Great Lakes NEWS & RUMOR Archive

* Report News

06/30:
The American two masted auxillary sailing vessel PRIDE OF BALTIMORE looked very graceful as she arrived in Montreal this evening. After an overnight stay she will enter the Seaway in transit to Detroit, Michigan

The Canadian Laker MONTREALAIS is out of her lay-up in Montreal and departed this evening for a St Lawrence Gulf port to load back for the Lakes

The rusty looking ex Socanav tanker Le Saule No 1 has been in-active in Sorel QC since January 07.97. Today she is being given a much needed coat of paint and now bears the name AL JOUL -Panamanian registry

The French sailing ship BELLE ESPOIR 11 is enjoying a visit to Montreal

Rumour has it that HMCS OKANAGAN, a submarine which has recently been undergoing a refit in Halifax Nova Scotia, will be entering the Seaway later in July

The 1979 built 30000ton bulker ELLIE is in the Cabot Strait off Newfoundland and is bound for the Port of Windsor ONT

Reported by: John Whitehead




U.S.S. Fahrion arrives at Port Weller

06/30:
At 7:15 p.m. on Sunday, June 29th, the Oliver Hazard Perry class, Guided Missile Frigate, U.S.S. Fahrion entered the Welland Canal and shortly thereafter tied up below lock one. It was a very calm evening so docking the 445 foot ship was no trouble however the McKeil tugs Argue Martin and Lac Erie were on hand just in case. The 15 year old ship is on the annual Great Lakes tour and will be visiting numerous ports throughout the lakes during July.

Reported by: Jeff Cameron




American Mariner visits Marinette

06/30:
The AMERICAN MARINER arrived on Saturday at the Marinette Fuel and Dock Co. in Marinette, WI. She off loaded an unknown amount of coal at the dock and departed at 6:00 PM.

Reported by: Wood




Today in Great Lakes History - June 30

On June 30, 1954, the Scott Misener began her maiden voyage.

In 1962 Cliffs Victory made her first trip down the Welland Canal with a load of iron ore for Hamilton, Ont.

The LEON FALK, JR.'s maiden voyage began on June 30, 1961 when she departed Baltimore and loaded 20,748 tons of iron ore at Sept Îles, Que. en route for Cleveland, OH and arrived there on July 8th. The FALK was one of seven T2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service.



Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Anderson to depart Bay Shipbuilding today

06/29:
Arthur M. Anderson is scheduled to depart Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay during late afternoon today.

Reported by: Al Miller




Port Stanley receives asphalt

06/29:
The first vessel carrying asphalt arrived in Port Stanley yesterday. The tanker Saturn delivered 7,000 metric tonnes of hot ashpalt cement to the McAsphalt Industries Marine Terminal.

Reported by: Richard Hill




Today in Great Lakes History - June 29

The BEECHGLEN was Launched in 1923 as a) CHARLES M. SCHWAB for the Interlake Steamship Co.

On June 29, 1962, the Canadian Hunter began her maiden voyage.

The JOSEPH L. BLOCK was christened on June 29, 1976.



Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

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Seaway Agencies Amend Tariff of Tolls

06/28:
Seaway Agencies Amend Tariff of Tolls with a 2½ percent cargo toll increase and the elimination of Welland Canal lockage fees.

(OTTAWA, June 25, 1997)-- The leaders of the Canadian St. Lawrence Seaway Authority and the U.S. Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation today announced that the two Seaway entities have agreed to amend the Seaway Tariff of Tolls, with a 2½ percent cargo toll increase, which goes into effect on August 1, 1997, and the elimination of Welland Canal vessel lockage fees beginning in 1998.

St. Lawrence Seaway Authority President Glendon R. Stewart and Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation Deputy Administrator David G. Sanders noted that the 2½ percent increase on both the Montreal/Lake Ontario and Welland Canal sections of The St. Lawrence Seaway System is the first rise in Seaway tolls since 1993. At the beginning of the 1998 navigation season, the Welland Canal lockage charge will be replaced with an increase in the Welland Canal cargo tolls and vessel charge per Gross Registered Ton (GRT).

"The Seaway toll agreement will help provide the Canadian Seaway Authority with the revenues necessary to continue offering commercial users with safe, efficient, and reliable transits through the Great Lakes Seaway System," Stewart said. "We believe that this modest increase will help us maintain our lock facilities and navigation channels to acceptable standards of safety and reliability."

Sanders hailed the new agreement and the elimination of the Welland Canal lockage charges beginning in 1998. "The elimination of this additional cost burden to our users achieves two important goals for our system. First, the elimination of the lockage fee will simplify the tolls process and make it easier to understand. Second, it will bring fairness to the Seaway System by placing all vessels on an even playing field."

Both leaders acknowledged this important U.S./Canadian binational agreement as a testimony to the strong working relationship of the two Seaway agencies, their long-term commitment to improve the cost competitiveness of the waterway, and to the current Seaway toll negotiation process.

Seaway tolls are collected by the Canadian Seaway Authority for the operations and maintenance of its locks and channels along the Montreal-Lake Ontario and the Welland Canal sections of the St. Lawrence Seaway System. The U.S. Seaway Corporation no longer collects tolls and is funded through annual appropriations from the U.S. Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund.

Information:Sylvie Moncion
(613) 598-4626

Reported by: St. Lawrence Seaway Authority




Bluenose II

06/28:
Bluenose II the Queen of the North Atlantic entered the Welland Canal the morning of June 27 enroute for Windsor Ont.

Reported by: Roger Tottman




Today in Great Lakes History - June 28

On June 28, 1938, at 8:50 a.m., the William A. Irvin departed Duluth with her first cargo of iron ore for Lorain, Ohio. 48 years later, in 1986, almost to the minute, the William A. Irvin opened as a museum to the public. I had the honor of conducting the first public tour aboard the vessel.

The ATLANTIC SUPERIOR arrived at the Algoma Steel Plant, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. on her maiden voyage in 1982 with a load of taconite but before she was unloaded christening ceremonies were conducted there.

the SAM LAUD ran aground June 28, 1975 on a shoal south of Sturgeon Bay, with a cargo of coal from Chicago, IL for Green Bay, WI. Six-thousand tons of coal were off-loaded the next day into the NICOLET before she could proceed to Green Bay along with the NICOLET to discharge cargoes. SAM LAUD entered the dry dock at Sturgeon Bay on July 3rd for repairs. She had suffered extensive bottom damage with leakage into seven double bottom tanks and the forepeak. She returned to service on August 21, 1975.

Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

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News from the Twin Ports

06/27:
The normally quiet C. Reiss coal dock on the St. Louis River is scheduled to receive its second caller in three days June 27 when H. Lee White is to call. Armco was there to unload coal June 25. After unloading at Reiss, the White will go to the BNSF ore dock to load. Even though the White will be "shifting in the harbor," the trip from Reiss to BN is about 6 to 8 miles.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - June 27

CANADIAN RANGER was launched in 1967 by Davie Shipbuilding Ltd., Lauzon, Que. as a) CHIMO, C.323030, for the Canada Steamship Lines Ltd.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

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Canadian Mariner to enter dry docks today

06/26:
The Canadian Mariner is due to arrive at Port Weller Dry Docks at 1500 hrs today to effect repairs to the damage from grounding in the St. Lawrence River. No Estimate of how long this will take as yet.

Reported by: Roger Tottman




News from the Twin Ports

06/26:
Armco made a two-way coal run to Duluth-Superior on June 25. The vessel unloaded coal up the St. Louis River at the C. Reiss Coal Dock in Duluth during the morning, then came back down the river in the afternoon to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal.

Once a common sight in the Twin Ports, the St. Clair now comes here only occasionally. On June 25 the vessel paid a rare call to the DMIR ore dock.

Reported by: Al Miller




Great Lakes Delegation Lining Up Behind Jones Act

06/26:
As of June 25, 173 members of the House of Representatives have signed House Continuing Resolution 65, a statement of full support for the Jones Act. Joining the list of Great Lakes legislators are Dingell (Michigan), Strickland (Ohio) and LaFalce (New York).

The Jones Act is one of several U.S. "Cabotage" laws and reserves the movement of cargo between U.S. ports to ships which are U.S.-owned, U.S.-built and U.S.-crewed. Although the Jones Act dates from 1920, the United States has had Cabotage laws since 1789 and these laws have fostered a domestic fleet second to none. The U.S.-Flag Great Lakes is the largest assemblage of self-unloading vessels in the world. For information on how the Jones Act benefits other regions of the country, please visit the homepage of the Maritime Cabotage Task Force, the national organization promoting the U.S. Cabotage laws.

Legislation to largely repeal the Jones Act was introduced in the House by Michigan Congressman Nick Smith, but the bill (H. R. 1991) has a mere 11 co-sponsors.

Click here to see a listing by state of those supporting lakes shipping
including links to their web pages and e-mail address!




News from the Twin Ports

06/25:
While the rest of the Midwest sweltered, the Duluth-Superior harbor was blanketed by a chilly fog. The fog prompted Philip R. Clarke to slow to a crawl as it entered Duluth about 7 a.m. June 24.

Arthur M. Anderson is due into Sturgeon Bay today, apparently bound for the shipyard. No word was given on how long it may be there.

Reported by: Al Miller




Great Lakes Ports Share In Rising Tonnages

06/25:
Shipments of iron ore, stone and coal from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 16.6 million tons in May, an increase of 3.8 percent compared to the corresponding period last year.

Iron ore cargos totaled 7,850,317 net tons, a decrease of 2.7 percent. The decline resulted from reduced shipments in Canadian lakers from St. Lawrence River ports.

A record-setting month for Canadian stone docks pushed the Lakes limestone and gypsum trade up 14.7 percent to 4.8 million tons. Coal cargos on the Lakes in May approached 4 million tons, an increase of 5.5 percent.

For the season, loadings of iron ore, stone and coal stand at 32.5 million tons, an increase of 13.7 percent. Iron ore cargos are up 6.3 percent. Stone loadings have increased 18.7 percent. The Lakes coal trade is nearly 27 percent ahead of last year's pace.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers Association




Tankers first Seaway Transit

06/25:
The 1994 built 17080 DWT tanker HAVELSTERN was in the Cabot Strait off Newfoundland at 0624/0025 and reported bound for Sarnia ONT. Part of a fleet of tankers owned by Rigel Schiffarts, the Havelstern's registry was recently revised from Germany to "Isle of Man". The good looking ice-reinforced blue hulled vessel will be making it's first Seaway transit, and the first IOM vessel to do so. She has been a regular year round visitor to Montreal since 1994. Rigel Schiffarfts is related to Rigel Shipping-Canada who operate the 6000 DWT chemical tankers DIAMOND STAR, JADE STAR, and EMERALD STAR year round in the Great Lakes and Canadian coastal trades

Reported by: John Whitehead




News from the Seaway

06/25:
The Bluenose will be in Toronto until Friday June 27. The HMS Bounty arrived in Toronto on June 23 and will be there until Tuesday July 1.

