Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

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* Report News


Cleveland Report

07/31:
Saturday was another busy day in Cleveland. The tug Sea Eagle and cement barge arrived for Blue Circle Cement but had to wait at Dock 20 for the downbound Pathfinder to clear. The David Z. Norton departed from the LTV steel mill late Saturday night.

The Stephen B. Roman was expected to arrive at Blue Circle early Sunday morning and the Sea Eagle was expected to move to CBS and wait for her to unload. The Roman usually docks at the new silos at Dock 20 or the Lafarge Dock.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Toronto High Value Cargo Up

07/31:
The Toronto Star, July 29th edition, reports that the Toronto Port Authority is looking for 100,000 square feet of storage space for high value cargo.

To date 53 foreign ships have visited Toronto compared to 70 for all of last year. The port authority is projecting that another 50 foreign ships will arrive before the end of the season.

The paper reports that high-value shipments have rose from 81,400 tonnes in 1995 to 255,500 tonnes last year.

The port charges 65 cents/ton for handling bulk cargoes such as stone and salt while charges of $ 6.00/tonne and up are applied on high-value cargo.

Since March of this year the port has handled 158,000 tons of high value cargo.




Coast Guard Festival

07/31:
This year marks the 76th anniversary of the Coast Guard Festival in Grand Haven. Four cutters will be featured: the 140-foot icebreaking tugs Neah Bay and Mobile Bay; the 180-foot buoy tender Acacia; and the 290-foot ice breaker Mackinaw.
The vessels will be open to the public for tours and the times are subject to change:
7/31 and 8/1 6-8 p.m.
8/2 9-11 a.m., 1-4 and 6-8 p.m.
8/3 9-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.
8/4 9-11 a.m. and 6-8 p.m.
8/5 9-11 a.m. and 3-8 p.m.

Sunday's (8/6) departure times usually are during the morning and early afternoon hours.

Reported by: David Swain




Lake Ontario Dredging

07/31:
Vessels from the Gradall Marine Contracting Company of Toledo OH, are presently dredging the Irondequiot Bay outlet. This outlet is located on Lake Ontario and about 3 miles east of the Port of Rochester.

The tug Prairieland, derrick barge and two spoil barges are working in the area. It is unusual to see any commercial activity in or near Irondequiot Bay.

Reported by: Jason LaDue




American Steamship Launches New Web Site

07/31:
ASC has just released their new web site. You will find pictures and information on your favorite vessels, and detailed information on the company.

Visit www.gatx.com/asc to view this great new site.




New Trip Raffle

07/31:
There has been a lot of interest in boat trip raffles since the last raffle ended. The International Ship Masters' Association Port Huron Lodge is offering a Chance to win a trip aboard the American Steamship Company 1000 ft. Walter J. McCarthy, Jr.

Click here for details




First Annual Gathering - EAST

07/31:
The first Gathering at the Soo was such a hit the viewers of this web site have asked that we organize another informal meeting.

The next Gathering will take place Saturday, October 28 on the Welland Canal during the fall grain rush. Each fall freighters carrying grain are busy moving the harvest from the heart land of North America down the Seaway. Be there to catch all the action.

Click here for details




Today in Great Lakes History - July 31

Sea trials took place for the JAMES R. BARKER this day in 1976. She was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flag ship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.). She was built at a cost of more than $43 million under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. She was the third thousand footer to sail on the Lakes and the first built entirely on the Lakes.

On July 31, 1974 as the Liberian vessel ARTADI approached the dock at Trois Rivières, Que. where she damaged the docked GORDON C. LEITCH's stern.

The CEDARBRANCH (2) was damaged and sunk by an explosion on July 31, 1965 several miles below Montreal, Que. resulting in a loss of one life.

On 31 July 1849, ACORN (wooden schooner, 84', 125 t, built in 1842 at Black River, Ohio) was struck amidships by the propeller TROY near West Sister Island in Lake Erie. She sank quickly, but no lives were lost since all hands made it to the TROY.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




John W. Brown Update

07/30:
The World War II Liberty Ship John W. Brown departed Cleveland Saturday morning to take her passengers on a "voyage into history" cruise on Lake Erie.

The "voyage into history" was enjoyed by the more than 700 passengers on board. Passengers were treated to tours of the ship, dancing to 1940's music of a live Big Band, a flyby of WW II vintage aircraft and much more. Tickets are still available for the Toronto Cruise on August 6. The cruise is well worth a trip to Toronto, you will be treated to a entertaining day on a historic steamer that will never again be seen on the lakes.

The Liberty Ship will be open for tours while in Cleveland at Dock 32 East, behind the Science center and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Be sure to stop by, for a $5.00 donation you can tour a piece of history that will never again be seen on the lakes. Her next port of call will be Buffalo, she is expected to arrive on August 1.

For additional details, call 410 558-0164 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com

Pictures of the Brown Arriving.
Decks full will passengers, the Brown departs for a cruise.
Video of the tug Washington assisting the Brown into dock. 1.3 meg

For more pictures of the Brown click here

Report and pictures by: TZ




Fleetmates Visits Toledo

07/30:
Lower Lakes Towing's Saginaw departed the new stone dock at CSX Coal Docks around 3:30 p.m. Saturday. This is believed to be her first trip to Toledo under her new name.

Fleetmate Cuyahoga is due at Andersons "E" Elevator some time on Monday. She will load corn for Port Colborne, Ontario delivery.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Wolverine in Saginaw

07/30:
Saturday afternoon the Wolverine was in bound at the Saginaw River front range light, this is her second trip to the area since Thursday. She was heading to unload at the Wirt Stone Docks in Bay City and Saginaw. The vessel cleared the Bay City dock at about 5:30 p.m. and was upbound for Saginaw.

The Wolverine arrived at the Wirt Stone Dock in Saginaw early Thursday afternoon. The vessel departed the dock about 7:30 p.m. and was outbound on the river during the evening. Each trip she has loaded at Stone Port.

Reported by: Stephen Hause and Lon Morgan




Today in Great Lakes History - July 30

Four years ago, on July 30, 1996, a portion of a coal cargo aboard the H. M. Griffith caught on fire while the vessel was approaching Whitefish Point. The burning cargo was dumped into Lake Superior after the vessel's unloading boom was swung outward.

The News page of this site was "Launched" reporting the coal fire aboard the Griffith.

The GORDON C. LEITCH (1) was launched July 30, 1952 for the Upper Lakes & St. Lawrence Transportation Co. Ltd., Toronto, Ont.

The Ice Breaker ALEXANDER HENRY entered service July 30, 1959.

On 30 July 1871, the 162' bark HARVEY BISSELL was carrying lumber from Toledo to Tonawanda, NY. When she was on the western end of Lake Erie, she sprang a leak. Although the crew worked the hand powered pumps constantly, the water kept gaining at a rate of about a foot an hour. The tug KATE WILLIAMS took her in tow, intending to get her to Detroit to be repaired, but this proved impossible. So the BISSELL was towed close to Point Pelee and allowed to sink in 14 feet of water. The WILLIAMS then left for Detroit to get steam pumps and other salvage equipment. On returning, they pumped out the BISSELL, refloated and repaired her. She lasted until 1905.

On 30 July 1872, the Port Huron Dry Dock launched SANDY, a lighter. Her dimensions were 75' x 20' x 5'.

On 30 July 1873, George Hardison of Detroit announced the beginning of a new shipyard in Port Huron, Michigan. It would be located above the 7th Street Bridge on the Black River on land owned by J. P. Haynes, accessible by River Street. Within 30 days of this announcement, the new yard had orders for two canalers three-and-aft rig for delivery in the Spring of 1874. Their dimensions were to be 146' overall, 139' keel, 26' beam and 11'6" depth.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Crewman Missing

07/29:
At 6:30 Friday morning crews on board the John J. Boland were unable to locate a crewmember that failed to report for his watch. The Coast Guard reports that the man had taken ill and went to his room about 3:30 p.m. Thursday afternoon. Shipmates check on him throughout the day Thursday and became alarmed when he did not show up for the watch Friday morning.

He was last seen at 8:00 p.m. Thursday night while the vessel was upbound in Lake Huron off Presque Isle sailing for Marquette, MI.

After searching the vessel the crew contacted Coast Guard Group Sault Ste. Marie, who began a massive search and rescue effort to locate the missing man.

Friday afternoon crews searching the St. Marys River recovered a pair of shoes about a mile apart in the Middle Neebish Channel. Images of the shoes were sent to the Boland, who had reached Marquette, and the crew confirmed they were the type he was wearing.

The search continued until 9:45 p.m. Friday night when it was officially suspended.




Wana Naree grounds in Duluth

07/29:
The 566-foot saltie Wana Naree was aground in Duluth for about an hour Friday night. She departed the Peavey Connor's Point elevator at about 6:45 p.m. on Friday, July 28th, with the assistance of the tug Minnesota, outbound for the Aerial Bridge.

About 15 minutes later she ran aground just downstream of the Blatnik Bridge, about 900 feet off of the St. Lawrence cement dock on the Port Terminal, as she crossed the East Gate Basin.

Apparently, the Minnesota was released from assisting the vessel before the grounding and headed back to her dock.

Ironically, the Wana Naree grounded right next to the barges that have been conducting dredging operations in that area of the harbor for the last two months. She appeared to be working her engines hard, swinging back and forth for about an hour. She finally freed herself at about 8:00 p.m., and then spent 10 more minutes maneuvering to avoid the shoal before heading out of the harbor, departing through the Duluth Ship Canal at about 8:50 p.m. She freed herself without the assistance of tugs.

The only other commercial vessel delayed in the grounding was the Columbia Star. The Star waited at the Superior Midwest Energy Terminal for a few extra minutes to depart while the Wana Naree maneuvered to avoid hitting the shoal a second time.

The Wana Naree is loaded with corn destine for Algeria.

Reported by: Eric Holst




John W. Brown Update

07/29:
The Liberty Ship John W. Brown arrived in Cleveland Friday morning. She was assisted into Dock 32 East, behind the Science center and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by the tugs Washington and Delaware.

The Liberty Ship will be open for tours while in Cleveland. Be sure to stop by, for a $5.00 donation you can tour a piece of history that will never again be seen on the lakes.

At 10:00 a.m. this morning the Brown will take passengers on a sold out cruise into Lake Erie.

Tickets are still available for the Toronto Cruise on August 6. The cruise is well worth a trip to Toronto, you will be treated to a entertaining day on a historic steamer that will never again be seen on the lakes.

For additional details, call 410 558-0164 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com

Pictures of the Brown Arriving. TZ
The Brown arrives at Cleveland's break wall.
The tug Delaware on the Brown's bow.

For more pictures of the Brown click here

Reported by: Rex Cassidy and TZ.




Ferry Sinks

07/29:
The Thursday edition of the Brockville Recorder & Times reported that police were called to the Royal Canadian Yacht Club in Toronto on Wednesday to investigate the sinking of the historic passenger ferry Hiawatha, in 26 feet of water at dockside. The Hiawatha, built in 1895 and considered one of the worlds oldest vessels still in daily service, was apparently boarded and sunk by vandals while moored at its dock. A passerby noticed early Wednesday that the 66-foot vessel was not at its usual dock and upon investigation saw its outline through the clear water.

The Hiawatha's sister vessel the Kwasind was also left semi-submerged and adrift, but was salvaged and returned to its dock. Police investigation continues but the police suspect that vandals opened the sea valves, allowing the vessel to fill with water.

Reported by: John Reynolds




Twin Ports Report

07/29:
Several Canadian straightdeckers have called in the Twin Ports recently for grain. The latest arrival is Canadian Provider, which was loading durum July 28 at Cenex Harvest States.

The U.S. Coast Guard's Mackinaw is scheduled to make an unusual call July 29 at Midwest Energy Terminal. U.S. Rep. David Obey of Wisconsin, U.S. Rep. Jim Oberstar of Minnesota and Coast Guard officials are scheduled to hold a 9:45 a.m. press conference aboard the ship to discuss details of building an icebreaker to replace the Mackinaw.

Barge Sarah Spencer was back in Duluth again July 27. The barge unloaded a partial cargo at General Mills before shifting next door to unload the remainder at Cargill B2.

Reported by: Al Miller




Transfer in Thunder Bay

07/29:
On Friday the Canadian Transfer remained at Pascol Engineering in Thunder Bay. She is docked undergoing some type of hydraulic system repairs and is expected to depart some time today.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Toledo Update

07/29:
On Friday the Algowest was removed from the Toledo Shiprepair drydock by the Gaelic tugs William Hoey and Susan Hoey. The West proceeded to the CSX Coal Dock to load coal.

The USCGC Bramble departed Toledo around 8:15 a.m. Friday.

The Federal Mackenzie was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading steel products. The tanker Gemini was at the B-P Oil Company Dock loading cargo.

The Canadian Ranger was at Andersons "K" Elevator and The Atlantic Huron at Andersons "E" Elevator. both vessels are loading grain. The Atlantic Huron was expected to depart by Friday evening. Once the Huron departs the Canadian Ranger will proceed to Andersons "E" Elevator to finish loading.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Seaway Update

07/29:
For the first time in many years, a vessel registered in Switzerland is expected to transit the Seaway. The Sabina is expect to arrive in the next few days bound for Toledo. This general cargo ship was launched at Hoogezand, Netherlands in December 1999 under the name Greta C. for Carisbrooke Shipping of Cowes, I.O.M. Before completion or shortly after she was completed, she was sold to Enzian Shipping of Basle, Switzerland and renamed.

A vessel which visited the Lakes earlier this year was expected to go up the Seaway Friday from Montreal bound for Burns Harbor, IN with the new name Spar Ruby. She is on charter to Fednav and her stack markings are painted with the company colors. The vessel is registered at Bergen, Norway. As Solveig, she called earlier this year at a few lake ports including Thunder Bay, from where she sailed on May 21 loaded with grain.

Arriving in Montreal approximately five hours apart Friday were two Swedish flagged roll-on/roll-off vessels. , The Tor Humbria was first to arrive went to an anchorage while her fleetmate, Tor Anglia tied up at section 48. It was unusual to see them in port as they normally are in service in Europe between Immingham, England and continental ports.

Two former Canadian-flag tankers were renamed recently. Jennie W. was renamed Orfeo and Petrawak, formerly Nancy Orr Gaucher of the Socanav fleet was renamed Tonga for service under the Belize flag. Her original name was Lana under which identity she completed at least one voyage to Great Lakes ports.

Another renaming is Thorscape becoming Jaya Star under the Singapore flag. The vessel spent several weeks at anchor in Toronto harbour last year.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Today in Great Lakes History - July 29

The OTTERCLIFFE HALL cleared Lauzon July 29, 1969 on her maiden voyage as the last "straight deck" Great Lakes bulk freighter built with a pilot house forward.

While at the Manitowoc Ship Building Co. for general repairs and engine overhaul, the CITY OF SAGINAW caught fire on July 29, 1971 and destroyed her upper deck and forward section. Damages were estimated from $450,000 to $750,000 and were not repaired. The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 was sold to Marine Salvage Ltd., Port Colborne, Ont. for scrap.

On July 29, 1974 the W.W. HOLLOWAY grounded in Lake St. Clair off the Grosse Pointe Yacht Club running downbound with stone. Lightering into the J.F. SCHOELKOPF,JR. was necessary before she was freed by four tugs on July 31st.

ENDERS M. VOORHEES departed River Rouge on her maiden voyage July 29, 1942 bound for Duluth, MN to load iron ore. She was the second of five "Supers" for the Pittsburgh fleet to enter service.

July 29, 1974 - The "PERE MARQUETTE 21" was towed to Milwaukee on July 29, 1974 and reduced to a barge.

July 29, 1971 - A fire broke out on the City of Saginaw 31, destroying her cabin deck and rendering her useless for further use. The blaze was caused by an acetylene torch, and caused over $1 million in damage.

The steam barge MARY ROBERTSON burned near Mackinac on 29 July 1872. Her crew escaped to a schooner-barge they were towing.

The MATERIAL SERVICE foundered in a heavy summer gale in 1936 off the South Chicago lighthouse. She was a canal motor barge not designed for open-lake use.

Data from: Jerry Pearson, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Crewman Missing

07/28: 4:45 p.m., 3:00 p.m. and 10:00 a.m. updates
Crews searching the St. Marys River have recoved a pair of shoes about a mile apart in the Middle Neebish Channel this afternoon. The Coast Guard continues the search for the missing crewman.

At 6:30 this morning crews on board the John J. Boland were unable to locate a crewmember that failed to report for his watch. After searching the vessel the crew contacted Coast Guard Group Sault Ste. Marie, who began a large search and rescue effort to locate the missing man. Friday afternoon the search continued focusing on the St Marys River.

The missing crewmember was last seen at 8:00 p.m. Thursday night while the vessel was upbound in Lake Huron off Presque Isle. The ship reported the crewman missing between Light 26 in the St. Marys River and Presque Isle Michigan.

Check back for updates.




John W. Brown Update

07/28:
On a beautiful Thursday evening the Liberty Ship John W. Brown departed Erie, PA. as a crowd of about 200 people and several pleasure craft looked on. The Brown is headed to Cleveland where she is expected to arrive early this morning. The Liberty Ship will be open for tours while in Cleveland and on Saturday she will take passengers on a sold out cruise into Lake Erie.

Tickets are still available for the Toronto Cruise on August 6. The cruise is well worth a trip to Toronto, you will be treated to a entertaining day on a historic steamer that will never again be seen on the lakes.

For additional details, call 410 558-0164 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com

Pictures of the Brown departing. Jeff Thoreson
The Brown departs Erie.
Stern view
Iowa holding the Brown at dock.

For more pictures of the Brown click here

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson and Mike Madigan Jr.




Elton Hoyt 2nd to Load Grain

07/28:
The Elton Hoyt 2nd was unloading iron ore at Rouge Steel in Detroit Thursday. The vessel is expected to then head to Duluth for cargo hold certification and load grain for Buffalo, NY. She is expected to arrive with the first load in Buffalo early on the morning of August 3.

While in Two Harbors last month the Hoyt was inspected to determine what modifications would be needed to become certified to carry grain. Since that time crews have performed the necessary work.

In December 1997 the Hoyt carried a load of sugar beets. This was the first time a self-unloading vessel carried sugar beets. The vessel successfully carried 1200 tons of beets to Marysville, MI and the Hoyt was dubiously dubbed the "Beet Boat".

Boatwatchers question how this will effect the future of the last U.S. straight deck grain vessel, the Kinsman Independent. The Independent has long been rumored to be in her final years of sailing. She normally works a trade route carrying grain from Duluth to Buffalo.




Two charged with breaking into the John Sherwin

07/28:
Two men face felony charges for breaking into the idle steamer John Sherwin at its dock in Superior apparently in search of an adventure and ship souvenirs, according to a report in the July 27 Duluth News Tribune.

The men are accused of taking the vessel's guest log, a ship mail bag, sunglasses with the name of the vessel on it and a navigation chart, then explored the empty 806-foot ship for two hours. They face a felony charge of burglary to a ship, a charge not often seen in court logs. According to court records, they had to give the souvenirs back.

The men, both from Duluth, appeared Wednesday in Douglas County Circuit Court on the charges. They haven't yet entered pleas.

According to court records, the two went to Connors Point last month to explore the John Sherwin, which has been idled in the Twin Ports since 1981. Once the flagship for the Interlake fleet, the 42-year-old vessel is now owned by Interlake's sister company, Lake Shipping Co. Inc.

