ports and the movement of grain by rail both east and west. Grain shipments through Thunder Bay have fallen from a high in the mid-80's of 19 million metric tons to only 5 million metric tons in the 1998-99 crop year.

    Mr. Cresswell linked the importance of grain shipments through the Waterway with movements of other commodities such as iron ore. There is unique Canadian synergy about the trade pattern on the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway, Mr. Cresswell continued, where the movement of grain downstream joins with the movement of iron ore upstream. If one disappears the other will face higher transportation rates, and a lessening of its competitive position.

    Mr. Cresswell ended by explaining the economic impact of the marine industry in Niagara. "There are more than 125 marine suppliers in Niagara. They directly employ over 2,000 people in jobs whose average income pays $16,000 more than the region's average. That's C$41,670 versus C$25,196." Indirectly, the industry supports more than 8,800 full-time jobs, he said.

    Reported by: Dave Wobser from a story in Skillings Mining Review




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 15

    On May 15, 1997, the "This Day in History" feature started on this page.

    The Philip R. Clarke--the first of the AAA class of vessel--turns 45. The Clarke began her maiden voyage from Lorain, Ohio on this date in 1952.

    After extensive renovation at Fraser Shipyard, the IRVIN L. CLYMER departed Superior on May 15, 1981 and went to Duluth, MN to load 11,154 tons of taconite ore for Lorain.

    On May 15, 1971 STONEFAX was sold for scrap.

    The HOMER D. WILLIAMS collided with the Canadian steamer WHEAT KING in fog on the St. Marys River May 15, 1968 with no reported significant damage.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Narragansett anchored with leaking seal

    05/14:
    The Liberian-registry 716-foot bulk carrier Narragansett is anchored at the Wilson Hill Anchorage in Massena, N.Y., because of a leaking Kort nozzle propeller shaft seal that has spilled some oil, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. The ship was sailing for Marinette, Wis., and Duluth, Minn., before being detained by the Captain of the Port at Buffalo, N.Y. Several actions have been tried to stop the leak and the operator has considered towing the vessel. However, it cannot be towed as a "deadship" in the St. Lawrence Seaway and efforts to secure dry dock space have also failed. At last report, a lubricant was being sought that, if spilled, would not cause an environmental threat.

    Reported by: Steve Schultz




    Blough delayed by weather

    05/14:
    The rains and wind that seemed to inhabit Minnesota for a week caused the Roger Blough to be delayed for a considerable amount of time. She was expeceted in Two Harbors midday on the 11th but was forced to anchor. At last report on the 13th she was still anchored waiting for winds to subside. Hopefully, she may be able to load on the 14th if weather cooperates. Taking no chance the Anderson which was due on the 14th to load was diverted to Duluth to load for Conneaut.

    Reported by: David French




    Management Changes

    05/14:
    The tugboat Michigan/Barge Great Lakes recently underwent a change of management. The Michigan/Great Lakes was owned by Coastwise Trading Co. until January of 1999. Coastwise was a fully-owned subsidiary of Amoco and Amoco is now part of BP-Amoco PLC (which has 60% British ownership). As part of the merger the vessels were leased to Keystone Shipping Co. who also runs a large liquid cargo fleet mostly on the East Coast (3 sister tug/barge units operate down in the Gulf of Mexico out of Texas City, TX).

    The boats are shipping BP-Amoco product to the same facilities served before the merger: the Total Terminal in Traverse City, MI and the Amoco Terminal in Cheboygan, MI.

    Keystone Shipping company offices are located in Pennsylvania.

    Reported by: N. Schultheiss




    Twin Ports Report

    05/14:
    Business on western Lake Superior was returning to normal the morning of May 13 after sustained strong winds prompted several vessels to anchor rather than chance narrow harbor entries or manuevering in the rivers. John G. Munson and Buckeye were departing the DMIR ore dock about 7:30 a.m. while Edwin H. Gott (which had anchored on the lake - not the Speer as originally reported) was fueling at the Murphy dock. The Indiana Harbor bound for Two Harbors, remained anchored off Duluth along with two salties, including Pomorze Zachodnie. Algolake had dropped anchor on the lake last night but by morning was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal. Also affected by the weather was Reserve, which anchored in the Apostle Islands May 12 en route to Silver Bay.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 14

    On May 14, 1959, the Charles M. Beeghly and the Herbert C. Jackson both entered service. While the vessels have been fleetmates since 1967, the Beeghly got her start as the Shenango II for the Shenango Furnace Company.

    On May 14, 1943, the Thomas Wilson entered service as the first of the sixteen vessels in the "Maritime" class.

    The HOCHELAGA's self-unloading boom was installed on the RICHARD REISS, which had lost her boom April 13, 1994 when it collapsed at Fairport, OH. The REISS cleared the Port Weller Dry Docks, where her HOCHELAGA boom was installed, on May 14, 1994.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Future of the USS' AAA Fleet

    05/13:
    Great Lakes Fleet in Duluth is proposing to its parent company to repower three or four steamers with diesel engines beginning as early as the end of this navigation season.

    If approved, plans call for installing a diesel engine in the Cason J. Callaway this winter. The Anderson, Clarke and possibly Munson would be repowered over the following two to three winters.

    The vessels' steam turbine power plants need either complete overhaul or replacement. Wear on the engines has resulted in considerably higher fuel consumption and lower horsepower today compared to when they were new.

    GLF considered whether to completely rebuild the turbines, convert the vessels to tug-barge units or repower with diesel engines.

    Rebuilding was rejected because of the cost. Just putting new blades on the turbine fans would cost $1 million per engine, and each complete rebuild would cost about $6 million to renew what is considered to be obsolete technology. In addition, the boilers need new tubing and other piping must be repaired or replaced. Even with rebuilt turbines, steam engineers are becoming increasingly difficult to find.

    Conversion to tug-barge units was rejected because it would cost more than repowering with diesel and cause hydrodynamic problems (inefficient flow of water past the hull). Also, the tug-barges would be about 831 feet long -- too long to serve an important customer in Lorain.

    The company has selected an MaK engine built in Germany to power the vessels. Key factors were its simple design, easy maintenance and low cost. Each vessel also would gain a variable pitch propeller and modified rudder. These diesel engines would cut fuel consumption in half while increasing horsepower. Cargo capacity would be increased slightly and fitout time reduced.

    With a new power plant, fleet officials estimate the hulls of these AAA vessels are good for another 25 years and the cargo holds for another 15 years. The fleet is examining ways to minimize the corrosion caused by salt cargoes that vessels are beginning to carry.