Germaster (spelling ?)(E) 1145 Cape Vincent stopped at 1140 due to engine problems. She had no engines for five minutes and then got underway and headed back toward the lake for repairs. She was anchored 1.5 miles SW of Tibbetts Point (44 04.29N , 76 23.97W) making repairs to a cracked #1 cylinder head> Repairs were completed and the ship got under way, at 1810 she was at Cape Vincent, 2116 for the Crossover.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Canadian Mariner aground more details

06/25:
Updates and corrections to the vessels that aided in the refloating of the Mariner. The tug Wyatt McKeil was not spelled correctly. The lighter was the D.C. Everest a.k.a. Condarrel (a former canaler/package freighter) and the spud barge Henry T was utilized with a crawler crane aboard to do the clamming. The Henry T was pulled from dredging at Burlington Piers to assist in the operation and will resume dredging in Hamilton today.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Today in Great Lakes History - June 25

1927 the B.F. Affleck was launched at Toledo Shipbuilding Co.

On June 25, 1938, the William A. Irvin began her maiden voyage, leaving Lorain, Ohio for Duluth to load iron ore.

The ALGOBAY collided head-on with the steamer MONTREALAIS in foggy conditions on the St. Clair River June 25, 1980 causing extensive bow damage to both vessels. Repairs to the ALGOBAY were made by Herb Fraser & Associates, Port Colborne, Ont. at an estimated cost of $500,000. She returned to service by mid August, 1980.

INDIANA HARBOR set a Great Lakes cargo record on June 25, 1993 loading 71,369 tons of western low sulfur coal at Superior (WI) Midwest Energy Terminal and transporting it 50 miles to Silver Bay, MN.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Andy Hering and Ahoy & Farewell II

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Hamilton Transfer Available for Hire in 1998

06/24:
An advertisement in the June 16th edition of "Canadian Sailings" report that ULS' Hamilton Transfer will be available for hire in 1998. The Hamilton Transfer is the ex- Crispin Oglebay, which was purchased by ULS in 1995 and converted to a cargo transfer ship, stationed at Dofasco Steel in Hamilton, Ontario. The vessel was employed at Dofasco after a shore side unloader collapsed and killed its operator. A transversing gantry crane was installed on the vessel at Port Weller Dry Docks. Dofasco receives most of their raw materials from straight deck bulk carriers, where shore side unloading equipment is necessary. It has been reported in the past that while the Hamilton Transfer has been adequate in her new role, she has not lived up to expectations. Dofasco has announced that they will replace the shore based unloader, apparently by 1998.

Reported by: Mark Jackson




Dredge Columbus to the rescue

06/24:
The dredge Columbus assisted (actually did all the work) the Marblehead Coast Guard in putting out a boat fire Sunday. The 20' boat was totally engulfed . The Columbus used one of its big deck guns to put the fire out..

Reported by: Brian McCune




Today in Great Lakes History - June 24

On June 24, 1971, a fire broke out in the engine room of the ROGER BLOUGH killing four yard workers and extensively damaging her Pielstick diesel engines. Extensive repairs, which included replacement of both engines, delayed the launch for nearly a year.

The RIDGETOWN was launched June 24, 1905 as a) WILLIAM E. COREY, the first flagship for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

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News from the Twin Ports

06/23:
Coast Guard Cutter Sundew departed Duluth over the weekend for Sturgeon Bay. No word on the reason for the trip. Meanwhile, Cutter Buckthorn is paying a rare call to the Twin Ports, docking at the Coast Guard dock until June 26.

Vessel lineups continue at Midwest Energy Terminal. Columbia Star was into the dock June 22 to load. It was just departing Monday morning while Mesabi Miner began loading coal and Oglebay Norton waited at the port terminal.

Reported by: Al Miller




Full Speed Ahead For Jones Act Lakers

06/23:
U.S.-Flag carriers hauled 13.9 million net tons of dry- and liquid-bulk cargo on the Lakes in May, an increase of 4.1 percent compared to the same period last year.

Iron ore cargos for the steel industry totaled 7,045,225 tons, an increase of 6.5 percent. Stone loadings in U.S. bottoms rose 8.4 percent to 3.6 million tons. Coal cargos increased slightly to 2,452,422 tons.

For the season, U.S.-Flag carriage stands at 28.5 million tons, an increase of 16.4 percent. While the increase reflects continued strong demand for cargo, the industry benefitted from more normal ice conditions in March and April which allowed vessels to resume operations without the excessive delays encountered at the start of the 1996 navigation season.

With the June 13 sailing of the CALCITE II (USS Great Lakes Fleet, Inc.), all boom-type self-unloaders are in service. The only U.S.-Flag ships yet to sail this year are the small cement carriers E. M. FORD and S. T. CRAPO and the straight-decker KINSMAN ENTERPRISE. Reported by: the Lake Carriers Association




Don't Be "Buffaloed"

06/23:
On June 18, Michigan Congressman Nick Smith introduced legislation to "reform" the Jones Act. Joining Congressman Smith were nine other members of the House and a Representative from Guam. Although the list of co-sponsors is a slight increase over those who backed Smith's failed HR 4006, it is surely a disappointment for Jones Act Reform Coaltion President Rob Quartel, seeing as he purports to represent "nearly 900,000 American ... economic interests" opposed to the Jones Act. In contrast, 167 members of the House have signed House Continuing Resolution 65 in support of the Jones Act and the list continues to grow.

Lake Carriers' Association intends to refute each and every criticism leveled at the Jones Act, and to begin with, will address Congressman Smith's May 19, 1997 "Dear Colleague" letter in which he contends that the Jones Act forces the city of Buffalo, N.Y. "to buy Canadian salt when a domestic supply is only 60 miles away." The letter states that "a salt mine employing (sic) 200 people with a capacity of 4 million tons a year operates (sic) only sixty miles away from Buffalo in Retsof, New York. This mine, and another mine nearby, could provide more than enough road salt to meet regional demand given access to efficient, cost-effective transportation options. Because they cannot obtain efficient waterborne transportation, Canadian salt is imported into port cities such as Buffalo, New York...."

Congressman Smith's letter further states "no Jones Act-qualified vessels are available to carry salt from one U.S. Great Lakes port to another."

Congressman Smith's information on the Lakes salt trade is so wrong it's embarrassing. First, on April 26 of this year, a U.S.-Flag laker, the PHILIP R. CLARKE, set a new record for the Lakes Jones Act salt trade by delivering 27,621 net tons of salt TO BUFFALO! Where was this cargo loaded? Fairport Harbor, Ohio, a short 146 miles away!

During the past few navigation seasons, no less than 9 U.S.-Flag lakers operated by four different carriers have hauled salt. These self-propelled vessels and tug/barge units have a combined per-trip capacity of 178,000 gross tons (200,000 net tons). U.S-Flag lakers have hauled roughly 11 million net tons of salt since 1985 (the year LCA began its survey of U.S.-Flag cargo carriage on the Great Lakes).

Concerning the Retsof Mine, it has been closed since March 1994 when a cave-in caused it to flood. Its closing had nothing to do with transportation issues. And, given that it lies 60 miles east of Buffalo, it was inaccessible to ships.

Please visit the Lake Carriers Association Homepage for more straight talk on the Jones Act's supposed shortcomings




Today in Great Lakes History - June 23

In 1926 the Lemoyne was launched at Midland Shipbuilding Co, Midland Ont. She was 6 feet wider and 4 feet shallower than the largest ship at that time.
1929 the Calcite II was launched at American Shipbuilding Co., Lorain OH
Launched in 1972 was the ALGOWAY (2) at Collingwood

Data from: Andy Hering and Ahoy & Farewell II

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Canadian Mariner aground more details

06/22:
(See original story dated 6/19) After partial unloading to barges on Thursday (6/19) night [except during passing rain/thunder storms] and Friday (6/20) all day and into the night. The CANADIAN MARINER was pulled off the shoal adjacent to Crossover Island, NY at 1015 EDT today 6/21/1997.

Tugs pressed into service for the effort were:
ROBINSON BAY S.L.S.D.C. Massena NY
CAROLYN JO McKeil Marine Ltd Hamilton Ont
EVANS MCKEIL McKeil Marine Ltd Hamilton Ont
GLENBROOK McKeil Marine Ltd Hamilton Ont
JOHN SPENCE McKeil Marine Ltd Hamilton Ont
WYATT MCKEIL McKeil Marine Ltd Hamilton Ont

Also assisting with the unloading efforts was the crane barge DC EVEREST.

Although several lines of 2.5 - 3 inches in diameter were snapped (broken) in the process of pulling the CANADIAN MARINER off the shoal there were no reported casualties or injuries.

CANADIAN MARINER was assisted to the Prescott Ont. anchorage area for inspection. She was subsiquently approved for Seaway transit provided that a SLSDC Pilot remained aboard and in command. She departed from an anchorage 1728 yesterday to continue passage eastward to Quebec City.

Reported by: David Aitcheson and John Whitehead




Ryerson loads in record time

06/22:
First Mate Steve Vandercook had everything going his way Thursday June 12 when he loaded the Edward L. Ryerson with 27,067 tons of Taconite in a record time of 2 hours and 51 minutes. The load was on the dock upon arrival, the engineers were able to pump out the ballast without delay and it was a beautiful late afternoon in Marquette at the LS&I ore dock.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Oglebay Norton buys vessels

06/22:
Oglebay Norton Co. said it bought the vessels DAVID Z. NORTON and WOLVERINE from GATX Capital Corp., according to a news service report in the June 21 Duluth News-Tribune. Cleveland-based Oglebay Norton has leased the ships since the 1970s, said Stuart Theis, ON vice president of marine transport. Low interest rates and expiration of the leases in 1998 and 1999, respectively, made the purchases in the company's best interest, he said.

Reported by: Al Miller




Seaway Queen undergoing repairs

06/22:
SEAWAY QUEEN will be at Port Weller for several weeks while workers there replace metal inside the ship's cargo hold. According to sources the port and starboard side tanks in holds #1,2 and 5 will receive the most attention while lesser repairs will be made throughout the vessel's cargo hold. Although specifics were not provided, a series of general repairs will be put in on machinery in the engine room as well. Externally, SEAWAY QUEEN will be entirely sandblasted and repainted.

Reported by:Jeff Cameron




Provmar Terminal II is now officially a barge

06/22:
Although PROVMAR TERMINAL II has served Provmar Fuels for the last decade as a fuel storage facility, the ship has remained entirely intact in the condition she was left following her retirement. There had been hope and speculation through past years that she may once again set sail under her own power and return to active service. With her visit to Port Weller Drydocks any hope anyone may have had of seeing the former IMPERIAL SARNIA running again was put to rest. The vessel's propeller and shaft were removed and the remaining hole was welded up. In addition all of the through hull fittings, water intakes and discharges, other than those required by the bilge pumps, were also welded shut. Any future movements will be handled by tugs.

