Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

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Updates

06/30
I'm having a hard time connecting tonight from the Soo. Please continue to send pictures and updates, I will have my high speed connection back Sunday.

Saturday night our group was treated to a cruise on the St. Marys River aboard Lock Tours Canada's Chief Shingwauk. The highlight of the cruise was a visit to the former Quedoc and Vandoc awaiting scrapping at Algoma Steel.

Preparing to board the Chief Shingwauk. The trip across the border was no problem both Friday and Saturday.
Vandoc.
Quedoc.
Lock Tours Canada.

Check back tomorrow for complete coverage of the 3rd Annual Boatnerd Gathering.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 30

On 30 June 1900, MARIAN TELLER (wooden propeller tug, 52', 33 gt, built in 1879 at W. Bay City) was towing the barge CANTON on Lake St. Clair. The TELLER sprang a leak about one mile from the Lake St. Clair Lightship. The rising water put out her fires. In the scramble to escape, the yawl was swamped and three lives were lost. Only Captain Cornwall and his son were saved when the passing steamer NORWALK picked them up.

Data from: Joe Barr, and David Swayze



Updates

06/29
I'm having a hard time connecting tonight from the Soo, check back for updates.




Soo Locks Cruise Tonight

06/29
Tonight a special "Freighter Chasing Cruise" will depart from Soo, Canada aboard the Chief Shingwauk. There are still a few tickets available if you would like to join cruise.

  • Departing at 6:00 p.m. sharp from the Roberta Bondar Dock in Sault, Canada and it will be returning at approximately at 9:00 p.m.
  • Cost is only $16.00 U.S. funds or $23.00 Canadian per person. This will include passage onboard for three hours as well as food .
  • Our route for this cruise will take us where ever the ships are. We will pass through the Soo Locks and the St. Marys River chasing freighters.

    For those wishing to be take the cruise, please send a check or money order payable to :
    Lock Tours Canada Boat Cruises
    Roberta Bondar Park Dock, P.O. Box 325,
    Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada.
    P6A 5L8

Order by phone: 877-226-3665 Please have your credit card number ready.

A boarding ticket will be mailed to you, so please ensure the return address is correct. Space is limited to the first 150 persons.

Please feel free to e-mail any questions to: Capt. John M. Chomniak
General Manager
Lock Tours Canada Boat Cruises

Click here for more details




Today in Great Lakes History - June 29

The BEECHGLEN was Launched in 1923 as a) CHARLES M. SCHWAB for the Interlake Steamship Co.

On June 29, 1962, the Canadian Hunter began her maiden voyage.

The JOSEPH L. BLOCK was christened on June 29, 1976.

The Canadian schooner DUNSTOWN arrived at Malden, Ontario on 29 June 1875 to be put in place as a lightship. Her sides were painted in large white letters: BAR POINT LIGHTSHIP.

On 29 June 1864, ALVIN CLARK (2-mast wooden schooner, 113', 220 t, built in 1846 at Truago (Trenton), Michigan) foundered in a terrific squall off Chambers Island on Green Bay. Two of the crew were rescued by the brig DEWITT, but three lost their lives. In 1969, a schooner identified as the CLARK was raised at great expense and put on display for some time at Marinette, Wisconsin, then at Menominee, Michigan, but it only lasted until 1995 when it was destroyed.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, A HREF ="http://www.boatnerd.com/swayze/shipwreck/">David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Quedoc Arrives

06/28
The former Paterson ship Quedoc arrived in Sault Ste. Marie Thursday afternoon. The vessel was towed to a dock near Algoma Steel by the tug Avenger IV. She joins her fleet mate Vandoc that was towed down on June 10 for scrapping.

The future of the Quedoc is uncertain and may be used as a barge, a floating dry dock or scrapped all together.




Cedarglen Continues

06/28
Wednesday afternoon the Cedarglen was cleared to continue its voyage after stopping for repairs. Initial reports stated the vessel grounded due to an electrical failure but this appears to be incorrect.

The vessel was down bound when it reported an electrical problem Wednesday morning. At that time, she went to anchor north of Whiskey Island to correct the problem and did not ground.

The cause of the electrical problem was two diodes on the #1 generator that burnt out. Technicians were called in to make the repair. Seaway inspectors remained on board until all repairs were made and the testing of the repairs was complete.

Reported by: Vicki J. Garcia and Marty Elliott




Goviken in for Repairs

06/28
Wednesday afternoon the salty Goviken entered Bay Ship in Sturgeon Bay, Wi. for unknown repairs. The Goviken was inbound at Sturgeon Bay about 4:00 p.m. The Selvick tug Jimmy L was assisting the Goviken to the dock.

The tug Mark Hannah and a tank barge were also in the area as the Goviken entered the ship yard.

Reported by: Scott Best




Soo Boatnerd Gathering

06/28
Thursday afternoon boat watchers began gathering in the Soo for the 3rd Annual Soo Boatnerd Gathering. That evening watchers were treated to a parade of 1000-footers. The upbound Burns Harbor, Edwin H. Gott and down bound George A. Stinson delighted the group that had gathered at Mission Point with salutes. Capt. Al Tielke aboard the Burns Harbor impressed the group with three salutes. One from the forward horn, one from the rear horn and a Shipmaster's Salute.

Burns Harbor upbound off Mission Point below the locks.
Close up of the flags on her bow.
Capt. Tielke takes a picture from the pilothouse.
George A. Stinson down bound.
Approacing the Gott.
Passing the Gott.
Edwin H. Gott upbound.
Ziemia Gnieznienska passing under the Mackinaw Bridge Thursday afternoon.
Another view.




Soo Locks Cruise On Saturday

06/28
Today is Engineers Day at the Soo Locks. On Engineers Day the US Army Corps of Engineers opens the area between the MacArthur and Poe Locks to the public and the ground floor of the Administration Building is open for tours. On Saturday, June 29 a special "Freighter Chasing Cruise" will depart from Soo, Canada aboard the Chief Shingwauk. Time is running out if you would like to reserve your ticket for the cruise.

  • Departing at 6:00 p.m. sharp from the Roberta Bondar Dock in Sault, Canada and it will be returning at approximately at 9:00 p.m.
  • Cost is only $16.00 U.S. funds or $23.00 Canadian per person. This will include passage onboard for three hours as well as food .
  • Our route for this cruise will take us where ever the ships are. We will pass through the Soo Locks and the St. Marys River chasing freighters.

    For those wishing to be take the cruise, please send a check or money order payable to :
    Lock Tours Canada Boat Cruises
    Roberta Bondar Park Dock, P.O. Box 325,
    Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada.
    P6A 5L8

Order by phone: 877-226-3665 Please have your credit card number ready.

A boarding ticket will be mailed to you, so please ensure the return address is correct. Space is limited to the first 150 persons.

Please feel free to e-mail any questions to: Capt. John M. Chomniak
General Manager
Lock Tours Canada Boat Cruises

Click here for more details




Updates

06/28
I'm working off a dial up connection while I am in the Soo. Typical images files I work with on the site start at 2-5 meg. I'm having a hard time downloading these images files, sorry for the delay.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 28

On June 28, 1938, at 8:50 a.m., the William A. Irvin departed Duluth with her first cargo of iron ore for Lorain, Ohio. 48 years later, in 1986, almost to the minute, the William A. Irvin opened as a museum to the public. I had the honor of conducting the first public tour aboard the vessel.

The ATLANTIC SUPERIOR arrived at the Algoma Steel Plant, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. on her maiden voyage in 1982 with a load of taconite but before she was unloaded christening ceremonies were conducted there.

the SAM LAUD ran aground June 28, 1975 on a shoal south of Sturgeon Bay, with a cargo of coal from Chicago, IL for Green Bay, WI. Six-thousand tons of coal were off-loaded the next day into the NICOLET before she could proceed to Green Bay along with the NICOLET to discharge cargoes. SAM LAUD entered the dry dock at Sturgeon Bay on July 3rd for repairs. She had suffered extensive bottom damage with leakage into seven double bottom tanks and the forepeak. She returned to service on August 21, 1975.

On 28 June 1893, JAMES AMADEUS (wooden propeller tug, 65', 44 gt, built in 1872 at Cleveland) sprang a leak and foundered near Cleveland, Ohio. Her crew abandoned her just before she went down.

On 28 June 1909, TEMPEST (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 138', 370 gt, built in 1876 at Grand haven, MI) burned to a total loss while unloading coal at the Galnais Dock at Perry Sound, Ontario. She was consumed very quickly and six of her crew were killed.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Cedarglen Grounds in St. Lawrence River

06/27
The Cedarglen grounded Wednesday morning on a shoal near Whiskey Island off Kring Point, NY. Coast Guard reports that the vessel scraped the starboard quarter of its hull, but the extent of damage was unknown.

After the incident the Cedarglen went to anchored north of Whiskey Island. The vessel had reported electrical problems prior to the grounding.

Reported by: Marty Elliott




Barker to Return to Service

06/27
After an uncertain start to the 2002 season the James R. Barker will see service this year. The modern 1000-footer did not fit out as it normally would in the spring. The closing of the LTV steel mills and down turn in the economy were to blame for the vessel not returning to service.

Things appear to be picking up with LTV operating under new owners. The Barker is expected to depart her lay-up dock in Sturgeon Bay, Wi. next week and load coal in Superior, Wi. on July 4 for the St. Clair Edison Coal Dock on the St. Clair River.

Reported by: Scott Best




Transfer Visits Manistee

06/27
The Canadian Transfer stopped in Manistee on Wednesday morning on her first ever trip to the port. ULS boats are very rare in Manistee, with the James Norris coming through in 1999 on her only trip to Manistee. The Transfer brought in a load of limestone to the Seng dock. She loaded in Meldrum Bay, Ontario. The vessel arrived at 7:15 a.m. and departed in the afternoon. The Fred R. White Jr. is due Manistee on Thursday at 11:00 p.m.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Crew Member Falls

06/27
Monday a crewman aboard the Adam E. Cornelius fell 5-10 feet from a ladder onto a catwalk at the Lafarge Stone Dock in Marblehead, Oh.

The U.S. Coast Guard Station Marblehead responded and found local EMS and police on scene. A small boat from Station Marblehead took the injured man to a waiting life flight helicopter.

He was then transported to St. Vincent Medical center in Toledo, Ohio with head and possible neck injuries.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Air Lift From the Anderson

06/27
The U.S. Coast Guard was involved with another evacuation late last week from the Arthur M. Anderson. Air Station Waukegan transferred a 44-year old crew man with chest and abdominal pains from the vessel to Victory Memorial Hospital in Waukegan, IL.

The man had been experiencing mild pain for several days. The ship was underway in Southern Lake Michigan, en route Indiana Harbor, when Group Milwaukee received their request for a MEDEVAC after the patient's condition worsened. AN HH-65A rescue helicopter launched and safely transported the patient.

Reported by: Greg Jackson




Marquette Update

06/27
The H. Lee White unloaded stone at Marquette's lower harbor Wednesday. The dock is cleaned and swept as each load of stone and coal is cleaned up.

The Algosteel, Sykes, Lee A. Tregurtha, and Great Lakes Trader are all due in Marquette on Thursday.

H. Lee White unloads.
Truck cleans the dock beneath the unloading boom.
Crewman walking on the boom.
Stern view unloading.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Burns Harbor Unloads in Burns Harbor

06/27
On Tuesday the Burns Harbor was unloading taconite at the Bethlehem side of the port. Also in port was the saltie Goviken was unloading it cargo of steel wire.

Burns Harbor unloading. Note the two obsolete unloaders pointing skyward.
Goviken unloading.

Reported by: Kent Armstrong




Cleveland News

06/27
The St. Marys II and Tug Sea Eagle were unloading at their silo on the river Wednesday afternoon. The David Z. Norton was unloading stone across the river at the Osborne dock at the same time. At 7:00 p.m. she was downbound being towed stern first by the G tug California. The Maumee was unloading stone at the Ontario dock at the mouth of the river, later in the evening she shifted up the old river bed unassisted to complete her unload of stone.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Soo Locks Cruise This Saturday

06/27
Friday, June 28 is Engineers Day at the Soo Locks. On Engineers Day the US Army Corps of Engineers opens the area between the MacArthur and Poe Locks to the public and the ground floor of the Administration Building is open for tours. On Saturday, June 29 a special "Freighter Chasing Cruise" will depart from Soo, Canada aboard the Chief Shingwauk. Time is running out if you would like to reserve your ticket for the cruise.

  • Departing at 6:00 p.m. sharp from the Roberta Bondar Dock in Sault, Canada and it will be returning at approximately at 9:00 p.m.
  • Cost is only $16.00 U.S. funds or $23.00 Canadian per person. This will include passage onboard for three hours as well as food .
  • Our route for this cruise will take us where ever the ships are. We will pass through the Soo Locks and the St. Marys River chasing freighters.

    For those wishing to be take the cruise, please send a check or money order payable to :
    Lock Tours Canada Boat Cruises
    Roberta Bondar Park Dock, P.O. Box 325,
    Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada.
    P6A 5L8

Order by phone: 877-226-3665 Please have your credit card number ready.

A boarding ticket will be mailed to you, so please ensure the return address is correct. Space is limited to the first 150 persons.

Please feel free to e-mail any questions to: Capt. John M. Chomniak
General Manager
Lock Tours Canada Boat Cruises

Click here for more details




Today in Great Lakes History - June 27

CANADIAN RANGER was launched in 1967 by Davie Shipbuilding Ltd., Lauzon, Que. as a) CHIMO, C.323030, for the Canada Steamship Lines Ltd.

WILLIAM EDENBORN (steel propeller freighter, 478, 5085 gt) was launched at W. Bay City, Michigan on 27 June 1900.

PRETORIA (3-mast schooner-barge, 338', 2790 gt) was launched at J. Davidson's yard (hull #94) in W. Bay City, Michigan on 27 June 1900. Mr. Davidson built her for his own fleet. She was one of the largest wooden vessel ever built and lasted until September 1905 when she sank in Lake Superior.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Quedoc Tow Departs

06/26
A group of about 30 people were gathered on the James Street Swing Bridge and on the old Paterson Dock Tuesday evening. The occasion, to witness what may very well be the last time that the old Paterson boat Quedoc, makes a trip across Lake Superior. At 6:30 p.m. the tugs Avenger IV and Point Valour attached lines to the aging boat. The Quedoc has been idle at the Paterson dock since the end of the 1991 shipping season but despite her rough exterior, she still looks great inside.

Her fleet mate, Vandoc was towed to Sault Ste. Marie on June 10 and now it was the Quedoc's turn. As lightning flashed and Thunder rolled across the darkening sky, the tugs prepared their tow. The trio pulled out from the dock with the local tug Point Valour leading the way downstream with a line attached to the stern of the Quedoc. The Purvis Marine tug Avenger IV took up the slack her line attached to the bow of the once proud vessel.

As they moved downstream towards the junction of the Kaministiquia River and the Mission River, the lead tug lost her towline. Her master quickly turned the tug around and picked up the towline off the stern.

The tow reached the junction of the two rivers just as the sun broke out. A bright rainbow appeared in the sky and arched over the Quedoc as she passed the Algosar, who was unloading at the Petro-Can dock. The tow continued with the Point Valour in the lead, passing the Kam River yacht club and the Valley Camp dock. The Quedoc was making her last journey along the same route that the Vandoc took two weeks previous. As they passed the Mission river piers, the Point Valour took stern of the Quedoc out toward Pie Island as the Avenger IV took up the bow towline and attached it tow her stern. She then pulled the bow around and the Point Valour took in her towline.

The Quedoc was now facing her uncertain future and open Lake Superior. It is unknown what will become of the Quedoc at this time. Possible uses will be to cut her down to a barge, partially scrap the vessel and create a floating drydock or scrap the entire ship.

Crews prepare for the tow. John Kuzma

Reported by: Rob Farrow and John Kuzma




Independent Enters Lay-up

06/26
The last active U.S. straight deck bulk carrier, Kinsman Independent entered temporary lay-up at the General Mills Frontier Elevator on Sunday. It is loaded with a storage cargo aboard to be unloaded before fitout in the fall.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Fire Delays Loading

06/26
Due to a electrical fire in the substation at the CSX coal loading facility in Toledo, the Calumet move over to the Midwestern Terminal (Stone Dock) to off load the 18 cars of coal back into the coal cars Tuesday. No word on how long CSX coal loading facility will be down.

The coal belonged to the Reiss Coal Company and was destined to be used in the car ferry Badger.

Calumet dock and unloading.
Stern view.
Coal returned to coal car.
Another view.
Tim Becker( white hard hat),Reiss Coal Company, supervising the off loading of his coal. Next to him in a yellow shirt, a railroad switchman communicating with the railroad engineer on the placement of the coal cars.
The mate from the Calumet directs the amount of coal off loading.

Reported by: Bob Vincent




Ferry Service Disrupted

06/26
Sunday night, the M.V. Jiimaan suffered a mechanical failure on one of her engines. The ferry provides service between Leamington Ontario and Pelee Island in Lake Erie.

The vessel was not able to operate Monday as well and she was replaced by the smaller ferry, M.V. Pelee Islander. On Monday the Pelee Islander is scheduled to run from Leamington Ontario to Sandusky Ohio. It is not know how many people were affected in Ontario but almost a full load of cars were stranded in Sandusky by the decision to pull the Pelee Islander from her regular route. It is not known when the Jiimaan will re-enter service.

Reported by: Doug Roe




Lakes Visitor in for Repairs

06/26
On Sunday the Mackenzie was in Antwerp, Belgium for repairs. The vessel was placed in one of the dry docks at Antwerp Ship services.

Crews were repairing the vessel's propeller. Once work is complete the Mackenzie will load at Antwerp for the Great Lakes.

Mackenzie in Dry Dock.
Bow view.
Stern view.
Profile.
Looking up from the bottom of the dry dock.
Close up of propeller and cort nozzle.
View of the Mackenzie from above.

Reported by: Chris Rombouts




Alpena Report

06/26
The steamer Alpena arrived into port early Tuesday morning to load cement at Lafarge. It left around 9:30 a.m. heading for Green Bay, WI. The J.A.W Iglehart was expected to be in port on Wednesday to load.

The Paul H. Townsend was in Saginaw unloading and will then likely head back to Alpena. The tug Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity was sailing for South Chicago.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Saginaw News

06/26
The Mississagi was inbound on the Saginaw River early Tuesday morning. After lightering at the new Bay Aggregates dock in Essexville, the vessel continued up to the GM dock in Saginaw to finish unloading.

This was the Mississagi's second visit to Saginaw since Sunday.

Also calling on Sunday were the Joseph H. Thompson, which delivered a load to the Bay Aggregates Dock, and the Maumee, which arrived in the evening at Saginaw Rock Products.

The Thompson and Maumee had also made quick turn around. Both vessels had returned to the river only about 36 hours after departing last Friday.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Busy Day in Fairport

06/26
Fairport Harbor OH was busy again Tuesday evening. The Canadian Navigator had arrived at 8:00 p.m. Monday and finally finished loading salt at 10:00 p.m. Tuesday.

The Calumet arrived at 8:00 p.m. Tuesday to unload stone from Marblehead, then was to load sand.

The suction dredge Atchafalaya was working the marina area, above the turning basin. Remaining in port were the Corps derrick McCauley and tug Koziol, plus several barges.

The sand sucker John R. Emery was moved to the west side of the river, next to the Osborne and another unidentified sand sucker, to make room at the sand loader.

The salt mine has not shipped by rail in many months. The entire length of the mine branch is full of stored empty piggyback cars.

Reported by: Dave Merchant




Toronto Update

06/26
The cement ships Stephen B. Roman and English River were both in port Tuesday.

T.H.C. 50 the Port Authority's heavy lift crane barge was back in service Tuesday morning after a lengthy refit. It was dredging the mouth of the Don River that morning and the Port Authority's tug Wm. Rest was hauling the spoils away with Port Authority's dump scows.

The McKeil tugs Atomic and Glenevis have been out of port for the past two days. They have likely gone to Oshawa to assist with vessel dockings there.

The Still Watch, ex-Coast Guard vessel Ville Marie, has been at Pier 28 for quite some time undergoing a new paint job. She now bears the name Vast Explorer, but this is only for the film that she is involved with. The new U.S. vessel Vast Explorer used the same dock about a month ago when it was outbound from the lakes after a lengthly lay-up at Wheatley, Ontario. The film is reportedly about the adventures of Robert Ballard, the Wood's Hole oceanographer who found the Titanic and PT 109. Still Watch reportedly will be at Pier 28 until November for this project.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Quebec Harbor Update

06/26
Three ships were docked in the St. Charles River estuary Tuesday including an unusual visitor.

The Algobay was loading iron ore for Burns Harbor and the large Panama bulker Rubin Peony (69,069 dwt, 740 feet) was unloading alumina from Banbury, Australia.

The unusual visitor was the McKeil Marine barge McCleary’s Spirit and tug William J. Moore loading jet fuel for Hamilton.

Many marine salutes were heard around 6:00 p.m. as the Canadian Coast-Guard Heavy Icebreaker Pierre Radisson departed the Quebec Coast-Guard base at Queen’s Wharf at the foot of the Château Frontenac on its annual trip to the Canadian Arctic. Many onlookers were on site to wish Bon Voyage to its crew. The Pierre Radisson was a beautiful site with its red hull and white upper structure as it moved to mid channel in the brilliant summer setting sun. The Radisson ‘s fleet mate Des Groseilliers will depart on its annual Arctic venture in early July.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




Blount-Barker Signs Contract For 120’ Whale Watch Catamaran

06/26
Blount-Barker Shipbuilding signed a contract with a B.B.O., LLC of Portsmouth, New Hampshire for the construction of a 120’ Whale Watch Catamaran for operation in Bar Harbor, Maine. The vessel designed by Crowther Multihulls of Sydney, Australia will operate both seasonal whale watch tours and high-speed commuter service.

The 124’ x 36’ catamaran designed with a main, mid and upper deck will accommodate 444 passengers at a loaded operating speed of 40 knots. The vessel’s structure will be designed to DNV Rules and Regulations for the classification of high-speed light craft and built to U.S. Coast Guard Subchapter K Rules and Regulations.

The all-welded aluminum catamaran will be powered by (4) Cummins KTA50-M2 engines, 1,800 HP at 1,900 RPM with ZF 4600D reverse gears driving (4) Hamilton HM651 Jets.

Blount-Barker Shipbuilding is an exclusive licensee for Crowther Multihulls, a leader in worldwide catamaran design. The vessel construction is due to begin immediately with completion scheduled for May 2003.

Reported by: Blount-Barker Shipbuilding




Today in Great Lakes History - June 26

In 1926 the Lemoyne was launched at Midland Shipbuilding Co, Midland Ont. She was 6 feet wider and 4 feet shallower than the largest ship at that time.
1929 the Calcite II was launched at American Shipbuilding Co., Lorain OH
Launched in 1972 was the ALGOWAY (2) at Collingwood

On 26 June 1867, WATERS W. BRAMAN (wooden propeller tug, 89 t, built in 1858 at Boston, Massachusetts for the U.S.Q.M.C. and named RESCUE) was near Pelee Island in Lake Erie when fire started in her coal bunker and quickly spread. Her crew abandoned her in the yawl and were later picked up by the propeller TRADER. She had been sold by the Quartermaster Corps just the previous year and she had come to the Lakes from the East Coast just five weeks before this accident.

On 26 June 1900, one hundred years ago, Boynton & Thompson purchased the wreck of the NELLIE TORRENT (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 141', 303 gt, built in 1881 at Wyandotte, MI) to raised her. She had been destroyed by fire at Lime Island near Detour, Michigan on 22 June 1899.

On 26 June 1882, the Port Huron Times reported that the ARAXES (wooden propeller, 182', 569 gt, built in 1856 at Buffalo, NY) sank in the Straits of Mackinac. She was raised on 6 July 1882 and repaired. She was built in 1856 and lasted until the summer of 1894 when she sank 4 miles off Bay City in Saginaw.

Data from: Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Quedoc Scrap Tow - Vandoc Scrapping

06/25
The final tow of former Paterson vessels from Thunder Bay is expected to take place later this week. The Quedoc is expected to be towed from Thunder Bay as early as Wednesday.

Crews from Purvis Marine were expected to depart their dock in the Soo on Monday heading for Thunder Bay.

The Quedoc has been in lay-up at Thunder Bay since the end of the 1991 season. Paterson sold the vessel and the Vandoc to Purvis Marine last month. The vessel is expected to be scrapped at Algoma Steel.

In Sault Ste. Marie, work crews have started removing parts and equipment from the Vandoc near the stern and will concentrate efforts on cutting a large entrance hole for easy access. Once completed, work crews will be able to drive necessary machinery and equipment into the ship for easy removal.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




River Closes Again

06/25
Monday night the US Coast Guard again closed the St. Marys River due to low visibility. The river was closed for a time on Sunday morning due to fog.

The river was closed Monday from Mud Lake junction buoy to the Soo Locks. The George A Stinson was upbound at Six Mile Point and the Buckeye was downbound at Gros Cap.

Reported by: Jerry Masson




Dry Spell in Goderich

06/25
Goderich's busy salt mine dock is on a three week production shutdown. Crews are moving and repairing the conveyor belts and apparently will not be sending any salt out of the mine. There may mean no boat traffic in Goderich for three weeks unless the port receives visitors into the grain terminals.