Court documents allege the two climbed around a fence to get aboard, then entered the pilot house through a porthole. Inside, drawers and files were rifled and paper burnt. One man told police they were looking for souvenirs and a flashlight and tried to create a torch with a screwdriver and paper, the criminal complaint said.

After collecting some souvenirs, they wandered around the ship for two hours, looking at its features, Eldred told a detective.

Reported by: Al Miller




Transfer Arrives for Repairs

07/28:
On Thursday the Canadian Transfer arrived at the Pascol Engineering Shearleg Dock on Thursday morning. She is in for some type of repairs.

She was assisted to the dock by the tugs Peninsula and George N. Carleton. She is expected to remain at the dock for at least four days.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Today in Great Lakes History - July 28

ALGOWEST passed Detroit, Mich. downbound on July 28, 1982, she had departed on her maiden voyage July 26 from Thunder Bay, Ont. to Quebec City with a 27,308 tonne load of barley.

b) ADAM E. CORNELIUS was christened July 28, 1973 at AmShip by Mrs. Roger Kyes as the a) ROGER M. KYES

COASTAL CANADA was launched July 28, 1952

The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was delivered on July 28th to the Buckeye Steamship Co. (Hutchinson & Co., mgr.), Cleveland. The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was part of a government program designed to upgrade and increase the capacity of the U.S. Great Lakes fleet during World War II. In order to help finance the building of new ships, the U.S.M.C. authorized a program that would allow existing fleets to obtain new boats by trading in their older boats to the Government for credit. The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was the ninth Maritimer and fourth of the six L6-S-Al types delivered. "L6" meant the vessel was built for the Great Lakes and was 600 to 699 feet in length. The "S" stood for steam power and "Al" identified specific design features.

On 28 July 1854, BOSTON (wooden propeller, 134', 259 t, built in 1847 at Ohio City, Ohio) was bound from Chicago for Ogdensburg, NY with pork, corn, whiskey and produce. On Lake Ontario, about 20 miles off Oak Orchard, NY, she collided with the bark PLYMOUTH and sank in about 20 minutes. No lives were lost. The crew and passengers made it to shore in three lifeboats. The boat that the captain was in sailed 50 miles to Charlotte, NY.

One hundred years ago, on 28 July 1900, the freighter PRINCETON was launched at Lorain, Ohio for the Pittsburgh Steamship Company.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




John W. Brown Update

07/27:
The John W. Brown participated in an air battle re-enactment off Erie, PA. in Lake Erie Wednesday. The Brown steamed into the lake about 6:30 p.m. with a full load of passenger. Those on the cruise were treated to a mock ariel attack as a fighter defended the ship from attacking Japanese Zeros.

The Brown is scheduled to be open for tours today from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. She is docked at the Foot of Holland Street. The Brown will depart Erie at 7:00 p.m. and arrive in Cleveland early Friday where she will be open for tours and a sold out cruise on Saturday.

Tickets are still available for the Toronto Cruise on August 6. The cruise is well worth a trip to Toronto, you will be treated to a entertaining day on a historic steamer that will never again be seen on the lakes.

For additional details, call 410 558-0164 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com

Pictures of the Brown during the Erie Cruise.
The Brown departs for the cruise.
A NA-64 Yale aircraft flies over the Brown.
Close up of the Yale.
A Japanese Zero attacks the Brown on Lake Erie.
"Brownie the River" painted on the Brown.
The G tugs Iowa and Ohio at the Erie sand and gravel dock.

For more pictures of the Brown click here

Report and pictures by: TZ




Independent Update

07/27:
The Kinsman Independent and Enterprise changed places on Tuesday morning. The Enterprise is now docked at the General Mills Frontier Elevator on the Buffalo Ship Canal while the Independent is out at the Buffalo Port Terminal Slip "A".

The Kinsman Independent arrived in Buffalo July 3. She unloaded part of her cargo at the Lake and Rail dock and then shifted to General Mills for short term lay-up with a partial storage cargo aboard.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Two Harbors Update

07/27:
Residents of Two Harbors are working on two restoration projects related to lake shipping.

A group of five people is cleaning and restoring the chime whistles of the 110-foot tug Edna G., which served the Two Harbors ore docks from 1896 to 1981 before being retired as a floating museum. Several weeks ago they removed the 200-pound set of whistles to clean the dirt and rust from chimes. They then "bead-blasted" the whistles to remove old paint and sand. Once clean, they took the whistles to the DMIR shops in Proctor, Minn., to convert them from steam to compressed air. Northshore Mining Co. is providing a cover for the two compressed air tanks that will power the whistle's new compressor. Danny's Auto in Two Harbors covered the cost of repainting the whistles. A test blow revealed the whistles still sound good with their high-pitched, melodious sound. The whistle set consists of a three-chime whistle and two single-chime tubular whistles. Extra care is being taken to preserve the whistles' original sound.

Another group of Two Harbors residents is working to restore the rotating beacon to the Two Harbors lighthouse, which recently has been decommissioned and is now owned by the Lake County Historical Society. The rotating beacon, which uses a 1,000-watt light bulb, operated from 1972 until is malfunctioned in 1998. It was then replaced by a smaller, flashing light. The Two Harbors lighthouse, which sits at the entrance to the harbor across from the DMIR ore docks, is now a bed-and-breakfast inn.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toronto Update

07/27:
Tuesday the heavy lift salty BBC Denmark departed for Port Weller. The tug Rosebud arrived in Toronto. The new City of Toronto flags were hoisted for the first time on all the Island ferries today.

On Monday the BBC Denmark unloaded a large yacht at the Atlas crane dock. The Hamilton Energy came in with fuel. The "Festival Of Lights" Awards Ceremony was held on board the River Gambler. The River Gambler shared a $25,000 1st Place Award with the yacht Destiny. The prize money goes to the Gambler's charity, The National Ballet of Canada. Second place award went to Empire Sandy, charity money going to St. John's Ambulance. Third place award went to Enterprise 2000, whose charity was Muscular Dystrophy Association.

Sunday the U.S.S. Defender departed port, assisted by the tug Atomic. The Stephen B. Roman was still unloading cement at Essroc. The cruise ship Le Levant departed port. The saltie Thorslake was unloading at Pier 51.

Saturday, July 22 the U.S.S. Defender and Le Levant in port. Stephen B. Roman arrived with cement. The Thorslake arrived at Pier 51.

Friday, July 21 the 75-foot trawler yacht Kelana was refloated at Toronto Drydock. U.S.S. Defender in port. Salty Pytheas departed for Port Weller with tug assistance. The Le Levant arrived in port.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Saltie Arrives

07/27:
The Bahamas registered saltie Tecam Sea arrived in Ashtabula Wednesday.

The Tecam Sea and tug Deleware heading to dock.
Another view.

Reported by: TZ




Today in Great Lakes History - July 27

On 27 July 1884, ALBERTA (steel propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 264', 2282 gt, built in 1883 in Scotland) collided in fog ) 6 miles NNW of Whitefish Point on Lake Superior with the JOHN M. OSBORNE (wooden propeller "steam barge", 178 ft., 891g , built in 1882 at Marine City. The OSBORNE had two barges in tow at the time. ALBERTA stayed in the gash until most of OSBORNE's crew scrambled aboard, then pulled out and the OSBORNE sank. ALBERTA sank in shallow water, 3 1/2 miles from shore. 3 or 4 lives were lost from the OSBORNE, one from ALBERTA in brave rescue attempt while trying to get the crewmen off the OSBORNE. This was ALBERTA's first year of service. She was recovered and repaired soon afterward. She was the sister of the ill fated ALGOMA which was lost in her first year of service. The wreck of the OSBORNE was located in 1984, 100 years after this incident.

One hundred years ago, on 27 July 1900, the steel freighter RENSSELAER was launched in Cleveland, Ohio for the Pittsburgh Steamship Company.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




John W. Brown Arrives

07/26:
On a beautiful sunny morning the Liberty Ship John W. Brown arrived in Erie, Pennsylvania Tuesday. The Brown is scheduled to be open for tours today from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and Thursday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. She is docked at the Foot of Holland Street.

Tickets are still available for the Toronto Cruise on August 6. The cruise is well worth a trip to Toronto, you will be treated to a entertaining day on a historic steamer that will never again be seen on the lakes.

For additional details, call 410 558-0164 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com

Pictures of the Brown arriving in Erie.
The Brown Arrives. Jeff Thoreson
Another view. Jeff Thoreson
Stern view. Jeff Thoreson
Tug Ohio arrives. TZ
Ohio working on the Brown's stern. TZ
Ohio moves to the bow to assist in docking. TZ
The Brown at dock. TZ

For more pictures of the Brown click here

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Norris Works Marquette Shuttle

07/26:
On Tuesday the James Norris made its third visit in five days to Marquette loading taconite for Algoma Steel at the Soo. Three more trips are scheduled as of July 25. Fleetmate Canadian Transfer remains at Algoma Steel with a "difficult to unload" cargo of coal. That load is being unloaded by clamshell. The Transfer arrived on July 19.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Toledo Update

07/26:
Traffic in Toledo remained brisk on Tuesday. At the T.W.I. Dock were the salties Stefania 1 and Kapitonas Sevcenko, both vessels were unloading steel products.

The saltie Pytheas was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator with a scheduled departure late Wednesday afternoon. The Atlantic Huron is the next scheduled vessel to load grain at this facility when the Pytheas departs. The Canadian Ranger continued to unloading wheat at the A.R.M.S. Dock, once finished she will clean out her cargo hold and then proceed to the Andersons "K" Elevator to start loading grain. Once the Atlantic Huron is finished at Andersons "E" Elevator the Canadian Ranger will then shift over to Andersons "E" elevator to finish the loading.

The tug Barbara Andrie and her barge unloading liquid asphalt. At the B-P Dock was the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge loading a petroleum cargo.

The H. Lee White was loading coal and was due to depart around 11:00 a.m.

The Algowest remains in drydock. She is expected to come off the drydock today and proceed to the CSX Coal Dock to load at noon.

The Reserve is the next scheduled ore boat due to arrive at 9:30 a.m. this morning.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Report

07/26:
On Monday the Salty Stefania 1 was at unloading at the Ceres docks. A St. Marys cement barge and tug were unloading at their Cuyahoga River dock. The Myron C. Taylor was departing the old river at 3:30 p.m. heading for Calcite, MI and fleetmate Calcite II was loading salt on the old river.

The Myron C. Taylor departing TZ

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Oglebay Norton Reports Record Revenues

07/26:
On Monday Oglebay Norton Company announced results for the second quarter and first six months ended June 30, 2000. Highlights for the period include:
Revenues for the quarter reached $98.5 million, a 14% gain from $86.7 million in the year-earlier period, and were $146.8 million for the first six months, up 12% compared to $131.7 million in the first half of 1999.
The company successfully completed the Michigan Limestone Operations acquisition on April 18, which contributed to the Lime and Limestone segment’s results in the second quarter. The company also completed the niche acquisition of Jebco Abrasives by Industrial Sands during June.

Oglebay Norton Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer John Lauer said, "Demand continues to remain strong across all of our business segments and markets. This increased demand coupled with ongoing operational improvements has helped offset the decline in earnings from Marine Services caused by low water levels and higher fuel costs. In view of the continuing pressure on Marine Services margins and the sale of both the Detroit and Ingersoll operations of Global Stone during the third quarter of 1999, we were pleased to achieve earnings which topped the strong year-ago results."

He continued, "Our Marine Services fleet continues to be fully booked for the remainder of the season. Revenues for the quarter and first half improved slightly compared with last year’s results; however, primarily as a result of low water levels and higher fuel and labor costs, operating income declined 46% and 49% respectively from the prior year results.

Visit Oglebay Norton's web site for more information




Today in Great Lakes History - July 26

The ALGOWEST sailed on her maiden voyage in1982 from Thunder Bay, Ont. to Quebec City with a 27,308 tonne load of barley.

On July 26, 1943 the BRUCE HUDSON caught fire while loading gasoline at East Chicago, IL and four persons lost their lives.

The CONALLISON departed Windsor, Ont. on her first trip for Johnstone on July 26, 1981.

WILLIAM A. McGONAGLE (2) sailed light on her maiden voyage from the shipyard on July 26, 1916 to Duluth, MN to load iron ore.

On 26 July 1877, CUMBERLAND (wooden side-wheeler, 205', 629 gc, built in 1871 at Port Robinson, Ontario) struck bottom at the Rock of Ages Reef off Isle Royale in good weather and sank in relatively shallow water. Later she was broken up by waves and her wreckage washed up on shore on what is now known as "Cumberland Point."

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




John W. Brown Arrives

07/25: 10:00 a.m. Update
On a beautiful sunny morning the Liberty Ship John W. Brown arrived in Erie, Pennsylvania. The Brown gave a security call at 6:00 a.m. and arrived at Erie one hour later. She was asstisted into port by the Great Lakes Towing tugs Ohio and Iowa.

The John W. Brown is scheduled to be open for tours today from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Wednesday from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and Thursday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. She is docked at the Foot of Holland Street.

Tickets are still available for the Toronto Cruise on August 6. The cruise is well worth a trip to Toronto, you will be treated to a entertaining day on a historic steamer that will never again be seen on the lakes.

For additional details, call 410 558-0164 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com

Pictures of the Brown arriving in Erie.
The Brown Arrives.
Another view.
Stern view.
Tug Ohio.
Stern view of tug.

For more pictures of the Brown click here

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Challenger and Conquest in Port

07/25:
On Monday afternoon the Southdown Challenger made her way into Charlevoix, MI. for another load of cement, this time destined for Ferrysburg, MI. It is not unusual to see the Challenger every four to five days in Charlevoix, but this time it was unique because her fleetmate the Southdown Conquest tied up right behind her. The Conquest docked at the breakwall to wait for the Challenger to load. Her next port of call is unknown.

Reported by: Dustin Sadowski




More Summer Boat Traffic in Sturgeon Bay

07/25:
American Canadian Caribbean Line's Niagara Prince, a 174-foot cruise ship, was in Sturgeon Bay Monday morning tied up at the city dock in front of the Stone Harbor Resort and Conference Center. Passengers were enjoying downtown shopping while others were given bus tours of Door County while in port.

Daily cruises, a new offering to the area, are available this summer aboard the Fred A. Busse. The Busse is a former Chicago fireboat operated by the Chicago Fireboat Cruise Co. At 92-feet, the fire red Busse still sports much of its fire fighting apparatus as it cruises the waters of Sturgeon Bay around Sherwood Point, the old stone quarry area and the shipping canal.

Reported by: Paul A. Graf




Twin Ports Report

07/25:
The work week got off to a busy start Monday morning in Duluth-Superior. Merweborg was loading grain at AGP elevator in Duluth, Pilica was under the dockside cranes at the Duluth port terminal with general cargo to unload, Federal Hudson was ready to load at Cenex Harvest States and Wana Naree was just being pushed into the Peavey Connors Point berth by two G-tugs. Algocen was being unloaded at the St. Lawrence Cement terminal. Also expected Monday were Edwin H. Gott to load taconite pellets at DMIR, Alpena to unload cement in Superior and Duluth, and Canadian Transfer to load pellets at BNSF ore dock.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

07/25:
On Monday the Cartierdoc was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator. She departed late in the afternoon and as soon as she cleared the Maumee River the "G" tugs Louisiana and Illinois towed the saltwater vessel Pytheas up river to Andersons "E" Elevator to load grain. She will depart sometime on Wednesday. The Canadian Ranger was unloading wheat at the A.R.M.S. Dock which is destined for the Nabisco plant. The Kapitonas Sevcenko was discharging cargo at the T.W.I. Dock. The U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Bramble was at the City Docks near the Willis B. Boyer museum ship.

The tug Mary E. Hannah and her barge were unloading cargo at the Seneca Oil Company Dock.

The Algowest remains in drydock at the shipyard. She is expected to be removed from the drydock on Wednesday and move to the CSX Coal Dock to load coal. The next scheduled coal boat was the American Mariner with an e.t.a. of 4:00 a.m. this morning. The next boat scheduled to load ore is the Reserve with an e.t.a. of 9:00a.m. Wednesday.

The annual Marine Mart is scheduled for Saturday September 9 from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. It will again be held in a large tent in front of the Willis B. Boyer.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Iroquois Lock Traffic

07/25:
On Monday the Daviken passed through the Iroquois Lock sailing downbound for Quebec.

Bow view
Stern view.

Report and pictures by: Peter Carter




Today in Great Lakes History - July 25

The bow section of the ROGER BLOUGH was floated into the new Lorain dry dock on July 25, 1970 and was joined with the 421 foot stern section. The launch of the completed hull was scheduled for July, 1971 but a fire broke out in the engine room on June 24, 1971 killing four yard workers and extensively damaging her Pielstick diesel engines. Extensive repairs, which included replacement of both engines, delayed the launch for nearly a year.

The CANADA MARQUIS (c) FEDERAL MACKENZIE) was upbound at Detroit, Mich. on July 25, 1983 on her maiden voyage.

July 25, 1983 - A wedding was held aboard the Badger during the sailing of "Love Boat II". Chris Gebhart and Pat Sroka of Ludington were married by Rev John Christensen.

The wooden lumber tug CYGNET, which worked on the Shiawassee and Bad Rivers and Lake Huron, was destroyed when her boiler exploded in "Blow-up Bayou" on the Shiawassee River.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




John W. Brown Departs Early

07/24:
The John W. Brown will not be open for tours today as expected. She is scheduled to depart Windsor early this morning to refuel at the Sterling Fuel docks south of Ambassador Bridge. Her next stop is Erie, Pennsylvania. She is expected to arrive at Erie on Tuesday where she will be open for tours from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Tickets are still available for the Toronto Cruise on August 6. The cruise is well worth a trip to Toronto, you will be treated to a entertaining day on a historic steamer that will never again be seen on the lakes.

For additional details, call 410 558-0164 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com

Reported by: Ken Kilbreath




Marblehead Update

07/24:
On Friday July 21st a barge believed to be the Kellstone was loading at the Marblehead Stone Dock. On Saturday the 22nd the Richard Reiss was loading stone at Marblehead.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Iroquois Lock Traffic

07/24:
Below are pictures traffic passing through the Sunday.

Le Levant passing Brockville at about 6:00 p.m.
Tecam sea entering the locks at Iroquois.
Jakov Sverdlov in the lock.
BBC Denmark departing the lock carrying a private boat on deck.
Closeup of the boat.

Report and pictures by: Peter Carter




John W. Brown Photo Gallery

07/24:
The John W. Brown Photo Gallery has been updated with more than 50 new pictures.

How would you like to own a piece of the John W. Brown? Project Liberty Ship's fund raising campaign, "Rivet Drive 2000" is now underway. For a small donation you can buy a "Rivet Bond" and receive an original 1942 rivet from the Brown. Click here for pictures and details




Today in Great Lakes History - July 24

The ALGOSOO (2) was Launched July 24, 1974 for Algoma Central Railway, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

The BURNS HARBOR sea trials were conducted on July 24, 1980 during which she performed an emergency stop in 3,160 feet loaded to a depth of 25/26 feet. She was the third thousand footer built for Bethlehem and the tenth on the Great Lakes.

ST.CLAIR (2) was launched July 24, 1975

The WILLIAM G. MATHER (2) left the River Rouge on her maiden voyage July 24, 1925 for Ashtabula, OH to load coal for the Canadian lakehead at Port Arthur/Fort William, Ont.

