Great Lakes NEWS & RUMOR Archive

* Report News


Ryerson to Sail

06/30:
Reports are that the Ryerson's crew is heading to fit-out the vessel. She should sail early this week.

Reported by: D. Ocean




Wolf River departs

06/30:
The M.V.WOLF RIVER departed Slip No. 1 in Thunder Bay yesterday evening. She is carrying a cargo of pulp logs (2,854.96M.T.) bound for Duluth Mn. This is her first trip since arriving in Thunder Bay last fall.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Surging Stone Trade Keeps Jones Act Lakers Busy in May

06/30:
Driven by record demand for stone cargos, U.S.-Flag lakers moved 14.5 million net tons of dry-bulk cargo in May, an increase of 5.4 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. For the season, the Lakes Jones Act dry-bulk trade stands at 30.3 million tons, an increase of 8.7 percent compared to the same point in 1997. While demand is strong for all cargos (except grain), the Lakes Jones Act fleet has benefited from a mild winter that allowed shipping to resume ahead of schedule and the addition of a large self-unloading barge in the stone trade.

Stone cargos in U.S.-Flag lakers topped 4.1 million tons in May, an increase of 14.5 percent. Demand from the construction industry is driving the stone trade to levels that better even pre-recession totals. Including loadings in Canadian-flag lakers, the May stone float on the Lakes set an all-time record for a single month - 5.2 million tons.

High operating rates at steel mills pushed the iron ore trade in U.S. bottoms to 7.1 million tons, a slight increase over the same period last year. Lead by growing demand for low-sulfur coal, coal cargos in U.S.-Flag lakers totaled 2.6 million tons, an increase of 7.3 percent.

For the season, the iron ore trade in American lakers stands at 16.4 million tons, an increase of 7.6 percent. The stone trade in U.S. bottoms stands at 7.6 million tons, an increase of 24.8 percent. Coal cargos are slightly behind last year's pace as the mild winter has not required some utilities to rebuild stockpiles of eastern coal at the usual pace.

As May began, Lakes Jones Act operators had 63 of their 69 vessels in service. A straight-decker in the iron ore trade was temporarily idled during the month and another straight-decker dedicated to grain was withdrawn from service until demand materializes. However, a cement carrier began its season on June 3 and during 1998 only 2 U.S.-Flag lakers are not expected to operate. One vessel is a small cement carrier; the other a straight-decker best suited to the carriage of grain.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers' Association




Ladies and Gentlemen, Toronto introduces THE PIER.

06/30:
Toronto, ON. 12 May 1998. Wind. Fire. Ice and Shipwrecks. Daring rescues and a naval invasion. On July 11, 1998 the city of Toronto will open the doors to The Pier -- its newest cultural heritage attraction, and nautical adventure centre. The Pier is located at 245 Queens Quay West (just south of Skydome and the CN Tower) in a dramatically restored 1930 shipping warehouse.

The Pier is an interactive, highly entertaining museum dedicated to all things nautical. Through a wide range of thematic exhibits, lively and ever-changing programs and activities designed with families in mind, The Pier has been built to bring Toronto's waterfront heritage alive!

"When the Marine Museum was located on the CNE grounds, we were separated not just from the city but from the lake as well. With a new bayside home, superb exhibits and a mandate to have fun, The Pier will be one of the hottest tickets on the waterfront," explained Heritage Toronto Chair Dr. Marion Joppe. "We expect to welcome almost 100,000 visitors to the bustling central waterfront this year!"

Established in 1959, the Marine Museum of Upper Canada is owned by the City of Toronto. Planning for the relocation of the museum began in 1988; the reconstruction of the physical site commenced in late 1997. Major funding for this $2 million dollar project has come from the City of Toronto and the Canada Ontario Infrastructure Works programme. Additional support has been provided by the Ministry of Citizenship, Culture and Recreation.

The Pier is housed in a warehouse originally built by the Toronto Harbour Commission for the Treeline Navigation Company. Over the past six months a design team composed of Reich + Petch Architects Inc., Taylor Manufacturing Industries Inc. and the Pier staff has turned the large two story brick building into a multi-purpose, open concept museum that comes complete with an indoor children's discovery centre housed inside the hull of a ship!

Many of the world's great cities have begun at the water's edge, and Toronto is no exception. The Bay and the Islands have captivated residents and visitors alike for over two centuries.

There is nowhere else in the city like The Pier, with its rare mix of culture, heritage, craftsmanship and recreational pursuits. The museum combines the best of waterfront charm and history to ensure a memorable experience for everyone! Every city has a history, but few Canadian places can boast of a more dynamic and engaging past than Toronto's waterfront. The building's exhibits are thematic and revolve around this exciting history. Commerce, War, Pleasure and Healing are all integral parts of the story of Toronto Bay.

The Pier is fittingly reachable by boat. As well visitors can get to the museum by walking, cycling, rollerblading, driving, riding the street car or even by paddling a canoe. The museum plans to use Lake Ontario to its advantage and will be offering boat rides and boat rentals!

Highlights of the Pier include:
* The Discovery Zone, a "flagship" space filled with hands-on exhibits that families will love. Interactive opportunities include exploring a shipwreck, trying on maritime costumes, turning paddlewheels and propellers, and moving a Great Lakes ship through a set of canal locks!
* The Boat Shop, is a special area within the museum where artisans construct traditional watercraft and bring forgotten boat building skills back to life.
* The Livery. This is where visitors can rent these same traditional wooden boats and explore the harbour. Boating lessons and life jackets are available on site!
* Exhibits. The Pier will be featuring artifacts from the city's impressive maritime collections, including: a spectacular model of the liner Lusitania, unique historical exhibits, and outstanding displays entitled "Toronto's Changing Harbour", "War on the Lakes", "Communication Afloat" and "Steam: The Driving Force", working steam whistles and engines and a rowing machine that lets visitors race against Toronto's world champion oarsman, Ned Hanlan.
* Bay Windows. The inaugural exhibit of The Pier's spacious gallery devoted to annual special exhibits will, in 1998, highlight the history and people of Toronto Bay from earliest times to the present day.
* Special Events. In 1998 and 1999 the Pier is planning to stage a wooden boat festival, harbour tours, ship visits, lecture series, movies and nautical demonstrations.

"The Pier has been built to be provide the best of waterfront charm and history to ensure a memorable experience for everyone and to add an exciting new dimension to the central bay! We have designed packages and programs for both individual and group visitors. Movie nights, musical performances, narrated one or two hour schooner cruises, fine dining at the water's edge, and escorted tours of the exhibits are programs that have been designed for groups," said The Pier marketing manager Neil Beaudry. "The group experience is quite affordable, ranging in price from $7.50 to $26.50 per person."

Located at 245 Queens Quay West The Pier will be open year round. There is a café in the museum and facilities rental space for a wide variety of uses. The building is fully accessible. An annual schedule of seasonal events and programs will soon be unveiled by the Pier. Admission rates are: adults, $8.50; students & seniors, $6.50; children, $5.50; and family pass, $20.00.

Information Contact:
Neil Beaudry
Marketing Manage
The Pier
416-392-6827 ext. 261

To Arrange for a Media Tour or for The Pier Team interviews please contact Stephen Weir 489-5868




Today in Great Lakes History - June 30

On June 30, 1954, the Scott Misener began her maiden voyage.

In 1962 Cliffs Victory made her first trip down the Welland Canal with a load of iron ore for Hamilton, Ont.

The LEON FALK, JR.'s maiden voyage began on June 30, 1961 when she departed Baltimore and loaded 20,748 tons of iron ore at Sept Îles, Que. en route for Cleveland, OH and arrived there on July 8th. The FALK was one of seven T2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News from the Seaway

06/29:
While at Chicago, The Philippines-flag bulker Handy Laker was renamed MOOR LAKER. She was downbound from Chicago at Sarnia yesterday morning June 28. She previously called at Cleveland and Detroit before arriving at Chicago. Another renaming to report is the following one. Last winter, CSL acquired a deep sea ship, the Gold Bond Trailblazer. She was renamed CSL TRAILBLAZER by CSL and is operating under a flag of convenience.

On June 11, an east coast ferry, the KATHARINE, registered at St. John`s, was towed up the Seaway by Jarrett McKeil assisted by Lac Vancouver. They were bound for Hamilton. I have no idea why McKeil Marine purchased that ferry which was owned by the Canadian Government.

On June 16, the bulker APTMARINER went aground off St. Nicholas Island at the eastern end of Lake St. Louis in the St.Lawrence Seaway. It was due to steering problems. She was bound for Cleveland with a load of steel coils taken at Klaipeda, Lithuania. Built at Sunderland, England, she is a regular visitor in the Great Lakes. She also completed at least one trip under her original name of Devonbrook. She was free on June 18 a few minutes after midnight by the tug Jerry Newberry of McKeil Marine and by André H. and Avantage owned by Three Rivers Boatman. The ship sustained some damages to her forepeak and will have to be repaired in a Great Lakes shipyard, perhaps the one at Toledo.

Entering the Seaway on June 20 was the chemical tanker KASLA registered at Douglas (Isle of Man) making her first trip under that name. She is best remembered by ship watchers under her previous name of Kiisla when registered in Finland. She traded between Great Lakes ports during the winter 85/86 and also from the winters 87 to 93. On her June 20 trip, she only went to Hamilton where she delivered a cargo of coal tar.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




And the Winner is..