Reported by: Lisa Stuparyk




Wenonah II in Service

06/25
The new cruise vessel Wenonah II entered regular service on May 18 and, along with Segwun is providing cruises through all three Muskoka lakes, sailing from either Gravenhurst or Port Carling in Ontario.

Wenonah II is beautifully designed to resemble a traditional inland lake steamer and, with her length of 129-feet, resembles both Cherokee (1907) and Sagamo (1906) . Along with Segwun, the steam yacht Wanda III, Wenonah II is owned by the Muskoka Steamship & Historical Society who are proud of Segwun being the oldest ship under Canadian registry while Wenonah II is the newest.

The new ship has an interior of restrained elegance, with a 84-seat dining room and a 80-seat lounge, both of which should permit passengers to enjoy the Muskoka scenery from April to November over many future years.

Click here for more information

Reported by: Dr Gordon C. Shaw




Detroit Traffic

06/25
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Sunday.
Goldeneye (Greece) at the Morterm Dock in Windsor.
John D Leitch backing down from Sterling Fuel to the Ojibway Salt Dock.
Stern view.
Tug Wyoming upbound for the Rouge River to assist the Jean Parisien from the Rouge Steel Slip.
Stern view.
Recently arrived in Detroit, the tug Maine upbound behind the Wyoming.
Stern view.
Tug Magnetic downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Federal Asahi (Hong Kong) upbound off Zug Island.
Stern view.
Sam Laud downbound off Zug Island.
Stern view.
Canadian Transport downbound with coal for Zug Island in the Rouge Shortcut.
H Lee White upbound off Zug Island.
Canadian Transfer unloading salt at the Osborne Dock in the Rouge River.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Fairport Traffic Jam

06/25
Fairport Harbor, OH was busy Monday evening. The Cuyahoga was loading salt at the mine. The Canadian Navigator backed in at 8:00 p.m. and tied up to the stone dock across from the salt dock waiting to load salt.

The Cuyahoga cleared at 8:40 p.m. followed out by the suction dredge Atchafalaya.

Also in port were the Corps derrick McCauley and tug Koziol, plus several barges.

The sand sucker John R. Emery remains docked on the east side of the river, boarded up.

Reported by: Dave Merchant




More News

06/25
I'm still having a problem processing pictures for the page, I hope to update the news with pictures early this week.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 25

1927 the B.F. Affleck was launched at Toledo Shipbuilding Co.

On June 25, 1938, the William A. Irvin began her maiden voyage, leaving Lorain, Ohio for Duluth to load iron ore.

INDIANA HARBOR set a then record cargo on June 25, 1993 loading 71,369 tons of western low sulfur coal at Superior (WI) Midwest Energy Terminal and transporting it 50 miles to Silver Bay, MN.

The ALGOBAY collided head-on with the steamer MONTREALAIS in foggy conditions on the St. Clair River June 25, 1980 causing extensive bow damage to both vessels. Repairs to the ALGOBAY were made by Herb Fraser & Associates, Port Colborne, Ont. at an estimated cost of $500,000. She returned to service by mid August, 1980.

At 1:00 AM on 25 June 1878, the 161', 3-mast wooden schooner PESHTIGO and the 143', 3-mast wooden schooner ST. ANDREW collided and sank near Cheboygan, Michigan and the Straits of Mackinac. Newspapers of the time claimed that forest fire smoke hampered visibility. Both vessels sank quickly. Two of the crew of PESHTIGO were lost, but the rest were rescued by the schooner S.V.R. WATSON. The entire crew of ST. ANDREW was rescued by the Canadian propeller OCEAN.

On the afternoon of 25 June 1885, the tug NIAGARA had the schooner MOUNT BLANC in tow while coming rounding to pick up the schooner REINDEER near Stag Island on the St. Clair River. The MOUNT BLANC struck the wreck of the tug B. B. JONES. The JONES had exploded in Port Huron on 25 May 1871 and the wreck was towed to the head of Stag Island where it was abandoned. After striking the wreck of the JONES, the ore laden MOUNT BLANC sank. She was later recovered and repaired and lasted until 1901.

Data from: Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




River Closed

06/24
The US Coast Guard closed the St. Marys River early Sunday morning due to low visibility from Mud Lake junction buoy to the Soo Locks. Upbound vessels included the Courtney Burton, CSL Tadoussac and Lee A Tregurtha. They were allowed to tie at the lower lock pier. The downbound Cedarglen and Armco docked at the locks.

The Federal Welland was underway upbound from the export dock at Algoma Steel for Thunder Bay.

The river was reopened later that morning.

Reported by: Jerry Masson




Dean Wins Tug Boat Race

06/24
Saturday the 26th annual International Freedom Festival Tug Boat Race was held on the Detroit River. The overall winner of the event was the tug Elmer Dean.

The weather was perfect for the event and crowds lined the Windsor waterfront to watch the tugs race for the finish line. Absent from the races this year were tugs owned by the Gaelic Tugboat Co. After weeks of preparing the tug Acushnet, the tug and its owners were stuck inside the Rouge River due to power outage that kept the bridges over the river closed.

Below are the official race results by class:
1st overall
Elmer Dean

2000+ horsepower
No tugs in this class

1001-2000 horsepower
1st - Elmer Dean
2nd - Demolen

351 - 1000 horsepower
1st - Dover
2nd - Neptune III

176-350
1st - Julie Ann
2nd - Sinbad

Under 175 Horsepower
1st - Bay Taz
2nd - Junior C

Non-displacement
1st - J.W. Westcott II
2nd - Joseph J. Hogan

Smallest tug
Enterprise

Best dressed
1st - Enterprise
2nd - Bay Taz

Race Commendation
Acushnet

Judge's Appreciation
Demolen - best safety program

Flags flying the Joseph J. Hogan departs the Westcott Dock.
Tug Isabelle.
Joan V and the Demolen prepare for the start.
Bay Taz converted the pilot house into a giant Stanley Cup this year.
Dover, Neptune III and Junior C II.
Close up Neptune III and Junior C II.
Enterprise with a purple octopus on the pilothouse roof.
Sinbad lines up for the start.
Capt. of the Demolen.
Capt. Sam Buchanan of the J.W. Westcott II discusses race strategy.
Onboard the Westcott II in the tense moments before the race starts, Capt. Sam Buchanan and deck hand Dave Tozer pose for a picture.
Field prepares for the start.
Lining up.
The start.
Field starts to spread out.
Close up.
Elmer Dean speeds into the lead.
New USACE tug Demolen showed its impressive speed taking 2nd overall.
Powering by.
Stern view.
Joseph J. Hogan during the race.
Through the other tug's wake.
Another view.
Dover from Goderich.
Racing up river.
Neptune III.
USCG Bristol Bay, the finish line in Windsor.
Impressive performance by this unnamed vessel.
The tugs head for the Detroit side on a parade lap.
View from Windsor. T. Parker
Elmer Dean crossing the finish line. T. Parker
Demolen. T. Parker
Westcott II and Joseph J. Hogan race to the finish line. T. Parker
Junior C. II and Sinbad. T. Parker
J.W. Westcott II heads for Windsor. T. Parker
Westcott II crew docks in Windsor for the awards luncheon.
Departing Windsor for the Westcott Co. Dock.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss and T. Parker




Marquette Update

06/24
A rainy, foggy day in Marquette on Sunday saw three ships at the upper harbor. The Charles M. Beeghly arrived first and unloaded coal, then backed out so the Courtney Burton could come in and load ore. The Beeghly waited in the fog for her turn to return to the dock to load. The Lee A. Tregurtha came in on the north side of the dock and began loading ore.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Hamilton Report

06/24
There were a fair number of vessels in Hamilton Harbor Saturday evening. The Frontenac was unloading iron ore pellets at Stelco, while over at Dofasco, the Algocen was doing the same.

At Pier 26, the James Norris was being loaded with slag with the Hamilton Energy refueling her. Across the way at Pier 23, the Regina Oldendorff was unloading steel products.

Over at Heddle Marine, the barge McAsphalt 401 is out of drydock and is connected to its tug the John Spence.

There were two salties moored at Pier 14. The Fraser was unloading steel beams and the Federal Polaris was unloading steel beams and steel coils. A small pleasure craft was also seen on the Federal Polaris as deck cargo.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Toronto News

06/24
Saturday saw the arrival of the Bulgarian salty Okolchitza with sugar for Redpath. She was assisted into her berth by McKeil's tugs.

The mega yacht Valkyrie departed after her previously damaged propeller was returned.

The 14th Annual Dragon Boat Festival began Saturday on Toronto Island. The side-paddlewheel steam ferry Trillium was put into service to help carry the large crowd of spectators. The Dragon Boat Festival continued on Sunday.

The hobby tug On Duty was in port Saturday as part of regatta. She is the ex-Ministry of Environment tug James Auld. Also in the regatta, which was welcomed into port by a water cannon display by the firetug Wm. Lyon Mackenzie, was a small naval auxiliary vessel named Crossbow 197.

The salty Olympic Miracle was unloading at Pier 35 Saturday. She arrived on Friday. It is probable that Canadian Mariner will be shifted back to Pier 35 once Olympic Miracle departs.

Early Friday morning the "Party Barge" Island Sauvage and its attendant tug King Fish 1 returned to Toronto from Hamilton.

Work continues in the Port Authority's yard on a rigging overhaul for the heavy lift crane barge T.H.C. 50. The C. & C. Marine tug Patricia D. and barge Rock Prince are out of port taking part in the Bronte Waterfront Festival. The barge is being used as a fireworks platform anchored off Coronation Park in Bronte. The schooner Empire Sandy is also participating in the Waterfront Festival, which ended Sunday night.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Soo Locks Cruise

06/24
Friday, June 28 is Engineers Day at the Soo Locks. On Engineers Day the US Army Corps of Engineers opens the area between the MacArthur and Poe Locks to the public and the ground floor of the Administration Building is open for tours. On Saturday, June 29 a special "Freighter Chasing Cruise" will depart from Soo, Canada aboard the Chief Shingwauk. Time is running out if you would like to reserve your ticket for the cruise.

  • Departing at 6:00 p.m. sharp from the Roberta Bondar Dock in Sault, Canada and it will be returning at approximately at 9:00 p.m.
  • Cost is only $16.00 U.S. funds or $23.00 Canadian per person. This will include passage onboard for three hours as well as food .
  • Our route for this cruise will take us where ever the ships are. We will pass through the Soo Locks and the St. Marys River chasing freighters.

    For those wishing to be take the cruise, please send a check or money order payable to :
    Lock Tours Canada Boat Cruises
    Roberta Bondar Park Dock, P.O. Box 325,
    Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada.
    P6A 5L8

Order by phone: 877-226-3665 Please have your credit card number ready.

A boarding ticket will be mailed to you, so please ensure the return address is correct. Space is limited to the first 150 persons.

Please feel free to e-mail any questions to: Capt. John M. Chomniak
General Manager
Lock Tours Canada Boat Cruises

Click here for more details




Shipping Merchandise Moving Sale.

06/24
Force 5 Promotions is offering all Boatnerd.com viewers some great savings. Force 5 is moving and needs to clean out the warehouse.

They will not be able to attend the Soo Festival this year so make sure you buy early. These prices will never be lower. Just a few examples, Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping hats $5.50, Paul R Tregurtha polo shirts, $12.00.
Click here to view




Weekly Updates

06/24
The weekly updates have been uploaded. Click here to view




More News

06/24
I'm still having a problem processing pictures for the page, I hope to update the news with pictures early this week.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 24

On June 24, 1971, a fire broke out in the engine room of the ROGER BLOUGH killing four yard workers and extensively damaging her Pielstick diesel engines. Extensive repairs, which included replacement of both engines, delayed the launch for nearly a year.

The RIDGETOWN was launched June 24, 1905 as a) WILLIAM E. COREY, the first flagship for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

CANOPUS (2-mast wooden brig, 386 t, built in 1855 at Huron, Ohio) was carrying 16,500 bushels of wheat when she collided with the bark REPUBLIC between 3:00 and 4:00 AM on 24 June 1865. The CANOPUS sank in about 20 minutes off Clay banks on Lake Erie. No lives were lost.

The wooden scow MYRA of Ashtabula was lost in a terrible squall on Lake Erie off Elk Creek on 24 June 1875. Three lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Today in Great Lakes History - June 23

In 1926 the Lemoyne was launched at Midland Shipbuilding Co, Midland Ont. She was 6 feet wider and 4 feet shallower than the largest ship at that time.

1929 the Calcite II was launched at American Shipbuilding Co., Lorain OH

Launched in 1972 was the ALGOWAY (2) at Collingwood.

The first whaleback, BARGE 101, was launched along the shore of St. Louis Bay near Duluth, MN on 23 June 1888. Captain Alexander McDougall, the inventor and designer, was there along with his wife, her sister-in-law and several hundred spectators. As the vessel splashed in to the bay, Mrs. McDougall is supposed to have muttered, "There goes our last dollar!"

On 23 June 1900, one hundred years ago, the 450 foot steel steamer SIMON J. MURPHY was launched at Wyandotte, Michigan for Eddy Brothers of Bay City.

On 23 June 1873, B. F. BRUCE was launched at Crosthwaite's yard in East Saginaw, Michigan. She is not properly a schooner, but what is known as a "three-and-after" in nautical terms. Her capacity was 50,000 bushels of grain (800 tons) and the building cost was $50,000.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Matthew Daley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Saginaw Update

06/22
The Joseph H. Thompson was outbound from Saginaw in a heavy thunderstorm early Friday afternoon after calling at the Wirt stone dock. The vessel had delivered part of her load at the Bay Aggregates dock in Bay City on Thursday evening and continued up to Saginaw during the night.

The Maumee entered the river at about 6 p.m. Friday and was upbound during the evening for the Wirt dock at Saginaw.

The tug Undaunted, with barge Pere Marquette 41, was outbound from the Sargent dock at Saginaw during the early morning hours on Thursday after completing unloading about midnight on Wednesday.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Busy Port Stanley

06/22
The port is fairly busy these days with the launching of two sailboats built by the local yacht builder, Kanter Yachts of St Thomas, Ontario. Both were built at a cost in excess of a million dollar each for American Ports.

The harbor is filled with vessels from Nadro Marine services of Port Dover who are working with drill barge Time Saver II. Time Saver is working offshore in the gas fields under Lake Erie approximately 6 miles off Port Stanley. The work boats on scene include the large tug /workboat Ecosse and the Intrepid 111 as well as the Vac. The tug Welland was dock on the west wall near the lift bridge on Wednesday.

The fishing fleet is busy at this time fishing for perch and pickerel as there quotas allow.

Reported by: Dave James




Tug Race Today

06/22
Saturday June 22 is the International Freedom Festival Tug Boat Race on the Detroit River. Starting at 1:00 p.m., tugs line up below the Ambassador Bridge and finish off Dieppe Park in Windsor. The best viewing spot for spectators is from the Windsor water front.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 22

The DAVID Z. NORTON (2) was Launched and christened as the WILLIAM R. ROESCH on June 22, 1973 for the Union Commerce Bank, Ohio (Trustee) and managed by the Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland, OH.

June 22, 1957 - W.L. Mercereau, known as the "Father of the Fleet", died. Mercereau developed the Pere Marquette fleet of carferries into the "largest in the world".

On 22 June 1853, CHALLENGE (wooden propeller freighter, 198', 665 t, built in 1853 at Newport, Michigan) was bound from Chicago for Buffalo with barreled pork and oats on one of her first trips. However, her boiler exploded off Cheboygan, Michigan. She burned and sank. Five died. The schooner NORTH STAR heard the blast ten miles away and came to the rescue of the rest of the passengers and crew.

On 22 June 1875, the Port Huron Times reported that "the Northern Transportation Company's fleet of 20 propellers, which have been idle all the season owing to difficulties between the Central Vermont and the Ogdensburg & Champlain Railroad Companies, have passed from the control of the Central Vermont Railroad Company and will commence regular trips as soon as they can be fitted out."

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Captain Remembered

06/21
Earlier Thursday morning the Paul R. Tregurtha anchored just short of the Duluth Ship Canal upon her arrival, taking pause for a memorial service for her recently deceased master, Mitch Hallin. The Arizona flag (Capt. Hallin's home state), Interlake Steamship Co. flag, and the Tregurtha's christening pennant were flying at the bow. During the afternoon as the Tregurtha loaded coal at Midwest Energy, the U.S. Coast Guard's Sundew made a short trip up the river from her base on Park Point, carrying a considerable number of people on her buoy deck. They may have made a visit to the Tregurtha to pay respects as well.

The Capt. Ralph Tucker made her second trip in as many weeks to the Twin Ports, arriving late Wednesday night to discharge dissolved calcium chloride at Hallett #6. After a quick trip to the Murphy Fuel terminal on her way downriver, she departed through the Duluth piers under sunny mid afternoon skies, passing the inbound Joseph L. Block just outside of the canal. The Tucker is the first powered tanker to visit the Twin Ports in many years.

Reported by: Eric Holst and Jim Zeirke




St. John Arrives

06/21
The sand sucker J.S. St. John has returned to Port Weller Dry Docks for shaft seal work. Noticeably absent from the deck of the vessel is large boom used to pump sand.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt and Jeff Thoreson




Algosar Departs

06/21
The Algosar got underway early Thursday morning after spending several days under going engine repairs. The vessel anchored in the Seaway after it developed problems with a cylinder liner.

Reported by: Walt Statham and Kent Malo




Windoc damage dispute may go to court

06/21
The dispute over damages to the Windoc may wind up in Canada's federal court after N.M. Paterson & Sons and St. Lawrence Seaway Management were unable to negotiate a financial settlement.

Windoc was severely damaged last summer when a lift bridge operated by the Seaway lowered its span onto the passing ship. The loss of the Windoc left Paterson with just three operating ships, which have now been sold to Canada Steamship Lines.

At the heart of the dispute is who is liable for the accident and the amount of the damages, said David Marler, the lawyer representing Paterson.

Marler says a videotape of the incident clearly shows the bridge span coming down on the passing vessel. The Seaway Corporation maintains the case is going to court because Paterson has refused requests to document its losses, an assertion that Marler denies.

Since the accident the Windoc has been sold to Groupe Ocean.

Reported by: Alan Kennedy




Algoville in Sarnia

06/21
The Algoville has been on the South wall of the Sarnia Government Docks since Wednesday. Not much action is visible on the outside with the exception of some commercial pickup trucks parked on the dock.

The Sarnia Government Dock has the fences closed and no one is allowed along side the vessel with the exception of a small section of the stern that is beyond the fenced area.

Reported by: Jamie Kerwin




Goderich Update

06/21
The tug Mark Hannah and barge E63 were docked on the north side of the salt mine Monday evening. It unloaded its cargo for the dust control company and was seen the next day heading north up the lake.

On Tuesday the Agawa Canyon came in to the salt mine, loaded, and then departed overnight Fischer Harbour, Ontario. Two ships were in on Wednesday - first was the Algoway that morning followed by the Algorail Wednesday evening. The Algoway loaded all day in hot calm weather and was leaving about 7:30 pm for Milwaukee. The Algorail turned herself around outside the harbor and backed unassisted into the dock on the north side of the mine to wait her turn.

The tug Dover was seen along side the Algorail and likely helped maneuver the vessel into loading position. The Algorail was still at the salt mine dock at 6:30 a.m. Thursday morning.

Reported by: Lisa Stuparyk




Toronto Report

06/21
Early Tuesday morning the Stephen B. Roman departed the harbor. That afternoon the English River finished unloading and departed.

The McKeil tugs Atomic and Glenevis shift Canadian Mariner from Pier 35 to Pier 52 on Wednesday.

The schooner Empire Sandy was scheduled to depart at midnight for a weekend at the Bronte Harbor Waterfront Festival.

McNally Marine has moved more equipment on the Burlington water pipe project. Derrick No. 1, and No. 4 have been joined by another spoil barge and the tugs Manistique, Whitby and Bagotville.

Reported by: Gerry O.




More News

06/21
I'm having a problem processing pictures for the page, I hope to update the news with pictures over the weekend.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 21

On June 21, 1942, the Alpena--formerly the Leon Fraser--entered service as the largest vessel on the Great Lakes. The former U.S. Steel bulk freighter, originally 639'6" long, retained at least a tie for that honor until the Wilfred Sykes entered service on April 19, 1950.

Also on June 21, 1942, the U.S. Steel bulk freighter Eugene J. Buffington ran hard aground on Boulder Reef in Lake Michigan and broke in two. The vessel was subsequently recovered and, after a long career with U.S. Steel, was finally sold for scrap in 1980.

The M/V RANGER III was side launched at Christy Ship (Bay Ship), Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin on Saturday, June 21st, 1958. The vessel was custom designed by R.A. Stearns (Bay Engineering) also of Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin for the National Park Service, Isle Royale National Park.

On June 21, 1986, during a severe thunderstorm (and unofficial observations of a funnel cloud) in the Duluth area, the Joshua A. Hatfield broke loose from Azcon Scrap Dock in Duluth and was blown across the harbor and ended up hard aground on Park Point (Minnesota Point). She remained stuck for nearly 3 weeks when a storm with east winds pushed the Hatfield free and she blew most of the way back across the harbor back to the scrap dock. Tugs were dispatched in time to safely guide the Hatfield back to the scrap dock. (June seems to be a bad month for U.S. Steel in accidents, with the June 7, 1977 accident involving the William A. Irvin, the June 15, 1943 collision between the D.M. Clemson and the George M. Humphrey, and the June 21, 1942 grounding of the Eugene J. Buffington on Boulder Reef.)

June 21, 1916 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 5, after departing the shipyards in Milwaukee on June 21, 1916 where 3 buckets (blades) were replaced on her starboard propeller, arrived Manistique. While maneuvering around in the harbor she struck the rocky bottom and broke off the same three blades off her starboard propeller.

June 21, 1994 - The Ludington Daily News reported a planned sale of the CITY OF MIDLAND 41 to Contessa Cruise lines of Minnesota. The deal included an option to sell the Spartan and Contessa was prohibited from competing against Lake Michigan Carferry, but it fell through.

The 3-mast wooden schooner GEORGE MURRAY was launched in Manitowoc, WI on 21 June 1873. At the time, she was billed as the largest vessel ever built on Lake Michigan. Her dimensions were 299' x 34' x 14', with the capacity to carry 50,000 bushels of grain. She was built by G. S. Rand for J. R. Slauson of Racine, WI.

On 21 June 1900 the wooden bulk freighter R. C. BRITTAIN was raised at Toledo, Ohio. She was then brought to Sarnia where repairs were made and the engine of the tug F. A. FOLGER was installed in her. She had previously sunk at Toledo and remained there for several years before being raised. She lasted until 1912 when she burned at Sarnia.

Data from: Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Taconite Harbor to receive cargo

06/20
It's nothing like the old days, of course, but Taconite Harbor on Minnesota's North Shore is scheduled to see vessel traffic next week.

Paul R. Tregurtha is scheduled to load 30,000 tons of low-sodium coal June 25 at Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior for delivery to the Minnesota Power generating plant at Taconite Harbor. The Duluth-based utility purchased the power plant last year after the closing of LTV Steel Mining Co.

Taconite Harbor was the loading port for taconite pellets produced by LTV Steel Mining Co. in Hoyt Lakes. The power plant originally was built to provide power to the mine.

After making the delivery to Taconite Harbor, the Tregurtha will return to Midwest Energy Terminal on June 27 to take a full load of coal for the WE Energies generating station at Presque Isle near Marquette.

Reported by: Al Miller




Algosar Repairs

06/20
Wednesday the Algosar remained anchored 3/4 of a mile above CIP 6/7 on the American side of the Seaway with engine problems. Crews are repairing the vessel and were expected to resume their trip early this morning.

The vessel was up bound at the time she encountered engine problems and boatwatchers reported plumes of black smoke emitting from her funnel just minutes before going to anchor.

Reported by: Walt Statham and Kent Malo




Probe of Rouge spill examines oil reclamation business

06/20
Investigators were expected to continue searching a Dearborn, Mich., oil reclamation business seeking information about last spring's oil spill in the Rouge River.

Last April about 60,000 gallons of used oil leaked into the river and floated two miles downstream to the Detroit River. Some small patches of oil reached Lake Erie. Vessels were delayed while the Rouge was closed for cleanup. Cost of the cleanup effort topped $2 million.

Investigators from the FBI, the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Attorney's Office, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Customs and the Michigan Attorney General's Office spent Monday and Tuesday executing a search warrant at Comprehensive Environmental Solutions, the Detroit Free Press reported.

Reported by: Hugh Jackson




More News

06/20
I have an early start at my real job Thursday morning, check back later in the day for more news updates.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 20

The WILLIAM P. COWAN cleared Lorain on her maiden voyage in 1918

In 1903 the twin screw rail car ferry GRAND HAVEN was launched for the Grand Trunk Carferry Line, Milwaukee, WI.

On June 20, 1953, the Canada Steamship Lines bulk freighter Burlington collided with and sank the Scotiadoc in Lake Superior.