The wooden steamer OSCAR TOWNSEND was launched at 2:20 PM at E. Fitzgerald's yard in Port Huron on 24 July 1873. The launch went well with a few hundred spectators. She was built for use in the iron ore trade by the Lake Superior Transportation Co. Her dimensions were 210' overall, 200' keel, 33'10" beam and 15' depth. She had three masts and was painted deep green.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




John W. Brown Cruise

07/23:
Under a sunny skies the World War II Liberty Ship John W. Brown left Windsor's Dieppe Gardens dock exactly at 10:00 a.m. She was preceded by the Joseph H. Thompson and Jr., she sailed upriver towards Lake St. Clair and the Canadian National Anthem and American National Anthem could be heard playing from the shore as she departed. The Brown was escorted by the Detroit Fire Boat Curtis Randolph providing a grand water show, tug Shannon, Diamond Jack's tour boat Diamond Queen and numerous pleasure craft.

The "voyage into history" was enjoyed by the more than 700 passengers on board. Passengers were treated to tours of the ship, dancing to 1940's music of a live Big Band, a flyby of WW II vintage aircraft and much more. Tickets are still available for the Toronto Cruise on August 6. The cruise is well worth a trip to Toronto, you will be treated to a entertaining day on a historic steamer that will never again be seen on the lakes.

For additional details, call 410 558-0164 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com

The John W. Brown will be open for tours in Windsor today from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Reported by: Ken Kilbreath




Saginaw in Grand Haven - Update

07/23:
The skilled crew onboard the Saginaw made quick work of the electrical problems that developed on Friday as they began to unload stone at the Meekhof's lower dock. Repairs were complete late Friday night and she depart early Saturday morning after unloading.

Reported by: David Swain




Federal Funds to Improve Navigation System

07/23:
The Detroit/Wayne County Port Authority reports that federal funding has been secured for a comprehensive study on how to improve the Great Lakes navigation system. The study will help to identify critical areas for improvement and updating, as well as create opportunities for new maritime technology and vessel design.

A senate panel approved funds in the amount of $500,000 on July 13, 2000. The appropriation of the funds is pending their inclusion in the final Energy and Water Appropriations Bill in fiscal year 2001. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District Office, will administer the study.




The Shipbreakers

07/23:
As reported Friday, the August 2000 issue of Atlantic Monthly has a fascinating cover article entitled "The Shipbreakers". It describes the present day business of scraping ships in India.

The article is available online at www.theatlantic.com

Reported by: Dale Stephan and Andy LaBorde




Today in Great Lakes History - July 23

The Keel for the TEXACO CHIEF (2) was laid July 23, 1968.

CANADOC (2) sailed on her maiden voyage July 23rd.

The RED WING (2) was christened on July 23, 1960 as the first all-welded vessel to emerge from Port Weller Dry Docks.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Saginaw Visits Grand Haven

07/22:
The Saginaw split her load, unloading at Muskegon and Grand Haven on Lake Michigan. Thursday night at 10:15 she made her way into Muskegon and on Friday morning she arrived at Grand Haven.

It was an inauspicious day for the Saginaw's first visit to Grand Haven harbor. She developed electrical problems while getting her boom into position to unload stone at the Meekhof's lower dock. The crew is working quickly to try to resolve the problem, as the vessel is situated right in the middle of the river and two vessels are due in today. One at Construction Aggregates and the other at the Meekhof's upper river dock. Both docks are upstream from where the Saginaw stays idle as of 6:00 p.m. Friday night.

Reported by: Don Geske and David Swain




Norris Visits Marquette

07/22:
Seaway Marine Transport's veteran steamer, James Norris, loaded taconite in Marquette on Friday, July 21, for Algoma Steel at the Soo. It was her first Marquette visit since July of 1998 and only her fifth in 12 seasons.

Reported by: Rod Burdick and Art Pickering




USS Updates

07/22:
The Calcite II arrived at Menominee Paper about 5:00 a.m. Friday morning with a load of coal for the paper mill. She was expected to proceed to Port Inland, MI. Friday evening to load for Cleveland.

The Roger Blough continues to make trips on the lower lakes. Yesterday she was passing Detroit bound on another trip to Conneaut, OH. She was expected to arrive early this morning and then proceed back to Two Harbors.

Calcite II unloading at sunrise in Menominee. Dick Lund
The Roger Blough passing Detroit. Pat Pavlat

Reported by: Chad Michaels and Pat Pavlat




Twin Ports Report

07/22:
After unloading stone at the Cutler dock, Courtney Burton made an unusual call July 21at Midwest Energy Terminal.

Twin Ports grain traffic perked along July 21. After quickly unloading at the Duluth port terminal, Vaasaborg shifted to the General Mills elevator in Duluth to load beet pellets. In Superior, familiar visitors Mecta Sea was loading at Peavey Connors Point and Mina Cebi was at Cenex Harvest States. Wana Naree was anchored on the lake waiting for a berth.

Reported by: Al Miller




Saginaw Update

07/22:
Friday was a busy day in Saginaw. The Adam E. Cornelius arrived at Saginaw Rock Products during the night and departed early Friday morning. After turning, the vessel tied up at the Sargent Dock near the I-75 bridge to await passage of the Algorail.

The Algorail arrived at the Buena Vista Dock at Saginaw at 10:15 a.m. She departed the dock at 3:40 p.m. and went up to the turning basin.

The Louis R. Desmarais was still at Essroc in Essexville at 12:50 p.m. when the Cornelius passed her heading out to the bay.

The barge Pathfinder and tug Dorothy Ann was expected to pass the front range lights at 8:20 p.m. enroute to the Rock Products Dock in Saginaw.

Reported by: Stephen Hause and Lon Morgan




History in the Making

07/22:
The John W. Brown will be open for tours in Windsor Sunday July 23 and Monday July 24 from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The Brown is scheduled to depart Windsor at 2:00 p.m. July 24 for Erie, PA. Be sure to stop by, for a $5.00 donation you can tour a piece of history that will never again be seen on the lakes.

At 10:00 a.m. this morning she will depart Windsor with 700 passengers heading up river and into Lake St. Clair. She should return about 4:00 p.m.

In three ports the Brown will offer locals one of the vessel's famous "Living History Day Cruises." All cruises are sold out except for the cruise departing from Toronto. For additional details, call 410 558-0164 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com




Today in Great Lakes History - July 22

PERE MARQUETTE 22 was launched on July 22, 1924.

One hundred years ago on 22 July 1900, the tug MATT H. ESSER was launched at Lorain, Ohio by H. D. Root for Captain Burke of Erie.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




John W. Brown Update

07/21:
The John W. Brown arrived safely against the Windsor dock Thursday afternoon about 5:45 pm with the assistance of the Gaelic Tugboat Company's tugs Patricia Hoey and Carolyn Hoey. As the ship approached Windsor passing under the Ambassador bridge the Detroit Fireboat Curtis Randolph put on a water show, and the U.S. Mail Boat J.W. Westcott II carried press people and photographers out for a look.

The John W. Brown will be open for tours in Windsor July today through the 24th (except Saturday) from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Be sure to stop by, for a $5.00 donation you can tour a piece of history that will never again be seen on the lakes.

Heading up the Detroit River
Stern view upbound on the Detroit River.
Tug Carolyn Hoey leads the Brown.
Carolyn Hoey working with the Brown.
Close up of the stern from the tug Patricia Hoey.
Having turn the Brown against the river's current, she docks safely in Windsor.

Report and pictures by: William Hoey




Ex USS Conawango to assist John W. Brown into Windsor

07/21:
The Liberty ship John W. Brown can only be landed against her port side. This means that the ship must be landed with her bow down the river, so the Gaelic Tugboat Company will dispatch their 2,000 hp tug Shannon for the job Saturday. The Shannon is the former U.S. Navy tug Connawango, YTB 388 built in 1943 for service in the Pacific. She later served at the Charleston Navy yard in Navy district 7. Marine artist Paul LaMarre and his son John have spent the past two days repainting the stack on the Shannon to her Navy appearance for Saturday's tow. The LaMarre's also touched up the gold lettering "Shannon" on the front of the pilot house.

Painting the stack
Touching up the name




Townsend Returns to Service

07/21:
On Wednesday the Paul H. Townsend departed temporary lay-up bound for Green Bay to unload their storage cargo of cement. The Townsend arrived on Thursday.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Cuyahoga Visits Kingsville

07/21:
The Cuyahoga was in Kingsville, Ontario Thursday morning to unload a cargo of stone. Kingsville is on Lake Erie's north shore north of Pelee island. She unloaded at one of the two docks that the Pelee Island ferry uses.

The Cuyahoga unloading.

Report and pictures by: Norm Barton




Twin Ports Report

07/21:
Kaye E. Barker, an occasional visitor to the Twin Ports, called in Superior on July 20 to unload stone at the CLM dock. The images below show the vessel after unloading was completed. The small tender Maxine Thompson tied alongside the Barker's starboard quarter is from Fraser Shipyards. After leaving Superior, the Barker was scheduled to proceed to Silver Bay to load.

The saltie Vaasaborg was at the Duluth port terminal July 20 unloading wood pulp. It's as least the second pulp cargo brought here this season by a "borg" vessel.

The DMIR ore dock in Duluth continues to attract vessels that don't commonly call in the Twin Ports. Nanticoke is due again July 25 and Saginaw is due back July 26.

Pictures of the Barker Unloading
At the dock.
Maxine Thompson alongside the Barker.
The Barker's bow.

Report and pictures by: Al Miller




Soo Update

07/21:
The Canadian Transfer arrived at Algoma Steel Tuesday evening loaded with coal, and began unloading. She encountered hydraulic problems and moved to the Algoma Export Dock where she was being unloaded by Purvis' new barge the PML9001 Thursday. The clam bucket is unloading her and loading large Euclid Trucks with the Coal. The Transfer's fleetmate, the James Norris also arrived loaded with coal for Algoma Steel.




Summer Shipping Activity in Sturgeon Bay

07/21:
While the Sturgeon Bay area and specifically Bay Shipbuilding Company are more familiarly known for the winter lay-up of 14-16 lakers, recent weeks has seen increased activity in and around Sturgeon Bay.

Clipper's 207-foot long Nantucket clipper made a port of call on Wednesday, July 19. The 100 passenger vessel tied up at the Sawyer Dock on the west side of Sturgeon Bay, taking on fuel from two 18-wheel tanker trucks. The Nantucket Clipper departed through the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal Thursday morning, 7/20, heading out into Lake Michigan.

Shortly after, the barge St. Mary's Cement pushed by the tug Petite Forte, entered Sturgeon Bay off of Lake Michigan, passed through both the Bay View and Michigan Street bridges and entered the west end of the graving dock at Bay Shipbuilding. The tug Bay Ship was there to assist the St. Mary's Cement. A large suction dredge is under construction in the east end of the dock.

Tied up all summer in one of the Bay Ship slips is the 150-foot John Purvis. Built in 1919 and named the Butterfield, with its black-hull and bright blue superstructure, had earlier been in a dry dock for inspection and repainting.

Carver Boats recently completed a boat show at the new resort conference center, Stone Harbor, featuring 8-10 gorgeous, gleaming white yachts.

Reported by: Paul A. Graf




Toledo Update

07/21:
As reported yesterday, the John W. Brown departed Toledo shortly after 9:00 a.m. under tow with the Gaelic tugs Susan Hoey on the bow and the William Hoey on the stern outbound for Lake Erie. As the Brown passed Toledo Shipyard she gave 3 long blasts on her steam whistle as a salute to the shipyard crews who did a great job on making her scheduled repairs in a timely manner.

At the CSX Coal Docks the Algolake was departing the dock at 8:00 a.m. The American Mariner was the next scheduled boat to load coal while the Jean Parisien was inbound headed for the CSX Dock and she will follow the Mariner when she is finished loading.

The next scheduled coal boat will be the American Republic today with an e.t.a. of 2:00 a.m. The next ore boat will be the Reserve also due today with an e.t.a. of 6:00 a.m.

The saltie Dobrush was loading grain at Anderson's "K" Elevator.

The Algowest was placed in drydock at Toledo Shipyard early Thursday morning before the Brown departed. The "G" tugs Illinois, and Montana assisted the Algowest. It is unknown why she is in drydock.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Weekly Toronto Report

07/21:
Tuesday 18th: USS Defender was still in port. Pytheas was at Redpath Sugar dock. Reconstruction continues on the tug Glenmont.

Monday 17th: Algowest was unloading at the salt dock, she departed later in the day. the U.S.S. Defender visited the port.

Sunday 16th: Canadian Ranger departed the harbor under her own power after a lengthy lay-up. She was towed into port on April 13th, from winter lay-up in Hamilton.

Saturday 15th: HMS Tecumseh was refloated at the Toronto Drydock and the 75-foot trawler yacht Kelana went on drydock for inspection and general repairs.

Friday 14th: Cuyahoga was at the stone dock and departed later in the day. Federal Maas departed with McKeil tug assistance.

Thursday 13th: Federal Maas arrived at Pier 51. Pytheas unloading at the Redpath Sugar dock.

Reported by: Gerry O.




The Shipbreakers

07/21:
The August 2000 issue of Atlantic Monthly has a fascinating cover article entitled "The Shipbreakers". It describes the present day business of scraping ships in India. The economic, environmental and political aspects are explored in great detail. Many Great Lakes ships made their last trip to overseas shipbreakers in the 1980's.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Today in Great Lakes History - July 21

The JAMES DAVIDSON and KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1) arrived under tow at Santander, Spain on July 21, 1974 for scrapping.

On July 21, 1975, the GEORGE D. GOBLE arrived at Lorain, Ohio with an unusual deck cargo loaded at American Ship Building Company's yard at South Chicago, Illinois. She was carrying the deckhouses for two Interlake Steamship Company thousand-foot self-unloaders being built at AmShip's Lorain yard. These vessels were completed as the JAMES R. BARKER and MESABI MINER.

On 21 July 1875, the schooner ELVA, which was built in Port Huron in 1861 for Capt. Sinclair, was sailing from Holland, Michigan for Milwaukee loaded with stove bolts. She capsized 12 miles from Milwaukee. Her crew took to the boats and made a landing in Kenosha and then rowed to Milwaukee. A tug was sent for the schooner and she was recovered.

One hundred years ago, on 21 July 1900, R. J. GORDON (wooden propeller passenger-package freighter, 104', 187 gt, built in 1881 at Marine City) was placed back in service carrying freight and passengers between Chicago and Grand Haven. She had burned in September 1899 at Chicago but was rebuilt during the winter.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




John W. Brown Update

07/20: 4:00 p.m. update
The John W. Brown passed upbound in the Detroit River at Grassy Island at 4:00 p.m. She expects to arrive in Windsor an hour early at about 5:00 p.m. The cruise ship Le Levant depart the dock in Windsor at 4:00 p.m.

1:00 p.m. Update
The John W. Brown departed her dock at Toledo today at 9:00 a.m. with the assistance of Gaelic Tugboat Company's tugs Susan Hoey and William Hoey. The passage outbound through the bridges was uneventful, except the vessel was slowed down as she passed Toledo World Industries dock as a crowd of about 50 people with cameras were lined along the dock to take photos of the historic vessel.

The pilot, Phil Knetchel of Grosse Ile, Michigan has asked to use the Livingston Channel upbound enroute to Windsor, where she will arrive about 6:00 p.m. with the assistance of the Gaelic Tugs Carolyn Hoey and Patricia Hoey.

Original Report
The John W. Brown is expected to depart Toledo at 9:00 a.m. this morning. The Gaelic Tugboat Company of Detroit has donated tug services to the Brown. The tugs Susan Hoey and William Hoey will assist the Brown from Toledo.

The Brown is scheduled to arrive in Windsor at 6:00 p.m., a cruise ship will keep the Brown from arriving earlier. Gaelic tugs based in Detroit will assist the Brown into Windsor.

Check back for updates.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Algowood Update

07/20:
The Algowood is undergoing a survey this week at Port Weller Dry Docks. The repairs may require 100 workers for three months to repair the vessel.

Repairs are reported to include replacing 30-feet of damaged hull with a new 40-foot section that will increase the vessel's overall length to 740-feet, the new maximum length for the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Reported by: Wayne Garrett




Middletown Arrives

07/20:
The Middletown made her first trip of the season into Escanaba yesterday. She unloaded a cargo of coal from Toledo at the Reiss dock #1.

Middletown Arrives
Unloading

Reported by: Sandy and Eric Chapman




Twin Ports Report

07/20:
Algocape was a welcome site in the Twin Ports this week. The straightdecker was loading grain at the Cenex Harvest States elevator in Superior. Although delayed somewhat by rainy weather on Tuesday, on July 19 all the hatches were off and loading had resumed under clear skies.

Two unusual callers scheduled for the DMIR ore dock in Two Harbors are Charles M. Beeghly on the 20th and Indiana Harbor on the 21. The Indiana Harbor has been a regular in Duluth this season but it rarely calls in Two Harbors. On the other hand, the DMIR dock in Duluth is seeing several USS GLF boats this week. Arthur M. Anderson unloaded stone July 18 and then loaded taconite pellets, Cason J. Callaway is due there July 21 to unload stone from Calcite and Edwin H. Gott is due there to load pellets on July 24. John G. Munson is due to make on of its periodic visits to Ontonagon early on July 21.

Reported by: Al Miller




Tug Sold

07/20:
The tug Susan Belle has been between owners in storage at the Gaelic Tugboat Company yard in Detroit for about two months. The 45 foot vessel was recently purchased by Minnesota Aggregates in Duluth. The delivery trip from Detroit to Duluth was decided upon by truck, and Gaelic's yard crew removed the cabins and loaded the hull on a lowboy truck for the new owners. The Susan Belle was built in 1953 as the Fred S. Eberle, and operated for many years for the Dunbar and Sullivan Dredging Company.

Image of the hull on the truck

Reported by: William Hoey




Coast Guard Rescue

07/20:
The U.S. Coast Guard Station Marblehead received a report of a jet ski overdue with two persons onboard on July 18. The jet ski departed in late afternoon for a trip reportedly in Sandusky Bay on Lake Erie. A Coast Guard rescue boat searched Sandusky Bay but did not find the jet ski. A U.S. Coast Guard helicopter from Air Station Detroit was requested and at 6:48 a.m. found the jet ski outside of Sandusky Bay, approximately four nautical miles north/northwest of the Huron River.

The search effort was re-oriented around the jet ski position and at 9:47 a.m. the two men were found approximately two nautical miles east of the jet ski position by Station Marblehead's rescue boat. They were transported by helicopter to Magruder Hospital in Port Clinton, where they were treated for hypothermia and released after spending 15 hours in the water. They had lost sight of land, became disoriented, and ran out of gas Monday afternoon.




Monthly Tonnage Report Cleveland Harbor

07/20:
The Lake Carriers' Association home page has been updated with the June tonnage reports for the Cuyahoga River.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 20

CANADOC (2) suffered severe bow damage on July 20, 1963 in a collision with the Swiss-flagged freighter BARILOCHE in dense fog off Ile de Orleans, near Quebec City.

The LEON FALK, JR. was christened at Cleveland, July 20, 1961 after one trip to Duluth, MN for ore.

HORACE JOHNSON was launched July 20, 1929 for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

SHELTER BAY (2) was launched July 20, 1907 as a) JAY C. MORSE.

