Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

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* Report News


Reserve Ends Dry Spell at Escanaba

07/31
Escanaba has had very little vessel traffic this season, but Oglebay Norton's Reserve made an appearance on July 30. The vessel arrived and unloaded coal at the South Reiss Dock.

Picture by Eric & Sandy Chapman
Reserve heading for Reiss Coal Dock 1 this afternoon.

Reported by: Eric & Sandy Chapman and Rod Burdick




American Canadian Caribbean Line to call in Duluth in 2003

07/31
American Canadian Caribbean Line Inc. says it will add Duluth to its cruise itinerary in 2003.

The 183-foot Grande Mariner is scheduled to call in Duluth four times next August. The vessel will end two trips and begin two trips in Duluth. Charlevoix will serve as the other end of the eight-night cruises. Prices will range from $1,840 to $2,185 per person, depending on cabin class.

Maria Digati, the cruise line's marketing director, said her company has seen mounting interest in cruising U.S. waters, particularly the Great Lakes.

"In view of recent world challenges, many people seem to be more interested than ever in exploring America these days," she told the Duluth News Tribune.

American Canadian Caribbean Line is a familiar sight on the lower lakes, but next year's cruises will mark its first venture into Lake Superior.

Duluth port and tourism officials are pleased that Duluth will be the starting and ending point of cruises because it means extra exposure and more visitors using hotels and restaurants.

This was expected to be Duluth's big year in the cruising industry, with ships making several calls at the port. But the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 put an end to that when American Classic Voyages declared bankruptcy, canceling cruises by its vessel Cape May Light.

This year only the Columbus, a regular visitor the past several seasons, is scheduled to call, arriving Oct. 2. Next year, however, that trade may end. A Duluth port official said the vessel may spend next season in the Baltic instead of the Great Lakes. But officials remain hopeful the Columbus will return to the lakes in 2004.

Reported by: Al Miller




Stelco, union reach tentative contract

07/31
Stelco Inc. says its Hilton Works division in Hamilton, Ontario, has reached a tentative contract settlement with a 4,000-member local of the United Steelworkers of America.

Details of a four-year pact -- which includes higher pensions -- were reviewed by employees Sunday. A ratification vote is scheduled for July 31 -- one day before the current contract expires.

Under terms of the settlement, the pension for a 30-year employee taking early retirement would increase by 44 per cent, the union said in a news release.

"I am pleased to recommend this agreement to our members, who have shown their support for the bargaining committee throughout this difficult set of negotiations," said Warren Smith, president of Local 1005.

Last Monday, a company proposal was circulated in the plant, but it would have left Hilton Works employees well behind employees at the company's plant at Nanticoke, Ont., on Lake Erie.

The company offer would have given a Hilton Works employee a pension of less than $24,000 a year after 30 years' service. The same years of toil at Nanticoke would earn a pension of more than $29,000.

"Our members' strong negative reaction to that document paved the way for the key achievement of these negotiations," Smith said.

Wages at Hilton Works range between $20.56 and $25.88 an hour, depending on job classification. Union members had voted 93 per cent in favor of a strike to back their goals.

Stelco is Canada's biggest steelmaker, active in six provinces and two U.S. states and with annual sales of $2.6 billion.

Reported by: Jordan Grabowski




Twin Ports Report

07/31
J.A.W. Iglehart paid a rare call to the Twin Ports on Tuesday when it tied up alongside the Ford to discharge cement at the Lafarge terminal in Superior. The Iglehart once was a common sight in the Twin Ports but it was pretty much replaced by the Alpena. Still, the Iglehart usually manages to make a couple trips a season to Superior and Duluth.

CSL Niagara was under the chutes at the DMIR ore dock on Tuesday morning. Nanticoke anchored out on the lake to wait for a loading berth at the ore dock. Also anchored out was Canadian Prospector, which was waiting for a berth at Cenex Harvest States elevator. Presque Isle -- which usually loads in Two Harbors -- is scheduled to call at the DMIR dock on Aug. 1.

Elsewhere around the ports on Tuesday, the saltie Virginiaborg was unloading salt at the CLM dock in Superior. The work was being performed by the dock's bridge crane, the last such operating crane in the Twin Ports. Fleet mate Vancouverborg was at the General Mills elevator in Superior to load beet pulp pellets. According to an article in a recent edition of the Duluth Seaway Port Authority's magazine, beet pulp pellets are sticky and best handled in lots of about 5,000 or 6,000 tons, making the "borg" vessels ideal carriers for this cargo.

Pictures by Kent Rengo
Virginaborg unloading her cargo of salt at the Cutler Magner dock in Superior. Note the full hopper of salt underneath the clam shell bucket. They were having a hard time getting enough semi trucks lined up to haul the salt to Duluth.
J.A.W. Iglehart docked at the J.B. Ford at the Lafarge dock in Superior.
Stern view.
Close up of the Iglehart's name, you can see part of her original name (P Amoco) underneath the letters J.A.W.
CSL Niagara loading taconite pellets at DM&IR's dock #6.
American Mariner tied up at Hallett Dock #5.

Reported by: Al Miller




Saginaw News

07/31
The Agawa Canyon was inbound the Saginaw River Tuesday night passing the Front Range around 7 p.m. She reported that she was upbound for the Valley Asphalt Dock.

On Monday, the Tug Rebecca Lynn and her asphalt barge arrived in the morning at the Bit-Mat Dock to unload. She was outbound very late Monday night.

Pictures by: Todd Shorkey
Agawa Canyon upbound clear of Independence Bridge.
Bow shot.
Stern view.
Mississagi downbound approaching the Essroc Dock.
Stern view.
Tug Rebecca Lynn and barge at the Bit-Mat offload.
Mississagi passing the Rebecca Lynn .

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Detroit Traffic

07/31
On Tuesday morning the Canadian Navigator was assisted to the Osborne Dock in the Rouge River by the Gaelic Tugs Patricia & Carolyn Hoey. When the ship arrived at the dock the Wilfred Sykes squeezed passed outbound for the Detroit River after unloading at Rouge Steel. The tugs had to move out of the way to allow the Sykes enough room to pass.
Patricia Hoey and the Canadian Navigator at the Osborne Dock.
Another view.
Bow view of Sykes.
Wilfred Sykes, Canadian Navigator & Patricia Hoey.
Sykes passing.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Lorain Report

07/31
The Middletown was departing Lorain, Oh. Tuesday after unloading at the Pellet Terminal. The American Republic came in and spun around in the harbor and backed in to the Pellet Terminal to load for Cleveland. The highly maneuverable Republic was built for the Lorain to Cleveland taconite shuttle.

Pictures by TZ
Middletown passing the lighthouse.
American Republic turning.
Another view.
Close up.
Turning on a dime.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Buffalo Update

07/31
Arthur M. Anderson arrived Tuesday afternoon with a load of stone. She was unloading in the Gateway terminal in Lackawanna, NY. The Gateway Terminal is the site of the old Bethlehem Steel plant.

Reported by: Tom Miller and Brian Wroblewski




Hamilton News

07/31
The Jean Parisien remained at anchor Tuesday morning in Hamilton Harbor. Later that afternoon, the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin joined the Parisien at Stelco's coal dock to do a coal mix for the manufacturer.

Over at Dofasco, the Montrealais was unloading iron ore pellets. The James Norris remains moored at Pier 11.

Tuesday morning the CSL Tadoussac locked down through the Welland and later that afternoon was seen from the Burlington Ship Canal, approaching Hamilton. Also approaching Hamilton from Toronto was the Hamilton Energy.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Toronto Harbor

07/31
The salty Kapitan Michealis began unloading Tuesday at Pier 51. Hamilton Energy came in and bunkered her, then departed a few hours later for Hamilton.

Federal Saguenay finished unloading at Pier 35 and departed.

The tall ship Empire Sandy departed for Port Weller Tuesday afternoon. She will be chartering out of Port Weller for the next two days and she will head up the Welland Canal on Friday for Port Colborne to participate in the Canal Days festivities.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Captain Guido Gulder

07/31
Captain Guido Gulder, a longtime shipmaster for the Pittsburgh Steamship Company, died July 23 in Duluth at age 94. Captain Gulder started sailing as a deckhand and rose to the rank of master before retiring in 1973. Among his favorite vessels was the steamer James A. Farrell. He was a member of the International Shipmasters Association and the Duluth-Superior Harbor Club.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 31

Sea trials took place for the JAMES R. BARKER this day in 1976. She was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flag ship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.). She was built at a cost of more than $43 million under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. She was the third thousand footer to sail on the Lakes and the first built entirely on the Lakes.

On July 31, 1974 as the Liberian vessel ARTADI approached the dock at Trois Rivières, Que. where she damaged the docked GORDON C. LEITCH's stern.

The CEDARBRANCH (2) was damaged and sunk by an explosion on July 31, 1965 several miles below Montreal, Que. resulting in a loss of one life.

On 31 July 1849, ACORN (wooden schooner, 84', 125 t, built in 1842 at Black River, Ohio) was struck amidships by the propeller TROY near West Sister Island in Lake Erie. She sank quickly, but no lives were lost since all hands made it to the TROY.

On 31 July 1850, AMERICA (wooden side-wheeler, 240', 1083 t, built in 1847 at Port Huron, MI) suffered a boiler or steam pipe explosion while sailing on Lake Erie. The explosion immediately killed nine persons and scalded others who died later. The vessel was repaired and sailed for three more seasons.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Coast Guard Festival Parade of Ships

07/30
Four U.S. Coast Guard vessels were expected to line up and cruise single-file into Grand Haven’s harbor yesterday.

The festival’s annual Parade of Ships began about 1 p.m. Ships on had this year were scheduled to be the ice breaker Mackinaw, based out of Cheboygan. It is scheduled for decommissioning in less than four years and replaced by the Mackinaw II.

Also scheduled to arrive are the cutters Sundew, a 180-foot buoy tender from Duluth, Minn.; Bristol Bay, a 140-foot tender based in Detroit; and Buckthorn, a 110-foot aids-to-navigation vessel based in Sault Ste. Marie.

The cutters will be made available for free public tours from Escanaba Park from the evening of July 29 through Sunday, Aug. 4. Ship tour times vary and are subject to change.

Click here for more details
Click here for a live cam

Reported by: Rob Kamberi




Brig Niagara Heading to Duluth

07/30
The U.S. Brig Niagara will sail under the Aerial Lift Bridge Thursday, August 1, and will call Duluth its "home port" until August 5. Public tours of the Niagara will be offered August 2-4.

Celebrating the tall ship arrival, Duluth's Port of Duluth Festival, August 3, (along Harbor Drive) will showcase live entertainment by Shangoya and Wild Ride, concessions, tall ship tours, and numerous maritime activities.

Brig Niagara at full sail.

Click here for more information




Rare Doubles at Marblehead

07/30
The Agawa Canyon was loading limestone at the Lafarge Marblehead gravel dock on Sunday. While the Canyon loaded the barge Pere Marquette 41 and tug Undaunted was tied up to the pier being loaded with limestone rip-rap using a front end loader and backhoes.

Reported by: Bob Smalling




Twin Ports Report

07/30
Monday in the Twin Ports was characterized by interesting boats in unusual places.

Roger Blough arrived at the DMIR ore docks about 7 a.m. to unload stone into the hopper. Oglebay Norton paid a rare call to the BNSF ore dock to load taconite pellets. Both vessels were tied up end-to-end at the Duluth port terminal for awhile as the Blough fueled and the Oglebay Norton waited for its loading berth to open up. Vancouverborg remained at the Duluth port terminal, where it had unloaded lumber.

In the grain trade, the saltie Peonia was loading at Cenex Harvest States grain elevator in Superior and barge Sarah Spencer was unloading grain at the General Mills elevator in Duluth.

Later in the day, CSL Niagara was due at the DMIR ore dock to load pellets and Canadian Transport was due at Midwest Energy Terminal.

Reported by: Al Miller




Marquette Update

07/30
The Lee A. Tregurtha loaded taconite on Monday at Marquette. The tentative schedule for the next few days is as follows: Tuesday, the C. Beeghly at 4 p.m. Wednesday the H. Lee White at 7 p.m. Thursday the Kaye E. Barker at 10 a.m. Friday the Tregurtha returns at 9 a.m. Saturday the Beeghly is scheduled to return about 6 p.m. with the Great Lakes Trader coming in at 7 p.m. All times and schedules subject to change.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Alpena Update

07/30
The Sam Laud arrived into port around noon on Monday to unload coal at Lafarge. The steamer Alpena also came into port at about 1:30 p.m. It loaded cement for St. Joseph. The Laud left at 5:30 p.m. followed by the Alpena.

The J.A.W Iglehart is in Superior, WI and the Jacklyn M barge Integrity is coming back from Milwaukee.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Toledo Update

07/30
The tug James A. Hannah with her barge was at the B-P Dock loading cargo Monday. The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge was at the Sun Dock loading cargo. The John G. Munson finished loading coal at the CSX Docks and departed Monday morning. There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

The Joseph H. Frantz and Saturn remain in lay-up. The tugs Mighty Jake, Mighty Jimmy, Prairieland, and Pioneerland with their related barges continue working on the Maumee River dredging project near the Willis B. Boyer museum ship and the I-280 Craig Bridge replacement project.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Catherine Desgagnes late Monday evening scheduled for a 7 a.m. start Tuesday morning, she will be followed by the American Republic and Algomarine on Thursday.

The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will now be the Courtney Burton on Thursday. The Buckeye on Friday, followed by the Reserve on Sunday. The Algosteel is due in at the Midwest Stone Docks located at the CSX Docks on Monday afternoon to unload stone.

Classic Toledo Shipping
American Steamship Company colors approaching the C&O Coal Docks where she will load a coal cargo.
William R. Roesch in Pringle Transit Company colors inbound Maumee Bay bound for the C&O Coal Docks to load a coal cargo.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Update

07/30
The Fred White was outbound Monday at 3 p.m. after unloading stone at Ontario. The H. Lee White was unloading taconite at the Whiskey Island terminal. The Maumee is expected to load salt at Cargill today and transferring 2 loads to the Ontario dock. Workers at Cargill were on strike and no ships have loaded there in quite some time.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Busy Day in Buffalo

07/30
Monday the English River was unloading at the Lafarge cement silo on the Buffalo River . At 2 p.m. the Maumee was inbound and passed the Buffalo Industrial Diving crews working on the new berths for the Naval and Servicemen’s Park. It then squeezed by the Kinsman Independent in temporary lay-up at General Mills. The Captain of the Maumee made it look easy as he proceeded to the sand dock in the City Ship Canal to unload sand from Brevort, Mi.

Reported by: Tom Miller and Brian Wroblewski




Hamilton Report

07/30
Monday evening, the James Norris was moored to the west side of Pier 11 across from the Canamera plant. No activity was seen on board the vessel.

A small ocean freighter was moored on the north face of Pier 14, but with its low profile, the name of the vessel could not be seen.

Monday evening the CSL Laurentien was seen docking at Stelco's iron ore dock. Shortly after, the Hamilton Energy came to refuel the Laurentien.

Transiting the Burlington Ship Canal at 7 p.m. was the Jean Parisien. It entered Hamilton Harbor and went to anchored. She will wait for the Laurentien to finish unloading iron ore before her own cargo of iron ore can be unloaded.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Cleveland to celebrate Coast Guard birthday

07/30
The City of Cleveland and Nautica Entertainment complex will host the United States Coast Guard Band for a free public concert on Aug. 4 at 7 p.m.

The concert is being held in honor of the 212th anniversary of the Coast Guard’s founding as the Revenue Cutter Service in 1790. It will mark the first visit of the Coast Guard Band to Northeast Ohio in more than ten years.

The Coast Guard icebreaking cutter, Biscayne Bay will be giving free tours from the Nautica boardwalk. Local museums and public agencies that focus on the health and history of Lake Erie and the Cleveland area will be on hand to meet with visitors and provide hands-on activities for all ages. Cutter tours and agency booths will open at 2 p.m.

There is no fee for admission to the festival or concert, and no tickets required. The concert will be held in the newly renovated Nautica Pavilion. Parking will be $2.00 before 5 p.m. Pack a picnic basket and celebrate the Coast Guard’s birthday.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 30

July 30, 1996, a portion of a coal cargo aboard the H. M. Griffith caught on fire while the vessel was approaching Whitefish Point. The burning cargo was dumped into Lake Superior after the vessel's unloading boom was swung outward.

The "News Page" on this site was "Launched" in 1996 reporting a coal fire aboard the Griffith.

The GORDON C. LEITCH (1) was launched July 30, 1952 for the Upper Lakes & St. Lawrence Transportation Co. Ltd., Toronto, Ont.

The Ice Breaker ALEXANDER HENRY entered service July 30, 1959.

On 30 July 1871, the 162' bark HARVEY BISSELL was carrying lumber from Toledo to Tonawanda, NY. When she was on the western end of Lake Erie, she sprang a leak. Although the crew worked the hand powered pumps constantly, the water kept gaining at a rate of about a foot an hour. The tug KATE WILLIAMS took her in tow, intending to get her to Detroit to be repaired, but this proved impossible. So the BISSELL was towed close to Point Pelee and allowed to sink in 14 feet of water. The WILLIAMS then left for Detroit to get steam pumps and other salvage equipment. On returning, they pumped out the BISSELL, refloated and repaired her. She lasted until 1905.

On 30 July 1872, the Port Huron Dry Dock launched SANDY, a lighter. Her dimensions were 75' x 20' x 5'.

On 30 July 1873, George Hardison of Detroit announced the beginning of a new shipyard in Port Huron, Michigan. It would be located above the 7th Street Bridge on the Black River on land owned by J. P. Haynes, accessible by River Street. Within 30 days of this announcement, the new yard had orders for two canalers three-and-aft rig for delivery in the Spring of 1874. Their dimensions were to be 146' overall, 139' keel, 26' beam and 11'6" depth.

On 30 July 1866, CITY OF BUFFALO (wooden propeller, 340', 2026 t, built in 1857 at Buffalo as a side-wheeler) was unloading 72,000 bushels of wheat at the Sturgis Elevator at Buffalo, NY when arsonists set fire to the complex. The fire destroyed the wharf, the elevator, several businesses and the ship. The arsonists were caught. Incidentally, the CITY OF BUFFALO was converted from a passenger side-wheeler to a propeller freighter during the winter of 1863-64. After the conversion, she was dubbed "the slowest steam-craft on the Lakes".

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Lake Ontario wreck is old sidewheeler

07/29
A recently discovered shipwreck about 80 meters off Hamilton's Confederation Park appears to be that of a sidewheel steamer.

The wreck was spotted from the air last year and thought to be the remains of a schooner. After examining the wreck, however, experts say it appears to a pre-Confederation sidewheeler about 45 meters long.

"It's a wonderful find," Peter Engelbert, a marine archeologist with the Ministry of Culture, told the Toronto Star. "It's a real treat because it wasn't what they thought it would be."

Sidewheel steamers played an important role in Hamilton's marine economy in the mid-1800s. They ferried passengers and cargo to Toronto and across the lake to American ports.

Several sidewheelers sank near Hamilton during that time, including The Queen of the West, which burned in 1853, nearly destroying Hamilton's entire waterfront.

But Howlett thinks The Queen of the West, at more than 60 meters long, is not the mystery wreck. He's looking closely at a sidewheel steamer called The City of Hamilton, later renamed The City of the Bay, built in 1850. It disappeared in 1878.

Reported by: Al Miller




Goderich News

07/29
The John B. Aird arrived at the salt mine Thursday afternoon. She was scheduled to leave about 10 p.m. that night, bound for Ogdensberg, NY. Friday afternoon brought the Canadian Navigator into the mine and the Flinterdun to the grain elevators.

The small Flinterdun was gone the next morning, which is an unusually short stay for a saltie. The Algoway was spotted at the mine early Saturday morning, and departed into the haze over the lake at 3 p.m. that afternoon.

Reported by: Lisa Stuparyk




Detroit Traffic

07/29
Buffalo downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Tug Evans Mc Keil & Salty Dog 1 upbound at Grassy Island.
Tug Evans Mc Keil.
Stern view of tug.
Halifax upbound at Grassy Island bound for the Blue Circle Cement Dock in the Rouge River.
Stern view.
CSL Laurentien downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Happy crew members of the Diamond Jack. Left to right, Betty, Jerry, Brad & Dave.
Algoeast downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Norton in Erie

07/29
Erie's flurry of activity continued Sunday. The David Z. Norton arrived at Erie Sunday afternoon with stone from Stoneport. After unloading at the Old Ore Dock, the vessel departed at 7:35 p.m. This is the second visit to Erie by the Norton this year, which has accounted for all of the cargos hauled into Erie by Oglebay Norton in 2002, and is the third load Erie has received from Stoneport.

Norton Outbound.
Stern view.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Toronto Update

07/29
Canadian Mariner has been shifted by McKeil tugs again. Saturday the Mariner was moved to Pier 52 to accommodate Federal Saguenay, which is now unloading at Pier 35. Stephen B. Roman also came into port again Saturday.

The French tall ship Bel Espoir II remains in port. She departed Sunday for Port Colborne's Canal Days celebrations.

Work continues on the Port Authority's ferry Maple City, which is ashore under the Atlas crane.

The rebuilding of the former tug Glenmont continues at a snail's pace. The new bridge has been plated, but as yet, no windows have been cut.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Blount-Barker Shipbuilding Awarded Contract For M/V Essex Conversion

07/29
Warren, R.I. (July 17, 2002) - Blount-Barker Shipbuilding signed a contract on April 15th with Delaware River Port Authority (DRPA) to convert the M/V Essex to passenger only service. The 100' open deck passenger/auto ferry with single ended propulsion will be converted to increase the maximum capacity from 149 to 600. Modifications include a conversion to double ended propulsion, enclosing the main deck and providing a steel canopy to cover the upper deck. The vessel will be converted for inspection and certification as a small passenger vessel in accordance with the requirements of 49CFR Subchapter K.

The M/V Essex was originally built by Blount Marine Corporation in 1981 for the Lake Champlain Transportation Company. It operated as an auto/passenger ferry under USCG Subchapter T requirements for 20 successful years. The vessel, acquired by the DPRA in 2001 will be renamed the M/V Freedom and will service the Delaware River between Camden and Philadelphia.

The M/V Freedom will be powered by 2 Caterpillar 3406C DITA engines producing 322hp at 1,800 rpm. The diesel engines will be coupled to Twin Disc 3:1 ratio MG-514C gearboxes and drive two 4-bladed 44"x 30"p Kahlenberg propellers. Twin 55 kW Northern Lights generators will provide the vessel's electrical needs.

The M/V Essex was redesigned and engineered by Bristol Harbor Marine Design, a naval architecture and marine engineering company located in Bristol, Rhode Island. Reconstruction for the vessel began in mid-April with completion scheduled for October 2002.

Reported by: Blount Barker Shipbuilding




Museum looking for help

07/29
Gaelic Tugboat Company has completed construction of a 500 pound display base for a 1,500 pound paddle wheel hub from a mid 19th century Great Lakes steamer. The paddle wheel hub was found by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers some years ago and given to the Dossin Museum.

The museum has had it in storage until recently when John Polacsek from the museum and Bill Hoey discussed how the hub could be displayed at the museum. Mr. Polacsek and the museum volunteers will build the wooden paddle wheel on the hub in the museum to complete the display.