At 9:00 a.m. on June 21st, the tugs GLENSIDE and ARGUE MARTIN pulled the PROVMAR TERMINAL II from Port Weller Drydocks and headed downbound through lock one of the Welland Canal. The tow was enroute back to Hamilton where the former tanker will resume her storage and transfer duties.

Reported by:Jeff Cameron




Other news from the Seaway

06/22:
The cdn tugs Glenbrook and Wyatt Mckeil were at Iroquois lock eastbound for Montreal at 1718. The cdn tug Evans Mckeil was west bound at Cape Vincent for Oshawa ONT at 1600. The Cdn tug Carolyn Jo was also at Iroquois at 1718 east bound for Valleyfield QC. The laker Cuyahoga, after an overnight discharge in Montreal left quickly for the Seaway. She departed Prescott Ont for Hamilton at 1851.

The USS FARHION is in Quebec City and expected in Montreal on June24 for a one day visit before entering the Seaway for the Great Lakes

Reported by: John Whitehead




Today in Great Lakes History - June 22

The DAVID Z. NORTON (2) was Launched and christened as the WILLIAM R. ROESCH on June 22, 1973 for the Union Commerce Bank, Ohio (Trustee) and managed by the Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland, OH.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

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Canadian Mariner aground in St. Lawrence River - update

06/21:
(See original story dated 6/19) Early reports are that the damage to the Mariner is extensive. A gash of some 200 feet runs under the number 1, 2, and 3 holds with bow thruster damage, (this is expensive to repair). The #1 tank was open to the sea and flooding faster than the pumps could handle while #2 tank was breached but under control. The ship, having just been released from a reported one million dollar dry docking at Port Weller, had been expriencing a vibration on the trip up to the lake head. It is speculated that the vibration caused a pivot bolt on the steering gear to turn, thus wearing the cotter pin causing it to break & allowing the pivot bolt to fall out. Had this happened in the middle of the lake; no problem. Unfortunetly it let go in the St. Lawrence.

It was reported that one crew member fell over board but was pulled on board with no injury. The impact was enough that the ship was raised 6 feet at the bow. Although it took the effort of several tugs the damaged vessel was finally freed and inspected. Shortly thereafter, permission was given to the ship to proceed on to Quebec City, discharge her grain payload and make directly from there to Port Weller Drydocks. Canadian Mariner is expected to arrive at the drydock by the end of June for necessary repairs.

Reported by: Ross James and Jeff Cameron




St Lawrence Water report

06/21:
St Lawrence Water Control Board Report..June 18. 1997 "The water level in Lake Ontario dropped 1cm in the last week. Outflow will be held at maximum possible without stopping navigation in Lower St Lawrence River and Seaway areas.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Eastern Arctic Sea lift

06/21:
The 1997 season of shipments from Seaway-East to the Canadian Arctic opened with the departure of the Cdn dry-cargo vessel LUCIEN-PAQUIN. The 1969 built 9441ton ex Boreland-79 etc departed Cote St Catherine wharf for Quebec to complete loading. The ship will make several lifts before ice in the Arctic closes navigation at the end of 1997

Reported by: John Whitehead




Today in Great Lakes History - June 21

On June 21, 1942, the Alpena--formerly the Leon Fraser--entered service as the largest vessel on the Great Lakes. The former U.S. Steel bulk freighter, originally 639'6" long, retained at least a tie for that honor until the Wilfred Sykes entered service on April 19, 1950.

Also on June 21, 1942, the U.S. Steel bulk freighter Eugene J. Buffington ran hard aground on Boulder Reef in Lake Michigan and broke in two. The vessel was subsequently recovered and, after a long career with U.S. Steel, was finally sold for scrap in 1980.

On June 21, 1986, during a severe thunderstorm (and unofficial observations of a funnel cloud) in the Duluth area, the Joshua A. Hatfield broke loose from Azcon Scrap Dock in Duluth and was blown across the harbor and ended up hard aground on Park Point (Minnesota Point). She remained stuck for nearly 3 weeks when a storm with east winds pushed the Hatfield free and she blew most of the way back across the harbor back to the scrap dock! Tugs were dispatched in time to safely guide the Hatfield back to the scrap dock. (June seems to be a bad month for U.S. Steel in accidents, with the June 7, 1977 accident involving the William A. Irvin, the June 15, 1943 collision between the D.M. Clemson and the George M. Humphrey, and the June 21, 1942 grounding of the Eugene J. Buffington on Boulder Reef.)

Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

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Cuyahoga transits Seaway

06/20:
At 1602 yesterday the Cuyahoga was Eastbound at Snell Lock on her very first transit of the St Lawrence Seaway, and is bound for Montreal QC. The American Laker J BURTON AYERS, built as the MESABI in 1943 in Lorain OH was purchased in 1995 by Black Creek Shipping Co Ltd (Lower Lakes Towing) and renamed CUYAHOGA under the Canadian flag.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Windoc Suffers engine problems

06/20:
The WINDOC suffered engine problems on Wednesday June 18 in lock 1 Welland Canal & the problem was exactly the same as the CARTIERDOC - a seized Turbo Charger.

Reported by: Dan Ocean




News from the Twin Ports

06/20:
Buckeye paid a rare call June 19 to the BNSF ore dock in Superior. It apparently took a partial load before proceeding to Silver Bay to finish loading.

Midwest Energy Terminal has seen a continual parade of boats since last weekend. As soon as one boat has left, another has taken its place, sometimes within the hour. The lineup has included Columbia Star, Oglebay Norton, Indiana Harbor, Walter J. McCarthy Jr., Lee A. Tregurtha with coal for Taconite Harbor, and, on June 19, Paul R. Tregurtha.

Reported by: Al Miller




Samuel Risley in dry dock

06/20:
The Canadian Coast Guard ship "Samuel Risley" entered drydock at PASCOL Engineering in Thunder Bay, Ontario on Wednesday. PASCOL was awarded the $250,000 contract to conduct the vessels mandatory 5-year inspection and refit. The work is expected to take at least three weeks to complete. It's the first government contract for PASCOL since taking over the former Port Arthur Shipbuilding Company.

Reported by: Richard Boon




Beauharnois Canal Section of the St Lawrence Seaway closed

06/20:
Traffic on the canal was terminated at 9:15 am EDT yesterday to permit re-alignment of the pathways of the St Louis lifting bridge 180ft long road and rail span. Ship traffic was light and the Canadian Empress was the only vessel affected by the closing. Reports are that traffic resumed early afternoon

Reported by: John Whitehead




Hannah tug visits Manistee

06/20:
The Mary Page Hannah/Hannah 2901 recently arrived in manistee. What is odd about this is that the Mary Hannah is only 60 feet long, the previous tugs pushing the 2901 in were 150 feet. This is the 4th Hannah barge in to Manistee. The barge switched tugs in Chicago.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Today in Great Lakes History - June 20

The WILLIAM P. COWAN cleared Lorain on her maiden voyage in 1918

In 1903 the twin screw rail car ferry GRAND HAVEN was launched for the Grand Trunk Carferry Line, Milwaukee, WI.

On June 20, 1953, the Canada Steamship Lines bulk freighter Burlington collided with and sank the Scotiadoc in Lake Superior.

On June 20, 1959, the Seaway Queen began her maiden voyage. The vessel was appropriately named, as at the time she was the largest Canadian vessel on the Great Lakes, the 2nd largest on the Great Lakes overall (behind the Edmund Fitzgerald), and she entered service the same week that Queen Elizabeth II and President Dwight D. Eisenhower formally dedicated the St. Lawrence Seaway. To this day, she remains one of the more popular and classic looking vessels on the Great Lakes.

Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

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Canadian Mariner aground in St. Lawrence River

06/19:
The Canadian Mariner ran aground at about 1030 EDT yesterday after losing steerage. Reports are the vessel was hard aground in the St. Lawrence River at light 162 taking on water. She was fully loaded with wheat and some of the cargo was reported as wet. At noon yesterday the area was beset with fog limiting visibility to one half mile or less, traffic was suspended in the area due to the grounding.

About 2130 EDT, a SLSDC 20 ft Boston Whaler had taken 3 *company* inspectors (all Captians) from a temporary shore base at Blind Bay Marina to the Canadian Mariner. Visibility in the area was at or below 1 mile due to fog

Reported by: David Aitcheson




Companies win prestigious awards for technologial innovation and best management practices.

06/19:
In May, Seaway Self Unloaders of St. Catharines, Ontario, received the "Best Transportation Solution" Award at the COMMON Conference Exposition in Boston, Massachusetts, for two new telecommunications applications. SSU's new communications system modernizes and streamlines the scheduling process for SSU's 18 vessel fleet. The "Best Transportation Solution" Award is presented to organizations throughout Canada and the United States that have shown "exceptional creativity in building leading-edge, cost-effective systems."

Groupe Desgagnes of Quebec City was ranked among Canada's 50 Best Managed Private Companies. The competition highlighed the company's best practices, in areas such as strategic planning, use of innovative and efficient management tools, and employee morale. Groupe Desgagnes was chosen from almost 1,000 companies in this contest sponsored by The Financial Post, Canadian Airlines, Bell Canada, Arthur Andersen, and Le Groupe Mallette Maheu.

"The awards are a reflection of our members' commitment to be attractive and efficient transportation providers," said Capt. Rejean Lanteigne. "They show that the industry is doing its part."

Seaway Self Unloader is responsible for the traffic and marketing functions of the combined fleet of the Upper Lakes Group and Algoma Central Corporation. Groupe Desgagnes provides shipping and passenger services.

For more information, please contact the Canadian Shipowners Association or the companies directly.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 19

1954 the George M. Humphrey (named for President Eisenhower's Secretary of Treasury) launched at American Shipbuild Co., Lorain, OH

In 1978, the Algobay was launched at Collingwood.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Andy Hering, and Ahoy & Farewell II

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Cartierdoc loses power in the Welland Canal

06/18:
At roughly 1:30 p.m., Sunday, June 15 the Cartierdoc lost power while upbound in ballast in the Welland Canal. The vessel came to rest on the mud bank between lock 2 and the Homer Street Bridge on the west side of the canal approximately 2,500 feet from the bridge. After inspection, McKiel's tug Argue Martin was called from Port Weller to assist the vessel back to lock 2 approach wall. The vessel was towed stern first and secured above lock 2 at 7:30 p.m. After repairs the vessel departed at 0030 hours June 17 bound Thunder Bay. Canal traffic was stopped from 1400 to 2000 hours.

The Lake Superior, Regina Oldendorff and Dixie Commander were delayed for 6 hours during the incident.

Reported by: Mark Shumaker




Legendary boatbuilder

06/18:
Reuben Hill, a legendary North Shore boatbuilder, who along with his father and brothers crafted more than 120 wooden fishing and sailboats, died Sunday at 92. Boats built by the Hill family formed the backbone of the commercial fishing industry along Minnesota's North Shore and on Isle Royale. They built row boats, fish boats, freight boats, sloops, sailboats and even five 120-foot antisubmarine boats during World War II.