06/29:
The winners in the annual tug boat races on the Detroit River Saturday were:
First Over all: Tug Karen Andrie

Over 1300 H.P. Class:
1st Shannon
2nd Patricia Hoey
3rd Carolyn Hoey
4th Americo Dean

750 - 1300 H.P. Class
1st Dover
2nd Stormont

410 - 750 H.P. Class
1st Vida C.
2nd Anne M. Dean

200 - 400 H.P. Class
1st Julie Anne
2nd J.W. Westcott II
3rd Joseph H. Hogan
4th R and R
5th Joan V.

Under 200 H.P. Class
Birmco
Isabella
Baytaz
Amigo 4
Enterprise



Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




New Raffle

06/29:
One of the most frequently asked questions is how a person can book a cruise on a lakes freighter, the answer is they can't. Great Lakes Freighters are not certified to carry passengers for hire, so you can't buy a ticket. A cruise aboard a lakes freighter is only available to the company's customers and some family members. The only chance for the general public to enjoy a once-in-a-life-time cruise is through non-profit raffles such as this:

The International Ship Masters' Association Detroit Lodge #7 is offering a Chance to win a trip on the S/S COURTNEY BURTON to benefit their convention fund.

Grand Prize is a trip for you and 5 friends aboard the COURTNEY BURTON, flagship of the Oglebay Norton fleet.

The drawing will be held on February 13, 1999, and the trip on the COURTNEY BURTON will take place during the 1999 Great Lakes shipping season. Departure port & dates will be coordinated with winner.

Click here for more information and the order form





Upcoming Event

06/29:
July 12 Huron Lightship Reunion at Port Huron, MI. A Coast Guard memorial and commemorative service aboard the Huron Lightship. This event will finally honor and pay proper tribute to the late Robert J. Gullickson who's supreme sacrifice forty years ago (May 7th, 1958) is now being recognized for his unselfish devotion to duty in attempting to save two shipmates lives. The other survivor has authored a beautiful poem honoring this event and ship. For more info., write ENC Neil C. Hamilton Ret or phone: 602-878-4286




Today in Great Lakes History - June 29

The BEECHGLEN was Launched in 1923 as a) CHARLES M. SCHWAB for the Interlake Steamship Co.

On June 29, 1962, the Canadian Hunter began her maiden voyage.

The JOSEPH L. BLOCK was christened on June 29, 1976.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - June 28

On June 28, 1938, at 8:50 a.m., the William A. Irvin departed Duluth with her first cargo of iron ore for Lorain, Ohio. 48 years later, in 1986, almost to the minute, the William A. Irvin opened as a museum to the public. I had the honor of conducting the first public tour aboard the vessel.

The ATLANTIC SUPERIOR arrived at the Algoma Steel Plant, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. on her maiden voyage in 1982 with a load of taconite but before she was unloaded christening ceremonies were conducted there.

the SAM LAUD ran aground June 28, 1975 on a shoal south of Sturgeon Bay, with a cargo of coal from Chicago, IL for Green Bay, WI. Six-thousand tons of coal were off-loaded the next day into the NICOLET before she could proceed to Green Bay along with the NICOLET to discharge cargoes. SAM LAUD entered the dry dock at Sturgeon Bay on July 3rd for repairs. She had suffered extensive bottom damage with leakage into seven double bottom tanks and the forepeak. She returned to service on August 21, 1975.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Tug Boat Races Today

06/27:
The annual tug boat races on the Detroit River will be held today. There are expected to be 15 - 20 tugs competing in the event. The race is run on the Canadian side of the river with Dieppe Park in Windsor as the finish line.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Today in Great Lakes History - June 27

CANADIAN RANGER was launched in 1967 by Davie Shipbuilding Ltd., Lauzon, Que. as a) CHIMO, C.323030, for the Canada Steamship Lines Ltd.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

06/26:
Several vessels that are occasional callers to Duluth-Superior have been in the Twin Ports recently. Middletown arrived June 25 to unload stone at the Northland Constructors dock. It then departed to load taconite in Silver Bay. Kaye E. Barker arrived the same day with stone for the Cutler dock. By June 26 it had shifted over to the DMIR ore dock to load taconite, using the spot usually reserved for the Inland Steel vessels. Canadian Olympic also came in to unload at Hallett 7 before moving across the harbor to load taconite at the BNSF ore dock in Superior. Also in town was Coast Guard Cutter Acacia, which has spent several days in Duluth. It was scheduled to depart June 26 with USCGC Sundew for training.

Reported by: Al Miller




New president of Canada Ports

06/26:
On 24 June, Canadian Transport Minister David Collenette announced the appointment of Jim Lynes of Wakefield, Quebec, as president of Canada Ports Corp. as of 1 July. Lynes will oversee the dissolution of the corportation, mandated under the new Canadian Marine Act. Lynes has a bachelor of arts with honors from Trinity College and a B.Ed. from the University of Toronto. Lynes joined the Canadian Department of Consumer and Corporate Affairs in 1973 and worked in the Canadian Office of Comptroller General starting in 1983. In 1986, he transferred to Transport Canada as a senior policy and program officer. Lynes was most recently director general of finance and he replaces Neil MacNeil at Canada Ports.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Mooring placed at the wreck of the Niagara

06/26:
On 24 June, the Neeskay, a research vessel operated by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's Great Lakes Water Institute, placed a permanent mooring at the site of the Niagara, which caught fire and sank on 24 Sept., 1856, about 0.8 kilometers/0.5 miles offshore and 14 kilometers/8.5 miles north of Port Washington, Wis. Between 100 and 165 people were killed. The sidewheel passenger steamer left Sheboygan, Wis., about 1400 and was lost two hours later. The 68.6-meter/225-foot vessel is in 16 meters/52 feet of water with 7.9 meters/26 feet over the wreck. In 1996, the Niagara was placed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. In order to aid divers to the site, two rail wheels were welded together to form a 630-kilogram/1,400-pound mooring. In addition to improving safety, damage to the Niagara will be limited since vessels will not have to anchor among wreckage or tie lines to the shipwreck. It is planned to place a plaque on the Niagara with a map and a sketch of the ship.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Navy ship for Lakes Cruise

06/26:
The US Navy ship that will take part of the promotional cruise for the Navy this year is the USS Samuel Elliot Morrison . This is her second visit to the lakes as she took part in the cruise of 1991 with her sister ship the USS Estocin

Reported by: David F.




Book on Indiana ports available

06/26:
The Indiana Port Commission, with the Indiana Historical Bureau, has published a history of three Indiana ports by Ralph D. Gray. "Public Ports for Indiana: A History of the Indiana Port Commission" profiles the Clark Maritime Center at Jeffersonville, the International Port at Burns Harbor and the Southwind Maritime Center at Mount Vernon. For information on obtaining the book, telephone 800-233-PORT or e-mail (PortsofIN@aol.com).

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - June 26

In 1926 the Lemoyne was launched at Midland Shipbuilding Co, Midland Ont. She was 6 feet wider and 4 feet shallower than the largest ship at that time.
1929 the Calcite II was launched at American Shipbuilding Co., Lorain OH
Launched in 1972 was the ALGOWAY (2) at Collingwood

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Cleveland Report Update

06/25:
It was reported on Monday that a salt water vessel unloading in Cleveland had possibly hit something between Port Colborne and Cleveland causing the vessel to take on water, this report was not correct. It is now believed that the damage was caused in berth 26 West at the Port of Cleveland, when the vessel was holed by several steel brackets protruding from the bulkhead beneath the surface of the water. The damaged vessel was repaired at the dock and departed Sunday for Burns Harbor.

Reported by: D. Doright




Detroit River Shut Down

06/25:
The Detroit River was closed to all upbound and downbound commercial traffic for four hours last night to allow for the annual fireworks show. The river re-opened on schedule. Part of the International Freedom Festival features fireworks that are launched from barges moored in the middle of the river off Hart Plaza. The parade of pleasure craft after the show is an annual headache for the Coast Guards.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Today in Great Lakes History - June 25

1927 the B.F. Affleck was launched at Toledo Shipbuilding Co.

On June 25, 1938, the William A. Irvin began her maiden voyage, leaving Lorain, Ohio for Duluth to load iron ore.

The ALGOBAY collided head-on with the steamer MONTREALAIS in foggy conditions on the St. Clair River June 25, 1980 causing extensive bow damage to both vessels. Repairs to the ALGOBAY were made by Herb Fraser & Associates, Port Colborne, Ont. at an estimated cost of $500,000. She returned to service by mid August, 1980.

INDIANA HARBOR set a Great Lakes cargo record on June 25, 1993 loading 71,369 tons of western low sulfur coal at Superior (WI) Midwest Energy Terminal and transporting it 50 miles to Silver Bay, MN.

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Ship Loses Power at Lock

06/24:
A ship carrying steel coils to Cleveland through the St. Lawrence Seaway delayed traffic Saturday, June 20th when its engines lost power. The APT MARINER, a 619 foot-long vessel,[Cosco Group Ltd, Hong Kong] lost power while going through Eisenhower Lock at 12:25p.m. It was cleared to go through the lock at 3:55p.m. Apparently there was no damage to the lock and it was considered a minor incident.

The engine trouble delayed two ships scheduled to go through the lock. Several ships were also delayed in the Cape Vincent area, but Seaway officials said the problem wasn't mechanical, but a shortage of pilots to guide the boats through the Seaway. The heavy amount of traffic on the Seaway has created a temporary shortage pilots. There is a mandatory rest period for the pilots, who are required on any ocean-going boat going through the locks and Seaway. This area is one of the most dangerous waterways and requires alert and rested pilots to safely navigate boats through. Groundings and spills here could be a major catastrophe with serious consequence.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Cargo Shipments Up in Duluth

06/24:
The Port of Duluth reported last Friday that cargo shipments are up 14 percent. This is in part due to barge operators striking on the lower Mississippi river and disputes in some railroads.