At this point, with the hub mounted on the base, the museum is in need of the donation of the use of a truck mounted hydraulic boom truck that could transport the 2,000 pound unit from Gaelic Tugboat yard to the Museum (about 10 miles) and unload it there. If you have such a truck in the Detroit area, or would like to donate the funds to rent one, (tax deductible) please call the Dossin Museum 313-852-4051 or Gaelic Tugboat Co.

Gaelic fleet engineer Jim Storen fitting mounting bolts to the unit.
Gaelic welder Gary Qualls working on the mounting plates.

Reported by: Bill Hoey




Today in Great Lakes History - July 29

The OTTERCLIFFE HALL cleared Lauzon July 29, 1969 on her maiden voyage as the last "straight deck" Great Lakes bulk freighter built with a pilot house forward.

While at the Manitowoc Ship Building Co. for general repairs and engine overhaul, the CITY OF SAGINAW caught fire on July 29, 1971 and destroyed her upper deck and forward section. Damages were estimated from $450,000 to $750,000 and were not repaired. The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 was sold to Marine Salvage Ltd., Port Colborne, Ont. for scrap.

On July 29, 1974 the W.W. HOLLOWAY grounded in Lake St. Clair off the Grosse Pointe Yacht Club running downbound with stone. Lightering into the J.F. SCHOELKOPF,JR. was necessary before she was freed by four tugs on July 31st.

ENDERS M. VOORHEES departed River Rouge on her maiden voyage July 29, 1942 bound for Duluth, MN to load iron ore. She was the second of five "Supers" for the Pittsburgh fleet to enter service.

July 29, 1974 - The "PERE MARQUETTE 21" was towed to Milwaukee on July 29, 1974 and reduced to a barge.

July 29, 1971 - A fire broke out on the City of Saginaw 31, destroying her cabin deck and rendering her useless for further use. The blaze was caused by an acetylene torch, and caused over $1 million in damage.

The steam barge MARY ROBERTSON burned near Mackinac on 29 July 1872. Her crew escaped to a schooner-barge they were towing.

The MATERIAL SERVICE foundered in a heavy summer gale in 1936 off the South Chicago lighthouse. She was a canal motor barge not designed for open-lake use.

The side-wheel river steamer DOMINION burned to the water's edge at her dock in the Thames River near Chatham, Ontario on 29 July 1875. She was built in 1867 at Wallaceburg, Ontario.

Data from: Jerry Pearson, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Bridge Delays Virginiaborg

07/28
Saturday morning the Ogden Street Bridge opened to allow a cruiser to make a westbound passage. As the bridge tender was closing the bridge, power was lost and the bridge was stuck half way closed.

At this time the saltie Virginiaborg was inbound for K&K Warehouse west dock. The Virginiaborg was just coming around the corner to line up for the bridge when the problem occurred.

The Virginiaborg first asked permission to come along side the Catherine Desgagnes which was unloading pig iron along the William H Donner, the Virginiaborg also considered docking behind the Donner but fears of shallow water kept them from docking.

The Virginiaborg proceeded to back up in the channel and hold in the channel until the bridge was repaired. After a two hour delay the bridge was operational and the Virginiaborg was able to pass through.

The Virginiaborg will begin unloading at 5 a.m. Sunday and should depart Sunday evening for Superior to unload its cargo of salt. The Catherine Desgagnes is expected to depart Sunday morning for Toledo, Ohio.

Stuck bridge that delayed Virginiaborg.
Virginiaborg waiting in the channel.
Virginiaborg passing Catherine Desgagnes and W.H. Donner.
Virginiaborg inbound for K&K dock with wood pulp.
Stern view heading up river.

Reported by: Scott Best




Twin Ports Tonnage

07/28
Taconite tonnage shipped through Duluth-Superior in the first six month of this year was up 3.7 percent from the same period a year ago, but coal and grain shipments are down, according to the Duluth Seaway Port Authority.

Overall, the ports have shipped 5.4 million tons of taconite this year compared to 5.1 million tons a year ago. One mining industry official attributed the increase to improving demand for steel.

Shipments of coal through Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior this was down 5.2 percent compared to last year. The decline was blamed largely to mild weather earlier this year.

The Twin Ports biggest hit came in grain shipments -- the ports' third-largest cargo. Tonnage this year was 709,619 metric tons, which was 21.2 percent below last year's pace. The decline was been reflected -- or caused -- by the noticeable decline in the number of salties in port this season.

The importance of coal as a cargo for the U.S.-flag lake fleet is evident in the schedule for Midwest Energy Terminal. Four 1,000-footers -- the Paul R. Tregurtha, James R. Barker, Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and Indiana Harbor -- are scheduled for dedicated service to the coal trade in August. Each vessel will be making more or less weekly trips from the terminal, and several other 1,000-footers will make one or more trips.

Click here for more information on the Duluth Seaway Port Authority

Reported by: Al Miller




Detroit Traffic

07/28
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Friday and Saturday.

American Mariner upbound at Grassy Island loaded with coal for Zug Island.
Stern view.
Barge A 390 & tug Maribeth Andrie downbound off Zug Island, turning into the Rouge River bound for Marathon.
Maribeth Andrie.
Stern view.
Tug W N Twolan upbound above Grassy Island towing two stray bundles of lumber back to the Motorcity Intermodal Dock.
Close up.
Dimitris Y (Malta) unloading at Nicholson's.
Arthur M Anderson upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
U.S. Corps of Engineers tug Demolen tied up at BASF in Wyandotte.
Stern view.
Lee A. Tregurtha heads for the Rouge River.
Stern view.
American Mariner waits to enter the Rouge River as the Lee A Tregurtha turns in.
American Mariner with the Maine & Wyoming.
Wilfred Sykes outbound the Rouge River at the Gaelic Tugboat Co. Dock Friday.
Stern view.
Crewboat David Allen tied up alongside the Patricia Hoey at the Gaelic Tug Dock. She is traveling from Port Maitland, ON to Sault Ste. Marie under command of Captain John P. Wellington.
Departing.
heading for the Detroit River.
On the Detroit River.
Oakglen at the ADM Dock in Windsor. She departed shortly after the picture was taken loaded with soya pellets bound for Three Rivers, QC.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Erie Update

07/28
After ten days without any cargo vessels in port, Erie had two visits on Saturday. The barge Pere Marquette 41 and tug Undaunted finished unloading her stone cargo at 10:00 a.m. Saturday morning. The pair departed by 10:45 a.m. and the Agawa Canyon entered port a short time later. The Canyon was inbound with stone from Thessalon, Ontario for the Mounfort Terminal. She turned around to the north of the outer buoys and backed in, an unusual maneuver for most boats since Presque Isle Bay has a large turning basin, but the bay was filled with a the large number of pleasure boaters. The Agawa Canyon was backed into the harbor and tied up at the Mounfort Terminal by 1:30 p.m.

The stone cargo onboard the Agawa Canyon was originally to be carried by the Algorail. The Algorail suffered a mechanical breakdown last week and was being repaired in Sarnia as the Agawa Canyon arrived.

With the Agawa Canyon's arrival all major U.S and Canadian fleets with the exception of Canada Steamship Lines have delivered cargo to Erie in 2002.

Crews began bright and early Saturday morning preparing the J.S. St John for sand dredging on Lake Erie. The vessel had been at Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs. They had finished the work by 5:20 p.m. and the St. John gave a security call departing the harbor, her first since leaving Erie on June 18.

This is the second time this season that two vessels have visited Erie on the same day. On July 8 the John J. Boland and Cuyahoga visited Erie.

Crews begin work on the J.S. St. John.
Pere Marquette 41 outbound.
Stern View.
Agawa Canyon backs in.
Bow View.
Another view.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Welland Canal Traffic

07/28
On Saturday, the saltie Helena Oldendorff was secured at Wharf 2 for some type of repairs by Fraser Ship Repair. C.S.L.'s Pineglen was downbound at Lock 3, with fleetmate Oakglen following behind at Lock 7. Also heading down the canal was the Gordon C. Leitch and saltie Federal Yoshino, which was sailing in ballast, due to the lack of cargo to be shipped. Above Lock 7 upbound was her fleetmate Federal Rhine.

Pictures by Alex Howard
Helena Oldendorff at Wharf 2.
Stern view.
Oakglen downbound.
Stern view.
Gordon C. Leitch.
Stern view.
Federal Yoshino in ballast.
Close up.
Federal Rhine.
Stern view.

Pictures by Roger LeLievre and Dave Wobser
Gordon C. Leitch passing Yankcanuck in Port Colborne. Yankcanuck was unloading gypsum from Ashtabula.
Oakglen down bound at Lock 8.
Canadian Leader passing Helena Oldendorff at Wharf #1.
Saginaw down bound at Glendale Bridge.

Reported by: Alex Howard, Roger LeLievre and Dave Wobser




Niagara in Bayfield

07/28
The Tall Ship Niagara arrived at Bayfield, WI. on Friday. The tall ship is in port to offer guided tours through today.

Reported by: Harvey Hadland




Today in Great Lakes History - July 28

ALGOWEST passed Detroit, Mich. downbound on July 28, 1982, she had departed on her maiden voyage July 26 from Thunder Bay, Ont. to Quebec City with a 27,308 tonne load of barley.

b) ADAM E. CORNELIUS was christened July 28, 1973 at AmShip by Mrs. Roger Kyes as the a) ROGER M. KYES

COASTAL CANADA was launched July 28, 1952

The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was delivered on July 28th to the Buckeye Steamship Co. (Hutchinson & Co., mgr.), Cleveland. The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was part of a government program designed to upgrade and increase the capacity of the U.S. Great Lakes fleet during World War II. In order to help finance the building of new ships, the U.S.M.C. authorized a program that would allow existing fleets to obtain new boats by trading in their older boats to the Government for credit. The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was the ninth Maritimer and fourth of the six L6-S-Al types delivered. "L6" meant the vessel was built for the Great Lakes and was 600 to 699 feet in length. The "S" stood for steam power and "Al" identified specific design features.

On 28 July 1854, BOSTON (wooden propeller, 134', 259 t, built in 1847 at Ohio City, Ohio) was bound from Chicago for Ogdensburg, NY with pork, corn, whiskey and produce. On Lake Ontario, about 20 miles off Oak Orchard, NY, she collided with the bark PLYMOUTH and sank in about 20 minutes. No lives were lost. The crew and passengers made it to shore in three lifeboats. The boat that the captain was in sailed 50 miles to Charlotte, NY.

In 1900, the freighter PRINCETON was launched at Lorain, Ohio for the Pittsburgh Steamship Company.

On 28 July 1862, CONVOY (2-mast wooden schooner, 130', 367 t, built in 1855 at Buffalo) was sailing down bound on a dark night on Lake Erie with 18,000 bushels of wheat when she collided with the empty bark SAM WARD and sank quickly in 12 fathoms of water. Her wreck drifted along the bottom and during the shipping season several vessels collided with her.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




J.S. St. John Departs Port Weller

07/27
The sand dredge J.S. St. John departed Port Weller Dry Docks in St. Catharines Friday. She had been at Port Weller Dry Docks for nearly a month for work on a leaky shaft seal. This is the second attempt to fix the seal.

She was observed departing Lock 7 Friday upbound, heading for her home port in Erie, PA. The St. John was built as a tanker at Pensacola, FL in 1945 for the U.S. Navy. In 1967 the tanker was converted to a sand dredge and now works Lake Erie sucking sand from the bottom of the lake.

Her return comes at the right moment, the sand piles at Erie Sand appear to be down to one load of the St. John, or about 650 tons.

Work continues on the remains of the Fort Henry at Lock 3, with only a skeletal frame remaining of the upper bridge deck and the bow section now completely removed.

Pictures by: Alex Howard
J.S. St. John upbound above Lock 7.
Stern view.
Remains of the Fort Henry pilothouse.
View from behind.
Upper bridge removed.
Another view.

Reported by: Alex Howard and Jeff Thoreson




Twin Ports Reports

07/27
The Duluth Seaway Port Authority announced Friday that iron ore tonnage shipped from Duluth-Superior in June passed coal tonnage for the first time since November 2000. Before that, iron ore had been the ports' dominant cargo for more than a century.

One reason iron ore tonnage may be up is the parade of boats -- mainly Oglebay Norton and American Steamship vessels -- calling at the BNSF ore dock in Superior.

For many seasons now, the ore dock in Allouez has operated at an almost sleepy pace, serving the Stewart J. Cort, Burns Harbor and George A. Stinson along with the occasional Canadian laker.

Since the closing of LTV Steel Mining Co. and the emergence of International Steel Group, the BNSF ore dock has handled significantly more vessels. Consider this lineup: Middletown and Burns Harbor on Friday; Stewart J. Cort and rare visits by Columbia Star and Oglebay Norton set for Sunday; Courtney Burton scheduled for Monday; a rare call by David Z. Norton set for Tuesday; American Mariner returning on Tuesday -- its second visit in two weeks following a seven-year hiatus here; and Adam E. Cornelius, George A. Stinson, Halifax and Burns Harbor all scheduled for Wednesday.

No official figures are available, but this could be the most traffic through Superior Entry in many years.

In another rarity that may become commonplace, Great Lakes Fleet's Roger Blough is at the Duluth DMIR dock on Monday afternoon to unload limestone. This will be the Blough's second trip to the stone hopper in the past couple weeks. In years past, the fleet's AAA boats and the Presque Isle have handled the stone trade, but this season that trade seems to be falling to the AAA boats and, at least for now, the Blough.

Reported by: Al Miller




Marquette Update

07/27
The Charles M. Beeghly loaded taconite at Marquette's ore dock on Friday while many boatwatchers spent time on the shoreline. The H. Lee White is due Saturday morning with the Sykes due late Saturday night. The Herbert Jackson is expected in on Sunday afternoon, with the Lee A. Tregurtha making a coal/ore run on Monday.

Beeghly loading.
The dock crew kicks open a gate and the ore flow down the shoot.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Port Huron Traffic

07/27
Friday evening the Wilfred Sykes was passing Port Huron upbound. Across the river in Sarnia, the Canadian Transfer remains in lay-up and Algorail is docked in the North Slip undergoing repairs.

Wifred Sykes upbound.
Heading for the Blue Water Bridges.
Buffalo fueling at the Shell Dock in Corunna, Ont. south of Sarnia.

Reported by: Andrew Severson




Fairport Report

07/27
Friday afternoon the Saginaw was loading at the salt mine. The Earl W. Oglebay was unloading stone at Sidley's by the Coast Guard station. The dredge Atchafalaya has been docked the past few days, not dredging the harbor.

Saginaw loading.
Stern view.
Earl W. Oglebay.
Wide view.

Reported by: Dave Merchant




Erie Update

07/27
The Tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 paid their first ever visit to Erie Friday. The barge was loaded with three different grades of stone from Sault Ste. Marie for the Mounfort Terminal. The pair arrived in Erie at about 10:25 a.m. The tug and barge attempted something that has not been done before, they turned at the Mounfort Terminal and docking facing outbound. That is something that only the smallest of vessels can attempt, since the space between the dock and the channel buoys is not much wider than the combined length of the pair.

The captain's wife and two German Shepards were waiting for the vessel on the South Pier, and the captain got the dogs to start barking as he passed and came out of the pilothouse and called for the dogs.

While the pair made many trips to Conneaut in 2000 to load gypsum for Nanticoke, this is the first time they have visited the port of Erie.

Tug and barge inbound.
Close Up.
Close Up of the tug.
Stern View.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Today in Great Lakes History - July 27

On 27 July 1884, ALBERTA (steel propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 264', 2282 gt, built in 1883 in Scotland) collided in fog ) 6 miles NNW of Whitefish Point on Lake Superior with the JOHN M. OSBORNE (wooden propeller "steam barge", 178 ft., 891g , built in 1882 at Marine City. The OSBORNE had two barges in tow at the time. ALBERTA stayed in the gash until most of OSBORNE's crew scrambled aboard, then pulled out and the OSBORNE sank. ALBERTA sank in shallow water, 3 1/2 miles from shore. 3 or 4 lives were lost from the OSBORNE, one from ALBERTA in brave rescue attempt while trying to get the crewmen off the OSBORNE. This was ALBERTA's first year of service. She was recovered and repaired soon afterward. She was the sister of the ill fated ALGOMA which was lost in her first year of service. The wreck of the OSBORNE was located in 1984, 100 years after this incident.

On 27 July 1900 the steel freighter RENSSELAER was launched in Cleveland, Ohio for the Pittsburgh Steamship Company.

On 27 July 1884, JOHN M. OSBORNE (wooden propeller steam barge, 178', 891 gt, built in 1882 at Marine City, MI) was carrying iron ore from Marquette to Ashtabula with two barges in tow when she was run into by the steel propeller passenger steamer ALBERTA (264', 2282 gt, built in 1883 at Scotland) in heavy fog off Whitefish Point on Lake Superior. The ALBERTA stayed in the gash while most of the OSBORNE's crew scrambled aboard. 4 or 5 lives were lost from the OSBORNE and one from the ALBERTA. The OSBORNE then sank and the ALBERTA made it to shallow water before she too sank. ALBERTA was recovered and put back in service. The wreck of the OSBORNE was located in 1984, 100 years after the accident.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Ste. Claire Restoration

07/26
Restoration work is moving along aboard the former Bob-lo boat Ste. Claire. Most of the outside decking on the passenger steamer has been replaced and covered with new canvas. The decks that were sagging have been repaired and refitted with new wood.

The lifeboat davits were stabilized and are now in good working order. The lifeboats have all received a new coat of white paint. Repairs to the steel on the main deck will start next week, after they are done painting will begin on the external areas of the boat. The Ste. Claire is scheduled to be moved in August by tugboat to an area near the Museum ship Willis B. Boyer.

After many years of lay-up the Ste. Claire was sold last fall and towed to Toledo. The vessel is undergoing a multi million dollar refit and will be open as a restaurant or other no-working attraction.

Towed from Detroit last fall

Reported by: Capt. Sam Buchanan




Tug and Barges on the Saginaw

07/26 The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons was inbound the Saginaw River Thursday morning with a split load for Bay City and Saginaw. She lightered at the Bay City Wirt Dock before departing during the afternoon for the Saginaw Wirt Dock to finish unloading. The pair departed Saginaw Wirt, turned in the 6th Street Turning Basin and was downbound for the lake late in the evening.

The tug Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity were inbound passing through Bay City around 6 p.m. They were headed to the Lafarge Terminal in Carrollton to unload cement overnight.

The tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort and barge Great Lakes Trader was outbound from Saginaw early Thursday morning after unloading at Saginaw Rock Products. The vessel had arrived on Wednesday.

Pictures by: Todd Shorkey
Tug Jacklyn M./Barge Integrity upbound approaching Wheeler's Landing.
Another view.
Tug Jacklyn M.
Stern view at Liberty Bridge.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Cliffs to buy bigger share of Hibbing Taconite

07/26
Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. said Wednesday that it will buy a bigger share of Hibbing Taconite as part of its long-term plan to restructure the domestic iron ore trade.

Cliffs will increase its ownership in Hibbing Taconite from 15 percent to 23 percent. In return, Cliffs will take on about $6 million in long-term plant liabilities.

Bethlehem Steel, now operating under bankruptcy protection, has long owned 70.3 percent of the taconite mine and processing plant located near Hibbing, Minn. Stelco Inc. owned 14.7 percent. Bethlehem announced a year ago that it wants to sell its stake in Hibbing Taconite, and Cliffs has says it still wants to acquire majority ownership in the operation.

John S. Brinzo, Cleveland-Cliffs chairman and chief executive, said the deal is part of a company strategy to be a leader in restructuring the domestic iron ore business.

Hibbing Taconite is expected to produce 7.5 million tons of taconite pellets this year, an increase of about 700,000 tons from a previous forecast. Hibbing Taconite ships its pellets through the Burlington Northern Santa Fe ore dock in Superior, Wis. Much of that tonnage is carried by the 1,000-footers Stewart J. Cort and Burns Harbor.

Reported by: Al Miller




Calumet and Wolverine Load

07/26
The Wolverine and Calumet were in Conneaut on Thursday, both to load coal. At 3:30 p.m. the Calumet was loading and the Wolverine was tied up waiting at the stone dock. The Wolverine was scheduled to load after the Calumet and was destined for Charlevoix.

The Yankcanuck was due in at 9:45 p.m. to load gypsum for Port Colborne. Friday the Philip R. Clarke is due with ore from Two Harbors at 8:30 a.m.

Wolverine at the Stone Dock.
Stern View.
Calumet loads.
Another View.
Stern View.
Another View.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Cliffs to become sole pellet supplier to Rouge

07/26
Cleveland-Cliffs Inc announced Wednesday that it will become the sole supplier of taconite pellets to the Rouge Industries steel mill.

In addition, Cliffs said it has loaned $10 million to Rouge on a secured basis, with a final maturity in 2007.

"Cliffs has a long and valued relationship with this important customer," said John S. Brinzo, Cliffs' chairman and chief executive officer. "Sales to Rouge, which were less than 1 million tons in 2001, are expected to approximate 1.3 million tons in 2002. Rouge is expected to purchase in excess of 3 million tons per year beginning in 2003, and has annual minimum obligations through 2007."

Cleveland-Cliffs is the largest supplier of iron ore products to the North American steel industry and is developing a significant ferrous metallics business. Subsidiaries of the company manage and hold equity interests in five iron ore mines in Michigan, Minnesota and Eastern Canada. Cliffs has a major iron ore reserve position in the United States and is a substantial iron ore merchant.

Rouge Steel owns about 40 percent of Evtac, a taconite producer near Eveleth, Minn. Generally, Rouge's share of Evtac's production is traded with another steel company for fluxed pellets from Cliffs' Tilden mine. Cliffs said there is no word yet on whether its new agreement with Rouge will affect Evtac's continued operation. Evtac ships its pellets through the DMIR ore dock in Duluth.

Reported by: Kenneth Borg, Al Miller, Lee Rowe and Ed Schipper




Marquette Update

07/26
The Lee A. Tregurtha loaded pellets at Marquette's ore dock on Thursday, beginning with cloudy weather, and ending in a downpour. Dock workers continued quickly loading the Lee A. after donning weather gear. The Charles M. Beeghly is due on Friday.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Busy End of the week for Green Bay

07/26
After a quiet week in port, ship traffic has picked up in Green Bay. The Alpena brought cement to Lafarge Wednesday and left Thursday morning. The Stolt Aspiration was rumored to have loaded at Anamax and departed early Wednesday morning.

The Catherine Desgagnes was unloading pig iron at the Fox River Dock and is due to depart Friday morning.

Calumet and Earl W. Oglebay are scheduled to visit in the next few days. On Sunday the Algoway is expected to arrive at the Fox River Dock to unload salt.

Reported by: Jason Leino




Aerial Views

07/26
Pilot and photographer Don Coles was flying over lower Lake Huron Thursday and sent in the pictures below. All photographs are available for purchase. Don's company, Great Lakes Aerial Photos, is available for hire for any aerial photography need.

Wilfred Sykes downbound on Lake Huron, east of Port Sanilac.
Stern view.
Another view.
Bow on view.
Stern.
St. Clair.
Philip R. Clarke.
Paul R. Tregurtha (1,013'6") dwarfs the saltie Johanna C (295-feet).
Close up Johanna C.
Earl W. Oglebay.
Algoway.