    On a somewhat related matter, the fleet's vessels that are about 70 years old -- Calcite II and Myron C. Taylor -- are expected to sail about four more seasons. After that, the fleet would like to replace them with new vessels -- either ships or tug-barges.

    Reported by: Mike D.




    Block Touches Bottom

    05/13:
    The downbound Joseph L. Block scraped bottom around 1 p.m. yesterday near Light 29 in the lower St. Mary's River near the Rock Cut. The survey vessel James Bray was immediately dispatched to the scene, as was the derrick boat Nicolet (pushed by the tug Shelter Bay) and downbound traffic was halted immediately. The Cason J. Callaway and Capetan Michalis were at anchor in Hay Lake; the George R. Stinson was tied up at the Carbide Dock in Soo Harbor awaiting the results of the Bray's survey. No word on if there was any damage to the Block, she was cleared to continue and at 3am was on northern Lake Michigan. There are reports that a dredge will arrive on site sometime this morning.

    Reported by: Roger LeLievre and Pat Clark




    Low Water Effects

    05/13:
    As the incident with the Block shows low water levels on the lakes continue to affect vessel operations, and one shipmaster said Wednesday that conditions will only get worse during the summer.

    The captain gave several examples of how water levels are reducing the amount of cargo vessels can carry. He cited a laker that normally carries 22,000 to 23,000 tons of stone out of Stoneport, but presently can carry only about 18,000 because of water levels. He also said sailors are seeing "land and rocks where we've never seen them before," and that water levels are low enough in the rivers and channels that it often affects how vessels respond when under way.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    News From the Seaway

    05/13:
    On May 2nd, ENERCHEM REFINER which was laid up at Sorel left for Panama according to the Coast Guard.

    The small Dutch vessel JOHANNES BOEL which arrived in Montreal on May 3rd from Thorold is still in Montreal undergoing some type of repairs.

    As of early Wednesday morning, NARRAGANSETT was still anchored at Wilson Hill for some unknown reasons. She had entered the Seaway bound for Marinette on May 8, destination changed for Nanticoke later on according to the Coast Guard.

    Anchored off Ojibway since May 1st is the SKAGEN waiting for a berth at Windsor.

    Beginning on May 15 and lasting until August 22 will be an exhibition titled "From canoes to Floating Palaces" to be held in the Bonsecours Market in the Old Montreal facing the Old Port. Admission is free.

    The Dutch firm Spliethoffs, which sent some of their ships trading into the Lakes over the last few years, ordered recently four 19,000dwt multi-purpose vessels from Stocznia Szczecinska,Poland similar to six building by Mitsubishi and Tsuneishi, Japan (three each) according to the March edition of "Marine News".

    PATERSON which arrived at Les Méchins on April 21 was still there as of this morning, May 12

    Reported by: René Beauchamp




    Winds Delay Shipping

    05/13:
    At least five vessels were delayed May 12 by strong winds in western Lake Superior. Four vessels were anchored off Duluth during the evening waiting for weather, joining a saltie already there waiting for a loading berth. Roger Blough decided to anchor rather than enter Two Harbors in the winds, and Edgar B. Speer was at anchor a short distance away. Another 1,000-footer and a Canadian laker also were at anchor. Inside the harbor, John G. Munson was tied up at the port terminal. Despite the winds, saltie Lake Charles departed through the Duluth ship canal.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Transfer in Saginaw

    05/13:
    The CANADIAN TRANSFER arrived at the front range of the Saginaw River at 1510 yesterday afternoon. She is enroute to the Buena Vista Dock in Saginaw to unload aggregate material.

    This vessel damaged her rudder last year on a similar trip.

    Reported by: Lon Morgan




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 13

    GEMINI was launched May 13, 1978.

    The JUPITER made her maiden voyage May 13, 1976 from Smith's Bluff, TX loaded with lube oil bound for Marcus Hooks, PA.

    On May 13, 1913 the THOMAS F. COLE collided with the barge IRON CITY on Lake St. Clair. The barge was cut in two.

    Delivered May 13, 1943, the THOMAS WILSON departed under the command of Captain Henry Borgen on her maiden voyage from Lorain light bound for Duluth, MN to load iron ore.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Mackinaw to Visit Superior - for 45 days

    05/12:
    Even though most of the ice has left the Duluth harbor, the US Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw will be returning to the Twin ports next Sunday, May 16. She expects to sail under the Lift Bridge at 8 AM. The vessel will under go dry dock maintenance at Fraser Shipyard.

    Visit the Duluth Shipping News for details




    Twin Ports Report

    05/12:
    Edwin H. Gott apparently is on a regular run with taconite pellets from Duluth DMIR to Nanticoke. The vessel is due at Duluth again May 12 to load for Nanticoke.

    St. Clair continues in the upper lakes ore trade. It's due into Duluth DMIR on May 16. Buckeye (due in May 17) and James R. Barker (due May 19) also are making fairly regular trips to the dock this season.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    200,000

    05/12:
    Mr. Jim Koci of Phillips, WI. was the 200,000th visitor to view the news page. This page was started in July 1996 and I'd like to thank everyone for making it a success!




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 12

    The CANADIAN EXPLORER was launched May 12, 1965 as a) CABOT.

    The THOMAS WALTERS entered service on May 12, 1911 with coal from Sandusky, OH to Duluth, MN.

    The carferry GRAND HAVEN was sold to the West India Fruit & Steamship Co., Norfolk, VA on May 12, 1946 and was brought down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, LA for reconditioning before reaching Port Everglades and the Port of Palm Beach, FL.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Voyager Sailing Again

    05/11:
    A call to the ULS vessel tape revealed that CANADIAN VOYAGER is out and running. She was due in Thunder Bay late yesterday. Diesel powered CANADIAN TRADER remains at the wall while a steamer is sailing.

    Reported by: Rod Burdick




    Twin Ports Report

    05/11:
    Fresh out of Bayship, Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived in Superior on May 10 to load at Midwest Energy Terminal.

    Joseph L. Block made an unusual trip May 10 to Two Harbors.

    An interesting collection of vessels was braving stiff northeast winds and occasional rain to load grain in the Twin Ports on May 10. Montrealais started the day at Cargill and then shifted to Concourse. Sarah Spencer and Atlantic Hickory were unloading grain at General Mills in Duluth. Kinsman Independent and Lake Charles were loading at Cenex-Harvest States.