At the end of June, 1877, the ferry MYRTLE began running between Port Huron and Sarnia. However, on 20 July 1877, the Port Huron Time reported that "The ferry MYRTLE has been taken off the route on account of the extreme dullness of the times."

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Lawsuit Filed in Linda E. Sinking

07/19:
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that family members of one of the crewmen who was lost on the Linda E. have filed a lawsuit against BP Amoco and the estate of the Linda E.'s owner, Leif Weborg. The lawsuit alleges that the barge Great Lakes and tug Michigan collided with the Linda E. killing all three men aboard. The tug and barge are operated by Coastwise Trading Co., a subsidiary of BP Amoco. The suit blames both operators for the alleged accident.

In June a team from the University of Michigan investigated the site of the Linda E. wreck using a remotely operated submarine equipped with lights and cameras. The investigation showed extensive damage to the right side of the fishing tug within 10 feet of the stern. The videotape showed fractures and dents in the steel superstructure, a broken window and a hole in the decking. The submarine also took paint samples from the Linda E as she rest on the bottom. The vessel is buried in mud up to the water line which would hide other damage from view.

Reported by: Scott Best




Marinette Marine Launches Navy Barge

07/19:
Over the weekend Marinette Marine launched the second Navy housing barge, it will eventually go to San Diego for use by the Navy. The barge that was launched last summer should be ready for delivery to the Navy this Fall.

In other port news, Ryba Marine Construction has finished dredging the Menominee River.

Reported by: Scott Best




Toledo Update

07/19:
Tuesday the saltie Vamand Wave was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. The tug/barge combo Atlantic Hickory/Sarah Spencer was unloading fertilizer at Andersons "K" Elevator. The Atlantic Erie was still at the T.W.I. Dock loading coke breeze.

The John G. Munson was loading coal at the CSX Docks. The USCGC Neah Bay, and the Liberty Ship John W. Brown were at the Port Authority Dock. The tug Donald C. Hannah with her barge was loading cargo at the B-P Oil Company Docks.

The next scheduled coal boats are the Calcite II with an e.t.a. of 8:00 p.m. Tuesday evening. On Wednesday the Algolake is expected with an e.t.a. of 6:00 p.m. and the American Mariner 9:00 p.m.

The next scheduled ore boat will be the Armco due in on Wednesday with an e.t.a. of 6:30 a.m.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




USS Updates

07/19:
The John G. Munson was loading for Ontonagon, Mich. Calcite II will be bound for Menominee, Mich.

Reported by: Al Miller




Lorain Report

07/19:
Sunday morning the Mesabi Miner arrived in Lorain, Ohio to discharge cargo at the Lorain Pellet Terminal.

About 3:00 p.m. the Canadian Transfer went up the river and slowly past the Miner. The Transfer came back out on to Lake Erie around 10:00 p.m. The Miner depart at the same time. Sunday night the American Republic came to the terminal from Cleveland.

Reported by: Chris Wilson




Training on Local Excursion Ships

07/19:
In the aftermath of the terrible tragedy at Tobermory Ontario, extensive training for excursion vessel crewmembers remains number one for all of the vessels sailing among the Thousand Islands.

Crewmembers aboard the Gananoque Boat Line fleet have been drilling diligently this past week to meet any on board emergency i.e. fire, heart attack, evacuation and person overboard. The new Water Immersion Lifesaving Float designed by Ian Campbell has been a success during drills as it simulates an actual person floating to be recovered. This device partially fills with water to enable rescuers to appreciate the actual weight of an immersed, unconscious victim.

Reported by: Brian Johnson




Today in Great Lakes History - July 19

EDWIN H. GOTT was float launched July 19, 1978.

CLARENCE B. RANDALL (1) sailed on her maiden voyage July 19, 1943 from Ashtabula light bound for Two Harbors, MN.

CANADOC (2) was christened on July 19, 1961.

The registry of the GORDON C. LEITCH (1) was closed on July 19, 1985 as “sold foreign.”

JOHN P. REISS in tandem tow with the carferry CITY OF SAGINAW 31 arrived at Castellon, Spain prior to July 19, 1973 for scrapping.

JOSEPH S. YOUNG (1) was christened at Buffalo, NY on July 19, 1957. The JOSEPH S. YOUNG (1) was the first of seven T2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service.

On 19 July 1831, the wooden schooner HENRY CLAY was carrying 800 barrels of salt and passengers from Oswego to the Welland Canal on her maiden voyage when she capsized in a squall and sank about 10 miles off Port Dalhousie on Lake Ontario. About 11 persons were aboard and at least 6 of them lost their lives. Three were saved by the steamer CANADA.

One hundred years ago, on 19 July 1900, the name of the Toledo tug A. ANDREWS, JR. was changed to PALLISTER.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




John W. Brown on the Move

07/18:
The John W. Brown departed the drydock at Toledo Shiprepair Monday afternoon. The Gaelic Tugboat Company tugs Susan Hoey and William Hoey took the Brown up the Maumee River as a dead ship tow. The John W. Brown will be open for tours in Toledo today and tomorrow from 10-5 pm. The ship will be docked near the Port Authority offices in downtown Toledo. She is scheduled to depart Toledo on Thursday for Windsor. (see story below)

Reported by: Jim Hoffman and William Hoey.




McKee Sons Update

07/18:
At the Government Dock in Sarnia work continues on the tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons.
Below are recent pictures of the pair.

McKee Sons at dock.
Tug Invincible from the McKee Sons.
Stern view of the pair.
Long view showing the Government Dock.


Report and pictures by: Matt Miner




John B. Aird Towed

07/18:
The John B Aird arrived at Ojibway Salt Dock in Windsor on Friday night to load. She was still at the dock early Tuesday morning, undergoing repairs. The tugs Stormont and Annie M. Dean are scheduled to tow the Aird up the Detroit River to the Lafarge dock just above the Sterling Fuel Dock. The short tow began about 1:00 a.m. this morning. The Aird must clear the salt dock for another Algoma ship to load.

The Aird at dock on Saturday N. Schultheiss

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Desgagnes in the Soo

07/18:
Yesterday the Catherine Desgagnes remained at the Roberta Bondar Dock in Soo, Canada. She was towed there last week with the assistance of the tug Scott Purvis.

The Desgagnes' rudder post was removed over the weekend and returned Monday evening when it was reinstalled. It is unknown when the vessel will get underway.

She can be viewed to the left of the picture on the webcam at www.adin.org/webcam




Toledo Update

07/18:
On Monday the Atlantic Erie arrived at the T.W.I. Dock to load coke breeze which is a fine grained type of coal similar to sand. The saltie Mini Cibi was also at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo.

The Middletown was at the Coal dock loading a coal cargo. The next coal boats scheduled to arrive will be the Calcite II e.t.a. of 12:15 p.m. today and the John G. Munson with an e.t.a. of 4:00 p.m. The next ore boat due in will be the Reserve with an e.t.a. of 5:00 a.m. on Wednesday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




GPS Saves Kayaker's Life

07/18:
Late Saturday afternoon, the U.S. Coast Guard Station Charlevoix received a call reporting that a 16-foot kayak was found south of Elk Rapids, MI. Station Charlevoix diverted their 41-foot rescue boat to search for a possible missing kayaker. Items found on board the kayak were a GPS, watch and water bottle.

Using the recovered GPS, Station Charlevoix's boat crew was able to determine the kayak's last position before it had been recovered by a good samaritan. Using this waypoint, Station Charlevoix began a trackline search opposite the predominate drift and found the missing kayaker wearing his life jacket and clinging to his paddle. The 41-year old man was hypothermic and transported to Elk Rapids, MI. for treatment. The man was later released.




Lake Erie Coal Increases Lead To 1.5 Million Tons

07/18:
Coal loadings at Lake Erie ports continued their brisk pace in June, totaling 2.8 million tons, an increase of 18.2 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. For the season, the Lake Erie coal trade is nearly 1.5 million tons ahead of last year's pace. The trade has benefited from a very early start - March 3. Also, Lake Erie has begun its seasonal rise, and water levels, while still below long-term average, are actually a bit higher than a year ago.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




U.S.-Flag Carriage Down Again in June

07/18:
While certainly not a June swoon, U.S.-Flag carriage on the Great Lakes again fell short of the level of a year ago. The major U.S.-Flag Lakes lines carried 12.5 million net tons of dry-bulk cargo in June, a decrease of 3.2 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. Since the resumption of the dry-bulk trades on February 7, U.S.-Flag carriage stands at 39.8 million tons, a decrease of 2.6 percent.

Iron ore cargoes for the steel industry were down just slightly in June, and for the season are essentially unchanged. There was a slight increase in stone cargoes and that small upturn brought the 2000 season-to-date total in line with 1999's end-of-June tally.

The seemingly large drop off in western coal cargoes merely reflects that June 1999 was a near record month.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Today in Great Lakes History - July 18

The AGAWA CANYON struck an abutment at Welland Canal’s Bridge 11 at Allanburg, Ont. on July 18, 1977 while downbound with salt for Kingston, Ont. and sustained a thirty foot gash just above the waterline at the port bow.

The Canal Tanker COMET entered service on July 18, 1913 for ocean service.

The WILLIAM J. FILBERT was in collision with the KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1) at the Burlington Northern Dock on July 18, 1970 when the Steel Trust steamer lost control in the current entering the slip.

The entire forward superstructure of the JOHN DYKSTRA (2) (BENSON FORD 1), including the forecastle deck, was delivered to South Bass Island in Lake Erie on July 18, 1986 on the barge THOR 101 towed by the tug GREGORY J. BUSCH. The superstructure was moved for use as a summer home where it remains. The hull of the DYKSTRA (2) was sold to Marine Salvage, Port Colborne, Ont. and was towed from Cleveland July 10th by the tugs ARGUE MARTIN and GLENBROOK to Ramey's Bend arriving there on July 12, 1986 where she was scrapped.

WILLIAM A. REISS (2) was launched July 18, 1925 as a) JOHN A. TOPPING.

WILLIAM G. MATHER (2) completed her sea trials on July 18, 1925.

On 18 July 1858, ANDROMEDA (2-mast wooden schooner, 112', 568 t, built in 1848n at Madison Dock, Ohio) was carrying 800 barrels of salt from Oswego to Chicago. She sprang a leak suddenly and foundered 20 miles from Sheboygan, Wisconsin. The crew escaped in her boat, many just in their underwear. They arrived at Manitowoc the next day.

On 18 July 1872, the schooner D. L. COUCH of Detroit (formerly AVCORN) sank about 10 miles from Long Point on Lake Erie. Two lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Deeper Draft for Seaway?

07/17:
During the 2000 navigation season, the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation and the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation plan to carry out testing under controlled conditions in the Seaway waters to establish the feasibility of increasing the draft to 26’06" (80.8dm) with the existing water levels and alert limits.

In the Welland Canal selected ships will be asked to transit the Welland Canal at the increased draft to evaluate their capability to enter and exit locks, the effect on lockage times and overall transit time and the ship reaction in meeting other ships. Their transits will be monitored as by ship inspectors on board to observe and record the ship reactions during its trip and sufficient water levels will be maintained throughout the ship’s transit.

In the Montreal to Lake Ontario section of the Seaway testing will involve the measurement of the ship’s squat while underway in different portions of the Seaway. On-the-fly DGPS technology will be used for the measurements. Transport Canada, the Seaway users and the two Seaway entities sponsor this project and Transport Development Corporation manages the contract.

Testing will be carried on selected ships loaded to a draft 26’3" requiring no special transit precautions.

The results of the tests will be compared to previous squat studies. The results can then be analyzed and applied throughout the System.




New Ship

07/17:
The Muskoka Lakes Steamship and Historical Society is planning to build a new vessel. A period ship has been designed, but powered by a diesel engine.

The new vessel will supplement the 1887 built Royal Mail Ship Segwun which will continue to run sightseeing cruises on the shorelines of the Muskoka Lakes.

The new vessel will be named the Wenoneh II, carrying 200 passengers vs. the R.M.S. Segwun's 99 passengers and will have all the modern amenities.

The group is hopeful that the new vessel will be operational August 2001. The total cost of the new vessel will be $5MM, Cdn. $1.6MM will be provided by the Federal & Provincial Government and the rest by mortgage and private donation.

Reported by: Scott Misener




1st Annual Gathering

07/17:
This week in the Original Photo Gallery we feature photographs from the 1st Annual Boatnerd Gathering held at the Soo Locks.

Click here to view




Wages from The Good Old Days

07/17:
July of 1941
The Independent Carferry Workers of the Great Lakes, representing unlicensed workers of the Pere Marquette and Ann Arbor Railroads, ratified a new contract giving them pay raises ranging from 7 to 32% retroactive to June 15.

Breakdown as follows:
Wheelsman, watchmen and lookouts: $4.76/day.
Deckhands, carhandlers, and patrolmen: $3.82/day
Oilers, water tenders, firemen and handymen: $4.69/day.
Coalpassers and wipers: $3.75/day.
Stewards: $6.92/day.
First cook: $6.51/day. Second cook: $4.32/day.
Waiters, porters and stewardesses: $3.40/day.
Second porters, second waiters, third porters and pantrymen: $3.20/day.
The pay increases include board and lodging and two and a half days liberty time per month.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Today in Great Lakes History - July 17

The ASHCROFT was towed out of Quebec City on July 17, 1969 in tandem with the steamer SIR THOMAS SHAUGHNESSY by the Polish tug JANTAR for scrapping at Castellon, Spain.

The BROOKDALE (2) lost her self-unloading boom overboard in the Detroit River during a wind and rain storm on July 17, 1980 while loading salt at the Canadian Rock Salt Dock at Ojibway, Ont.

The COMET was towed from Toledo to Ashtabula, OH on July 17, 1973 where she was broken up during the summer and fall of 1973.

WILLIAM J. FILBERT was launched in 1907.

On her last trip the COLONEL JAMES PICKANDS arrived at Cleveland on July 17, 1974 with a load of iron ore.

GOLDEN HIND loaded her first dry bulk cargo on July 17, 1954.

On 17 July 1856, TINTO (wooden propeller, 135', built in 1855-56 at Sorel, Quebec) caught fire and burned to a total loss only 2 miles from shore. She was between Snake Island and Nine Mile Point on Lake Ontario. 18 lives were lost. The survivors jumped into the water and were picked up by a boat from shore. A newspaper article stated that she had no lifeboat aboard. Her machinery was later recovered and installed in the AVON.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algowood Arrives for Repairs

07/16:
The Algowood arrived at Port Weller Dry Docks yesterday shortly before noon. The tow departed Bruce Mines, ONT. on July 10.

The vessel will undergo an estimated $5 million repair job to damage suffered on June 2 when the vessel encountered structural problems while loading stone at Bruce Mines, Ontario. Repairs are reported to include replacing 30-feet of damaged hull with a new 40-foot section that will increase the vessel's overall length to 740-feet, the new maximum length for the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Please e-mail any pictures of the tow.

Reported by: John Stark




Kingfisher in Erie

07/16:
The USS Kingfisher, a 188-foot U.S. Navy minesweeper visited Erie Saturday on her tour of the Great Lakes. The vessel put on a show of how she swept for mines from 10:00 am to noon on Saturday and will be open for tours Today.

The Kingfisher at dock.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Port Stanley Harbor to be Dredged

07/16:
Local news, the Free Press, reports that dredging of Port Stanley's harbor will begin as soon as possible. The Lake Erie port has suffered from silting that has drastically reduced the depth of the harbor. With out dredging shipping from the port could stop all together.

Gar Knutson (L -- Elgin-Middlesex-London) said in a release Transport Canada will do the $2.9-million (C) work on an "exceptional basis." Ottawa normally does only essential work on ports to be divested, but made an exception because of the commercial impact on the port, it said.

City officials have said wheat and other crops will have to be trucked from the port if the harbor isn't dredged. In addition to grain the port faces losing fertilizer quonsets and the Lakes Terminals and Warehousing which handle salt and coal.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 16

DETROIT EDISON (2) departed Quebec City July 16th 1986, along with former fleetmate SHARON, in tow of the U.S. tug PRUDENT to Brownsville, Tex. for scrapping.

The SAGINAW BAY departed Quebec City on July 16, 1985 in tandem with the E.B. BARBER towed by the Polish tug KORAL for scrapping at Vigo, Spain.

The NORTHERN VENTURE entered Great Lakes service July 16, 1961 upbound light for the Canadian lakehead to load grain.

On July 16, 1935 the BRUCE HUDSON capsized on Lake Ontario off Cobourg, Ont. while in tow of the wooden-hulled tug MUSCALLONGE.

Keel laying of the CHI-CHEEMAUN was on July 16, 1973.

CATARACT (wooden propeller, 150', 352 t, built in 1852 at Buffalo) caught fire on 16 July 1861, 5 miles off Erie, Pennsylvania. She became an inferno astern in just a few minutes and this prevented her boats from being launched. Four died. Some were saved by clinging to floating wreckage and some others were rescued by a small fishing boat. The schooner ST. PAUL picked up some survivors, Among those picked up by Captain Mosher of the ST. PAUL, were Captain McNally and the CATARACT's carpenter. Capt. Mosher had rescued these same two men in 1858 when the propeller INDIANA was lost in Lake Superior.

On 16 July 1873, the new barge MINNEAPOLIS was towed to Detroit for outfitting. She had just been launched four days earlier at Marine City. While on the way to Detroit, a Canadian man named Sinclair fell overboard and drowned.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algowood Update

07/15:
The Algowood tow was reported to be secured at Warf 2, the Sand Dock in the Welland Canal early this morning. The tugs Progress, Seahound and Vac took over the tow from the McKeil tugs at Thorold. The tow is expected to arrive later today at Port Weller Dry Docks.

The vessel will undergo an estimated $5 million repair job to damage suffered on June 2 when the vessel encountered structural problems while loading stone at Bruce Mines, Ontario. Repairs are reported to include replacing 30-feet of damaged hull with a new 40-foot section that will increase the vessel's overall length to 740-feet, the new maximum length for the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Check back for updates. Please e-mail with updates or pictures.

Reported by: Skip Gillham, Peter Zurren and John Stark




Desgagnes in for Repairs

07/15:
The Catherine Desgagnes was brought to the Roberta Bondar Dock in Soo, Canada with the assistance of the tug Scott Purvis. Repairs appear to be in the vicinity of the rudder stock, various equipment including a crane can be seen working at the rudder. She can be viewed on the webcam at www.adin.org/webcam




Twin Ports Report

07/15:
Friday morning was busy in the Twin Ports, especially for the grain trade. Federal Fraser was loading at Cenex Harvest States, Lake Charles was at AGP and Iryda was at Peavey Connors Point. Down the bay, George A. Stinson was loading at the BNSF ore dock. The most unusual site was Canadian Leader loading at the General Mills elevator in Duluth. ULS boats don't call there very often, and even the site of a straightdecker loading there has become uncommon.

Reported by: Al Miller




Port Huron to Mackinaw Race

07/15:
The 76th annual sailboat race to Mackinac Island begins this morning at 11:30 a.m. from a starting line 4 miles north of the Blue Water Bridges. The first of the 269 sailboats are expect to finish the race on Sunday evening or early Monday.




Change in Delivery Schedules Affect SMET Loadings

07/15:
Loadings of low-sulfur coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in June totaled 1.6 million tons, a decrease of roughly 20 percent compared to last June. However, the decrease is nowhere near as significant as it seems. First, June 1999 was the second-best month the facility has ever had. Second, a major customer has changed the schedule for some of its coal deliveries. These arrangements will distort the month-to-month comparisons this season.