Other recent Images
Construction at the Turtle Island Lighthouse in Maumee Bay, Lake Erie.
Another view.
Goderich, Ontario.
Another view.
Looking to Lake Huron.
Willowglen.
Wide view.





Toledo News

07/26
The Gordon C. Leitch was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report. The Joseph H. Frantz, and Saturn remain in lay-up at there respective dock sites.

The tugs Mighty Jake, Mighty Jimmy, Pioneerland, and Prairieland with there barges are presently working on the Maumee River dredging project near the Willis B. Boyer museum ship and on the I-280 bridge replacement project.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the American Mariner on Friday. The Algomarine on Saturday. The John G. Munson, and Reserve on Sunday followed by the Catherine Desgagnes on Monday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Courtney Burton on Friday, followed by the Reserve and Buckeye on Sunday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Lorain Update

07/26
The Saginaw arrived in Lorain Thursday and headed up the Black River to lighten part of a cargo of stone and then departed for Cleveland to finish unloading. The Buffalo came in to the Pellet Terminal to lighten also then will head to Cleveland to unload at ISG.

Pictures by TZ
Saginaw inbound.
Passing the lighthouse.
Buffalo at dock.
Buffalo departs.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Fairport, Ohio News

07/26
On Wednesday the Calumet was unloading stone at the Osborne South Dock, on the west bank of the turning basin. The sailboat Saint Paul, which has sailed 24,000 miles from Russia by a husband and wife team was also in port. The dredge Atchafalaya remains in port dredging the harbor.

Calumet unloading.
Close up of her stack.
Russian sailboat St. Paul.
Another view.

Reported by: Dave Merchant




Toronto Update

07/26
The French tall ship Bel Espoir II arrived in Toronto on Tuesday and will remain in port for the weekend.

McKeil's tugs Atomic and Lac Como returned from Oshawa early Thursday morning. The tug Everlast and barge Norman McLeod were unloading in Oshawa Thursday.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 26

The ALGOWEST sailed on her maiden voyage in1982 from Thunder Bay, Ont. to Quebec City with a 27,308 tonne load of barley.

On July 26, 1943 the BRUCE HUDSON caught fire while loading gasoline at East Chicago, IL and four persons lost their lives.

The CONALLISON departed Windsor, Ont. on her first trip for Johnstone on July 26, 1981.

WILLIAM A. McGONAGLE (2) sailed light on her maiden voyage from the shipyard on July 26, 1916 to Duluth, MN to load iron ore.

On 26 July 1877, CUMBERLAND (wooden side-wheeler, 205', 629 gc, built in 1871 at Port Robinson, Ontario) struck bottom at the Rock of Ages Reef off Isle Royale in good weather and sank in relatively shallow water. Later she was broken up by waves and her wreckage washed up on shore on what is now known as "Cumberland Point."

On 26July 1885, ISLE ROYALE (wooden propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 92', 92 gt, built in 1879) sprang a leak near Susick Island near Isle Royale on Lake Superior. She sank but her passengers and crew made it to the island. She was owned by Cooley, Lavague & Company of Duluth. She was originally built as the barge AGNES.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algorail Towed for Repairs

07/25
The Algorail dropped anchor about 9 p.m. Tuesday night in the St. Clair River off the Dow Chemical Dock in Sarnia. The vessel suffered a mechanical failure and was stopped in the river, unable to proceed. Wednesday morning about 11 a.m. the tug John Spence arrived to tow the Algorail up river to Sarnia's North Slip.

The tug Menasha assisted the tow into the North Slip and docked the vessel at the south end of the slip. Wednesday evening the Algorail remained docked under going repairs.

Reported by: Bob Mattson and Jamie Kerwin




Mackinaw to welcome Grand Haven visitors

07/25
The Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw, the Great Lakes’ largest and oldest cutter, is scheduled to join the cutters Sundew, Bristol Bay and Buckthorn for a parade of ships in Grand Haven’s harbor at 1 p.m. Monday, July 29.

But that’s just the beginning of Mackinaw’s involvement in the 2002 Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival, which runs from July 26 through August 4 - the 212th anniversary of the establishment of the Revenue Cutter Service, precursor to the Coast Guard. Mackinaw’s crew will be available at scheduled times throughout the week to guide visitors on tours of the 290-foot icebreaker, a perennial favorite with Great Lakes ship buffs.

Last year, Coast Guard men and women - including members of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, the service’s civilian volunteer branch - guided more than 12,000 guests through the ship some call “The Queen of the Lakes.”

During the tours, visitors can meet many of Mackinaw’s 75 officers and crew and learn about how the ship - the most powerful icebreaker in the world when it was commissioned in 1944 - helps extend the Great Lakes shipping season with its unique icebreaking design.

Grand Haven’s ties to the Coast Guard run long and deep. The city was the homeport of the Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba - originally designed as a Great Lakes icebreaker - which was torpedoed and sunk while on convoy escort duty during World War II. All but two of the 103-man crew were lost. Shocked by the tragedy, area citizens responded by raising more than $1 million in war bonds to help replace the lost ship.

Today Grand Haven, by act of Congress, proudly bears the official designation “Coast Guard City, USA.” Its residents celebrate with a 10-day festival each year, and in return, the officers and crew of Mackinaw are honored to cap their summer with a stop there.




Sykes Loads

07/25
The Wilfred Sykes came in to Marquette very early on Wednesday morning and quickly began loading taconite pellets. The Sykes is headed for Rouge Steel in Detroit.

The next ship due in Marquette is the Lee A. Tregurtha on Thursday afternoon, the Beeghly tentatively scheduled for Friday and a return of the Sykes with the H Lee White and Herbert C. Jackson on Sunday.

Sykes loading Wednesday morning.
Another view.
Bow view.
Close up.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Oglebay Norton reports earnings decline, but expects improvement this year

07/25
Second-quarter earnings fell for Oglebay Norton's mineral and Great Lakes shipping operations, but signs are promising for the remainder of the year.

Oglebay Norton reported Tuesday that revenues for its Great Lakes Minerals segment declined to $46.9 million from $50.9 million in the second quarter. Company officials attributed the drop primarily to the timing associated with the start of the shipping season on the Great Lakes.

Overall, Oglebay Norton's revenues for the quarter were $112.6 million compared to $119.5 million in the year earlier period. Revenues for the six-month period were $174.9 million compared to $185.3 million in the prior year six-month period.

The fleet's cargo volume and revenue were down nearly 24 percent in the second quarter, mainly because of the loss of iron ore shipments to bankrupt LTV Steel Co., said Michael D. Lundin, Oglebay Norton's president and chief operating officer.

However, the bad news was offset by signs of a promising future.

Both coal and stone shipments have remained stable this year, and operating income for the Great Lakes Mineral segment improved by nearly $1 million quarter over quarter. Revenue was aided by cost reductions at company limestone operations, higher water levels on the Great Lakes, and efficiencies from Oglebay Norton's vessel pooling agreement with American Steamship Co.

"Stone demand to remain solid," Lundin said. "We will continue to realize synergies from both the pooling agreement and its integration with our limestone operations, and we will continue to explore strategic partnerships and alliances."

Oglebay Norton also is benefiting from the start of steel production by International Steel Group, which purchased the steelmaking assets of LTV.

Oglebay Norton negotiated a 15-year agreement with Cleveland Cliffs to transport taconite pellets from Cliffs-operated mines to ISG mills in Gary and Cleveland through its pooling agreement with American Steamship. ISG hopes to produce 5 million to 6 million tons of steel a year, but production should be less than that amount this year.

In addition, Oglebay Norton has secured a deal to handle the transfer of all pellets in the Cleveland area. They will be moved across Oglebay's Cleveland Bulk Terminal facility. Financial benefits of this operation should be reflected in third-quarter earnings.

The agreement with Cliffs fits into Oglebay Norton's efforts to secure long-term shipping contracts. Lundin said 80 percent of the fleet's business is composed of multi-year contracts to haul coal, limestone and taconite pellets.

Lundin said Oglebay Norton's marine operations will continue to focus on its pooling agreement with American Steamship Co.

With the pooling arrangement, Oglebay Norton expected to have two to three vessels laid up this season. But due to efficiencies resulting from agreement and changing market conditions, only the steamer Joseph H. Frantz remains in lay-up.

Lundin also said the company remains "on track" in its "due diligence" to buy Erie Sand & Gravel, which operates the vessel Richard Reiss. Due Diligence refers to the last stage of the buying process. Included in the deal is the Reiss, which has been in lay-up this season and is not expected to sail.

Oglebay Norton Company, a Cleveland, Ohio-based company, provides essential minerals and aggregates to a broad range of markets, from building materials and home improvement to the environmental, energy and metallurgical industries. Building on a 149-year heritage, its vision is to become the premier growth company in the industrial minerals industry. The company's website is located at www.oglebaynorton.com.

Reported by: Al Miller




Norton Loads in Lorain

07/25
The David Z. Norton arrived in Lorain, Oh. Wednesday to take on a load of taconite for the ISG Steel Mill in Cleveland. The Norton entered port in high winds making the tricky entry look easy.

The Pellet Terminal in Lorain is schedule to be shut down and moved to Cleveland later this year. Currently, large vessels carry the taconite from the upper lakes and unload in Lorain. The smaller vessels then reload the cargo for delivery up the winding Cuyahoga River.

Pictures by TZ
David Z. Norton entering Lorain.
Crew members prepare for docking.
Backing to the dock.
Close up as the bow thruster is used.
Backing to the Pellet Terminal.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Thunder Bay interested in buying the Keewatin

07/25
City officials in Thunder Bay, Ontario, once again are expressing interest in buying the retired passenger steamer Keewatin and moving it from Saugatuck, Mich., to their Lake Superior port to serve as a tourist attraction. The Keewatin was built for the Canadian Pacific Railroad and carried passengers between Port McNicoll and Thunder Bay -- then known as Fort William and Port Arthur -- until retired in 1965. The steamship was purchased in 1967 by R.J. Peterson, who docked it in Saugatuck to serve as a museum.

Thunder Bay officials said the 95-year-old vessel could be used for display and possibly as a small convention center. City councilors recently authorized spending up to $20,000 to investigate buying the vessel.

"It's very preliminary, but certainly it represents an exciting prospect," Robert Petrie, Thunder Bay's acting city manager, told The Grand Rapids Press.

"The first step is to have a look at it and see what kind of condition it's in and what it would take to get it up here," Petrie said.

Peterson said he would consider an offer from Thunder Bay. However, he would likely keep the vessel in Saugatuck if efforts succeed bringing more attractions and visitors to the Keewatin's current berth at Peterson's marina. The Keewatin currently draws about 25 to 100 visitors a day.

Thunder Bay expressed interest in the Keewatin several years ago but the discussion went nowhere. Among the reasons reportedly was that moving the Keewatin would require considerable dredging to get the vessel to the channel in Saugatuck harbor.

Saugatuck-area leaders said they do not want to lose the ship.

"R.J. and his wife have done a super job of presenting it to the public," Paul Cook, president of the Saugatuck-Douglas Convention and Visitors Bureau, told the newspaper. "It would be conspicuous by its absence. It's part of the landscape, the harborscape."

Reported by: Al Miller, Roger LeLievre and Jim Fahlstedt




Twin Ports Report

07/25
Vessel traffic in the Twin Ports was slow on Wednesday, but the vessels that appeared were interesting. Armco made an unusual visit to the BNSF ore dock to load taconite pellets and Mesabi Miner made one its occasional visits to the DMIR dock in Duluth to load pellets. John G. Munson, always a welcome sight, was scheduled to arrive early Thursday to load at DMIR.

Several vessels from Duluth-based Great Lakes Fleet, including the Roger Blough, are hauling stone this week. The Blough, which was built to haul pellets, is scheduled to load another stone cargo Friday at Cedarville. Earlier this month it made a rare trip to carry stone to the DMIR ore dock in Duluth. Also carrying stone are Arthur M. Anderson, scheduled to unload in Buffalo on Friday; Cason J. Callaway, which is set to unload part of its cargo Saturday at Duluth's Hallett 5 dock and the other half at DMIR in Duluth.

The power plant at Taconite Harbor is generating several cargoes of coal this summer. James R. Barker called at the North Shore port last weekend and is due there again about August 1 or 2.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

07/25
Wednesday the Gordon C. Leitch was at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator loading grain. The Algosteel was unloading stone at the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock when finished unloading stone she shifted over to the CSX Dock to load coal. The Adam E. Cornelius was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore.

The tug Rebecca Lynn with her barge were loading at the B-P Dock. The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge were at the Sun Dock loading cargo. Both tug and barge units finished loading cargo and departed late Wednesday afternoon.

The Algobay was inbound Toledo Ship Channel late Wednesday afternoon for an unknown dock site

The Joseph H. Frantz, and Saturn remain in layup at there respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will now be the American Mariner on Friday. The Algomarine on Saturday, followed by the John G. Munson, and Reserve on Sunday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Courtney Burton on Friday, followed by the Reserve, and Buckeye on Sunday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Unloading in Oshawa

07/25
Wednesday the saltie Dimitris Y was in Oshawa unloading a cargo of steel rebar. The vessel finished unloading and departed Oshawa about 4 p.m. bound for Detroit.

Dimitris Y unloading.
Rebar lifted from the cargo hold.
Tugs Atomic and Lac Como ready to pull Dimitris Y into position for departure.
Outbound.
Bow passing.
Stern view heading onto the lake.
Lac Como departs.

Reported by: Jim Gallacher




Seaway Traffic

07/25
Below are images of traffic passing Brockville, Ontario Wednesday.

Mecta Sea.
Mecta Sea with the Toro following close behind.
Stern view of the Mecta Sea.
Close up of the Toro.
Stern view.

Reported by: Peter Carter




Today in Great Lakes History - July 25

The bow section of the ROGER BLOUGH was floated into the new Lorain dry dock on July 25, 1970 and was joined with the 421 foot stern section. The launch of the completed hull was scheduled for July, 1971 but a fire broke out in the engine room on June 24, 1971 killing four yard workers and extensively damaging her Pielstick diesel engines. Extensive repairs, which included replacement of both engines, delayed the launch for nearly a year.

The CANADA MARQUIS (c) FEDERAL MACKENZIE) was upbound at Detroit, Mich. on July 25, 1983 on her maiden voyage.

July 25, 1983 - A wedding was held aboard the Badger during the sailing of "Love Boat II". Chris Gebhart and Pat Sroka of Ludington were married by Rev John Christensen.

The wooden lumber tug CYGNET, which worked on the Shiawassee and Bad Rivers and Lake Huron, was destroyed when her boiler exploded in "Blow-up Bayou" on the Shiawassee River.

The wooden bulk freighter D. C. WHITNEY was launched at Langell's shipyard in St. Clair, Michigan on 25 July 1882. Her dimensions were 229' x 40' x15', 1090 gross tons.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Mississagi Visit

07/24
Lower Lakes Towing's Mississagi visited the small northern Lake Michigan port of Brevort, MI, for two straight trips this week. The vessel loaded sand for Fisher Harbor, Ontario on Sunday and again on Tuesday. Fisher Harbor is located on eastern Georgian Bay.

Lower Lakes Towing and Grand River Navigation vessels have been normal visitors to Brevort this season.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




US Steel Reports Profit

07/24
US Steel Monday reported better-than-expected profits and reversed a year-ago loss, cashing in on price hikes that followed new tariffs on imports and the shutdown of competing steel producers.

U.S. Steel, the nation's largest integrated steelmaker, said income during the second quarter rose to $27 million, compared with the loss of $30 million for the same period last year.

"Clearly there had to be some impact from the drop in imports, but I think it's the closure of some of their competitors that really made the difference," said Chuck Bradford, a steel analyst with Bradford Research.

Earlier this year, President Bush imposed tariffs of up to 30 percent on a range of steel imports to help revive an industry that has been in crisis since 1997 when Asia's financial problems sparked a sharp rise in shipments to the United States.

More than 30 steelmakers, including Bethlehem Steel Corp., have filed for bankruptcy since then.

Now with the tariffs, a weaker dollar and the shutdown of extra capacity, the steel industry is showing signs of a revival. Bethlehem Steel on Monday posted a narrowed loss of $118.9 million in the second quarter.

In its flat-rolled steel business, which feeds the automotive and appliance industries and is a key indicator of the company's health, shipments rose 13 percent from a year ago to 2.6 million tons. Prices also showed signs of rising, although many of U.S. Steel's sales are based on longer term contracts. The company said prices rose to an average of $402 a ton, up $25 from earlier this year.

Shipments are expected to increase slightly in the third quarter, the company said, and reach about 10.1 million net tons for the year.

Prices may also continue to rise as some of the longer-term contracts with customers expire, paving the way for the company to renegotiate more profitable deals with automakers, construction companies and manufacturers.

Reported by: Lisa Flint




Group ready to being restoring DeTour Reef Lighthouse

07/24
A group that hopes to restore the 71-year-old DeTour Reef Lighthouse has gathered nearly $1 million in grants and is almost ready to begin work.

The Soo Evening News reports that the nonprofit DeTour Reef Light Preservation Society has devised a two-part plan to restore the exterior and interior of the light located about 1 1/2 miles off DeTour and Drummond at the mouth of the St. Marys River. Money for the work will come from a $705,000 grant from the "Clean Michigan" bond fund and $241,500 from the federal and state transportation departments.

Plans call for a contract to be awarded this summer to a contractor to do the exterior work. The project, which may begin yet this year, will include installation of new metal windows, doors and shutters, replacement of the original copper roof, repainting the entire structure and masonry work on the concrete caisson.

Work on the light's interior will make up the plan's second phase. Items on that work list include restoring the keeper's quarters on the second floor and reinstallating the lighthouse's foghorns.

The society hopes to eventually staff the lighthouse with a caretaker who would guide visitors around the structure. The group is exploring the possibility of having a local operator provide boat service to the light.

Reported by: David Wren




Lake Survey

07/24
The Canadian Coast Guard Research vessel Limnos made a brief appearance in Erie, Pa Tuesday to collect water samples. The vessel arrived in port about 12 noon and had departed by 1 p.m., headed to a work site east of Long Point.

The Limnos and her American counterpart Lake Guardian have been searching Lake Erie for a so-called dead zone, or an area deprived of oxygen. They are now focusing on the eastern basin, which is located east of Erie. That part of the lake recently turned itself over and went from 78 to 58 degrees in water temperature.

Limnos inbound.
Stern View.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Marquette Update

07/24
The Wilfred Sykes is expected to load at Marquette Wednesday morning, the H. Lee White is due on Thursday, followed by the Charles M. Beeghly on Friday.

Sunday will be a busy day at the dock, with the Sykes and H. Lee White returning and the Herbert C. Jackson also coming in to load.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Goderich Update

07/24
The Capt Henry Jackman was loading at the salt mine mid-afternoon on Thursday, July 18th. On Saturday, the Algomarine was seen loading at 11:30 p.m. and departed early the next morning. The Agawa Canyon came in through strong winds on Monday, loaded all afternoon, and was gone by late evening.

Reported by: Lisa Stuparyk




Toledo News

07/24
Tuesday the Canadian Olympic was at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge departed from her layup dock and was loading cargo at the Sun Oil Dock. The Joseph H. Frantz and Saturn remain in layup at there respective dock sites.

There was an Andrie tug and barge unit at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The tugs Mighty Jake, Mighty Jimmy, Prairieland and Pioneerland are still working the Maumee River dredging project now located near the Willis B. Boyer museum ship, and on the I-280 replacement bridge project.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel on Wednesday followed by the H. Lee White on Thursday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will now be the Courtney Burton on Friday. The Reserve on Saturday, followed by the Buckeye on Sunday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Tall Ship H.M.S. Detroit to be Launched Aug. 17

07/24
The first phase of the H.M.S. Detroit's construction is complete. The replica tall ship that served as Canada's flag ship will be launched on Aug. 17th at 8 a.m. at Hike Metal Ship Yard in Wheatley, Ont.

H.M.S. Detroit, named in honor of the capture of Fort Detroit in the War of 1812 played a significant role in the development of Canada and the United States.

As the largest Tall Ship on the Great Lakes she will serve as an "Ambassador of Friendship," an educational forum and tourist attraction.

In Celebration of this event, the tall ship Niagara will moor in Amherstburg, home port of H.M.S. Detroit, August 24 & 25 open for public dockside tours 10a.m. - 5p.m.

Reported by: Al Jackman




Keewatin History Published

07/24
Bob and Cindy Zimmerman have published the book "Ninety-Five Years Young: The Story of the S.S. Keewatin, 1907 to the Present." The book tells the story of this steamer from its construction in 1907 in Scotland, its operation on the Great Lakes for the Canadian Pacific Railway from 1907 to 1967 and its present use as a privately-owned marine museum in the Douglas/Saugatuck, Mich. area. Included are many rare photos and the stories of many who worked aboard the vessel during its long career.
Click here for more information




Today in Great Lakes History - July 24

The ALGOSOO (2) was Launched July 24, 1974 for Algoma Central Railway, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

The BURNS HARBOR sea trials were conducted on July 24, 1980 during which she performed an emergency stop in 3,160 feet loaded to a depth of 25/26 feet. She was the third thousand footer built for Bethlehem and the tenth on the Great Lakes.

ST.CLAIR (2) was launched July 24, 1975

The WILLIAM G. MATHER (2) left the River Rouge on her maiden voyage July 24, 1925 for Ashtabula, OH to load coal for the Canadian lakehead at Port Arthur/Fort William, Ont.

The wooden steamer OSCAR TOWNSEND was launched at 2:20 PM at E. Fitzgerald's yard in Port Huron on 24 July 1873. The launch went well with a few hundred spectators. She was built for use in the iron ore trade by the Lake Superior Transportation Co. Her dimensions were 210' overall, 200' keel, 33'10" beam and 15' depth. She had three masts and was painted deep green.

On 24 July 1847, CONSTITUTION (wooden passenger/package freight side-wheeler, 141', 444 t, built in 1837 at Charleston, OH) struck a pier in Sandusky harbor, stove a large hole in her bow and sank. Her machinery was later recovered and installed in J. D. MORTON.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algomarine Assists in Rescue

07/23
Six people were safely rescued after their 44-foot sailing vessel capsized near White Shoal Light north of Grays Reef Passage. The vessel was participating in the Chicago to Mackinac Race when strong winds caused the vessel to capsize throwing all six people into the water.

The crew of the sail boat launched a flare that was seen by the Algomarine. The Algomarine contacted Group Sault Ste Marie and located the capsized vessel.

U.S. Coast Guard Station St Ignace launched a rescue vessel. The Algomarine provided illumination as the nearby yacht Kokamo O recovered all the people from the water. The sailing vessel will be removed by commercial salvage.

Reported by: Glen Young




Lake Huron Ports

07/23
Early Monday morning the Sam Laud delivered coal into Lafarge. It left around 9 a.m. Waiting at anchor in Thunder Bay on Lake Huron was the Wolverine. It came into Lafarge to unload more coal after the Laud departed. The Wolverine left around 4 p.m.

The steamer Alpena is due into port on Tuesday afternoon. The tug Jacklyn M and barge Integrity is in Detroit.