On June 20, 1959, the Seaway Queen began her maiden voyage. The vessel was appropriately named, as at the time she was the largest Canadian vessel on the Great Lakes, the 2nd largest on the Great Lakes overall (behind the Edmund Fitzgerald), and she entered service the same week that Queen Elizabeth II and President Dwight D. Eisenhower formally dedicated the St. Lawrence Seaway. To this day, she remains one of the more popular and classic looking vessels on the Great Lakes.

June 20, 1936 - The PERE MARQUETTE 21 was blocked in Manitowoc following an accident which disabled the Manitowoc Tenth Street Bridge, making it impossible to raise the structure.

June 20, 1993 - The BADGER struck the Ludington breakwall while arriving Ludington. She was sent to Sturgeon Bay for repairs. 10 days operations and 21 sailings were lost.

The 230' wooden freighter JAMES DAVIDSON was launched at J. Davidson's yard in W. Bay City on 20 June 1874.

The MINNEHAHA, a wooden "clipper" schooner, was launched at James A. Baker's shipyard in Oswego, NY on 20 June 1857. Her dimensions were 110' keel, 125 overall, x 25'6" x 10'6". She could carry 13,000 bushels of grain. Mr. James Navagh, her master builder, received a gold watch and chain worth $200 in appreciation of his fine work on this vessel.

On Wednesday night, 20 June 1877, the schooner EVELINE (wooden schooner, 118', 236 gt, built in 1861 at Litchfield, MI) was struck by lightning about sixty miles out from Alpena, Michigan. The bolt shattered the mainmast, throwing three large pieces over the vessel's sides. The large spar was split perpendicularly in two and the lightning bolt followed the grain of the wood in a circular manner until it reached the main boom jaw, which is enclosed in a band of iron fastened by a large bolt. This bolt was literally cut in two. The mate, George Mayom, had the left side of his body blistered and the skin burned off from the shoulder to the foot. His right leg, hands and arm were also severely burned, and he suffered internal injuries and bled freely. The vessel made it to port and she was repaired. She lasted until September 1895 when she sank off Kewaunee, Wisconsin.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Mississagi Stops in Sarnia

06/19
The Mississagi stopped in Sarnia Tuesday for some type of repairs. The vessel was docked on the South Wall of the Government Docks with the bow ballasted down in the water while repairs were being done to the propeller area. She departed around 5:30 p.m., downbound for the Shell Dock for fuel.

Reported by: Jamie Kerwin




Acushnet prepared for Tug Races

06/19
The Detroit River International Freedom Festival tugboat race is scheduled for this Saturday, June 22 at Windsor. On the Nicholson Drydock in Ecorse Michigan is the former U.S. Navy tug Acushnet. The hull looks to be in first class condition and has been pressure washed. Several 55 gallon drums of a car wax material is on hand to be applied to the hull to reduce the water resistance.

Captain Brian Williams, owner and captain of the vessel has high hopes of winning the "Capt. William Hoey Jr." trophy for first across the finish line.

Stern view of the Acushnet on the Drydock.
Bow view.

Reported by: Bill Hoey




Algosar Stops for Repairs

06/19
The Algosar has stopped at CIP 7 above Valleyfield in the Seaway for about three days now. The vessel reportedly has a defective cylinder liner which is being replaced. The Algosar is expected to be repaired and get underway some time today.

The vessel was up bound at the time she encountered engine problems and boatwatchers reported plumes of black smoke emitting from her funnel just minutes before going to anchor.

Reported by: Walt Statham and Kent Malo




Sykes Loading at Port Inland

06/19
The classic steamer Wilfred Sykes tied up to the loading dock on Monday morning after the departure of the Great Lakes Trader. It took on load of stone for Saginaw and was expected to leave around 4:00 a.m. At anchor was the barge Pere Marquette and tug Undaunted which will load after the Sykes.

Sykes loading.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Rigel Shipping Joins Canadian Shipowners Association

06/19
Mr. Donald N. Morrison, President, Canadian Shipowners Association (CSA), is pleased to announce that Rigel Shipping Canada joined the CSA. The CSA Board of Directors approved the company’s membership application at a recent meeting.

Rigel Shipping, headed by President Brian Ritchie and based in Shediac New Brunswick, operates a fleet of three, double-hulled tankers providing petroleum and chemical tanker shipping services to Canadian petroleum and petrochemical industries. The company is ISO 9002 and ISM certified and has been in operation in Canada since 1993.

The Canadian Shipowners Association represents the interests of the Canadian companies that own and operate Canadian-flag vessels on the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Waterway, the Arctic, and the eastern seaboard of the United States and Canada. These companies include: Algoma Central Corporation, Canada Steamship Lines, Groupe Desgagnés Inc., Oceanex (1997) Inc., Rigel Shipping Canada Inc., Seaway Marine Transport, Shell Canada Products and Upper Lakes Group Inc.

The Canadian fleet provides communities and industries with reliable, economic and environmentally sustainable transportation. Quietly effective, the domestic marine transportation industry plays an essential role in Canada’s industrial, petrochemical, agricultural and natural resources economy.

Reported by: Canadian Shipowners Association




Twin Ports Report

06/19
Courtney Burton marked its return to service by loading taconite June 18 at the BNSF ore dock. It was a busy day there, with Halifax and George A. Stinson due later the same day.

Elsewhere in port, Kinsman Independent was loading at General Mills S elevator in Superior. Rio Glory continued to load at Cenex Harvest States and Vancouverborg was loading at General Mills in Duluth.

The Duluth DMIR dock was busy with Presque Isle unloading stone during the day. Frontenac was due at the dock later in the day to load taconite pellets.

American Mariner, an infrequent caller in the Twin Ports, will be making a pair of appearances here. It's scheduled to load at DMIR on June 19 and again June 24.

The DMIR dock in Two Harbors continues with its new semi-regular callers. Indiana Harbor was expected there in the evening of June 18; St. Clair is due on the 20th, and the Joe Block is due on the 21st.

Reported by: Al Miller




Paul R. in Marquette

06/19
Big Paul Tregurtha brought a load of coal to Marquette's Presque Isle Power Plant Tuesday. The 1000-footers back into the dock so their unloading booms can reach the coal hopper at the plant.

The John Boland and Charles Beeghly are due in Marquette some time today.

Inbound at the break wall.
Turning in the harbor.
Approaching the ore dock.
Backing past the hopper.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Sturgeon Bay update

06/19
Below are images of Sturgeon Bay, WI. taken from the tour vessel Fred A. Busse. The Busse is a former Chicago Fire Boat.

Fred A. Busse at dock.
$15 million dollar yacht Anson Bell under construction.
Edward L. Ryerson in lay-up.
Profile of bow.
Close up of the forward cabins.
James R. Barker at Bay Ship with boom extended.
Southdown Conquest/Susan Hannah at the ship yard for unknown repairs.
Susan Hannah shows her heritage "Lady Elda".
The Lighthouse "Big Red" On the Lake Michigan side of the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal. It was built in 1882, the year the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal was completed.
Coast Guard Station (Lake Michigan side of the Canal).
Sherwood Point Light House (built 1882 and automated in 1972).
Tug John A. Selvick (built 1898).

Reported by: Dick Lund




Alpena Update

06/19
The Paul H. Townsend came into port Monday morning to load cement at Lafarge. It departed around 3:30 p.m. heading for Saginaw. At anchor in the bay was fleet mate Alpena. It waited until the Townsend cleared the channel and passed, each ship exchanged salutes. The Alpena loaded cement for Green Bay, WI.

Passing on the bay.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Saginaw Update

06/19
Three vessels were visiting at docks at Saginaw within a few hundred yards of each other on Tuesday morning.

The Joyce L. Van Enkevort/Great Lakes Trader had arrived during the night to deliver a split load at the Sargent dock and at Saginaw Rock Products. The Algoway arrived early in the morning at the GM dock in Saginaw, while the cement carrier Paul H. Townsend was secured alongside the E.M. Ford almost directly across the river.

The Joyce L./Great Lakes Trader completed work at Saginaw Rock about 9:30 a.m. and was outbound after turning. The Algoway cleared her dock shortly after the Great Lakes Trader passed and was outbound from Sixth Street about 12:30 p.m.

Pictures by: Stephen Hause
Great Lakes Trader outbound from Saginaw on Tuesday.
Approaching E.M. Ford and Paul H. Townsend.
Joyce L. passing Ford and Townsend.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Amherstburg Traffic

06/19
Cuyahoga upbound at sunset Monday.
Setting sun.

Reported by: David Cozens




Erie News

06/19
The Sam Laud was in Erie early Tuesday, unloading gravel at the Old Ore Dock. The vessel arrived at 5:30 a.m. and departed at 10:30. Before coming into Erie, the vessel talked with the Canadian Navigator and they agreed to pass on 1 whistle.

Laud outbound.
Another View.
Stern View.
Locomotives scheduled to be shipped from Erie sometime this week.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Trip Raffle Winners

06/19
Below is a list of the winners in the Children's aid Society of Huron County trip raffle.
Mr. Joseph M. Duffer - Trip for two on a great lakes freighter - Leechburg, PA Ticket purchased through this web site.
Ms. Joyce Easterly - holiday for two on a great lakes freighter - Grayling, MI
Mr. D. Keillor - BBQ & cruise for 12 on the Donald Bert, - Goderich Bayfield, ON
Mr. Donald McGinness -round trip passage for two and vehicle across Lake Michigan - Dover Plains, NY
Mr. Keith Rowston - passage for two and vehicle crossing - Georgian Bay Blyth, ON
Mr. Jack Hoffmeyer - narrated Detroit River cruise for four - Goderich, ON
Mr. Joe Freeman - narrated Detroit River cruise for four - Goderich, On
Mr. Ken Crowley - 30,000 Island cruise for two - Gibraltar, MI
Mr. John White - Kempenfelt Bay Cruise for two - Goderich, ON
Mr. Raymond Haller - cruise for two out of Port Huron - North Olmstead, Ohio
Mr. J. Scrimgeour - 30,000 Island Cruise family pass - Milverton, ON.
Mr. Jack Riddell - Luck Tour family pass - Clinton, ON
If you weren't one of the luck winners there are more opportunities to win a once in a life time trip. Click here for details.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 19

1954 the George M. Humphrey (named for President Eisenhower's Secretary of Treasury) launched at American Shipbuilding Co., Lorain, OH.

In 1978, the Algobay was launched at Collingwood.

On 19 June 1836, DELAWARE (wooden passenger/package freight side wheeler, 105', 178 t, built in 1833 at Huron, Ohio) was carrying general merchandise and passengers in a storm on Lake Michigan when she was thrown ashore off Niles, Illinois. She broke in two and was wrecked. No lives were lost.

On 19 June 1900 the wooden schooner THOMAS L. HOWLAND was raised and towed to Buffalo for repairs. She had been sunk by the ice off Windmill Point in the Detroit River early in the season.

At 5:30 PM, on 19 June 1872, the wooden package freight/passenger propeller MONTANA (236', 1535 gt) was finally afloat at Port Huron, Michigan. She was unsuccessfully launched at the Port Huron Dry Dock Company on Saturday, 15 June, but she got stuck in the mud. The tugs VULCAN, PRINDEVILLE, BROCKWAY and BURNSIDE were all employed to free her and the MONTANA's engines were also going. It took four days of pulling, hoisting and dredging to free her. The effort to get her free and afloat cost Alexander Muir, her builder, over $3,000 (in 1872 dollars). She lasted until 1914, when she burned near Alpena, Michigan.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Rare Stop for Leitch

06/18
On Monday the John D. Leitch made a rare stop at Wharf 6 Industrial Dock in Thorold. Her captain placed the bow against the west wall, then slowly brought the stern around until she could be lined up to back in to the dock. The Leitch is scheduled to be there for three days for interior repairs. It is believed to that her visit is several firsts, the largest vessel to visit the dock and the John D. Leitch`s first visit. The Leitch is loaded with ore from the lower St. Lawrence.

Pictures by Alex Howard
John D. Leitch arriving.
Preparing to turn.
Stern swinging out.
Turning.
Stern coming around.
Preparing to back.
Backing to Wharf 6.
Stern along side the dock.
Along side the dock.
Another View.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt and Alex Howard




Earl W. Unloads

06/18
Earl W. Oglebay arrived early Monday morning to discharge her cargo of coal at the Cemex Cement Plant in Charlevoix Michigan. She departed late afternoon the same day. The next boat due into Charlevoix is the Southdown Challenger on Wednesday.

Reported by: Dustin Sadowski




Townsend In Detroit

06/18
After opening the 2002 season for ILM early in the year, and then going into layup in Muskegon shortly after, ILM's Paul H. Townsend is back out sailing. On Sunday it took a load of cement to Detroit. The Townsend is the vessel that is first to enter lay-up when demand for cement is low. Continued high demand should see the Townsend running for the rest of the season.

Reported by: Nathan Nietering and Michael Koprowicz




Marquette Update

06/18
The Lee A Tregurtha loaded taconite at Marquette's upper harbor on Monday. The vessel reportedly took on 361 train cars for about 26,000 tons of ore.

Lee A. ready to depart.
Turning in the harbor.
Outbound.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Goderich Update

06/18
The Agawa Canyon docked at the salt mine last Wednesday evening. It loaded and left during the night for Milwaukee, Wisconsin. On Friday, the Canadian Transfer loaded salt, and then the Algomarine on Saturday. The Algomarine arrived in the pouring rain at 4:00 p.m., backing into the dock with the help of the tugboats.

Reported by: Lisa Stuparyk




Amherstburg Traffic

06/18
Sunday evening the tug Everlast and barge Norman McLeod were passing upbound in the lower Detroit River.

Upbound light.
Close up.

Reported by: David Cozens




Toledo Report

06/18
The Algosteel was unloading stone at the midwest terminal stone dock, when finished unloading stone she shifted over to the CSX Coal Docks to load coal. The Armco is due in later on Monday evening at the CSX Docks, she will then follow the Algosteel loading coal. There are no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

The American Republic remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing survey/repairs. The Joseph H. Frantz, Saturn, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in layup at there respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Lee A. Tregurtha on Thursday, followed by the McKee Sons on Thursday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Adam E. Cornelius on Thursday, followed by the Armco on Monday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto News

06/18
An unidentified mega yacht was in port on Monday. The vessel is U.S. registered classic yacht. The Valkyrie remains in port, probably waiting for the damaged prop to be repaired and returned. The dredge that the tug Sandra Mary brought in Sunday from Hamilton is the John Holden. McNally's Hamilton yard is full and they have to store equipment in Toronto until the cooling water project begins.

The tug Salvor departed, possibly for Hamilton, after docking the Metis. The Stephen B. Roman came in late on Monday to Section 34-3 the Essroc north slip. Metis is in the south slip. Pomorze Zachodnie arrived Monday afternoon and was assisted my McKeil's tugs into the Redpath Sugar slip.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 18

In 1949 the Wilfred Sykes was launched at American Shipbuilding Co., Lorain, OH. At the time she was the largest and most powerful vessel on the lakes. The Sykes was also the first boat to have a poop deck.

1964 The Saguenay was launched at Davie Ship Building Ltd., Lauzon, Quebec.

1968 the Algocen was launched at Collingwood.

On 18 June 1869, a little less than a week after being launched, Capt. Luce sailed the schooner DAVID A. WELLS on her maiden voyage from Port Huron for Menominee.

On 18 June 1858, the steamship CANADA left the Lakes via the St. Lawrence rapids since she was too large for the existing locks. She had been built by Louis Shickluna at the Niagara Drydock Company in 1853 at a cost of $63,000. She was sold for ocean service after the Depression of 1857. Her hull was rebuilt and she was renamed MISSISSIPPI. She foundered in a gale in the South Atlantic on 12 August 1862.

The venerable side-wheel passenger ferry Trillium was launched June 18, 1910 by Polson Iron Works in Toronto.

Data from: Gerry O., Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Courtney Burton Returns to Service

06/17
The Courtney Burton departed her lay-up berth at the CSX Docks in Toledo Saturday and is now upbound headed for Superior, Wisconsin to load cargo.

This leaves the Joseph H. Frantz as the only vessel in the Oglebay Norton fleet not sailing this season.

Pictures by Michael Koprowicz
Courtney Burton fit out on Saturday.
Stern view.
Frantz in lay-up.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman, Nathan Nietering and Michael Koprowicz




Highlander Sea Arrives in Port Huron

06/17
The Tall-Ship Highlander Sea arrived at the Port Huron Seaway Terminal, its new home port, about 1:30 p.m. Sunday. The Ship was purchased by Acheson Ventures earlier this year.

Reported by: Bruce Hurd




Amphibious Bus Taking on Water

06/17
Sunday night an amphibious bus operated by Beaver Tours called for help on its marine radio reporting that it was taking on water and adrift in Kingston Harbor. There were no passengers onboard at the time of the incident.

With assistance from the CCGC Bitern and its small tender the bus was towed and pushed near shore. A line was transferred to shore and a large tow truck pulled the vessel from the water.
Beaver Bus Tours

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Wolverine Unloads

06/17
Saturday afternoon the Wolverine arrived at Calcite to load stone for Detroit Lime. The Wolverine was scheduled to load at Stoneport but had a change of orders Saturday morning due to other traffic at the Stoneport dock. At 1:00 a.m. Sunday morning the Wolverine was ready to depart for Detroit.

Stern view at the loading dock.
Deck view loading stone at Calcite.
"Brett" checks out the Wolverine near the Engine room.

Reported by: Scott Best




Windy II at the Soo

06/17
The tall ship Windy II, based in Chicago, visited the twin Soo's over the weekend during the Dragon Boat races. The 155-foot sailing vessel departed the Carbide Dock Saturday afternoon upbound through the American Soo Locks for a tour of the upper river. With a reported draft of eight feet ten inches the tall ship was able to transit the Canadian Soo Locks downbound, with inches to spare.

Windy II entering the lock.
Stern view.
Departing the lock

Reported by: Jerry Masson




Twin Ports Report

06/17
Cason J. Callaway steamed into Duluth early Sunday under clear skies. The vessel was to unload limestone before proceeding to Two Harbors late in the day to load taconite pellets. The Callaway was expected to cap an unusually busy day in Two Harbors. The Edgar B. Speer and Edwin H. Gott were both expected to load there on Sunday.

Elsewhere in Duluth, Oglebay Norton arrived in late morning to load at Midwest Energy Terminal. Rio Glory was the only saltie in port. It was sitting at Cenex Harvest States waiting to start loading today.

A pair of unusual callers are scheduled to visit western Lake Superior today. Buckeye is due at BNSF ore dock in Superior and Adam E. Cornelius is due at Silver Bay.

Midwest Energy Terminal is expecting a steady stream of vessels this week. The lineup includes: Paul R. Tregurtha on June 17 to load for Marquette; Algowood, June 18; Walter J. McCarthy Jr., June 19; Paul R. Tregurtha and Canadian Enterprise, June 20; Columbia Star and Oglebay Norton, June 21; and Canadian Progress, June 22.

Reported by: Al Miller




Hamilton Update

06/17
Sunday afternoon was a busy time in Hamilton Harbor. The Federal Welland was moored at Pier 10 unloading a bagged bulk cargo. Over at Pier 14, the Goviken was moored with no unloading activity seen.

At Pier 23, the Stolt Aspiration was unloading some a chemical/tar based product while just moored north of her is the Spar Garnet unloading steel billets from the rear hold and steel slabs from the forward hold.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Toledo Report

06/17
The H. Lee White was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore. There are no other active vessels in port at the time of this report. The American Republic remains in drydock at the shipyard undergoing survey/repairs. The Joseph H. Frantz, Saturn, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in lay-up at there respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel and Armco on Monday. The Lee A. Tregurtha on Weds. followed by the Canadian Navigator, McKee Sons, and John G. Munson on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boats due into the Torco Ore Docks will be the Adam E. Cornelius on Thursday, followed by the Armco on Monday 24 June.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
A.S. Glossbrenner with the tug Patricia Hoey assisting her headed upbound the Maumee River bound for one of the grain elevators to load grain. She was renamed Algogulf (1) in 1987, then was converted to a self unloader in 1990 and renamed Algosteel.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto News

06/17
Sandra Mary brought another McNally dredge (possibly the John Holden) into port yesterday and berthed it behind Mister Joe. Later in the day Salvor & Metis came in to Essroc.

The salty Gunay-A continues unloading at Pier 52.

The mega yacht Valkyrie of George Town, Cayman Islands, is moored next to the harbor police station, probably waiting for her damaged prop to be repaired and returned before she moves on.

Reported by: Gerry O.




New Discussion Boards

06/17
To better handle traffic to the discussion areas of this site two new boards have been added. The latest is a board dedicated to Industry Issues and meant to be used by those working in the shipping industry. Click here to view

The other is a Regional Discussion Board for off topic and regional discussion that did not fit on the Information Search board.

The Information Search Page is the original board and dedicated to shipping questions & answers and less personal discussion.




Soo Locks Cruise

06/17
Friday, June 28 is Engineers Day at the Soo Locks. On Engineers Day the US Army Corps of Engineers opens the area between the MacArthur and Poe Locks to the public and the ground floor of the Administration Building is open for tours. On Saturday, June 29 a special "Freighter Chasing Cruise" will depart from Soo, Canada aboard the Chief Shingwauk. Time is running out if you would like to reserve your ticket for the cruise.

  • Departing at 6:00 p.m. sharp from the Roberta Bondar Dock in Sault, Canada and it will be returning at approximately at 9:00 p.m.
  • Cost is only $16.00 U.S. funds or $23.00 Canadian per person. This will include passage onboard for three hours as well as food .
  • Our route for this cruise will take us where ever the ships are. We will pass through the Soo Locks and the St. Marys River chasing freighters.

    For those wishing to be take the cruise, please send a check or money order payable to :
    Lock Tours Canada Boat Cruises
    Roberta Bondar Park Dock, P.O. Box 325,
    Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada.
    P6A 5L8

Order by phone: 877-226-3665 Please have your credit card number ready.

A boarding ticket will be mailed to you, so please ensure the return address is correct. Space is limited to the first 150 persons.

Please feel free to e-mail any questions to: Capt. John M. Chomniak
General Manager
Lock Tours Canada Boat Cruises

Click here for more details




Shipping Merchandise Moving Sale.

06/17
Force 5 Promotions is offering all Boatnerd.com viewers some great savings. Force 5 is moving and needs to clean out the warehouse.

They will not be able to attend the Soo Festival this year so make sure you buy early. These prices will never be lower. Just a few examples, Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping hats $5.50, Paul R Tregurtha polo shirts, $12.00.
Click here to view




Weekly Updates

06/17
The weekly updates have been uploaded. Click here to view




Today in Great Lakes History - June 17

The SCOTT MISENER (2) was christened on June 17, 1951. She was the first vessel built at Port Weller.

The PATERSON (1) collided with the steamer EDMUND W. MUDGE in 1957 in fog on the St. Clair River opposite Marine City, MI.

The WILLIAM A. IRVIN was towed back to Duluth on June 17, 1986 by the tugs SIOUX and DAKOTA to be on station as a museum ship at the new $3 million convention facility.

June 17, 1998 - The tug/barge PERE MARQUETTE 41/UNDAUNTED arrived Ludington from Sturgeon Bay after the remainder of the conversion there.

The propeller OWEN SOUND was launched at Collingwood, Ontario on 17 June 1875. She measured 900 tons and could carry 30,000 bushels of grain.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Dry Dock Reopens

06/16
Buffalo Industrial property off Ganson St. has been the site of activity in recent weeks. Crews have been digging out the old Buffalo Dry Docks. Buffalo Industrial Diving has officially opened one of the old dry dock slips to begin immediate construction of work barges for their fleet. Once complete, they will begin building barges for other interests as orders come in.

This news is unprecedented. They are reopening a yard that had been closed and filled in for almost 40 years, but has a shipbuilding history going back to the mid 1800's.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




New Logos on Oakglen

06/16
The Oakglen is now sporting new Company logos on each side of her name on the front cabins. The Canadian Steamship Line Flag emblems were painted on some time during the last trip to Thunder Bay. They are the same emblems as her fleet mate Mapleglen sports on her front cabins. The Oakglen departed Thunder Bay on Friday while the Mapleglen remains at the Keefer dock in Temporary lay-up.

At United Grain Growers "m" elevator on Thursday.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Marquette Report

06/16
The Charles Beeghly loaded taconite at Marquette's upper harbor on Saturday.

The Armco arrived at Marquette's upper harbor to load taconite Friday evening. Also due Friday was the John J. Boland.

Pictures by Lee Rowe and Levin King
Beeghly loading on Saturday.
Armco inbound using bow thruster to line up for the dock.
Crew member lowered to the dock.
Armco at the dock.
Crane barge Schwartz in port to work on the breakwall.
New stone placed on the break wall.
Barges filled with stone.
Old Coast Guard station boat ramps.

Reported by: Lee Rowe and Levin King




Saginaw News

06/16
The Calumet was upbound the Saginaw River during the evening hours on Saturday, passing the Lafayette Bridge at 6:30pm. She was headed up to the Saginaw Rock Products Dock.