Reported by: David F.




Blough to Lower Lakes

06/24:
Reports are that the Roger Blough will be making another run to the lower lakes. She is scheduled to arrive in Conneaut on the 25th.

Reported by: David F.




World registries in 1997

06/24:
Lloyd's Register of Shipping's most recent World Fleet Statistics reports that Panama had the world's largest register at the end of 1997, with 6,188 ships of 91.128 million gross tons and an average age of 17 years. This accounts for 17 percent of the world's fleet. Liberia is second with 1,697 ships of 60.058 million gross tons averaging 12 years. Third was the Bahamas with 1,221 ships of 25.523 million gross tons averaging 16 years. In all, at the end of 1997, the world fleet totaled 85,494 ships of 522.2 million gross tons with 45,097 cargo vessels of 757.84 million deadweight tons. The average age of the fleet is 19 years with the youngest that of containerships at 10 years. The oldest average type is passenger and general cargo ships at 30 years. However, the oldest category includes only 342 ships of 600,000 gross tons. Tankers average 18 years. In 1997, 1,820 ships of 25.2 million gross tons were completed with Japan and South Korea responsible for 71 percent. Other registries, ranked by decreasing gross tonnage, are:

4. Greece, 1,641 ships of 25.288 million gross tons, 24 years
5. Cyprus, 1,650 of 23.653 million, 16
6. Malta, 1,378 of 22.984 million, 19
7. Norway, 715 of 19.780 million, 15
8. Singapore, 1,656 of 18.875 million, 11
9. Japan, 9,310 of 18,516 million, 11
10. China, 3,175 of 16.339 million, 18
11. Russia, 4,814 of 12.282 million, 17
12. United States, 5,260 of 11.789 million, 24
13. The Philippines, 1,699 of 8.849 million, 22
14. St. Vincent and the Grenadines, 1,343 of 8.374 million, 22
15. South Korea, 2,441 of 7.430 million, 20
16. Germany, 1,125 of 6.950 million, 17
17. India, 941 of 6.934 million, 15
18. Turkey, 1,146 of 6.567 million, 23
19. Marshall Islands, 168 of 6.314 million, 13
20 Italy, 1,324 of 6.194 million, 22

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - June 24

On June 24, 1971, a fire broke out in the engine room of the ROGER BLOUGH killing four yard workers and extensively damaging her Pielstick diesel engines. Extensive repairs, which included replacement of both engines, delayed the launch for nearly a year.

The RIDGETOWN was launched June 24, 1905 as a) WILLIAM E. COREY, the first flagship for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





06/23:
Back up and running. Should have the other pages updated later today.





Twin Ports Report

06/23:
St. Clair, once a regular at Midwest Energy Terminal, has been seen there little this season and last. This season it's been calling more often at the BN ore dock in Superior. Its most recent call there was June 22.

Fred R. White Jr., an infrequent caller in the Twin Ports, arrived in Superior on June 21 to load coal bound for Taconite Harbor. After unloading at the power plant there, the White took on taconite.

A two-year project to demolish the former Cargill C and D grain elevators in Duluth took a major step over the weekend of June 20-21 when the contractor set off demolition charges in half of Cargill C. Part of the concrete silos collapsed completely, but much of the structure remained standing and canted far to one side.

Reported by: Al Miller




Pere Marquette 41 Christeded

06/23:
A Christening ceremony was held on June 18th for the new ATB Pere Marquette 41. The new vessel was Christened by Mrs. Elsie Conrad (wife of Charles Conrad) and Mrs. Dorothy Manglitz (mother of Bob Manglitz), with the words "We Christen Thee Pere Marquette 41".

The new vessel gives a second life to the former City of Midland 41. Pere Marquette Shipping Company was founded by Bob Manglitz, Jim Anderson, and Don Clingan. Ed Wiltse is Vice President and Chief Operating Officer.

Reported by: the Max Hanley




New Commodity for Manistee

06/23:
With the addition of the Pere Marquette 41 to the Great Lakes Fleet, it has opened a new trade in Manistee. The Pere Marquette 41/Undaunted will be hauling logs out of Manistee. This comes 50 years after Roen fleet barges delivered pulpwood to Manistee. The shipments will be heading out, starting in the middle of July. This might even attract a few salties to load in Manistee.



Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Ship Runs Into Seaway Lock Wall

06/23:
A Bahamian Registered ship, MOUNTAIN BLOSSOM, crashed into an approach wall in the St. Lawrence Seaway's Eisenhower Lock Wednesday, June 17th, spilling 50 gallons of flamable liquid and forcing people within a half mile to evacuate. The spill was contained quickly by Seaway workers and U.S.Coast Guard officers. The liquid, a fuel product known as Xylene, floats on water and produces a flammable, irritating vapor. The Eisenhower Lock was closed from 5:45 to 10:50 pm Thursday, holding up several vessels. The ship was cleared to leave the lock just before 11pm. A temporary sealant was applied to cover the boat's fracture until it reaches Montreal, where permanent repairs will be made. The collusion crushed a portion of the lock's concrete wall and tore some of the rubber fender. To ensure the safety of residents, Massena Fire Department and state police quickly established an evacuation area and firefighters conducted air sampling to ensure that there was no threat of explosion Spill response contractors have been hired by the vessel's owner to remove the Xylene remaining in the lock to prevent further environmental impact.Alcohol tests conducted after the incident determined that the pilot and crew members had not been drinking.

The MOUNTAIN BLOSSOM was the second ship to spill fuel in the locks in the past year. In August, a Maltese ship discharged jet fuel into the Snell Lock after a minor collision. This fuel dissipated within a few hours and the locks were reopened the same day. Campers were evacuated from Barnhart Island, and no one was injured in the incident.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin and Steve Schultz




Cargo Endurance Runs aground

06/23:
The Liberian m bulk carrier CARGO ENDURANCE (26,412 gross), bound New Orleans with Ilmenite Ore, grounded in way of her No.2 hold near Havre St. Pierre, St. Lawrence River, June 19th. She refloated later same day by her own means. No damages reported.



Reported by: John Whitehead




Cleveland Report

06/23:
(SEE UPDATE 6/25)
Arabella (sp?) was discharging billetts (long bars of unfinished steel) when one of the slings was released accidentally sending the billetts through the side of the ship. Repairs are underway at the terminal. The were no reports of injuries or water ingress.

The vessel Alexandria arrived for discharge of steel products and was found with 7 feet of water in one hold and 9 feet in another! Speculation is that the Vessel hit something between Port Colborne and Cleveland. Surveyors are figuring on about a $1,000,000 in damages to cargo alone.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Mackinaw seeing red

06/23:
The painting of the Mackinaw to a red hull is proceeding. Mackinaw's hull color change isapproximately 95% complete with the starboard side done.

Click here for a picture from the USCG (large file size, 200+k)


Reported by: Andy Torrence




Snowbirds Flying Team To Perform

06/23:
The Snowbirds, Canada`s premiere flying team will perform a 35 minute airshow over Lake Huron at Goderich Harbor today, June 23rd at 6:15 p.m. The show is part of the 60th Anniversary celebrations for the Goderich Airport. The center stage for the show will be the Goderich Main Harbor, just south of the salt dock. The area for the show will be restricted to boat traffic. The organizers are requesting a $2.00 per person donation for the show. Free shuttle service will be available from the Suncoast Mall(on Bayfield Road) to the harbor beginning at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday. Limited parking is available at the harbor. The Snowbirds will arrive on Monday, June 22nd at approxiately 12:00 noon and depart Goderich airport on Wednesday, June 24th at 10:00 a.m.



Reported by: Philip Nash




New Service to Canada

06/23:
Norasia Shipping Services S.A. has chartered the Selandia (12,340-dwt, 1,012-TEU containership built in 1997) for its weekly trans-Atlantic service that began this week. The company is reportedly paying U.S.$7,000 daily for an 18-day round-trip. The first vessel on the Canada-Europe Express was to be the 1,400-TEU containership Norasia Samantha, which was christened earlier this month by Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft AG in Kiel, Germany. However, its completion has been delayed. It is now expected that the Norasia Samantha and the Norasia Savannah, a follow-on ship also under construction, will be deployed next month. The new route calls at Antwerp, Belgium; Felixstowe, England; and Montreal.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Update

06/23:
Welland Canal Ship Society meets 3rd Saturday of the Month (June 20th) at Grantham Lions Centre at the corner of Niagara St & Lakshore Rd (1 block west of lock 1) This month's meeting is a slide theme night "WHAT DO WE HAVE HERE'? Meetings open to all those interested in ships and their history. Meeting time 1900 hours

Reported by: Barry Andersen




Today in Great Lakes History - June 23

In 1926 the Lemoyne was launched at Midland Shipbuilding Co, Midland Ont. She was 6 feet wider and 4 feet shallower than the largest ship at that time.
1929 the Calcite II was launched at American Shipbuilding Co., Lorain OH
Launched in 1972 was the ALGOWAY (2) at Collingwood

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - June 22

The DAVID Z. NORTON (2) was Launched and christened as the WILLIAM R. ROESCH on June 22, 1973 for the Union Commerce Bank, Ohio (Trustee) and managed by the Kinsman Marine Transit Co., Cleveland, OH.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - June 21

On June 21, 1942, the Alpena--formerly the Leon Fraser--entered service as the largest vessel on the Great Lakes. The former U.S. Steel bulk freighter, originally 639'6" long, retained at least a tie for that honor until the Wilfred Sykes entered service on April 19, 1950.