For the season, shipments from SMET stand at 5.6 million net tons, a slight increase compared to the same point in the 1999 navigation season.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Detroit River Festival

07/15:
A "Detroit River Festival" is being held at the Harbor Hill Marina in Detroit, on July 21-23. This is the same marina where the Dossin Great Lakes Museum has held its Nautical Mart the last few years. There will be an Antique and Classic Boat Show, a Marine Mart of Artists, Craftsperson's and Memorabilia, Marine Wares and Services. The event is being sponsored by the Michigan Chapter-Antique & Classic Boat Society, Dossin Great Lakes Museum, the Great Lakes Maritime Institute, and Events Unlimited.

The schedule includes:
Friday
5:00 to 8:00 Reception for Media and Participants 6:30 to 7:30 Auction, proceeds to Dossin 5:00 to 8:00 Entertainment

Saturday
9:00 to 5:00 Antique and Classic Boat Show, Marine Mart and Exhibits. Also seminars and restoration demonstrations.
12:00 to 4:00 Shuttles to DYC/Dossin (?) /Sinbads/ Casino and entertainment
6:00 to 9:00 Outdoor Barbecue and entertainment

Reported by: Al Hart




Today in Great Lakes History - July 15

On July 15, 1961, the Walter A. Sterling (now Lee A. Tregurtha) entered service on the Great Lakes after conversion from a tanker. The next day, on July 16, 1961, the Pioneer Challenger (now Middletown) entered service.

The CHICAGO TRADER was launched (as THE HARVESTER) in 1911 by the American Ship Building Co., Lorain, OH.

In 1946 the NORISLE was launched for the Dominion & Owen Sound Transportation Co. Ltd.

In 1934 the Ann Arbor #4 collided with the steamer N.F. Leopol in a heavy fog.

On Saturday, 15 July 1871, an argument between Captain James Bradley and Mate John Reed started while the schooner ROBERT EMMETT was docked at Erie, Pennsylvania unloading iron ore. They were still shouting at each other as the ship sailed out of the harbor. In short order, the ship turned around and anchored in the harbor. At 3:00 AM the following morning, Reed rowed ashore, went directly to the police station and charged that Capt. Bradley had assaulted him with a knife. At dawn, as the police were on their way to question Capt. Bradley, they found him stepping ashore from the deck of a tug, fuming that Reed had stolen the ship's only small boat. Bradley and Reed were at each other again and the police arrested both men. Bradley then filed charges against Reed for mutiny, assault and theft of the ship's boat. The case went to court the very next day. Justice of the Peace Foster saw his courtroom packed with curious sailors and skippers. Reed and Bradley were both still fuming and after listening to just a little testimony, Foster found both men guilty, fined them both and ordered both to pay court costs. The matter didn't end there since Reed later had to get a court order to get his personal belongings off the EMMETT. There is no record of what the disagreement was that started this whole mess.

Data from: Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algowood Update

07/14: 2: 00 p.m. update
A third tug is assisting the Algowood through the Welland Canal. At 2:00 p.m. the Algowood was in Lock 6. All three tugs are able to fit the lock in with the ship and the tow is making good progress.

7:00 a.m. update
The tugs towing the Algowood continue their voyage to Port Weller Dry Docks where they are expected to arrive some time today. The tow entered the Welland Canal early this moring. At 6:38 a.m. their positon was reported as Port Robinson.

The vessel will undergo an estimated $5 million repair job to damage suffered on June 2 when the vessel encountered structural problems while loading stone at Bruce Mines, Ontario. Repairs are reported to include replacing 30-feet of damaged hull with a new 40-foot section that will increase the vessel's overall length to 740-feet, the new maximum length for the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Check back for updates. Please e-mail with updates or pictures.




Golden Rivet

07/14:
In a ceremony at Toledo Ship Repair Thursday, the last ceremonial "Golden Rivet" was driven in to the hull of the World War II Liberty Ship John W. Brown. The Brown arrived on May 27 and has had about 14,000 rivets replaced by the skilled crews at the ship yard. In addition to the rivets, the vessels propeller, bearings, and through-hull fittings were inspected.; workers replaced zinc anodes on the hull that stem corrosion, replaced some of the ship's steel plates, sandblast and repaint the hull, and built life raft storage racks. The price tag for the work was expected to be just under $1,000,000.

The John W. Brown will be open for tours in Toledo on July 18 and 19 from 10-5 pm. The ship will be docked by the Port Authority offices in downtown Toledo. The address is One Maritime Plaza (behind Channel 11-WTOL news on the corner of Summit and Cherry Streets.)

A $5 donation is requested and parking should be available at the Toledo Sports Arena across the river with a Trolley taking you to the docks and back.

Follow I-75 to the Downtown Toledo exit. You will be on Erie Street, take Eire Street to Cherry. Turn right on Cherry and at the next big intersection you will see WTOL-11 on your left.

Brown on the dry dock on in June. Picture by Bill Hoey.

In three ports the Brown will offer locals one of the vessel's famous "Living History Day Cruises." All cruises are sold out except for the cruise departing from Toronto.

On Sunday, 6 August, the John W. Brown will conduct one of the famous cruises from the port of Toronto. This will be a six hour trip, featuring continental breakfast, full buffet luncheon, afternoon snacks and sodas. This trip will recreate the atmosphere of WW II with a big band, reenactors, an air show featuring an attack by Japanese warplanes. The ship is fully open for inspection, including the engine room, with its great 140 ton triple expansion steam engine.

The Brown's schedule is below, the ship is open to tour each day from 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.:
18 & 19 July - at Toledo public berth
22 July - Detroit cruise
25 July - arrive Erie
29 July - Cleveland cruise
1 Aug - arrive Buffalo
6 Aug - Toronto cruise
10 Aug - arrive Montreal
18 Aug - arrive Halifax
25 Aug - arrive Baltimore

For additional details, call 410 558-0164, fax 410 558-1737 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com

For those of you who could not get tickets for the July 22 Detroit cruise, Diamond Jack's River Tours will offer a two hour cruise on one of their ships that follows the Brown. The cruise is filling up fast, call 313-843-9376 or e-mail for details.

Reported by: Project Liberty Ship




Twin Ports Report

07/14:
Joe Block made one of its increasingly unusual visits to the Twin Ports on July 13, loading taconite pellets at the DMIR ore dock. John G. Munson, also an occasional caller here, is scheduled to arrive July 14 to unload stone at the Reiss Inland dock up the St. Louis River, then proceed to Two Harbors to load pellets on July 15.

The saltie Lake Charles is wasting no time in its call to the Twin Ports. The ship arrived at the AGP grain elevator in Duluth about noon on July 13. By 12:30, the elevator's leg was down in the hold and loading had commenced.

The tug Salty Dog and barge arrived in Duluth about 1 p.m. July 13, passing the outbound Joe Block just outside the piers. The barge is loaded with calcium chloride destined for delivery to the Hallett dock in Duluth.

Reported by: Al Miller




Transfer unloads in Ontonagon

07/14:
Seaway Marine Transport's, Canadian Transfer, made its first ever appearance at the small, western U.P. port of Ontonagon on July 13. She delivered a cargo of slag to the EDC Dock from the Algoma Export Dock at the Soo. Since the closure of the local copper mine, Ontonagon only sees a few shipments of coal and aggregates each season.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Algorail Docks in Midland

07/14:
The Algorail docked in Midland at the Unimin plant at 01:00 this morning. She arrived form the Badgeley Island quarry carrying silica stone. She was expected to be outbound before the lunch hour. The Algoma Central Marine ships have been frequent callers to Midland this summer.

Reported by: Rudy Smith




Frantz Visits Saginaw

07/14:
Thursday the Joseph H. Frantz arrived at the Wirt Stone Dock in Saginaw about 10:30 a.m. After unloading, the vessel continued up to the First Street turning basin and reported she was outbound for the bay at about 4:45 p.m. About 30 minutes later, she sounded her customary short salute to a small group of boat watchers who had been waiting for her at Zilwaukee City Park.

Reported by: Stephen Hause




Toledo update

07/14:
On Thursday morning the saltwater ship Daviken arrived at T.W.I. Dock. She has recently been repainted in the new dark green hull color scheme. She was the former Malinska. The saltwater ship Makeebka was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. She departed the dock after 1:00 p.m. bound for the Seaway.

The tug Donald C. Hannah with her barge was loading at the Hocking Valley Dock. The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Katmai Bay was tied up at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock just north of the shipyard.

At the shipyard the John W. Brown is finishing up her scheduled repairs. If all goes well she will be towed out of the drydock on Monday and will be taken to the Port Authority Building/Lafarge Cement Docks where she will be open for public tours on Tuesday and Wednesday before departing for the Detroit/ Windsor area on Thursday, July 20.

In the small drydock at the ship yard there appears to be a tug or small vessel undergoing survey/ repair work.

The next scheduled coal boat is the Algomarine due in on Saturday at approximately 10:00 a.m. The next ore boat is the Reserve also due in on Saturday at approximately 8:00 p.m.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Port Dover Update

07/14:
The Harbour Princess I is now running tours from Port Dover to Long Point. This vessel was formerly the Garden City which did Welland Canal tours.

Nadro Marine has sold the tug Bert Verge. This tug has been converted to pleasure use. Nadro has also sold a 'ville" class tug to Harry Gamble. The tug has no name on it at present. The Nadro tug Lois T. was the only vessel in their yard. She had a fresh coat of paint on her deck.

The McKeil tug Konigsburg and a small barge were moored in the fishing tug basin.

Reported by: Gerry O.




June Stone Trade Up A Few Boatloads

07/14:
Shipments of limestone and gypsum from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports in June totaled 4,738,186 net tons, an increase that equals three cargos in a mid-sized self-unloader. For the season, the stone trade stands at 12,969,557 net tons, an increase of 1.8 percent.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Today in Great Lakes History - July 14

The AMERICAN REPUBLIC was launched July 14, 1980 by the Bay Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

While upbound in the St. Lawrence River on July 14, 1970 for Saginaw, MI with a load of pig iron from Sorel, Que., the EASTCLIFFE HALL grounded in mud near Chrysler Shoal six miles above Massena, NY at 0300 hours but was able to free herself. A few hours later, approaching Cornwall, she struck a submerged object and sank within a few minutes in 70 feet of water only 650 feet from the point of impact. The submerged object was believed to be an old aid to navigation light stand. Nine lives were lost. Divers determined that her back was broken in two places. After salvaging part of the cargo, her cabins were leveled and her hull was filled.

In 1988 the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON and "tow mate" CONSUMERS POWER passed through the Panama Canal heading for the cutters torch in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

July events, 41 Years Ago
July 4, 1958 - The keel for the second of two new bulk freighters for Interlake Steamship Co. was laid at Great Lakes Engineering Works shipyard at River Rouge, Michigan on Wednesday morning June 25. Now known as Hull 302, the ship will be 689 ft. long, 75 ft. beam and 37-1/2 ft. molded depth with a designed maximum cargo capacity of about 24,000 tons. H. C. Downer & Associates of Cleveland did the design work. The ship will be powered by a 6,000 shp steam turbine main engine with coal-fired boilers. Interlake's other new ship, the 710-ft. flagship JOHN SHERWIN, joined the Great Lakes bulk cargo fleet in May of this year.
Hull 302 was eventually named HERBERT C. JACKSON.

Data from: Dave Wobser, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algowood Update

07/13: 8:00 a.m. update
The tugs towing the Algowood continue their voyage to Port Weller Dry Docks in the Welland Canal. Yesterday the tow departed her anchorage in lower Lake Huron at first light and made an uneventful trip through the St. Clair and Detroit Rivers. At 9:00 p.m. last night the tow was sailing east bound about 7 miles south east of Colchester, ONT. in western Lake Erie. The tow is reporting their position and speed to the Canadian Coast Guard's Sarnia Traffic Center every three hours. At 6:00 a.m. this moring the tow was making slow progress traveling at 5 knots accross Lake Eire. There was no e.t.a. for Port Colborne and the entrance to the Welland Canal.

Check back for updates. Please e-mail with updates or pictures.

Images and video by Teresa Parker as the tow passed Detroit and Windsor. The tow moved to the American side of the Detroit River to allow the CCG Griffon, David Z. Norton, and the Sam Laud to pass.
The Griffon passes the tow near Belle Isle
The tow passing Detroit's skyline
Video Clips (very large file size)
The Sam Laud passes the tow (1.4 meg)
Passing under the Ambassador Bridge (1.4 meg)

Images by Mike Nault taken in the St. Clair River Wednesday morning.
The tow passing downbound.
The lead tug Carrol C 1.
The trailing tug Bonnie B. III.
Another view.
Close up of the temporary repairs to the midbody.
Another view of repairs.
Close up of the waterline.
Stern view of the tow.
Another stern view.
The tow passes the salty IRA

The tow is expected to arrive at Port Weller Dry Docks on Friday, July 15. The vessel will undergo an estimated $5 million repair job to damage suffered on June 2 when the vessel encountered structural problems while loading stone at Bruce Mines, Ontario. Repairs are reported to include replacing 30-feet of damaged hull with a new 40-foot section that will increase the vessel's overall length to 740-feet, the new maximum length for the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Reported by: Ken Kilbreath, Sam Buchanan, Mike Nicholls, Barry Hiscocks and John Meyland.




Barge St. Mary's Cement Update

07/13:
The barge St. Mary's Cement, which ran aground on St. Martin's Island Shoal on Friday, July 7th, was refloated Tuesday afternoon and taken to Washington Island for further evaluation before being towed to Green Bay, WI., for repairs.




John W. Brown Update

07/13:
The World War II Liberty Ship John W. Brown will be open for tours in Toledo on July 18 and 19 from 10-5 pm. The ship will be docked by the Port Authority offices in downtown Toledo. The address is One Maritime Plaza (behind Channel 11-WTOL news on the corner of Summit and Cherry Streets.)

A $5 donation is requested and parking should be availabe at the Toledo Sports Arena acrossed the river with a Trolley taking you to the docks and back.

Follow I-75 to the Downtown Toledo exit. You will be on Erie Street, take Eire Street to Cherry. Turn right on Cherry and at the next big intersection you will see WTOL-11 on your left.

Brown on the dry dock on in June. Picture by Bill Hoey.

In three ports the Brown will offer locals one of the vessel's famous "Living History Day Cruises." All cruises are sold out except for the cruise departing from Toronto.

On Sunday, 6 August, the John W. Brown will conduct one of the famous cruises from the port of Toronto. This will be a six hour trip, featuring continental breakfast, full buffet luncheon, afternoon snacks and sodas. This trip will recreate the atmosphere of WW II with a big band, reenactors, an air show featuring an attack by Japanese warplanes. The ship is fully open for inspection, including the engine room, with its great 140 ton triple expansion steam engine.

The Brown's schedule is below:
27 May - arrived Toledo
18 & 19 July - at Toledo public berth
22 July - Detroit cruise
25 July - arrive Erie
29 July - Cleveland cruise
1 Aug - arrive Buffalo
6 Aug - Toronto cruise
10 Aug - arrive Montreal
18 Aug - arrive Halifax
25 Aug - arrive Baltimore

For additional details, call 410 558-0164, fax 410 558-1737 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com

For those of you who could not get tickets for the July 22 Detroit cruise, Diamond Jack's River Tours will offer a two hour cruise on one of their ships that follows the Brown. Call 313-843-9376 or e-mail for details.

Reported by: Richard Russell and Jim Hoffman




Niagara Prince at Holland

07/13:
The Niagara Prince is set to arrive at Holland, MI. at 9:00 a.m. this morning. This will mark the first time in almost thirty years that a passenger ship will make a call in the Lake Michigan port. She is scheduled to be in port for the day, departing at 5:00 p.m. Additional calls will be made on July 21 and 29, as well as August 6, 13, and 21.

Reported by: Bob Vande Vusse




Injured Crewman Removed from Spar Jade

07/13:
On Tuesday a crewmember from the saltie Spar Jade was struck by a rope mooring line and was knocked down, seriously injuring his head. He was rushed to a nearby hospital for treatment. There is no update on his condition.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Halifax Report

07/13:
This morning CSL's Melvin H Baker III arrived in Halifax on her regular run for a load of Gypsum. She had to wait for the Nanticoke to leave the Gypsum dock in Bedford basin before tying up.

When the Nanticoke left the Gypsum dock with a full load she proceeded to Halifax to have repairs done to her self-unloading equipment. Reports indicate there is problem with a valve which prevents unloading. An estimate on her repair time is 2 to 3 days. Nanticoke had previously unloaded a cargo of grain or wheat in Halifax.

The tanker Jade Star also arrived in Dartmouth and secured at the Irving Dock.

The Cory group from the UK has recently sold their tug interests to Weismuller. Part of the sale included the tugs belonging to Ectug (Eastern Canada Towing), which had tugs in Halifax, Sept Isles, and Baie Comeau. As a result of this sale the Tugs in Halifax are slowly being painted in the colors of the new owners. Weismuller has a working agreement with Smit.

The cruise ship Big Red Boat II arrived in Halifax this morning for a day long visit. Tourists could be seen all over the Halifax Peninsula, with many heading toward the Casino. The ship left the dock at 1700 bound for Saint John, N.B.

A number of foreign Naval ships are also in Halifax. One is a US assault ship, with the number 20 painted on the bow. A second appeared to have the flag of South Africa flying from the stern.

Reported by: Paul Beesley




July 1 Vessel Survey

07/13:
The major U.S.-Flag operators on the Great Lakes had 63 of their 70 vessels in service on July 1, the same total as a year ago. Joining the fleet is the self-unloading barge GREAT LAKES TRADER. She began her career by loading 37,410 net tons of iron ore at Escanaba, Michigan, on June 21.

Two U.S.-Flag lakers that have been active this season have entered short-term lay-up. They are the Kinsman Independent, a straight-decker dedicated to the grain trade, and the cement carrier Paul H. Townsend.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Manitowoc to Report Results

07/13:
The Manitowoc Company, Inc. will broadcast its second-quarter 2000 financial results conference call over the Internet today at 11:00 a.m. ET.

Those who wish to listen to the conference call should visit the investor relations section of the company's Web site at www.manitowoc.com at least 15 minutes prior to the event's broadcast.

Manitowoc's marine segment operates three shipyards around the lakes, Bay Shipbuilding , Toledo Shiprepair and Cleveland Shiprepair.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 13

The ALGOWEST was christened at Collingwood on July 13, 1982.

SASKATCHEWAN PIONEER was launched July 13, 1983.

The LIGHTSHIP 103 was opened to visitors on July 13, 1974 at the city's Pine Grove Park along the St. Clair River.

The rebuilt BOSCOBEL was launched at the Peshtigo Company yard at Algonac on 13 July 1876. Originally built in 1867 as a passenger/package freight propeller vessel, she burned and sank near Ft. Gratiot in 1869. The wreck was raised, but no work was done until January 1876 when she was completely rebuilt as a schooner-barge at Algonac. She sank again in the ice on Lake Erie in 1895 and was again raised and rebuilt. She lasted until 1909 when she sank in the middle of Lake Huron during a storm.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algowood Tow

07/12: 2:00 p.m.
The Algowood tow is scheduled to pass by the J.W. Westcott Company station at 2:20 p.m.