The Calumet was in contact with the Tug Gregory J. Busch/Barge STC 2004 who was downbound from Saginaw. The two vessels arranged a meet around the I-75 Bridge. The Busch was downbound through Bay City around 10pm. She had to slow for the Independence Bridge who was without power and could only raise one leaf of the draw at a time.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Calumet upbound approaching Lafayette Bridge.
Close up.
Stern view.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Toledo Report

06/16
Early Saturday morning the Courtney Burton was still at the CSX Docks, she was expected to depart at any time. The John G. Munson was loading coal at the CSX Docks. The American Mariner is due in at the CSX Docks later on Saturday evening to load coal. There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

The American Republic remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing survey/repairs. The Joseph H. Frantz, Saturn, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in layup at there respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel, and Armco on Monday, followed by the Lee A. Tregurtha on Weds. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the H. Lee White on Sunday, followed by the Adam E. Cornelius on Thursday.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
George M. Carl loading grain at the Midstates Elevator.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Welland Canal Update

06/16
Saturday saw a parade of tug-barge combos above Lock 7. First it was the tug Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys Cement II, followed by the tug Margaret Ann and barge loaded with transformers destined for Long Island, N.Y. Close behind it was the cement barge Metis and tug Salvor returning from their recent trip to Buffalo.

Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys Cement II.
Close up of pilothouse.
Stern view.
Margaret Ann and barge.
Close up of Margaret Ann.
Stern view.
Transformers on the barge.
Metis and Salvor.
Close up of Salvor.
Stern view.

Reported by: Alex Howard




Today in Great Lakes History - June 16

In 1967 the Canadian Leader was launched at Collingwood. She was the last steam powered lake ship.

Upbound in the Welland Canal June 16, 1963 loaded with iron ore for Chicago, U.S. Steel's BENJAMIN FAIRLESS suffered bow damage in collision with Canadian steamer RALPH S. MISENER.

In 1918 the WILLIAM P SNYDER, JR. was in collision with the steamer GEORGE W. PERKINS in Duluth Harbor resulting in damages of $5,000 to both vessels.

On 16 June 1861, ANDOVER (2-mast wooden schooner, 98', 190 t, built in 1844 at Black River, Ohio) was carrying lumber in a storm and ground on Pointe aux Barques reef on Lake Huron. Though not thought to be seriously damaged, she resisted all efforts by the tug ZOUAVE to release her. She was finally stripped and abandoned.

On 16 June 1887, CHAMPLAIN (wooden propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 135', 438 gt, built in 1870 at Cleveland) was carrying passengers, merchandise and horses on Lake Michigan when an engine room lamp exploded. The fire spread so quickly that the pumps could not be started. She headed for Fisherman's Island, Grand Traverse Bay, Lake Michigan, but struck a bar and sank a mile short of the beach. 22 of the 57 persons aboard died, most from drowning. Although initially declared a total loss, the hull was towed into Harbor Springs, Michigan, then taken to Milwaukee, Wisconsin and rebuilt as CITY OF CHARLEVOIX. She was also lengthened to 165'. She lasted until 1924 when she burned at her lay-up dock in Manistee, Michigan. At that time, she was named KANSAS.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Future of the Windoc

06/15
The hull of the Windoc is expected to be towed to Montreal or Quebec by her new owners Groupe Ocean in the next two weeks. Groupe Ocean is examining three possible uses for the hull. One would be conversion to a tug and barge combination with a notch at the stern, next would see use as a storage barge and finally they could sell the hull for scrap.

Groupe Ocean owns a dry dock in Quebec and a subsidiary of the company is McAllister Towing. With the range of services available to the company many believe the hull will be converted to a barge.

Last summer the Windoc was struck by a bridge in the Welland Canal. The damage from the accident and resulting fire effectively ended the vessel's career as a powered vessel. It has been dock in Hamilton since the accident.

Reported by: Kent Malo




Everlast & McLeod Together Again

06/15
The tug Everlast and barge Norman McLeod are expected to depart Hamilton this morning. The pair have been at McKeil Dock finishing minor repairs. The Everlast had been out of service after two crankcase explosions damaged her engines.

The vessel remained in Sarnia under going engine repairs for almost three months. The lengthily repairs were reported to be caused by a parts delay that came from over seas. The barge Norman McLeod continued to work, pushed by other tugs.

Reported by: Wally Wallace




Mississagi Visits Saginaw

06/15
The Mississagi was inbound the Saginaw River passing the Front Range around 4:40 a.m. She stopped in Essexville to lighter at the Sand & Stone Dock before continuing upriver to finish at the Bay City Wirt dock. Mississagi then turned at the Bay City Wirt Turning Basin and was outbound for the lake at 12:20 p.m.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Mississagi beginning to swing her stern upriver.
Across the Saginaw River.
Continuing her swing.
Nose into shore.
Stern coming around.
Backing away from shore.
Using the bow thruster.
Into the shipping channel.
Stern view downbound approaching Independence Bridge.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Challenger Loads

06/15
The Southdown Challenger arrived in Charlevoix at about 1:00 p.m. Friday to load cement destined for Cleveland and Detroit. The Challenger is due in again on Wednesday, June 19.

Loading in Charlevoix.
View forward on deck.
View aft.

Reported by: Dustin Sadowski




Maritime Visitor Center Welcomes 12 Millionth

06/15
The Corps of Engineers' Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center in Duluth welcomed its 12 millionth visitor on Friday, June 7th.The visitor center opened in 1973 right at the Duluth Ship Canal on the shore of Lake Superior, the perfect spot for boatwatching with the Aerial Bridge and 3 lighthouses, too. The visitor center is a free service of the Detroit District, Corps of Engineers, and open every day now thru the end of September, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Reported by: Thom Holden




Soo Locks Cruise

06/15
Friday, June 28 is Engineers Day at the Soo Locks. On Engineers Day the US Army Corps of Engineers opens the area between the MacArthur and Poe Locks to the public and the ground floor of the Administration Building is open for tours. On Saturday, June 29 a special "Freighter Chasing Cruise" will depart from Soo, Canada aboard the Chief Shingwauk. Time is running out if you would like to reserve your ticket for the cruise.

  • Departing at 6:00 p.m. sharp from the Roberta Bondar Dock in Sault, Canada and it will be returning at approximately at 9:00 p.m.
  • Cost is only $16.00 U.S. funds or $23.00 Canadian per person. This will include passage onboard for three hours as well as food .
  • Our route for this cruise will take us where ever the ships are. We will pass through the Soo Locks and the St. Marys River chasing freighters.

    For those wishing to be take the cruise, please send a check or money order payable to :
    Lock Tours Canada Boat Cruises
    Roberta Bondar Park Dock, P.O. Box 325,
    Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada.
    P6A 5L8

Order by phone: 877-226-3665 Please have your credit card number ready.

A boarding ticket will be mailed to you, so please ensure the return address is correct. Space is limited to the first 150 persons.

Please feel free to e-mail any questions to: Capt. John M. Chomniak
General Manager
Lock Tours Canada Boat Cruises

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Today in Great Lakes History - June 15

On June 15, 1943, the D.M. Clemson collided with and sank the George M. Humphrey in the Straits of Mackinac. Both of these 600-footers recovered for long careers. The D.M. Clemson was sold for scrap in 1980. The George M. Humphrey was recovered over a year later, renamed the Captain John Roen, later converted to a self-unloader, and finished her career as the Consumers Power at the end of the 1985 season before being scrapped in 1988.

In 1972, the Roger Blough entered service on her maiden voyage, departing Lorain, Ohio for Two Harbors, Minnesota to load ore. She was nearly a year late because of a fire in her engine room.

1989 Roger M. Kyes rechristened Adam E. Cornelius.

The wooden 180' schooner JOHN A. FRANCOMB was launched at W. Bay City, Michigan on 15 June 1889. She was built by F. W. Wheeler (hull #61). She lasted until she was abandoned at Bay City in 1934.

GRECIAN (steel propeller freighter, 296', 2348 gt, built 1891 at Cleveland, Ohio) had struck a rock near Detour, Michigan on 7 June 1906, but made dock at Detour before settling on bottom.. After her cargo was removed, she was raised, and while in towed by her fleet mate SIR HENRY BESSEMER, bound for Detroit Shipbuilding Co. in Ecorse, Michigan for repairs, relying on air pressure in her sealed holds kept her afloat. However, on 15 June 1906, her holds began to fill with water and she sank in Lake Huron off Thunder Bay. Her crew was rescued by SIR HENRY BESSEMER.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Busy Day in Buffalo

06/14
The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons, barge Metis and tug Salvor and Kinsman Independent were all in port unloading Thursday.

About 6:00 a.m. the tug Washington met the Independent in the Buffalo harbor entrance and guided it into Buffalo harbor, on its way upriver with grain from Superior. The Salvor and Metis were unloading powdered cement from Clarkson at St. Lawrence Cement Plant on the Union Ship Canal.

The Buffalo Industrial Diving Corp. will be conducting blasting operations in the Buffalo River at the new Naval Park Basin from now until July 2. The tugs Westwind and Ruby will be handling the barges and scows while the underwater work is underway. They have also set up a containment boom in the river to prevent silt from leaving the dredge area.

Metis unloading. Dan Sweeley
Another view. Jeff Thoreson
McKee Sons unloading. Dan Sweeley
Independent and Washington pass the lighthouse. Jeff Thoreson
Closer View. Jeff Thoreson
The Washington gets pushed by the Independent. Jeff Thoreson
Crew members open the hatch covers. Jeff Thoreson
Stern View of the Independent and Washington as they make their way upriver. Jeff Thoreson

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski, Jeff Thoreson and Dan Sweeley




Small Boat Burns

06/14
Two boaters were rescued Wednesday evening after their boat caught fire in Marquette harbor. A crew from Coast Guard Station Marquette and a good samaritan pulled Michael Hains and James Ogle, both from Marquette, from the water.

The American Mariner spotted a 24-foot boat named Grey Ghost 4 on fire and reported it to the Coast Guard.

Station Marquette responded with its 30-foot rescue boat and pulled one of the men from the water. A good samaritan pulled the other out of the water. The boat burned to the waterline and sank. The two victims were transported to Marquette General Hospital.

Reported by: Brian Kloosterman




Marquette Update

06/14
The Algolake waited while the Lee A. Tregurtha unloaded coal at Marquette's upper harbor Thursday. Then the Lee A. moved to the north side of the dock and the Algolake took her place on the south side and began unloading.

Algolake waiting to unload.
Lee A. Tregurtha unloading.
Algolake and Lee A.
Algolake unloading.
Close up.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Toledo News

06/14
The Algocen was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator Thursday. The James A. Hannah with her barge was at the B-P Dock loading cargo. The Federal Bergon was unloading cargo at the T.W.I. Dock. There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

The American Republic remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing survey/repairs. The Courtney Burton is fitting out (wheelhouse windows are now unboarded, and is taking on water ballast) at the CSX Dock and should be out sailing by the end of this week.

There were no coal or ore vessels in port for Thursday. The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Adam E. Cornelius, McKee Sons, and John G. Munson on Friday, followed by the American Mariner on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the H. Lee White on Sunday.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
George M. Steinbrenner, and Charles C. West at the C&O Docks "Frog Pond" area awaiting there fate with the scrap yard.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Conneaut Update

06/14
The Edwin H. Gott and CSL Niagara were in Conneaut on Thursday. The Gott arrived at 7:30 a.m. to unload 58,000 tons of pellets from Two Harbors, while the CSL Niagara arrived from Nanticoke to load 30,000 tons of coal for Hamilton at 11:30 a.m. The Earl Oglebay was due to make the short trip from Cleveland to Conneaut, scheduled to arrive at 9:00 p.m. to load for Charlevoix.

The Jean Parisien arrived at Ashtabula at about the same time the Niagara arrived Conneaut. The Parisien was to load coal at the N&S Coal Dock. The Reserve was due Ashtabula at midnight to unload taconite from Silver Bay, Wisconsin.

Gott unloading.
Close Up.
Stern View.
Niagara loads.
Stern View .

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Hamilton News

06/14
Wednesday the Atlantic Erie was unloading iron ore pellets from Duluth at Stelco. That evening, she is moored at the north end of Stelco's iron ore dock being loaded with mill scale.

Two salties, the Spar Garnet and the Yarmouth with cargoes of steel products were anchored in the harbor. Another saltie, the Federal Yukon was moored at Pier 23 unloading steel products.

The tug Everlast has been moored at McKeil Marine's yard since Monday.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Toronto Dry Dock

06/14
The mega yacht Valkyie, registered in George Town, Cayman Islands, went on Toronto Drydock Wednesday after the schooner Alison Lake was refloated. Valkyrie was built last year by Crescent Yachts, Victoria, B.C. for a reported $12 million dollars (US). She struck an obstruction in the Seaway and had to have a propeller repaired. Fortunately, she carries a spare for just such an occasion. Valkyrie was refloated Thursday afternoon.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Seaway Traffic

06/14
Below are images of traffic passing Brockville, Ontario Thursday.

Federal Welland.
Close up of bow.
Kapitonas Stulpinas.
McCleary's Spirit.
Close up.
Stern view.
Barge Ocean Hauler.
Close up.

Reported by: Peter Carter




Westcott II Heads South

06/14
Last Saturday the Detroit Mail Boat J.W. Westcott II headed south to Grosse Ile in the lower Detroit River. This will be the farthest down river for the boat since 1949. The Westcott II visit the Ford Yacht Club for the opening of the island ceremony.

Downbound in the Detroit River.
Passing the Indiana Harbor.
The newly christened USACE tug Demolen at the Detroit USACE dock.
The new saltie Bluewing unloading at the former McClouth Steel plant in Trenton.
Coast guard RHI along side.
Stern view.
Approaching the Swing Bridge to Grosse Ile.
Haeding for the Ford Yacht Club.
Docked at the yacht club.
Ceremony at the club.
We depart leading a parade of about 30 boats.
Detroit Fireboat Curtis Randolph anchored of the yacht club.
On our return the Randolph powers its fire monitors.
Another view.
Returning to the yacht club.
Old anchor on display.
Plaque explaining the anchor's history.
We head back up river and find the John D. Leitch loading salt in Windsor.
Close up of the new hull.
Boom swung out over the river to clear the decks for loading.
View under the boom.
Close up of the bow.
"Canadian Century" is still visible under new name.
Bow view as we continue up river.
Dave Tozer at the wheel with Capt. Sam Buchanan.
New name boards on the Westcott II.
Returning to the Westcott Co. Station.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Today in Great Lakes History - June 14

Roger Blough departed the shipyard light on her maiden voyage the night of June 14, 1972 for Two Harbors, MN to load 41,608 gross tons of taconite ore pellets.

On June 14, 1988, Consumers Power, with her former fleet mate John T. Hutchinson, departed Lauzon in tow of the Panamanian tug/supply ship Omega 809, bound for the scrap yard in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

The steamer PRINCESS was sold to Little and Fitzgerald on 14 June 1873. She was built in 1858 at Algonac, Michigan by Z. Pangborn.

The wooden scow TINKER was launched at Leighton & Dunford's yard in Port Huron, Michigan on 14 June 1876.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Vandoc Scrap Tow Arrives

06/13
The tug Reliance cleared the MacArthur Lock downbound at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday after placing the Vandoc at the Purvis west property near Algoma Steel. The former Algoma Central vessel Sir Denys Lowson has come home for the last time.

The Adanac met the tow at Gros Cap to assist it down the St. Marys River. The tug Scott Purvis met the tow at the export dock at Algoma Steel to help with the docking of the Vandoc at around 11:00 am.

The vessel is expected to be scrapped with the steel heading directly to the furnaces at Algoma.

Tow departing Thunder Bay. Rob Farrow
As the Sir Denys Lowson. Photo taken in August, 1981. She was heading into the Mac Lock after leaving Algoma Steel. Roger LeLievre
Vandoc in 1987. Ron & Jason LaDue


Reported by: Jerry Masson and Scott McLellan




Rare Transit in Buffalo

06/13
The Union Ship Canal on the Lackawanna/Buffalo border received its first deep draft cargo vessel in 10 years Wednesday evening. The tug Salvor and cement barge Metis came in the South Entrance around 7:00 p.m. to tie up at the old St. Lawrence Cement Plant on Rt. 5. The tug and barge were expected to remain at the dock for about 24 hours.

The last cargo carrier to use the Union Slip was the tug Petite Forte and barge Clarkson Carrier in the early 90's when the plant was owned by Independent Cement. The marine unloading facilities were maintained in working condition in the advent that waterborne transportation would become viable in the future and it looks like that time has come.

Since the 90's the Buffalo operation has been supplied by truck from the plant in Clarkson, Ontario. At one time there was a large cement making factory and bagging operation in port with integrated marine, rail, and truck transport facilities.

The processing operations and all their buildings have since been shut down and demolished but a large storage elevator remains, along with some older, architecturally significant silos.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski and Jimmy Sprunt




Barge Sinks

06/13
Last Thursday a spud barge owned by McMullen and Pitz Co of Manitowoc, WI sank in the Menominee River at the Marinette Marine Co Dock. The barge had a large excavator onboard that was being used for dredging. The exact cause of the sinking is still under investigation by the Coast Guard and crews have pollution containment booms set up around the barge.

McMullen and Pitz has been doing dredging and dock work at Marinette Marine since early April. Sunday morning the tug Kurt Luedtke and derrick barge #16 arrived in Marinette to lift the excavator and crane from the bottom of the river.

Crews set up the crane and lines at Marinette Fuel and Dock and then went up river to Marinette Marine Sunday afternoon. By 5:00 p.m. the excavator had been pulled from the river, while the barge remained on the bottom.

By Tuesday afternoon crews had pulled the barge to the surface and made some repairs to keep the barge afloat in the river. The Tug Kurt Luedtke and derrick barge #16 were outbound the Menominee River about 6:30 p.m. Tuesday evening heading back to Frankfort MI.

Crews prepare lines at Marinette Fuel and Dock for the lift Sunday afternoon.
Kurt Luedtke derrick barge #16 preparing to head through the Ogden Street Bridge.
Preparing to lift the excavator from river at Marinette Marine dock.
Excavator that was pulled from the river .
Cranes working to lift the barge from river Tuesday afternoon.

Reported by: Scott Best




Coal Trade Up Again In May

06/13
Coal loadings at Great Lakes ports totaled 4.6 million net tons in May, an increase of 4.3 percent compared to a year ago. The May total also represents the second straight month in which the coal trade has outperformed last year. As a result, the season-to-date total now represents a slight increase over 2001.

Cargos of western coal were down 10.5 percent in May and for the season are slightly behind last year's pace. A major Michigan utility has reduced its orders for western coal this season to reduce stockpiles. Coal loadings at Lake Erie ports increased 14.4 percent in May and for the season are 3.1 percent ahead of last year's pace. The upturn reflects increased shipments of metallurgical coal to a Michigan steelmaker and the fact that some users of steam coal have advanced delivers in case last season's coal availability problems resurface.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Lighthouse plan launched at Point Betsie

06/13
Secretary of the Interior Gail Norton was in Frankfort, Mich., on Tuesday to launch the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Program.

The Coast Guard is preparing to dispose of hundreds of lighthouses and range lights around the country. The expense of maintaining the structures and the advent of electronic navigation devices such as the Global Positioning System, makes many of the lighthouses unnecessary.

Many of the lights slated for disposal are around the Great Lakes. Most are in Michigan, where 70 of 100 lights are expected to be offered for sale to governments and organizations and, possibly, individuals.

At her appearance in Michigan, Norton signed an agreement to move the Munising Range Light a few miles east to Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. The act also covers a lighthouse that will be moved in Maine.

"Historical lighthouses like Munising ... are national treasures," she said. "This program recognizes the cultural, recreational and educational value of these structures by transferring them to the best possible stewards, both public and private, for long-term restoration."

Four other lighthouses will be moved: two in New York, one in Georgia and one in Florida. Norton said the Lighthouse Preservation Program committee is considering moving two more Michigan lighthouses - the Cheboygan River Range Front Light, built in 1880, and the Sturgeon Point Light, built in 1869.

"We evaluate applications (for lighthouses) to make sure that the organizations requesting them can afford to preserve their history," Norton said. "We are recommending the transfer of 300 lighthouses ... to whomever, public or private, can care for them in the long term."

Norton said Point Betsie Lighthouse, built in 1858, may be in the second round of lighthouses that they evaluate. Benzie County Commissioner Chairwoman Mary Pitcher said the county is interested in purchasing the light, which is automated but houses Coast Guard families stationed in nearby Frankfort. "We are currently working hard to acquire, preserve and protect this landmark for future generations," she said.

Pitcher said the county is looking into the cost of owning the historic lighthouse. "Benzie County is conducting a feasibility study with a historic architectural firm to determine what needs to be accomplished to restore and rehabilitate the light station," she said. "We are determining sources of potential revenue for future operations, maintenance and capital improvements."

"This will aid us in determining the scope of the county's involvement in the future of Point Betsie and what organization will be required to operate the lighthouse locally."

Reported by: Al Miller




Duluth Workboat Report

06/13
Work on the 1908 tug Essayons is nearly complete, the tug has undergone a total rebuild into a live-a-board. She may be put into service as a bed & breakfast near bay front in Duluth.

The tug Seneca has received a fresh coat of paint, in the new colors of the Zenith Tugboat Company.

Marine Tech's crane barge NO.1 has been rebuilt, painted and renamed Alton Andrew. She is working on a project at the Coast Guard station in Duluth.

Scrapping has begun on the historical 1916 stream dipper dredge Col. D.D. Gaillard at Barkers Island. The dredge has been land locked and on display since the mid-1980's. Billington Contracting is dismantling the vessel and will be saving the hull and spuds for use as a barge. The "slip" will be dug out and the hull will be pulled out with a tug later in the year.

Tug Seneca underway in the Duluth harbor showing off her new paint scheme.
Passing.
Stern view.
Tug Oatka with the Seneca (in old paint) and bumboat Marine Supplier at N.P. #2 dock.
1908-built iron tug Mount McKay chugging out of N.P. #2.
1929 grocery launch DONA ashore at N.P. #2.
Alan Luedtke, former Corps tug Two Rivers, laid up at Frankfort, but still looking sharp.
Two Rivers in better days, she has just arrived with a fresh scow for the dipper Col. D.D. Gaillard while dredging Milwaukee in 1966.
Tug Alex C. with her stern sunk at New Bedford, Mass. She is one of many, retired and abandoned, half sunk along the river banks.
Tug Essayons getting a paint job and finishing touches at N.P. #2.

Reported by: Franz VonRiedel




Marquette News

06/13
A pleasure boat exploded and burned in Marquette's upper harbor Wednesday. The crew onboard the American Mariner immediately called the Coast Guard for help.

Two men on the pleasure craft leaped into the water and were rescued by a local fisherman and the Coast Guard.

The Herbert C. Jackson was unloading coal at the time, while the American Mariner was tied up on the North side of the dock waiting for the Jackson to finish. Then the two ships traded spots at the ore dock and the American Mariner began loading taconite.

The pleasure craft continued burning for about an hour, closely watched by the Coast Guard, and could be seen beyond the stern of both ships.

The H. Lee White was also in port unloading stone at Marquette's Shiras steam plant dock. Decks hands must look forward to trips to this dock, ships unloading there use a pick-up truck to pull their cables to tie up.

The crane barge Schwartz and tug Bill Maier continued work on the lower harbor break wall.

Pictures by Lee Rowe
Burning pleasure craft.
Herbert C. Jackson unloads.
American Mariner waits for the Jackson to clear.
American Mariner loading.
Bow view of Mariner and Jackson.
View from the North side of the dock.
H. Lee White arrives.
Truck pulls the cables.
Work on the break wall.

Reported by: Lee Rowe and Art Pickering




Saginaw News

06/13
The tug Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity were outbound the Saginaw River Wednesday morning passing through Bay City around 8:30 a.m. She had unloaded cement at the Lafarge Terminal in Carrollton.

The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder was inbound passing the Pump-out Island around 11:30 a.m. She went upriver to the Sargent Dock in Saginaw to unload. The pair completed the unload and were outbound at the Independence Bridge in Bay City around 10:00 p.m.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Jacklyn M./Integrity downbound at Bay City Wirt.
Stern view clear of Independence Bridge.
Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder upbound at Vet's Park.
Close up.
Stern View at Bay Aggregates.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Port Huron Traffic

06/13
Algowood upbound.
Stern view as the sun rises.
Pineglen downbound.
Close up.
Algorail downbound.
CSl Tadoussac upbound.
Canadian Leader downbound under the Blue Water Bridges.
Blue Water Bridges.

Reported by: Clayton Sharrard




Toledo News

06/13
The Algocen was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The Algosteel was loading coal at the CSX Docks. There are no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

The American Republic remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing survey/repairs. The Joseph H. Frantz, tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge, and the Saturn remain in lay-up at there respective dock sites.

The Courtney Burton is fitting out at the CSX Docks and is expected to sail by the end of this week.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Adam E. Cornelius, McKee Sons, and John G. Munson on Friday. The American Mariner on Saturday, followed by the Algosteel on Monday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the H. Lee White on Sunday.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Frank Purnell in Columbia colors unloading salt at the salt dock in downtown Toledo. In 1974 she was renamed Robert C. Norton (2).

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Highlander Sea Arrives Sunday

06/13
The vintage gaff topsail schooner Highlander Sea will arrive in Port Huron on Sunday, June 16. The public is encouraged to visit the Port Huron Seaway Terminal from 2-5 p.m. and welcome the vessel to her new homeport.