Also on June 21, 1942, the U.S. Steel bulk freighter Eugene J. Buffington ran hard aground on Boulder Reef in Lake Michigan and broke in two. The vessel was subsequently recovered and, after a long career with U.S. Steel, was finally sold for scrap in 1980.

The M/V RANGER III was side launched at Christy Ship (Bay Ship), Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin on Saturday, June 21st, 1958. The vessel was custom designed by R.A. Stearns (Bay Engineering) also of Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin for the National Park Service, Isle Royale National Park.

On June 21, 1986, during a severe thunderstorm (and unofficial observations of a funnel cloud) in the Duluth area, the Joshua A. Hatfield broke loose from Azcon Scrap Dock in Duluth and was blown across the harbor and ended up hard aground on Park Point (Minnesota Point). She remained stuck for nearly 3 weeks when a storm with east winds pushed the Hatfield free and she blew most of the way back across the harbor back to the scrap dock! Tugs were dispatched in time to safely guide the Hatfield back to the scrap dock. (June seems to be a bad month for U.S. Steel in accidents, with the June 7, 1977 accident involving the William A. Irvin, the June 15, 1943 collision between the D.M. Clemson and the George M. Humphrey, and the June 21, 1942 grounding of the Eugene J. Buffington on Boulder Reef.)

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - June 20

The WILLIAM P. COWAN cleared Lorain on her maiden voyage in 1918

In 1903 the twin screw rail car ferry GRAND HAVEN was launched for the Grand Trunk Carferry Line, Milwaukee, WI.

On June 20, 1953, the Canada Steamship Lines bulk freighter Burlington collided with and sank the Scotiadoc in Lake Superior.

On June 20, 1959, the Seaway Queen began her maiden voyage. The vessel was appropriately named, as at the time she was the largest Canadian vessel on the Great Lakes, the 2nd largest on the Great Lakes overall (behind the Edmund Fitzgerald), and she entered service the same week that Queen Elizabeth II and President Dwight D. Eisenhower formally dedicated the St. Lawrence Seaway. To this day, she remains one of the more popular and classic looking vessels on the Great Lakes.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - June 19

1954 the George M. Humphrey (named for President Eisenhower's Secretary of Treasury) launched at American Shipbuild Co., Lorain, OH

In 1978, the Algobay was launched at Collingwood.

Data from: Jody Aho Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

06/18:
Traffic remains brisk at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal. Courtney Burton is scheduled to make a rare call at the dock June 19, followed by Walter J. McCarthy Jr., June 19; Columbia Star, June 20; Fred R. White Jr., June 20; Paul R. Tregurtha, June 21; and Oglebay Norton, June 22.

Reported by: Al Miller




Pere Marquette 41 arrives

06/18:
The Pere Marquette 41 arrived Ludington yesterday morning. She entered the harbor at 7:00 am, and tied up at 7:30 am.

Pere Marquette Shipping Inc. is having a re-christening ceremony and open house aboard the S.S. Badger in the "Upper Deck Cafe" at 7:30 pm today, June 18th. The public is invited to attend.

Reported by: the Max Hanley




Kaye E. Barker loads unusual cargo

06/18:
Afer unloading taconite on June 16, 1998, the Stmr. Kaye E. Barker shifted from the Rouge Steel Dock in the Rouge River to the DMT1 dock in the Rouge River. She is scheduled to load approximately 27,000 tons of mill scale to be unloaded in Gary, IN. This is the same cargo she loaded last fall at Nicholson Dock & Terminal, and also the same cargo that was loaded a few years ago into the Edward L. Ryerson on her rare trips to Detroit. Loading will take approximately 24 hours. Also wishing the "flower lady" and her husband a happy 40th wedding anniversary and a safe trip.

Reported by: Wade P. Streeter




Columbus to call Milwaukee in September

06/18:
The Port of Milwaukee said 16 June that Hapag-Lloyd AG will bring its Columbus (14,000-gt, 150-meter/492-foot motor passenger ship built in 1997) to the city on 5 Sept. and 25 Sept. for day-long calls as part of cruises on the North American Great Lakes. In September 1999, the Columbus will again be calling Milwaukee as well as Green Bay, Wis. The cruises this fall have reportedly sold out.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Correction -- New tug name

06/18:
The name in the recent publication was incorrectly stated to be The Interlake Dorothy Sue. The new Interlake tug name is Interlake Dorothy Ann, after Vice Chairman Paul R. Tregurtha's eldest daughter.

Reported by: the Interlake Steamship Company




Today in Great Lakes History - June 18

In 1949 the Wilfred Sykes was launched at American Shipbuilding Co., Lorain, OH. At the time she was the largest and most powerful vessel on the lakes. The Sykes was also the first boat to have a poop deck.

1964 The Saguenay was launced at Davie Ship Building Ltd., Lauzon, Quebec

1968 the Algocen was launched at Collingwood

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Re-christening Scheduled

06/17:
The re-christening and open house for the Pere Marquette 41 is scheduled for this Thursday evening at 7:30 PM in the Upper Deck Cafe on the Badger. The Pere Marquette 41 is due back in Ludington this morning around 7:30 to 8:00 AM. The Pere Marquette 41 was scheduled for sea trials at Sturgeon Bay yesterday, then she was to leave for Ludington.

Reported by: the Max Hanley




Record Demand For Low-Sulfur Coal

06/17:
Shipments of low-sulfur coal from Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wisconsin, totaled 1,719,531 net tons in May, an increase of 23 percent compared to the same period last year. For the season, SMET's shipments stand at 3,760,173 tons, an increase of 30.7 percent.

According to published reports, SMET projects loading 16.5 million tons of coal this year, by far a new record for the 22-year-old operation.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers’ Association




Nyanza update

06/17:
NYANZA which was reported to have left Montreal May 15th is now reported back in Montreal Port with no departure date, as per the June 16/98 9pm Harbour report.

Reported by: the John Whitehead




U.S. Coast Guard seeking committee members

06/17:
The U.S. Coast Guard is seeking six new members for its Merchant Marine Personnel Advisory Committee, which advises on training, certification and other personnel matters under Coast Guard jurisdiction. The six will start serving on 31 Jan. for three years. Specifically, those being sought include an able-bodied seaman, a licensed deck officer, a licensed engineering officer, a pilot, a representative of a firm in vessel operations or management and an educator affiliated with a maritime academy. Applications are being accepted until 1 Aug. Information is available by writing Commandant (G-MSO-1), U.S. Coast Guard, 2100 Second Street S.W., Washington, D.C., 20593-0001, telephoning 202-267-0229 or faxing 202-267-4570.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - June 17

The SCOTT MISENER (2) was christened on June 17, 1951. She was the first vessel built at Port Weller.

The PATERSON (1) collided with the steamer EDMUND W. MUDGE in 1957 in fog on the St. Clair River opposite Marine City, MI.

The WILLIAM A. IRVIN was towed back to Duluth on June 17, 1986 by the tugs SIOUX and DAKOTA to be on station as a museum ship at the new $3 million convention facility.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




June Vessel Report

06/16:
The major U.S.-Flag Great Lakes carriers had 63 of their 70 vessels in service on June 1, the same as a year ago. Since the survey date, two idled tankers have returned to service and the cement carrier PAUL H. TOWNSEND began its season on June 3. The straight-decker EDWARD L. RYERSON has entered short-term lay-up, but is expected to return to service by month's end. The grain carrier KINSMAN INDEPENDENT has been withdrawn from service until demand warrants its reactivation.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers’ Association




Bumb Boat Returns

06/16:
More than a decade after the last bum boat disappeared from Duluth-Superior harbor, a group of boat enthusiasts has resurrected the Marine Trader and gone into business serving ships calling in the Twin Ports. Bruce and Franz Von Reidel, a father-son team, and other supporters put the Marine Trader back in service three weeks ago. Since then they've been serving ships as a traditional bum boat, pulling alongside docked vessels and selling crewmen clothing, sundries and other items.

Reported by: Al Miller




Algontario becomes a regular

06/16:
Algontario, which spent the weekend in Duluth, is becoming a regular in Duluth-Superior. The vessel this season has made several trips to unload cement at the St. Lawrence Cement terminal in Duluth. After cleaning its holds, it then shifts to Harvest States elevator in Superior to load.

Reported by: Al Miller




Salties in the News

06/16:
The bulk carrier FLARE which broke in two and sank in the Gulf of St Lawrence earlier this year whilst enroute to the Great Lakes, will be the subject of a search to establish the cause of the incident. Incorrect ballasting and defective ballast tanks are suspected. A 300 kilogram remote controlled submarine will be used by Canadian Federal investigators in July. The vessel bow section is in 100 meters of water

Lloyds Casualty list revealed today that the Salty bulk carrier GRANT CARRIER is detained in the Great Lakes, until repairs are carried out to a holed ballast tank. This was discovered June 14 when the vessel was subjected to U.S Coastguard inspection of the vessel in Cleveland.

The salty NYANZA has been the subject of an internet search for her whereabouts by a UK debt management company after she left Gibraltar May 25 -destination "Canada". She was located last week in Gros Cacouna Quebec in the Lower St Lawrence. The vessel made a very fast visit to Montreal and departed June 15, destination unknown.