Reported by: Al Miller




Seaway Queen to enter dry dock today

06/18:
The SEAWAY QUEEN will be moved from the fitout berth into the shelf dock about 0800 hours today.

Reported by: Jeff Cameron




Provmar Terminal II towed to Port Weller Drydocks

06/18:
At about 11:00 a.m., on Tuesday June 17th, the McKiel tugs GLENSIDE and LAC ERIE arrived at Port Weller Drydocks towing the fuel storage barge and former steamer PROVMAR TERMINAL II (a) IMPERIAL SARNIA (II)(86). Apparently, the ship is to undergo a hull survey and possible repairs should they be needed. PROVMAR TERMINAL II has been moored at Provmar Fuels' Hamilton dock since December 15th, 1986, and has been used since then for the storage and transfer of ship fuels from the mainland to Provmar's bunkering vessel HAMILTON ENERGY. PROVMAR TERMINAL II was floated into Port Weller's deep dock shortly following her arrival. The LAC ERIE returned to Hamilton once PROVMAR TERMINAL II was secured while GLENSIDE remained behind at the drydocks presumably to assist the tug JAMES E. McGRATH in moving the SEAWAY QUEEN. The barge was noted to be heavily covered with Zebra Mussels.

Reported by: Jeff Cameron




Jennie departs Port weller Dry Docks

06/18:
The JEANNIE departed Port Weller Dry Docks on Sunday, June 15 and headed towards Thunder Bay to load a cargo of wheat for Libya.

The Greek flagged vessel had entered Port Weller Dry Dock on May 22, for repairs caused by a grounding in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Reported by: Mark Shumaker




Bluenose and HMS Bounty

06/18:
The schedule for the Bluenose is as follows: June 16-17 Cornwall, June 18 Prescott, June 19 Brockville, June 20 -22 Kingston, June 23-27 Toronto, June 29-July 2 Windsor, July 3-5 Sarnia and July 10-12 Thunder Bay. there will be an accompanying Caravan with displays. Both the caravan and ship will be open for free tours .

HMS Bounty is due in Kingston on June 16. Apparently, for a charge, you can take a cruise on the ship.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Today in Great Lakes History - June 18

In 1949 the Wilfred Sykes was launched at American Shipbuilding Co., Lorain, OH. At the time she was the largest and most powerful vessel on the lakes. The Sykes was also the first boat to have a poop deck.

1964 The Saguenay was launced at Davie Ship Building Ltd., Lauzon, Quebec

1968 the Algocen was launched at Collingwood

Data from: Andy Hering, and Ahoy & Farewell II

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M.V. Joseph H. Frantz grazes bridge

06/17:
At approximately 1900 hours 6/16/97 contact was made on the Veterans Memorial Bridge in the Saginaw River at Bay City, Michigan. The vessel Joseph H Frantz was outbound from the Wirt Stone Dock in Saginaw when the incident occurred.

The bridge tender attempted to make contact with the Frantz when it was realized the bridge was not responding to the tenders attempt. A radio problem in the bridge, made it impossible for the bridge to notify the Frantz. The master of the Frantz [Capt. Gary Meilke] realized the bridge was malfunctioning and dropped the stern anchor, and reversed the engine.

The Frantz blew the whistle at least 3 times for an opening and there was broken radio communication from the bridge. The Frantz's master informed the bridge tender that engines were reversed and that they should try to open at least one side of the span, and he'd try to go through that way.

The Frantz grazed the east span in a down position as the west span had been raised. With the stern anchor chain still in the water, she proceeded through the Liberty Bridge and tied up at Wirt Stone Dock in Bay City for inspection. According to the dock crew at Wirt, there was damage sustained to the forward starboard railings, as well as the deck boat launch. Frantz was to proceed outbound for the lake after at 30 minute stop, at which time the Saginaw River Coast Guard came alongside to assist in the visual inspection. It appears that there was no contact below the water line.

Reported by: Lon Morgan and Dan Maus




English River out of Dry Dock

06/17:
English River was pulled out of Port Weller Friday Afternoon and was downbound later that night.

Reported by: Roger Tottman




High winds cause problems

06/17:
Seaway East is having problems with wind gusts up to 50 miles per hour which are causing minor delays and inconvenience.
At 11.48am Seaway Beauharnois (Control) advised that smoke was coming from the wooden baulks on the Cote St Catherine Lock stopping walls. The approaching west bound laker Gordon C Leitch advised she would stand by with fire hoses on passing the wall. At 12.03pm Montreal Coastguard Radio issued a "securitie-securitie" notice that a small craft warning is in effect The American sailing vessel Bounty west bound at Eisenhower Lock at 0924 this morning reports a change of destination from Rochester NY to Kingston ONT. The sailing vessel Fair Jeanne -CDN arrived at Kingston at 0610 this am after an overnight passage. Kingston is a last viable port for westbound vessels before the open waters of Lake Ontario.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Preview of May U.S.-Flag Float - 1996 Cement Total Revised

06/17:
Preview of May U.S.-Flag Float
Although returns are not quite complete, U.S.-Flag carriage on the Lakes approached, if not topped, 14 million tons in May. Iron ore cargos in U.S. bottoms totaled 7,045,225 net tons, an increase of 6.5 percent compared to a year earlier. The U.S.-Flag stone float topped 3.6 million tons, an increase of 8.4 percent

1996 Cement Total Revised Upward

With publication of Canadian Shipowners Association’s 1996 Annual Report, LCA can finalize the 1996 Cement Trade totals. Shipments of cement on the Great Lakes totaled 5,155,573 net tons in 1996, an increase of 11.6 percent. LCA’s 1996 Annual Report (released in May) estimated the 1996 cement trade at 4.6 million tons.

Reported by: Lake Carriers Association




The Jones Act and Other U.S. Cabotage Laws

06/17:
I have a lot of question on the Jones Act, please visit the following link for complete details:
The Jones Act and Other U.S. Cabotage Laws





Today in Great Lakes History - June 17

The SCOTT MISENER (2) was christened on June 17, 1951. She was the first vessel built at Port Weller.

The PATERSON (1) collided with the steamer EDMUND W. MUDGE in 1957 in fog on the St. Clair River opposite Marine City, MI.

The WILLIAM A. IRVIN was towed back to Duluth on June 17, 1986 by the tugs SIOUX and DAKOTA to be on station as a museum ship at the new $3 million convention facility.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

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CSL TARANTAU & SAGUENAY, Self Unloaders

06/16:
In TORONTO harbour the ships SAGUENAY & TARANTAU are laid up. The SAGUENAY has all ports welded up & appears ready for the tow to the scrappers.

The TARANTAU has been sitting in the "turning basin" since December of '96 and is need of substantial metal work with a price tag of Cdn.$8,000,000. Normally this work would be commenced at her current location as this is significantly cheaper than repairs being performed at Port Weller, for example. But no work is proceeding. Therefore it is rumored that she also is for the scrap heap.

This is unusual considering that both ships are much coveted "self unloaders". Only time will tell.

The SEAWAY QUEEN is scheduled to enter the Port Weller dry dock on the 18th.

Reported by: Jim Fitzgerald




Hms Bounty makes it

06/16:
The American auxillary sailing vessel BOUNTY passed through the Seaway East area today. She was reported at Lock #2 -Cote St Catherine, in the South Shore Canal of the St Lawrence Seaway, at 1539 hrs, destination - Rochester NY

Reported by: John Whitehead




Today in Great Lakes History - June 16

In 1967 the Canadian Leader was launched at Collingwood. She was the last steam powered lake ship.

Upbound in the Welland Canal June 16, 1963 loaded with iron ore for Chicago, U.S. Steel's BENJAMIN FAIRLESS suffered bow damage in collision with Canadian steamer RALPH S. MISENER.

In 1918 the WILLIAM P SNYDER, JR. was in collision with the steamer GEORGE W. PERKINS in Duluth Harbor resulting in damages of $5,000 to both vessels.



Data from:Andy Hering and Ahoy & Farewell II

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Busy Day in South Chicago

06/15:
Algowood was unloading salt at 92nd St. in South. Chicago @1400CST. At approx. 1430 in Indiana Harbor. both the Joseph H. Thompson and the James R. Barker were docked at LTV Steel. The Edward L. Ryerson and what appeared to be the Canadian Explorer were docked at Inland Steel. The Barker was being fueled by the Jos. F. Bigane. All this occured under sunny skies, temps. in the high sixties.

Reported by: Gary R. Clark




Port Weller Dry Docks

06/15:
LaFarge Cement's 'English River' was in Port Weller Dry Docks as of Wednesday apparently for minor repairs and a five year inspection. The Canadian Mariner sailed Tuesday.

Reported by: Roger Tottman




Sailor's Lament

06/15:
The St Lawrence River from Quebec City to Montreal is living up to it's reputation that the wind is down , and the current is always down, once the tidal waters of the Lower St Lawrence are left behind. The American auxillary sailing vessel HMS BOUNTY was reported 60 nautical miles east of Montreal at 1.30 pm today averaging a westward speed over the ground of 3 nautical miles per hour.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Calling Point 2 events

06/15:
At this time of the year Ile Notre Dame (site of Expo '67, and Man and his World) at Calling Point 2 (the extreme eastern point of the St Lawrence Seaway), is extremely busy.Seaway bridges and local highways in the vicinity are closed to traffic as hundreds of thousands of people converge on the scene. The Seaway waters are filled with hundreds of visiting pleasure craft vying for a good view point. The Formula One road trials for International Grand Prix road racing were held today on Ile Notre Dame and will be followed tonight by International and World Fireworks competitions.Police try to stop the dropping of bottles and other matter from bridges onto vessels passing below. Canadian Coast Guard in Montreal issued a "Pan Pan - Securitie Securitie" message this afternoon advising all vessels to not approach a burning pleasure craft at Contrecour just east of Montreal.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Today in Great Lakes History - June 15

On June 15, 1943, the D.M. Clemson collided with and sank the George M. Humphrey in the Straits of Mackinac. Both of these 600-footers recovered for long careers. The D.M. Clemson was sold for scrap in 1980. The George M. Humphrey was recovered over a year later, renamed the Captain John Roen, later converted to a self-unloader, and finished her career as the Consumers Power at the end of the 1985 season before being scrapped in 1988.

In 1972, the Roger Blough entered service on her maiden voyage, departing Lorain, Ohio for Two Harbors, Minnesota to load ore. She was nearly a year late because of a fire in her engine room.

1989 Roger M. Kyes rechristened Adam E. Cornelius

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Andy Hering, and Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Barge Integrity makes first trip to Duluth - Superior

06/14:
At 7:00 p.m. Friday, the cement barge Integrity and tug Jacklyn M. made its first trip to Duluth-Superior. The tug-barge combination went to the Superior's Lafarge cement terminal to start the unload and will complete the unload at Duluth. The duo is expected to depart sometime Saturday afternoon.