    After completing its load at the Cenex-Harvest States elevator, Kinsman Independent departed Duluth in the face of 15- to 25-knot winds from the northeast, with speeds on the open lake expected to rise to 30 knots overnight. At last sight, the boat was several miles out of Duluth, headed directly into the wind and easily cutting through 5- to 8-foot waves.

    Two unusual vessel calls are scheduled for May 11. Columbia Star will take a break from its frequent coal cargoes to load at Taconite Harbor. H. Lee White will unload stone at the Northland Constructors dock in Duluth and then load taconite pellets at the BNSF ore dock in Superior

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Update on the Nanticoke

    05/11:
    A story in the May 7th Toledo Blade updates the incident involving the Naticoke in the Maumee River. The Nanticoke was traveling upstream after loading at the Cargill Dock and came within 25 feet of hitting protective pilings on a Toledo railroad bridge. A gusty 35-mph wind apparently caught the Nanticoke's stern and pushed the ship off course as it neared the bridge, and the wind and current then prevented the captain from regaining course.

    The vessel was operating with out tugboat assistance when the incident occurred, vessels equipped with bow-thrusters will often transit with out a tug.

    The tug Carolyn Hoye was called to assist and arrived at the ship as she was close to the bridge. The 1600 bhp tug helped ease the Nanticoke's stern against the east side of the channel so the ship wouldn't run hard aground. The tug Louisiana later arrived and worked with the Carolyn Hoye to push the Nanticoke back into a position to sail through the bridge.

    The Blade reports that the Conrail bridge is notorious among Great Lakes mariners as a difficult bridge to navigate because of its narrow passageway. The bridge is just downstream from a sharp bend in the Maumee that creates extremely tricky river currents. Seven times between 1986 and 1993, ships struck the Conrail bridge, closing it for as long as 24 hours. But there have been no accidents there since then.

    Reported by: Ricky Gwynn, Toledo Blade story by David Patch




    More on the Inviken

    05/11:
    The Inviken, which grounded at 42 degrees 21 minutes north, 82 degrees 56 minutes west on May 6 at the head of the Detroit River in Michigan, was sailing from Thunder Bay, Ontario, to Sorel, Quebec, with mustard seed. The motor bulk carrier is registered in the Bahamas, was built in 1986 and has weights of 17,460 gross tons and 30,070 deadweight tons. It was refloated May 7.

    Reported by: Steve Schultz




    Dredging in Saginaw

    05/11:
    State and federal officials are looking at three potential sites to dump dredgings from the Saginaw River, according to a news article appearing in the Bay City Times and the Saginaw News. The three 50-acre sites are located in Saginaw County and are privately owned, according to the news article. The exact locations were not named, and the sites would require analyses and tests by the EPA.

    The Saginaw River has not been thoroughly dredged in ten years, partly because of a lack of location to dump the sludge, the article stated. Officials are concerned about the problems low water levels are causing for commercial shipping on the river.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 11

    On May 11, 1953, the Henry Steinbrenner went down in Lake Superior near Isle Royale with 17 of her 31 crewmembers. The storm followed an unseasonably warm and humid stretch of weather in northern Minnesota for that time of year which fueled the storm's fast growth. The high temperature of 87 degrees set in Grand Marais, Minnesota on May 8, 1953, still stands as that town's all-time record high for the month of May, and it is just eight degrees shy of the town's all-time record for any month.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Pere Marquette 41 to Receive a Self-unloading Boom

    05/10:
    The barge Pere Marquette 41 is scheduled to have a self-unloading boom installed some time in June. The conveyor recently arrived in Ludington.

    The unloading boom will enable material to be piled up to 80 feet away from the barge. It is designed so that the barge's hydraulic cranes can still be used for larger freight, such as logs and large boulders.

    Click here for an image of the design


    Reported by: Max Hanley




    Bridge Blocks Traffic

    05/10:
    1130hrs update:
    Marine Traffic can resume on the Saginaw River with the successful repair of the Liberty Bridge.

    Original Story:
    The Liberty Bridge on the Saginaw River in Bay City is stuck in the down position and could not open electrically or manually. It is expected to be repaired sometime this morning.

    As of 6:20am this morning the MV Wolverine remains moored at the Bay City Wirt Stone Dock awaiting inbound passage to Saginaw, Paul H. Townsend remains upriver, location unknown and the Adam E. Cornelius remains moored at Bay City Aggregate Dock awaiting outbound passage. This is the second trip for the Cornelius since returning to American Steam Ship Co.

    Reported by: Tom Gerger and Dan Maus




    Twin Ports Report

    05/10:
    Montrealais returned to Duluth over the weekend with another cargo for the St. Lawrence Cement terminal. Kinsman Independent also is back to load at the Concourse elevator.

    Olympic Merit took the unusual step of loading on Sunday at the Cenex Harvest States elevator.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Inviken Inspected

    05/10:
    The Inviken arrived at the Welland Canal's R&P coal dock on Saturday for inspection from the recent grounding in the Detroit River. She was cleared for transit of the canal and was underway downbound. She cleared the canal late that night.

    Reported by: Mark Shumaker




    Kingston Report

    05/10:
    A trip on the tour boat Island Belle yesterday from the Canadian Middle Channel and the Bateau Channel between Kingston and Gananoque revealed water levels the are much lower than normal at this time of year. The remains of an old schooner near Gananoque has the bow showing about two feet above water. The remains of the old wooden Amherst Islander near Howe Island again have the bow showing about 2' out of the water.

    The American small tug Captain Alex left Kingston on the 8th at 1930, for Clayton. She brought one of the old Sunrise catamarans and left it at the old customs dock in Kingston.

    The Emerald Star was westbound for Bronte. A crew member said they were going to Bronte, then Clarkson, Quebec and Newfoundland.

    Reported by: Ron Walsh




    Captain Dean Hobbs to appear in Bay City

    05/10:
    Captain Dean Hobbs, master of the S/S Badger Lake Michigan Car ferry will be the speaker at the Saginaw River Marine Historical Society on Saturday May 15th at 7:00 P.M. This meeting will include discussing re-establishment of Lodge 5, International Shipmasters Association and the annual ice cream social. Anyone interested is invited to attend the event. Meeting will be held at the Parish Hall of The Trinity Episcopal Church, located Center & Grant Streets in Bay City. Click here for more information (e-mail)




    Correction

    05/10:
    Correction to the news report from the 8th that stated the Adam E. Cornelius was the largest ship up the Saginaw River this year.

    The ATB Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Pathfinder is the longest at 710 feet. The tug Joyce L. and barge Pathfinder has transitted all the way to the Saginaw Rock dock in Saginaw which is the farthest a commercial ship can go.