“Everyone is so excited about this tall ship,” said Acheson Ventures’ spokeman, Paul Maxwell. “From Jim and Sue Acheson, to the team at Acheson Ventures, to the little kids and grandmothers in Port Huron and beyond, we can hardly wait!” he said.

While waiting is what they have been doing since Acheson Ventures purchased the ship in April 2002, the momentum has been building. While the ship underwent the final stage of a multi-stage refit in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia this spring, the Acheson Ventures team had the ship repatriated the ship as a US flag vessel, ironed out insurance issues, and hired a marketing director to coordinate the ship’s programming.

“We want to do it right,” said Mr. Maxwell, referring to the time and effort involved in getting the ship here. “Highlander Sea will be the goodwill ambassador and flagship for Port Huron and this community has every right to be excited,” he said.

Highlander Sea departed Lunenburg, Nova Scotia on May 31, to journey up the St. Lawrence, though the Great Lakes to Port Huron. Yesterday the ship was in St. Catharines, Ontario. She was expected to proceed though the Welland Canal this morning and depart Port Colborne after an overnight stop Friday morning. There will be no shipboard tours on arrival day as the ship will be clearing customs and immigration upon arrival, and the crew will have been sailed all night,. The public is invited to view her stately lines from the Terminal dock and Pavilion overlook deck. Shipboard tours will commence the following week. Call Acheson Ventures’ events line for the onboard tour schedule: 810/966-8811. The Port Huron Seaway Terminal is located at 2336, Military Street in Port Huron. Parking is free.

Reported by: Acheson Ventures




Gap In U.S.-Flag Carriage Not So Great In May

06/13
The major U.S.-Flag Great Lakes carriers moved 10.9 million net tons of dry-bulk cargo in May, a decrease of 9.4 percent compared to a year ago. However, that decrease does represent an improvement of sorts. In April, U.S.-Flag carriage was down nearly 20 percent compared to the corresponding period in 2001. For the season, U.S.-Flag carriage stands at 21.2 million net tons, a decrease of 15.5 percent.

Iron ore cargos for the steel industry continued their long slump in May. Loadings totaled 4.9 million net tons, a decrease of 16.4 percent. For the season, U.S.-Flag iron ore cargos total 9.8 million tons, a decrease of 27.4 percent. One bright spot was the revival of the Lorain/Cleveland iron ore "shuttle." The trade resumed on May 23 when the EARL W. OGLEBAY (Oglebay Norton Marine Services Company) loaded 15,762 net tons (14,073 gross tons) of iron ore pellets for delivery to ISG's Cleveland Works. The shuttle had been inactive since shortly before the closure of LTV Steel. (Since the steel mill in Cleveland is located at the end of the commercial section of the twisting and confined Cuyahoga River, it cannot be served by the largest vessels in the fleet. Starting in 1981, 1,000-footers have been delivering iron ore to LTV's Pellet Terminal at the mouth of the Black River in Lorain. The cargo is then reloaded into vessels small enough to transit the Cuyahoga. To better serve ISG, the boat loader in Lorain will be moved to Cleveland Bulk Terminal before the beginning of the next navigation season, so this is likely the last season for the shuttle.)

Coal cargos in U.S. bottoms were essentially unchanged in May, and are holding even for the season. Shipments of western coal are off by nearly 12 percent, the result of a cutback at a major Michigan utility. On the other hand, loadings at Lake Erie ports are up by 41 percent. A Detroit-area steel mill has increased its take of metallurgical coal and a number of small consumers of steam coal have opted to advance some delivers in the event last season's coal availability problems resurface.

Limestone loadings in U.S.-Flag lakers totaled 3,146,535 net tons in May, a decrease of 2.5 percent. Since the resumption of the stone trade in late March, U.S.-Flag cargos stand at 5.6 million tons, an increase of one cargo in a mid-sized self-unloader.

Of the other cargos the fleet carries, cement again registered a significant decrease in May - 16.3 percent. A wet spring and a generally sluggish construction industry have produced a season-to-date decrease of 15 percent..

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Tug Race June 22

06/13
Saturday June 22 is the International Freedom Festival Tug Boat Race on the Detroit River. Starting at 1:00 p.m., tugs line up below the Ambassador Bridge and finish off Dieppe Park in Windsor. The best viewing spot for spectators is from the Windsor water front.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 13

On June 13, 1983, the John B. Aird began its maiden voyage, a load of coal from Thunder Bay to Nanticoke, Ontario.

The IRVING S. OLDS carried a then-record 17,817 gross tons of iron ore on June 13, 1943 from Lake Superior and transported a total of 736,800 short tons of various bulk cargoes the next year.

On the morning of June 13, 1905 running downbound on Lake Superior, the heavily laden SYLVANIA encountered heavy fog as she approached the Soo. Confused whistle signals resulted in the SYLVANIA glancing off the Pittsburgh S.S. steamer SIR HENRY BESSEMER which sustained a 175 foot port side gash from the SYLVANIA's anchor. The BESSEMER required $40,000 in repairs and the SYLVANIA's damages totaled $10,000 which included a new anchor and shell plating which was completed at the Craig Shipbuilding Co., Toledo, OH.

June 13, 1930 - Shortly after leaving Menominee, fireman Walter O'Leary of the ANN ARBOR NO. 7 became ill. The carferry proceeded at full speed to the nearest doctor at Sturgeon Bay, where surgery was performed to remove gall stones.

June 13, 1974 - The CITY OF GREEN BAY (formerly WABASH) was sold to Marine Salvage Company to be scrapped.

On 13 June 1903, CHARLES H. DAVIS (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 145', 391 gt, built in 1881 at Saginaw) was carrying limestone on Lake Erie off Cleveland when she developed a leak which quickly got worse and admitted water faster than her pumps capacity. She sank near the Cleveland breakwater. She was an unusual vessel, reportedly built of pine and pointed at both ends with her planking set diagonally.

Data from: Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Manitoulin Heads for Turkey

06/12
Tuesday morning the tugs Omni St. Laurent and Advantage took the Manitoulin from Slip 18 in the Richelieu River beginning her final journey to the scrapper’s torch in Turkey. At 9:30 a.m. the tugs pulled the vessel into the St. Lawrence River where the Russian tug Akhtiar took the tow from the bow. With the Advantage on the stern the tow departed Sorel at 12:30 p.m. headed for the Atlantic Ocean. Another grand lady departs the shipping scene under grey skies and heavy hearts.

The Manitoulin will be scrapped by Donmez Metals of Izmir, Turkey. The tug Akhtiar will tow the vessel for breaking at either Izmir or Antalya, Turkey.

Pictures by Michel Berube
Akhtiar powers up.
Omni St. Laurent waiting on the bow.
Taking up slack.
Tow departing.
Moving in the Richelieu River.
Advantage guiding the stern out.
Akhtiar along side Tuesday morning. André Cournoyer

Reported by: Andre Guevremont, Kent Malo and Brian McCaughrin




Bell Returned

06/12
The bell from Vandoc has been returned to N. M. Paterson & Sons. The large silver bell with the inscription "Sir Denys Lowson" on it, was turned into the Thunder Bay Police Station. It had been stored in a basement.

This follows Paterson's plea on Crime Stoppers for the return of the bells. Paterson is pleased that the bell has been returned and hold high hopes that the bell from the Quedoc inscribed "Beavercliffe Hall", will also be returned.

Crime Stoppers will pay up to $1,000 for information that leads to the recovery of the bell. Crime Stoppers anonymous tip line 800-222-8477.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Lakes Limestone Trade Remains Sluggish In May

06/12
Shipments of limestone from U.S. and Canadian ports on the Great Lakes totaled 4.2 million net tons in May, a decrease of 3.4 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. Demand from the construction industry remains sluggish. On a season-to-date basis, shipments stand at 7.6 million net tons, a decrease of 3.1 percent. The end-of-May total also reflects the fact that while steel production has resumed in Cleveland, fluxstone deliveries to ISG have yet to resume.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Goderich News

06/12
Residents of Goderich were treated Saturday afternoon to watching the Oakglen back into the harbor with the help of three tugs. While in port crews were painting the CSL flag on her bow. She unloaded grain at both elevators and then departed early Tuesday morning.

The Peter R. Cresswell was loading at the salt mine on Sunday and the Algoway loaded on Monday. The Cresswell is headed to Bowmanville, Ontario to unload while the Algoway will take her cargo of salt to Chicago, Illinois.

Reported by: Lisa Stuparyk




Saginaw News

06/12
The Wilfred Sykes was inbound the Saginaw River Tuesday morning, passing the Pump-Out Island around 10:30 a.m. with a split load for Bay City and Saginaw. The Sykes lightered at the Bay City Wirt Dock before departing at 3:10 p.m. for the Wirt Saginaw Dock to finish. She was expected to be outbound early Wednesday morning.

The Tug Joseph Thompson, Jr. and Barge Joseph H. Thompson were inbound passing the Saginaw River Front Range at 4:35 p.m. The pair was headed up to the Bay Aggregates Dock in Downtown Bay City. She unloaded through the evening hours and expected to depart around 1:30 a.m. for the Airport Turning Basin.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Wilfred Sykes upbound passing the old Rupp Oil Dock.
Close Up.
Passing through Independence Bridge.
Stern View.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Toledo News

06/11
The Algocen was at Andersons "K" Elevator loading grain. The American Republic remains in drydock undergoing survey/repairs. The Courtney Burton is fitting out at the CSX Docks and is expected to sail by the end of this week.

The Joseph H. Frantz, tug Mary E. Hannah and her barge, and the Saturn remain in lay-up at there respective dock sites. There was an unidentified salt water ship and an Andrie tug/barge unit at the T.W.I. Dock. There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel on Weds. The Adam E. Cornelius, McKee Sons, and John G. Munson on Friday. The American Mariner on Saturday followed by the Armco on Sunday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the H. Lee White on Sunday.

Cason J. Callaway headed upbound the Maumee River as a straight decker loaded with ore. She will be heading for the old Cargill grain elevator for temporary lay-up due to a strike called for by the various sailors unions during 1982. She will spend several weeks in layup at this dock site.
Vandoc at the City Docks. She is waiting here as all three grain elevators upriver have ship traffic loading at them. As soon as her dock becomes vacant she will proceed upriver to load grain. Earlier in her career the vessel sailed for the Algoma Central Fleet as the Sir Denys Lowson.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto Report

06/12
Canadian Mariner came into port in ballast Tuesday morning and tied up at Pier 35, after which she pumped her ballast tanks. This may be a temporary lay-up. The vessel is expected to enter Port Weller Dry Docks for her 5-year inspection later this summer.

The tour boat Pioneer Queen was relaunched on Monday afternoon and she returned to her harbor berth. She had been ashore at the Atlas crane getting a keel cooling system installed.

The schooner Alison Lake will be refloated at the Toronto Drydock later this week.

Reported by: Gerry O.




New Discussion Boards

06/12
To better handle traffic to the discussion areas of this site two new boards have been added. The latest is a board dedicated to Industry Issues and meant to be used by those working in the shipping industry. Click here to view

The other is a Regional Discussion Board for off topic and regional discussion that did not fit on the Information Search board.

The Information Search Page is the original board and dedicated to shipping questions & answers and less personal discussion.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 12

"STUBBY", The bow and stern sections of the STEWART J. CORT welded together passed Port Colborne, Ont. on June 12, 1970 bound for Erie, PA under her own power. STUBBY's bow and stern sections were later separated at Erie Marine, Inc., a Div. of Litton, and joined to the 816 foot hull mid-body.

The NANTICOKE departed Collingwood in 1980 starting her maiden voyage.

In 1959 the BENSON FORD ran aground in the Amherstburg Channel on her upbound trip with coal for the Rouge Plant. After five days of lightering and with tug assistance, she was freed. Damages amounted to 41 bottom plates which took 30 days to repair.

On 12 June 1832, the wooden schooner GUERRIER was sailing from Oswego for Detroit when she capsized in a squall off Bar Point on Lake Erie. Captain Pember and the crew and most of the passengers made it to the Canadian shore, but one family was trapped in the cabin. The husband was able to keep his head above water in the upside down cabin, but through the night, one by one, his four children and then his wife slipped from his grasp and perished. The following day, Capt. Stanard took his steamer NIAGARA to the wreck and rescued the man.

One hundred years ago, 12 June 1900, the steel tow barge BRYN MAWR was launched at South Chicago for the Pittsburgh Steamship Company.

The wooden propeller freighter MILWAUKEE (264', 1770 gt) was launched at Quayle & Sons yard in Cleveland, Ohio on 12 June 1879 for the Western Transportation Company of Buffalo. She had supporting arches above decks. In 1902, she was renamed YONKERS and rebuilt as a barge in 1911. She lasted until 1917-1918 when she stranded, then burned.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Vandoc Tow Departs

06/11
About 11:00 a.m. Monday Purvis Marine Crews put the finishing touches to the Vandoc tow and she was ready to depart. The local Thunder Bay Marine Services tug, Point Valour, took up position at the Stern of the Vandoc and the Purvis Marine Tug, Reliance was on the bow. The Point Valour led the way down the river as the Reliance was slowly pulled backwards off the bow of the Vandoc.

This allowed her to control the vessel's bow in the tight confines of the river. As the tow reached the junction of the Kaministiquia and Mission Rivers, they were greeted by a handful of dedicated boatnerds standing on the bank just in front of the old CSL boat Saguenay. This small group included one of her former Shipkeepers.

The tugs maneuvered the Vandoc around about 100 degrees, so that the bow now faced down the Mission River. The big tug Reliance took over and picked up speed. The trio were now moving at a good speed with the Point Valour worked the stern. They continued on past Valley Camp were many of its former visitors have now also gone to scrap.

As they cleared the Mission River Entrance around 1:30 p.m., the Vandoc took on a new look. One that hadn't been seen in over 10 years. She was on open water and sailing proudly, almost like the good old days. As she sailed out past the Welcome islands, attention now turned back to her fleet mate still sitting at the Paterson dock and now very much by herself. When will it be her turn to make that last one way voyage into history.

Vandoc awaiting fate.
Reliance coming up river.
Reliance arrives.
Reliance pulls herself towards Vandoc.
Reliance along side.
Tied up for the night.
Crew gets to work immediately.
Vandoc's last look at her fleet mate.
Reliance tied up to Vandoc.
Tow departs with Vandoc being towed backwards past the Atlantic Huron.
Point Valour in the lead as they head down the Kaministiqua River.
Boatnerds gather as Vandoc approaches.
Trio approaches turning basin at Kam and Mission River junction.
Vandoc at turning basin.
Reliance tilts as Vandoc tugs at her.
Reliance starts to turn the Vandoc bow first towards the Mission River.
Point Valour follows suit.
Point Valour pulling Vandoc's stern up river.
Reliance now in lead as the trio heads down the Mission River.
Point Valour rides the stern of the tow.
Making the turn past Valley Camp.
Head on.
Picking up speed as they head for the Mission River piers.
Passing the piers the Point Valour drops her tow.
Point Valour moving up alongside Vandoc as they hit open lake.
Reliance speeds up onto open lake.
Vandoc Sailing again.
Point Valour says goodbye.
Nothing but open lake ahead.
Another view of departing duo.
Goodbye Vandoc.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Cedarglen Under Tow

06/11
The Cedarglen was under tow on the Seaway Monday. The vessel went aground Monday morning about a quarter mile west of the St. Louis Bridge in the Beauharnois Canal. The Bridge experienced a temporary malfunction and in the progress of holding back, the Cedarglen ran aground.

The tugs Ocean Jupiter and Ocean Intrepide were towing the vessel down the Seaway with a possible destination of Montreal for repairs. The Cedarglen was due to unload in Three Rivers, Quebec.

Tugs along side.
Another view.

Reported by: Ron Walsh and Kent Malo




Tug arrives for Manitoulin Scrap tow

06/11
The Russian tug Akhtiar has arrived at Sorel to prepare for the tow of Manitoulin to Turkish ship breakers. The tow is scheduled to leave sometime this week.

The vessel has been in lay-up since December, 2000. More information on the Manitoulin

Reported by: Kent Malo




Corps to submit preliminary plan for enlarging Seaway

06/11
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is expected to soon present a plan outlining the work needed to expand the St. Lawrence Seaway so it could handle larger ships.

Expansion projects would include deepening connecting channels by 10-feet, enlarging the locks on both the St. Lawrence River and the Welland Canal by about 30-feet in width and more than 390-feet in length; and deepening individual American ports to allow for the entry of larger vessels.

The report predicts that expanding the system would increase its cargo tonnage by more than half in 60 years - from 232 million tonnes two years ago to 357 million tonnes in 2060.

The Corps proposal is in its infancy. If approved by headquarters, it will be passed on to Congress seeking endorsement for the next: a five-year, $20 million intensive study, said the report's manager, Wayne Schloop.

Although still only a distant possibility, expansion of the Seaway would be welcome by many Great Lakes ports.

Activity in Toronto's port, for instance, would likely more than double, said Mike Doran, the Toronto Port Authority's director of operations. "We would become a very important port. As would the rest of the ports on the Great Lakes," he said.

When completed in 1959, the St Lawrence Seaway locks already were considered obsolete by many people in the industry because their size could not accommodate many of the world's largest ships. Since then, the number of saltwater ships small enough to use the Seaway has fallen sharply as larger and more economical vessels have taken their place.

"When the Seaway was opened, roughly half the ships in the world could use the system. Today, only about 10 per cent of the fleet can pass through," said Ray Johnston, president of the Chamber of Maritime Commerce in Ottawa. "What's at stake here is the competitiveness of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway system."

Canadian support is vital to any expansion plan because the Welland Canal and much of the St. Lawrence River system is in Canada. A condition of continuing to the feasibility phase is finding a co-sponsor, which the Corps hopes to find in Transport Canada.

The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp., which operates the locks on the river, has already voiced its support and is currently lobbying Transport Canada to put up $10 million toward the project, said Camille Répanier, vice president of strategic and business development for the nonprofit organization.

Even in its early stages, the expansion plan is drawing some opposition from environmental groups, which say enlarging the Seaway would mean dredging away animal habitat and deepening channels would increase the flow of water out of the Great Lakes. Some also are raising the specter of giant tankers visiting the Great Lakes, even though the largest tankers generally are only unloaded at large, offshore terminals and the lakes have little in the way of tanker unloading facilities.

Stephanie Weiss, executive director of Save the River, an American group formed more than 20 years ago, called spending money on a further study "wasteful."

Reported by: Brian Harrison and Joan Baldwin




Shipwreck artifact amnesty runs through July 31

06/11
Divers and other people who possess artifacts illegally taken from Michigan shipwrecks have until July 31 to return them without fear of prosecution under a state amnesty program.

The amnesty period for the returning items taken from shipwrecks started June 1. Once August starts, anyone caught removing or possessing artifacts from Great Lakes shipwrecks -- without the proper permits -- faces up to two years in prison and fines of up to $5,000.

The emphasis on enforcing laws against looting wrecks is aimed at preserving the dive sites for future users, state official’s say.

"We've got a growing recreational activity out there," said Lt. Timothy Burke of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources' enforcement division. "All we're trying to do is make sure we have something available to the next generation so they have something to see down there, too."

"In terms of enforcement, if anybody comes up to me and says, 'Yeah, I've got this item that is worth thousands of dollars,' we're not going to question, we're not going to do any further investigation," Burke told the Oakland Press.

David Lohr, owner of Diver's Den scuba shop in Lake Orion, said divers prefer to visit wrecks that haven't been stripped clean by souvenir hunters.

"That's always the best," he said. "When you go out diving on shipwrecks, and there are artifacts and things like that around, it's always more enjoyable."

Lohr, who started diving in 1969, said he's never seen anyone take an artifact from a shipwreck, but that artifact losses are noticeable over time. "It's got to be the divers who police themselves because the state can't be everywhere," he said.

Although most divers don't take artifacts from wrecks, the dive sites deteriorate over time as a few people make off with "trophies."

"Obviously, there are some big things like bells and nameplates that are really trophies for lack of a better term," Burke told the newspaper. "But there are things like china, any small knickknack that is on a boat is liable to come up missing. If a boat has a kitchen sink, it's liable to come up missing."

The effort to preserve shipwrecks, said Burke, came at the request of the sport diving community.

"They want to go back and see these things," he said. "They don't want to go back and find stripped hulks."

While some divers are looking for artifacts to scavenge, most seem to approach the hulks with a certain amount of reverence, he said.

"More than one diver has referred to these as underwater museums: Look but don't touch," he said.

Reported by: Al Miller




Twin Ports Report

06/11
Saltie traffic in the Twin Ports so far this season seemingly has been feast or famine. Several days may pass with no salties, then suddenly several will show up at once. That was the case June 10, when five salties were in port. Early morning saw Flinterspirit loading at Cargill B1, Alam Sempurna loading at AGP elevator and Lake Charles unloading steel coils at the port terminal, all in Duluth. Over in Superior, Vaasaborg remained at the General Mills S elevator. Moving up St. Louis Bay was Jill C, bound for Hallett 6 to load bentonite. Federal Rhine was expected late in the day for Cenex Harvest States. Also, Reserve pulled into the CLM dock in Superior about mid-morning to begin unloading stone.

Recent changes in the steel industry have brought some uncommon callers to docks in the Twin Ports. The most recent was John J. Boland loading at BNSF in Superior on June 9. Another infrequent visitor will be Lee A. Tregurtha, which is scheduled to arrive June 11 with coal to unload at the CLM dock in Superior. (This dock received a load of coal last season.) After finishing there, the vessel is due to shift to Midwest Energy Terminal to load low-sulfur coal for Marquette. On June 10, the Mesabi Miner paid a rare call at the dock to load.

Reported by: Al Miller




Marquette Report

06/11
The Kaye E. Barker loaded ore at Marquette's upper harbor Sunday. The Corps of Engineers crane barge Schwartz was in Marquette possibly for work on the break walls along with tugs Bill Maier and Fairchild. Two additional barges loaded with stone are tied up there as well.

Kaye E. Barker loading.
Schwartz and Fairchild.
Another view.
Close up of equipment used to place the stone.
Bill Maier.
Kinsman Independent departing Duluth.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Busy day in Owen Sound

06/11
Saturday afternoon found the harbor's east wall busy with two barges unloading. The barge Southdown Conquest and tug Susan W. Hannah came in earlier in the day to unload cement. The Doug McKeil with a fully loaded Ocean Hauler (TMI-96) came into port later in the afternoon with sodium chloride. At the time of the photos, the Ocean Hauler was drawing 19 feet.

Southdown Conquest and Ocean Hauler.
Doug McKeil and Ocean Hauler.
Close up.

Reported by: Torben Hawksbridge




Saginaw News

06/11
The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was inbound the Saginaw River Monday morning passing the Pump-Out Island at 8:30am. She continued to the Consumer's Energy Dock in Essexville to unload coal.

The tug Dorothy Ann & barge Pathfinder were in next, passing the Pump-Out Island at 9:30am. She lightered at the new Bay Aggregates Dock before proceeding upriver to the old Downtown Bay City dock to finish. She was outbound during the early evening hours.

Passing the outbound Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder was the inbound Tug Jacklyn M. & Barge Integrity. The pair was headed upriver to the Lafarge Terminal in Carrollton to unload cement.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. unloading at Consumers Energy.
Another View.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Toledo Update

06/11
The Nanticoke was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading petroleum coke. The CSL Niagara is scheduled to arrive and load coal at the CSX Docks late Monday afternoon. The Algocen, with the Gaelic tugs Susan Hoey and William Hoey assisting, was headed upriver to one of the three grain elevators to load grain. The American Republic remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing survey/repairs. The Courtney Burton is fitting out at the CSX Docks and should be out sailing by the end of the week.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel on Weds. The Adam E. Cornelius, McKee Sons, and John G. Munson on Friday, followed by the American Mariner on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the H. Lee White on Sunday 16 June. The Joseph H. Frantz, tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge and the Saturn remain in lay-up at there respective dock sites.

Classic Views of Toledo Shipping
Fort Henry arriving at the Toledo Warehouse Terminal Dock where she will unload newsprint for the local newspaper Toledo Blade.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto Report

06/11
Sunday Toronto harbor was quite busy, Monday was another story. Malyovitza is already on Lake Erie, Moor Laker is in the Canal upbound and Federal Schelde is downbound on Lake Ontario.

Highlander Sea was in the Canal yesterday. She checked in at 3:00 a.m. She is bound for her new home in Port Huron.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Federal Bergen in Oshawa

06/11
The Federal Bergen arrived in Oshawa on June 5 to unload steel coils and rebar that was originally destined for Toronto. The vessel is expected to depart midweek.

Federal Bergen unloading.
Close up of bow from dock.
Stern view.
View from across the harbor.

Reported by: Jim Gallacher




Welland Canal Traffic

06/11
On Monday the tug Everlast was downbound in the canal above Lock 3 on her way to Hamilton to link up with the barge Norman McLeod after undergoing engine repairs. Also in the system was the salty Elm (ex Polar Queen) at Lock 7 and the tour vessel Niagara Prince was below Lock 1.

Everlast heading to Hamilton.
Stern view.
Elm downbound above Lock 7.
Stern view.
Niagara Prince below Lock 1.
Close up.
Stern view.