Other unusual visitors here now include the Calcite II loading at D.M. and I.R., West side of dock #6 and the Canadian Explorer unloading cement at St. Lawrence Cement.

Reported by: Jody L. Aho




Port of Montreal Daily Ship Count

06/14:
PORT OF MONTREAL - DAILY SHIP COUNT - 0611/0834
         In the Harbour ----Expected
Ocean Going  --- 10 --- 13
Inland **         --- 6 --- 2
Coastal            --- 8 --- 1
Total              --- 24 --- 16

Some "Inland** " details :- Comeaudoc, Montrealais, Algogulf and Algoriver are inactive. Algowest and Manitoulin are due at Elevator No 4 to discharge. The Iranian salty IRAN AFZAL -22,023 GRT is loading as wheat becomes available

The above counts do not include vessels in transit through Montreal Harbour, to and from the St Lawrence Seaway

Reported by: John Whitehead




Calcite II departs Fraser Shipyards

06/13:
About noon today, tugs began assisting Calcite II in leaving Fraser Shipyards. The vessel is scheduled to load at the DMIR ore docks with cargo for Lorain.

Reported by: Al Miller




Great Lakes Delegation Lining Up Behind Jones Act Update

06/13:
As of today (June 13), 162 members of the House of Representatives have signed House Continuing Resolution 65, a statement of full support for the Jones Act. The Jones Act is one of several U.S. "Cabotage" laws and reserves the movement of cargo between U.S. ports to ships which are U.S.-owned, U.S.-built and U.S.-crewed. Although the Jones Act dates from 1920, the United States has had Cabotage laws since 1789 and these laws have fostered a domestic fleet second to none. The U.S.-Flag Great Lakes is the largest assemblage of self-unloading vessels in the world.

Click here to see a listing by state of those supporting lakes shipping
including links to their web pages and e-mail address!





News from the Twin Ports

06/13:
Midwest Energy Terminal is a busy place this week, resulting in some vessel delays. Canadian Transport was loading the morning of June 12 while Indiana Harbor waited at the Duluth port terminal. Next in line was Charles M. Beeghly, which also tied up at the port terminal. Paul R. Tregurtha is due in June 13 and is expected to tie up at the port terminal while it waits for the Beeghly to finish loading.

Reported by: Al Miller




Steamer Segwun starts her 111th. season

06/13:
On June 5, 1997, the steamer Segwun started her 111th season of sailing on the Muskoka lakes, about 100 miles north of Toronto. She has about 15 percent more bookings for group sailings and charters than in 1996 and so she remains about the only successful marine resurrection, to date, in North America. It is hoped, of course that Columbia of Detroit will soon join Segwun. The "Segwun Historical Group" have successfully completed the restoration of the 94' steam yacht Wanda III which will be available for charters on the Muskoka Lakes; a cruise on W3 takes one back to the days of Edwardian luxury, available to tycoons before World War I. The Segwun schedule is similar to that of 1995 and 1996 with an all-day cruise on Mondays in July and August and cruises of various lengths the rest of the days and then a dinner cruise with a roast beef dinner each evening. As a ship fan, it has been great to participate in these restorations and hope than all readers can do likewise. Phone Segwun office at 705-687-6667

Reported by: Gordon C. Shaw




Today in Great Lakes History - June 13

On June 13, 1983, the John B. Aird began its maiden voyage, a load of coal from Thunder Bay to Nanticoke, Ontario.

The IRVING S. OLDS carried a then-record 17,817 gross tons of iron ore on June 13, 1943 from Lake Superior and transported a total of 736,800 short tons of various bulk cargoes the next year.

On the morning of June 13, 1905 running downbound on Lake Superior, the heavily laden SYLVANIA encountered heavy fog as she approached the Soo. Confused whistle signals resulted in the SYLVANIA glancing off the Pittsburgh S.S. steamer SIR HENRY BESSEMER which sustained a 175 foot port side gash from the SYLVANIA's anchor. The BESSEMER required $40,000 in repairs and the SYLVANIA's damages totaled $10,000 which included a new anchor and shell plating which was completed at the Craig Shipbuilding Co., Toledo, OH.

Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

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Calcite II to begin 1997 season today

06/12:
Calcite II is scheduled to depart Fraser Shipyards some time today, she has been in lay-up since November 5, 1996. This seasons maiden voyage will begin by loading at the DMIR ore dock.

Reported by: Al Miller




Enerchem Trader Loads at Amherstburg

06/12:
The Enerchem Trader was taking on a load of calcium chloride Wednesday morning from General Chemical in Amherstburg, Ontario. This marks her first trip as a member of the Enerchem Fleet. Also seen loading at this dock last Monday (the 9th) was the Halifax registered Jade Star.

Reported by: James Neumiller




A Busy Weekend Upcoming In South Lake Michigan

06/12:
This Friday the M/V BURNS HARBOR is due at 1600 at Bethlehem Steel at Burns Harbor IN.. On Sat. 6/14/97 the MEDUSA CHALLENGER is due at 01:30 in Lake Calumet to unload cement. Over at Indiana Harbor at LTV Steel the ITB JOESPH H. THOMPSON is due at 05:00 and the M/V JAMES R. BARKER is due at 09:00. The M/V STEWART J. CORT is due at Bethlehem Steel at 10:00, in Burns Harbor, IN.. The DAVID Z. NORTON is also due at B.H. at the LAKES AND RIVERS DOCK at 12:00. The straight decker EDWARD L. RYERSON is due at Inland Steel in Indiana Harbor at 15:00. On Sun 6/15/97 the WILFRED SYKES is also due at Inland Steel at 02:00. The tankship JOS.F.BIGANE is schedualed to fuel the BURNS HARBOR, JOE THOMPSON, STEWART CORT, and the EDWARD L. RYERSON. HOW'S THAT FOR A BUSY WEEKEND? This story does not contain any info on foreign flag ships. However South Chicago is constantly busy with this type of traffic.

Reported by: Kevin Kelley




News from the Seaway

06/12:
The laid-up Canadian tanker Enerchem Asphalt was towed from Halifax to Les Mechins QC last winter . She was sold a few days ago, re-named AFRICAN ASPHALT, -port of registry St Vincent and Grenadines, and has since left for Sea, destination unknown

The American registered HMS BOUNTY, held back by srong north- westerly head winds of the last few days reported her position at 0610/2304 as only 49.18 North and 64.17 West . This is in the Gaspe Passage south of Anticosti, prior to entering the St Lawrence River

The Cdn Schooner BLUENOSE 2 arrived Montreal 0611/1747, She has a 10 port itinerary for her visit to Great Lakes US and Cdn Ports

Reported by: John Whitehead




Containers on the Great Lakes

06/12:
Christensen Canadian African Lines operate 3 versatile ships on a year round direct service from Africa to Montreal and to Lake Ontario ports in Season. The blue hulled THORSCAPE, THOR 1 and THORSWAVE are frequently seen in The St Lawrence Seaway and Lake Ontario with a full deck load of containers loaded 3 high. The ships sport Stulchen type heavy lift gear and have bulk and refrigerated capacity. The vessels run a regular service to Capetown, Durban and other African ports on inducement. This company deck loaded the well known Lakes pusher tugs MARGARET and PHYLLIS YORK for shipment to Nigeria recently. The Singapore registered THORSCAPE, 20005 dwt passed Grondines QC at 1700 on June08 westbound for Montreal and Lake Ontario

Reported by: John Whitehead




International Board Holds Open House for People Interested in Lake Superior Regulation

06/12:
The International Lake Superior Board of Control will hold an open house to encourage dialogue with people interested in Lake Superior outflows and Lakes Superior, Michigan and Huron water levels.

This open house will be held on Tuesday, June 17, from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. It will be at the Lakehead Region Conservation Authority Office, 130 Conservation Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario.

The purpose of this meeting is to inform the public of the Board's current activities and to hear public comments and suggestions regarding the Board's work. Discussion will focus on the responsibilities of the Board in matters which affect the levels and outflows of Lake Superior.

The International Lake Superior Board of Control is a binational committee reporting to and advising the International Joint Commission on matters relating to the regulation of Lake Superior outflows.

For further information, please contact Mr. Peter Yee or Mr. David Fay at Environment Canada's office in Cornwall, Ontario, at (613) 938-5725.

Reported by: John Whitehead




May Coal Trade Up 5.6 Percent

06/12:
Shipments of coal from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 3,961,930 net tons in May, an increase of 5.6 percent compared to a year ago. For the season, the Lakes coal trade stands at 8 million tons, an increase of 27 percent. While demand is strong, the increase partially reflects the more normal ice conditions which prevailed at the resumption of the coal trade in late March.

Reported by: Lake Carriers Association




Today in Great Lakes History - June 12

"STUBBY", The bow and stern sections of the STEWART J. CORT welded together passed Port Colborne, Ont. on June 12, 1970 bound for Erie, PA under her own power. STUBBY's bow and stern sections were later separated at Erie Marine, Inc., a Div. of Litton, and joined to the 816 foot hull mid-body

The NANTICOKE departed Collingwood in 1980 starting her maiden voyage

In 1959 the BENSON FORD ran aground in the Amherstburg Channel on her upbound trip with coal for the Rouge Plant. After five days of lightering and with tug assistance, she was freed. Damages amounted to 41 bottom plates which took 30 days to repair.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Great Lakes Delegation Lining Up Behind Jones Act Update

06/11:
The latest count for the pro-Jones Act resolution being circulated among the House of Representatives is 157. Joining the list of Great Lakes legislators who have signed House Continuing Resolution 65 are: Rick Lazio (NY); Susan Molinari (NY); Amo Houghton (NY); and Joseph McDade (PA)

Click here to see a listing by state of those supporting lakes shipping
including links to their web pages and e-mail address!





Enerchem Trader departs on maiden voyage under new name

06/11:
Enerchem Trader departed the North Slip in Point Edward, Ont. some time Monday. She was downbound past Detroit on Monday afternoon about 3:30 P.M. The former Le Chene No.1 was purchased from the bankrupt Socanav by Enerchem Transport Inc. She has been repainted from the red hull to dark green, and named Enerchem Trader. In addition to the new color sceme, she has an interesting new stack marking that appears to be some type of whale.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




USS Fleet update

06/11:
Roger Blough apparently spent a few days in Erie, Pa, undergoing repairs. The vessel was listed as undergoing repairs in port earlier this week. On June 10, GLF listed it as being in Erie and due out June 11.

Myron C. Taylor is scheduled to make another call in Milwaukee. She's due there June 13 at 0300, although that's certain to change over the next couple days.

Reported by: Al Miller




Where is the barge?

06/11:
The Stephen Reinauer was spotted at 11AM on the 10th tied up pier side at the Port of Buffalo Terminal "B" without her barge section. This is very unusual since they are always seen together in one form or another. I do not know where the barge is. The world wonders........