    Reported by: Paul Berger




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 10

    On May 10, 1981, the Paul R. Tregurtha entered service. She became the largest vessel on the Great Lakes at that time, and at least in the last 130 years, she has held the honor of being the largest vessel on the Great Lakes longer than any other vessel.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    McCarthy Departs Bayship

    05/09:
    At noon yesterday the Walter J. McCarthy left the drydock at BayShip for Duluth. The vessel had been there for about a week having a leaking shaft seal repaired. It took about an hour and three tugs to get it out of the drydock, quite an operation and very well done. It can cost about $5,000 per hour to run a thousand footer, with the McCarthy laid up in the drydock for a week, the CFO must be crying.

    After the McCarthy cleared the dock, the cement carrying tug/barge Jacquelin M/Integrity who was also at Bay Ship for work, departed, destination unknown.

    Reported by: Chuck Klima




    Deck Cargo for Sarah Spencer

    05/09:
    The barge Sarah Spencer pushed by the tug Atlantic Hickory Departed Thunder Bay yesterday loaded for Duluth. Her cargo included barley plus a deck cargo of steel beams.

    Reported by: Ron Konkol




    Cyber Survey

    05/09:
    Visit the Letters to the Editor page and leave your comments on: Where would you like to see the Corps (or other group) set up more Soo type Web Cameras?




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 09

    On May 9, 1951 the CLIFFS VICTORY arrived at the South Chicago yard of the American Ship Building Co. completing her 37 day, 3,000 mile journey from Baltimore. There her deck houses, stack, masts, deck machinery, rudder and propeller were installed and the floatation pontoons removed.

    JOHN J. BOLAND was launched May 9, 1953 making way for the keel of the DETROIT EDISON (2) to be laid.

    The ROBERT C. NORTON (2) was laid up on May 9, 1980 for the last time at the Hans Hansen Dock at Toledo.

    PETER REISS was launched May 9, 1910.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Labor Contracts

    05/08:
    United States Steel Group and Bethlehem Steel Corp. hope to settle their labor contracts with the United Steelworkers of America by the end of this month, according to the Duluth News-Tribune.

    Talks between company officials and union representatives over local issues already are underway at U.S. Steel's Minntac taconite plant in Mountain Iron, Minn. Negotiations involving 28,000 U.S. Steel and Bethlehem employees start Monday in Pittsburgh.

    Contracts expire July 31 for Steelworkers at Iron Range taconite plants. The article didn't mention the contract for Local 5000 -- the Steelworkers local representating most unlicensed sailor on Great Lakes vessels.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Adam E. Cornelius Calls in Saginaw

    05/08:
    The Adam E. Cornelius made a visit to the Saginaw River on Thursday May 6, with stone for Saginaw Rock Products. This is her first visit since her return to American Steamship Company from Central Marine. This vessel used to visit the river in the mid 1980's (then as the Roger M. Kyes) before her charter to Inland Steel. She is widest (78') to navigate past Essexville this year. Many area boatwatchers hope this isn't her only visit this year.

    The longest vessels to visit Saginaw this year so far have been:
    Walter J. McCarthy Jr. April 20 Consumers Energy Essexville.
    Frontenac April 10, April 23, May 5, Essroc Cement Essexville.
    Capt. Henry Jackmen April 8, NorthStar Dock Essexville.
    American Mariner Due in May 7 or 8 water levels.
    Adam E. Cornelius May 6 Saginaw Rock Products

    Reported by: Brian Ferguson




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 08

    COLUMBIA STAR was christened May 8, 1981.

    EDGAR B. SPEER was launched May 8, 1980, after long delay because of labor strife.

    The FRED R. WHITE, JR. was christened May 8, 1979 and was named for Oglebay Norton's then vice-chairman of the board.

    On May 8, 1979 the ASHLAND struck the north entry pier of the Duluth Ship Canal while outbound loaded. Thick ice blowing in from Lake Superior had interfered with her maneuverability. She dropped her anchor to lessen the impact but drifted over the flukes ripping a two by five foot hole in her bottom port side forward. She was inspected and repaired at the Duluth Port Terminal. One anchor was lost.

    The CHAMPLAIN's starboard side was damaged when she side swiped the Swedish steamer BROLAND near the lower end of the St. Clair River cut-off, May 8, 1963.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Salty Aground in Detroit River

    05/07:
    The Bahamian-registry Inviken ran aground at the head of the Detroit River yesterday about 1830hrs. The vessel is stuck on the North (Detroit) side of the shipping channel opposite Peche Island, where Lake St. Clair meets the Detroit River. She is not blocking the channel and the cause of the grounding is unknown. Her forward draft is 26 feet and soundings in the area have the depth at 25 feet.

    The vessel was downbound with grain from Thunder Bay, heading to Sorel, Quebec. Efforts were underway last night to refloat the vessel by emptying ballast and working with a 2,000hp Gaelic Tugboat Co. tug. The vessel will head to the Belle Isle anchorage once refloated for inspection by the U.S. Coast Guard.




    Crewmember jumps from ship in St. Marys River

    05/07:
    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' survey vessel James M. Bray called U.S. Coast Guard Group Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., on May 5 to report that it had rescued a person who had intentionally jumped off the Mina Cebi, a 637-foot commercial vessel, near Six Mile Point on the St. Marys River in Michigan. The Coast Guard transported the man to emergency medical services and he was hospitalized with hypothermia. Personnel from Coast Guard Marine Safety Office Sault Ste. Marie and the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service boarded the Mina Cebi and later allowed it to proceed. The INS has taken the man into custody and will repatriate him to Turkey.

    Reported by: Steve Schultz and P. Pietrowski




    Nanticoke makes contact with bridge

    05/07:
    Reports have the M/V Nanticoke making contact with a railway bridge pile on a recent trip on the Maumee River in Toledo, OH. The vessel was heading to the grain elevators to load corn. She may have been caught in heavy winds and there were reports of damage visible on the ship.

    Reported by: D. Ocean




    Twin Ports Report

    05/07:
    On its second trip out of the shipyard following repairs, Arthur M. Anderson is scheduled to return to Calcite on May 10.

    Several regulars are due at Midwest Energy Terminal over the next few days, including Paul R. Tregurtha, May 7; Walter J. McCarthy jr., May 10 and Columbia Star, May 11. Less common callers will be Charles M. Beeghly on May 8, St. Clair on May 8, and Mesabi Miner on May 9.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Lower Water Levels Impact Western Coal Trade

    05/07:
    Shipments of low sulfur coal from Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wisconsin, totaled 1,523,018 net tons in April, a decrease of roughly 110,000 tons compared to a year ago. SMET loaded the same of number of vessels during the month, 33, but with water levels declining, the ships could not carry as much cargo. For example, in April 1998, 1,000-foot-long vessels were departing with loads anywhere from 65,000 to 68,000 tons. This April, the largest single loading was 63,885 tons.