The classic steamer Herbert C. Jackson arrived at Stoneport around noon on Monday. It was taking on a load of stone bound for Chicago. It was scheduled to leave at midnight. At anchor was the Great Lakes Trader which will load after the Jackson.

Jackson loading.
Great Lakes Trader anchored off shore.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Toledo Update

07/23
The Canadian Olympic was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. The Joseph H. Frantz, Saturn, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in layup at there respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel on Wednesday, followed by the H. Lee White on Thursday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Adam E. Cornelius on Tuesday, followed by the Armco on Friday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Instructor receives spot with merchant marine

07/23
An instructor at the Great Lakes Maritime Academy at Northwestern Michigan College has been appointed to a federal merchant marine committee.

Mike Surgalski is one of 18 members of the Merchant Marine Personnel Advisory Committee, which sets education standards for the maritime industry.

He was named to the position by U.S. Secretary of Transportation Norman Mineta.

Surgalski has been an instructor at Great Lakes Maritime Academy at Northwestern Michigan College for seven years. He said he has sought the appointment for some time.

"I applied for this five years ago, and I re-applied every year, and it is just a matter of persistence paying off," he said.

Surgalski's term expires Jan. 31, 2004, but he has been asked to serve another two-year term after that. The committee advises the Department of Transportation on training, qualification, certification, documentation and fitness standards for the Merchant Marine.

The committee meets twice a year, with one session held in Washington, D.C., and the other in a U.S. city of the committee's choosing. Surgalski's first meeting will be in September in Cleveland, Ohio.

Surgalski said his background as a professional mariner until 1995 gave his application punch. He is the only representative from the Great Lakes district. "I have never had a letter from a cabinet officer, so that is exciting," Surgalski said.

Reported by: D. Kohls




Today in Great Lakes History - July 23

The Keel for the TEXACO CHIEF (2) was laid July 23, 1968.

CANADOC (2) sailed on her maiden voyage July 23rd.

The RED WING (2) was christened on July 23, 1960 as the first all-welded vessel to emerge from Port Weller Dry Docks.

On 23 July 1878, H. R. PRESTON (wooden quarter-deck canal boat built in 1877 at Oneida Lake, NY) was carrying 250 tons of ashes from Picton, Ontario to Oswego, New York in tow of the tug ALANSON SUMNER along with three other canal boats when they encountered a storm on Lake Ontario. About 15 miles from Oswego, the PRESTON broke her towline and was taken alongside the SUMNER with some difficulty. About a mile out of port she lost her hold tarps and began to sink quickly. She was cut loose from the tug and her two crewmen were saved by the Oswego tug WM. AVERY. Though she was lying heavily on the bottom in 50 feet of water, her wreckage came ashore near 4 Mile Point in early September.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Ryerson tours termed "outstanding success"

07/22
More than 1,200 people took the rare opportunity to tour the steamer Edward L. Ryerson this past Saturday and Sunday in Sturgeon Bay, Wisc. The event, organized by and a fund-raiser for the Door County Maritime Museum, was called an "outstanding success" by museum spokesperson Annie Lempert.

Saturday's weather was pleasant throughout most of the day, although a gusty wind kept exhibitors on the dock busy finding new ways to keep their wares secured. Early thunderstorms Sunday morning gave way to heat and humidity Sunday afternoon as visitors were guided through the Ryerson in groups of 15.

Among former crewmembers stationed on board ship was retired Ryerson Chief Engineer Dave Hunt, who explained the intricacies of his former domain to visitors. Also on hand were Lee Barr, fleet operations manager of Central Marine Logistics (operator of the Ryerson), and his wife, Annie, both of whom could be found holding down the fort in the passenger lounge.

As the event wound down, there was talk of a return engagement, although nothing official was announced. The Ryerson, built in 1960, has been inactive since 1998. Her lack of self-unloading gear is the chief reason the vessel remains on the sidelines. There was no word given over the weekend about the Ryerson's future.

Pictures by Roger LeLievre
Ryerson from the tour boat Fred A. Busse (bow).
Stern view.
Sign says Ryerson tours "Sold Out".
Shipkeeper Dave Thompson puts up the Ryerson's christening pennant.
Inland Steel houseflag and christening pennant fly from the forward mast.
Waiting for a tour.
Lots of activity on the dock.
Door County Maritime Museum volunteers greet ticket holders.
Tour heads up the Ryerson's ladder.
Tour heads up the Ryerson's ladder (another view).
Climbing up to the pilothouse.
Leaving the aft cabin heading forward.
Leaving the aft cabin heading forward (another view).
Pausing before entering forward superstructure.
Heading up the main deck.
Pilothouse, inside.
Volunteer guide explains workings of pilothouse.
Pilothouse, inside (another view).
Andy Vervelde takes a turn at the wheel.
Young visitor samples the comforts of the passenger lounge.
Retired Ryerson Chief Engineer Dave Hunt holds forth in the engine room.
Ryerson shipkeeper Dave Thompson (left) and Lee Barr, fleet operations manager, Central Marine Logistics. Without the cooperation of these two individuals, the tours would not have been possible.
Docents wait for next tour.
Door County Marine Museum's Jan Johnson sells books dockside to benefit the museum.
Photographer Chris Winters shows pictures from his book-in-progress, "Sleeping Giant," a collection of Ryerson photos.
Boatnerds Rob Farrow (Thunder Bay), Ric Woodard and Glenn Blasziewicz (Duluth) wait for their tour.
Great Laker magazines and Chris Winters' photographs on display in the passenger dining room for a private reception Friday night.
Sunset from the Ryerson's stern.

Pictures by Eric, Sandy and Jon Chapman
Looking forward on deck.
Another view.
View inside.
Looking aft.
Galley.
View from the pilothouse.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




Gillen Party

07/22
On Friday night the Edward Gillen Company, a Milwaukee based marine construction firm, hosted a party for employees, guests and customers. The party took place on one of the company's material handling barges which had been decorated for the occasion with tables, chairs and a tent. This year’s theme was red, white & blue. Each guest was provided with a sailors cap to add to the mood. Food and drinks were provided.

Just before 7:00 PM the tug Edward Gillen III's Captain John Jorgenson eased the barge away from the dock. Guests were treated to an evening of cruising around Milwaukee's inner and outer harbors, as well as a short excursion up the Milwaukee River. The evening culminated with a trip back to the outer harbor to watch a fireworks display provided by 'Festa Italiana', one of the cities many ethnic festivals.

Barge ready for guests.
Guests boarding.
Departing.
Cruising.
Tug Edward E. Gillen III.
Fireworks over the harbor.

Touring the river along side the Ryerson Saturday was an Amphicar. Made in the1960's in Germany, the Amphicar is powered by a 43 HP, 4 cylinder Triumph engine. It has two propellers and is maneuvered in the water by the front wheels which act as rudders. 3500 were manufactured and it's estimated 500 have survived.
Amphicar.
Cruising past the Ryerson.
Close up.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Saginaw Update

07/22 The Herbert C. Jackson was inbound the Saginaw River Sunday night. The Jackson made her first visit to the new Bay Aggregates Dock near the mouth of the river arriving around 8:00pm. The stockpiles of stone at the old Downtown Bay City location continue to dwindle and before long will be non-existent.

With the arrival of the Herbert C. Jackson on Sunday, it leaves the following 11 vessels who made visits to the Saginaw River in 2001 who have yet to visit in 2002:
Joseph H. Frantz, Earl W. Oglebay, American Mariner, American Republic, Saginaw, Cuyahoga, Halifax, H. Lee White, Saturn, Agawa Canyon, and St. Clair.

Pictures by: Todd Shorkey
Herbert C. Jackson upbound at Essroc.
Turning into the Bay Aggregates Dock.
Another view.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Detroit Traffic

07/22
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Saturday from the Detroit tour boat Diamond Queen and others from Sunday.

Aurora Borealis upbound off Dieppe Park.
Nantucket Clipper at Dieppe Park.
David Z Norton at Sterling Fuel.
Peonia (Liberia) at DMT #2.
Stern view.
Jane Ann IV upbound pushing the Sarah Spencer, passing Windsor. Jeff Brake
Nantucket Clipper at Dieppe Park at sunset. Jeff Brake
Nantucket Clipper downbound Sunday morning at Grassy Island. Destination Quebec City.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Indiana - Burns Harbor Traffic

07/22 Below are images of recent visitors to The Port of Indiana/Burns Harbor

Capt. Ralph Tucker unloading fuel.
Fueling hose.
Stern view.
Darya Ma unloaded slabs from Algeria.
Canadian Navigator unloaded taconite at Bethlehem Steel .

Reported by: Peter Zagorac




Saginaw River Cruise

07/22 The Saginaw River Marine Historical Society will hold its First History Cruise on the Saginaw River on the evening of Friday, August 9, on board the Princess Wenonah. The cruise will depart Wenonah Park on the east side of the Saginaw River in downtown Bay City, Michigan, at 7 p.m. The three-hour trip will transit the river from Bay City to Saginaw. Members of the society will present exhibits on the maritime history of the river and describe points of interest along the waterway.

The Princess Wenona is an excursion boat operated on the Saginaw River by Bay City Boat Lines. The vessel is a former Lake Erie ferry boat. Light snacks will be provided and a cash bar is available.

Tickets are priced at $15 per person. Tickets are limited and should be ordered early by sending remittance, check or money order payable to:
The Saginaw River Marine Historical Society
Cruise Tickets
P.O. Box 2051
Bay City MI 48707-2051
Please be sure to include your return address and a telephone number.

Reported by: Stephen Hause




Weekly Updates

07/22
The weekly updates have been uploaded. Click here to view




Today in Great Lakes History - July 22

PERE MARQUETTE 22 was launched on July 22, 1924.

One hundred years ago on 22 July 1900, the tug MATT H. ESSER was launched at Lorain, Ohio by H. D. Root for Captain Burke of Erie.

The M. I. MILLS (wooden propeller tug, 122', 152 t, built in 1867 at Marine City, MI), which sank in a collision with the bark UNADILLA on 9 May 1873, was found on 22 July 1873 in 90 feet of water in Lake Huron off Sand Beach, Michigan. Plans were made to raise her at the cost of $5,000. This effort was unsuccessful as was another abortive attempt in 1895.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Oswego to seek ferry service

07/21
Officials in Oswego, N.Y., are courting the company that wants to launch a ferry between Rochester and Toronto.

"We expressed an interest for obvious reasons: We're a port and ready made for something like this," Jeff Wallace, the executive assistant to the Oswego mayor, told the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper.

Oswego's interest doesn't mean the two communities are competing for a ferry service.

"We've clearly been focusing all our efforts on the Rochester to Toronto route," said Dominick Delucia, president of Canadian American Transportation Systems, the private company that wants to start the ferry service. "The route wouldn't compete with Rochester. We would want it to be part of an overall integrated service around the lake."

CATS officials visited with government leaders in Oswego -- a lakeside city of about 20,000 people -- about three weeks ago to talk about bringing a fast ferry to the city.

CATS is trying to raise money to launch the Rochester-to-Toronto route. The service would cost about $62 million to begin, and the company is seeking about $20 million in public investment, Delucia said.

Reported by: Len Freeman




Detroit Traffic

07/21
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Friday & Saturday.

Algoeast downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Arion (Holland) downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Patricia Hoey at the Gaelic Yard.
tug James A Hannah & barge Hannah 5101 upbound just after leaving the Rouge River, heading to Sterling for fuel.
Close up.
Philip R Clarke at Sterling Fuel.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo News

07/21
The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was loading coal at the CSX Docks with the Reserve waiting to follow. The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel on Wednesday followed by the H. Lee White on Friday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Armco on Sunday, followed by the Adam E. Cornelius on Monday.

The Joseph H. Frantz, Saturn, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in layup at there respective dock sites. There were no vessels at the Shipyard on Saturday.

The tugs Mighty Jake, Mighty Jimmy, Prairieland, and Pioneerland with there related barges are working on the Maumee River dredging project near the grain elevators as well as on the I-280 bridge replacement project.

Classic Toledo Shipping
A.H. Ferbert approaching Andersons Elevator where she will load a grain cargo bound for a St. Lawrence River port. On the return trip back into the Lakes she will bring in an ore cargo to be offloaded at either Conneaut, or Lorain, Ohio.
Tanker Rocket at the Sun Oil Dock getting ready to load a petroleum cargo.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - July 21

The JAMES DAVIDSON and KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1) arrived under tow at Santander, Spain on July 21, 1974 for scrapping.

On July 21, 1975, the GEORGE D. GOBLE arrived at Lorain, Ohio with an unusual deck cargo loaded at American Ship Building Company's yard at South Chicago, Illinois. She was carrying the deckhouses for two Interlake Steamship Company thousand-foot self-unloaders being built at AmShip's Lorain yard. These vessels were completed as the JAMES R. BARKER and MESABI MINER.

On 21 July 1875, the schooner ELVA, which was built in Port Huron in 1861 for Capt. Sinclair, was sailing from Holland, Michigan for Milwaukee loaded with stove bolts. She capsized 12 miles from Milwaukee. Her crew took to the boats and made a landing in Kenosha and then rowed to Milwaukee. A tug was sent for the schooner and she was recovered.

In 1900, R. J. GORDON (wooden propeller passenger-package freighter, 104', 187 gt, built in 1881 at Marine City) was placed back in service carrying freight and passengers between Chicago and Grand Haven. She had burned in September 1899 at Chicago but was rebuilt during the winter.

On 21 July 1875, the old barge HURON, which had been in use for a number of years as a car ferry for the Grand Trunk Railroad at Port Huron/Sarnia, was sold to Sandie and Archie Stewart. They planned to convert her to a dry-dock by adding three feet to her sides and removing her arches. The sale price was $1,500 in gold.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Ryerson Tours

07/20
Sunny skies and moderate temperatures are expected in Sturgeon Bay this morning for the first day of public tours aboard the steamer Edward L. Ryerson. The tours, which raise funds for the Door County Maritime Museum, are sold out. According to museum officials, 1,200 tickets were purchased for the guided tours, which run today and Sunday aboard the classic laker, which has been idle in Sturgeon Bay since the end of the 1998 shipping season.

On Friday night, nearly 150 Door County Maritime Museum members, their guests and museum volunteers attended a special reception aboard the vessel, which included a buffet-style dinner in the steamer's galley, crew and officer's dining rooms. A showing of Ryerson photographs by Chris Winters was also included in the evening's program.

Earlier, volunteers spent several hours tidying up the vessel and, as guests began arriving Friday night, the Inland Steel houseflag and Edward L. Ryerson christening pennant were hoisted at the forward mast by shipkeeper Dave Thompson and Lee Barr, representing Central Marine Logistics, operator of the Ryerson.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




Environmental Group Objects to Study

07/20
Kingston would be hard hit by any expansion of the St. Lawrence Seaway, an activist warns. "Kingston would see none of the benefits of such a project," said Mark Mattson, executive director of Lake Ontario Keeper, an environmental group.

"We'd like to nip it in the bud. It would be a real setback if this went through."

A study done by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers called the Navigation System Review recommends Canada and the U.S. spend billions of dollars to expand locks and harbors and widen and deepen the Seaway to allow larger vessels on the Great Lakes.

Widening or deepening the St. Lawrence risks dredging polluted sediments, says Krystyn Tully, programs director for Lake Ontario Keeper, seriously undermining the Canadian government's commitment to clean up the Great Lakes.

The engineers even looked at blowing up parts of islands in the Thousand Islands to allow larger ships to pass through, she added.

Mattson said Kingston could see higher wake levels, greater damage to shoreline properties and a higher risk of accidents on the water.

The U.S. is asking the Canadian government for $10 million for a seven-year feasibility study to follow their navigation study. The proposal is currently in front of Transport Canada.

"Our biggest objection is that the Corps wants the Canadian government to buy into a $10-million project to essentially turn the Great Lakes into a bigger highway," Mattson said.

"We'd like to see the Great Lakes protected and enhanced. This seems to be going in the opposite direction."

The forum will address concerns about the Navigation System Review, which Tully says is deeply flawed. "It's a terrible study. The economic analysis doesn't make sense," Tully said. "Why should [the Canadian government] invest $10 million in a study that won't have any credibility?"

Mattson says if the government invests $10 million in the feasibility study, its likely that the Corps' plans for the waterways would be implemented in some form.

"The feasibility study isn't going to find out why they shouldn't go ahead with the project. It will focus on why to do it."

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Alpena Update

07/20
The steamer Alpena arrived into port Friday afternoon to load cement at Lafarge. It is heading for Milwaukee. The Jacklyn M barge Integrity will be in port late Saturday night to load.

The J.A.W Iglehart has been in Alpena on a temporary lay-up since Monday. It is expected to sail next week. The Paul H. Townsend is still in Muskegon in lay-up but is scheduled to leave the first week of August.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Saginaw Update

07/20
The Wilfred Sykes arrived in the Saginaw River Friday morning, passing the Pump-Out Island around 7:30 a.m. She stopped at the Bay City Wirt Dock to lighter and then continued upriver to the Saginaw Wirt Dock to finish. After turning in the 6th Street Turning Basin, the Sykes was outbound for the lake, passing the Front Range at 10:30 p.m.

Pictures by: Todd Shorkey
Wilfred Sykes upbound at Wheeler's Landing.
Another view.
Stern View.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Welland Canal Traffic

07/20
Friday afternoon, the Greek registered Olympic Mentor was downbound above Lock 7. The tug Seahound was sailing behind heron its way to assist the Nassau registered Harriett, The Harriett was ready to depart Wharf 6 Industrial Dock in Thorold after unloading what appeared to be bauxite ore. The docks own tug, the WB Indock also helped in the departure. Once in the main channel the Harriett headed downbound for Lock 7. Olympic Mentor passing.
Stern view.
Entering Lock 7.
Harriett backs from Wharf 6.
Seahound along side.
Working the side.
WB Indock working the bow.
Close up.
Turned in the main channel.
Heading for Lock 7.


Reported by: Alex Howard




Escaped carp threaten lake fishery

07/20
Asian carp, the latest exotic species to threaten the Great Lakes, is worse than the sea lamprey or the zebra mussel, scientists say.

Asian carp -- also known as bighead carp -- escaped from Arkansas catfish farms during floods. They weigh up to 100 pounds, breed rapidly and ravenously devour food consumed by other species. They have moved up the Illinois River to within 25 miles of Lake Michigan, according to a story in Thursday's Chicago Tribune.

Officials had hoped a $2.2 million temporary electrified barrier in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal at Romeoville, Ill., would halt the creatures' advance. But leaders of a Canadian-American commission that monitors the Great Lakes basin have urged the United States to install a more permanent barrier.

Bighead carp eat up to 40 percent of their body weight daily in vegetation, microscopic animal life or native mussels and fish, depleting food stocks for native filter feeders such as paddlefish, gizzard shad and bigmouth buffalo. They also compete with larval and juvenile fish and mussels.

Recreational users of the water might also feel some impact. Asian carp have an odd penchant for hurling themselves over or into boats, sometimes striking people.

Neck injuries, broken noses and bruises are just a few of the traumas inflicted by the leaping fish, according to Pam Thiel, project leader at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Fishery Resources Office in LaCrosse, Wis. Some researchers on boats have started using cookie sheets or garbage can lids as shields.

The airborne carp could sail over the electrified barrier in the canal, some officials fear.

"We have a $4 billion sport and commercial fishery in the Great Lakes. That whole fishery is literally at risk," said Dennis Schornack, co-chairman of the International Joint Commission, which is calling for the U.S. and Canada to take immediate action. "This could turn the Great Lakes into a carp pond."

Reported by: Chris Winkler




Brig Niagara Open for Tours

07/20
The tall ship brig Niagara will be moored at the Carbide Dock in Sault Ste Marie, Mi. today for tours. There is no cost to tour the vessel.

Reported by: Brian Kloosterman




Book Signing Today in Duluth

07/20
Jody Aho, author of "The Steamer William A. Irvin: Queen of the Silver Stackers", will be the guest at a book signing in Duluth on Saturday, July 20 from 2-3 p.m. The signing is being hosted by The Bookstore At Fitger's, located in the lower level of the Fitger's Brewery Complex, 600 East Superior Street, Duluth.

A regular contributor to this site, Jody has also participated in several other publications dealing with Great Lakes shipping history. His "Marine Milestones" have been a fixture in "Know Your Ships" since 1998. He has also contributed to "Ships of the Great Lakes Cookbook: Discover Their Culinary Legends". Jody has also written articles for or contributed his photography to "The Nor' Easter", the journal of the Lake Superior Marine Museum Association; "Great Laker"; and "Great Lakes Photo Magazine."




Book Signing at Whitefish Point

07/20
Author Wes Oleszewski will be at the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum at Whitefish Point to sign books today at 1 p.m.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 20

CANADOC (2) suffered severe bow damage on July 20, 1963 in a collision with the Swiss-flagged freighter BARILOCHE in dense fog off Ile de Orleans, near Quebec City.

The LEON FALK, JR. was christened at Cleveland, July 20, 1961 after one trip to Duluth, MN for ore.

HORACE JOHNSON was launched July 20, 1929 for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

SHELTER BAY (2) was launched July 20, 1907 as a) JAY C. MORSE.

At the end of June, 1877, the ferry MYRTLE began running between Port Huron and Sarnia. However, on 20 July 1877, the Port Huron Time reported that "The ferry MYRTLE has been taken off the route on account of the extreme dullness of the times."

The scow DIXIE burned during the night of 20 July 1875 while lying at Kenyon's dock in East China Township on the St. Clair River.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Iron Ore Shipments Up 4.3 Percent In June

07/19
Waterborne and rail shipments of iron ore in North America totaled 7.1 million gross tons in June, an increase of 4.3 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. However, the trade continues to lag behind 2001 on both a season-to-date and year-to-date basis.

June shipments of iron ore from Great Lakes ports totaled 5.1 million tons, an increase of 10.3 percent compared to last year. The increase could not, however, offset the decreases registered in previous months. On a season-to-date basis, Great Lakes iron ore shipments stand at 14.7 million tons, a decrease of 9.7 percent. On a year-to-date basis, the 16.1 million tons loaded at Great Lakes ports represent a decrease of 8 percent.

Iron ore loadings at eastern Canadian ports in June slipped by more than 32 percent, totaling only 750,000 tons. Season- and year-to-date, shipments from the three Canadian ports stand at 2.5 million tons, a decrease of 14.6 percent.

Vessel shipments to North American ports outside the Great Lakes more than tripled in June to 422,977 tons. For the year, this segment of the trade has increased by 65 percent to 1.6 million tons.

The all-rail iron ore move totaled 783,964 tons in June, a decrease of 14.3 percent. Year-to-date, rail shipments stand at 4.8 million tons, a decrease of 11.3 percent.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Environmental group Targets Nanticoke

07/19
The power plant at Nanticoke, Ontario, a major destination for coal shipped on the Great Lakes, is Canada's single biggest source of air pollution, according to a report issued by an environmental group.

The report by Ontario Clean Air Alliance shows the power plant on Lake Erie is responsible for 6 percent of all air pollution in Canada. Information in the report comes from Environment Canada's national pollutant release inventory.

Ontario Power Generation, the province's publicly owned generating utility, insists it is meeting all regulations set out by the province and is installing equipment to reduce some of its toxic emissions.