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Miss Libby visits Port Stanley

06/11:
Miss Libby (drilling platform for PEMBINA) entered Port Stanley harbour at 24:00 hours Saturday night, escorted by the towing tug JANETTE M (Dan Minor Marine out of Port Colborne.) She docked on the east side bottle neck of the harbour, unloaded piping and equipment on the dock and left Sunday morning at 07:00 hours. She is now situated 22 miles offshore. The pilot boat INTREPED III (Nadro Marine) has been back and forth transporting people & gear twice a day.

Reported by: Richard Hill




Correction - Elton Hoyt 2nd to LTV

06/11:
Last month (see story dated 05/12) it was reported that Interlake's Elton Hoyt 2nd was 60 feet longer than any vessel to transit that far up the Cuyahoga River. New information shows that the ELTON HOYT 2nd is 38 feet longer than any other ship that has worked the Cuyahoga. We have since learned that American Steamship's old ADAM E. CORNELIUS made the run, She was 660 feet long.

Reported by: Lake Carriers Association




Bluenose II set for Kingston

06/11:
The auxillary Schooner BLUENOSE ll, now touring the lakes is Scheduled to be in Kingston , June 20 to June 22

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Schedule for the U.S.S. Fahrion

06/11:
The U.S. Naval Reserve Oliver Hazard Perry-class Guided-Missile Frigate U.S.S. Fahrion (FFG 22) will be making the U.S. Navy's Canadian/U.S. Great Lakes cruise this year. Dates that the ship will be in port are:

Ogdensburg, N.Y. 25 - 28 June
Cleveland 1 - 6 July
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 8 - 10 July
Duluth, Minn. 11 - 14 July
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 17 - 22 July
Muskegon, Mich. 23 - 27 July
Milwaukee 28 July - 2 Aug.
Chicago 3 - 10 Aug.
Erie, Pa. 13 - 18 Aug.
Oswego, N.Y. 20 - 24 Aug.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Trade Up In May and April

06/11:
May Stone:
Shipments of limestone and gypsum from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 4.8 million net tons in May, an increase of 14.8 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. As noted in a previous news item, the May stone float from Canadian ports (880,563 tons) is the highest level since LCA began its monthly survey.
For the season, stone shipments stand at 7.9 million tons, an increase of 18.7 percent.

April Iron Ore, Stone and Coal:
Shipments of iron ore, stone and coal from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 13.6 million tons in April, an increase of 22.9 percent compared to a year ago. The most significant increase came in the coal trade. With utilities needing to replenish stockpiles after the winter, coal shipments rose 54.6 percent to 3.5 million tons. Iron ore cargos totaled 7.1 million tons, an increase of 9.4 percent. The Lakes stone trade topped 3 million tons, an increase of 29.5 percent.

For the season, shipments of iron ore, stone and coal stand at 15.9 million tons, an increase of 26.4 percent.

Reported by: Lake Carriers Association




Today in Great Lakes History - June 11

ATLANTIC SUPERIOR was float launched in 1982 for Federal Commerce & Navigation Ltd., Montreal, Quebec (Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., mgr.) built for the Caribbean trade.

MESABI MINER was christened at Duluth on June 11th, the MESABI MINER became the fourth thousand foot bulk carrier on the Great Lakes and Interlake's second.

IRVIN L. CLYMER - a) CARL D. BRADLEY (1) cleared Lorain in her gray and white livery, 1917, on her maiden voyage light bound for Calcite, MI to load limestone. She was the first Great Lakes commercial ship equipped with both Morse code telegraphy as well as ship-to--shore radio in 1922, which was standard on only 20 vessels by 1924.

On June 11, 1936 the EDWARD J. BERWIND collided with the AYCLIFFE HALL 16 miles West of Long Point on Lake Erie. The Hall Corp. steamer went to the bottom and was not salvaged.



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

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Great Lakes Delegation Lining Up Behind Jones Act

06/10:
As June 9, more than 150 members of the House of Representatives have signed House Continuing Resolution 65, a statement of full support for the Jones Act. The Jones Act is one of several U.S. "Cabotage" laws and reserves the movement of cargo between U.S. ports to ships which are U.S.-owned, U.S.-built and U.S.-crewed. Although the Jones Act dates from 1920, the United States has had Cabotage laws since 1789 and these laws have fostered a domestic fleet second to none.

Many Great Lakes legislators have signed H. Con. Res. 65.

Click here to see a listing by state of those supporting lakes shipping
including links to their web pages and e-mail address!





Lakes Jones Act Fleet Off To Fast Start

06/10:
The U.S.-Flag fleet on the Great Lakes moved 11.5 million net tons of cargo in April, an increase of 26 percent compared to a year ago. Less severe ice conditions, coupled with strong demand for cargo, enabled Jones Act carriers to quickly resume "summer sailing" schedules in April, where in 1996, the U.S. Coast Guard continued breaking ice well into May.

The U.S.-Flag iron ore float in April totaled 6.1 million tons, an increase of 11 percent compared to a year earlier. However, the most significant increases came in the coal trade. Western coal cargos loaded in Superior, Wisconsin, topped 1.2 million tons, an increase of 57 percent. Loadings of eastern coal at Lake Erie and Lake Michigan ports neared 1 million tons, or essentially twice that of a year ago.

The U.S.-Flag stone float totaled 2.4 million tons, an increase of 45 percent.

The 1997 U.S.-Flag dry-bulk shipping season began with the sailing of the DAVID Z. NORTON (Oglebay Norton Company), and through April, U.S.-Flag carriage stands at 14.5 million tons, an increase of 30.8 percent compared to 1996.

Although the 1997 navigation season is still young, the Lakes Jones Act fleet has already established two new benchmarks. On April 26, the steamship PHILIP R. CLARKE (USS Great Lakes Fleet, Inc.) broke the U.S.-Flag record for salt by loading 27,621 tons at Fairport Harbor, Ohio, for delivery to Buffalo, New York. This cargo bettered the previous record, also held by the CLARKE, by 2,296 tons.

On May 12, the 698-foot-long ELTON HOYT 2ND (Interlake Steamship) became the longest ship to ever navigate the twisting Cuyahoga River in Cleveland, Ohio. The HOYT is 38 feet longer than any other ship that has ever ventured into that waterway.

Reported by: Lake Carriers Association




CSL self unloaders

06/10:
Three of the CANADA STEAMSHIP LINES self unloaders have been modified and equipped with special equipment including bow structures, deck piping and slurry tanks. The ATLANTIC HURON, NANTICOKE and ATLANTIC ERIE are being used in the ballasting of the 600,000 ton drilling rig HIBERNIA off the coast of Newfoundland

Reported by: John Whitehead




Replica HMS Bounty headed for the Lakes

06/10:
A replica of HMS BOUNTY has been sighted heading west in the Northumberland Straits and into the St Lawrence River. The American registered vessel is bound for the Great Lakes and could enter the Seaway in some 4 days.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Today in Great Lakes History - June 10

The LEWIS WILSON FOY ( b) OGLEBAY NORTON) loaded her first cargo June 10, 1978 at Burlington Northern #5, Superior, WI with 57,952 tons of Hibbing taconite pellets for Burns Harbor, IN. In 1991.



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




First trip to the lakes

06/09:
The new Shanghai built salty FEDERAL MAAS passed Cape Vincent (Lake Ontario) at 5pm yesterday bound for Hamilton ONT on her first trip into the Great Lakes

Reported by: John Whitehead




Calcite II ready for 1997

06/05:
Calcite II was pulled from the frog pond at Fraser Shipyards on June 5 and positioned alongside a fit-out dock. On June 8 there was exhaust coming from the stack and several cars parked alongside as the vessel prepares for departure this week.

Reported by: Al Miller




Seaway News

06/09:
The Auxillary S.V FAIR JEANNE-CA arrived in Kingston Ontario yesterday morning from overseas.She is expected to conduct a series of passenger cruises between Canadian and American ports this summer

The auxillary Schooner BLUENOSE ll working her way westward up the St Lawrence River, has been in Quebec City for 2 days after taking part in the opening ceremonies of the Confederation Bridge between Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick provinces, Canada. Her present cruise itinerary is not yet known

The Danish 1600 ton -can be sail assisted- freighter SEA MAID has completed her trip to the Great Lakes and yesterday was at Becancour QC, enroute to the Atlantic.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Two missing despite tireless efforts

06/09:
At 2345, Friday 06 June, two pleasure craft collided at buoy 45 in the Maumee River, adjacent to Coast Guard Station Toledo and the CSX Coal Docks. 9 persons were involved, as a 21' boat with 6 people on board broad sided a 25' vessel carrying three passengers. Rumors speculate that alcohol may have been a contributing factor. Due to the close proximity to the Station, response time to the scene was under three minutes. Nevertheless, the operator and one passenger on the 21 footer failed to remain on the surface after the collision. The Coast Guard, with the assistance of the Lucas County Sheriff Department, ODNR and volunteer boaters, scoured the area,without results, for nearly 16 hours. The search was suspended due to exhaustion and water conditions. The two young men remain missing and are presumed dead. All seven survivors were injured and were taken to local hospitals. The 21' vessel was estimated to be traveling at nearly 40 knots at the point of collision. The Coast Guard can release no further information at this time. All parties involved are to be commended for their superior efforts and perseverance.

Reported by: Ryan Barone




Today in Great Lakes History - June 9

1. LIGHTSHIP 103 was delivered to the 12th District Headquarters at Milwaukee, WI on June 9, 1921 to begin her Great Lakes career.

June 9, 1983 ALGOWEST loaded a then-record 1,047,758 bushels of wheat at Thunder Bay.

ROGER BLOUGH began sea trials in 1972

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Andy Hering, and Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - June 8

1978 the Lewis Wilson Foy ( b) OGLEBAY NORTON ) was christened for the Bethlehem Steel Co., Cleveland, Ohio.

In 1938, the Governor Miller, sistership to the William A. Irvin, began her maiden voyage, leaving Lorain, Ohio. The Governor Miller was only the 2nd Great Lakes vessel to be powered by a steam turbine with a direct drive to the propeller shaft via reduction gear.

1976 - the Superior Midwest Energy Terminal loaded its first cargo of low-sulfur coal. The John J. Boland took the honors as the first vessel to load at this dock.

1977 the HARRY L. ALLEN was the first freighter to load at Burlington Northern's Dock #5 in Superior, WI

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Andy Hering, and Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Federal River class freighters

06/07:
The new Federal freighter -FEDERAL MAAS, 34,500 tons DWMT, 200 meters long, Shanghai built, arrived in Montreal early this morning after an overnight passage up the St Lawrence.The first departure date and time for the St Lawrence Seaway is not yet known. Other new vessels in the class FEDERAL ST LAURENT, CALUMET, AND SAGUENAY visited Great Lakes ports in 1996. The FEDERAL RHINE visited earlier this year. A new FEDERAL SCHELDE is expected later this year

Reported by: John Whitehead




Record Month for Canadian Stone Docks

06/07:
Stone shipments from Canadian stone ports totaled 880,563 net tons in May, the highest level recorded since LCA began its monthly survey of the stone trade.