Reported by: John Whitehead




The next boat to: Bob-Lo

06/16:
This is a rare opportuntity to visit the Island. If you would like to join the cruise call today! 313-843-9376

Great Lakes Maritime Institute presents: The next boat to: Bob-Lo / Diamond Belle / Saturday, June 20, 1998.
The Steamer Ste. Claire was the last boat to Bob-Lo, departed Detroit Sept. 2, 1991 at 6pm.
Bob-Lo opened 100 years ago June 20, 1898.
Disembark at the old Steamer Dock. Stroll the grounds to the 1913 dance hall. Walk to lighthouse & blockhouse. See the new Bois Blanc homes.

This special voyage of the Diamond Belle will depart from Diamond Jack's Landing at the foot of West Grand Blvd, Detroit-4 blocks from Clark Street Exit off I-75

Bob-Lo Island is in Canada. You must have two pieces of I.D., one must be passport or birth certificate. You will be required to identify yourself to both Canadian and U.S. Customs & immigration.

Ships Schedule - Subject to many conditions
9:00 am - Depart Diamond Jack's landing.
9:15 am - Arrive Windsor (Customs Canada).
9:30 am - Depart Windsor.
10:00 am - Passing Columbia & Ste. Claire.
11:15 am - Arrive Bob-Lo Island
12:00 noon - Luncheon at Bob-Lo pavillion. Tour island at your leisure.
2:00 pm - Depart Bob-Lo Island. Cruising wetlands east of Fighting Island past LaSalle Canada.
4:00 pm - Arrive Diamond Jack's landing.

Tickets by Reservation Only
$65 per person - including $6.50 U.S. Customs Nafta tax.
Includes round trip river voyage to Bob-Lo (drinks extra).
Note: Some areas on Bob-Lo are not open to our group.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 16

In 1967 the Canadian Leader was launched at Collingwood. She was the last steam powered lake ship.

Upbound in the Welland Canal June 16, 1963 loaded with iron ore for Chicago, U.S. Steel's BENJAMIN FAIRLESS suffered bow damage in collision with Canadian steamer RALPH S. MISENER.

In 1918 the WILLIAM P SNYDER, JR. was in collision with the steamer GEORGE W. PERKINS in Duluth Harbor resulting in damages of $5,000 to both vessels.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




New Interlake Tug Name

06/15:
According to "American Tugboat Review 1998," a special publication of Professional Mariner magazine, the tug now under construction at Ocean Tug & Barge, Bellingham Mass. which will eventually be used to push Interlake's barge Pathfinder, will be named "Interlake Dorothy Sue." According to the article, the 7,200 hp tug is the largest z-drive tugboat ever built in North America. Delivery is expected in the spring of 1999. The article also speculates that the tug Joyce Van Enkevort, which now pushes the Pathfinder, "will likely be assigned to a new barge, possibly one now being built." No explanation for the name Interlake Dorothy Sue was mentioned in the article.

Reported by: the Know Your Ships




St. Clair Spills Fuel

06/15:
The St. Clair was in the Escanaba harbor on Friday and lost approximately 600 gallons of diesel fuel over board. The Coast Guard arrived to contain the leak and set up a containment boom around the vessel. The cause of the leak is unknown, she was expected to depart on Sunday.

Reported by: the Marine Historical Society of Detroit




B+B Dredging purchases new hopper

06/15:
The B+B Dredging company has purchased a 1200 cubic yard trailing arm hopper dredge from Gulf Coast Trailing for use on the Great Lakes. This boat will replace the venerable "Columbus" which was driven off the lakes by lawsuits filed by Lake Michigan Contractors. The "Columbus" is currently dredging in Mobil, Alabama under a contract with the Corp of Engineers.

Reported by: the D. Ocean




Today in Great Lakes History - June 15

On June 15, 1943, the D.M. Clemson collided with and sank the George M. Humphrey in the Straits of Mackinac. Both of these 600-footers recovered for long careers. The D.M. Clemson was sold for scrap in 1980. The George M. Humphrey was recovered over a year later, renamed the Captain John Roen, later converted to a self-unloader, and finished her career as the Consumers Power at the end of the 1985 season before being scrapped in 1988.

In 1972, the Roger Blough entered service on her maiden voyage, departing Lorain, Ohio for Two Harbors, Minnesota to load ore. She was nearly a year late because of a fire in her engine room.

1989 Roger M. Kyes rechristened Adam E. Cornelius

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Andy Hering, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Wildlife on the river

06/13:
While upbound in the Middle Neebish channel of the St. Marys River June 6, Captain Phil Fitch, master of the Burns Harbor noticed what looked like a moving log in the river. A second look determined that is was a large bear swimming across the channel. Captain Fitch shut down the engines of the Burns Harbor at the same time blowing the whistle. The bear kept coming and missed the boat by less than 200 feet. He/she climbed up on the rocks and disappeared into the woods. Just another day on the St. Marys River.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Update on the Blough

06/13:
Roger Blough was downbound in the river several days ago when it received word of an equipment breakdown at the Conneaut Ore dock on Lake Erie. The ore-laden ship was rerouted to Gary to deliver its cargo.

Reported by: Mark Peabody




New Plateau For Great Lakes Stone Trade

06/13:
CLEVELAND--Monthly stone shipments from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports topped the 5-million ton mark for possibly the first time in May. Loadings of aggregate for the construction industry and fluxstone for the steel industry totaled 5,130,079 net tons. The previous known peak for the Lakes stone trade was 4,980,154 tons in July 1997.

U.S.-Flag lakers carried 4.1 million tons of stone, or 80 percent, of the record May float. Virtually all of that stone was delivered to American ports. The movement of cargo between two U.S. ports is generally referred to as the Jones Act trades. Section 27 of the Merchant Marine Act of 1920 reserves the movement of cargo between U.S. ports to vessels that are American-owned, -crewed and -built. The United States has reserved domestic waterborne commerce to American vessels since virtually the first days of the republic.

For the season, stone shipments from Great Lakes ports stand at 9,569,289 tons, an increase of 21 percent over the corresponding period last year. Incredibly enough, 1997 was itself nearly a record season for stone. The 39.1 million tons loaded last year was the highest level achieved since 1978 and not too far behind the all-time high - 43.1 million tons in 1974.

While demand for stone is brisk, the trade has also benefited from the mild winter. With virtually no ice and moderate temperatures, many stone docks resumed shipping in March. Typically, stone does not start moving until early April and generally does not reach its stride until late in the month.

"Many people believed that the recession of last decade so changed the face of Great Lakes shipping that our heyday was behind us," said George J. Ryan, President of Lake Carriers’ Association. "However, this new benchmark for the stone trade is just one example of how U.S.-Flag carriers and Great Lakes shippers have proved the naysayers wrong. Iron ore shipments have rebounded to levels many thought we’d never see again. The western coal trade continues to increase significantly each year."

Reported by: the Lake Carriers’ Association




Today in Great Lakes History - June 13

On June 13, 1983, the John B. Aird began its maiden voyage, a load of coal from Thunder Bay to Nanticoke, Ontario.

The IRVING S. OLDS carried a then-record 17,817 gross tons of iron ore on June 13, 1943 from Lake Superior and transported a total of 736,800 short tons of various bulk cargoes the next year.

On the morning of June 13, 1905 running downbound on Lake Superior, the heavily laden SYLVANIA encountered heavy fog as she approached the Soo. Confused whistle signals resulted in the SYLVANIA glancing off the Pittsburgh S.S. steamer SIR HENRY BESSEMER which sustained a 175 foot port side gash from the SYLVANIA's anchor. The BESSEMER required $40,000 in repairs and the SYLVANIA's damages totaled $10,000 which included a new anchor and shell plating which was completed at the Craig Shipbuilding Co., Toledo, OH.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




"New" Dock in Rouge River

06/12:
The lower end of the old DMT1 dock in the Rouge River has been accepting stone cargos lately. The Kaye E. Barker unloaded stone there on Monday June 8. It has been reported that the Pathfinder/Joyce L. VanEnkevort has also unloaded there. Reports are that the dock is now either leased or owned by the Edw. C. Levy Co. It is being called the "Conmix" dock by the vessels unloading there. As far as I know these are the only two ships to have unloaded there so far. Would be nice to see some salties in the Rouge again.

Reported by: Wade P. Streeter




Tug Sinks

06/12:
The June 5th edition of the Door County Advocate, reported that during the severe windstorm which went through lower Wisconsin and Michigan on May 31, the 65 foot Roen Salvage Company tug "Steve Asher" sank. Apparently the high winds and accompanying seas pushed the tug sideways against the barge it was towing and it sank near the east shore of Lake Michigan near White Lake in about 15 feet of water. According to the article, the two crewmen on the tug jumped to safety on the barge when the tug took on water and then began to roll over. Roen later raised the tug using its construction barges.

Reported by: Lew Clarke




Roger Blough

06/12:
The loaded Roger Blough was down bound under the Blue Water bridge around 5:00 PM Saturday, June 6. The still loaded Blough was upbound under the Blue Water bridge at Noon the following day. Wrong turn at Detour or a change of orders?

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Maritime Antique Show

06/12:
Don't forget, June 12-14 is the big Maritime Antique Show in St. Clair, MI. This show will feature: Treasures of the Atocha exhibition & sale; Tashmoo whistle blowing; Simulated Coast Guard Rescue; Bagpipe band; sea chanters; Sea songs by Dan Hall; seafood tasting; diving safety; collectibles, memorabilia, books, Photographs, videos, tableware, ship models, maritime museum booths, tattoos, pig roast. Dealers and vendors with maritime related collectibles are welcome. For more information contact Jim Clary 810-329-7744 marineart@jclary.com




New Vessel Passage Port

06/12:
Proud to announce that this site will now be providing the vessel passage reports for Owen Sound. Visit the Vessel Passage section to see the reports.