    For the season, loadings at SMET stand at 2,104,534 tons, an increase of approximately 60,000 tons compared to the same point in the 1998 season.

    Visit the Lake Carriers' Association for complete details




    Sailboat Grounds

    05/07:
    The 70 ft Sailing Vessel APPLEDORE with 27 passengers and 4 crew went aground in seven feet of water in Saginaw Harbor. All passengers were taken off. Marine Safety Office Detroit inspected the vessel and found the hull appeared water tight. It was refloated and is moored at Bay City awaiting underwater survey.




    First ships arrive Collingwood and Owen Sound

    05/07:
    The barge Southdown Conquest and tug arrived in Owen Sound Wednesday to open the local navigation season.

    The Chi-Cheemaun actually opened the Owen Sound navigation season last Monday. She sailed for Collingwood at 10AM for rededication services of the ship upon its 25th anniversary of its original christening. Arriving at Collingwood at about 1300 she had some problem getting into the dock to unload her passengers for the services. After half an hour passengers disembarked for the ceremonies and a bus trip back to Owen Sound. Another 600 passengers departed Collingwood at about 1530 for the cruise back to Owen Sound which docked there at about 1830.

    The fact that she had picked up passengers at Collingwood and disembarked them at Owen Sound made the Chi-Cheemaun the first official ship of the navigation season. Had it sailed from Owen Sound and not stopped at Collingwood, it would not have been the first ship. Unfortunately, she did not receive the top hat in Owen Sound but Collingwood officials presented Capt. Leo Schreiber with that ports top hat, the first presentation since about 1990.

    Reported by: Peter Bowers




    Coast Guard rescues pilot of downed plane

    05/07:
    A single engine Piper Cherokee was inbound for Burke Lakefront Airport yesterday when the pilot reported engine trouble, and the airport lost contact with him. A few boaters near the Water Intake Crib reported the downed plane to Cleveland Police, and the Coast Guard responded immediately. The 21 foot and 41 foot boats were sent out, followed by the Neah Bay shortly thereafter. The small rescue boat reached the pilot first, and hauled him in. On the way back in, they met with the Neah Bay and picked up two Coast Guard medical technicians from the Neah Bay, who administered IVs and oxygen. He was transported to a local hospital by ambulance upon arrival at the Coast Guard station. David S. Whitehead is in stable condition. He suffered from severe hypothermia, and will recover soon. It is not known what caused the engine trouble.

    Reported by: Mike Reindel




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 07

    On May 7, 1965, the Cedarville was struck by the ocean vessel Topdalsfjord in the Straits of Mackinac during dense fog. The Cedarville sank about forty minutes after the collision with the loss of ten crewmembers.

    ALGOPORT was launched May 7, 1979

    The HUTCHCLIFFE HALL entered service on May 7, 1954.

    A.M. BYERS was launched May 7, 1910.

    May 7, 1903 - The Benton Harbor, Coloma & Paw Paw Lake Railway was purchased by the Pere Marquette Railroad.

    May 7, 1929 - The Pere Marquette notified Ludington it was interested in buying the frontage on Pere Marquette Lake that had been used by the Monroe Body Company. The city council asked $25,000 for the property, and the railroad agreed. Work on the No. 3 slip began a few months later.

    Data from: Max Hanley , Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Anderson to Two Harbors

    05/06:
    Apparently there was a change of plans for Arthur M. Anderson's first trip since leaving Bay Shipbuilding. The vessel is now due at Two Harbors on May 5 to load for Conneaut. Philip R. Clarke will make the trip to Silver Bay, due there May 8.

    Also due at Two Harbors over the next few days are Joe Block and Indiana Harbor.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    The Badger's Boilers are Lit

    05/06:
    In preparation for the Lake Michigan Carferry's upcoming sailing season, the Badger's boilers were lit during the night Tuesday as part of her annual boiler test. During the winter lay-up, all four boilers were rebuilt.

    Reported by: Max Hanley




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 06

    On May 6, 1984 the CANADIAN RANGER sailed from Port Weller on her maiden voyage to load coal at Toledo, OH.

    In 1944 the HILDA (2) and the barge MAITLAND NO.1 started the rescue operation of freighter GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (1) which sank in a collision with the D.M. CLEMSON (2) in the Straits of Mackinac.

    This day in 1923 the EDWIN E. SLICK was struck by the steamer J. LEONARD REPLOGLE in the ice on Whitefish Bay, Lake Superior.

    The HARVEY D. GOULDER entered service on May 6, 1906.

    On May 6, 1934 the ROYALTON (1) helped rescue the steamer TEN which had lost power in a Lake Superior ice field and required a tow to safety.

    On May 6, 1975 while unloading iron ore at Conneaut, OH, a leg and bucket from no.2 Hulett gave way and fell into the RALPH H. WATSON's cargo hold. A crane was rigged to remove the wreckage. A nine by twelve foot patch was required on her port side tank which was holed in the accident.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Close call in Milwaukee

    05/05:
    The Canadian Venture, which just might be the last boat to load grain in Milwaukee, came through the breakwall on Tuesday morning. (Cargill, Inc. has purchased Continental Grain and has yet to announce any future plans for the Milwaukee elevator.) The Canadian Venture's arrival was not quite a typical docking. The Venture was assisted by the G-tugs California and Virginia. As the tugs turned the Venture in the inner harbor, already crowded with the J.A.W. Iglehart, the stern of the Venture came within just a few feet of the port side on the Iglehart. There was no damage to either boat.

    Reported by: Andy LaBorde




    Twin Ports Report

    05/05:
    Joseph H. Thompson is in its semi-regular trade to Taconite Harbor again this season. It's due there again May 5.

    The Cenex-Harvest States terminal in Superior continues its quick pace this season. Two vessels are loading again May 4: Trias at the gallery and Algoville at berth 2.