For the season, stone shipments from Canadian docks total 1,138,655 net tons, an increase of 732,309 tons compared to last year.

Canadian stone docks surveyed are Manitoulin Island, Smelter Bay, Bruce Mines and Port Colbourne.

Reported by: Lake Carriers Association




June 1 Vessel Report

06/07:
On June 1, U.S.-Flag Great Lakes carriers had 63 of their 70 ships and tug/barge units in service. This total represents a decrease of one self-propelled tanker and one tug/barge tanker unit compared to a year earlier. The inactive tankers are expected to return to service in June. The Lakes Jones Act fleet is expected to grow further during the month with the activation of a small self-unloader. [Calcite II]

Reported by: Lake Carriers Association




Today in Great Lakes History - June 7

1958 the Edmund Fitzgerald was launched at Great Lakes Engineering Works, River Rouge, MI (the animated image at the top of this page shows the launch)

In 1977, the William A. Irvin ran into the side of the Rock Cut after a power failure on board. The vessel received only slight damage. ( For a more detailed account, read my book "The Steamer William A. Irvin: Queen of the Silver Stackers").

Also on June 7, 1977 the MESABI MINER departed the shipyard on her maiden voyage to load ore at Duluth, MN.

On June 7, 1991, the Alpena (former Leon Fraser) began her maiden voyage as a cement carrier, departing Superior, Wisconsin, for her namesake port. Fraser Shipyards, who performed the conversion, took out a full-page ad in the Superior Evening Telegram proclaiming "INLAND LAKES MANAGEMENT, YOUR SHIP IS READY" and a picture of the vessel.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Andy Hering, and Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




St. Lawrence River Weekly Data

06/06:
INTERNATIONAL ST. LAWRENCE RIVER BOARD OF CONTROL PROVISIONAL WEEKLY DATA
Week ending Wed June 4/97 Average for this time of year (c)

Lake Ontario:
Actual end of Week Level 75.33 (247.15) 75.04 (246.19)
Computed Plan 1958-D Level (a) 75.88 (248.95)

Computed Preproject Level (b) 75.94 (249.15)

Lake Ontario Weekly Mean Outflow 9570 (338000) 7860 (277600)
Lake Ontario Weekly Total Supply 8580 (303000) 7900 (279000)
Lake St. Lawrence at Long Sault Dam Weekly Mean Level 73.14 (239.96) 73.64 (241.60)
Lac St. Louis at Pointe Claire Weekly Mean Level 22.08 (72.44) 21.45 (70.37)
Montreal Harbour at Jetty #1
Weekly Mean Level 7.64 (25.07) 6.84 (22.44)
Ottawa River at Carillon
Weekly Mean Outflow 2850 (100600) 2330 (82300)
Preliminary Lake Ontario Outflow for Week Ending Friday June. 13/97 * see below 9500 (335500) 7890 (278600)

* While Lake Ontario's level appears to have reached its peak for the year last month, the subsequent decline has been very slow. This is due mainly to the continued extremely high inflows from Lake Erie, where the levels are near record high. A Lake Ontario outflow of 8780 cubic metres per second is specified by the Lake Ontario regulation plan for the coming week. However, the International St. Lawrence River Board of Control has directed that maximum possible outflows be continued in light of the water level conditions on Lake Ontario. Hence, a flow of 9500 cubic metres per second is expected for the coming week, with some very slight reductions during the week only if Lake Ontario's level continues to decline. This flow is the maximum possible without causing excessive velocities in the St. Lawrence River which will stop seaway navigation.

(a) Levels that would have occured with strict adherence to Regulation Plan 1958-D.
(b) Levels that would have occured had there been no Lake Ontario regulation.
(c) For comparison purposes, Lake Ontario water level data since 1918 are used to be consistent with those published in the US. and Canadian Great Lakes bulletins (http://chswww.bur.dfo.ca/danp/wlgraphs. html). Other averages here are for the period since 1960 as Lake Ontario regulation began that year.

Note: Levels are in metres and (feet) IGLD 1985.Supply and flows are in m3/s and (ft3/s). Lake Ontario Regulation began in 1960.

Information in this report is compiled by the International St. Lawrence River Board of Control from provisional data provided by Ontario Hydro, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environment Canada, Hydro Quebec, the New York Power Authority, and the U.S. National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration.

For more information contact the Canadian Regulation Representative of the Board PETER_YEE@PCH.GC.CA

Reported by: John Whitehead




Today in Great Lakes History - June 6

1944 Joseph H. Thompson participated in the D-Day invasion at Normandy

The E.B. BARBER entered service on June 6, 1953.

In 1953, the Armco began her maiden voyage from Lorain, Ohio bound for Superior, Wisconsin to load iron ore.

On June 6, 1959, the Sarah Spencer (formerly Adam E. Cornelius, Edmund V. Smith, and Sea Barge One) began her maiden voyage from Manitowoc, Wisconsin. This was the last Great Lakes vessel constructed with telescoping hatch covers.

POINTE NOIRE was in collision with Cleveland Tanker's SATURN on June 6, 1977 near Fighting Island in the Detroit River.

CLIFFS VICTORY loaded her first cargo after conversion, she loaded 13,089 gross tons of iron ore at Marquette, MI on June 6th 1951. Her downbound delivery trip to Cleveland, OH took only 38 hours, normally a 55 to 60 hour run for other lakers, and averaged over 13.9 knots (16 mph).

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Andy Hering, and Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Navigator busy, Algobay in for repairs

06/05:
Port Colborne, Ontario Warf 18-2 just above the fuel dock Upper Lakes newly converted Self Unloader Canadian Navigator (x St. Lawrence avigotor) unloaded 300 tonnes of Salt at Port Colborne yesterday June 3rd at 1700 hours---it then resumed to Hamilton to unload the rest of her cargo. She has been out 5 weeks and this load marks her 7 cargo.

Algoma's Algobay at warf 16 the old R and P Coal Dock has been in since Sat. May 30---having repairs to the unloading equiptment by Fraser Ship Repair Co.

Reported by: Joe Van Volkenburg




Twin Ports round up

06/05:
Sarah Spencer and Atlantic Hickory backed into the General Mills elevator in Duluth on June 4 to discharge grain.

After loading at the Peavey elevator in Superior, Kinsman Independent docked at the Duluth port terminal June 3 and 4 for repairs. The vessel departed Duluth about 3 p.m. June 4.

Since being taken off the coal run a few years back, St. Clair has become something of a vagabond. Last week it was loading at the BN ore dock in Superior. Later this week it's due into Taconite Harbor.

Edwin H. Gott departed Duluth June 3 on another ore run to Nanticoke. It's due there June 6 at 2100.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - June 5

1972 the ROGER BLOUGH was christened

Also in 1972 the PARKER EVANS was in collision with the upbound Erie Sand steamer SIDNEY E. SMITH, JR. just below the Blue Water Bridge, at Port Huron, MI. The SMITH sank in twenty minutes with no loss of life. The EVANS, with bow damage, proceeded to Port Weller Dry Docks Ltd., St. Catharines, Ont. for extensive repairs. As a result of this accident, on October 4, 1972 alternate one-way traffic between the Black River Buoy and Buoys One and Two in Lake Huron was agreed upon by the shipping companies. Also a call-in system was initiated to monitor traffic between the Detroit River Light and Buoys Seven and Eight in Lake Huron by the newly established Sarnia Traffic.

On June 5, 1979, the Cartiercliffe Hall (later Winnipeg and now Algontario) caught fire on Lake Superior off the Keweenaw Peninsula just before 4:00 a.m. Six crewmembers died in the fire, and the U.S. Steel bulk freighter Thomas W. Lamont was able to rescue others from the Cartiercliffe Hall.

LIGHTSHIP 103 (HURON) had her keel laid June 5, 1918. In 1971 the lightship was acquired by the City of Port Huron for use as a museum.

Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Paterson sets another record - Press release

06/04:
N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited, Marine Division, is pleased to announce that the flag ship of the fleet, MV PATERSON, has set another record load in the Port of Thunder Bay. On May 24, 1997, MV PATERSON sailed for the Port of Windsor with a load of Number 1 Canola which totalled 26,881.588 metric tonnes.

Mr. Robert J. Paterson, Chief Executive Officer, Paterson Marine Division, commented "The PATERSON has added to her record of achievements. This vessel has set records for the carriage of wheat, barley, soybeans, and iron ore on the St. Lawrence Seaway System. Our ability to offer customers efficient transportation of all bulk commodities is consistently enhanced by this ship. By extending the overall length of the ship when we built her, additional cargo can be carried which ensures the economic viability and competitiveness of the vessel in a tough marketplace."

The Paterson company is a recognized leader in the carriage of bulk cargoes on the Great Lakes and innovative grain elevator design and construction on the prairies. The company currently operates seven modern bulk carriers in its Marine Division and 50 grain elevators across western Canada in its Grain Division.

Other records set by the vessel are as follows:

MV PATERSON set a record load for wheat loaded at Thunder Bay, Ontario, May 18, 1994. The amount was 29,016.427 metric tonnes and was delivered to the lower St. Lawrence River for eventual export.

MV PATERSON set a record load for barley loaded at Thunder Bay, Ontario, August 17, 1987. The amount loaded was 27,960.765 metric tonnes and was delivered to the lower St. Lawrence River for eventual export.

MV PATERSON set a record load for soybeans loaded at the Port of Duluth, Minnesota, May 5th, 1996. The amount loaded was 28,941.613 metric tonnes (1,063,471.20/60 bushels). The supplier was Harvest States Cooperatives, Superior Terminal, and the destination port was Three Rivers, PQ.

MV PATERSON set a St. Lawrence Seaway record for iron ore pellets loaded at Sept Isles, Quebec, November 20, 1995 and delivered to Burns Harbour, Indiana. The amount loaded was 29,651 metric tonnes.

The MV PATERSON was launched in Collingwood, Ontario on April 18, 1985. The shipyard delivered the vessel in June of that year to N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited. At the time of delivery the ship represented the pinnacle of Great Lakes shipbuilding technology and design, including such features as the most hydrodynamically optimized hull form combined with a single fuel efficient diesel engine burning heavier and cheaper fuels. The shipyard anticipated the vessel's ability to carry heavier loads due to the advent and use of higher tensile, hence lighter, steels during construction. Through computer aided design and close attention to detail the ship is a full two metres longer than any other in her class. This added length is found under the waterline in her bow design which saw the creation of an extended ram portion which can be inserted below the lowered boom at the exits from the various locks within the seaway system.

When contacted regarding this most recent achievement, Paul Kennedy, Director of Marketing and Communications, Port of Thunder Bay commented "The Port of Thunder Bay is encouraged to see new benchmarks in customer service and operational efficiency being established. The record canola cargo aboard the MV PATERSON illustrates that the Port of Thunder Bay and the Great Lakes transportation route are exceeding customer needs for economic bulk transportation."