Welland Canal Ship Society

06/12:
The Welland Canal Ship Society meets the 3rd Saturday of each month at the Granthom Lyons Club in St Catharines, ON. This Saturday our meeting begins at 7 pm. Our meetings are open to those considering joining the club.

There is usually a slide show and presentation with a brief break for coffee and cookies.

Reported by: J. J. Van Volkenburg




Position Open

06/12:
The National Park Service, Isle Royale National Park, headquartered in Houghton, Michigan is seeking applications for the position of "Able Bodied Seaman" onboard the M/V RANGER III. The position is temporary starting on or about July 7, 1998 and extending to approximately October 15, 1998. For further information see the U.S. Department of Interior AVADS web page at www.usgs.gov/doi/avads/announcements/index.html or call Debbie Francis at 906-487-7144. If the position cannot be filled with an "AB" it may be filled with an "Ordinary Seaman".

Reported by: William Hanrahan




Today in Great Lakes History - June 12

"STUBBY", The bow and stern sections of the STEWART J. CORT welded together passed Port Colborne, Ont. on June 12, 1970 bound for Erie, PA under her own power. STUBBY's bow and stern sections were later separated at Erie Marine, Inc., a Div. of Litton, and joined to the 816 foot hull mid-body

The NANTICOKE departed Collingwood in 1980 starting her maiden voyage

In 1959 the BENSON FORD ran aground in the Amherstburg Channel on her upbound trip with coal for the Rouge Plant. After five days of lightering and with tug assistance, she was freed. Damages amounted to 41 bottom plates which took 30 days to repair.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




St. Lawrence Seaway to 31 May

06/11:
The St. Lawrence Seaway Authority reported 4 June that cargo moving by the St. Lawrence Seaway this year to 31 May increased from the same period last year. On the Montreal-Lake Ontarion section, cargo totalled 7.227 million metric tons, up from 7.166 million. On the Welland Canal, the total in the first five months was 8.546 million metric tons, an increase from 8.174 million tons. On the Montreal-Lake Ontario section, increases in general cargo and iron ore offset decreases in grain and other dry bulk cargoes. In the Welland Canal, general cargo and bulk commodities such as coal and grain registered increases.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - June 11

ATLANTIC SUPERIOR was float launched in 1982 for Federal Commerce & Navigation Ltd., Montreal, Quebec (Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., mgr.) built for the Caribbean trade.

MESABI MINER was christened at Duluth on June 11th, the MESABI MINER became the fourth thousand foot bulk carrier on the Great Lakes and Interlake's second.

IRVIN L. CLYMER - a) CARL D. BRADLEY (1) cleared Lorain in her gray and white livery, 1917, on her maiden voyage light bound for Calcite, MI to load limestone. She was the first Great Lakes commercial ship equipped with both Morse code telegraphy as well as ship-to--shore radio in 1922, which was standard on only 20 vessels by 1924.

On June 11, 1936 the EDWARD J. BERWIND collided with the AYCLIFFE HALL 16 miles West of Long Point on Lake Erie. The Hall Corp. steamer went to the bottom and was not salvaged.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - June 10

The OGLEBAY NORTON (a LEWIS WILSON FOY) loaded her first cargo June 10, 1978 at Burlington Northern #5, Superior, WI with 57,952 tons of Hibbing taconite pellets for Burns Harbor, IN. In 1991.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News from the Seaway

06/09:
A recent casualty dated June 5 and reported by Lloyd's is the following one. The Danish mv SEA STAR (1,433 gt, built 1979) Barranquilla for Port au Prince with cement in bags was in collision with a japanese fishing vessel on June 3. SEA STAR sank almost immediately, 5 crew rescued, 2 missing. This vessel completed a voyage in the Great Lakes in April when she delivered a cargo of steel to Cleveland and returned in ballast.

Going up the Seaway for the first time in ten years on June 8 was the general cargo, Friendship type, Bahamas-flag ARABELLA bound for Cleveland. Back in 1988, she was then registered in Greece. Built in 1983, she had made her maiden trip in the Seaway a year later. 21 of this type of vessels were built between 1978 and 1989 in Japan and the majority of them visited Great Lakes ports over the years. 11 of them are fitted with horizontally slewing cranes such as ARABELLA and 10 are fitted with travelling gantry cranes.A sister-ship to ARABELLA, KENT NAVIGATOR called at Chicago last year. She has since been renamed AGAMEMNON by her owners.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Grain Slow

06/09:
Reports from ULS Group on Sunday say that many boats will not come out until fall. Specifically SS Montrealais, SS Quebecois, SS Canadian Mariner and SS Seaway Queen will not come out until late September.

Last year at this time all but the Seaway Queen were out and stayed out all summer.

Reported by: J J Van Volkenburg




More on Grain Slow Down

06/09:
On the U.S. side, the KINSMAN INDEPENDENT went up the Buffalo River on Sunday to tie up at the Lake & Rail Elevator. She is expected to be laid up for 5 - 6 weeks, there are no orders for grain until that time.

Reported by: Tom Coonly




Bridge Rehab

06/09:
The City of Buffalo is in the planning stages for rehab of the South Park Ave. lift bridge. The city is trying to find other cities that have gone through other such updates and how the new systems are functioning.

If you can help with this type of information please contact Tom Coonly




Today in Great Lakes History - June 9

LIGHTSHIP 103 was delivered to the 12th District Headquarters at Milwaukee, WI on June 9, 1921 to begin her Great Lakes career.

June 9, 1983 ALGOWEST loaded a then-record 1,047,758 bushels of wheat at Thunder Bay.

ROGER BLOUGH began sea trials in 1972

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Andy Hering, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Lake Ontario Ferries Update

06/08:
On Friday, June 5, the first of Shaker Cruise Lines Hydrofoils "Sunrise V" arrived in Port Dalhousie Harbour. Shaker intends to utilize two 71-passenger Hydrofoils in order to support it's cross-lake Ferry Operations between Toronto, Port Dalhousie, Niagara-on-the-Lake, and Lewiston, NY.

Waterways Transportation Services is still not in operation despite start dates indicated in the Globe & Mail (reported start date June 1) and the Toronto Sun (reported start date May 15). Sources in Toronto Harbour indicate that while Waterways I - the 300-seat catamaran - has been flagged Canadian she still has some modifications to her Safety Systems to complete. The Engine Room compartments are too small for standard CO2 Containers and suppliers are recommending customizing Co2 Containers for her. Waterways I will link Jordan Harbour and Toronto when her modifications are finally complete.

Hydrofoil Lake Jet Lines is running the Seaflight I, a 139-passenger Hydrofoil between Toronto and Queenston, Ontario. Despite some difficulties with the Municipal Government in Queenston over Dock zoning, Seaflight I has been operating for a week now. Observers note few, if any, passengers on most of their runs. One observation that resulted in a great deal of attention was that of the U.S. Coast Guard Station Niagara which responded to complaints about Seaflight I's wake on the Niagara River. On Saturday, June 6, videographers chronicled the passage - and subsequent wake impact on the Lewiston Anchorage - as it departed Queenston. Also in attendance was a County Sherrif's Police Boat that reported the disturbance to the Coast Guard.

Reported by: Erin Diel Corner House Imaginations




Today in Great Lakes History - June 8

1978 the Lewis Wilson Foy ( b) OGLEBAY NORTON ) was christened for the Bethlehem Steel Co., Cleveland, Ohio.

In 1938, the Governor Miller, sistership to the William A. Irvin, began her maiden voyage, leaving Lorain, Ohio. The Governor Miller was only the 2nd Great Lakes vessel to be powered by a steam turbine with a direct drive to the propeller shaft via reduction gear.

1976 - the Superior Midwest Energy Terminal loaded its first cargo of low-sulfur coal. The John J. Boland took the honors as the first vessel to load at this dock.

1977 the HARRY L. ALLEN was the first freighter to load at Burlington Northern's Dock #5 in Superior, WI

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Andy Hering, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Cuyahoga refloated

06/07:
Yesterday afternoon, a barge owned by Busch Marine was put along side of S/S Cuyahoga and off loaded approx 700 tonnes of stone and this was enough to allow her to float free. She off loaded more of her cargo at Bay Aggregates and then eventually headed to Saginaw. Busch was to deliver the material to the Saginaw dock and bucket it off with the crane carried on the barge. This same spot has given a few other vessels problems , it would seem these ships should keep a more shallow draft going to Saginaw, at least until the problem is corrected .

Reported by: Dan Maus




Today in Great Lakes History - June 7

1958 the Edmund Fitzgerald was launched at Great Lakes Engineering Works, River Rouge, MI (the animated image at the top of this page shows the launch)

In 1977, the William A. Irvin ran into the side of the Rock Cut after a power failure on board. The vessel received only slight damage. ( For a more detailed account, read my book "The Steamer William A. Irvin: Queen of the Silver Stackers").

Also on June 7, 1977 the MESABI MINER departed the shipyard on her maiden voyage to load ore at Duluth, MN.

On June 7, 1991, the Alpena (former Leon Fraser) began her maiden voyage as a cement carrier, departing Superior, Wisconsin, for her namesake port. Fraser Shipyards, who performed the conversion, took out a full-page ad in the Superior Evening Telegram proclaiming "INLAND LAKES MANAGEMENT, YOUR SHIP IS READY" and a picture of the vessel.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Andy Hering, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Cuyahoga stuck in Saginaw River

06/06:
This morning, the Steamer Cuyahoga was stuck hard aground in the Saginaw River. She was in the center of the channel between Liberty Bridge and Veterans Memorial bridge, the area seems to be in need of dredging there. She was heading upbound to Saginaw.