But Jack Gibbons, of the clean air alliance, told the Canadian Press that the province needs much tougher environmental laws.

"The regulatory regime is just not strict enough," said Gibbons. "They're very weak regulations that allow (Ontario Power Generation) to emit excessive amounts of pollutants that are causing a very serious public health hazard."

For the past couple years, the Nanticoke plant has received low-sulfur western coal by ship from Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wis. In a typical week during the shipping season, three or four Canadian and sometimes U.S. lakers will load in Superior with cargo destined for Nanticoke.

Reported by: Roger Buchanan




Pellet Terminal Sale

07/19
The sale of the Lorain, Ohio pellet terminal is complete. Local media quoted Lorain Mayor Craig Fulton as saying "Its ours, I have the deed ". The terminal that services the ISG Steel Mill in Cleveland will be moved to Whiskey Island in Cleveland Harbor.

Starting in 1981, 1,000-footers have been delivering iron ore to the pellet terminal at the mouth of the Black River in Lorain. The cargo is then reloaded into vessels small enough to transit all the way up the winding Cuyahoga River in Cleveland. To better serve the ISG Steel Mill, the boat loader in Lorain will be moved to Cleveland Bulk Terminal before the beginning of the next navigation season, so this is likely the last season for the shuttle.

The Cleveland - Cuyahoga Port Authority advertised for bids to dismantle, move and set up equipment from Lorain to Cleveland.

Mayor Foltin told local media "the hulking ore loaders and the dusty piles of Taconite should be gone by years end". The water front property in Lorain will then be developed for recreational use.

Reported by: Ned Gang




PM 41 Loads Scrap

07/19
After completing her unload of stone Wednesday morning, the tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 remained tied up at the Verplank dock in Holland for the rest of the day. The tug and barge were waiting for delivery of additional loading equipment.

With the delivery made Thursday morning, she backed up to the Padnos dock and began loading scrap material for delivery to Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.

Also in Holland Thursday, the Grande Mariner tied up at Crescent Shores Marina for her second of six stops this year.

Reported by: Bob Vande Vusse




Scrapping Continues on Fort Henry

07/19
The remains of the Fort Henry continue to be reduced to a pile of scrap metal as most of the bow section has now been removed. All of the windows and doors have been cut out and a large hole is now visible above the bridge area. The anchor winch has been cut to pieces and the life boat has been taken away. Traveling in the canal was her former fleet mate Oakglen, which is two years older than the Fort Henry.

Fort Henry scrapped.
Growing scrap pile.
Windows removed.
Aft side of pilot house.
Another view.
Close up.
Oakglen passing.
Stern view.

Reported by: Alex Howard




Marquette Update

07/19
The Charles Beeghly loaded taconite at Marquette on Thursday. No other ships are due until Sunday when the Lee A. Tregurtha is due in late. On Monday the W. Sykes is due along with the return of the Beeghly.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Saginaw Update

07/19
The Buffalo arrived early Thursday morning arriving at the New Bay Aggregates Dock in Bay City to unload. She finished and was outbound before noon.

The Calumet arrived late Wednesday to deliver limestone to the Saginaw Rock Products Dock. She was outbound passing through Bay City during the afternoon hours.

The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons also unloaded Thursday morning, lightering in Essexville before departing around 8 a.m. to finish unloading at the Valley Asphalt Dock in Saginaw. The pair was outbound passing the Airport Turning Basin around 5:30 p.m.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




St. Clair River Traffic

07/19
Below are images of traffic on the St Clair River Thursday.

Olympic Mentor downbound.
Peter Creswell upbound.
John Spence and McAsphalt 401 downbound.
Canadian Transfer laid up in Sarnia's North Slip.
Roger Blough down at Marine City.
Indiana Harbor at DTE.
Columbia Star.

Reported by: Andy Severson




Toledo News

07/19
The Middletown finished unloading ore at the Torco Dock and departed around 9 a.m. Thursday morning. Before leaving she reported to the U.S. Coast Guard a possible fire by the Lakefront Docks near the Saturn and Ex Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire were tied up at. Upon further investigation no fire was found in the area and both vessels tied up here are in good condition. The Joseph H. Frantz, Saturn, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in lay-up at there respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Friday, followed by the Reserve on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Reserve on Saturday, followed by the Armco on Sunday. There is nothing in at the Shipyard at the present time.

Classic Toledo Shipping
Paterson unloading ore at the Interlake Iron Company Dock (Toledo Furnace).

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Hamilton Report

07/19
Thursday evening the Federal Oshima was unloading a bulk cargo at Pier 11 while over at Pier 12, the Pineglen was also unloading a bulk cargo.

The CSL Tadoussac was unloading iron ore pellets at Stelco.

The saltie Seaguardian II was moored at Pier 23 unloading steel slabs. Immediately astern of her and moored diagonally across Pier 23 was the Algomarine unloading sand. The Seaguardian II was moored close to where the sand was to be unloaded from the Algomarine, this prevented the Marine from docking in a normal position.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Today in Great Lakes History - July 19

EDWIN H. GOTT was float launched July 19, 1978.

CLARENCE B. RANDALL (1) sailed on her maiden voyage July 19, 1943 from Ashtabula light bound for Two Harbors, MN.

CANADOC (2) was christened on July 19, 1961.

The registry of the GORDON C. LEITCH (1) was closed on July 19, 1985 as “sold foreign.”

JOHN P. REISS in tandem tow with the carferry CITY OF SAGINAW 31 arrived at Castellon, Spain prior to July 19, 1973 for scrapping.

JOSEPH S. YOUNG (1) was christened at Buffalo, NY on July 19, 1957. The JOSEPH S. YOUNG (1) was the first of seven T2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service.

On 19 July 1831, the wooden schooner HENRY CLAY was carrying 800 barrels of salt and passengers from Oswego to the Welland Canal on her maiden voyage when she capsized in a squall and sank about 10 miles off Port Dalhousie on Lake Ontario. About 11 persons were aboard and at least 6 of them lost their lives. Three were saved by the steamer CANADA.

On 19 July 1900, the name of the Toledo tug A. ANDREWS, JR. was changed to PALLISTER.

On 19 July 1871, J. BARBER (wooden propeller steamer, 125', 306 t, built in 1856 at Cleveland, OH) was carrying fruit from St. Joseph, Michigan to Chicago when she caught fire and sank 14 miles off Michigan City, Indiana. Five lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Unloading Hopper May Be End of Independent

07/18
The General Mills Frontier Grain Elevator in Buffalo is sporting a new self-unloader hopper on the north side of the building. This grain elevator is serviced by the last U.S. straight deck grain carrier, the Kinsman Independent. With the ability to accept grain from self unloading vessels, this could put the Independent out of work.

Self unloading vessel such as the Herbert C. Jackson have taken over some of the Buffalo grain trade and could expand to carry to the General Mills Frontier Elevator. The Kinsman Independent's fleet mate Kinsman Enterprise was sold early this year for scrapping.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




U.S.-Flag Carriage Inches Upward Again In June

07/18
U.S.-Flag shipments of dry-bulk cargo on the Great Lakes in June totaled 11.4 million net tons, a decrease of 3 percent compared to a year ago. However, the June total represents the second month in a row in which the gap between this season and last has narrowed significantly. The 2002 season began with a 20-percent decrease in April, the first full month of navigation in the dry-bulk trades, but May float was down by 9.4 percent.

Another positive sign in June was the sailing of three idled lakers. Oglebay Norton Marine Services Company activated its Buckeye on June 8 and its Courtney Burton on June 15. Both vessels are mid-sized self-unloaders. Interlake Steamship sailed its 1,000-footer James R. Barker on June 29. However, there are still four U.S.-Flag lakers with no sail date for 2002, and a fifth, the Kinsman Independent, has been laid up until more grain cargos become available.

For the first time this season, the June U.S.-Flag iron ore total increased compared to the corresponding period last year.

Shipments of iron ore in U.S. bottoms topped 5.4 million tons, an increase of 3.2 percent. The trade benefited from the resumption of steel production at ISG's Cleveland and Indiana Harbor facilities. However, for the season, U.S.-Flag iron ore cargos have declined by nearly 19 percent, a clear indication that the American steel industry has yet to turn the corner in its efforts to rebound from years of unfair trade in foreign steel.

Coal loadings in U.S.-Flag lakers slipped 5.3 percent to 2.2 million net tons in June. The season-to-date total, 6.9 million tons, represents a decrease of 1.8 percent. Reduced demand for western coal from a major Michigan utility accounts for the decrease.

Stone cargos in U.S. hulls fell nearly 10 percent in June to 3.1 million tons. Steel's struggles continued to impact shipments of fluxstone, but a general sluggishness in the construction market also contributed to the decrease.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Missing Sailor

07/18
Tuesday night a crew man from the saltie Kent was reported missing. The 47 year old man was working on deck when he lost his footing and fell off the ship east of Montreal near Verchères, Quebec. The Canadian Coast Guard searched for the man but did not find him. Divers were expected to continue the search Wednesday morning while the vessel remained at anchor in Contrecoeur.

Reported by: Laurent Côté




Twin Ports Report

07/18
Sometimes you're lucky, sometimes you're not. That's the way it's been for crews of two salties in the Twin Ports. The Isolda has been docked at the Cenex Harvest States terminal for the past couple of humid, sweltering days. Meanwhile, the Utviken has been anchored on the lake in the coolest spot for miles around.

Since the closing of LTV Steel Mining Co. more than a year ago, BNSF ore dock has seen a much bigger variety of vessels than it has in the past several years. Wednesday was no exception: H. Lee White was loading there during the day and Great Lakes Trader was expected late that night.

An attractive visitor on the Duluth side was John G. Munson, arriving under the Aerial Lift Bridge shortly before 5 p.m. It unloaded stone at the Reiss Inland Dock before shifting to DMIR ore dock to load taconite pellets.

Oglebay Norton was loading coal at Midwest Energy Terminal on Wednesday. Algobay was anchored on Lake Superior awaiting its turn at the coal dock. Canadian Enterprise was expected later that night to join the line.

Reported by: Al Miller




Marquette Update

07/18
The Herbert C. Jackson arrived at a hot and hazy Marquette on Wednesday and began loading pellets. The Charles M. Beeghly is due in early Thursday morning. The next ship may not arrive until Sunday. The Sykes is scheduled for a trip to Marquette next week, tentatively set for Monday.

Herbert C. Jackson approaches the dock.
Flowers on the forward cabins.
Close up of bow.
Chutes lowered.
Jackson loading.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Busy Day at Stone Port

07/18
Tuesday was a busy day with the John G. Munson loading in the early morning hours followed by the Joseph H. Thompson around 11 a.m. It departed around 9 p.m. heading for Indiana Harbor. Waiting at anchor was the Wilfred Sykes which backed into the dock to load after the Thompson left. The Sykes is taking stone to Bay City. Anchored off port was the Calumet who loaded on Wednesday.

Calumet at anchor Tuesday.
Thompson departs.
Sykes loading.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Toledo News

07/18
The Oakglen was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. The salt water vessel Peonia was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The Joseph H. Frantz, Saturn, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in layup at there respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Friday. The Reserve on Saturday, followed by the Algosteel on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Middletown on Thursday. The Reserve on Saturday, followed by the Armco on Sunday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Book Signing This Weekend in Duluth

07/18
Jody Aho, author of "The Steamer William A. Irvin: Queen of the Silver Stackers", will be the guest at a book signing in Duluth on Saturday, July 20 from 2-3 p.m. The signing is being hosted by The Bookstore At Fitger's, located in the lower level of the Fitger's Brewery Complex, 600 East Superior Street, Duluth.

A regular contributor to this site, Jody has also participated in several other publications dealing with Great Lakes shipping history. His "Marine Milestones" have been a fixture in "Know Your Ships" since 1998. He has also contributed to "Ships of the Great Lakes Cookbook: Discover Their Culinary Legends". Jody has also written articles for or contributed his photography to "The Nor' Easter", the journal of the Lake Superior Marine Museum Association; "Great Laker"; and "Great Lakes Photo Magazine."




Book Signing at Whitefish Point

07/18
Author Wes Oleszewski will be at the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum at Whitefish Point to sign books on Saturday, July 20. The event will begin at 1 p.m.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 18

The AGAWA CANYON struck an abutment at Welland Canal's Bridge 11 at Allanburg, Ont. on July 18, 1977 while downbound with salt for Kingston, Ont. and sustained a thirty-foot gash just above the waterline at the port bow.

The Canal Tanker COMET entered service on July 18, 1913 for ocean service.

The WILLIAM J. FILBERT was in collision with the KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1) at the Burlington Northern Dock on July 18, 1970 when the Steel Trust steamer lost control in the current entering the slip.

The entire forward superstructure of the JOHN DYKSTRA (2) (BENSON FORD 1), including the forecastle deck, was delivered to South Bass Island in Lake Erie on July 18, 1986 on the barge THOR 101 towed by the tug GREGORY J. BUSCH. The superstructure was moved for use as a summer home where it remains. The hull of the DYKSTRA (2) was sold to Marine Salvage, Port Colborne, Ont. and was towed from Cleveland July 10th by the tugs ARGUE MARTIN and GLENBROOK to Ramey's Bend arriving there on July 12, 1986 where she was scrapped.

WILLIAM A. REISS (2) was launched July 18, 1925 as a) JOHN A. TOPPING.

WILLIAM G. MATHER (2) completed her sea trials on July 18, 1925.

On 18 July 1858, ANDROMEDA (2-mast wooden schooner, 112', 568 t, built in 1848n at Madison Dock, Ohio) was carrying 800 barrels of salt from Oswego to Chicago. She sprang a leak suddenly and foundered 20 miles from Sheboygan, Wisconsin. The crew escaped in her boat, many just in their underwear. They arrived at Manitowoc the next day.

On 18 July 1872, the schooner D. L. COUCH of Detroit (formerly AVCORN) sank about 10 miles from Long Point on Lake Erie. Two lives were lost.

The wooden propeller freigjhter N. K. FAIRBANK (205', 980 gt) was launched in Marine City, Michigan on 18 July 1874. She was then towed to Detroit where her engines were in stalled by William Cowie. She had two direct acting condensing engines 34' x 32" on one shaft and her boiler was installed on her main deck. She only lasted until 1895 when she stranded and burned near Port Colborne, Ontario. The remains of the hull were sold to Carter Brothers of Port Colborne and it was rebuilt and enrolled as a new vessel with the name ELIZA H. STRONG. The STRONG lasted until she burned in 1904.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Traffic Returns to Goderich

07/17
The first boat in the Goderich harbor in three weeks was the Oakglen. The vessel arrived last Thursday and spent several days at the grain terminals.

The salt mine had a three week production shutdown that ended last weekend with the arrival of the Agawa Canyon early Sunday afternoon. She loaded while the Capt Henry Jackman waited her turn tied up on the north side of the mine. The Canyon departed, sailing for Milwaukee.

The Capt Henry Jackman loaded overnight and into the morning hours of Monday. She then departed, also heading for Milwaukee.

Later on Monday, the John D. Leitch was seen loading at the mine. After the dry spell of the shutdown, Goderich residents and tourists are pleased to see so many vessels back in the harbor.

Pictures by Peter Kling
Agawa Canyon docking at the Sifto Salt.
Crewman lowered to the dock.
Ready to unload.

Reported by: Lisa Stuparyk




Deeper Drafts Return

07/17
Rising water levels have led to some relief for shipping companies. After years of record low water levels, the Oglebay Norton was recently able to top a load of 66,000 tons.

On July 11 the 1000-footer loaded 66,192 net tons of coal at the Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wisconsin. The cargo was destine for the Detroit Edison coal dock at the Recor Power Plant on the St. Clair River. The load was the most carried on a single trip this season and possibly the best since 1999.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




St. Lawrence River Update

07/17
The saltie Scan Germania was departing the Alstom dock on the Richelieu River July 6 when it struck the CN rail road bridge. The Scan Germania was backing when it hit the swing bridge, knocking the north end into the water. The Scan Germania appeared to suffer little more than cosmetic damage in the incident.

The bridge is owned by Canadian National Railway and was last used in 2000. It connects Sorel with Tracy.

The partially scrapped Alcor was moved last week a short distance past the bridge. Scrapping is expected to continue in early August. The vessel ran aground in November, 1999 on the St-Lawrence River east of Quebec City. The Alcor suffered extensive structural damage and was sold for scrap. Scrapping was put on hold last year as resident complained of the operation.

Last Friday the CSL Tadoussac ran aground at Pointe aux Trembles Anchorage. The vessel was towed to pier Bickerdike B7, inspected and cleared to continue on its trip. Tadoussac was reported to be passing Sorel upbound Tuesday afternoon.

Photos by Andre Cournoyer and Michel Berube
The bridge knocked into the water.
Close up.
Scan Germania departing. A hanging painting platform at the stern is the only evidence of the incident.

Reported by: Andre Guevremont, Kent Malo and Laurent Côté




High-speed Lake Michigan Ferry

07/17
Three proposals to establish a new cross lake ferry service between Wisconsin and Michigan have run into delays caused by difficulty in finding financial backing.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported Monday that the start-up date for a proposed high-speed ferry line between Milwaukee and Muskegon has been pushed back a year to 2004.

Lake Michigan Carferry Inc., operators of the ferry Badger, has put on hold its plan to refurbish the long-idle Spartan and put it into service between Racine and Muskegon.

In addition, Eau Claire neurosurgeon Thomas Rankin has been unable to come up with the $80 million needed to build two high-speed ferries to run between Milwaukee and Muskegon.

Jay Sorenson, spokesman for Lake Michigan Carferry, told the newspaper that finding money for a start-up ferry service is difficult in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and last year's bankruptcy of American Classic Voyages.

The Lake Michigan Carferry continues to operate the Badger on daily crossings from Ludington, Mi to Manitowoc, Wi.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




Split Load for the Cuyahoga

07/17
Tuesday morning the Cuyahoga arrived in Lorain, Oh. to deliver a partial load on the Black River. After unloading the Cuyahoga backed out to Lake Erie and turned for Cleveland to unload the rest at West Third Street on her name sake river.

Pictures by TZ
Cuyahoga inbound.
Backing past the lighthouse.
Onto Lake Erie.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Marquette Report

07/17
The John J. Boland loaded taconite at Marquette on Monday. The James R. Barker unloaded coal at the Presque Isle power plant on Tuesday. This was the Barker's second trip to Marquette since her fit-out.

The Herbert C. Jackson is due in to load taconite on Wednesday, with the Charles M. Beeghly tentatively scheduled for Thursday. The next ship in may not arrive until Sunday, a slow week at the dock.

Boland loading on Monday.
James R. barker unloading.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Saginaw Update

07/17
The Calumet was outbound the Saginaw River Tuesday morning after unloading overnight in Saginaw. She was passing through downtown Bay City just after 8:30 a.m.

The Sam Laud passed the Saginaw River Front Range around noon on her way to the New Bay Aggregates Dock in Bay City and unloaded through the afternoon. The Laud is scheduled to return to the same dock in a few days.

Pictures by: Todd Shorkey
Calumet downbound passing Bay City Wirt Dock.
Close up.
Bow view at Independence Bridge.
Sam Laud Inbound at Essroc.
Turning into the Bay Aggregates Dock.
Tall Ship Appledore passing the Laud.
Unloading at Bay Aggregates.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Detroit News

07/17 Tuesday was a busy day on the Detroit and Rouge Rivers. The Saginaw was in the old channel of the Rouge River unloading coke onto area 5 on Zug Island. The Canadian Transport was unloading at the Zug Island coal dock on the Short Cut Canal.

The CSL Laurentien passed downbound at 8:15 a.m. The Armco was upbound at 10:20 a.m. passing the down bound Frontenac a short time later. About 11:00 a.m. the Peter R. Cresswell docked at Zug Island and was unloading limestone.

The Fred R. White Jr. was downbound at 2:00 p.m. The Charles M. Beeghley departed the Rouge River Short Cut canal around 2:10 p.m. and turned upbound followed by the tug Karen Andrie with barge A397 turning on right wheel going downbound. They were followed by the Saginaw departing the Rouge and heading up river.

Reported by: Kenneth Borg




Detroit Traffic

07/17
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Tuesday.

Limnos downbound off Great Lakes Steel bound for the Wyandotte Channel.
Stern view.
Daviken (Bahamas) upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Lake Guardian downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
CSL Laurentien downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Canadian Transport unloading coal in the Rouge Short Cut Canal.
Yankcanuck downbound off Nicholson's bound for the Wyandotte & Trenton Channels with steel for the old Mc Louth Steel Dock in Trenton.
Stern view.
Something you don't see everyday. The yacht Vakasa from South Africa. At the Wyandotte Yacht Club fuel dock in Ecorse Creek.
Close up.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo News

07/17
The salt water vessel Elise Oldendorff was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator. The Mississagi was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The salt water vessels Peonia and Varnebank were unloading cargo at the T.W.I. Dock. The Canadian Transport was loading coal at the CSX Docks. There were no vessels at the shipyard at the time of this report.

The Joseph H. Frantz, Saturn, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in layup at there respective dock sites.

The tugs Mighty Jake, Mighty Jimmy, Prairieland, and Pioneerland are working with various barges on the Maumee River dredging project by the grain elevators, as well as on the new I-280 bridge replacement project.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin late Thursday evening. The Reserve on Saturday, followed by the Algosteel on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Middletown on Thursday. The Reserve on Saturday, followed by the Armco on Sunday.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Hochelaga and the Charles C. West at the C&O Coal Docks.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Erie update

07/17
The Adam E. Cornelius made her fifth visit to Erie in 2002 on Tuesday, inbound at 7:30 to unload stone at the Old Ore Dock. The vessel pulled into the Old Ore Dock to unload stone from Drummond Island.

Cornelius Inbound.
Stern View .
The Erie Pier head Lighthouse .

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Arnold's Books closing up shop

07/17
Judy Herba, long-time proprietor of Arnold's Antiquarian Booksellers, 218 S. Water St., Marine City, Mich., is closing her store, effective Aug. 15. She cited ill health as the reason for the closure. In an effort to reduce inventory, the store is holding a 60% off sale on many items, including those of Great Lakes and nautical interest. Herba said she plans to open an on-line store in the near future.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




Today in Great Lakes History - July 17

The ASHCROFT was towed out of Quebec City on July 17, 1969 in tandem with the steamer SIR THOMAS SHAUGHNESSY by the Polish tug JANTAR for scrapping at Castellon, Spain.

The BROOKDALE (2) lost her self-unloading boom overboard in the Detroit River during a wind and rain storm on July 17, 1980 while loading salt at the Canadian Rock Salt Dock at Ojibway, Ont.

The COMET was towed from Toledo to Ashtabula, OH on July 17, 1973 where she was broken up during the summer and fall of 1973.

WILLIAM J. FILBERT was launched in 1907.

On her last trip the COLONEL JAMES PICKANDS arrived at Cleveland on July 17, 1974 with a load of iron ore.

GOLDEN HIND loaded her first dry bulk cargo on July 17, 1954.