Reported by: Alex Howard




Sykes Flying Special Wings Flag

06/11
After hearing about the hockey spirit and rivalry going around on the Boatnerd website and between various ships around the lakes, the Detroit Red Wings Hockey team decided to make their presence known by presenting a flag to be flown on one of the ships.

As the rivalry intensified aboard the Wilfred Sykes between the Captain (a Red Wings Fan) and the First Mate (an Avalanche fan), it was decided that the Sykes would be a good choice to represent the Red Wings and Hockey Town.

The flag was put aboard the ship at Saginaw during the playoffs between Colorado and Hockey town, however the official presentation wasn't made until Sunday at Rouge Steel. The flag was presented to Capt. Ron Brezinski of the Sykes and has been flying proudly from the forward mast since the Colorado-Red Wings Playoffs. Capt. Brezinski reports that various ships have called to give him good natured ribbing about flying the flag, but he hasn't budged in his Hockey Town spirit and the flag is still flying high.

Capt. Ron Brezinski (left) and Wade Streeter prepare to raise the flag.
Flying above the pilothouse.
Bow view at Fort Street.
Inbound through the Jefferson Street Bridge.
Passing under I-75.
Approaching Rouge Steel.
Stern view upbound on the Detroit River.

Reported by: Josh Smithers




Today in Great Lakes History - June 11

ATLANTIC SUPERIOR was float launched in 1982 for Federal Commerce & Navigation Ltd., Montreal, Quebec (Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., mgr.) built for the Caribbean trade.

MESABI MINER was christened at Duluth in 1977, the MESABI MINER became the fourth thousand-foot bulk carrier on the Great Lakes and Interlake's second.

IRVIN L. CLYMER - a) CARL D. BRADLEY (1) cleared Lorain in her gray and white livery, 1917, on her maiden voyage light bound for Calcite, MI to load limestone. She was the first Great Lakes commercial ship equipped with both Morse code telegraphy as well as ship-to--shore radio in 1922, which was standard on only 20 vessels by 1924.

On June 11, 1936 the EDWARD J. BERWIND collided with the AYCLIFFE HALL 16 miles West of Long Point on Lake Erie. The Hall Corp. steamer went to the bottom and was not salvaged.

June 11, 1981 - The BADGER steamed out of Ludington en route to Milwaukee under an MDOT subsidy that was approved earlier in March.

The propeller E. B. HALE was launched at Cleveland at the yard of Quayle & Sons on 11 June 1874. Her length was 217' keel, 227' overall. She was owned by Capt. Bradley, Mr. Thomas Quayle and Mr. Loomis and she cost $100,000.

The wooden rabbit J. S. RUBY was launched at Fair Haven, Michigan on 11 June 1881. Her dimensions were 106'6" x 21' x 7'. She was towed to Port Huron for the installation of her boiler and engine that were built by the Phoenix Iron Works. She lasted until burned to a total loss off Stag Island in the St. Clair River on November 9, 1891.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Vandoc Tow Ready to Depart

06/10
The Purvis tug Reliance, former Atlantic Cedar, arrived in Thunder Bay on Sunday. She passed the Welcome Islands around 10:00 a.m. and tied up to the stern of the Vandoc just after noon.

The crews immediately went to work getting the Vandoc prepared for the tow down to Algoma Steel at Sault Ste. Marie, ON. The tug crews hoped to start the tow Sunday night or Monday morning tomorrow morning.

The Vandoc has been in lay-up at Thunder Bay since the end of the 1991 season. Paterson sold the vessel and the Quedoc to Purvis Marine last month. The vessel is expected to be scrapped at Algoma Steel.

Check back for updates as the tow departs.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Pelee Islander Trials

06/10
The Pelee Islander was scheduled to depart the Welland Dock Sunday morning after her repowering and undergo trials on Lake Erie. Once successful trials are complete the vessel will return to Port Colborne and, after any final adjustments, will return to work serving Pelee Island travelers.

Reported by: Skip Gillham




Marquette Monthly Traffic

06/10
May was a busy month for boatwatchers in Marquette with as many as three ships visiting on some days.

For the month shipping in and out of both harbors increased by 44% compared to May 2001. A total of 49 vessels visited Marquette last month compared to 34 in May 2001. For the season, vessel visits are up by 5% with 91 visits compared to the same time frame in 2001 in which 87 vessels visited Marquette.

The lower harbor broke even with it stats in which 6 vessels visited compared to 6 in May 2001. For season thus far, vessel visits are down by 8% with 11 vessels compared to the same time frame in 2001 in which 12 vessels visited the lower harbor. The most frequent visitor in and out of the lower harbor was the H. Lee White with three visits followed by the U.S.C.G. Sundew who made two visits. The only other vessel making a visit during the month of May was the John Boland.

At the upper harbor the month of May saw a large 54% jump in vessel visits in and out of Marquette. A total of 43 vessels visited the upper harbor in May compared to just 28 during May 2001. For the season the upper harbor is experiencing a 7% increase in visits with a total of 80 vessels visiting the upper harbor this year compared to 75 during the same time frame in 2001.

The increases come by vessels that have rarely visited Marquette over the past five years. The list of vessels includes the Middletown who made five visits during the month of May compared to one visit all season long last year. The Armco who also had one visit last year made four stops. The Wilfred Sykes hasn't been seen in Marquette for some time made three stops in May.

Reported by: Art Pickering




Updates

06/10
Check back Monday night for additional news items and the regular weekly updates.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 10

The OGLEBAY NORTON (a LEWIS WILSON FOY) loaded her first cargo June 10, 1978 at Burlington Northern #5, Superior, WI with 57,952 tons of Hibbing taconite pellets for Burns Harbor, IN. In 1991.

In 1892 the keel for the ANN ARBOR NO. 1 was laid.

The ANN ARBOR NO. 4 was sold to the Michigan State Ferries in 1937 and renamed "CITY OF CHEBOYGAN".

On 10 June 1877, while lying at her dock at Detroit, the wooden side-wheeler R. N. RICE burned. The damage was estimated at $30,000. After this fire, she was rebuilt as a barge.

The propeller MONTGOMERY burned in the early morning hours of 10 June 1878. The fire started while she was laying at the dock in Point Edward, Ontario. The carferry INTERNATIONAL towed her out into the St. Clair River and cast her off to drift. Fortunately there were no injuries. She finally was beached opposite Batchelor's Mill on the Canadian side by the tugs CRUSADER and J. H. MARTIN. At 10:00 AM, she was still burning. The MONTGOMERY was a steam barge of 1,104 tons, built in 1856 and owned by Capt. John Pridgeon. She was fully loaded with 29,000 bushels of corn, 320 barrels of flour, 540 barrels of corn meal, 200 bags of timothy seed and 111 bales of broom corn, besides other freight. The local papers claimed that the spectacle presented by the burning vessel as she drifted down the river was "grand and beautiful". The light was so brilliant that the entire city of Port Huron was illuminated and many people came out to watch. The following day, the wreck was towed to the American side of the river just below Avery's Mill. Whatever was left of her cargo was taken off and sold. Her engines and boiler were so badly warped and twisted from the intense heat that they were worthless except as scrap.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Buckeye Returns to Service

06/09
The Buckeye departed her lay-up berth in Toledo early Saturday morning and is now out sailing. She headed upbound and stop for Fuel at Sterling Fuel in Windsor. The Buckeye is expected to load at the Burlington Northern dock in Superior, WI. on Monday evening.

Fleet mate Courtney Burton is undergoing fit out in Toledo and is expected to sail late next week. This leaves the Joseph H. Frantz as the only vessel in the Oglebay Norton fleet not sailing this season.

Pictures by N. Schultheiss
Buckeye upbound in the Detroit River.
Close up of bow.
Stern view.
Dead slow speed approaching the fuel dock.
Stern view.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman and Bryan Monaco




Tug Everlast Set To Resume

06/09
With engine repairs having been completed this past week, the Everlast underwent sea trials on Saturday. under the command of Capt. Mark Broennle, the big tug departed the Government Dock at Sarnia about 10:00 a.m. and traveled upbound to Lake Huron where she performed flawlessly. Plans are set for her to depart Sarnia on Sunday morning and proceed to Hamilton where the barge Norman Mc Leod awaits her arrival.

Reported by: Jamie Kerwin and John Philbin




Reliance Heads for Thunder Bay

06/09
The Purvis Marine tug Reliance departed her dock in the Sault Ste. Marie harbor just after 9:00 a.m. Saturday morning. The big tug is heading to Thunder Bay where it is expected tow the Vandoc from its long term lay-up dock for scrapping at Algoma Steel.

Reported by: Scott McLellan and Ron Phillips




Last Trip to Detroit

06/09
The Wilfred Sykes is expected to arrive in Detroit on Sunday morning. She is due to arrive off the Rouge River entry at 9:00 a.m. The Sykes is reported to be scheduled for only one more Rouge trip this year. The Syke's trips to Detroit were part of an operating agreement between owner Central Marine Logistics and the Interlake Steamship. Co.

Reported by: Wade Streeter




Twin Ports Report

06/09
Early rising boatnerds Saturday caught a parade of vessels entering and leaving Duluth harbor. Columbia Star arrived about 8 a.m. The vessel approached the ship canal at an unusually slow speed. Once under the Aerial Lift Bridge, the vessel turned sharply to port to leave room for the Arthur M. Anderson, which was coming around the turning buoy on its way out of the harbor. The two big vessels executive the difficult maneuver easily and with plenty of room to spare. Columbia Star proceeded to the Midwest Energy Terminal to load coal 60,000 tons of coal for Nanticoke, Ontario. Once past the Star, the Anderson picked up speed in the ship canal. The vessel had delivered stone to the Reiss Inland dock in Duluth and was steaming light to Two Harbors, where it loaded taconite pellets. Following just a few minutes behind the Anderson was Atlantic Erie, departing the DM&IR ore dock in West Duluth with taconite pellets.

Also in port was the Kinsman Independent, which was loading grain at the General Mills elevator in Duluth. Later in the day, the Vaasaborg, which spent time aground in the St. Lawrence River, arrived through the Duluth ship canal and proceeded to the General Mills S Elevator in Superior to load.

Kinsman Independent loading bright and early Saturday at General Mills.
Another view of "America's Straight Decker."
Stern view from across the harbor showing Kinsman Independent under the spouts.
Columbia Star approaching Duluth.
Closeup of the Star's bow.
Columbia Star entering ship canal. Video Clip
Columbia Star in the ship canal . Video Clip
Columbia Star stern view.
Arthur M. Anderson departing Duluth harbor and approaching the ship canal.
Arthur M. Anderson steaming under the lift bridge.
Arthur M. Anderson. Video Clip
Arthur M. Anderson - another movie.
Stern view of the Anderson.
Atlantic Erie rounding the turning buoy headed toward the ship canal.
Lookouts on the bow.
Atlantic Erie departure movie.

Reported by: Al Miller




Goderich News

06/09
The Algorail arrived in Goderich early Thursday morning, loaded salt at the mine all day and departed for Milwaukee in the late afternoon. The Agawa Canyon came in Friday, also loaded salt all day and departed for Escanaba, Michigan. There was an extra visitor to the harbor earlier in the week. The small Coast Guard boat Shark was in port for several days.

Reported by: Lisa Stuparyk




Toledo Update

06/09
The salt water vessels Spar Ruby, and Virginiaborg are due in at the T.W.I. Dock to unload cargo. The Canadian Transport is due in at the CSX Coal Docks to load coal on Saturday evening. As reported above, the Buckeye departed from her lay-up berth early Saturday.

The American Republic remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing survey/repairs. The Joseph H. Frantz, the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge, and the Saturn remain in lay-up at there respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the CSL Niagara on Monday, followed by the Algosteel on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Docks will be the American Mariner

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Frank A. Sherman in bound Maumee Bay headed for the C&O Coal Docks to load coal.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - June 9

LIGHTSHIP 103 was delivered to the 12th District Headquarters at Milwaukee, WI on June 9, 1921 to begin her Great Lakes career.

June 9, 1983 ALGOWEST loaded a then-record 1,047,758 bushels of wheat at Thunder Bay.

ROGER BLOUGH began sea trials in 1972.

June 9, 1911 The Ann Arbor No. 1 was raised by Smith Wrecking Company of Muskegon after being considered a menace to navigation by the Coast Guard (she had been sunk by the south breakwater at Frankfort after burning on March 8th). She was taken to Muskegon, and repaired sufficiently to become a sand scow for the Love Construction Company. The cost of raising her was $8,000.

On 9 June 1884, ANNAPEE (2-mast wooden scow-schooner, 71', 118 gt, built in 1867 at Ahnapee (Wolf River), WI) was bound from Torch Lake, Michigan for Milwaukee with a load of railroad ties and cordwood when she stranded in fog on North Point in Lake Michigan, 2 1/2 miles from Sheboygan, WI. Later a strong wind blew her into the rocks and she broke up. No lives were lost and part of her cargo was saved.

On 9 June 1882, the LIZZIE A. LAW (wooden schooner, 196', 747 gt, built in 1875 at Port Huron, MI) collided with the R. B. HAYES (wooden schooner, 147', 668 gt, built in 1877 at Gibraltar, MI) near the foot of Lake Huron. Although the LAW suffered severe damages, she completed her trip to Buffalo and was repaired there. The LAW lasted until 1908 when she was lost in a storm.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Andy Hering, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Everlast Repairs

06/08
The tug Everlast was alongside the South wall of the Sarnia Government Docks Friday evening. It is unknown when the tug moved but exhaust was coming from the stack and one of the radar was spinning. It looked as though they where preparing to depart some time that evening for sea trials or had just returned from them.

The vessel has been in Sarnia under going engine repairs since mid March. The lengthily repairs were reported to be caused by a parts delay that came from over seas. The barge Norman McLeod continued to work, pushed by other tugs.

Everlast assisted into Sarnia in March

Reported by: Jamie Kerwin




End Reported Near for Former Paterson Boats

06/08
N. M. Paterson & Sons has apparently sold its bulk carriers Vandoc and Quedoc to Purvis Marine in Soo, Ont. A representative with Purvis was unavailable for comment but the first vessel expected to be towed from its long term lay-up dock in Thunder Bay is the Vandoc. The tow could begin early next week. There was no information available on how the vessel would be used but many expect it to be scrapped at Algoma Steel.

Reported by: Ron Phillips




New Tug Commissioned

06/08
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers commissioned their new tug in Detroit on Friday. The tugboat the James C. Demolen was commissioned in a ceremony that morning. The tug is named in honor of a long time deck hand who served on the Forney. The Demolen is the former U.S. Navy tug Metacom.

Reported by: Ken Borg




Toledo News

06/08
The H. Lee White was loading coal at the CSX Docks on Friday. The Middletown was unloading ore at the Torco Docks. There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

The Buckeye remains at the Lakefront Docks fitting out. The small hopper dredge Atchafalaya remains tied up at Lakefront Docks. The Saturn is in temporary lay-up at the Lakefront docks. The Courtney Burton remains at the CSX Dock and is fitting out. The American Republic remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing survey/repairs. The Joseph H. Frantz, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in lay-up.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Canadian Transport on Saturday. The CSL Niagara on Monday, followed by the Algosteel on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Ore Docks will now be the American Mariner on Monday 10 June.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Tug Daryl C. Hannah towing the J.R. Sensibar up the Maumee River. The Sensibar will eventually be placed in drydock at the Shipyard. The Sensibar was just sold to the Johnstone Shipping Company and when she came off the drydock she was renamed Conallisson.
Barbara Ann handling the bow end of the J.R. Sensibar tow.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Welland Canal Traffic

06/08
Below are images of traffic on the Welland Canal Friday.
Frontenac underway.
Close up of the bow.
Saginaw passing the Frontenac.
Saginaw passing.
Close up.
Stern view.
Frontenac passing the Spar Ruby.
Spar Ruby passing.
Stern view above Lock 7.

Reported by: Alex Howard




Kingston News

06/08
Friday was a very busy day around Kingston. Shortly before 11:00 a.m. the CSL Tadoussac secured in Picton while the Stephen B. Roman was also bound for Picton. The Roman arrived at 12:30 p.m. and went to anchor. The Tadoussac estimated 14 hours to unload.

The John B. Aird was eastbound at False Duck Islands about 5:00 p.m.. She is likely headed for Bath cement plant. The English River is also eastbound for Bath. She expected to arrive about 7:00 p.m. for Sodus Point and will likely have to go to anchor.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Today in Great Lakes History - June 8

1978 the Lewis Wilson Foy ( b) OGLEBAY NORTON ) was christened for the Bethlehem Steel Co., Cleveland, Ohio.

In 1938, the Governor Miller, sister ship to the William A. Irvin, began her maiden voyage, leaving Lorain, Ohio. The Governor Miller was only the 2nd Great Lakes vessel to be powered by a steam turbine with a direct drive to the propeller shaft via reduction gear.

1976 - the Superior Midwest Energy Terminal loaded its first cargo of low-sulfur coal. The John J. Boland took the honors as the first vessel to load at this dock.

1977 the HARRY L. ALLEN was the first freighter to load at Burlington Northern's Dock #5 in Superior, WI.

On 8 June 1847, CHESAPEAKE (wooden side-wheeler, 172', 412 t, built in 1838 at Maumee, Ohio) was fully laden and had 97 aboard when she rammed the schooner JOHN F. PORTER on a dark night off Conneaut, Ohio. As she started to sink, she was run to shore in an effort to save her, but she sank a mile short of the beach. Lake Erie was fairly calm and the crew and passengers tried to get to shore in boats and makeshift rafts. Most made it and many were also picked up by the steamer HARRISON. Estimates of the number of dead vary from 7 to 13.

The wooden side-wheel tug and upriver packet TRAFFIC (75', 50 t, built in 1853 at St. Clair, MI) sank near Sebewaing, Michigan on 8 June 1868. She was recovered and repaired, but only lasted a little longer than a year since she burned in Saginaw in October 1869.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Thieves Strip Ships

06/07
The loss of two brass bells is the latest in a lengthy list of items taken from ships belonging to N.M. Paterson & Sons.

“There are countless numbers of pieces of memorabilia that have been taken from us that we never really bothered chasing down because we figured we’d never get them back,” said Alexander Paterson, director of finance and administration for N.M. Paterson & Sons.

The Paterson’s have announced that brass bells from the Quedoc and Vandoc are missing. The two vessels, which have been sold, have been moored on the Kam River near the James Street swing bridge for more than 10 years.

The two bells are estimated at $5,000 each. But their value goes beyond money.

“The historical significance of the loss is of greater concern to company officials,” Thunder Bay Police Crime Stoppers coordinator Andy Weiler said. “It was hoped the bells would end up in a museum for all to view.”

The brass bells are about 16 inches (45 centimeters) high and have a base of about 12 inches or 30 cm. One is inscribed “Beaver Cliffe Hall” and the other says “Sir Denys Lowson,” the original name of the two ships.

Paterson said the family is publicizing this loss, and that of other items such as a 1985 silver clock, in the hope someone knows where these rare items are.

“You never know. If something is in somebody’s basement and somebody knows about it, we’d sure like to get some of this stuff back, or else it’s going to be gone forever and we’d like to preserve it.”

Crime Stoppers will pay up to $1,000 for information that leads to the recovery of these items. Anonymous tip line 800-222-8477.

Reported by: Donald Paterson




Bridge Damages Tour Boat

06/07
The International Railroad Bridge swing span (known as Harbor Draw) over the Black Rock Canal hit the stern tent of the cruise vessel Miss Buffalo II on Wednesday afternoon. A Coast Guard vessel and the Miss Buffalo I were allowed to pass but as the Miss Buffalo II came through the draw, the bridge began to close early and knocked the poles out from underneath the aft tent canvas. Three people were injured, none seriously. The exact cause was unknown at this time.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Freighter Strikes Dock

06/07
Sunday the Earl W. Oglebay collided with three pleasure craft rafted off the Shooters Restaurant dock on the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland. The Earl W. was unloaded and traveling out bound at the time of the incident. All three pleasure craft were damaged in the incident. There were no injuries and no pollution was reported.

This turn in the river has been the site of a number of accidents. Pleasure craft routinely raft off the dock into the shipping channel.

Reported by: M. Parker




Westcott II Heads South

06/07
The Detroit Mail Boat J.W. Westcott II will head south to Grosse Ile in the lower Detroit River on Saturday. A short trip for some vessels, but this will be the farthest down river for the boat since 1949.

The mail boat operates in the upper Detroit River delivering mail and supplies to passing freighters. It was built in 1949 by Paasch Marine Services at Erie, PA.

The Westcott II will visit the Ford Yacht Club for the opening of the island ceremony.

Reported by: Capt. Sam Buchanan




Twin Ports Report

06/07
The DMIR ore docks are doing a steady business this spring, with a few new regulars in Two Harbors and numerous Canadian vessels in Duluth.

In the past several seasons, most vessels calling in Two Harbors have belonged to Great Lakes Fleet. This season, however, Joe Block is becoming a common caller in Two Harbors. Its next trip there is scheduled for today. Oglebay Norton also is scheduled to call June 11. The rest of the lineup there is Roger Blough, June 7; Arthur M. Anderson, June 8, Edwin H. Gott, June 9, Edgar B. Speer, June 10, Presque Isle and John G. Munson, June 11; and Roger Blough, June 12.

In Duluth, four of the next six vessels scheduled to call are Canadian. Halifax and Atlantic Erie are due today, CSL Laurentian and St. Clair are scheduled for June 8, and CSL Tadoussac and Philip R. Clarke are set for June 13.

Boatwatchers in Duluth get a glimpse of Arthur M. Anderson on Saturday when it's due to unload at the Reiss Inland dock up the St. Louis River. Buffalo boatwatchers get a shot at seeing the Cason J. Callaway today and the Philip R. Clarke on June 9. John G. Munson is due in Detroit today.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo News

06/07
The Algomarine finished loading coal and departed from the CSX Docks on Thursday morning. The Charles M. Beeghly arrived soon after at the CSX Docks to load coal and is expected to depart Thursday afternoon.

There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

The Buckeye is fitting out and is expected to sail in the next several days. The Courtney Burton is fitting out and is expected to sail mid June sometime. The American Republic remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing survey/repairs.

The Joseph H. Frantz, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in layup.

The small hopper dredge Atchafalaya was tied up at the Lakefront Docks.

The Armco is due in Thursday evening at the Torco Dock to unload ore pellets. The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the H. Lee White on Friday afternoon. The Canadian Progress on Saturday afternoon, followed by the CSL Niagara on Monday morning. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Middletown on Friday afternoon, followed by the Armco on Wednesday morning.

E. B. Barber at the C&O #2 Dock waiting to load coal.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Erie Update

06/07
The Canadian Transfer was in Erie on Thursday, arriving at 3:30 p.m. with stone for the Old Ore Dock. The Transfer turned and backed into the Old Ore Dock to unload. This is the vessel's first trip into Erie under her current name.

In other Erie news, the Richard Reiss was spotted with her pilot house windows uncovered. It is unclear why the windows were uncovered.

Transfer inbound.
Close Up of her stern.
Stern View.
Reiss with windows unboarded.
Close Up.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Seaway Traffic

06/07
Bluewing below the Iroquois Locks Thursday morning.
Stern view.
Close up of the stack.
Sabina.
Stern view.
At the Iroquois Lock.
Jill C. passing on Sunday.
Close up of stack.
Stern view.

Reported by: Peter Carter




Search & Rescue Turns to Murder Investigation

06/07
On Sunday the U.S. Coast Guard was called to assist in the search for a missing 19 year old man off North Bass Island, Ohio. Station Marblehead received a call from a sailing vessel reporting a missing person. The owner/operator reported that he awoke and discovered that his friend and the sailing vessel's dingy where both missing.

Station Marblehead launched and conducted several searches with the Put In Bay Police Department that resulted in the dingy being found on shore just north of Middle Bass State Park.

The outboard was locked in the up position and a life jacket was also found onboard. The dingy appeared to have been dragged up onto the beach. A search was made for the man but he was not found.

The Ohio Department or Natural Resources and local law enforcement agents are conducting a murder investigation after conducting an interview with the owner/operator of the sailing vessel Teak Butterfly. According to the Coast Guard, it was discovered during the investigation that the men where in a long term relationship and may have been involved illegal activities.

Reported by: Bill Watzlawek




Today in Great Lakes History - June 7

1958 the Edmund Fitzgerald was launched at Great Lakes Engineering Works, River Rouge, MI.

In 1977, the William A. Irvin ran into the side of the Rock Cut after a power failure on board. The vessel received only slight damage. (For a more detailed account, read Jody Aho's book "The Steamer William A. Irvin: Queen of the Silver Stackers").

Also on June 7, 1977 the MESABI MINER departed the shipyard on her maiden voyage to load ore at Duluth, MN.

On June 7, 1991, the Alpena (former Leon Fraser) began her maiden voyage as a cement carrier, departing Superior, Wisconsin, for her namesake port. Fraser Shipyards, who performed the conversion, took out a full-page ad in the Superior Evening Telegram proclaiming "INLAND LAKES MANAGEMENT, YOUR SHIP IS READY" and a picture of the vessel.

On 7 June 1859, COLUMBIA (2-mast wooden brig, 92', 177 gt, built in 1842 at Sandusky, Ohio) broke up in a storm near Sherwood Point, Green Bay (Death's Door). She was famous for bringing the first load of copper ore from the Keweenaw Peninsula to through the Soo. She also brought the first locomotive to Marquette.