At 10:00 A.M. the tug Gregory Busch and barge were enroute to attempt to free the Cuyahoga from mud.

Reported by: Dan Maus




Busy Day at Port Huron

06/06:
Ths ship enthusists attending the Maritime Flea Market in Port Huron on Saturday and later venturing to the St. Clair River were treated to a full day of ship related action. Between 1:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. vessel passages included FRED R.WHITE,JR., ATLANTIC HICKORY / SARAH SPENCER, ALGOWAY, ZIEMA SUWALSKA, tug GOTHAM and barge, CANADIAN LEADER, ROGER BLOUGH AND BROOMPARK, all down bound. Up bounders included INDIANA HARBOR, SOLTA, DAVID Z. NORTON, SAMUEL RISLEY, MARY E. HANNAH and barge HANNAH 3601, KAYE E. BARKER and GEORGE A. STINSON. Most interesting was viewing the GEORGE A. STINSON in her "new clothes" with a newly painted black hull including a styled letter "N" in red on her bow next to her name. Also new paint included the American Steamship stack markings.

Reported by: John Meyland




Rare Vessel Visits Along the Seaway

06/06:
The tall ship ANNA KRISTINA, one of only 20 ships of its kind still in existence is making a stop June5-7 in the Seaway town of Clayton, New York on its way to Chicago. Public tours of the Norwegian vessel are available. The ship is a Hardanger Jakt, named after the fjord area in Norway where such vessels are built.It took 600 pine trees to build the ship.Its distinctive style features a transom stern, sloop or ketched rigged. The ketch is 108 feet long with a 21 foot beam. Because these ships were usually constructed and owned by farmers who had substantial supplies of timber, these vessels were solidly constructed. They were used for trading goods in Norway and in Europe.

Of the 2,000 Hardanger jakts built over 300 years, the ANNA KRISTANA is one of only 20 still in existence. Built in the 1880s, the ship set sail in the spring of 1890 with the name DYREFJELD. In 1977, Hans van de Vooren and his family found the ship laid up and hidden away in a northern Norway port. The family purchased the ship,renamed it and began a decade-long project to restore it. Since then the ship has sailed to various parts of the world and participated in the making of several films in Europe. The ANNA KRISTINA has her mizzenmast between the galley and the captain's cabin and has a square top sail. She is now traveling to Chicago, Ill.where she will be part of the 1998 Great Lakes Tall Ships Race, the world's oldest fresh water yacht race. Clayton, New York is among the first stops for the ship which is expected to visit other N.Y.ports in Oswego, Rochester, and Dunkirk.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Soo Locks Engineers Day

06/06:
For readers planning a trip to the Soo area, Engineers Day at the Soo Locks this year is Friday, June 26. As in the past, the public will be given free access to the "island" between the MacArthur and Poe Locks. Saturday, June 27, is the annual International Bridge Walk from Soo, Mi., to Soo, ON.

Reported by: Know Your Ships




Today in Great Lakes History - June 6

1944 Joseph H. Thompson participated in the D-Day invasion at Normandy

The E.B. BARBER entered service on June 6, 1953.

In 1953, the Armco began her maiden voyage from Lorain, Ohio bound for Superior, Wisconsin to load iron ore.

On June 6, 1959, the Sarah Spencer (formerly Adam E. Cornelius, Edmund V. Smith, and Sea Barge One) began her maiden voyage from Manitowoc, Wisconsin. This was the last Great Lakes vessel constructed with telescoping hatch covers.

POINTE NOIRE was in collision with Cleveland Tanker's SATURN on June 6, 1977 near Fighting Island in the Detroit River.

CLIFFS VICTORY loaded her first cargo after conversion, she loaded 13,089 gross tons of iron ore at Marquette, MI on June 6th 1951. Her downbound delivery trip to Cleveland, OH took only 38 hours, normally a 55 to 60 hour run for other lakers, and averaged over 13.9 knots (16 mph).

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Andy Hering, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - June 5

1972 the ROGER BLOUGH was christened

Also in 1972 the PARKER EVANS was in collision with the upbound Erie Sand steamer SIDNEY E. SMITH, JR. just below the Blue Water Bridge, at Port Huron, MI. The SMITH sank in twenty minutes with no loss of life. The EVANS, with bow damage, proceeded to Port Weller Dry Docks Ltd., St. Catharines, Ont. for extensive repairs. As a result of this accident, on October 4, 1972 alternate one-way traffic between the Black River Buoy and Buoys One and Two in Lake Huron was agreed upon by the shipping companies. Also a call-in system was initiated to monitor traffic between the Detroit River Light and Buoys Seven and Eight in Lake Huron by the newly established Sarnia Traffic.

On June 5, 1979, the Cartiercliffe Hall (later Winnipeg and now Algontario) caught fire on Lake Superior off the Keweenaw Peninsula just before 4:00 a.m. Six crewmembers died in the fire, and the U.S. Steel bulk freighter Thomas W. Lamont was able to rescue others from the Cartiercliffe Hall.

LIGHTSHIP 103 (HURON) had her keel laid June 5, 1918. In 1971 the lightship was acquired by the City of Port Huron for use as a museum.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports News

06/04:
A busy June 4 in the Twin Ports includes vessels calling at some unusual docks. Ziemia Suwalska was loading grain at the Great Northern elevator in Superior. This very old elevator, now apparently leased by General Mills, has been busier so far this year than at any time in the past decade. Saltie Lake Charles was unloading cargo at the Duluth port terminal and John B. Aird was loading coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal.

Reported by: Al Miller




New U.S. Coast Guard commandant

06/04:
U.S. Coast Guard Adm. James M. Loy became the Coast Guard's 21st commandant 29 May at Fort McNair in Washington. He relieved Adm. Robert E. Kramek, who is retiring after more than 37 years of service. Loy also assumed Kramek's duty as U.S. Interdiction Coordinator, who advises the director of the U.S. Office of National Drug Control Policy as well as the President and also coordinates all of the country's drug interdiction operations in the western hemisphere. Kramek, a 1961 graduate of the Coast Guard Academy, is married to the former Patricia Havard of Washington. They have four children, Tracy, Joseph, Suzanne and Nancy. Loy has been chief of staff since 1996. A native of Altoona, Pa., he commanded the Atlantic Area and Maritime Defense Zone Atlantic. A 1964 graduate of the Coast Guard Academy, he has commanded four cutters, including 43 combat patrols in Vietnam. Loy and his wife, the former Kay McGirk of Altoona, have two children, Kelly and Michael.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





I.T.W.F. releases crew conditions report

06/04:
A recent report by MORI for the International Transport Workers' Federation has stated that a quarter of crewmembers surveyed said that they had been the victim of racism while 10 percent had suffered physical violence. The Seafarers' Living Conditions Survey questioned 6,504 crewmembers using a form which was then evaluated. Some 11 percent said they had to pay to get a job with 43 percent of Indonesian citizens reporting they had to pay. Crews on open-registry ships accounted for 44 percent of those questioned, about the proportion of the gross tonnage of open registry ships, but vessels under open registry total only 19 percent. Ships registered in Romania, Russia and Ukraine were ranked the lowest with the longest hours, lowest pay and unsafe conditions. Also, many crewmembers reported that they are paid less than the federation level of U.S.$1,100 per month at the time of the survey. Some 84 percent of Philippine citizens earned less.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - June 4

On May 24, 1997, the MV PATERSON sailed for the Port of Windsor with a load of Number 1 Canola which totalled 26,881.588 metric tonnes setting a new record for the Port of Thunder Bay.

In 1947 the 525-foot Canada Steamship Lines bulk freighter Emperor stranded on Canoe Rocks on Lake Superior and sank with a loss of 12 lives.

Cliffs Victory sailed on her maiden voyage light from South Chicago in 1951

OTTERCLIFFE HALL (e) CANADIAN TRADER had her Keel laid 1968

The EDGAR B. SPEER was christened June 4th 1980 at Lorain for the Connecticut Bank & Trust Co., Hartford, CT, managed by the Great Lakes Fleet of the United States Steel Corp., Duluth, MN.

In 1988, the Irving S. Olds departed Duluth under tow, headed for scrap.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Iglehart Hits Bar

06/03:
At 4:14 PM yesterday, the J.A.W. IGLEHART, loaded with cement from Bath, Ontario, struck "sunset Joe's" a popular outdoor bar in Cleveland's Flats, just minutes before the bar was to open. The Iglehart was maneuvering backward with the help of an unidentified Great Lakes Towing Co. tugboat. She was en route to the Huron Cement Dock on Old River Rd. Damage to the vessel was "cosmetic", but damage to the bar was reported as considerable. Cause of the accident is unknown at this time but at the time of the accident Cleveland was being stuck by thunderstorms with winds above 20 mph and gusts into the 30's. The winds were from a direction that could have forced the Iglehart onto the dock where the bar is located.