On 17 July 1856, TINTO (wooden propeller, 135', built in 1855-56 at Sorel, Quebec) caught fire and burned to a total loss only 2 miles from shore. She was between Snake Island and Nine Mile Point on Lake Ontario. 18 lives were lost. The survivors jumped into the water and were picked up by a boat from shore. A newspaper article stated that she had no lifeboat aboard. Her machinery was later recovered and installed in the AVON.

On 17 July 1883, B. PARSONS (2-mast wooden schooner, 218 t, built in 1856 at Vermilion, OH) struck the north pier while entering the harbor at Charlevoix, Michigan during a gale. She sank crosswise in the channel and blocked passage into the harbor for two weeks until she broke up enough to allow vessels to pass. In December, the steam tug COE towed the hulk a half mile down the beach and abandoned it.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




New Five Year Collective Agreement at Port Weller

07/16
The employees of Port Weller Dry Docks, members of the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Local 680, have ratified a new five year collective agreement, the union and the company announced in a joint statement today.

The new agreement, provides 3.5 per cent wage increases in the first year and an overall average increase of 2.6 per cent for each year of the five years, and includes productivity improvements and incentive programs.

A $500 signing bonus will also be paid to eligible employees in the bargaining unit. The union negotiating committee recommended approval of the new collective agreement which continues on through to May 31, 2008. Monetary improvements will commence June 1, 2003 when the present agreement expires.

"The approval of this collective agreement by Port Weller Dry Docks employees enables the company to aggressively market our shipbuilding and major conversion capabilities nationally and internationally", said Alan S. Thoms, President, Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd., Port Weller's parent company. "The Port Weller facility is now in a much better position to secure long term ship-building contracts", he added.

"This new collective agreement is beneficial to all parties", said Dan Langlois, Business Agent, Local 680. "It will provide continuity of work for our members and will help the Company fill its order books", said Mr. Langlois.

During the past winter, 400 people were employed at Canada's only Great Lakes shipbuilding yard on a combination of ship repairs and a major conversion. Present employment is approximately 100.

Reported by: Port Weller Dry Docks




Manitowoc Marine Group Launches Tug Ocean Reliance

07/16
Saturday morning the 127-foot tug Ocean Reliance was launched into the Menominee River at Marinette Marine Co. The tug is the first of two tugs being built at Marinette Marine. When delivered, Ocean Reliance and its sister tug Coastal Reliance will be mated with 155,000-barrel, double-hulled petroleum barges, which are currently being constructed at Manitowoc's Bay Shipbuilding subsidiary.

Ocean Reliance is powered by 9,280-horsepower engines and is equipped with an Intercon coupling system that will link the ocean-class tug with its 512-foot barge. Scheduled for delivery later this year, both tug/barge units are fully compliant with the provisions of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA '90), which mandates that any vessel carrying crude oil or refined petroleum products in U.S. waters must be double-hulled.

Both of Vessel Management's new tug/barge units will operate in the Pacific Northwest and are among the largest and most-sophisticated vessels of their type ever constructed in the United States.

Pictures by Scott Best
Ocean Reliance ready to be launched.
Krystal and Erica Kobasic move into position for the launch.
Ocean Reliance hits the Menominee River.
Ocean Reliance just after launch.

Reported by: Scott Best and Dick Sheehy




Arion in Menominee

07/16
Monday evening the Arion arrived in Menominee to unload wood pulp from Finland at K&K Warehouse dock. Marinette Fuel and Dock is expecting two loads of salt this month on an Algoma Central Marine or Upper Lakes Shipping vessel. Also due near the end of the month is the salty Ira with more pig iron.

Arion passing Green Island (about 3-4 miles out).
Arion on the Menominee River.
Arion passing through Ogden Street Bridge.
Arion docking at K & K Warehouse with the unloading cranes at the ready.

Reported by: Scott Best and Dick Lund




Buckeye Unloads

07/16
Monday morning the Buckeye was backing into the Pellet Terminal to unload. The pellets are then loaded onto smaller boats for the steel mill in Cleveland. The pellet terminal is scheduled to close soon and be moved to Cleveland's water front.

Pictures by TZ
Backing past the lighthouse.
Close up.
Wide view.
Docked and unloading.
Close up.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Marquette Update

07/16
The John J. Boland unloaded coal at Marquette's Shiras Steam Plant on Sunday, then moved to the ore dock in the upper harbor to load taconite on Monday. No other ships are due into Marquette until the Herbert Jackson is scheduled in on Wednesday.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Toledo News

07/16
The Elise Oldendorff was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator. The Mississagi was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The saltwater vessel Varnebank was unloading wood products at the T.W.I. Docks. The Armco is due in at the Torco Ore Dock on Monday evening to unload ore.

The Joseph H. Frantz, Saturn, and the tug Mary E. Hannah and her barge remain in layup at there respective dock sites.

The tugs Mighty Jake, Mighty Jimmy, Prairieland, and Pioneerland are working with related barges on the Maumee River dredging project and the new I-280 bridge replacement project.

The next coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Canadian Transport on Tuesday. The Algosteel on Thursday, followed by the Rt. Hon Paul J. Martin on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Middletown on Thursday, followed by the Reserve on Friday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto Harbor

07/16
Beaver Marine tug Mister Joe departed the harbor Monday. Beaver Marine is a subsidiary company wholly owned by McNally. Windmill Point remains on the island airport ferry service. The regular ferry Maple City has been hauled out at Pier 35's Atlas crane.

An old Toronto harbor charter vessel, Majesty, has been overhauled during the past year near Belleville and she will be returning to Toronto to reenter the trade shortly.

Reported by: Gerry O.




More on the Fort Henry Scrapping

07/16
The pilothouse and forecastle of the steamer Fort Henry were intended to be an asset to the city of St. Catherines. But the structures, preserved near the Welland Canal's Lock 3, are being razed because they were the targets of recurring vandalism and expensive to maintain.

McKeil Marine of Hamilton purchased the pilothouse and forecastle in 1993 and planned to turn them into a tourist attraction for visitors to the Welland Canal and the St. Catherines Museum. Unfortunately, local vandals repeatedly targeted the pilothouse. Attempts to repair the pilothouse only drew more visits from the vandals.

Finally, McKeil decided to give up. Unable to find any organization that wanted to take over the pilothouse, the company decided to scrap it.

"Our main business with it in the past few years has been the regular expressions of concern from the Seaway and from residents," McKeil's vice president of finance Steve Fletcher told the St. Catherines Standard newspaper. "When you're in the business of operating barges, you can't be running back and forth to fix it up every week."

Virginia Hatch-Stewart would have gladly adopted the Fort Henry. The St. Catharines Museum's chief officer had wanted the structures for the museum's outdoor discovery park.

However, the museum couldn't afford to maintain the structures and no one from the community stepped forward to take on the project.

The Fort Henry was built for Canada Steamship Lines in 1955. The vessel was known for its speed and was said to make the run from Thunder Bay to Kingston in 74 hours. But as fast as the Fort Henry was, it guzzled a lot of fuel and as oil prices rose, it was eased out of service in the late 1970s.

Reported by: Barry Sellers




Great Laker Distributor

07/16
The magazine Great Laker is now available through your local book store or gift shop through Ingram Periodicals. Ingram distributes magazines to outlets such as Borders, Barnes & Noble and many others in the United States. If you would like your favorite bookstore or retailer to stock "Great Laker" they can call Ingram Periodicals at (800) 627-6247. "Great Laker" is title No. 56947.

Find out more at www.greatlaker.com




Weekly Updates

07/16
The weekly updates have been uploaded. Click here to view




Today in Great Lakes History - July 16

DETROIT EDISON (2) departed Quebec City July 16th 1986, along with former fleetmate SHARON, in tow of the U.S. tug PRUDENT to Brownsville, Tex. for scrapping.

The SAGINAW BAY departed Quebec City on July 16, 1985 in tandem with the E.B. BARBER towed by the Polish tug KORAL for scrapping at Vigo, Spain.

The NORTHERN VENTURE entered Great Lakes service July 16, 1961 upbound light for the Canadian lakehead to load grain.

On July 16, 1935 the BRUCE HUDSON capsized on Lake Ontario off Cobourg, Ont. while in tow of the wooden-hulled tug MUSCALLONGE.

Keel laying of the CHI-CHEEMAUN was on July 16, 1973.

CATARACT (wooden propeller, 150', 352 t, built in 1852 at Buffalo) caught fire on 16 July 1861, 5 miles off Erie, Pennsylvania. She became an inferno astern in just a few minutes and this prevented her boats from being launched. Four died. Some were saved by clinging to floating wreckage and some others were rescued by a small fishing boat. The schooner ST. PAUL picked up some survivors, Among those picked up by Captain Mosher of the ST. PAUL, were Captain McNally and the CATARACT's carpenter. Capt. Mosher had rescued these same two men in 1858 when the propeller INDIANA was lost in Lake Superior.

On 16 July 1873, the new barge MINNEAPOLIS was towed to Detroit for outfitting. She had just been launched four days earlier at Marine City. While on the way to Detroit, a Canadian man named Sinclair fell overboard and drowned.

On 16 July 1874, the Port Huron Times reported that "the old steamer REINDEER has been rebuilt to a barge by L. C. Rogers at H. C. Schnoor's shipyard at Fair Haven, [Michigan]. Her beautiful horns have been taken down, [she carried a set of large antlers], her machinery and cumbersome side-wheels removed, and she has been fully refitted with center arch and deck frame complex."

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Both sides to present arguments in Windoc-bridge collision

07/15
A lawsuit filed over the Windoc's collision with a Welland Canal bridge last summer moves ahead in federal court next month, with both sides claiming the other was at fault.

N.M. Paterson and Sons of Thunder Bay, which owned the Windoc, is suing the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp., operator of the bridge, for $20 million. The Aug. 11, 2001, accident severely damaged the Windoc and ultimately prompted Paterson to dispose of its Great Lakes fleet.

Both sides in the lawsuit will present their cases at pre-trial examination for discovery proceedings scheduled for Aug. 6-9 at the federal courthouse in Toronto. The hearing will be closed to the public.

Documents filed in the case reveal that each side blames the other for the accident.

In a statement of claim filed last fall, Paterson says the Windoc was about halfway under the Allenburg lift bridge when the bridge deck lowered onto the bulk carrier's stern tower.

However, the St. Catherines Standard newspaper reports that the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp. denies it was negligent and blames the accident on the shipping company and the Windoc's crew. The Seaway didn't provide any explanation to support its statement, saying it will provide details prior to trial.

David Marler, lead legal counsel for N.M. Paterson, told the Standard that he's eager to hear the Seaway's legal team argue the crash was somehow the Windoc's fault.

"This is an astonishing statement," he told the newspaper. "They're just stonewalling."

Marler said he will present in court a home video taken by a tourist that clearly shows the bridge deck descending into the Windoc's path.

Paterson is seeking about $20 million in compensation to cover projected revenue from the Windoc plus expenses directly related to salvaging the ship and its cargo of grain. In the wake of the accident, the company has decided to cease its marine operations entirely and focus on its Winnipeg-based grain export division.

Reported by: Launy Paul




First Trip Up

07/15
The tug William J. Moore and barge McCleary's Spirit are on their first trip together above Lake Ontario. The pair were upbound in the Detroit River early this morning. The tug and barge are expected to arrive in Sarnia about 10:00 a.m.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt




Lansdowne Renovation

07/15
Work has begun on the renovation of the Lansdowne in Erie, Pa. A demolition permit was issued on May 3 and the demolition work began shortly after.

The Lansdowne is currently being converted to a floating restaurant by Specialty Restaurants of Anaheim. When complete, the former rail barge will be moored where the Viking is at the Sassafrass Street Dock, which is being converted to a park.

The former Lansdowne is almost completely gone and is now just a skeleton. Nothing exists inside of her or out, as has been the case since she was towed from Buffalo to Erie by the tug Manitou in 1999. The two stacks have been scrapped. All new chairs, tables and furnishings are being put in, and the restaurant is scheduled to be open by Memorial Day 2003. All the boarded window frames have been removed and are to be replaced.

The Lansdowne, when done, will fit right in on the bayfront, which is being developed with the bus terminal, cruise terminal and convention center.

Work on the Lansdowne.
Another view.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Pipe Project

07/15
Below are images of the water pipe project off Burlington, Ont. McNally Construction Inc. tugs and barge are working on the project. Crews drilled and blasted a trench which they are now laying the pipeline in.

McNally Construction Co. spud barge working in conjunction with the tug Manistique east of downtown Burlington.
Another view.
Close up.
Crane lifting.
Crews working with the pipe.
Wide view of project.

Other images from Hamilton Harbor
Windoc.
Sandy Graham on dry dock.
Prescotont.
McNally Yard in Hamilton.
John Spence.
John D. Leitch.
Escouminac.
Elm.
Americo Dean.
Elsie D in Toronto.
Glenmont in Toronto.

Reported by: Gerry O.




June Marquette Traffic

07/15
The month of June was busy in the Lake Superior port. The number of ships visiting over-all in both harbors experience an 85% increase for the month of June compared to June 2001. Shipping for the season is up by 24% compared to the same time frame in 2001. Over, 50 vessels visited both harbors during the month of June compared to 27 visiting in June 2001. So far this season, 141 vessels visited Marquette's harbors compared to 114 during the same time frame last year.

For the lower harbor, a 20% increase was seen when 6 vessels visited during the month of June. During June 2001, five vessels visited the lower harbor. A total of 17 vessels have visited the lower harbor this season which is the same number for the same time frame in 2001. For the third month in a row, the H. Lee White once again lead all vessels with 4 visits followed by the Army Corps of Engineers Tug Bill Maier and Barge H.J. Schwartz and the Army Corp of Engineers Tug Fairchild, each having one visit.

For the upper harbor June was a busy month with 44 vessels calling. In June 2001, 22 vessels visited the harbor. For the season, the harbor's traffic is up by 28% with 124 vessels visiting this season compared to 97 during the same time frame last season. The big leaders for the month of June all came from the same fleet. The Lee Tregurtha, Charles Beeghly, and Herbert Jackson each had 4 visits to the upper harbor during the month of June. Several vessels made three trips into Marquette's upper harbor which include the Middletown, Great Lakes Trader, Kaye Barker, Algosteel, and the Algomarine. The H. Lee White, John Boland, American Mariner, Adam Cornelius, Paul Tregurtha, and the Wilfred Sykes each had two visits in June. The following vessels each had one visit; the Algolake, Armco, Fred White, Courtney Burton, and the Peter Cresswell. Currently, Interlake Steamship and Algoma Central are leading fleets thus far this season followed by Lakes Shipping, Oglebay Norton, and American Steamship. American vessels are outpacing the Canadian vessels nearing 3 to 1.

Reported by: Art Pickering




Detroit Traffic

07/15
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Sunday.

Algoway downbound below Grassy Island bound for Toledo.
Stern view
Rebecca Lynn upbound at Zug Island headed for the Sterling Fuel Dock
Stern view
Lake Erie (Marshall Islands) anchored at Ojibway Anchorage
Stern view
Algoport loading at the Ojibway Salt Dock.
Deckhand earning a little overtime pay
Stern view
Gemini upbound at Grassy Island after unloading at the General Chemical Dock in Amherstburg
Stern view
Mesabi Miner downbound at Grassy Island
Stern view
Great Lakes Trader & Joyce L Van Enkevort downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view
American Mariner downbound at Grassy Island
Stern view

USCGC Cypress stopped in Cleveland. By Rich Nicholls

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

07/15
The Elise Oldendorff was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator. The J.A.W. Iglehart was unloading cement at the Lafarge Dock. There are no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

The Joseph H. Frantz, Saturn, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in layup at there respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due at the CSX Docks will be the Canadian Transport on Tuesday. The Algosteel on Thursday, followed by the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Friday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Armco on Monday. The Middletown on Thursday, followed by the Reserve on Friday.

Classic Toledo Shipping
Calcite II (grey color scheme) inbound Maumee Bay bound for the C&O Coal Docks to load coal. She sails today as the Maumee.
Joshua A. Hatfield loading coal at the C&O #3 Dock.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Rare Opportunity to Tour the Ryerson

07/15
The Door County Maritime Museum will be offering tours of the classic lakes freighter Edward L. Ryerson on Saturday July 20th and Sunday July 21st. Tickets for the hour long tour are $10.00 per person and are limited. Contact the museum at (920) 743-5958 or visit www.dcmm.org




Lighthouse Cruise

07/15
On July 27 the Keweenaw Star will depart Houghton, Mi at 9:30 a.m. and travel around the Keweenaw Peninsula visiting all 10 lighthouses, the lighthouses that we will be seeing are the Keweenaw upper light, Five Mile point, Eagle River, Eagle Harbor, Copper Harbor, Gull Rock, Manitou Island, Mendota, Jacobsville, Keweenaw Lower. A box lunch and hors dovers will be on the boat along with a cash bar. The cost is $80.00 per person and includes the pass for the Keweenaw Lighthouse celebration.
Visit www.keweenawexcursions.com for more information.




Thunder Bay Tall Ships

07/15
Step back in time and step aboard a piece of maritime history at the 2nd annual Thunder Bay Tall Ships® Festival in Alpena August 16th through the 18th. Tour the wooden schooners HMS Bee and Madeline and the warship U.S. Brig Niagara, replicas of early 19th century vessels.

The festival will feature sword fighting demonstrations, stories of Michigan’s maritime history, and activities for children. The festival is hosted by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and Underwater Preserve and the City of Alpena. Proceeds will benefit the Thunder Bay Sanctuary education efforts. For more information, call (989) 354-4181.




Summer Great Laker

07/15
The Summer 2002 issue of the quarterly magazine Great Laker is now on its way to subscribers. The cover story is an exclusive photographic look at the steamer Edward L. Ryerson, with outstanding images from a yet-to-be-published book by Chris Winters. Also included is a tour of Apostle Island Lighthouses and report on the renovations at the Port Washington Lighthouse.

Also featured:

  • "Meet the Flower Lady": ... a profile of Detroit's Arlene Earl, florist to the freighters
  • "Last Port for Old Lakers" ... Great Laker writers Paul "Wally" Wallace and Roger LeLievre rode the scrap tows of the Algogulf and Kinsman Enterprise. They share their journeys with readers.
  • "Harbor Beach Shipwreck Irony" ... author Wes Oleszewski looks at the shipwrecks of the Harbor Beach area.
  • Plus laker and lighthouse news, book and CD reviews and more.

    Find out more or subscribe to Great Laker on line at www.greatlaker.com




  • Today in Great Lakes History - July 15

    On July 15, 1961, the Walter A. Sterling (now Lee A. Tregurtha) entered service on the Great Lakes after conversion from a tanker. The next day, on July 16, 1961, the Pioneer Challenger (now Middletown) entered service.

    The CHICAGO TRADER was launched (as THE HARVESTER) in 1911 by the American Ship Building Co., Lorain, OH.

    In 1946 the NORISLE was launched for the Dominion & Owen Sound Transportation Co. Ltd.

    In 1934 the Ann Arbor #4 collided with the steamer N.F. Leopol in a heavy fog.

    On Saturday, 15 July 1871, an argument between Captain James Bradley and Mate John Reed started while the schooner ROBERT EMMETT was docked at Erie, Pennsylvania unloading iron ore. They were still shouting at each other as the ship sailed out of the harbor. In short order, the ship turned around and anchored in the harbor. At 3:00 AM the following morning, Reed rowed ashore, went directly to the police station and charged that Capt. Bradley had assaulted him with a knife. At dawn, as the police were on their way to question Capt. Bradley, they found him stepping ashore from the deck of a tug, fuming that Reed had stolen the ship's only small boat. Bradley and Reed were at each other again and the police arrested both men. Bradley then filed charges against Reed for mutiny, assault and theft of the ship's boat. The case went to court the very next day. Justice of the Peace Foster saw his courtroom packed with curious sailors and skippers. Reed and Bradley were both still fuming and after listening to just a little testimony, Foster found both men guilty, fined them both and ordered both to pay court costs. The matter didn't end there since Reed later had to get a court order to get his personal belongings off the EMMETT. There is no record of what the disagreement was that started this whole mess.

    The iron side-wheel steamer DARIUS COLE (201', 538 gt) was launched at the Glode Iron Works (hull #10) in Cleveland, Ohio on 15 July 1885. During her career, she had two other names: HURON 1906 - 1921, and COLONIAL 1921 - 1925. She burned off Barcelona, New York on Lake Erie on 1 September 1925 while on an excursion. The hull was beached and later towed to Dunkirk, New York for scrapping.

    Data from: Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Rare Trip for Blough

    07/14
    After making a rare call at Port Dolomite, the Roger Blough is scheduled to arrive in Duluth early on July 15 to unload stone at the DMIR ore dock. The Blough's shuttle boom can reach the stone hopper, and the vessel has unloaded stone in Duluth at least a couple of times in the past several years. However, it's still a rare cargo for the Blough. After unloading, the Blough will proceed to Two Harbors to load taconite pellets.

    Reported by: Al Miller and Jeff Thoreson




    River Barges in Milwaukee

    07/14
    The 1898-built tug John M. Selvick, under the command of its namesake, arrived in Milwaukee Friday night with three covered river barges. They proceeded to the Nidera grain elevator where they will be loaded starting on Monday.

    The U.S. Coast Guard announced operating rule revisions to allow Mississippi River barges to Milwaukee this spring. This is the first group of barges to arrive since the announcement.

    John M. Selvick docked.
    Barges docked at the grain elevators.

    Reported by: Andy LaBorde




    Stinson in Superior

    07/14
    Boatwatchers in Superior, Wi. saw a rare sight Saturday as the George A. Stinson docked at the old Lakehead Pipeline dock in the East End of Superior. The slip is located just south of the old King Midas flour mill and has not seen a boat docked there in many years.

    The Stinson docked for service work to a propeller and electrical work. Once repairs are complete they will load at Allouez, Wi.

    Stinson docked.
    Close up.

    Reported by: Dan Mackey




    Interlake in Erie

    07/14
    The Pathfinder delivered stone to Erie on Friday. The cargo was loaded at Stoneport and is the second load Interlake has delivered this year, along with the second load from Stoneport. The Lee A. Tregurtha delivered a load from Stoneport as the first vessel to Erie on March 31. Last year no Interlake vessels brought cargo to Erie, although the Pathfinder waited weather October 6.

    Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




    Stone Loaded in Holland

    07/14
    Friday evening the tug Duluth, marked with a Great Lakes Dock & Materials logo arrived at Holland with two empty dump scows and proceeded to Brewer's dock to load stone.

    The material is bound for Grand Haven, where it will be used as filter material in the new water intake pipe that is being built in Lake Michigan. While it is routine for stone to arrive in Holland by water, it is unusual for stone product to leave that way.

    Reported by: Bob Vande Vusse




    Twin Ports Report

    07/14
    Duluth and Superior were bustling with waterborne commerce Saturday. Early rising boatwatchers saw the Algolake enter the Duluth ship canal and immediately make a hard left turn as it executed a starboard-to-starboard passing with the outbound Arthur M. Anderson, which was just rounding the turning buoy. Around the harbor, Quebecois was unloading at St. Lawrence Cement, Joe Block was loading under the gravity chutes at DMIR, and Arizona Dream was at the Cenex Harvest States grain elevator. After making port, the Algolake proceeded to Midwest Energy Terminal to load. Late in the afternoon, the John J. Boland arrived in Duluth to make a rare call at Midwest Energy Terminal.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Marquette Update

    07/14
    The Herbert C. Jackson loaded taconite at Marquette's upper harbor on Saturday. While the Jackson loaded, fleetmates Charles M. Beeghly and Kaye E. Barker shared space on the south side of the dock, waiting their turn to be loaded. This is the second time this year that Interlake ships have shared dock tie-up space while waiting time to load.