For further information please contact:

D.C. Paterson
N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited
1918 Yonge Street, P.O. Box 664
Thunder Bay, Ontario. P7C 4W6
807-577-8421

Reported by: D.C. Paterson




Today in Great Lakes History - June 4

1947--50 years ago--the 525-foot Canada Steamship Lines bulk freighter Emperor stranded on Canoe Rocks on Lake Superior and sank with a loss of 12 lives.

Cliffs Victory sailed on her maiden voyage light from South Chicago in 1951

OTTERCLIFFE HALL (e) CANADIAN TRADER had her Keel laid 1968

The EDGAR B. SPEER was christened June 4th 1980 at Lorain for the Connecticut Bank & Trust Co., Hartford, CT, managed by the Great Lakes Fleet of the United States Steel Corp., Duluth, MN.

In 1988, the Irving S. Olds departed Duluth under tow, headed for scrap.

Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Calcite II due out

06/03:
The Calcite II is due out of lay-up on June 10th or 11th. She will depart Superior on either of these days.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




MV WINDOC to resume service

06/03:
The MV WINDOC will clear temporary lay up berth on June 4, 1997 to resume service. The vessel laid up May 8, 1997 due to slow loads and lack of grain in the Port of Thunder Bay. The grain has been arriving in greater quantities and the vessel will resume regular service on June 4, 1997 at 0800K.

Reported by: D.C. Paterson




Parade of vessels

06/03:
Early rising boatwatchers in Duluth got a treat June 2 when three lakers left port within 10 minutes. Leading the parade was Buckeye, loaded with ore from DMIR. Following about 1,200 feet astern was John G. Munson, which had delivered limestone and was en route to Two Harbors for a downbound cargo. About 5 minutes behind Munson was Paul R. Tregurtha with coal from Midwest Energy Terminal.

Reported by: Al Miller




Tank Barge in Manistee

06/03:
The tank barge Mary E. Hannah and Hannah 2901 were in Manistee yesterday. This is the first trip of the year, for the Hannah Barges, and the 3rd ever. Ambar Inc. recently bought Akzo salt, and has created a calcium chloride loading facility. In addition Ambar gets 1 coal boat a year.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Adam E. Cornelius - Fraser Shipyards update

06/03:
Adam E. Cornelius had a short stay in Fraser Shipyards. It was out of the yard on June 2 and loading at the DMIR ore docks in West Duluth.

Reported by: Al Miller




High water levels

06/03:
U.S. Coast Guard station Toledo reports water level at +80 inches over low water datum. The station was awash Sunday, as well as the adjacent marinas. As of monday night, it was back down to +65 inches, but falling slowly. The flood conditions in Toledo were caused by three days of steady rain and brisk easterly winds, which pushed lake water into the Western Lake Erie basin. no word on restrictions to commercial traffic.

Reported by: Ryan Barone




Great Lakes Maritime Academy openings

06/03:
The Great Lakes Maritime Academy, located in Traverse City, Michigan, has a few openings remaining for its new class which begins in mid-August. The Great Lakes Maritime Academy offers a 3 year program to train officers for either the deck or engine departments of the large Great Lakes vessels we all know so well. Cadets of the Academy spend 270 days sailing on Great Lakes vessels as well as intensive classroom training in preparation for writing their Coast Guard licensing exam. Graduates are qualified as either 3rd assistant engineers, steam or diesel unlimited horsepower or unlimited tonnage near-coastal mates with Great Lakes pilotage. Anyone interested in finding out more should call Judi at 1-800-748-0566 extension 1200 immediately.

You can also check out our web page: Great Lakes Maritime Academy Homepage




Today in Great Lakes History - June 3

The JOHN B. AIRD was christened in 1983 at Thunder Bay for Algoma Central Marine, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

After successfully completing her sea trials on June 3, 1951, the CLIFFS VICTORY entered service a little under six months from the time she was purchased from the U.S.M.C.

The PATERSON (1) entered service on June 3, 1954 with 440,000 bushels of wheat from Port Arthur.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News on tug to push Mauthe/Pathfinder

06/02:
Ocean Tug & Barge Engineering of Bellingham, MA has been contracted to design a unique and innovative tug for pushing the converted "J.L. Mauthe" (possible new name: Pathfinder). The 7,200 BHP tug is a variant of the OT&BE "Seaway" Class tug series designed specifically for Great Lakes operations. Equipped with an articulated connection system and twin Z-drives, the 126 foot long tug will have a beam of 44 feet. The pilothouse will be single one set 70 feet over the waterline of the tug. The tug will be designed such that it can push the barge or take it alongside on the hip. Reports are that a rendering of the tug will be posted soon on OT&BE's web site

Reported by: Dan Ocean




Reckless boater flips vessel in ship's wake

06/02:
A reckless boater flipped their vessel in the Lee A. Tregurtha's wake yesterday evening in the St Clair River. The incident happened as the Tregurtha passed the Recour Point power station in St. Clair, where the Columbia Star was unloading. The crew on the Star first reported the vessel in trouble, summoning assistance for the people that were aboard the overturned pleasure craft. The captian of the Tregurtha reports the boater was operating in a reckless manner, traveling at a high rate of speed 6-10 FEET off the Tregurtha. It sounds like they were jumping the ship's wake, what ever the case all persons on the small boat were rescued from the river.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Help Wanted

06/02:
Isle Royale National Park is seeking an AB Seaman to fill a position on board the USNPS RANGER III. The position typically works May thru October at forty hours per week. For further information and an application contact Debbie Francis at 906-487-7144 or William Hanrahan at 906-487-7163.




Adam E. Cornelius enters Fraser Shipyards

06/02:
Adam E. Cornelius was in Superior's Fraser Shipyards on June 1. There was no sign of any work being done outside the vessel, and the employee parking lot was empty, so it didn't appear to be an emergency.

Reported by: Al Miller




Sunken Logs

06/02:
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is accepting written comments on 33 sites in northern Wisconsin where it is believed sunken logs are located. Several firms are seeking permits to recover the logs, just as a current business has been doing near Ashland and Bayfield, Wis., since last year.

Last week, the corps held a hearing to solicit comments on the expanding retrival operations. At the hearing, several people said the corps should not let more logs be salvaged, as they provide support for organisms that fish feed upon. As a result, studies should be conducted, they say, before more are removed, thereby potentially threatening the environment of the area. In addition, the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa opposes the recovery operations. Citing treaties with the federal government in 1837, 1852 and 1854, the tribe is considering recovery of the logs to be theft until a review is completed. The first business salvaging the logs, Lake Superior Water-Logged Lumber in Ashland, Wis., has offered to pay the same fee to the tribe that it pays the state. In addition, they will suspend recovery if asked.

Permits to recover the logs must be granted by the corps, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the Wisconsin Historical Society. As owner of the logs, Wisconsin gets 30 percent of the market value of the wood. A maple log of 100 board feet of lumber is worth about U.S.$115, so the state gets about U.S.$35. Millions of birch, cherry, elm hemlock, maple and red oak logs sank when being floated to mills in the area in the late 1800s. Low oxygen levels and cold waters preserved the logs, which are now prized for industries using old-growth wood that in some cases is unavailable.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - June 2

In 1973 the SYLVANIA, downbound light in fog, collided with the FRANK PURNELL just north of the Detroit River Light at 0523 hours. The SYLVANIA suffered minor bow damage and went to Toledo for repairs.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Tug taking on water in the St. Clair River

06/01:
The tug Adanac has holed her bow and is taking on water. She was downbound with a barge in the St. Clair River passing Seaway Island (11:10 A.M. EST) when the current pushed her aground and tore a hole in the tug's bow. The crew then ran the tug aground when the bow compartment began flooding. She now rests aground in the South Channel on the starboard side. The crew reports no injuries or danger to the vessel at this point.

Sorry , no update. Sarnia Traffic Center will no longer release information. The radio warnings have ended so the vessel was removed. Please e-mail if you can provide information.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Myron C. Taylor makes rare trip

06/01:
The Myron C. Taylor made what is now a rare trip up Milwaukee's Menomonee river early Friday morning, May 30. The Taylor delivered stone to the one remaining storage dock on the river and was assisted by the G-tug California, both in and out. There are now very few boats left that are small enough to navigate up the Menomonee river valley. At one time this area was filled with coal docks. They have now been replaced with soccer fields and an indian casino.

According to the September 1952 issue of 'Ships and the Sea', "Milwaukee is the largest coal receiving port on Lake Michigan and the second largest on the Great lakes. An average of 3 1/2 to 4 million tons arrives yearly in from 450 to 600 lake vessels. (!) The valley docks standing storage of more than a million tons is the world's largest open-air concentration of coal." In the early 50's the average was one lake vessel per hour arriving at the port of Milwaukee. This also included the many carferries that called on Milwaukee.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Fred White makes unusual trip

06/01:
The Fred R. White Jr. was upbound 5\31 for Calcite, to partially load, and then to Cedarville to finish. She will be loading for the Duluth D.M.I.R. stone dock. This trip is usually made by USS vessels, recently the John G. Munson, and the Presque Isle. Another Oglebay Norton vessel, the Armco is loading coal for St. Clair Detroit Edison. The plant usually uses western coal, but have already received 2 southern coal shipments.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Memorial Day Parade of sorts

06/01:
The Memorial Day Parade past the Mud Lake (Munuscong) Junction buoy included the CORT, the KAYE E BARKER, the Canadian research vessel LIMNOS, MAPLEGLEN, ALGOWAY, the tug AVENGER IV and the barge CHIEF WAWATAM, the ST. CLAIR, the grand EDWARD L. RYERSON, ROGER BLOUGH, GEORGE A. STINSON, JOHN B. AIRD, ARTHUR M. ANDERSON, and the CANADIAN TRADER . Ships passing during the Red Wings game may not have been counted.

Reported by: Liz G Calhoun




Today in Great Lakes History - June 1

In 1943 the IRVING S. OLDS collided with the 524 foot steamer CHARLES O. JENKINS in heavy fog 28 miles northeast of Cleveland on Lake Erie and was holed eight feet above the water line. The OLDS was able to help the badly damaged JENKINS back to Cleveland by lashing the two vessels together. After a grueling seven hours the JENKINS was beached in the outer harbor to prevent her from sinking further. The OLDS was repaired in time to carry a then-record 17,817 gross tons of iron ore on June 13, 1943

In 1952 the J.L. Mauthe was launched at Great Lakes Engineering Works, River Rouge, MI.

The WHITEFISH BAY, loaded with 950,000 bushels of spring wheat, was cited as she carried the billionth metric ton of cargo through the Eisenhower Lock in 1983.

JOSEPH S. YOUNG (2) Launched June 1, 1907 as a) WILPEN for the Shenango Steamship Co., a subsidiary of Shenango Furnace Co., Cleveland, OH.

The H. LEE WHITE departed Sturgeon Bay light on her maiden voyage June 1, 1974 to load iron ore at Escanaba, MI for Indiana Harbor, IN.

Data from: Andy Hering and Ahoy & Farewell II

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