Reported by: Al Hart and Rex Cassidy




Top Secret Shuttle Exposed

06/03: Fake Story
For years it has been suspected that Great Lakes Freighters are ferrying nuclear submarines onto the Lakes. Keeping with it's original mission of exposing the shipping industries top secret operations, this web site now exposes the nuclear sub shuttle run! The U.S. Navy has secretly transported nuclear submarines around the Great Lakes inside a specially designed ore carrier, the Sub Carrying Freighter (SCF). The submarines entered and exited the ship through doors in its bow. Inside the ship, submarines can be serviced, and crew members relax with amenities such as racquetball courts and saunas. It is reported that the Ryerson's trip up the Seaway was canceled when sources reported the operation to this web page. It is reported that the Navy occasionally will put the submarines to work, removing the nuclear missiles from the vessel and using the empty silos to carry cargoes of stone or iron ore. The Navy is considering discontinuing the program because of growing discontent among submarine crews, who found the night life to be too boring in various Great Lakes ports.

This never before seen photo (fake) shows the U.S.S. Wyoming exiting a SCF above the Soo Locks.




Back to the real news


International year of the Ocean

06/03:
USCG & CCG announce joint celebration. The United Nations has declared 1998 as the International Year of the Ocean to focus attention on the need to protect the marine environment and to ensure healthy waters. Events are being planned in various countries to celebrate the importance of oceans to our history, our economy and our dailiy lives.

The Canadian Coast Guard, Central and Arctic Region, and the United States Coast Guard, 9th District, have the privilege of having the Great Lakes within our areas of responsibility. The Great Lakes, in addition to being a key commercial and recreational waterway, represents the water supply for approximately 30 million people in Canada and the United States.

In recognition of the interdependencies between the oceans and the Great Lakes, the Canadian Coast Guard, Central and Arctic Region, and the United States Coast Guard, 9th District, invite you to celebrate in an international event entitled "The Great Lakes Celebrate the International Year of the Ocean". the showcase is jointly supported by the City of Port Huron, Michigan, and the City of Sarnia, Ontario. The open house will take place on Saturday, July 11, 1998 in Sarnia. We invite you, as a member of the Great Lakies community, to attend this celebration.

More details on the time, location, and events taking place can be found on the dedicated web page http://www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/cen-arc/iyo.htm




New Book OUR "DOWNRIVER" RIVER

06/03:
Our "Downriver" River, a book dedicated to all of the people who have lived around, visited, boated on, or just wondered about the history of, the lower Detroit River. It discusses the nautical history of the Downriver communities of Wyandotte, Trenton, Gibraltar, Grosse Ile, and Amherstburg. It also covers the history of the many Downriver islands, including pictures of Sugar Island when it was an amusement park, and Stony Island when it was a community of over thirty homes. It describes (including over 80 pictures) when the various bridges were built, which canals are natural, the building hundreds of ships in the area, rumrunning, current and past light houses, how Crystal Bay was developed, etc., etc. It also includes a guided historical boat tour of the Downriver area with 63 points of interest. Available for $19.95 at many Downriver nautical shops and yacht clubs, or autographed copy from author for $21.95, including S & H.

For more information please contact the book's author:
Rockne P. Smith
30777 Young Dr.
Gibraltar, MI 48173
rockne5@ili.net




Fourth annual Henry B. Smith Memorial Diver's Weekend

06/03:
In order to raise awarness of the Marquette Underwater Preserve, We are holding our fourth annual Divers Weekend Saturday,August 15th and Sunday, August 16th. On Saturday there will be a Treasure hunt for intersted divers and snorkellers ($5.00 per person); Saturday night from 5pm to 9pm there will be a free Divers Showcase, featuring U/W video presentations, equipment displays, and local marine authors and artists. On Sunday, there will be a Lower Marquette Harbor clean-up, a PADI Project AWARE event. For further information, please contact Diver Down Scuba at (906) 225-1699 or the Marquette Country Convention & Visitors Bureau at (800) 544-4321.




Today in Great Lakes History - June 3

The JOHN B. AIRD was christened in 1983 at Thunder Bay for Algoma Central Marine, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

After successfully completing her sea trials on June 3, 1951, the CLIFFS VICTORY entered service a little under six months from the time she was purchased from the U.S.M.C.

The PATERSON (1) entered service on June 3, 1954 with 440,000 bushels of wheat from Port Arthur.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Busy day for the Rouge

06/02:
It was a busy day on the Rouge River yesterday. The Elton Hoyt 2nd was unloading at Rouge Steel, the Charles E. Wilson is at the Detroit Lime dock, the McAsphalt at Petroleum dock, the Barge St. Mary's Cement is at the St. Mary's Cement dock, the John J. Boland was at the Concrete Mix dock and the H. Lee White was at mouth of the Rouge unloading coal for Great Lakes Steel. This is a very unusual day because traffic has been slow in the Rouge this year.

Reported by: Dave Marcoux




Twin Ports News

06/02:
May ended on a busy note in the Twin Ports. Adam E. Cornelius nipped into Fraser Shipyards for minor repairs in mid-afternoon and was out again during the evening. Kinsman Independent finished loading at Harvest States elevator, the proceeded up St. Louis Bay to the turning basic, where it turned, then went down the bay and backed into the old Great Northern elevator, now leased by General Mills. It seems like this year there have been a lot more boats loading grain on Saturday and Sunday than in the past. Another unusual visitor was Nanticoke, which took on grain at Cargill B1 - this is likely the first time Nanticoke has ever loaded grain here.

Reported by: Al Miller




Mantadoc downbound in Canal on first trip

06/02:
On Saturday the Mantadoc was in Lock 8 in Port Colborne. She was enroute to Cardinal, ON from Toledo, OH. The vessel only has 3 orders booked this year. The next being from the Thunder Bay to Port Colborne wharf 19 1 Maple Leaf Mills. She has another booked after that and if another order does not come in then she will go to the wall. She is subject for her 5 year in August which will send the men home for 3-4 weeks and then she will not come out again until the fall.

Reported by: J. J. Van Volkenburg




SLOAN in Escanaba

06/02:
Maritimer, GEORGE A. SLOAN, took a break from her stone runs and loaded siliceous ore in Escanaba on May 31 for Lorain. EDWARD L. RYERSON was also at the dock waiting to load on her last trip before "wet" lay-up in Sturgeon Bay.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Slow Load in Milwaukee

06/02:
Algolake was loading sand Sunday at the Terminal in Milwaukee using a shore side crane one bucket at a time. They partially load on the other side of the lake and then top off over here due to Milwaukee's deeper harbor.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Today in Great Lakes History - June 2

In 1973 the SYLVANIA, downbound light in fog, collided with the FRANK PURNELL just north of the Detroit River Light at 0523 hours. The SYLVANIA suffered minor bow damage and went to Toledo for repairs.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




MV Kom at Welland Lock 6

06/01:
About 8:15 yesterday morning the Motor Vessel Kom (port of registry - Valletta, Malta) had a difficult downbound trip between Welland Canal Locks 7 and 6, apparently due to high winds. As the Canadian Leader waited in the the upbound side of Lock 6 (the highest of the twinned flight locks), the Kom veered toward the open upbound lock. The Canadian Leader reversed into the lock and the Kom ended up diagonally across the canal above the flight locks, with the bow actually in the departure portion of the upbound Lock 6 and the stern against the wall above the downbound lock.

Lines where passed from the ship to Welland Seaway personnel on shore and the ship winches were used to help the Kom back to the east wall of the canal above downbound Lock 6. She then proceeded into the lock while the Canadian Leader headed to Lock 7.

Reported by: Marc & Jill Vander Meulen




Saginaw River Closed

06/01:
The Saginaw River was closed for several hours yesterday afternoon when the Enerchem Catalyst came off the Triple Clean Liquid Fuels dock due to the wind after the off loading pipe had been connected to the dock. They hadn't started pumping fuel yet so there wasn't a problem, but it sounds like the potential was there.

Reported by: Lon Morgan




Duluth News

06/01:
Loading grain at Cargill B-1 on May 30th and 31st was the CSL self-unloader Nanticoke. The Nanticoke is an infrequent visitor to the Twin Ports, and when it does visit, she usually loads ore and not grain. It's been several years since she last loaded grain in the harbor. Also, expect for the Canadian Ranger, it's rare to see a Canadian self-unloader in port loading grain.

Reported by: Gary A. Putney




Buffalo`s Standard Elevator

06/01:
Work has begun on the Standard Elevator on South St. in Buffalo to allow it toaccept self unloading grain boats, this will cause further cuts to the scoopers working the waterfront in Buffalo. Buffalo is the home of the electric grain elevator and the scoopers on the waterfront are almost as old as the waterfront itself.

Reported by: Tom Coonly




Today in Great Lakes History - June 1

In 1943 the IRVING S. OLDS collided with the 524 foot steamer CHARLES O. JENKINS in heavy fog 28 miles northeast of Cleveland on Lake Erie and was holed eight feet above the water line. The OLDS was able to help the badly damaged JENKINS back to Cleveland by lashing the two vessels together. After a grueling seven hours the JENKINS was beached in the outer harbor to prevent her from sinking further. The OLDS was repaired in time to carry a then-record 17,817 gross tons of iron ore on June 13, 1943

In 1952 the J.L. Mauthe was launched at Great Lakes Engineering Works, River Rouge, MI.

The WHITEFISH BAY, loaded with 950,000 bushels of spring wheat, was cited as she carried the billionth metric ton of cargo through the Eisenhower Lock in 1983.

JOSEPH S. YOUNG (2) Launched June 1, 1907 as a) WILPEN for the Shenango Steamship Co., a subsidiary of Shenango Furnace Co., Cleveland, OH.

The H. LEE WHITE departed Sturgeon Bay light on her maiden voyage June 1, 1974 to load iron ore at Escanaba, MI for Indiana Harbor, IN.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history







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