10:30, 9:45, 9:00, and 7:00 a.m. updates
Tuesday evening the Algowood tow anchored in lower Lake Huron for the night. The tugs and Algowood began their voyage down the St. Clair and Detroit Rivers at first light this morning. At 6:15 a.m. the tow was passing the Black River in Port Huron. By 8:45 the tow was passing the Salt Dock Light at Marine City, MI. The tug Carrol C 1 was on the bow and the tug Bonnie B. III was on the stern. The tow has been traveling at 8 knots and has an e.t.a. of 11:44 a.m. for the St. Clair Crib Light. A safety zone has been established around the vessel and it may take longer than the normal amount of time to transit the river system.

Check back for updates. Please e-mail with updates or pictures.

Images by Mike Nault taken in the St. Clair River Wednesday morning.
The tow passing downbound.
The lead tug Carrol C 1.
The trailing tug Bonnie B. III.
Another view.
Close up of the temporary repairs to the midbody.
Another view of repairs.
Close up of the waterline.
Stern view of the tow.
Another stern view.
The tow passes the salty IRA

The tow is expected to arrive at Port Weller Dry Docks on Friday, July 15. The vessel will undergo an estimated $5 million repair job to damage suffered on June 2 when the vessel encountered structural problems while loading stone at Bruce Mines, Ontario. Repairs are reported to include replacing 30-feet of damaged hull with a new 40-foot section that will increase the vessel's overall length to 740-feet, the new maximum length for the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls, Barry Hiscocks and John Meyland




Barge St. Mary's Cement Update

07/12:
The barge St. Mary's Cement, a 360-foot double-hulled, doubled-sided cement barge, remains hard aground amidships on a 60-foot rock shelf near St. Martin's Island. A dive survey confirmed a void was taking on water via two 1-inch holes in the bottom shellplate. All diesel, lube oil and slops were successfully removed. The barge remains loaded with cement. The barge is awaiting a naval architect structural report and recommendations for revised salvage plan.




Twin Ports Report

07/12:
A recent Coast Guard inspection of the Cypriot-flag Atlantis Spirit in Superior resulted in no action on crew members' complaints that the vessel lacked food during its 51-day layover on the Great Lakes while awaiting cargo.

The ship was adequately stocked when inspected Friday at the Peavey Connors Point grain elevator, Cmdr. Andrew Palmiotto of the Coast Guard's Marine Safety Office told the Duluth News Tribune. The complaint, referred to the Coast Guard by the International Transportation Federation (ITF), was ``a false alarm,'' he said.

``They did have enough food when we went on board. It was primarily frozen food and canned goods, confirming what the captain and pilot told us earlier last week,'' Palmiotto said. ``Sailors have a right to complain if they're not satisfied, but we were satisfied that what the company provided was good and in adequate supply.'' The vessel was expected to depart Superior on July 11.

After unloading stone at the DMIR ore dock, the Philip R. Clarke spent part of the night and much of the morning of July 11 on the Dock 6's east side, apparently loading with the gravity chutes. "East of 6" has gotten little use this season. Last season it was used primarily by the Joe Block.

Jean Parisien paid an unusual call July 11 to Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior. The vessel's calls in the Twin Ports usually are at the DMIR ore dock. This time the Parisien was loading coal for Ontario Power in Nanticoke. It will be followed today by Canadian Transport and Canadian Enterprise, both scheduled to load for the same destination. Columbia Star is due in July 14 to load for Detroit Edison in St. Clair and Joseph H. Thompson is due the same day to load for the LTV power plant in Taconite Harbor. After that, Algobay is scheduled to load July 15 with another load bound for Ontario Power.

Reported by: Al Miller




Algorail in Midland

07/12:
The Algorail docked at the Unimin plant in Midland. ONT. at 5:00 p.m. Tuesday. She was carrying a load of silica stone from the Badgeley Island Quarry in northern Georgian Bay. On her way in, she was churning up mud and silt - a visible result of this year's low water levels. Also worth noting, her flag was flying at half mast.

After quickly unloading the Algorail departed Midland at 9:00 p.m. She was destined for the Badgeley Island Quarry, with an ETA of 6:00 a.m. this morning. She is expected back in Midland tonight.

Reported by: Rudy Smith




Busy Morning on Lower Detroit River

07/12:
Tuesday morning there were four vessels between Grassy Island Light and Detroit River Light (D.R.L.). Downbound the Dorothy Ann with Pathfinder, came out of the Rouge, John Spence with an asphalt barge also out of the Rouge. Upbound the Atlantic Hickory with Sarah Spencer and the Donald C. Hanna with a barge. The Karen Andrie called in at D.R.L. upbound with the barge A 397 for the Rouge. More and more tugs and barges.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toronto Update

07/12:
July 11th: Kapitanas Serafinas departed port without tug assistance. Wana Naree remained at Pier 51 unloading, and the McKeil party barge Island Sauvage remained in port. HMS Tecumseh remained on drydock.

July 10th: Kapitonas Serafinas arrived during the night. Tug Glenevis and workboat Salvager departed harbor with two fireworks barges in tow. The Benson & Hedges "Symphony Of Fire" barge Erie West hoisted anchor and was taken back to Hamilton by McKeil tugs including Lac Como and Paul E. No. 1. Canadian Century dropped off salt and departed. The tug William Rest and the derrick barge T.H.C. 50 departed the Keating Channel to work on Buoy T13. The tug Nadro Clipper came into port and departed again.

July 9th: Stephen B. Roman came in with cement to the Essroc dock. The RCYC hosted its annual Easter Seals Regatta with more than a hundred 30-foot plus sailboats and motor yachts parading in the harbor. Wana Naree arrived at Pier 51, assisted by McKeil tugs.

July 8th: Le Levant returned for her third visit of the season. The Benson & Hedges "Symphony Of Fire" wound up with perfect weather for the fireworks finale and every charter vessel in the area attended.

July 7th: HMCS Toronto departed, assisted by McKeil tugs Lac Como and Paul E. No. 1. The fire tug William Lyon Mackenzie gave a farewell water display and six harbor police vessels watched.

July 6th: HMS Tecumseh entered Toronto Drydock for inspection and some repairs, including having it's rudder widened. She suffered no damage to her hull from the recent grounding in the St. Clair River, but the $1,000 (U.S.) tow bill to get her out of the mud, must have hurt.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Early Start For Coal Boosts Lakes Trade Overall

07/12:
Thanks largely to a very early resumption of coal loadings from Lake Erie ports, shipments of the major dry-bulk commodities from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports are slightly ahead of last year's pace through May. Loadings of iron ore, coal and stone stood at 35.6 million tons at the end of May, an increase of 3.4 percent.

The mild winter allowed the Lake Erie coal trade to resume on March 3. Normally, coal does not begin to move from Lake Erie in earnest until the last week of March. Strong demand from Canadian customers is also driving the Lake Erie coal trade, and with most cargoes moving in Seaway-sized vessels, the impacts of lower water levels are not quite so pronounced.

The Lakes iron ore and stone trades have registered nominal increases as of the end of May.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Algowood Pictures

07/12:
Picture and history from the Fleet Photo Gallery

Pictures by Randy Johnson taken on June 3.
The Algowood at the dock.
A closer view.
From the side.
Stern view.

Close up pictures by Paul Beesley
A view of the damage.
Another view.
Close up showing the damaged hull.
The buckled and torn hull.
Inside the flooded cargo hold.

Pictures of crews working to repair the Algowood in late June
Fitting the port side shell.
Port side shell.
The 2 inch shell skin starboard side.
First shell skin plate starboard side.
Port side shell.
The first 2 inch skin welded starboard side.
Fitting port side.
The leak in the number 3 cargo hold before repairs.
Port side deck piece.
Starboard side 2 x 2 inch plates.
Port side shell.
Welding port side shell.
Chart of the area




Today in Great Lakes History - July 12

The BELLE RIVER (WALTER J. McCARTHY JR.) was christened on July 12, 1977 as American Steamship's first thousand-footer and the first thousand-footer built at Bay Ship.

The H.M. GRIFFITH was launched July 12, 1973 for the Canada Steamship Lines.

In 1986 The ENDERS M. VOORHEES was chained together with her sisters, A.H. FERBERT (2) and IRVING S. OLDS, a severe thunder storm struck Duluth pushing the trio across St. Louis Bay eventually grounding them near Superior, WI. It was discovered that the force of the storm had pulled the bollards out of the Hallett Dock No.5 thus releasing the ships.

On July 12, 1958, the Frank A. Sherman entered service, departing Port Weller, Ontario, for Duluth and a load of iron ore on its maiden voyage.

On 12 July 1871, ADVANCE (wooden scow-schooner, 49T, built in 1847 at Fairport, OH), was bound for Detroit from Cleveland with a load of coal. She and the steamer U.S. GRANT collided near South Bass Island (Put-in-Bay) in Lake Erie and ADVANCE sank. Her crew escaped in the yawl.

On 12 July 1852, CITY OF OSWEGO (wooden propeller passenger-package freight vessel, 138', 357 t, built in 1852 at Buffalo, NY) collided with the steamer AMERICA and sank off Willowick, Ohio, a few miles east of Cleveland. 15 lives were lost. This was CITY OF OSWEGO's first season of operation.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algowood Tow

07/11: 7:00 p.m. Update
Shortly before 7:00 p.m. the Algowood tow anchored in lower Lake Huron for the night. The tugs and Algowood are expected to head down the St. Clair River at first light Wednesday.

Check back for updates. Please e-mail with updates or pictures.

7:30 a.m. Update
The Algowood tow is expected to reach buoys 11 and 12 in lower lake Huron at 5:00 p.m. today. The tow will go to anchor and await inspection before transiting the St. Clair and Detroit Rivers. She is expected to remain there over night and then begin the trip the through the rivers at first light.

Original Report
Last night the Algowood tow was reported to be making slow progress in northern Lake Huron. The tow passed Great Duck Island at 10:00 p.m. The estimated time for the entrance to the St. Clair River is unknown. The tow is expected to go to anchor for inspection in lower Lake Huron before entering the St. Clair River.

On Monday the vessel was towed from Bruce Mines after she was refloated and moved away from the dock on Saturday.

The tow is expected to arrive at Port Weller Dry Docks on Friday, July 15. The vessel will undergo an estimated $5 million repair job to damage suffered on June 2 when the vessel encountered structural problems while loading stone at Bruce Mines, Ontario. Repairs are reported to include replacing 30-feet of damaged hull with a new 40-foot section that will increase the vessel's overall length to 740-feet, the new maximum length for the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Barge St. Mary's Cement Aground On St. Martin's Island Shoal

07/11:
On July 7 the 360-foot barge St. Mary's Cement ran aground near St. Martin's Island while being pushed by the tug Petite Forte. The barge was loaded with approximately 9,200 short tons of cement for Green Bay.

The forepeak was holed, but installed pumps were keeping up with the flooding.

The U.S. Coast Guard reports that the barge is hard aground starboard side and amidship. Fourteen thousand gallons of No. 2 diesel were offloaded. One thousand gallons of lube oil are to be removed.

Severe weather Sunday morning caused buckling and bending in the barge which rendered her offloading equipment inoperable. A naval architect will inspect the barge before salvage plans are developed.

No injuries or pollution was reported and the cause of the incident is under investigation.




Twin Ports Salty Traffic

07/11:
Duluth and Superior had fairly heavy saltie traffic on July 10. Atlantis Spirit was finishing its load at Peavey Connors Point grain elevator and expected to depart late in the day, Fossnes was loading at Cargill B1 in Duluth, Millenium Eagle was loading at Cenex Harvest States in Superior, and Olympic Melody was unloading heavy equipment at the Duluth port terminal. Marianna was anchored on the lake and expected to arrive in port July 11. The remainder of the week looks busy, too, with Salty Dog, Iryda, Federal Fraser, Lake Charles, Mecta Sea and Merweborg all scheduled to arrive.

Reported by: Al Miller




DMIR Dock

07/11:
Duluth's DMIR ore dock continues to attract interesting vessels this season. Joe Block -- an infrequent visitor this season -- is due back again July 12; Algoport is due July 21; Atlantic Huron is scheduled for July 23; and Saginaw is scheduled to make its third trip of the season to the dock on July 26. Regular caller James R. Barker loaded July 9 and is due back July 19 and Indiana Harbor is set for July 14 and 20.

Reported by: Al Miller




Milwaukee Update

07/11:
The large amount of boat traffic in Milwaukee this past weekend can mean only one thing; the harbor will be empty for the rest of the week.

The Jacklyn M/Integrity arrived late Saturday afternoon followed by the Susan Hannah/Southdown Conquest. The Algoway was forced to anchor outside until the Integrity cleared Sunday morning because it blocked a portion of the salt dock. Just after the Algoway cleared the breakwall Sunday afternoon the Myron C. Taylor arrived with a load of salt. Right behind the Taylor was the Lee A. Tregurtha with a load of coal.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Saginaw Update

07/11:
The Sam Laud was upbound through Bay City at 8:45 a.m. Monday and discharged a cargo of stone at the Buena Vista Dock near the I-75 bridge. The vessel was outbound from the turning basin at Saginaw at 3:30 p.m. and cleared the river at about 7:00 p.m.

The Sam Laud is a frequent visitor to the Saginaw River, but it is unusual to see this vessel deliver cargo to the Buena Vista Dock.

Reported by: Stephen Hause




Crewman Evacuated from the Algorail

07/11:
Over the weekend Sarnia Traffic relayed a requested for a medevac of a male crewman from the Algorail as she transited Lake Huron. The crewman possibly had a heart attack. A U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Detroit helicopter hoisted the man and transported him to Bay Medical Center. The Coast Guard last reported that the man was in critical condition.




McKeil tugs towing Algowood

07/11:
The 1992-3 Lloyd's Register shows the CARROL C I (IMO#7017674), (C.710569), built in 1969 at Port Arthur. TX by Gulfport Shipbuilding (Hull#719) launched as a.) ESSO ORANJESTAD II: 100.27 feet (30.56m) X 32.02 (9.76m) X 17.03 (5.19m): 308 gross tons, 127 net tons. Renamed b.) ESSO SAN NICOLAS, c.) SAN NICOLAS , d.) CARROL C and e.) CARROLL C I. Owners in 1992 Newfoundland Marine Energy Ltd. St. John's, Nfl.

Her sister BONNIE B III: Gulfport (IMO#7017663) (C.809073) Hull#718, same dimensions. 291 gross tons, 92 net tons. a. ESSO ORANJESTAD, b.) ORANJESTAD, c.) SAN NICOLAS, d.) SAN NICOLAS II and e.) BONNIE B III. Same owner.

The tugs are both powered by EMD 16 cyl oil eng 9.06" X 10", 230mm X 254mm. 2,875 h.p.
The 1999 ABS Record shows CARROL C as CAROL C.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




New Dive Attraction?

07/11:
A Green Bay scuba-diving club wants to sink a 72-year-old Straits of Mackinac car ferry in Lake Michigan, but the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is wary of the proposal, according to a recent story distributed by the Associated Press.

The Neptune's Nimrods Dive Club is seeking state approval to sink the 196-foot Straits of Mackinac in 80 feet of water off Algoma, Wis. The ship would be used as a dive site for recreational divers. It would be the first authorized sinking of a vessel in Wisconsin waters, officials said. The stripped-down ferry currently is docked in Kewaunee, Wis.

DNR officials are leery of the proposal, saying it could set an unfavorable precedent that might lead to dumping of other objects in the lake. One DNR spokesman said the proposed sinking is a "gray area" of the law.

The Straits of Mackinac ferried automobiles between the lower and upper peninsulas of Michigan from 1928 until the Mackinac Bridge opened in 1957. The Michigan Highway Department then sold the vessel to Straits Transit Co, which used it to haul cargo. More recently it was used by Peterson Builders for storage.

Reported by: Al Miller and Sean Whelan




Today in Great Lakes History - July 11

The INDIANA HARBOR was christened July 11, 1979.

On July 11, 1943 the ENDERS M. VOORHEES became the first downbound vessel to transit the newly built MacArthur Lock at the Soo.

On 11 July 1888, the 2-mast wooden schooner JOHN TIBBETS was carrying coal on Lake Erie when she foundered in the shallows near Clear Creek, 7 miles west of Port Rowan, Ontario and then broke up in the storm waves. Her crew made it to shore in the yawl. She was built in 1863 at Clayton, NY on the hull of the Canadian schooner PERSEVERANCE which was originally built in 1855.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Sarnia Update

07/10:
On Sunday, the Cuyahoga remained in the north slip in Sarnia with the propeller hub removed and the tail shaft backed several feet out of the stern tube.

At the Government dock, the tug Invincible is now in the notch of the McKee Sons. Heavy wooden fender blocks have been placed between the tug sides and the barge.

Reported by: George Lee




Canadian Voyager visits Indiana Harbor

07/10:
The Canadian Voyager was unloading at the Inland Steel dock Sunday. She arrived at 4:00 p.m. Saturday making her second trip this season.

Reported by: Gary R. Clark




Cleveland Update

07/10:
The American Republic departed Cleveland at 9:00 a.m. Sunday, another 18 hour turn around on the Lorain - Cleveland shuttle.

The Saginaw was in Cleveland on Sunday morning. She began unloading stone at the Ontario dock at the mouth of the river and then moved upriver to West 3rd to complete the unload at the Cuyahoga Road Products dock.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




More Lake Erie Traffic

07/10:
Sunday the Canadian Enterprise loading coal in Ashtabula. Great Lakes Towing has made a vessel change in Ashtabula, the tug Ohio is now there with the tug Iowa. The Rhode Island appears to have been reassigned to another port.

In Conneaut a crowd of about 30 were on hand to watch the Arthur M Anderson back into port to unload. The unloading was delayed for about 30 minuets due to a strong thunder storm which blew in off the lake as the Anderson was docking.

Reported by: Mike Madigan




Busy Day on the Rouge River

07/10:
Early Sunday morning the Louis R Desmarais was headed up the Rouge to the St. Mary's Cement Dock to unload. ASC's Buffalo was unloading coal at the former Detroit Lime dock at 1:00 p.m. The Elton Hoyt 2nd was unloading at the Rouge Steel Complex later in the evening.

The tug Bonnie G Selvick was downbound towing the small tug Wolverine and a dredge with 150-feet of pipe. She was at Grassy Island at about 08:00 Monday morning. She was downbound yesterday but stopped just above the Ambassador Bridge because of weather. The captain of the tug is Bill Palmer from Soo, MI.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls and Nathan Nietering




HMCS Toronto

07/10:
Saturday the Canadian Frigate HMCS Toronto arrived in Brockville. The Toronto stopped to disembark passengers after a cruise from Kingston Ontario through the 1000 islands. A tour boat from Gananoque boat line picked up the passengers and brought them to shore.

Pictures by Peter Carter
Toronto Underway
Waiting to disembark

On Sunday morning the Toronto departed from Prescott enroute to Montreal.

Reported by: Peter Carter and John Reynolds




Today in Great Lakes History - July 10

HENRY R. PLATT, JR. (2) was launched as a) G.A. TOMLINSON (1) at the American Ship Building Co., Lorain, OH - July 10, 1909.

In 1998 the Algowest was re-dedicated at Port Weller Dry Docks. The $20 million conversion of the ship to a self-unloader from a bulk-carrier was completed by 400 shipbuilders at Port Weller Dry Docks during the previous eight months.