    Paterson's Windoc loaded April 30 at the Cargill elevator in Duluth. Paterson boats make few calls in the Twin Ports each year.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Oberstarand Abraham Named Great Lakes Legislators of the Year

    05/05:
    Minnesota Congressman James L. Oberstar and Michigan Senator Spencer Abraham were named Great Lakes Legislators of the Year by the Great Lakes Maritime Task Force at a breakfast in Washington on April 28. Below are the news releases GLMTF issued to announce these awards:

    Rep. James L. Oberstar
    Washington, DC---Minnesota Congressman James L. Oberstar has been named Great Lakes House Legislator of the Year by the Great Lakes Maritime Task Force, a coalition of labor and management representing virtually every facet of Great Lakes shipping. The award recognizes Rep. Oberstar’s unwaivering commitment to domestic and international waterborne commerce on the Great Lakes during his 25-year career in the House of Representatives.

    The Great Lakes Maritime Task Force presented the award to Congressman Oberstar at a gathering in Washington on April 28. "Our coalition has decided to honor a House and Senate member of the Great Lakes delegation on an annual basis, and there was never any question that Jim Oberstar had to be the first recipient in the House," said GLMTF President John D. Baker. "He is Mr. Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway in the House." Baker, who is also President of the ILA’s Great Lakes District Council, added that Congressman Oberstar "commands the respect of every member of the House, regardless of party affiliation. When Jim Oberstar speaks, people listen."

    George J. Ryan, Third Vice President of GLMTF and President of Lake Carriers’ Association, credited Oberstar with several major accomplishments in just the past few years. "When it looked like the icebreaker MACKINAW was going to be retired without an adequate replacement being assigned to the Great Lakes, Jim Oberstar went to bat for our region and not only kept the MACKINAW in service, but began the process of securing a new icebreaker to replace her. Because of Jim’s commitment to Great Lakes shipping and the iron ore miners and steelworkers who depend on those cargos our ships deliver during periods of ice cover, the House of Representatives has earmarked $128 million to build a new heavy icebreaker for the Great Lakes in FY2001. We still must win appropriation of those funds, but with Congressman Oberstar on watch, we know we’ll reach our goal."

    Ryan further noted that Congressman Oberstar played a leading role in blocking a proposed Navigational Assistance Tax (NAT) that would have imposed user charges for Aids to Navigation and icebreaking on the Great Lakes and other U.S. waterways. "Thanks to Jim Oberstar, the House has approved legislation declaring these essential Coast Guard services shall continue to be funded from general revenues."

    The presentation ceremony also recognized Congressman Oberstar’s allegiance with American labor. "Jim Oberstar has always fought to make sure that domestic waterborne commerce creates jobs for American mariners and business opportunities for American ship operators by supporting the Jones Act," said Daniel L. Smith, 2nd Vice President of GLMTF and Vice President of American Maritime Officers. "The Jones Act’s requirement that cargo moving between U.S. ports be carried in vessels that are U.S-owned, U.S.-built and U.S.-crewed is the cornerstone of American maritime policy and has produced a U.S.-Flag Great Lakes fleet second to none. No maritime nation, not even those that subsidize their national flag fleets, can boast of vessels as efficient as those flying the American flag on the Great Lakes."

    While domestic cargo movement dominates the Great Lakes, Congressman Oberstar has long kept a watchful eye on the St. Lawrence Seaway to ensure that international commerce remains a key element of Great Lakes shipping. "Jim Oberstar is committed to the Seaway and its future," said John D. Baker. "He is constantly looking for ways to increase the efficiency of the Seaway so that the public ports in our region can fulfill their promise of importing and exporting goods that benefit our region."

    In an important new initiative, Congressman Oberstar, along with Pennsylvania Congressman Borski, has introduced legislation to again fund operational and maintenance dredging of the nation’s deepdraft ports and waterways from general revenues. "This bill recognizes that a system of efficient ports and waterways benefits all Americans," said George J. Ryan. "Nationwide the Jones Act trades routinely top 1 billion tons. Virtually all our imports and exports move over water. The Harbor Services User Fee the administration wants to impose on waterborne commerce will so raise the cost of Great Lakes shipping that more than a little cargo will be diverted to the railroads and Canadian ports. This nation funded O&M dredging from general revenues until 1986 and that’s the way it should be again. The Great Lakes Maritime Task Force pledges its full support in Jim’s campaign to return to a system that built the world’s finest system of ports and waterways."

    Senator Spencer Abraham
    Washington, DC---Michigan Senator Spencer Abraham has been named Great Lakes Senator of the Year by the Great Lakes Maritime Task Force, a coalition of labor and management representing virtually every facet of Great Lakes shipping. The award recognizes Senator Abraham’s emergence as the voice of Great Lakes shipping in the Senate during his first term of office.

    The Great Lakes Maritime Task Force presented the award to Senator Abraham at a gathering in Washington on April 28. "No one is more deserving of this award," said GLMTF President John D. Baker. "The administration proposed two new taxes on waterborne commerce last year, but with Spencer Abraham on watch in the Senate, both proposals were resoundingly rejected."

    The taxes in question, the Navigational Assistance Tax (NAT) and the Harbor Services User Fee, would have dramatically increased the cost of moving cargo to and from Michigan’s many Great Lakes ports. "Spencer Abraham knows what’s good for Great Lakes shipping is good for Michigan," declared Baker, President of the ILA’s Great Lakes District Council. "Michigan has 39 deepdraft ports on the Great Lakes, eight more than the other seven Great Lakes states combined. These new and increased taxes would have hurt Michigan’s iron ore mining industry, the utilities that receive coal via the Lakes, the many limestone quarries and the international cargo moving through Detroit. The efficiency and thus the continued viability of these major employers depends on low cost and safe transportation on the Great Lakes."

    George J. Ryan, Third Vice President of GLMTF and President of the Lake Carriers’ Association, further emphasized Sen. Abraham’s role in defeating these proposals. "As a member of the Senate Commerce Committee, Spencer Abraham was on the front line in the battle against the NAT. The icebreaking portion of this tax would have added $0.63 to the cost of moving a ton of iron ore from Marquette to the Rouge steel plant or coal from Superior, Wisconsin, to St. Clair at the beginning and end of the shipping season. Senator Abraham opposed this tax not only because of its negative impacts on Michigan industry, but because Coast Guard icebreakers have a dual mission of icebreaking in the Detroit and St. Clair rivers to minimize the potential for flooding."

    Abraham’s opposition to the proposed Harbor Services User Fee was another major accomplishment figuring in his selection as Great Lakes Senator of the Year. This tax would have increased the cost of shipping iron ore and coal on the Great Lakes by $0.20 a ton or more. This tax would have cost just one Michigan customer, Detroit Edison, more than $1.6 million in 1998 had it become law.