The METEOR (wooden steam barge, 201', 729 gt, built in 1863 at Cleveland, OH) burned at Buckley's dock at the foot of 2nd Street in Detroit, Michigan on 7 June 1873. The fire supposedly started in her hold at 1:30 AM and was not discovered until it was too late. The ship burned to the waterline and sank. Some docks and warehouses also burned in this catastrophe. The wreck was raised in early September 1875 and towed to the foot of Belle Isle where the machinery and hull were sold at the U.S. Marshall's sale on 24 April 1876. Although originally thought to be the end of this vessel, the hull was purchased by Stephen B. Grummond of Detroit for $480. It was rebuilt as the schooner-barge NELSON BLOOM in 1882 and lasted until abandoned in 1925.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Jackson Visits Holland

06/06
The Herbert C. Jackson arrived in Holland, Mi. Wednesday evening and proceeded to the James DeYoung power plant to unload her cargo of 12,500 tons of eastern coal. She is the largest vessel to call in Holland so far this year. The Jackson was sporting a Red Wings flag from the pilot house. She was expected to depart early Thursday morning.

Reported by: Bob Vande Vusse




Barker Loads

06/06
The Kaye Barker tied up at Marquette's upper harbor on Wednesday, waiting to load. The Adam Cornelius is expected to arrive today.

Low fog rolls out of the harbor.
Bow view.
Close up.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Lake Erie Ports

06/06
Wednesday morning the Sam Laud was loading coal at the Sandusky. The vessel signed on to leave around 10:30 a.m. About that time the Maumee gave a security call entering Sandusky Bay for the coal dock. The two boats passed in the Bay.

The John B. Aird unloaded taconite early that morning in Huron, Oh. Limestone and taconite were piled high indicating that there has been recent traffic.

Southdown Challenger was unloading at their dock in the Cuyahoga River. Around 4:30 p.m. she called for the "G" tug California to pull her stern first back into the harbor.

The Cleveland Fire Department fire boat Anthony J. Celebreeze was touring on the Cuyahoga River.

Stephen R. Roman backed into the inner harbor and was unloading at the new Lafarge facility just outside the Conrail Bridge.

The taconite piles at the Lorain Pellet Terminal are dwindling, while the piles at the facility on Cleveland's Whiskey Island are growing. Whiskey Island is scheduled to be the new pellet terminal site. Railroad cars are presently being loaded at the site with an end loader.

Maumee entering Sandusky Bay. Dave Wobser
Maumee turning to line up with the Sandusky Coal Dock. Dave Wobser
Celebreese in Cuyahoga River. Dave Wobser
Southdown Challenger unloading. Dave Wobser
John B. Aird departing Huron. TZ


Reported by: Dave Wobser




Busy Day in Kingston

06/06
Wednesday was a busy day in the Kingston area. The day began with thick fog that closed the American Narrows for a time. The Antalina was anchored east of Mason Point, shortly before 9:00 a.m. the section was reopened and the vessel got underway.

The Wolfe Islander III, Island Queen III, Island Belle and Canadian Empress all had to carry on in reduced visibility. The popular overnight vessel, Canadian Empress, arrived in Kingston at her usual time of 2:00 p.m. and was expected to depart at 7:00 p.m. She heads to an anchorage at MacDonald Island over night, with an eventual destination of Ottawa.

The Algoport was unloading Gypsum at the cement plant in Bath. She departed Wednesday afternoon for Little Narrows. This is in the Bras D'or lakes of Nova Scotia. Her eta for Cape Vincent was 6:00 p.m. The English River was headed for Bath to load cement.

The rather strange looking amphibious bus for Beaver Tours has started tours in the Kingston area which include a 40 minute trip on the harbor.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Martin won't return to CSL after cabinet ouster

06/06
Canadian Finance Minister Paul Martin says he'll stay in politics rather than return to the helm of Canada Steamship Lines after being ousted from the cabinet by Prime Minister Jean Chretien.

A long-standing rivalry between Martin and Chretien is linked to a highly successful campaign organized by Martin to take over as Liberal leader when Chretien retires. Observers say Chretien feared Martin supporters would try to force him out before he wanted to go.

Martin is widely credited with introducing economic policies that have helped the Canadian economy grow faster than that of any other G-7 country. However, he was facing growing questions about large corporate donations he had received for his leadership campaign. The Chretien government has lost several key ministers in recent weeks due to patronage scandals.

Martin placed Canada Steamship Lines in a blind trust before entering the cabinet in 1993.

Reported by: Robert Kowl




Cleveland group working to save Chicago's Hulett unloaders

06/06
A group trying to preserve the last Hulett unloaders on the Great Lakes is seeking support in Chicago, where a recently closed LTV Corp. coke plant has the last intact examples of the giant machines.

Unfortunately, the group is battling to overcome ignorance of the machines' industrial significance, their immense size and the substantial cost of preserving them.

"Huh?'' and "What the heck are Huletts?'' are typical responses to the preservation effort by those outside the steel industry, Steve Merkel, president of the volunteer organization, told the Hammond Times.

Huletts were used in the steel industry to unload Great Lakes vessels bringing iron ore to steel mills. The gigantic machines, which lower a large clamshell bucket into a ship's hold, were invented by Ohio-native George H. Hulett in the late 1800s. They revolutionized ship unloading and were a key to the growth of Great Lakes shipping during the early 1900s.

Because of their historical significance, the "Save the Huletts" campaign has been under way in Cleveland since the late 1990s. Its organizers -- The Friends of the Hulett Ore Unloaders and Steamer William G. Mather, a committee of Ohio-based Citizen's Vision -- are now hoping it spreads to Chicago.

"Our concentration is on the Huletts in Cleveland,'' said Ray Saikus, a member of the Cleveland campaign. "We hoping someone in Chicago will pick up the ball for the ones in Chicago.''

At one time 75 Huletts operated around the lakes. Now only four remain: two in Cleveland and two in Chicago. The unloaders in Cleveland were dismantled in January 2001 Two were placed in storage for future use at a proposed park along the Cuyahoga River.

The last six operable machines were used by LTV Corp.'s Cleveland Steel Works until 1992 and at the bankrupt company's Chicago Coke plant until it ceased operating in late December. Two of the four in Cleveland were demolished in 2000 and the other two decommissioned. That leaves the two in Chicago as the only intact Huletts in the world.

"Cleveland's were built in 1912 and put in service in 1913,'' Saikus said. "The ones in Chicago were built in the 1950s. Their designs are almost identical.''

In an effort to keep the Chicago Huletts from being dismantled they have petitioned the federal bankruptcy court hearing the LTV's Chapter 11 case to preserve the two Chicago Huletts, their associated equipment and structures "until appropriate disposition of them can be made in keeping with their historical significance,'' according to the court filing.

"These Huletts operated on a full-time schedule until the final plant shut down at the end of 2001,'' the motion says. "If the Chicago coke plant is not restarted, these historic machines are in jeopardy of being lost forever. Because of their historical significance, they, like the Cleveland Huletts, would be eligible to be listed on the National Register of Historical Places and could possibly become a National Landmark.''

The committee's motion, filed by vice chairman Stephen L. Merkel, claims the cost of demolishing the Huletts is likely to exceed their scrap value, that they don't interfere with the current use of the closed plant; they don't pose an environmental hazard; they don't pose a navigational hazard to the waterway or to aircraft and their preservation is in the public's interest.

Members of the committee say LTV has objected to preserving the machines. LTV, which with the exception of the coke plant, sold most of its steelmaking assets to International Steel Group in April, couldn't be reached for comment. There were no offers for the coke plant.

The bankruptcy court has not yet to rule on either motion.

Merkel and his group have contacted the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency and the Chicago Historical Society for assistance.

The Museum of Science and Industry responded that the machines are too big for its collection, Merkel said. The Illinois Historic Preservation Agency's staff showed an interest and were sent information on the project, but haven't responded, he said.

Peter Alter, historian at the Chicago Historical Society, said the Huletts "are immense and expensive and something we don't have the funding to help with.''

Although the committee's only estimated the cost of preserving the two dismantled Cleveland Huletts, Merkel said saving those in Chicago will probably cost about the same.

"We figure it will be about $3 million to $5 million for the pair,'' he said. "A lot depends on where they go because transportation is a good part of the cost.''

Reported by: Clem Miner




Festival of Sail 2002 Celebration in Oswego, NY

06/06
Oswego, New York will play host to the Festival of Sail 2002 this coming weekend, with a celebration of boats. The following vessels will be in port at the Oswego Historic Maritime District on Lake Ontario: US Brig Niagara, LT-5 Tug Boat ("The Elisha Nash") - Last remaining vessel from Normandy Invasion, Schooner PILGRIM, Schooner LOTUS, OMF ONTARIO, and The NYS CANAL BOAT #8 - all will be open for tours.

The area is located at the harbor End of West 1st Street along the Oswego River, and Port of Oswego, NY. Hours are: Friday (6/14): 1PM - 6PM, Saturday (6/15): 10AM - 6PM, and Sunday (6/16): 10AM - 6PM.
Cost for tours is: $6 for adults, $3 for children 6-12, and under 5 FREE.

The Port of Oswego and Marine Museum are an enjoyable trip for any boatwatcher. Cement carriers, tankers and occasional salty frequent the area, along with numerous tugs that are in port year round.

Reported by: Tom Moriarty




Today in Great Lakes History - June 6

1944 Joseph H. Thompson participated in the D-Day invasion at Normandy

The E.B. BARBER entered service on June 6, 1953.

In 1953, the Armco began her maiden voyage from Lorain, Ohio bound for Superior, Wisconsin to load iron ore.

On June 6, 1959, the Sarah Spencer (formerly Adam E. Cornelius, Edmund V. Smith, and Sea Barge One) began her maiden voyage from Manitowoc, Wisconsin. This was the last Great Lakes vessel constructed with telescoping hatch covers.

POINTE NOIRE was in collision with Cleveland Tanker's SATURN on June 6, 1977 near Fighting Island in the Detroit River.

On 6 June 1869, ASA COVELL (wooden propeller tug, 20 gt, built in 1852 at Buffalo) was towing the brig IROQUOIS up the Cuyahoga River at Cleveland when her boiler exploded and she sank. Her captain was killed when the pilothouse was blown into the river.

On 6 June 1883, HERCULES (wooden schooner-barge, 139', 195 t, built in 1867 at Algonac, MI) was upbound in the south bend of the St. Clair River near Algonac, Michigan when the CLARION (iron propeller package freighter, 240', 1711 gt, built in 1881 at Wyandotte, MI) overtook her and collided with her in broad daylight. HERCULES drifted to the bank, capsized and sank. No lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Manitoulin Set For Scrapping

06/05
After remaining idle in Sorel, the Manitoulin is expected to be towed for scrapping this Friday or Saturday. A Russian tug is expected to take the vessel into tow with a final destination in an undisclosed Country.

The vessel has been in lay-up since December, 2000. On Monday at Sorel crews were removing the CSL markings from the vessels.

More information on the Manitoulin

Reported by: Kent Malo




Active Fleet Yet To Equal Last Year's Total

06/05
The active U.S.-Flag Great Lakes fleet totaled 54 vessels on June 1, a decrease of three hulls compared to a year ago. However, the gap is narrowing; on May 1, the active fleet was down 5 hulls compared to a year ago. A number of vessels (four to be exact) still have no sail date for 2002. Those ships are the Elton Hoyt 2nd, Edward L. Ryerson, Richard Reiss, and Joseph H. Frantz. The latter two vessels did operate in 2001, but the Hoyt and Ryerson have been idle for a few seasons now.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Niagara begins summer tour

06/05
The U.S. Brig Niagara has begun its summer tour, setting our from Erie, Penn., for 12 Great Lakes ports.

Over the next four months, the vessel will travel farther west than ever before. Ports of call include Duluth, Green Bay, Toledo and Toronto. It will return to Erie on Sept. 13.

The vessel's mission is to serve as ambassador and bring the Erie name to other ports, said Captain John Beebe-Center.

"We want to spread the word about Erie, let others know who we are," said Beebe-Center, who is in his second season as captain. "It's a shame when it leaves. We like to be here, we're from here, but we can do more good for the city when we spread the name."

Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry was aboard the Niagara in the Battle of Lake Erie, when the United States defeated the British. That famous battle in September 1813 at Put-in-Bay, Ohio, was a turning point in the War of 1812.

Beebe-Center and a crew of 45, including 28 volunteers, have been preparing for the voyage since April 16.

Brig Niagara down bound on the Welland Canal Tuesday morning. Roger Tottman

Reported by: Al Miller




Menominee visits Menominee

06/05
Saturday was a busy day in Menominee. At 7:00 a.m. the Menominee picked up anchor off the Menominee breakwall and went under tow of the Selvick tugs Jimmy L and Carla Anne Selvick. The Menominee went to the K&K west dock to unload a small cargo of lumber.

Only the number three cargo hold was unloaded in port and the rest of the lumber will be unloaded in Duluth. Before the Menominee came into port, the Vlieborg had to move from the K&K west dock to the east dock to allow dock space for the Menominee to unload.

The Menominee departed the river at 4:30 p.m. about that time the Vlieborg finished unloading. After unloading the Vlieborg had to install bulkheads before heading to Thunder Bay to load grain. At 9:30 p.m. the Vlieborg departed the dock for the turning basin near the Ansul dock and was outbound at the Menekaunee bridge at 10:30 p.m.

Selvick tugs heading out to meet Menominee.
Vlieborg backing in the river to K&K east dock.
Menominee passing through Menekaunee Bridge inbound.
Menominee outbound passing the Vlieborg.
Close up Menominee.
Menominee passing through Menekaunee bridge outbound with Carla Anne Selvick.

Reported by: Scott Best




Soo, Ontario, begins fundraising for Norgoma, river center

06/05
Development officials in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, are beginning an effort to raise about $750,000 from the public for the museum ship Norgoma and an associated St. Marys River Interpretive Center.

Overall cost of the project is estimated to be $3 million. Organizers also are attempting to get a $1.5 million grant from the Northern Ontario Heritage Fund Corporation and $600,000 from Heritage Canada.

The Norgoma was one of the last package freighters to operate on the Great Lakes, carrying freight and passengers on the "Turkey Trail" between the Sault and Owen Sound. The vessel plied that run from 1950 to 1963, then served as a Manitoulin Island-Tobermory auto ferry until being retired in 1974. The vessel has since been docked at the Soo.

As part of the project, volunteers want to offer tours and 'virtual' cruises on the boat. They also want to include overnight 'bed and breakfast' accommodations.

Reported by: SooToday.com




White Loads in Marquette

06/05
The H. Lee White loaded taconite at Marquette's upper harbor Tuesday. The Peter Cresswell and Kaye E. Barker are due in on Wednesday.

Close up loading.
Dusty loading.
Close up of stern.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Busy Day in Alpena

06/05
Boatwatchers were treated to unusual callers on Tuesday. The Canadian Transfer tied up at the Alpena Oil Co. dock in the Thunder Bay River about 10:30 a.m. It unloaded the second cargo of salt for this year. It departed around 3:00 p.m. and backed out into the bay.

The tug Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity waited until the Transfer cleared the channel and proceeded into Lafarge to load cement.

Also at anchor in Thunder Bay was the Calumet. It waited until the Transfer passed and then headed into the river. It tied up at 5:00 p.m. and unloaded a cargo of crushed stone from Stoneport.

Canadian Transfer unloading.
Transfer departs.
Calumet arrives.
Unloading.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Saginaw News

06/05
The Adam E. Cornelius made her first visit to the Saginaw River on Tuesday, unloading at the Bay Aggregates Dock in Bay City. She unloaded through the afternoon before departing for the Airport Turning Basin. The Cornelius was downbound for the lake passing Cass Ave. at 10:30 p.m.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Adam E. Cornelius unloading at Bay Aggregates.
Another view.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Hamilton Update

06/05
The saltie Lykes Energizer was moored at the north face of Pier 12. Unloading was taking place, several cargo containers were seen on deck. Over at Pier 23, the Federal Rhine was finished offloading with hatches closed. Two small pleasure craft were seen being carried on deck.

Also seen at Pier 23 was the tanker barge Norman McLeod and tug Salvor pulling away from the slip at 6:45 p.m.. They then moved over to McKeil Marine's yard and arrived there 45 minutes later.

The CCG Griffon is moored at CCIW.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Today in Great Lakes History - June 5

1972 the ROGER BLOUGH was christened

Also in 1972 the PARKER EVANS was in collision with the upbound Erie Sand steamer SIDNEY E. SMITH, JR. just below the Blue Water Bridge, at Port Huron, MI. The SMITH sank in twenty minutes with no loss of life. The EVANS, with bow damage, proceeded to Port Weller Dry Docks for extensive repairs. As a result of this accident, on October 4, 1972 alternate one-way traffic between the Black River Buoy and Buoys One and Two in Lake Huron was agreed upon by the shipping companies. Also a call-in system was initiated to monitor traffic between the Detroit River Light and Buoys Seven and Eight in Lake Huron by the newly established Sarnia Traffic.

On June 5, 1979, the Cartiercliffe Hall (later Winnipeg and now Algontario) caught fire on Lake Superior off the Keweenaw Peninsula just before 4:00 a.m. Six crewmembers died in the fire, and the U.S. Steel bulk freighter Thomas W. Lamont was able to rescue others from the Cartiercliffe Hall.

June 5, 1947 The Pere Marquette Railway was acquired by the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad.

LIGHTSHIP 103 (HURON) had her keel laid June 5, 1918. In 1971 the lightship was acquired by the City of Port Huron for use as a museum.

On 5 June 1864, COL. A. B. WILLIAMS (2 mast wooden schooner, 110', 150 t, built in 1856 at Big Sodus, NY) was carrying coal on Lake Huron when she collided with the big ore-laden bark TWILIGHT. The WILLIAMS sank in 85 feet of water, 3 miles below Port Sanilac. Her crew was rescued by the TWILIGHT.

Shortly before midnight, Sunday, 5 June 1870, the WABASH and EMPIRE STATE collided in Lake Huron about 10 miles above Gratiot Light. The WABASH sank and the EMPIRE STATE was damaged. The steamer JAY GOULD took the passengers off both vessels.

Data from: Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Divers explore possible Chicora wreck

06/04
Divers spent last weekend exploring a Lake Michigan ship wreck that they believe may be the Chicora, which vanished in 1895 with 23 crew members 23 and one passenger.

"Suddenly, the wreck just looms out of the darkness in front of you,'' diver Charles Larsen, of Holland, told the Grand Rapids Press. "It is in amazing shape. The wood is still solid. There is the curve of the handrail. You think of it as a work of art.''

No name or identity numbers were located Saturday by the divers, who could spend no more than 10 minutes in the 40-degree waters.

"You can only see about 4 feet at a time, so it's a matter of simply knowing something large is there,'' said Todd VanderArk. "You are following the line down and all of a sudden, bam, there's something there. It was just awesome.''

The ship is sitting upright in 260 feet of water about 15 miles from shore. Its hull is intact, but cabins and wooden superstructure are missing.

VanderArk dove with fellow Holland residents Jeff Vos and Paul Kulper, who are members of the organization South West Michigan Underwater Preserve. Larsen dove with Doug Welsch, representing a group called the Michigan Shipwreck Research Associates.

Nothing can be removed from the wreck site because the ship is property of the state. The divers plan to catalog everything in the wreck area before announcing its location.

Bound for St. Joseph from Milwaukee on Jan. 21, 1895, the Chicora found the harbor blocked by ice. Witnesses claimed to see the steamer struggling to find a port in a building storm.

Although the wreck is the right size and shape, and even the right color, Peggy Kurpinski said some other wrecks in the same region of Lake Michigan are of similar length and construction.

"Until you find a name board or a hull number or some other unique identifier, it's just not easy to say this is the Chicora,'' said Kurpinski, president of the Underwater Preserve group.

Reported by: Al Miller and Jerry Heinzel




Neuman Ferry Boats Sold

06/04
The three remaining boats of the Neuman line, which provided service from Sandusky and Marblehead to Kelleys Island for most of the last century, have been sold to Kelleys Island Ferry Boat Line, the Sandusky Register reported in its Sunday, June 2 edition.

The Neuman boat Kelley Islander had already been painted bright orange to match the Kelleys Island Ferry Boat Line's Shirley Irene and Kayla Marie, the Register reported.

The Palladino family, owners of the Kelleys Island Ferry Boat Line (and the tug Frank Palladino and the barge Kellstone I), also told the Register they plan to build a boat similar to the Shirley Irene, and expand and improve their ferry facility in Marblehead in the near future. The Kelleys Island line's Marblehead dock is just east of the Lafarge gravel dock in Marblehead. Neuman's Marblehead dock, just west of the Marblehead Coast Guard Station, has been closed. Neuman's Sandusky dock will be sold to the Murray and Murray law firm, which owns a law office and marina next door

The Endeavor is at left, the Kelley Islander is in the middle, and the Commuter's wheelhouse can be seen at the right, with the Murray and Murray building behind it.

Reported by: Don Lee




Beeghly Loads

06/04
The Charles M. Beeghly unloaded coal at Marquette's upper harbor on Monday and later loaded taconite. The Great Lakes Trader and H. Lee White were due in Marquette Monday or Tuesday.

Beeghly loading.
Bow view.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Twin Ports Report

06/04
Twin Ports boatwatchers may need to do a double-take later this week when the Oglebay Norton is scheduled to make quick back-to-back calls at Midwest Energy Terminal. The vessel is scheduled to load 60,000 tons of coal on Tuesday for delivery to the power plant at Silver Bay, Minn. It then is due to return to Superior on Thursday to load another 60,000 tons for the Cobb Generating station in Muskegon, Mich.

Midwest Energy Terminal is scheduled to handle is usual crowd of 1,000-footers and Canadian lakers over the next several days. The one unusual caller in the mix is Lee A. Tregurtha, which is scheduled to call June 11 to load coal for delivery to the power plant at Presque Isle (Marquette), Mich.

In port on Monday, Alpena was unloading at the Lafarge terminal in Superior, Indiana Harbor was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal, St. Clair was loading at the DMIR ore dock, Armco and CSL Niagara were both due at the DMIR ore dock during the evening, and the saltie Menominee was scheduled to arrive at the Duluth port terminal to unload lumber.

Reported by: Al Miller




Thunder Bay News

06/04
The old logging tug PPM-31 has been relaunched. She was built by Russel Brothers at Fort Frances, Ontario in 1937 and served the inland lakes as an alligator tug for many years. She is 40' x 12' x 5' and 24 gt. Owned by Abitibi Power and Paper Co., Ltd., at one time. Sold and eventually moved up to Lake Nipigon at Orient Bay. Recently sold and brought to Thunder Bay, she was hauled up on the bank of the McKellar River for reconditioning. As of Monday, June 3, 2002, she was tied up at the slip behind the old Kemp Fisheries near the P & H elevator.

Over the past weekend crews have been cleaning up the old Gravel and Lakes Ltd., dock beside the Marina. The area is in the middle of the proposed new Marina Park Project. Gravel and Lakes Ltd., have moved over to Pascol Engineering's property. In the process of cleaning up the old dock area, the large push tug F.A. Johnson was pulled out of the mud and towed over to the slip beside Thunder Bay Terminals where the Wolf River has been laid up for the past few years. The tug Donald Mac, who remained idle last year, was also moved from the old dock location. This dock area is basically a peninsula that juts out into the lake and has been added to over the years. The first Paterson owned boat, D.R. Van Allen is buried underneath it. She was condemned in 1920 and her engine was put in the tug Joe Smith. This tug burned to the waterline in 1928 and sank in 15' of water at Amethyst Harbor where her hull remains today. The Van Allen's hull was then filled with rock and sunk at the waterfront as a dock. If the proposed project for the Marina goes through, the D.R. Van Allen's timber's may yet see the light of day again during the dredging part of the project.

Cargoes in the Port of Thunder Bay are virtually the same as last year at this time. 2.3 million Metric tons of cargo have passed through the city, that is almost the same as last year. While 129 vessels have passed through Port this year, which is the exact amount of traffic through the Port last year at this time.

Monday, the Vlieborg was backed into Richardson's and was loading, while two elevators over, the Orsula was loading at United Grain Growers "a". The Saltie Hope 1 was loading at Cargill and the Cedarglen and the Algoville were waiting at anchor just outside the breakwall. Over at the Great West Timber dock, crews were loading the barge McAllister 132 with lumber in preparation for another trip. She is pushed/pulled by the tug W.N. Twolan and their main ports of call are Detroit, Michigan and Superior, Wisconsin.

There is still no official word on the fate of the two Paterson boats here in town. The Quedoc and the Vandoc have been in lay-up here since 1991 and were put up for sale by Paterson early this year. The bid deadline has come and gone with no word on who the successful bidders were.

Wolf River tied up at the Thunder Bay Terminal slip.
F.A. Johnson.
Joe Smith Piston Rod, ex D.R. Van Allen Engine.
McAllister 132 at Great West Timber Dock.
PPM 31 on the bank of the McKellar River being refurbished.
Donald Mac at the Thunder Bay waterfront.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Alpena News

06/04
The Algorail arrived in Alpena around 11:30 a.m. Monday. It arrived at the Alpena Oil Co. Dock on the Thunder Bay River and proceeded to unload the first salt cargo of the year. The Algorail finished unloading around 4:00 p.m. and backed out of the river to turn around in the bay.