On 10 July 1866, COQUETTE (1-mast wooden scow-sloop, 90', 140 t, built in 1858 at Perry, Ohio as a schooner) capsized in a storm on Lake Michigan and was lost with her crew of four. She had originally been built for the U.S. Government.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Barge Aground

07/09:
On Friday night the tug Superior departed Milwaukee enroute to Green Bay. They were expected to picking up a cement barge in Green Bay and proceeding to Martin Reef to lighten the Petite Forte/St. Marys I. The pair are reported aground there and no further details are available.

Martin Reef is between Detour and Cedarville.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Parade Continues

07/09:
The parade of 1000-footers on the St. Clair River continued Saturday with the Paul R. Tregurtha departing the St. Clair Edison coal dock. The Walter J. McCarthy quickly took her place. As the Paul R. departed, the Oglebay Norton was upbound at Marine City.

The McCarthy was the fifth 1000-footer to pass on the St. Clair River in a 24 hour period. There are 13 total 1000-footers on the lakes.

Reported by: Duane Upton




Busy Evening in the Straits

07/09:
Thursday evening the activity from Gray's Reef east to Detour and Poe Reef was the heaviest locals had seen in many years. East bound in the South Channel were the salties Iryda, Malene and Federal Fraser. They were joined by the George A. Sloan and the Presque Isle coming from Round Island.

Westbound at the bridge, the salty Millennium Eagle led the Integrity bound for Alpena, Barbara Andrie, and Calcite II. The Petite Forte was also moving in the Straits along with the usual ferries and recreational boats.

Security calls and meeting/passing arrangements came one after the other over the radio and all vessels transited without so much as a second thought by their crews. Another testament to the skill of Great Lakes Mariners.

Reported by: Karl Hardesty




Buckeye in Escanaba

07/09:
Saturday the Buckeye arrived in Escanaba to load.

Loading with the Wilfred Sykes on the other side of the dock. picture by: Eric and Sandy Chapman

Reported by: Eric and Sandy Chapman and Rod Burdick




Marquette Update

07/09:
June Monthly Boatwatching Report
Shipping in and out of Marquette is still on the rise. Traffic is up 5% compared to May as the season builds to a full bell. During the month on May, 56 vessels sailed in and out of Marquette harbors. During the month of June 59 vessels made the trip in and out of Marquette.

The H. Lee White is leading all vessels for the year visiting the lower harbor with 7 visits followed by the Adam Cornelius with 5, John Boland and the American Mariner with 4 visits each, the USCG Sundew with 3 visits, and 8 other vessels with 1 visit each. All the vessels visiting the lower harbor were American vessels.

As for the upper harbor, the Canadian Transfer is leading all vessel visits for the year with 31 visits followed by the Elton Hoyt who has 19 visits for the year. The Charles M. Beeghly and the Lee A. Tregurtha each have 14 visits, the Kaye E. Barker has 10 visits, the H. Lee White has 8 visits, Algosteel and the American Mariner each have 7 visits, the Herbert C. Jackson and the John J. Boland each have 6 visits while the Adam Cornelius has 5 visits. The James R. Barker and the Paul R. Tregurtha each have 3 visits and the Mesabi Miner and the Joseph H. Thompson each have 2 visits. The Courtney Burton, Capt. Henry Jackman, USCG Sundew, Armco, Middletown, Great Lakes Trader, and the Fred R. White each have 1 visit this year.

Of the 132 visits, the Interlake Steamship and Lakes Shipping combined have the most vessel visits so far this season followed by Upper Lakes and then American Steamship. However, vessels flying the American Flag outnumber Canadian vessels by nearly a 3 to 1 margin.

If numbers are any indication, the month of July is starting off with a bang. Only eight days into the month and the number of vessels visiting this month is already on pace with June's figures.

Reported by: Art Pickering




Cleveland Update

07/09:
On Saturday morning the Calcite II was loading salt on the old river.

The American Republic was running the LTV shuttle from Lorain. She made a very fast round trip Friday and Saturday. The full trip usually takes 21 hours and was completed today in approximately 18.

The Republic became very popular with sailboat racers as well this afternoon. When she departed Cleveland she avoided the 80 some sailboats gathered for Cleveland race week and left with a bone in her teeth in order not to foul the start of a race.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Weather Hampers Boatwatching

07/09:
Rain and wind, part of a storm system pushing through Minnesota hampered boatwatching in the Twin Ports on Friday. The Salty Lake Ontario was forced to delay loading at AGP, pushing back her departure one day. The weather also pushed the arrival of the Salty Fossnes back a couple of hours.

On a related note, problems with the Aerial Lift Bridge forced the Atlantic Huron to delay her approach into Duluth. After the problems were solved she quickly came about and entered the harbor around 5:00 p.m. Central Time with a small crowd of soggy but dedicated boatwatchers on hand. This is believed to be her first visit to the Twin Ports this season. She quickly proceeded to the Mesabi Ore docks and docked head first to begin loading.

Reported by: David French




HMCS Toronto Visits Kingston

07/09:
On Friday, July 7, the Canadian Frigate HMCS Toronto dropped anchor in outer Kingston harbor. Arriving from Toronto, she had aboard various veterans from World War II as well as Senior Captain Wilf Bilow of the Gananoque Boat Line who also made the trip.

Stepping onto the Island Belle, which ran shuttle service for the Canadian Frigate, Captain Bilow remarked, "Wow!! That is a fast boat!!"

A free shuttle service ran Saturday from the Crawford Wharf from 9:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. aboard the Island Belle.

Shortly after, the HMCS Toronto was scheduled to depart Kingston, entering the St. Lawrence Seaway where she will again drop anchor in the port of Brockville. The Thousand Islander III will offer a shuttle service from that port, leaving from the Blockhouse Island wharf.

Reported by: Brian Johnson




Farewell visit of HMCS Onondaga

07/09:
The HMCS Onondaga, an Oberon class submarine built in 1967, is on a farewell visit to several St. Lawrence River and Eastern Canada ports. After stop overs in Montreal and Trois-Rivieres earlier in the week, the Onondaga docked in Quebec Harbour in the outer Louise Basin on Thursday evening. The public is invited to visit the Sub today and get the feel of the close quarters which is home to the 82 crew members of this Cold War era warship. The Onondaga will sail on Monday morning for Prince-Edward Island.

In October the Onondaga will retire from active service to undertake a new life as a proud addition to the National War Museum in the nation's Capital at Ottawa, Ontario Canada.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




Today in Great Lakes History - July 9

WILLIAM R. ROESCH (DAVID Z. NORTON) loaded her first cargo in 1973 at Superior, WI where she loaded 18,828 tons of iron ore bound for Jones & Laughlin's Cuyahoga River plant at Cleveland.

The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS and her fleetmate IRVING S. OLDS passed through the Panama Canal on July 9, 1988 under tow by the German tug OSA RAVENSTURM. The pair was on a 14,000 mile journey to Kaohsiung, Taiwan arriving there on November 8, 1988 for scrapping by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.

On 9 July 1876, ST. CLAIR (wooden propeller freighter with some passenger accommodations, 127', 326 gt, built in 1867 at Algonac, Michigan) had 14 crew and 18 passengers aboard along with cargo of flour, feed and deck loads of cattle as she sailed on Lake Superior. At 2:00 AM, she caught fire about five miles off shore from 14 Mile Point. She was a wood burner and had a history of shipboard fires. The fire spread so quickly that only one boat could be launched and being overloaded, it capsized. The cries of those left on the vessel, along with the bellowing of the cattle, were heart rending. Only six survived in the one lifeboat since the cold water took its toll on those who clung to it. Eventually they righted the boat and paddled to shore, leaving the ST. CLAIR burned to the waterline.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algowood Update

07/08:
The Algowood is scheduled to arrive at Port Weller Dry Docks on Friday, July 15. The vessel will undergo an estimated $5 million repair job to damage suffered on June 2 when the vessel encountered structural problems while loading stone at Bruce Mines, Ontario.

On Friday two of the tugs that will participate in the tow were docked at Sarnia's Government Dock. The tugs Bonnie B. III and Carrol C. 1, were rafted to one another being refueled from two trucks. Both are registered in St. John's, Nfld. Their stack markings are white with a narrow green stripe at the top and both were flying McKeil Marine house flags.

Reported by: Roger Tottman and Barry Hiscocks




Sarina Update

07/08:
Work continued Friday on the barge McKee Sons and tug Invincible in Sarnia. The latest sailing date for the pair is early August.

The Cuyahoga remained in the North Slip undergoing drive or propeller shaft related repairs.

The tanker Algocatalyst is also docked in the north slip astern of the Cuyahoga with Fraser Ship Repairs working on the vessel.

Reported by: Barry Hiscocks




Atlantis Spirit Docks Amid Controversy

07/08:
The saltie Atlantis Spirit faces controversy after docking in Superior following 51 days at anchor waiting for cargo.

On Friday, a representative of the International Transportation Workers Federation planned to inspect the ship at the Peavey Connors Point grain elevator. The inspection was in response to complaints that crew members lacked sufficient food and were not paid on schedule during the time the boat lay idle.

The vessel's management denies the charges. A spokesman for Atlantis Management said the ship had food and the crew was paid on time. The master told the Duluth News Tribune that the ship ran short of fresh food but frozen and canned food was available.

The 497-foot Atlantis Spirit unloaded cargo May 17 in Oswego, then lay at anchor on Lake Ontario until late June after a company that chartered the ship failed to make its payment. After the charter agreement was revoked June 27, the ship's management began seeking a return cargo to Europe.

The ship arrived off Duluth on July 1 and went to anchor because its loading dock was not available. Milk and butter were delivered that day, but other food deliveries were delayed until July 4 because of rough seas.

Reported by: Al Miller




Busy day at St. Clair Edison

07/08:
Thursday the Columbia Star was unloading at the St. Clair Edison coal dock with the Oglebay Norton anchored just below Recors Point waiting her turn at the dock. The Paul R. Tregurtha then arrived and anchored below the Oglebay Norton.

It was a great day for watching 1000-footers as the Edgar B. Speer and George A. Stinson were upbound.

Oglebay Norton cleared the dock about 10:00 a.m. Friday and sailed downbound. She met the upbound James R Barker in the St. Clair River at the Salt dock.

Reported by: Duane Upton




Goderich to Host Marine Heritage Festival

07/08:
Goderich, Ontario will host the Marine Heritage and Marine Underwater Festival on Saturday, July 8 and Sunday July 9. Singer-songwriter Lee Murdock will perform at the festival on Saturday between 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. at Lions Harbour Park.

Admission is free. Activities for the weekend include an introduction to scuba diving coarse, underwater photo contest and treasure hunt. The Canadian Coast Guard ship Samuel Risley will be at the south harbour dock on Saturday and Sunday from 12:00 noon to 3:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. The Ontario Provincial Police will also have their patrol vessel on display.

The Arts and Crafts festival is also being held in the Square in Goderich, July 7-9.

More information is available from the Goderich Tourist Information Center, 519-524-6600 or 1-800-280-7637.

Reported by: Philip Nash




Today in Great Lakes History - July 8

LOUIS R. DESMARAIS was launched July 8,1977.

In 1918 a slip joint on the main steam line of the Ann Arbor #5 let go, killing four men and badly scalding one other. The dead were: Lon Boyd, W.T. Archie Gailbraith, 1st assistant engineer Arthur R. Gilbert, coal passer William Herbert Freeman, 2nd engineer.

In 1984 the Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Company (MWT) resumed service to Milwaukee with disappointing results.

On 8 July 1908, JAMES G. BLAINE (formerly PENSAUKEE, wooden schooner-barge, 177'/555GT, built in 1867 at Little Sturgeon Bay, WI) was being towed in Lake Ontario by the tug WILLIAM G. PROCTOR. Her towline broke in a storm and she was driven ashore near Oswego, NY where the waves broke her up. No lives were lost. At the time of her loss, even though she was over 40 years old, she was still fully rigged as a 3-mast schooner.

On 8 July 1863, ALMIRA (2-mast wooden scow-schooner, 85', 80 t, built in 1849 at Black River, Ohio) was dismasted and capsized in a violent squall on Lake Ontario. All hands were lost. On 27 July, the cargo of barreled fish was found by the schooner M. L. COLLINS. The ALMIRA was found still afloat by the schooner PETREL on 30 July. She was rebuilt and sailed until December 1871 when she foundered in the ice.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Kobe Steel eyeing LTV taconite plant

07/07:
One of Japan's leading steelmakers is among the companies that have expressed an interest in LTV Steel Mining Company, a Minnesota taconite producer scheduled to close next year.

Kobe Steel has developed an experimental ironmaking process that could replace taconite pellet production. Representatives of the steelmaker earlier this week briefed the East Range Economic Response Team, a group of about two dozen government, industry and Steelworkers officials seeking to find a new user for the taconite mine and processing plant.

Kobe is looking for a site to begin a small-scale operation using its new ironmaking process. In the process, uncooked taconite pellets known as "green balls" would be turned into high-quality metalized ``shots'' of iron within a high temperature rotary furnace. The small, irregularly shaped shots would have a higher iron content than taconite plants, enabling them to be used in blast furnaces or the increasingly common electric arc furnaces.

Kobe is seeking a North American partner and an investment of $20 million to $40 million to prove the process on a scale of 50,000 to 200,000 tons annually. If that proves successful, the process could be used on a larger, commercial scale.

Several other companies have expressed interest in the LTV operation, which is scheduled to close in 2001 and put 1,400 people out of work. LTV ships pellets from Taconite Harbor. Throughout the discussion of potential new uses for LTV, no one has mentioned the fate of Taconite Harbor or whether the various types of "value added" products such as pig iron could or would be shipped by boat.

Reported by: Al Miller




Saginaw Update

07/07:
On Thursday the Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder arrived at Saginaw Rock Products at 10:30 a.m. The vessel cleared the dock late in the afternoon and was outbound from the turning basin at 5:00 p.m.

On her transit out the river about 30 minutes later, the Pathfinder passed the steamer Saginaw, which was discharging cargo at the Buena Vista Dock just south of the I-75 bridge. A few minutes later, the vessel passed the barge Pere Marquette 41 and tug Undaunted, which were docked at the Sargent Terminal on the opposite side of the river just north of the bridge.

From the distance, it appeared that the Pere Marquette 41 was using her clamshells to unload large rocks into trucks parked at the dock.

Reported by: Stephen Hause and Lon Morgan




G-Tugs Assist Steamer Halifax into Conneaut

07/07:
The Great Lakes Towing Company tugs Ohio and Iowa assisted the Canada Steamship Lines steamer Halifax into Conneaut, Ohio, early this morning. The Halifax had experienced a difficulty with its propulsion system and required a assistance into Conneaut. The tugs Ohio and Iowa responded quickly to assist the vessel safely into the Coal Dock.




Buckeye loads in Escanaba

07/07:
Oglebay Norton's Buckeye made a rare trip to Escanaba on July 6 and loaded taconite for Indiana Harbor. It might have been her first Escanaba visit since the late 1980's when she sailed as the Sparrows Point.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Unusual Route

07/07:
The tug Evans McKeil and the barge Salty dog were westbound on the Seaway Monday. They departed from the main channel at Quebec Head at the eastern end of Wolfe Island and proceeded up the Canadian Middle Channel. This is the first commercial vessel to use this channel this year. The tug and barge were carrying asphalt to Millhaven, Ont.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Today in Great Lakes History - July 7

The BURNS HARBOR's sea trials were conducted on July 7, 1980.

JEAN PARISIEN was launched July 7, 1977.

The DAVID Z. NORTON sailed on her maiden voyage July 7, 1973 as the WILLIAM R. ROESCH. She sailed light from Lorain to Superior, WI where she loaded 18,828 tons of iron ore on July 9th bound for Jones & Laughlin's Cuyahoga River plant at Cleveland.

In 1971 the City of Saginaw 31 went to Manitowoc for a thorough overhaul. While there, a fire broke out July 29 destroying her cabin deck and rendering her useless for further use. The blaze was caused by an acetylene torch, and caused over $1 million in damage.

On 7 July 1895, IDA MAY BROWN (wooden schooner, 53'/20GT, built 1884 at Charlevoix, MI) was carrying gravel when her cargo shifted in heavy weather. She capsized and later drifted to the beach near Michigan City, IN. Her crew was rescued by the U.S. Lifesavers.

On 7 July 1851, GALLINIPPER (wooden schooner, 95', 145 t, built in 1846 at Milwaukee on the hull of NANCY DOUSMAN) capsized and foundered in a white squall in Lake Michigan. The wreck drifted to a point about 10 miles SSE of Manitowoc where it sank.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Presque Isle Corp. Purchased by Lafarge

07/06:
Lafarge Corporation has acquired all of the outstanding stock of Presque Isle Corporation, which operates one of the largest stone quarries in the United States. The purchase price was approximately $56 million.

Presque Isle Corp. is a private company owned by LTV Steel, National Steel and Bethlehem Steel. As part of the purchase agreement, LTV and Bethlehem have signed an agreement to continue purchasing their supply of metallurgical stone from the Presque Isle quarry.

The quarry in Presque Isle, Michigan, located approximately 20 miles north of Alpena on the shore of Lake Huron, produces more than 7.5 million tons of aggregates annually. The quarry's estimated 450 million tons of reserves equate to a life of more than 50 years at current production levels. The quarry delivers aggregate products to customers through a network of docks on the Great Lakes.

"This acquisition will complement Lafarge's existing water-based aggregate production facilities on Manitoulin Island, Ontario and Marblehead, Ohio, and let Lafarge take advantage of synergies on the Great Lakes", said John M. Piecuch, Lafarge Corporation President and CEO.

Following the passage of the TEA-21 (Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century), Presque Isle's main markets in Ohio, Illinois and Michigan are projected to grow at a rate of 3-5 percent annually. TEA-21 is expected to increase combined federal highway aid in those states by more than $750 million.

With 15 cement plants, 700 construction materials operations, 4 gypsum wallboard manufacturing facilities in the U.S. and Canada, Lafarge Corporation is North America's largest diversified supplier of construction materials.




Cuyahoga in Sarnia

07/06:
On Wednesday the Cuyahoga was docked in the north slip in Sarnia with her four propeller blades removed and sitting on the dock. Repair crews were working on the hub.

Reported by: George Lee




Lorain Update

07/06:
It was a dull weekend for boatwatchers at Lorain, Ohio. No boat traffic was noted from Saturday evening until Tuesday afternoon. Early on the 4th the Mesabi Miner arrived to unload at the Lorain Pellet Terminal. The Miner stayed until after the fireworks display ended at 10:00 p.m. As dozens of small boats blew horns in appreciation of the great fireworks display, the Miner piped in with her opinion--then quickly departed.

Reported by: Chris Wilson




Toronto Update

07/06:
June 30 the HMCS Toronto and HMS Tecumseh arrived for Canada Day celebrations.

The barge S.A. Queen was under tow of the water taxis Robert L. astern and Brenda C. They took the barge to Harbour Square Park where the tug Atomic took over. S.A. Queen carried a giant video screen brought in from San Francisco for the Canada Day festivities. Salties Ira and Capitan Vodenko were at the container dock. Canadian Progress came in to unload and Hamilton Energy was in shortly afterwards.