    Another reason Abraham was selected for this honor was his staunch support of U.S.-Flag shipping and the Jones Act on the Great Lakes. The Jones Act requires that cargo moving between U.S. ports be carried in vessels that are U.S.-owned, -built and -crewed. "There have been proposals to allow foreign ships into our domestic trades, but Senator Abraham set the record straight concerning the Great Lakes," said Daniel L. Smith, 2nd Vice President of GLMTF and Vice President of American Maritime Officers. "He broadcast the message that the Lakes Jones Act fleet is the pacesetter for the dry-bulk trades. No other maritime nation, not even those that subsidize their national flag fleets, can boast of vessels as efficient and safe as those flying the American flag on the Great Lakes."

    GLMTF also applauded Senator Abraham for his commitment to the Great Lakes environment. Recognizing the importance of Michigan’s recreational and fishing industries, Senator Abraham authored language directing the U.S. Coast Guard to ensure compliance with a policy that limits vessel washdown of di minimis amounts of non-toxic cargo residue to those waters where there is no conceivable impact on spawning or fishing.

    Founded in 1992, the Great Lakes Maritime Task Force is dedicated to promoting domestic and international shipping on the Great Lakes. Its membership represents both labor and management from ship operators, shipboard unions, longshoremen, Great Lakes shipyards, dredging companies and others involved in waterborne commerce. The Michigan-based members of GLMTF are the Great Lakes office of the Seafarers International Union; Lake Michigan Car Ferry Service; Lake Michigan Contractors; Luedtke Engineering Company; Nicholson Terminal & Dock Co.; Michigan Maritime Trades Port Council; and Pere Marquette Shipping Company. GLMTF is considered one of the leading advocates of the Jones Act and other U.S. Cabotage laws which reserve domestic waterborne commerce to vessels that are U.S.-owned, -built and -crewed.

    Visit the Lake Carriers' Association for complete details




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 05

    WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) was launched May 5, 1953.

    The MERCURY (2) collided with the bulker ERNEST T. WEIR on May 5, 1964 near the mouth of the St. Clair River. The tanker suffered severe bow damage, the result of her faulty steering gear.

    On May 5, 1980 the SHARON grounded in the Trenton Channel of the Detroit River. She was freed on May 7th and proceeded to Monroe, MI and was laid up there on May 8, 1980. No repairs were made and she never sailed again.

    On May 5, 1914 the GEORGE F. BAKER was traveling downbound in Lake Superior in dense fog with 10,500 tons of iron ore from Ashland, WI. She ran hard aground on Sawtooth Reef off Eagle River, on Upper Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula. May 5, 1914 - An unusual cargo, two "Jack Johnsons" (Navy guns) were hauled by the Pere Marquette 17.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Max Hanley , Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Sunny Blossom Arrives

    05/04:
    The tankers Sunny Blossom and Diamond Star arrived together at Dow Chemical in Sarnia yesterday afternoon.

    The Sunny Blossom was refloated at 0747 1 May by the tugs Alicia A and Pacific Standard. Lightering was completed the day before followed by deballasting that morning. Only minor hull scrapes were found. Also, at the time of grounding, the ship had 14,410 metric tons of caustic soda, 7,661 gallons of lube oil and 256,802 gallons of fuel oil.

    Reported by: Gretchen Driftmyer and Steve Schultz




    Anderson Returns to Service

    05/04:
    The Arthur M. Anderson is returning to service following a grounding at Calcite that forced it into the shipyard for repairs. The Anderson departed Bayship sometime on May 2nd and is scheduled to load at Silver Bay on May 5, then proceed to Ashtabula.

    Reported by: Al Miller and David French




    May 1 Vessel Report

    05/04:
    The major U.S.-Flag carriers on the Great Lakes had 63 of their 69 vessels in service on May 1, an increase of two hulls compared to a year ago. However, the increase comes in cement carriers and tankers. The dry-bulk carrier segment dedicated to the iron ore, coal and stone trades is actually down by two vessels.

    Not currently scheduled to sail this year are the self-unloader JOHN J. BOLAND, the straight-deckers EDWARD L. RYERSON and KINSMAN ENTERPRISE, and the cement carrier E. M. FORD. The latter two ships did not operate in 1998.

    Visit the Lake Carriers' Association for complete details




    Salty Clears St. Clair River

    05/04:
    The Netherlands-flagged VLISTBORG cleared the St. Clair River upbound on her maiden voyage on May 1. She is a sister of the VECHTBORG which paid her first visit to the Lakes last year. The J.W. Westcott report for May 1 recorded the VLISTBORG as the VECHTBORG in error. They were both built at the Foxhol yard of Bodewes Scheefswerf "Volharding. The VECHTBORG as hull #331 and the VLISTBORG as hull #332.She entered the Seaway about the same time as the Chinese-built and Netherlands-flagged JOHANNES BOELE which was also on her first visit. This ship was built in 1997 as the JOHANNES BOELE but was renamed SEABOARD ATLANTIC later that year. She reverted tp her original name in 1998 and became the UAL ANGOLA later that year. She reverted once more to her original name this year. Her owners and managers did not change during this period.

    Reported by: Norman Eakins




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 04

    On May 4, 1958, the John Sherwin entered service. If the Sherwin remains laid up until May 28, 2005, not counting the winter lay-ups the vessel has experienced, she will have been in lay-up for half of her life on the Great Lakes. She last sailed on November 16, 1981.

    On her maiden voyage May 4, 1976, the ST. CLAIR (2) departed Sturgeon Bay for Escanaba, MI to load 39,803 gross tons of iron ore pellets for Indiana Harbor, IN arriving there on May 5th.

    The OREFAX ran aground on May 4, 1963 way off course near Manistique, MI. She was lightered and pulled off by the Roen Salvage Co. and made her way to Toronto, Ont. where she discharged her cargo and left for repairs.

    The tanker VENUS (2) suffered an explosion on May 4, 1972 when the crew were cleaning tanks while at anchor waiting for the fog to lift about seven miles west of the Eisenhower Lock in the Seaway. Two explosions rocked the ship killing her skipper, Captain Stanley, and injuring three crewmen.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Sunny Blossom Refloated

    05/03:
    The Sunny Blossom was refloated Saturday morning after crews transfered more than 575,000 gallons of the sodium hydroxide cargo lighten the ship enough to raise it off the rocky Allan Offy Shoal.

    The vessel got underway with a stop at Wilson Bay for futher inspection by divers who found no serious hull damage only "scratches." The cause of the April 24th grounding has still not been released by the Coast Guard or the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation.