In other news, the J.A.W Iglehart arrived in port on Monday to load cement at Lafarge. It left around 3:00 p.m. heading for Whitefish, ON.

Algorail backing from port.
Passing the Alpena Lighthouse.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Oshawa Update

06/04
The Federal Rhine was expected to departs Oshawa bound for Hamilton about 5:00 p.m. Monday.

The unloading of the Mecta Sea was stopped until the Federal Rhine had finished unloading. This will likely delay the Mecta Sea's departure for Montreal until at least June 5.

Federal Rhine unloading.
Federal Rhine's Chief Officer Randeep S. Bhalla.
3rd Engineer returning to the Federal Rhine.
Mecta Sea docked.
Mecta Sea and Federal Rhine.
Bow view.

Reported by: Jim Gallacher




Toronto News

06/04
Canadian Navigator arrived in Toronto late Sunday night and unloaded her cargo of salt during the night. It departed about 9:00 a.m. Tuesday. The salty Ellen Knutsen departed Clarkson about the same time.

The small hydrographic survey Agile departed the Pier 4 basin Monday morning and returned to Burlington.

Monday afternoon the McKeil tugs Atomic and Glenevis went to Redpath Sugar dock and turned the salty Cashin, so that she is now stern first to the street with her bow facing into the harbor. She is expected to finish unloading today. Three other salties remain in port: Flinterspirit, Moor Laker and Gunay-A.

Pictures by Ted Siuda
Cashin at Redpath Sugar.
Metis.
Seaway Queen and Canadian Venture.
Another view.
Bow view.
Federal Maas unloading.
Steel coil offloaded.
Federal Maas and Moor Laker.
Flinter Spirit unloading.
Opening hatch.
Another view.
Stern view.
Gunay-A unloading.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Steelworkers push for Canadian tariffs

06/04
Canada could worsen trade relations with the United States if Ottawa doesn't match U.S. steel tariffs against other countries, the Steelworkers union said.

"We believe that Canada's failure to defend our industry from the same pressures that led to safeguard action in the United States might create problems for Canadians seeking exemptions from U.S. actions in the future," Steelworkers researcher Hugh Mackenzie wrote in a brief to the Canadian International Trade Tribunal.

The tribunal next week is set to begin three weeks of hearings on whether Canadian producers require "safeguards" to protect steelmakers from steel imports. A final decision is expected to be made Aug. 19.

The hearings come less than three months after the U.S. imposed tariffs of up to 30 per cent on foreign steel to protect its domestic market from low-priced imports. Canada and Mexico were exempted from the U.S. tariff action as NAFTA partners.

The union, which has 23,000 members in the steel industry in Canada and 88,000 in the United States, wants Canada to impose similar tariffs on steel imports to ensure the country doesn't become a dumping ground for steel that previously would have been destined for the United States. Without tariffs, Canada could be used by foreign steelmakers as a back-door entry into the American market and that would worsen Canada-U.S. trade relations, Mackenzie wrote.

Last week the U.S. Commerce Department said steel imports were down 29 percent over the same month a year ago. April was the first month the three-year tariffs of up to 30 percent on certain kinds of imported steel were in effect.

Reported by: Mike Allen




New concepts urged for Great Lakes

06/04
The head of Fednav Ltd. recently told a Canadian maritime conference that the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway need to explore new concepts in transportation to boost traffic.

Laurence Pathy, president and chief executive of Fednav Ltd., the largest ocean-going user of the Seaway, made several suggestions that, he said, would also ease highway congestion and protect the environment.

"Instead of pouring billions of dollars into new roads, why not provide relatively modest support for the development of trans-lake or inter-lake ro/ro and ferry systems that would greatly ease traffic congestion and air pollution?" he said. "In Europe and Japan, such truck/trailer ferry systems are common and economically viable."

Extending the Seaway season from nine months to year-round could lead to revival of container feeder services between Montreal and the Great Lakes, he said.

Pathy also noted that operators on the lakes have been slow to develop the concept of integrated tug and barge systems .Those systems, used in short-haul trades, could provide significant cost reduction benefits to shippers, he added.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - June 4

In 1947 the 525-foot Canada Steamship Lines bulk freighter Emperor stranded on Canoe Rocks on Lake Superior and sank with a loss of 12 lives.

Cliffs Victory sailed on her maiden voyage light from South Chicago in 1951

OTTERCLIFFE HALL (e) CANADIAN TRADER had her Keel laid 1968

The EDGAR B. SPEER was christened June 4th 1980 at Lorain for the Connecticut Bank & Trust Co., Hartford, CT, managed by the Great Lakes Fleet of the United States Steel Corp., Duluth, MN.

In 1988, the Irving S. Olds departed Duluth under tow, headed for scrapping.

June 4, 1940 - Oiler George Riemersma (age 50) died of a heart attack while at work on the PERE MARQUETTE 21.

June 4, 1942 - John A. Clancey, 58, general manager of the Grand Trunk Western Railway and president of the Grand Trunk Milwaukee Carferry Co. died suddenly of a heart attack while at his desk in Detroit.

The Port Huron Times reported that "The new trim and tidy tug, the P. L. JOHNSON, built for Capt. Sol Rummage, passed up last night with her first tow. She is of medium size and wears the national colors on her smokestack for which some of the boys call her a floating barber shop."

On 4 June 1859, GENERAL HOUSTON (2-mast wooden schooner, 83', 123 t, built in 1844 at French Creek, NY) was bound from Port Huron for Buffalo with a load of lumber. During a terrific gale, she missed the mouth of the Grand River near Fairborn, Ohio and went on the pier where she broke up. Fortunately no lives were lost. The lighthouse keeper on the pier where she broke up later refused to light the lantern while the wreck was in place for fear of drawing other vessels into it. The U. S. Government quickly contracted to remove the hulk from the channel, but a month later, a storm did the job for free, obliterating the wreck so completely that it was reported to have just "disappeared."

June 4th, 2001 marks the 100th anniversary of the famous race between the Tashmoo and the City of Erie, an exciting race that included many thousands of dollars in wagers, great advance publicity, and the use of many other boats to watch the action along the way. The drama was such that carrier pigeons were released at various times to take the latest updates to waiting newspaper reporters. The City of Erie won the race in a very close match, and the story has been retold in several books about the Great Lakes.

Data from: Max Hanley, Shawn Burgess-Keith, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Cliffs postpones mill shutdown

06/03
Cleveland-Cliffs is postponing a four-week summer shutdown at Hibbing Taconite, and company officials said the plant may increase production this year.

"We are pleased to announce the delay of the summer shutdown and the potential for a higher production target for 2002," General Manager John Tuomi said. "However, our production levels for remain subject to change."

Earlier this year the plant shut down for four weeks to regulate its pellet inventory. Another four-week shutdown had been scheduled for July.

Hibbing Taconite had been scheduled to produce 6.8 million tons of pellets this year. Friday's announcement means the plant's production level for this year will be decided later.

Cliffs owns 15 percent of Hibbing Taconite while Stelco owns 14.7 percent and Bethlehem Steel owns 70.3 percent. The plant ships its pellets through the BNSF ore dock in Superior.

Reported by: Al Miller




Saginaw Visits Duluth

06/03
Saturday the Saginaw arrived in Duluth to load taconite at the DM&IR dock.

Saginaw inbound.
View on deck.
Crew members working the lines on the dock.
Working the winches to position the Saginaw for loading.
Chutes lowered to the open hatches.
Taconite sliding down the chute.
Crew members pose for a picture.
Saginaw's turbine engine.
Crew member and the anchor windlass.
Crew lounge.
View aft.
Name board on the pilot house.
Wheel stand in pilothouse.
Chart table.

Other weekend traffic in Duluth
Munson arrives.
Canadian Enterprise departing.
Mesabi Miner inbound the ship canal.
Algosoo outbound.

Reported by: Steve Haverty




Busy Day in Cleveland

06/03
Cleveland saw a flurry of morning traffic on Sunday. The St. Marys II and tug Sea Eagle were unloading at Blue Circle cement on the river and planned to leave on Monday. The Kellstone I was unloading at its river dock. The Maumee was unloading stone that morning at the Ontario dock near the river mouth. She departed westward at noon.

The Earl W. Oglebay appeared to be unloading stone at Dock 28 and left port at 11:00 a.m. heading for Conneaut. The Middletown arrived at 10:00 a.m. and unloaded at the Cleveland Bulk Terminal on Whiskey Island. This is the second trip this week for the Middletown with ore from the upper lakes.

The Cuyahoga completed the parade with its 11:00 a.m. arrival from the west. She was headed upriver to unload stone at the Cuyahoga Road Products dock near West Third Street.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Erie News

06/03
The Sam Laud was inbound Erie at 2:00 pm Sunday to unload stone at the Mounfort Terminal and Old Ore Dock. This was the Laud's first visit of 2002 and she departed at 8:15 p.m.

Laud inbound.
Stern View.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Toronto Update

06/03
Federal Maas departed Sunday afternoon with McKeil tug assistance. On what is perhaps its first visit to Toronto, the tug Pascol came Sunday and rafted to Still Watch, which remained at Pier 35. Pascol departed a few hours later.

Pascol is an acronym for Port Arthur Shipbuilding Co. Ltd. and was built by them for yard use. It was later sold and renamed Cool Canadian. It was resold last year and now appears to have been given back its original name.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Final Bells

06/03
In late May the Algogulf and Kinsman Enterprise were towed to International Marine Salvage in Port Colborne for scrapping. Below are images of the tows.

Pictures by Alex Howard
Algogulf dock in Hamilton ready to be towed.
Stern view.
Delayed by wind, the tugs wait at Port Weller to bring the Algogulf in.
Seahound and Vac.
Docking for inspection.
Close up.
Chios Sailor passes as tow is prepared to get underway.
Heading for Lock 1.
In Lock 1.
Stern view.
Arriving below Lock 3.
Close up of those along for the tow.
Departing.
Close up.
Progress pulling on the bow.
Vac and Seahound trailing.
Ready for scrapping at IMS.

Kinsman Enterprise Tow
Pictures by Alex Howard
Entering Port Colborne.
Kinsman Enterprise arrives at IMS in Port Colborne.
Progress departs.

Pictures by Dave Wobser
Looking Forward from Lifeboat Deck.
Rear Anchor Windlass.
Asst. Engineer's Quarters.
Crew's Mess.
Officer's & Guest's Dining Room.
Guest Lounge.
Typical Deck Crew Quarters.
Guest Quarters.
Galley Cook stove.
Galley China Storage.
Stripped Pilothouse.
Chart Table in rear of Pilothouse.
Great Laker Magazine Reporters hard at work during tow.

Traffic in the Canal that weekend.
Saginaw downbound.
John D. Leitch.
Oakglen.
Yankcanuck.
Louis J. Goulet.

Related links:
Algogulf.
Kinsman Enterprise.
International Marine Salvage.





Enterprise Memories Updated

06/03
As the Kinsman Enterprise has made her last trip on the end of a towline, below are photos of her in happier days.

As the Harry Coulby, laid up in Fraser Shipyard in Superior, 11/3/88.
Departing Superior with a load of iron ore bound for the Huletts in Cleveland, 9/16/90.
Arriving Duluth to load grain, 10/14/90.
Departing Duluth, view from the Aerial Bridge, 10/28/90.
Loading in fog at General Mills Elevator A in Duluth, 5/31/91.
Close-up of stern, black & white shot, 5/31/91.
Docked at the old Great Northern Elevator S in Superior, 6/25/91.
Steam winches on deck, 6/25/91.
Backing away from the Burlington Northern ore dock in Superior, 7/6/91.
Loading ore at BN in Superior, 7/13/91.
Steaming into Lake Superior on a cold November afternoon, 11/7/91.
Drydocked at Fraser Shipyard in Superior, 10/22/92.
Loading at Harvest States in Superior, 10/23/92.
On deck departing Harvest States to finish loading at Cargill B1 in Duluth, 10/23/92.
On deck passing under the Blatnik Bridge.
Steaming down the Front Channel in Duluth.
Docked at Cargill B1.
Scott Misener (Algogulf) loading at Harvest States in Superior, 11/9/92.

Reported by: Richard Jenkins




Trip Raffles

06/03
One of the most commonly asked questions is "How can I get a ride on a freighter?" A cruise aboard a lakes freighter is only available to the shipping company's customers and some family members. The only chance for the public to enjoy a once-in-a-life-time cruise is through trip raffles held by non-profit associations. Currently there are four trip raffles offering Great Lakes Cruises. Click here for a listing of trips




Annual Soo Gathering

06/03
The Soo Gathering is not far off and will be held Friday & Saturday, June 28 & 29.
Planned events include:
FRIDAY, June 28
9:30 a.m. Boatnerd Group Picture on the steps below the MacArthur Lock.
10:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m. Engineer's Day Open House. Visit the area between the Mac and Poe Locks.
4:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. Model boat regatta at Mission Point (pond next to Clyde’s)
6:30 PM - Tug Parade up and down the Mac Lock.
10:00-12:00 PM Boatnerd Slide Show, Roberta Bondar Park Pavillion, Soo, Ont. (the big white permanent tent). Bring your lawn chair and a tray of your best slides.

SATURDAY, JUNE 29
9:00 am International Bridge Walk leaves from Lake Superior State Univ. Norris Center. Buses return walkers to US side.
12:00 Noon - Tugs Races in lower Soo harbor. Best viewing from Alford Park (east of the power plant )in US, or Bondar Park in Ontario.
6:00 PM The Annual Boatnerd 3-hour Boat Chasing Cruise aboard the Chief Shingwauk, the official Boatnerd Cruise Boat, leaves Bondar Park, Soo, Ontario. $16.00 US, $23.00 CDN. Pizza and snacks included. Cash Bar on board. Advance reservations required - Send check to Lock Tours Canada, PO Box 325, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario P6A 5L8, or call 1-877-226-3665 with your credit card. This trip sells out each year, please reserve your tickets early.

If you plan to attend please click here




Weekly Updates

06/03
The weekly updates have been uploaded. Click here to view




Today in Great Lakes History - June 3

The JOHN B. AIRD was christened in 1983 at Thunder Bay for Algoma Central Marine, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

After successfully completing her sea trials on June 3, 1951, the CLIFFS VICTORY entered service a little under six months from the time she was purchased from the U.S.M.C.

The PATERSON (1) entered service on June 3, 1954 with 440,000 bushels of wheat from Port Arthur.

On 3 June 1870, T. F. PARK (wooden side-wheeler, 170', 450 t, built in 1851 at Chatham, Ontario) caught fire and burned to the waterline at the dock near the Detroit & Milwaukee Grain Elevator at Detroit, Michigan. The hull was later removed after being struck by several vessels.

On 3 June 1875, the iron carferry HURON (238', 1052 gt) was launched at Point Edward, Ontario for the Grand Trunk Railway. Miss Jessie S. Hughes of Toronto christened the vessel with a bottle of wine. The hull's iron plates were manufactured in Scotland and shipped to Point Edward where they were assembled. Work began on 12 August 1874. Her engine and boiler were built by Mr. Wilson at Dundas, Ontario. This vessel ran between Windsor and Detroit for over a century.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Tucker Headed for Thunder Bay

06/02
The Capt. Ralph Tucker began an unusual trip late Saturday night when it departed Allied Chemical in Amherstburg, Ont. The vessel spent the day loading at the dock on the Detroit River and upon departure reported their destination as Thunder Bay.

Since entering service for McKeil the small tanker has been dedicated to a route between Amherstburg and Manistee, Mi.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Busy Day in Oshawa

06/02
The Port of Oshawa was very active Saturday with the Mecta Sea and the Federal Rhine both unloading steel. The tugs Lac Como and Glenevis are docked waiting to assist both ships when they leave port in the next few days.

The Fisheries & Oceans ship Advent was on one of her patrol visits to the port.

Comra was on standby for any search and rescue work that may be required. The Marine Rescue Association boat (a former 1961 Florida Fishing boat purchased by the City of Oshawa) is manned by volunteers.

Federal Rhine & Mecta Sea unloading.
Comra ready for action.
Comra Volunteers Capt. Rob Platt & Crew members Joe Walsh and Scott Logan.
Comra pamphlet.
Page 2.
Looking up at one of the deck cranes.
Close up of super structure.
Federal Rhine unloading steel beams.
Another view. Douglas Essery
Tugs Lac Como & Glenevis docked.

Reported by: Jim Gallacher




Saginaw Update

06/02
The Calumet arrived on the Saginaw River early Saturday morning, lightering at the Bay City Wirt Stone Dock before continuing upriver to the Saginaw Wirt Dock to finish. She departed the Saginaw Dock around 11:30 a.m., turned in the 6th Street Turning Basin, and headed out to the lake.

The barge Joseph H. Thompson and tug Joseph H. Thompson, Jr. were inbound at Light 1 around 11:30 a.m. She unloaded her complete cargo at the Bay City Wirt Dock before departing around 8:00 p.m.

The barge Great Lakes Trader and tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort were next in, passing Smith Park in Essexville around 2:25 p.m. She lightered at Essexville Sand & Stone before heading up to finish unloading in Saginaw a few hours later.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Joseph H. Thompson upbound at the Essroc Terminal.
Close up view.
Stern View at Dow Chemical.
Unloading at Bay City Wirt.
Great Lakes Trader - Joyce L. upbound at Essroc.
Close up view.
Stern View.
Calumet downbound approaching the Thompson.
Calumet close up.
Stern view.
Another view.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Welland Canal Traffic

06/02
Below are photos taken at the Welland Canal Saturday Morning.

Canadian Mariner downbound below Lock 3.
Stern View.
Algorail upbound below Lock 3.
Stern View.
Algogulf at IMS.
Enterprise and hull of the Louis R. Desmarais at IMS.
Gordon C Leitch below Lock 8.
Stern View.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Toronto & Hamilton News

06/02
The tug Wendy B. remains in Toronto moored ahead of Seaway Queen at Pier 35. The salties Flinterspirit and Moor Laker arrived overnight Saturday at Pier 35 and Pier 51.

The CCG Griffon departed via the East Gap just after 9:00 a.m. and arrived at Hamilton just after noon. Shortly after the Griffon departed, CGR 100 passed through the harbor. Departing Toronto Friday were the USCG Neah Bay and the Fisheries and Oceans vessel Merlin, which had been in Toronto as part of the flotilla of small coast guard, fisheries and hydrographic vessels attending a hydrographic conference with the Griffon.

Late Friday night the Stephen B. Roman departed after transferring her cargo to the barge Metis. The saltie Sunay-A was berthed at Pier 52, having arrived overnight Thursday. There were some dockside emergency service vehicles attending to her early that day. Federal Maas remained at Pier 52; Cashin continues unloading at Redpath Sugar dock. The tug Mister Joe and barge Pitts 12 remain at Pier 35. The Still Watch (ex-CCG Ville Warie) was at Pier 28 having some dockside work done on her stern by shore side crane.

Recently the charter vessel Capt. Matthew Flinders went to Ashbridge's Bay for a day's film shoot for a Lotto 649 television ad.

At Hamilton, the big tug John Spence is getting new bow plating at McKeil's yard. The Christian Island ferry Sandy Graham is on Heddle's small drydock, while the McAsphalt 401 is on Heddle's large drydock.

McNally Marine are busy dredging just east of Burlington. The tug Manistique and dump scow are attending to the spud barge Pitts 2.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 2

In 1973 the SYLVANIA, downbound light in fog, collided with the FRANK PURNELL just north of the Detroit River Light at 0523 hours. The SYLVANIA suffered minor bow damage and went to Toledo for repairs.

On 2 June 1855, J. W. BLAKE (wooden scow-schooner, 68', 33 t, built in 1853 at Dover, Ohio) was carrying lumber in a storm four miles off Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin when she capsized. Her crew escaped in her yawl, but it was a very close call for one who was asleep below decks when she capsized. The vessel was later recovered and put back in service.

June 2, 1988 - The CITY OF MIDLAND 41 took on 17 truckloads of lake trout, which were planted off Beaver Island.

On 2 June 1882, INDUSTRY (wooden schooner, 63', 30 t, built in 1847 at Michigan City, IN) capsized and sank just a half mile from South Haven, MI. The three crewmen clung to the wreck for a while as rescue attempts were made from shore, but they all perished. The wreck later drifted to the beach about five miles south of town and went to pieces.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Vaasaborg Refloated

06/01
Friday the Vaasaborg was pulled free from the spot where it had grounded a week earlier in the St. Lawrence River. The small saltie secured at Contrecoeur Firday evening with the Aivik to take on the 1800 tonnes of cargo that had been offloaded.

There was no damage reported and the Vaasaborg resumed its journey Saturday to Menominee, MI. with a cargo of bleached wood pulp.

Reported by: Kent Malo




Atlantic Cedar renamed Reliance

06/01
Purvis Marine has renamed the tug Atlantic Cedar, which it purchased early last season. The new name, Reliance, was painted on the hull sometime in the last two weeks, perhaps during a recent stop at the MCM Drydock in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.

Reliance at the Purvis Dock picture by Jerry Masson

Reported by: John Chomniak




Marquette Update

06/01
The Mesabi Miner unloaded coal at Marquette's upper harbor Friday. The Fred White and Herbert Jackson are due in on Saturday.

Mesabi Miner unloading.
Another view.
Close up.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Soo News

06/01
Fog again delayed traffic in the St. Marys River Thursday night, with the St. Marys River closed for several hours early Friday. Vessel traffic was brisk throughout the day Friday, with downbound passages by Federal Agno, Irma, Paul R. Tregurtha, Kinsman Independent, Adam E. Cornelius, Sarah Spencer, Algosar, tug Avenger IV, Algobay and Presque Isle. Upbounders included George A. Stinson, Joseph L. Block, Algocape, Saginaw, Herbert C. Jackson, Fred R. White Jr. and Canadian Transport.

Pictures by: Roger LeLievre
Algocape heads out of the locks into a blustery Whitefish Bay.
Joseph L. Block departs the MacArthur Lock.
Another view of the Block showing the Wisconsin Central jackknife railroad bridge.
Herbert C Jackson upbound at Nine Mile Point.
Stern view of the Jackson.
Kinsman Independent on her way to Buffalo, passing Six Mile Point.
Saginaw passes Nine Mile Point headed for the Soo Locks.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre and Jerry Masson




Green Bay News

06/01
The Algoway departed Green Bay Friday morning followed a short time later by the David Z. Norton bound for Port Inland, MI. The Barbara Andrie is scheduled to arrive at Koch Materials on Sunday afternoon.

The Buffalo is scheduled to arrive at Western Lime Corp on Monday and then depart that evening for Port Inland.

Reported by: Jason Leino




Today in Great Lakes History - June 1

In 1943 the IRVING S. OLDS collided with the 524 foot steamer CHARLES O. JENKINS in heavy fog 28 miles northeast of Cleveland on Lake Erie and was holed eight feet above the water line. The OLDS was able to help the badly damaged JENKINS back to Cleveland by lashing the two vessels together. After a grueling seven hours the JENKINS was beached in the outer harbor to prevent her from sinking further. The OLDS was repaired in time to carry a then-record 17,817 gross tons of iron ore on June 13, 1943

In 1952 the J.L. Mauthe was launched at Great Lakes Engineering Works, River Rouge, MI.

The WHITEFISH BAY, loaded with 950,000 bushels of spring wheat, was cited as she carried the billionth metric ton of cargo through the Eisenhower Lock in 1983.

JOSEPH S. YOUNG (2) Launched June 1, 1907 as a) WILPEN for the Shenango Steamship Co., a subsidiary of Shenango Furnace Co., Cleveland, OH.

The H. LEE WHITE departed Sturgeon Bay light on her maiden voyage June 1, 1974 to load iron ore at Escanaba, MI for Indiana Harbor, IN.

June 1, 1902 - While northbound for Manistque, the ANN ARBOR NO. 1 went aground in a heavy fog about noon on South Manitou Island, but was able to free herself and to proceed undamaged.

June 1, 1938 - The PERE MARQUETTE 21, under the command of Captain Arthur Altschwager, was released from a sand bar in the outer harbor(Manitowoc) at 1:06 p.m today after being aground for six hours. Her sister ship, the PERE MARQUETTE 22, commanded by J.F. Johnson, freed the ferry after taking a line and pulling the big ship back off the bar.

June, 1958 The Ann Arbor #6 was taken out of service for extensive refitting. she was renamed Arthur K. Atkinson.

On 1 June 1887, LUCINDA VAN VALKENBURG (wooden schooner, 129', 302 gt, built in 1862 at Tonawanda, NY) collided with the iron steamer LEHIGH in fog and sank near Thunder Bay Island on Lake Huron. The crew was safely taken aboard the LEHIGH and brought to Port Huron.

On 1 June 1892, the steel bulk freighter CHOCTAW was launched at the Cleveland Shipbuilding Company (hull #17) in Cleveland, Ohio for the Lake Superior Iron Company. Her dimensions were 207' x 38' x 18' and she had a triple expansion steam engine 17', 29", 47" x 36". She was built as "monitor" type vessel based on whaleback design with all her cabins aft. She lasted until sunk in a collision in 1915.

Data from: Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series


This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history




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