On July 1 Canada Day got off with a bang as a flotilla of small Tall Ships departed the harbor firing salutes to HMCS Toronto. The five ship fleet sporting yankee flags, invaded Sunnyside Beach in Humber Bay, where Canadian militiamen in 1812 costume returned fire. The fleet was led by Royalist, followed by Solstice Moon, HMS Tecumseh, True North of Toronto, and Empire Sandy. Tecumseh had to drop out of the first firing run due to engine problems. The fleet invaded Kew Beach in the afternoon, the whole event being broadcast in the harbor on the giant video screen aboard S.A. Queen.

The annual Parade of Lights, a charity fundraiser, took place Saturday night with a large number of ships dressing up for the occasion. Overall winner for best decorated ship was Nautical Adventure's River Gambler.

A small boat, with seven passengers aboard, sank in the Western Gap enroute to see the fireworks at the Benson & Hedges "Symphony of Fire" in Humber Bay. The Gap was temporarily closed to navigation.

On July 2 the barge S.A. Queen was taken to Pier 52 by the tug Tracey M. so that the giant video screen could be unloaded. Dimitrius Y came in to Pier 52 to unload during the day. HMCS Toronto was out for day tours.

On July 3 the Dimitrius Y. departed for Hamilton.

Tuesday the Ira departed harbor with assistance from the McKeil tugs Atomic and Robert B. No. 1. The HMCS Toronto was still in port.

On Wednesday the HMS Tecumseh was scheduled for drydocking. She was aground in the St. Clair River last week. She is expected to be on the drydock for a week.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Lake Levels

07/06:
During June, precipitation was above average on lakes Superior, Erie, and Ontario. Precipitation was below average for lake Michigan and Huron. For the last 12 months, precipitation was below average on Lake Erie and above average on the remaining lakes. The net supply of water was above average to all of the Great Lakes Basins for June.

In comparison with their long-term (1918-1999) averages, June monthly mean levels are listed below.
Lake Superior -9"
Michigan - Huron -19"
St. Clair -9"
Erie -6"
Lake Ontario was 9 inches above average.

Visit www.lre.usace.army.mil for more information.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 6

The CACOUNA's bow was damaged in a collision with the Greek tanker CAPTAIN JOHN on the fog-shrouded St. Lawrence River July 6, 1971. The CACOUNA was repaired by replacing her bow with that of her near sistership the SILLERY which was being scrapped.

ASHCROFT was used to haul ore, grain and coal only on the upper Great Lakes until July 6, 1932 when she was able to enter Lake Ontario through the newly expanded Welland Canal. On that trip ASHCROFT, loaded with grain from Fort William, Ont. for Kingston, Ont., was the largest vessel to traverse the canal to date.

The keel was laid for the GOVERNOR MILLER in 1937.

The COLUMBIA STAR set a record for the Head-Of-The-Lakes coal trade. The vessel loaded 70,903 net tons of low-sulfur coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wisconsin, on July 6, 1997.

On 6 July 1836, YOUNG LION (2-mast, wooden schooner, 73"/83T, built in 1830 at buffalo, NY) was carrying railroad iron and lumber. About 12 miles from Erie, PA, in rough weather, her seams opened and she quickly sank with just her topmasts left above the water. 3 died, but 5 managed to clamber up the masts and hold on until the schooner NEW YORK rescued them.

On 6 July 1871, CASTALIA (2-mast wooden schooner, 119', 242 gt, built in 1847 as a brig at Sandusky, Ohio) was on her way to pick up lumber at the camp at Byuing Inlet, Georgian Bay, when she came too close to Cove Island Reef and stranded in 3' of water. Although not badly damaged, she was about a mile from deep water. Tugs could not get to her and she was sailing light, so there was no cargo to lighten. She was stripped and abandoned. She finally broke up in a storm on 12 July 1871.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Mapleglen in Chicago

07/05:
The Mapleglen was unloading at the Acme Steel dock in South Chicago on Tuesday. This is her first trip into South Chicago in recent memory.

Reported by: Gary R. Clark




Seaway Update

07/05:
The first vessel to have been renamed in a Seaway/Great Lakes port this year was the Dutch flag LINDENGRACHT at Valleyfield following her sale to Canadian-flag interests. On or about June 28, she was renamed UMIAVUT and hoisted the Canadian flag, her new port of registry being Montreal. She is loading for the Arctic. LINDENGRACHT had entered the Seaway on June 22 bound for Cleveland with general cargo. She is partly owned by a company operating

AIVIK and is not replacing LUCIEN PAQUIN as originally reported. LUCIEN PAQUIN will in fact also go to Valleyfield in a few days to load for the Arctic.

On June 29, entering the Seaway for the first time under a foreign-flag (Barbados) was ANNA DESGAGNÉS. Her destination was Côte Ste.Catherine where she is loading supplies for the Arctic and where she will be reflagged Canadian . Her first trip up the Seaway occurred last year. She was Canadian-flag at that time.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




The Nina Arrives

07/05:
Now through Sunday the replica of Columbus' ship Nina is docked at Metro Beach Metro Park in Harrison Township, Michigan. The vessel is open for tours and will continue to tour Great Lakes ports.
Mount Clemens, MI June 29- July 5
Port Huron, MI July 7-9
Vermilion, Ohio July 12 - July 17
Bay City, MI July 20 - 26
Cheboygan, MI July 28 - 30

Visit the Nina's web site at www.thenina.com

Reported by: Andrew Severson




The Winner Is

07/05:
The winner of the cruise on the Lee A. Tregurtha was Bill Vallier of Harrison Township, MI.

On July 4th, the vacationing captain of the Lee A., Capt. Jim Nuzzo, drew the winning ticket. Detroit Lodge #7 would like to thank everyone for supporting the raffle.

Bill and three friends will be cruising the Great Lakes aboard the Lee. A. Tregurtha this August.

Captain Nuzzo (left) and winner Bill Vallier posing for a picture after the drawing.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 5

PAUL H. CARNAHAN was launched in 1945 as a) HONEY HILL, a T2-SE-Al World War II Fuel Tanker, for U.S. Maritime Commission.

July 5, 1991 - Charles Conrad announced he had formed a corporation to purchase he Ludington carferry operation from Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Company.

JUSTIN R. WHITING was launched on 5 July 1874 at Langell's yard at the mouth of the Pine River in St. Clair, Michigan. Her dimensions were 144' x 26'2" x 11'6". Although built to be a self-powered steam barge, she was towed as a regular barge during her first season of operation.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Great Lakes Trader Update

07/04:
The Great Lakes Trader passed downbound at the Soo Locks Monday at 7:00 a.m. with her first cargo from Marquette. She passed Detroit downbound on Tuesday morning. The Trader was the subject of an extensive article in the Marine Beat column of the Soo Evening News on Sunday.

The Great Lakes Trader is scheduled to load at Stoneport on Lake Huron July 6 at 4:00 p.m.

The Great Lakes Trader at dock in Marquette. by Tom Piaget

Reported by: Roger LeLievre and Pam Bensman




Independent in Buffalo

07/04:
The Kinsman Independent arrived in Buffalo early Monday morning. She unloaded part of her cargo at the Lake and Rail dock and then shifted to General Mills by evening. She is expected to go into short term lay-up with a partial storage cargo aboard. This cargo will be unloaded within the next few weeks.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Marinette/Menominee Update

07/04:
On Monday the saltwater vessel IVI arrived to unload Pig Iron at Marinette Fuel and Dock. It was assisted in docking by the tug Jimmy L and Carla Anne Selvick.

On July 1 the pulp boat Marinette made its first trip of the year to Menominee to load pulp at Great Lakes Pulp and Fiber. On Saturday the Marinette and the Munksund were in port together. Marinette was assisted by Jimmy L and Carla Anne Selvick. As of Monday morning the Marinette is still loading and the dredging barges and tug are tied up behind it for the holiday weekend.

The Marinette/Menominee Harbor has taken a busy turn the last week or two.

Reported by: Scott Best




Light Removed

07/04:
Marquette maritime museum officials along with the crew of the USCG Sundew removed the 2 ton light and pedestal from the Stannard Rock lighthouse, some 40 miles out into Lake Superior, and replaced it with a modern light. The original light and pedestal were then transported to Marquette where it will be restored and placed in the Maritime Museum on display later this summer.

The USCG Sundew remains in Marquette's lower harbor through Wednesday morning to participate in the 4th festivities.

Reported by: Art Pickering




New Cutter Visits Soo

07/04:
The latest US Coast Guard 175 ft Keeper Class cutter, George Cobb (WLM 564), visited Sault Ste. Marie Monday afternoon as part of her shakedown cruise. After a trip into Whitefish Bay, the Cobb will be open to the public Tuesday afternoon. She was built at Marinette, Wisc., and will eventually be stationed at San Pedro, Calif., in the 11th Coast Guard District.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre and Dave Wobser




Algoway Departs Midland

07/04:
The Algoway arrived in Midland on Saturday July 1. After unloading her cargo of silica stone from Badgeley Island, she departed Midland on Monday July 3. As she rounded Giant's Tomb Island, she encountered thick fog. Her fog horn could be heard as she headed north towards Hope Island.

Reported by: Rudy Smith




Wolverine Visits Saginaw

07/04:
The Wolverine departed the Wirt Stone Dock in Saginaw at 7:00 p.m. Monday and proceeded up to the turning basin. The vessel expressed some concern over a disabled pleasure boat which was adrift in the river ahead of her and was in radio contact with the occupants of the boat. After the Wolverine's report another pleasure craft was able to tow the disabled boat out of the way before the Wolverine reached its position.

Reported by: Stephen Hause




Mackinaw Funding Clears Senate

07/04:
The U.S. Senate has approved $110 million in funding to replace the Coast Guard cutter Mackinaw. The legislation, part of the Military Construction Appropriations Bill, passed the Senate last Friday, according the an article in the Soo Evening News Sunday, The new cutter would take over the Mackinaw's icebreaking role and be used for search and rescue operations on the Great Lakes.

Meanwhile, the Mackinaw was busy Sunday night in the lower St. Marys River just north of DeTour searching for the source of a red distress flare, which may or may not have been part of a someone's July 4th merrymaking.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




Today in Great Lakes History - July 4

The WILLIS B. BOYER museum ship was opened to the public in 1987.

In 1976 the SAM LAUD grounded entering Buffalo, NY. She was dry docked at Lorain, OH for repairs to bottom plates of No. 1, 2 and 3 port and starboard tanks.

Also on this day in 1976, the H. Lee White struck the Algoma Steel plant dock at the Canadian Soo resulting in damages to her stern amounting to $108,000 at the repair yard of Sturgeon Bay.

The JOSEPH S. YOUNG (1) was commissioned July 4, 1957. She was the first of seven T2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service.

On July 4, 1953, the John G. Munson set a Great Lakes record for limestone by loading 21,011 tons of limestone at Calcite, Michigan. This record for limestone stood until being broken by the Canada Steamship Lines self-unloader Manitoulin late in the 1966 season.

July 4, 1952 - The Pere Marquette 18 (II) was laid up due to railroad strike. She was never to operate again.

The wooden propeller freighter MAINE, owned by Northern Transportation Co., had sailed from Chicago and was on Lake Ontario on 4 July 1871, when Fireman Orsebius Kelley stoked the fire at 8:00 PM and went to the porter's room to get a lamp. When he returned, the boiler exploded with such force that Kelley was mortally wounded and died later. The blast also killed Engineer M. H. Downer, deckhand Joshua Kelley (the fireman's brother), Halbert Butterfield (a 13 year old passenger) and his mother. The MAINE still floated after the blast. She was repaired and put back in service. Including this boiler explosion, she had four major mishaps in her career. She sank in 1872, burned in 1898, and finally burned again in 1911.

One hundred years ago, on 4 July 1900 during her maiden voyage from St. Clair, Michigan to Cleveland, Ohio, the wooden steam barge ALFRED MITCHELL ran aground at Bar Point Light. It was claimed that the steering gear broke which rendered the boat unmanageable. Later that same day the MITCHELL was released by the wrecker SAGINAW.

Data from: Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Great Lakes Trader Arrives in Marquette

07/03:
The barge Great Lakes Trader and tug Joyce L. VanEnkevort made their first trip on Lake Superior and into Marquette, MI. on Sunday. She loaded for an unknown port and departed around 7:00 p.m.

On the other side of the ore dock was an unusual visitor, the Paul R. Tregurtha was unloading western coal from Superior, WI. The trip was a break from her normal St. Clair destination.

The Great Lakes Trader at dock in Marquette. by Tom Piaget

Reported by: Tom Piaget and Rod Burdick




Algowood Update

07/03:
The Algowood is expected to be towed from Bruce Mines, Ontario some time between July 5 and July 7. She will be moved to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs.

On June 1 the vessel encountered structural problems while loading. Early estimated show that repairs will cost in excess of five million dollars.

It is anticipated that the repair will be completed in the fall and the ship will be back in service. The cause of the damage is still under investigation.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Marinette Due in Menominee

07/03:
The pulp boat Marinette is due in Menominee to load pulp for Europe. She will be the fourth pulp boat of the season All three of the Great Lakes European Shipping AS boats will have visited Menominee at least once this season when it arrives.

Reported by: Scott Best




Algoway in Midland

07/03:
The Algoway made another visit to Midland Ont., arriving in Midland on July 1. She proceeded to unload silica sand from the Badgeley Island quarry at the Unimin dock. Due to the low water, she does not lie alongside the wharf. Instead, she lies 15 to 20 feet away from the dock and extends her self-unloading boom over the stone pile on the dock.

Reported by: Rudy Smith




Update Delays

07/03:
Due to a server problem the regular updates will be delayed until later this morning. Sorry for any inconvenience.




The Winner Is

07/03:
The latest winner in the weekly drawing was Mark Mattson of Woodhaven, MI. Mark took the final prize, a copy of the new Soo Locks Visitor's Guide.

The weekly prize drawing may continue in the future as prizes become available.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 3

The JOHN B. AIRD was christened June 3, 1983 at Thunder Bay for Algoma Central Marine, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

The ROGER BLOUGH was moved out of the dry dock on June 3, 1972.

In 1954 the CLIFFS VICTORY successfully completing her sea trials.

The FRANK ARMSTRONG departed light from Ashtabula, OH on her maiden voyage in command of Captain H. Chesley Inches June 3, 1943 bound for Superior, WI to load iron ore.

The PATERSON (1) entered service on June 3, 1954 with 440,000 bushels of wheat from Port Arthur.

On 3 July 1872, the wooden steam barge MARY MILLS was launched at P. Lester's yard at Marysville, Michigan.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Update Delays

07/02:
Due to a server problem the News Page updates were delayed. Sorry for any inconvenience.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 02

On July 2, 1966, the Simcoe (later Algostream) entered service. Another Canadian straight decker retired before its time.

The railroad carferry TRANSIT was launched at Walkerville, Ontario on 2 July 1872 at the Jenkins Brothers shipyard.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Great Lakes Trader makes Maiden Voyage

07/01:
The new barge Great Lakes Trader and tug Joyce L. VanEnkevort made their maiden voyage up the St. Marys River, passing 6 Mile Point at 6:00 p.m. She was traveling upbound light (unloaded) for Marquette.

The Great Lakes Trader waiting below the Poe Lock. from the Soo Locks Live cam

Reported by: Roger LeLievre, Rod Burdick and David French




Columbia Star on the Today Show

07/01:
Oglebay Norton's 1000-foot Columbia Star will be featured along with Capt. Al Gintz and Glen Nekvasil of the Lake Carriers' Association on the Today Show to be shown on Monday, July 3 between 7:00 - 8:00 AM. The subject is water levels and the impact on commerce and recreation.




Armco in Escanaba

07/01:
On Thursday the Armco caught local boatwatchers in Escanaba by suprise as she arrived to load.

Loading at sunset.

Report and picture by: Eric and Sandy Chapman




Grounding of Alcor

07/01:
The Journal de Quebec reported yesterday that the preliminary report issued by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) in the grounding of the Maltese bulk-carrier Alcor in the early morning of November 9th 1999 in the St. Lawrence River off the eastern tip of Ile d'Orleans must exclude mechanical failure of the steering gear as possible cause of the grounding. At the time, the Ukrainian crew had reported steering gear problems.

TSB investigator Paul Drouin reported to the newspaper that the main parts of the steering apparatus was removed from the vessel and were extensively tested in Quebec City and all was found to be in good working order. "We must now look at other causes" Drouin told the paper "not only human error but also environment factors such as the narrow channel (300 meters and 12 meters depth at low tide), strong currents and wind." The final report is expected later this year.

The Groupe Desgagne finally refloated the Alcor on Dec 5/99 after part of the cargo of clinker had been removed. The ship was then towed to Quebec City. Later, it was reported that Groupe Desgagne purchased the Alcor from its Greek owners and the ship remains tied-up in the St. Charles River (Quebec Harbor). Its fate is unknown.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




Buffington Harbor Renovations

07/01:
The Gary Post-Tribune reports that city officials plan to finalizing negotiations with the Elgin Joliet & Eastern Railway Co. to take over property east of Buffington Harbor's casino boats. Majestic Star Casino owner Don Barden is ready to move forward with a multimillion-dollar lakefront plan, spurred by the council's appropriation of $5 million to demolish the neighboring Lehigh-Portland Cement Co., provided the railway abandons tracks there.

Reported by: Heidi Viar




First Annual Gathering

07/01:
The First Annual Gathering of the Boatnerds was held Friday at the Soo Locks. Under warm and sunny skies the participants were treated to a parade of boats that lasted until after dark. The high light of the day was a "Freighter Chasing Cruise" through the locks and down the St. Marys River. 141 people enjoyed the trip aboard Lock Tours Canada's Chief Shingwauk (Official Soo Locks Tour Boat of the Boatnerd Web Site). Passengers enjoyed dinner and meeting the other viewers of this web site as Captain John Chomniak and his crew took the tour boat close to passing vessels. Some of the passing vessels included the Stewart J. Cort, Kinsman Independent, Canadian Navigator and Presque Isle.

Considered a success by all, the Boatnerd Gathering at the Soo will be an annual event.

Some of the participants gathered at the Locks for a group picture Photo by Max Hanley
The Burns Harbor departing the Poe Lock




Update Delays

07/01:
I was moved to a motel room that does not have a phone line, Saturday updates were delayed by a few hours.

Updates are made possible by use of a phone line at Marine Publishing's Soo office, my thanks to editor Roger LeLievre. Visit Marine Publishing's home page at www.knowyourships.com




Today in Great Lakes History - July 01

On July 1, 1940, the Harry Coulby (now Kinsman Enterprise) became the first Great Lakes vessel to load in excess of 16,000 tons of iron ore when it loaded 16,067 tons of iron ore in Ashland, Wisconsin.

On 1 July 1927, ROBERT C. WENTE (wooden, propeller, bulk freighter, 141'/336 GT, built in 1888 at Gibralter, MI) burned to a total loss in the St. Clair River. In 1911, she sank in Lake Michigan, but was raised and refurbished.

July, 1983 - The C&O sold it's remaining 3 carferries to Glen Bowden and George Towns. They begin operating cross-lake service between Ludington and Kewaunee under the name Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Co. (MWT)

On 1 July 1852, CASPIAN (wooden side-wheeler, 252', 921 t, built in 1851 at Newport, Michigan) foundered a short distance off Cleveland's piers. Some of her gear and structural material were salvaged in the Spring of 1853 and the wreck was then flattened with dynamite.

One hundred years ago, 1 July 1900, the new wooden steam barge ALFRED MITCHELL started her maiden voyage from St. Clair, Michigan for Cleveland, Ohio to load coal. She was owned by Langell & Sons.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




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