    Reported by: Joan Baldwin and Bill Nygard




    Lee A. Tregurtha and Joseph Frantz load coal at Rail to Water

    05/03:
    The Lee A. Tregurtha docked at Milwaukee at about 1400 hrs yesterday to discharge 20,000 net tons of coal for Wisconsin Electric. The Joseph Frantz was also loading coal at Rail to Water yesterday morning.

    Reported by: Ken Thompson




    Position Available

    05/03:
    The U.S. Office of Personnel and Management (OPM), Huntsville, Alabama, on behalf of Isle Royale National Park, Houghton, Michigan, is accepting applications for the position of "Marine First Officer" onboard the National Park Service vessel RANGER III. Information about the position can be found on the OPM web page at: http://www.usajobs.opm.gov/wfjic/jobs/AH0785.HTM, by calling OPM at (256) 837-0894, or Isle Royale N.P. at (906)-487-7163.




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 03

    On May 3, 1959, the first large saltwater vessel to transit the new St. Lawrence Seaway arrived at Duluth. The Ramon de Larrinaga took the honors as the first saltie, passing under Duluth's Aerial Bridge at 1:16 p.m., followed by a saltie named the Herald sixteen minutes later.

    In 1922 the Pere Marquette 16, as the barge Harriet B. collided with the steamer Quincy A. Shaw, and sank off Two Harbors, Minnesota.

    Data from: Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    News From Port Huron

    05/02:
    The salty VLISTBORG made her maiden voyage past Port Huron yesterday morning, another in the growing Wagenborg fleet of medium size ships to service the Great Lakes. Her hull is painted grey with a wide red racing stripe and lighter grey boottop.

    CANADIAN PROVIDER is also out, a great surprise. She was upbound yesterday evening. With ALGOCEN upbound early this morning, was a good day for boatwatching. day here at Port Huron.

    Reported by: Gretchen Driftmyer




    Busy Night on Rouge River

    05/02:
    Last night was a busy night for the Rouge River. Vessels in the river Friday night were: M/V Adam E. Cornelius unloading coal at Short Cut, M/V American Republic unloading coal at Area B(old riverbed), M/V H. Lee White (stone?) and the M/V Algoway?(salt or stone). There are also some miscellaneous tugs/barges in the river.

    Reported by: Wade P. Streeter




    Today in Great Lakes History - May 02

    The CORT created a sensation as she passed Detroit/Windsor on mid-day on May 2, 1972 amid throngs of people lining both sides of the Detroit and St. Clair Rivers, whistling acknowledging salutes on her upbound maiden run.

    ADAM E. CORNELIUS (1) was launched May 2, 1908.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




    Sunny Blossom update

    05/01:
    The Diamond Star arrived alongside the Sunny Blossom early 29 April. The Canadian-registry tugs Alice A and Pacific Standard are providing assistance and the captain of the Port of Buffalo, N.Y., has formed a 200-yard security zone around the area. The zone is being enforced by a boat from U.S. Coast Guard Station Oswego, N.Y. Lightering of about 5,000 metric tons of the ship's 14,400 metric tons of sodium hydroxide (caustic soda) started later in the day and was expected to last 16 hours. Refloating was planned for about noon 30 April.

    Reported by: Steve Schultz




    First Saltie to Load Grain In Toledo for 1999 Season

    05/01:
    The salt water vessel Kapitonas Damieka arrived at the ADM/Countrymark elevators in Toledo to load grain Thursday evening. She will be loaded over the weekend and shall depart on Monday. Two Great Lakes Towing tugs escorted the vessel to the ADM/Countrymark elevators.

    Reported by: D. Ocean




    Catherine Desgagnes Delivers

    05/01:
    The Catherine Desgagnes unloaded at the Coal and Fuel dock in Marinette, WI on the Menominee River, she departed yesterday. This may be the first vessel to use the newly refurbished dock. Work on the steel seawall and dock continue at both ends.

    Reported by: Connie Fletcher




    Huron Receives Pellet Cargoes

    05/01:
    Skillings Mining Review reports that the Wheeling & Lake Erie Ry. received delivery of Empire pellets at its Huron, Ohio ore dock on April 3, 8, 14 and 19. The tug/barge JOSEPH H. THOMPSON, of Upper Lakes Towing Co. Escanaba, discharged 19,889 gross tons, 19,714 gross tons, 20,302 gross tons and 20,302 gross tons, respectively.

    Reported by: Dave Wobser




    1999 Diamond Jack Schedule

    05/01:
    Detroit's Riverboat Diamond Jack to begin special tours and charters
    Continuing its tradition, the riverboat Diamond Jack begins special student historical tours on the Detroit River on Monday May 3. During the 1998 spring season Diamond Jacks carried over 20,000 students on special 1 1/2 hour trips. This year the trip extended with a stop at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Isle. The Great Lakes Maritime Institute has funded the rebuild of the old ferry dock next to the museum grounds. With this stop of the "Jack", the museum expects to greatly expand the number of young visitors to the facility, introducing them to the history of Great Lakes shipping. Visit Diamond Jack's web site at www.diamondjack.com

    June 1 - August 29
    Departing Tuesday through Sunday

    September 3 -- September 26
    Departing Friday through Sunday

    From Detroit

    HART PLAZA ST. AUBIN PARK
    2:00 pm 2:15 pm
    4:00 pm 4:15 pm
    6:00 pm 6:15 pm

    Departure time subject to change
    phone for info :313-843-7676

    Adults....................... $12
    Seniors..................... $ 11
    Children 6 to 16......... $ 9






    Today in Great Lakes History - May 01

    The EDMUND FITZGERALD collided with the Canadian steamer HOCHELAGA at the mouth of the Detroit River, May 1, 1970, suffering slight damage at hatches 18 and 19.

    The STEWART J. CORT departed Erie on her maiden voyage at 0400 May 1, 1972. She was delayed by fog in western Lake Erie and then created a sensation as she passed Detroit/Windsor mid-day on May 2nd amid throngs of people lining both sides of the Detroit and St. Clair Rivers, whistling acknowledging salutes on her upbound maiden run.

    Scrapping began on the CHICAGO TRADER May 1, 1978.

    JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was launched May 1, 1943.

    The IRVING S. OLDS sustained an eight foot long crack across her spar deck and eight inches down one side in a storm on Lake Huron May 1, 1963.

    LIGHTSHIP 103 (HURON) was launched May 1, 1920.

    SOO RIVER TRADER brought the first shipment of bulk cement to open the $18 million St. Lawrence Cement distribution dock at Duluth on May 1, 1982.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
    Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





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