    Both the Beeghly and Kaye Barker are expected to load on Sunday.

    The American Mariner arrived in Marquette on Friday and loaded taconite. The Algosteel was also due on Friday. The Herbert C. Jackson unloaded coal on Friday and waited Saturday to load taconite.

    Beeghley and Barker share the dock.
    Close up.
    Wide view.
    Herbert C. Jackson preparing to load.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe




    Detroit Traffic

    07/14
    Below are images of traffic passing on the Detroit River Saturday morning.
    Cuyahoga upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Middletown upbound above Mama Juda.
    Stern view.
    Agawa Canyon downbound below Nicholson's.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Mike Nicholls




    Toledo News

    07/14
    The Elise Oldendorff was at the Andersons "E" Elevator loading grain. The Adam E. Cornelius was unloading ore at the Torco Ore Dock. There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

    The Joseph H. Frantz and Saturn remain in lay-up at there respective dock sites. The Mary E. Hannah with her barge has returned back to the Hocking Valley Dock for temporary lay-up.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Canadian Transport on Tuesday. The Algosteel on Thursday, followed by the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Friday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Armco on Monday. The Middletown on Wednesday followed by the Reserve on Friday.

    Classic Toledo Shipping
    Erindale (ex W.F. White) upbound the Maumee River from the Cherry Street Bridge bound for one of the Elevators to load grain for a Canadian port.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Today in Great Lakes History - July 14

    The AMERICAN REPUBLIC was launched July 14, 1980 by the Bay Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

    While upbound in the St. Lawrence River on July 14, 1970 for Saginaw, MI with a load of pig iron from Sorel, Que., the EASTCLIFFE HALL grounded in mud near Chrysler Shoal six miles above Massena, NY at 0300 hours but was able to free herself. A few hours later, approaching Cornwall, she struck a submerged object and sank within a few minutes in 70 feet of water only 650 feet from the point of impact. The submerged object was believed to be an old aid to navigation light stand. Nine lives were lost. Divers determined that her back was broken in two places. After salvaging part of the cargo, her cabins were leveled and her hull was filled.

    In 1988 the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON and "tow mate" CONSUMERS POWER passed through the Panama Canal heading for the cutters torch in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

    On 14 July 1908, MENTOR (wooden propeller tug, 53', 23 gt, built in 1882 at Saugatuck, MI) burned south of Chicago, Illinois. No lives lost. Her original name was HATTIE A. FOX.

    On 14 July 1891, T. H. ORTON (wooden barge, 262 gt, built in 1873 at Buffalo, NY) anchored off Marblehead on Lake Erie to ride out a storm. She dragged her anchors and was driven ashore where she was declared a total wreck. She may have been recovered though. Just two years earlier, this vessel went through a similar incident at the same spot!

    Data from: Dave Wobser, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Algoport Stops for Repairs

    07/13
    Friday afternoon, the Algoma self-unloader Algoport was secured below Lock 1 in the Welland Canal. The vessel was stopped for repair work to its unloading system. Fraser Ship repair was on hand to do the work as the ship took on stores.

    Work continued Friday on the dismantling of the Fort Henry. Her bridge has been completely gutted and mast removed and placed on the ground.

    Algoport arrives.
    Stern view docked.
    Crane along side.
    Equipment lifted to the Algoport.
    Stores taken aboard.
    Wide view.
    Scrapping of the Fort Henry pilot house Friday.
    Scap piled along side.
    The bridge.
    Crews working inside.
    Another view.
    Looking out the pilot house windows.
    Life boat.

    Reported by: Alex Howard




    Port Huron to Mackinaw Race Starts Today

    07/13
    The 78th annual sailboat race to Mackinac Island begins this morning at 11:30 a.m. from a starting line 4 miles north of the Blue Water Bridges. The first of the nearly 300 boats sailboats are expect to finish the race on Sunday evening or early Monday.

    For sailors racing the larger boats there is the Southampton Course, 253 nautical miles of water stretching out across Lake Huron.

    For the smaller boats, there’s the 235-nautical-mile Shore Course, which hugs the Michigan shoreline.

    Reported by: Chris Jackson




    Twin Ports Report

    07/13
    A considerable portion of the American Steamship/Oglebay Norton vessels are calling at ports on western Lake Superior over the next few days. Several of them are vessels that aren't often seen in the Twin Ports.

    The lineup includes:
    --Indiana Harbor, loading at Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wis., on July 14 bound for St. Clair, Mich.
    --Walter J. McCarthy Jr. loading at Midwest Energy Terminal on July 12 bound for St. Clair and Monroe
    --Columbia Star loading at Midwest Energy Terminal on July 15
    --George A. Stinson loading at BNSF in Superior, Wis., on July 13 for Zug Island
    --St. Clair loading at BNSF July 15 for Zug Island
    --H. Lee White loading at DMIR in Duluth on July 17 for Indiana Harbor.
    --John J. Boland loading at Midwest Energy Terminal July 13 for Marquette, Mich.
    --Armco loading at Silver Bay, Minn., on July 13.
    --Buckeye unloading stone at CLM dock in Superior on July 12 and then shifting to BNSF to load for the Lorain Pellet Terminal
    --Middletown loading at Silver Bay on July 15
    --American Republic loading at BNSF on July 17 for Lorain Pellet Terminal.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Marquette Update

    07/13
    The John J. Boland unloaded stone at Marquette's lower harbor Friday. Trucks were busy hauling the stone from the dock to the mines.

    The Herbert Jackson unloaded coal at the upper harbor and will then load taconite pellets. The American Mariner and Algosteel were expected Friday evening after a delay. Due in on Saturday are the Charles Beeghly and the Kaye Barker, which will probably not load until Sunday.

    Boland unloading.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe




    Saginaw Update

    07/13
    The Mississagi was outbound from the Sixth Street turning basin in Saginaw early Friday morning. The vessel had arrived late Thursday evening and unloaded during the night at the Buena Vista and GM docks.

    While outbound, the Mississagi met the inbound tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort and barge Great Lakes Trader at the Burroughs dock near the I-75 Bridge. After the Mississagi had passed, the Great Lakes Trader continued up to Saginaw Rock Products. The vessel unloaded there during the morning and was outbound Friday afternoon.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Cruise business steady but not growing right now

    07/13
    The Great Lakes cruising business seems to be one of those good news/bad news situations.

    The good news is that, despite a sluggish economy, ships are still offering cruises on the lakes and there's talk of more ships coming to the lakes in the next few years. The bad news is that a couple of vessels have gone out of business and the Great Lakes cruising business is not growing.

    About a half-dozen cruise ships are now on the Great Lakes, about the same number as three years ago. Some tourism officials say they were hoping the industry would take off.

    "I hoped for more," said Felicia Fairchild, executive director of the Saugatuck/Douglas Convention and Visitors Bureau, told the Grand Rapids Press. "If we do see more activity, I think it will be in 2004 and beyond."

    On Lake Michigan, Holland recently began its third year as a cruise-ship port by welcoming the 100-passenger Grande Mariner, operated by the American Canadian Caribbean line.

    Only two vessels are scheduled to call at ports in Michigan's Allegan and Ottawa counties. Nonetheless, Fairchild is confident the demand for cruises on the Great Lakes, billed as an alternative to destinations in the Caribbean, is not fading.

    "I honestly think the market is a little softer, just like it is everywhere else in the world," she told the newspaper. "We're in a recovering economy."

    This year, the French ship Le Levant is docking several times in Grand Haven, while the Grande Mariner has six scheduled visits in Holland. The 420-passenger German ship c. Columbus will make two calls at Ludington.

    West Michigan ports this year had been scheduled to host two other ships with capacities of 225 passengers: the Arcadia and the Cape May Light, but financial troubles put both vessels out of business.

    Despite those troubles, officials who promote and book Great Lakes cruises say the industry is in good shape.

    "We're still seeing an enormous amount of interest," said Christopher Wright, secretary of Mariport Group, an Ontario, Canada, consulting firm promoting a "Cruise the Great Lakes" initiative.

    Wright said he expects one new ship, and possibly a second, to begin cruises on the Great Lakes in 2003 or 2004.

    Maria Digati, marketing director for the American Canadian Caribbean Line, said the impact of Sept. 11 has been positive for companies with cruise ships on the Great Lakes.

    "People are enjoying rediscovering America this year. As a result, the Great Lakes have been a hot spot in cruising," she said.

    Reported by: Steve Roper




    Book Signing in Duluth

    07/13
    Jody Aho, author of "The Steamer William A. Irvin: Queen of the Silver Stackers", will be the guest at a book signing in Duluth on Saturday, July 20 from 2-3 p.m. The signing is being hosted by The Bookstore At Fitger's, located in the lower level of the Fitger's Brewery Complex, 600 East Superior Street, Duluth.

    A regular contributor to this site, Jody has also participated in several other publications dealing with Great Lakes shipping history. His "Marine Milestones" have been a fixture in "Know Your Ships" since 1998. He has also contributed to "Ships of the Great Lakes Cookbook: Discover Their Culinary Legends". Jody has also written articles for or contributed his photography to "The Nor' Easter", the journal of the Lake Superior Marine Museum Association; "Great Laker"; and "Great Lakes Photo Magazine."




    Ryerson Tour

    07/13
    The Door County Maritime Museum will be offering tours of the Edward L. Ryerson on Saturday July 20th and Sunday July 21st. Tickets for the hour long tour are $10.00 per person and are limited. Contact the museum at (920) 743-5958 or visit www.dcmm.org




    Today in Great Lakes History - July 13

    The ALGOWEST was christened at Collingwood on July 13, 1982.

    SASKATCHEWAN PIONEER was launched July 13, 1983.

    The LIGHTSHIP 103 was opened to visitors on July 13, 1974 at the city's Pine Grove Park along the St. Clair River.

    The rebuilt BOSCOBEL was launched at the Peshtigo Company yard at Algonac on 13 July 1876. Originally built in 1867 as a passenger/package freight propeller vessel, she burned and sank near Ft. Gratiot in 1869. The wreck was raised, but no work was done until January 1876 when she was completely rebuilt as a schooner-barge at Algonac. She sank again in the ice on Lake Erie in 1895 and was again raised and rebuilt. She lasted until 1909 when she sank in the middle of Lake Huron during a storm.

    On 13 July 1876, the Port Huron Weekly Times listed the following vessels as being idle at Marine City, Michigan: Steam Barges BAY CITY, D. W. POWERS and GERMANIA; steamer GLADYS; Schooners TAILOR and C. SPADEMAN; and Barges MARINE CITY and ST. JOSEPH.

    On 13 July 1876, the Detroit Tribune reported that "the captain of a well-known Oswego vessel, on his last trip to Oswego, found that the receipts of the trip exceeded the expenses in the neighborhood of $250, and stowed $210 of the amount away in a drawer of his desk on the schooner. The money remained there some days before the captain felt the necessity of using a portion of it, and when he opened the drawer to take out the required amount he found that a family of mice had file a pre-emption claim and domiciled themselves within the recess, using the greenbacks with the utmost freedom to render their newly chosen quarters absolutely comfortable. A package containing $60 was gnawed into scraps the size of the tip of the little finger, while only enough of the larger package containing $150 remained to enable the astonished seaman to determine the numbers of the bills, so that the money can be refunded to him by the United States Treasury Department. The captain made an affidavit of the facts, and forwarded it and the remnants of the greenbacks to Washington, with the view of recovering the full value of the money destroyed. He is now on the way to Oswego with his vessel, and no doubt frequently ruminates over the adage, "The best laid schemes of mice and men, . . ."

    Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Rare Visitor in Green Bay

    07/12
    The American Mariner made a rare visit to Green Bay Wednesday night. She arrived in Green Bay around 7:30 p.m. and proceeded to Western Lime Co with a load of stone.

    The Mariner is an unusual visitor for Green Bay. The vessel had been a regular visitor in the early to mid-1980's when American Steamship Co. delivered coal to the Pulliam Power Plant. The plant is now serviced by unit trains.

    The Alpena was due at Lafarge with a load of cement Thursday.

    Reported by: Jason Leino and Tim Nixon




    Calumet in Menominee

    07/12
    Wednesday afternoon the Calumet arrived in Menominee to unload coal at the Menominee Paper Co dock. As the Calumet was arriving the American Mariner was passing downbound on the Bay heading for Green Bay with a load of stone.

    The USCG OAK was also performing sea trials in the Bay as the Calumet arrived. The Calumet unloaded a very small amount of cargo and was outbound at 7:30 p.m. heading for Stoneport MI.

    In other port news, the Erica Kobasic, Krystal and a barge arrived in Menominee Thursday afternoon. The Tug Ocean Reliance is expected to be launched any time. The pulp ship Arion is expected at K&K Warehouse next week to unload wood pulp from Finland.

    Calumet off Menominee with American Mariner in the distance.
    Calumet inbound Menominee at the outer buoy.
    Calumet unloading, USCG Oak passing inbound.
    Calumet unloading.
    Wide view unloading.
    Calumet backing out.
    Calumet outbound passing Menominee lighthouse.

    Reported by: Scott Best




    Alpena Report

    07/12
    The Wolverine arrived at Lafarge coal dock about 3 p.m. on Thursday to unload and was expected to depart late Thursday night.

    The Alpena was in Green Bay and will be in Alpena some time Saturday morning. The J.A.W Iglehart is expected in port today. The Paul H. Townsend is still in lay-up but will be out at the end of the month.

    Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




    Saginaw Update

    07/12
    The Mississagi was inbound the Saginaw River Thursday night passing through Bay City around 9 p.m.

    The Maumee passed through Bay City late Wednesday morning upbound for the Sargent dock near the I-75 Bridge. The vessel completed unloading early in the evening and was outbound from the Sixth Street turning basin in Saginaw at 7:25 p.m.

    The former Calcite II is showing signs of her continued hard work for the Grand River Navigation fleet. The GRN/LLT gray is wearing away from the bow, revealing the old USS/Great Lakes Fleet diagonal stripes underneath.

    The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was inbound passing the Pump-Out Island at 1:50 p.m. She arrived shortly thereafter and unloaded coal at the Consumers Energy Dock through the afternoon and evening. The McCarthy departed shortly after 10p.m. after the outbound Maumee had cleared.

    Pictures by Todd Shorkey
    Mississagi upbound at Wheeler's Landing.
    Close up.
    Bow view.
    Stern view.
    Maumee upbound passing Wheeler's Landing Wednesday.
    Close Up.
    Maumee bow at Central Michigan Railway Bridge.
    Maumee stern view.
    Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. inbound at the Front Range.
    Close up.
    Another view.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    St. Clair Traffic

    07/12
    Below are images of traffic passing Harsens Island in the St. Clair River Thursday evening.

    Tug W. N. Twolan and barge McAllister 132 downbound for Detroit.
    Yacht Kismet upbound off Harsen's Island.
    St. Clair Flats South Channel range lights.
    George A. Stinson refueling near Sarnia.
    John G. Munson upbound off of Marine City.
    Paul R. Tregurtha unloading coal at the St. Clair Edison plant.
    James R. Barker arriving at the St. Clair Edison plant, with more coal, less than one hour after the Tregurtha departed.
    The Barker's bow thruster working hard.
    Some of the Port Huron to Mackinac race boats in the Black River in Port Huron.

    Reported by: Kent Armstrong




    Detroit Traffic

    07/12
    Below are images of traffic passing on the Detroit River.
    Canadian tall ship Pathfinder upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Diamond Jack upbound in the Wyandotte Channel.
    Stern view.
    Canadian tall ship Playfair upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Roger Blough upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Canadian Leader upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Lake Superior passing Canadian Leader at Fighting Island North Light.
    Lake Superior (Marshall Islands) downbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Goviken (Bahamas) downbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Mike Nicholls




    Seaway Traffic

    07/12
    Below are images of traffic passing near the Iroquois lock in the Seaway Wednesday.

    Cruise ship Le Levant entering Iroquois Lock.
    Stern view below the lock.
    Zemia Gnieznienska passing Brockville, Ont.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Peter Carter




    Thunder Bay Passage

    07/12
    The Thunder Bay Vessel Passage section of this site has been updated. Tom Stewart is contributing vessel movements from the Lake Superior Port.

    Click here to view.




    Fawn Island Gathering Tomorrow

    07/12
    A day of boat watching and river cruising is planned for this Saturday, July 13. The weather forecast calls for 80-degree temperatures and sunny skies, perfect weather for boat watching in the St. Clair River.

    Ron and Shari Schwartz and George Lee from Hammond Bay River Cruises are hosting the exclusive "Boatnerd" outing. Two cruises are planned on the 54-foot, 40 passenger charter vessel Hammond Bay. Fawn Island is located across from Sombra, Ontario and Marine City, Michigan.

    For more information on the cruise e-mail hammondbay@sympatico.ca or call 519-892-3973

    Click here for more Details on the event




    Harbor Beach, Michigan - Maritime Festival

    07/12
    July 19-21 Harbor Beach celebrates its annual Maritime Festival on Lake Huron.

    The festival includes many events and programs. One of the programs features the full story of the H.C. Akeley wreck, which appeared in this news section on Wednesday. It is told in the first chapter of Wes Oleszewski's book "Mysteries and Histories: Shipwrecks of the Great Lakes" and readers will get to talk to the author in person at on Friday, July 19th. Wes will be speaking and then signing books starting at 7:00 pm.
    Visit harborbeachchamber.com for more information.




    Toledo Harbor Light Cruise

    07/12
    The Toledo based cruise vessel Sandpiper will depart on a lighthouse cruise this Sunday. The four hour trip passes through Toledo's busy port and takes passengers out to view the Harbor Light. This trip also runs in August. Click here for details




    Today in Great Lakes History - July 12

    The BELLE RIVER (WALTER J. McCARTHY JR.) was christened on July 12, 1977 as American Steamship's first thousand-footer and the first thousand-footer built at Bay Ship.

    The H.M. GRIFFITH was launched July 12, 1973 for the Canada Steamship Lines.

    In 1986 The ENDERS M. VOORHEES was chained together with her sisters, A.H. FERBERT (2) and IRVING S. OLDS, a severe thunderstorm struck Duluth pushing the trio across St. Louis Bay eventually grounding them near Superior, WI. It was discovered that the force of the storm had pulled the bollards out of the Hallett Dock No.5 thus releasing the ships.

    On July 12, 1958, the Frank A. Sherman entered service, departing Port Weller, Ontario, for Duluth and a load of iron ore on its maiden voyage.

    On 12 July 1871, ADVANCE (wooden scow-schooner, 49T, built in 1847 at Fairport, OH), was bound for Detroit from Cleveland with a load of coal. She and the steamer U.S. GRANT collided near South Bass Island (Put-in-Bay) in Lake Erie and ADVANCE sank. Her crew escaped in the yawl.

    On 12 July 1852, CITY OF OSWEGO (wooden propeller passenger-package freight vessel, 138', 357 t, built in 1852 at Buffalo, NY) collided with the steamer AMERICA and sank off Willowick, Ohio, a few miles east of Cleveland. 15 lives were lost. This was CITY OF OSWEGO's first season of operation.

    On 12 July 1889, T. H. ORTON (wooden barge, 262 gt, built in 1873 at Buffalo, NY) anchored off Marblehead on Lake Erie to ride out a storm. She dragged her anchors and was driven ashore where she was declared a total wreck. She was recovered and just two years later, at the same place, this incident was repeated.

    Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Atlantic Huron Departs

    07/11
    Wednesday the Atlantic Huron was high in the water with most of the ballast pumped out. Instead of ballasting down the bow to make the stern high, they simply raised the entire vessel uniformly. Welders where busy working on the kort nozzle. It appears that a fin that runs vertically on the Nozzle was missing.

    Work was complete Wednesday night and the Atlantic Huron departed the Government Docks around 10:15 p.m.

    Reported by: Jamie Kerwin




    Pilot House Scrapping

    07/11
    The scrapping of the Fort Henry bow and pilot house was well under way Wednesday afternoon. The tip of the bow has been cut off, and the mast has been cut like a tree.

    Scrapping of the Fort Henry's bow section.
    Mast cut from the top of the pilothouse.
    Tip of bow cut away.
    Side view.
    View of the pilot house from the back.

    While crews were scrapping the Fort Henry the Jean Parisien was downbound at Lock 3.
    Jean Parisien easing out of the lock.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Alex Howard




    Twin Ports Report

    07/11
    The DMIR ore docks are maintaining a steady pace in the dog days of summer. In Two Harbors, the next few days are strictly a Great Lakes Fleet affair. The lineup includes Edgar B. Speer, July 11, Edwin H. Gott, July 12, Arthur M. Anderson, July 12, Roger Blough, July 13, Presque Isle, July 14, and Edgar B. Speer, July 16.

    In Duluth, the schedule includes a mixed bag of interesting vessels, several of whom are not regular callers. The lineup includes Mesabi Miner, July 11; the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin, July 12; Arthur M. Anderson to unload stone, July 12; Joe Block, July 13; Nanticoke, July 14; St. Clair, July 15; H. Lee White, July 17; and John G. Munson, probably to unload stone, July 17. The Mesabi Miner is an occasional visitor to the DMIR. Joe Block has been making frequent calls to Two Harbors this season, so it hasn't been seen much in Duluth. Nanticoke was not seen in the Twin Ports for many years, but the past couple seasons it's made several visits here. St. Clair also has been making frequent calls in Two Harbors this season.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Updates

    07/11
    I have an early start at work in the morning. Check back tomorrow for more news and pictures.




    Today in Great Lakes History - July 11

    The INDIANA HARBOR was christened July 11, 1979.

    On July 11, 1943 the ENDERS M. VOORHEES became the first downbound vessel to transit the newly built MacArthur Lock at the Soo.

    On 11 July 1888, the 2-mast wooden schooner JOHN TIBBETS was carrying coal on Lake Erie when she foundered in the shallows near Clear Creek, 7 miles west of Port Rowan, Ontario and then broke up in the storm waves. Her crew made it to shore in the yawl. She was built in 1863 at Clayton, NY on the hull of the Canadian schooner PERSEVERANCE which was originally built in 1855.

    PERSIA, a 150' passenger/package freight vessel, was launched at Melancthon Simpson's shipyard at St. Catharine's, Ontario on 11 July 1873. She was built at a cost of $37,000. She lasted until the 1920s when she was converted to a barge and then abandoned.

    MONTEZUMA (3-mast wooden schooner-barge, 341', 2722 gt) was launched at the John Davidson shipyard (hull no. 102) in W. Bay City, Michigan on 11 July 1903. She was one of the largest wooden vessels ever built. It was later stated in the press that the reason Davidson's last large vessels took so long to build was the difficulty in obtaining the required large oak timbers and their expense. As steel went down in price, wood went up, and Davidson's last hulls cost as much as comparably-sized steel ones. At the time of launching this vessel the Davidson shipyard announced that it would not build any more wooden freight vessels.

    Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Crewman Evacuated

    07/10
    On Sunday U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Traverse City completed the medical evacuation of the Chief Officer of the Canadian Coast Guard Cutter Griffon. The 38 year old male, a diabetic, was unresponsive. An Air Station Traverse City HH-65A rescue helicopter transported the Chief Officer from Lake Superior near Caribou Island to the hospital in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.

    The Chief Officer is now at home and the Griffon is in Thunder Bay preparing for a construction run.

    Reported by: Bill Wren




    Algolake Ready to be Refloated

    07/10
    The crew will be returning to the Algolake on Thursday and vessel will be floated off the Pascol Engineering dry-dock on Friday. The vessel was dry-docked in Thunder Bay on June 29 because of kort nozzle problems.

    Reported by: Philip Nash




    Huron Stops for Repairs

    07/10
    The Atlantic Huron arrived at Sarnia's Government Dock around 8:00 p.m. By 9:00 p.m. crews were ballasting the vessel down at the bow to expose its kort nozzle and propeller. A work scow had been pulled alongside the nozzle area and there were several welding machines on the dock.

    It is not possible to get next to the vessel, as the gates to the government docks where closed immediately upon arrival of the vessel.

    Reported by: Larry Jackson




    Fort Henry Pilot House

    07/10
    The once proud pilothouse of the former Fort Henry, on display at Lock 3 in the Welland Canal, is in the process of being broken up.

    The pilothouse was removed from the vessel when it was scrapped and put on display at Lock 3. The pilot house suffered from neglect and vandalism leading to this end. The work crew is cutting the pilothouse down and sending the pieces off to a scrap yard. The entire pilot house will probably be gone by end of week.

    Pilot house last fall. Alex Howard
    Fort Henry in better days. Edward J. Morris

    Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt




    Davis Lock in Use

    07/10
    Three out of the four American locks at Sault Ste. Marie were pressed into service early this week. Tour boats and the upbound Lee A. Tregurtha were seen transiting the rarely-used Davis Lock Monday afternoon, while on Tuesday the Catherine Desgagnes also was spotted exiting the Davis, or third, lock.

    It is unknown why the Davis Lock was in operation, although sometimes the Corps of Engineers activates the lock when traffic is especially heavy due to a large volume of pleasure craft seeking passage.

    Sometimes the Davis Lock is used if the MacArthur Lock is out of service, although this did not appear to be the case Monday and Tuesday. Because of its shallow draft, only upbound lakers without cargo can use the Davis Lock.

    Reported by: Roger LeLievre




    Stone Trade Underperforms Again In June

    07/10
    Shipments of limestone on the Great Lakes totaled 4.4 million net tons in June, a decrease of 2.7 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. For the season, the trade stands at 12 million tons, a decrease of 3 percent compared to the same point in the 2001 navigation season.

    Although demand in some stone markets - metallurgical and environmental to name two - remains on a par with the recent past, orders from the construction industry are still sluggish. In fact, in some areas of the Great Lakes basin, demand for construction aggregate is down substantially.

    The trade has also been impacted by the comparatively low level of activity at ISG, the successor to LTV Steel. It takes approximately 400 pounds of fluxstone to make a ton of raw steel. ISG only resumed making steel in late May and as of today has but two blast furnaces in operation.

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




    Cypress Heading for new Home Port

    07/10
    The Coast Guard's newest Juniper Class Seagoing Buoy tender, the Cypress (WLB 210), is on her delivery trip off the lakes. The 225-foot vessel was launched in October, 2001 at Marinette Marine in Wisconsin. The Coast Guard took delivered on June 24.

    The vessel is expected to stop at the U.S. Coast Guard Base in Sault Ste. Marie today after spending the night on Lake Superior. The Cypress will then continue on for her new home port of Mobile, Alabama.

    Reported by: Brian Kloosterman




    Sunken ship may be the Akeley, not the Chicora

    07/10
    The Lake Michigan wreck that some thought might be the long-lost steamer Chicora may instead be the H.C. Akeley, according to researchers exploring the hulk.

    "The evidence of the wreck being the Chicora is getting thinner and thinner," Doug Welsch, a member of Michigan Shipwreck Research Associates, told the Grand Rapids Press. "The location and style of the engineer isn't consistent with the Chicora. There's still no conclusive evidence either way."

    The Chicora was a Graham and Morton steamer that sank in 1885 while making a mid-winter trip to haul flour from Milwaukee to St. Joseph, Mich. The Akeley sank in 1883 while carrying corn from Chicago to Buffalo.

    "We're seeing a lot of damage to the stern of the vessel, and we know the Akeley went down stern first," said Craig Rich, also a member of MSRA.

    Rich said group members have made seven dives at the site and now are certain the wreck is not that of the Chicora.

    "Everything we have accumulated says this is not the Chicora. It's another wreck," he said.

    The wreck was discovered last spring by a local research group using old stories, current and wind charts, sonar and underwater cameras. The ship sits upright on the bottom about 15 miles from shore. Its hull is intact, but its cabins and superstructure are missing.

    Ultimately, it may the ship's cargo -- now resembling "mush," Welsch said -- that enables researchers to determine whether the wreck is the Chicora or Akeley. The group must get state permission to remove anything from the wreck.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Marquette News

    07/10
    An unusual sight at the Marquette ore dock Tuesday was both the Kaye E. Barker and Lee A. Tregurtha tied up to the same side of the dock. While the Reserve was on the opposite side loading ore, the Kaye Barker (pulled up closer to the shore than most vessels) was pumping off ballast while a work crew on the Lee A. Tregurtha was repainting the draft markings on the side of the ship.

    The Lee A Tregurtha was expected to move to the other side of the dock once the Reserve finished loading and departed.

    Reserve loading.
    Lee A. Tregurtha docked behind the Kaye. E. Barker.
    Close up of the Barker.
    Lee A. tucked in behind the Barker.
    Close up.
    View of the Barker from opposite side of dock.
    Crew painting the Tregurtha.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe




    All Star Traffic

    07/10
    The Port of Milwaukee had its own All-Star day to match the fact that the city was hosting the All-Star baseball game Tuesday.

    The J.A.W. Iglehart was unloading cement at the Lafarge terminal while the Saginaw was loading grain across the mooring basin. Just after noon the Herbert C. Jackson arrived with a load of coal.

    Reported by: Andy LaBorde




    Busy Day at Stone Port

    07/10
    Tuesday was a busy day at Stoneport with many vessels loading. The Wilfred Sykes loaded early Tuesday morning and departed around 8 a.m. Then the barge McKee Sons and tug Invincible tied up at the dock to load with fleet mate Maumee waiting at anchor. Also waiting was the tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder.

    Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




    Saginaw Update

    07/10
    Shipping activity continues busy on the Saginaw River this week, with five vessels calling on Monday and Tuesday. Inbound on Monday morning were the Maumee, Algoway, Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder and the Joseph H. Thompson.

    The Maumee arrived early in the morning at the Wirt dock in Saginaw, and the Algoway arrived several hours later at the adjacent Buena Vista dock. Both vessels were outbound during the afternoon.

    The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder called at the new Bay Aggregates dock near the mouth of the river. The Thompson called at docks up river in Saginaw, departing the Valley Asphalt dock near the Sixth Street turning basin about midnight. Both the Dorothy Ann and the Thompson had visited the Saginaw River only two days earlier.

    The tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort and barge Great Lakes Trader was in the river on Tuesday. She was docked at the Burroughs dock near the I-75 Bridge late in the afternoon, and moved up to the Bay City Wirt dock to lighter before continuing upriver. The tug and barge were moving slow and reported that it would take about 6 hours to get from Bay City Wirt to Saginaw.

    Pictures by Todd Shorkey
    Tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort and barge Great Lakes Trader unloading at Bay City Wirt.
    Another view.
    Upbound approaching Veteran's Memorial Bridge.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Cleveland Update

    07/10
    The American Republic arrived off Cleveland about 12 noon Tuesday. She proceeded upbound to her regular dock at the ISG steel works to unload taconite. The Mississagi was unloading stone at a dock near West 3rd street that afternoon and was being towed downriver by the G Tug California at 4 p.m.

    Reported by: Rex Cassidy




    Fairport, Ohio Report

    07/10
    The Cuyahoga was loading salt in Fairport Tuesday afternoon. The suction dredge Atchafalya is still working out in the entrance channel. The Corps derrick McCauley and tug Koziol were moving around the area.

    Reported by: Dave Merchant




    Erie Update

    07/10
    Two vessels were in Erie, PA to unload on Monday. The John J. Boland was unloading gravel at the Mounfort Terminal in the early afternoon. Later she shifted to the Old Ore Dock and finished unloading. The Boland departed at 6:00 a.m. and passed the inbound Cuyahoga on her way out. The two passed very close just north of the outer buoys. The Cuyahoga was inbound on her way to the Old Ore Dock with stone from Meldrum Bay. The Cuyahoga had given a 25 minute security call at 5:48 on her way in, but waited for the Boland before entering. The Cuyahoga came farther west than most vessels before backing into the Old Ore Dock. The Cuyahoga is the second Lower Lakes vessel to visit Erie in 2002. The Saginaw delivered a load of stone on June 11.

    In Conneaut, the Philip R. Clarke was unloading stone at noon before departing for Fairport to load for Sandusky, and the Atlantic Huron was departing with coal. Tuesday the Jean Parisien is due at 3 pm to load coal, along with the Roger Blough at 10 pm, which will unload ore, and is due back Thursday at 2 am, along with the McKee Sons at 3 pm,both to load coal. The Jean Parisien is due back on Saturday, and then the coal dock has nothing scheduled until the Atlantic Huron on July 16.

    Boland outbound.
    Stern View.
    Cuyahoga inbound.
    Stern View.

    Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




    Today in Great Lakes History - July 10

    HENRY R. PLATT, JR. (2) was launched as a) G.A. TOMLINSON (1) at the American Ship Building Co., Lorain, OH - July 10, 1909.

    In 1998 the Algowest was re-dedicated at Port Weller Dry Docks. The $20 million conversion of the ship to a self-unloader from a bulk-carrier was completed by 400 shipbuilders at Port Weller Dry Docks during the previous eight months.

    On 10 July 1866, COQUETTE (1-mast wooden scow-sloop, 90', 140 t, built in 1858 at Perry, Ohio as a schooner) capsized in a storm on Lake Michigan and was lost with her crew of four. She had originally been built for the U.S. Government.

    On 10 July 1911, JOHN MITCHELL (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 420', 4468 gt, built in 1907 at St. Clair, MI) was carrying wheat off Whitefish Point on Lake Superior when she was rammed broadside by the coal-laden steel steamer WILLIAM HENRY MACK (steel propeller bulk freighter, 354', 3781 gt, built in 1903 at Cleveland, OH). The MACK tried to keep her bow in the hole, but the MITCHELL still sank in 7 minutes. Quick work saved most of her crew and all 7 passengers. Three of the 34 onboard were lost. The MACK got most of the blame for the accident. The MITCHELL's wreck was discovered upside-down on the bottom in 1972. (Note: Bowling Green's database gives the date of this accident as 19 July 1911 and Dave Swayze's Shipwreck database gives the date as 10 July 1911.)

    Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Republic Departs

    07/09
    Late Monday night the American Republic departed the old Interlake Dock in Toledo, beginning the 2002 season. The Republic is the final vessel to get a late start on the season in a group of freighters that were originally expected to sit out the shipping season.

    Shortly after midnight the vessel was east bound in Lake Erie's Pelee Passage.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Aird Unloads

    07/09
    The John B. Aird was unloading iron ore at the Bethlehem Steel dock in Burns International Harbor Monday morning. Due to barge loading at the north end of the dock, the Aird had to dock in an unusual manner with her stern pointing south.

    Aird unloading.

    Reported by: Kent Armstrong




    Toledo News

    07/09
    Monday the Gordon C. Leitch was at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator loading grain. The Calumet was loading coal at the CSX Dock and was expected to depart Monday evening.

    The Joseph H. Frantz and the Saturn remain in lay-up at there respective dock sites. The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge is now back out sailing once again.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel and Middletown on Tuesday, followed by the Reserve on Friday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Courtney Burton on Tuesday. The Armco on Wednesday. followed by the Adam E. Cornelius on Friday.

    Classic Toledo Shipping by Jim Hoffman
    Kinsman Independent loading coal at the C&O #2 Dock during the late sixties.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman and Scott Ousky




    Hamilton Update

    07/09
    Earlier Monday the Federal Weser was at Pier 14 and the Federal Hudson was at Pier 10. The Weser left about 1:30 p.m. while the Hudson left later on in the afternoon.

    The tug William J. Moore and the tanker barge McCleary's Spirit were at Pier 11 unloading jet fuel Monday morning and departed the Harbor at 9:30 a.m.

    Monday evening Fed Nav's Lake Erie was moored at Pier 14 and unloading steel beams.

    Over at Dofasco, the Algobay was unloading coal while the Algoville was unloading iron ore pellets.

    At 7:15 p.m. the CSL Laurentien coming from the direction of the Welland Canal transited the Burlington Ship Canal. A half hour later the Laurentien docked at Stelco's coal dock to unload.

    The tug RCL Tug 11 towing McNally Construction spud barge transited the Burlington Ship Canal at 8:10 p.m. The tug and barge have been doing pipe line work over at the Burlington shore of Lake Ontario.

    The ship canal will be busy with tug and barge traffic this summer. Burlington is adding a new water intake just east of the Bronte piers. A pair of barges are working on a pier that is being added and tugs are shuttling back and forth from Hamilton as well.

    Reported by: Patricia Burgon and M. Ouellette




    Fawn Island Gathering

    07/09
    A day of boat watching and river cruising is planned for July 13. Ron and Shari Schwartz and George Lee from Hammond Bay River Cruises are hosting the exclusive "Boatnerd" outing on the St. Clair River. Click here for Details




    Today in Great Lakes History - July 9

    WILLIAM R. ROESCH (DAVID Z. NORTON) loaded her first cargo in 1973 at Superior, WI where she loaded 18,828 tons of iron ore bound for Jones & Laughlin's Cuyahoga River plant at Cleveland.

    The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS and her fleet mate IRVING S. OLDS passed through the Panama Canal on July 9, 1988 under tow by the German tug OSA RAVENSTURM. The pair was on a 14,000 mile journey to Kaohsiung, Taiwan arriving there on November 8, 1988 for scrapping by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.

    On 9 July 1876, ST. CLAIR (wooden propeller freighter with some passenger accommodations, 127', 326 gt, built in 1867 at Algonac, Michigan) had 14 crew and 18 passengers aboard along with cargo of flour, feed and deck loads of cattle as she sailed on Lake Superior. At 2:00 AM, she caught fire about five miles off shore from 14 Mile Point. She was a wood burner and had a history of shipboard fires. The fire spread so quickly that only one boat could be launched and being overloaded, it capsized. The cries of those left on the vessel, along with the bellowing of the cattle, were heart rending. Only six survived in the one lifeboat since the cold water took its toll on those who clung to it. Eventually they righted the boat and paddled to shore, leaving the ST. CLAIR burned to the waterline.

    On 9 July 1891, W. A. MOORE (wood propeller tug, 119', 212 gt, built in 1865 at Detroit, MI) burned to a total loss at Cleveland, Ohio.

    Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    American Republic Departure

    07/08
    Saturday the American Republic had been removed from Toledo Shiprepair dry dock and tied up at the old Interlake Iron docks. The vessel is expected to enter service early this week.

    The old Interlake property has been cleared and will be the work yard for the new I-280 bridge. Concrete will be poured and cast at this facility, then transported to the bridge site and assembled with cables. In the Maumee River, there is work being done near the Craig Bridge (current I-280 bridge) as crews are preparing the center support for the new bridge.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman and Scott Ousky




    Barker in Marquette

    07/08
    The James R. Barker made what is believed to be her first trip of the year to Marquette to bring coal to the Presque Isle steam plant Sunday. The Algomarine made a quick return to load taconite pellets on Sunday also.

    No ships are due in to Marquette on Monday, but on Tuesday five vessels are tentatively scheduled. This should mean a wait for some of them. The Algomarine will be returning, the Kaye E. Barker, Reserve, Lee A. Tregurtha, and American Mariner are also expected.

    James R. Barker unloading.
    Algomarine loading.
    Reserve loading last week.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe




    Transfer in Sarnia

    07/08
    The Canadian Transfer recently entered lay-up in Sarnia. The vessel is docked in the North Slip with her pilot house windows covered in paper.

    Reported by: Ron LaDue




    Dredging for Owen Sound

    07/08
    Owen Sound officials are looking to increase traffic in the harbor by dredging to allow deep draft ocean-going ships into port. An economic impact study was released, which identifies a need to dredge the harbor to a depth of 26-feet from its current 22-foot depth.

    Economic Development Office spokesman Steve Furness told CFOS Radio that the current depth is too shallow for larger loads, and current grain ships have had to be run with half-loads. He says larger ships are needed for European exports. A presentation was made last year to Transportation Minister David Collonette, and the feds asked for a study to be done.

    The study, now complete, indicates a cost of 8 to 14 million dollars to do the work. Furness says the elevators are currently in excellent shape, and are set up to maintain "identity preservation", which is currently a hot topic in the agriculture industry. The study predicts many economic impacts including construction, on going business, and attracting new business.

    The city will now be looking at partnerships with the federal transportation department, and the private sector.

    In related news, no cruise ships will visit the Lake Huron port this season. Furness reported that talks with Hapag-Lloyd, the owner of the MS Columbus, have indicated the ship will not be coming. Furness says the company is still trying to recover from last year's losses following the September 11th attacks. Last year's cruise, which included Owen Sound, was cancelled after passengers could not arrive by air following the terror attacks in the US. Furness says Hapag-Lloyd has however, indicated it is still very interested in keeping Owen Sound as a port of call for future cruises.

    Reported by: David Shearman




    Two Harbors, MN. Traffic

    07/08
    The Joseph L. Block pulling away from the south side of #2 and the John Munson on the north side. The Block just finished taking on a load of pellets from Inland/Ispat Minorca Mine.
    Away from the dock turning 90 degrees to depart Two Harbors..
    Block leaving the harbor heading into Lake Superior.

    Reported by: Kent Rengo




    Soo Update

    07/08
    Below are recent images of traffic in Sault Ste. Marie.

    Canadian Coast Guard Ship Griffon in Soo Harbor on Saturday.
    J.A.W. Iglehart downbound on Sunday afternoon.
    Lake Superior heads for namesake lake on Saturday.
    Lee A Tregurtha at Six Mile Point Saturday morning.
    Algocape downbound at Six Mile on Saturday morning.
    Cedarglen meets Fred R White Jr. in the lower St Marys River. Sunday morning.
    Cedarglen.
    Philip R. Clarke downbound Saturday night.
    Middletown downbound on Sunday afternoon.
    Middletown's engine room door reflects patriotic flavor.
    Oakglen up at Nine Mile Saturday night.
    Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin.
    Pineglen eases into the turn at Mission Point Saturday.
    Fred R. White Jr. downbound Sunday morning.

    Reported by: Roger LeLievre




    Saginaw Update

    07/08
    The Algorail was inbound the Saginaw River Sunday morning, passing the Lafayette Bridge at 8:25 a.m. She was upbound for the Buena Vista Dock.

    The Wilfred Sykes departed the Bay City Wirt Dock around 11:40 a.m. after unloading overnight. The Sykes entered the Bay City Wirt Turning Basin and quickly turned with little difficulty in the seldom used basin, before heading to the lake.

    The US Brig Niagara was preparing to depart Bay City around 5:00 p.m. after spending the weekend in port.

    The Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder departed the Burroughs dock near the I-75 bridge early Saturday and was outbound during the morning. The Mississagi was upbound for the GM dock at Saginaw at the time the Dorothy Ann was departing. The Mississagi was outbound Saturday afternoon.

    The Joseph H. Thompson called at the Bay Aggregates dock on Saturday, then continued up to the Saginaw Asphalt dock at Carrollton late in the afternoon. The vessel was outbound late in the evening. At about midnight, the Thompson reported to the Coast Guard that a pleasure boat appeared to be in trouble and taking on water near the I-75 bridge, but that another pleasure boat was providing assistance.

    Pictures by Todd Shorkey
    Algorail upbound approaching Lafayette Bridge.
    Close up.
    Stern view clear of Lafayette.
    Wilfred Sykes at Bay City Wirt.
    Bow view in the turning basin.
    Another view.
    Wilfred Sykes head on.
    Using the bow thruster.
    Another View.
    Almost turned.
    Outbound from Bay City Wirt.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Detroit Traffic

    07/08
    Below are images of traffic passing on the Detroit River Sunday.
    Helena Oldendorff (Liberia) upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Pilot Rick White waves from the bridge wing.
    Canadian Enterprise upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Algocape downbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.

    Pictures taken last week in Houghton, MI
    Ranger III in Houghton.
    Keweenaw Star in Houghton.
    Isle Royale Queen II in Copper Harbor.

    Mike's Computer was out of service for over a month. Below is a gallery of 133 images from late May and June. Click here to view.

    Reported by: Mike Nicholls




    Toledo News

    07/08
    The Joseph H. Frantz, Saturn, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in lay-up at there respective dock sites. There are no active vessels in port at the time of this report.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Calumet and Algosteel on Monday. The Middletown on Tuesday followed by the Reserve on Friday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Courtney Burton on Tuesday. The Armco on Wednesday followed by the Adam E. Cornelius on Friday.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Toronto Update

    07/08
    Saturday the Island Airport ferry Maple City was under the Atlas crane at Pier 35. The back-up ferry Windmill Point is in service to the airport.

    The tug Patricia D. went to Oakville today to pick up an airplane which ditched into Lake Ontario. No one was killed in the accident. The plane was floated and towed to the C & C Marine yard in Toronto, where it will be lifted.

    The Toronto Island ferries remain idle as the union strike continues into its 13th day.

    Saturday evening a fatal shooting took place after the "Party Barge" Island Sauvage docked. The rowdy party received two noise complaints earlier in the day. After the barge (which is pushed by the tug King Fish 1) moored one of the passengers went to his car and came back with a gun. Five shots were fired leaving one person dead and one wounded. Police cordoned off the dock and the street for several hours. Elsewhere, the harbor was quiet.

    Reported by: Gerry O.




    Fawn Island Gathering

    07/08
    A day of boat watching and river cruising is planned for July 13. Ron and Shari Schwartz and George Lee from Hammond Bay River Cruises are hosting the exclusive "Boatnerd" outing on the St. Clair River. Click here for Details




    Weekly Updates

    07/08
    Check back early Tuesday morning for the regular weekly updates.




    Today in Great Lakes History - July 8

    LOUIS R. DESMARAIS was launched July 8,1977.

    In 1918 a slip joint on the main steam line of the Ann Arbor #5 let go, killing four men and badly scalding one other. The dead were: Lon Boyd, W.T. Archie Gailbraith, 1st assistant engineer Arthur R. Gilbert, coal passer William Herbert Freeman, 2nd engineer.

    In 1984 the Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Company (MWT) resumed service to Milwaukee with disappointing results.

    On 8 July 1908, JAMES G. BLAINE (formerly PENSAUKEE, wooden schooner-barge, 177'/555GT, built in 1867 at Little Sturgeon Bay, WI) was being towed in Lake Ontario by the tug WILLIAM G. PROCTOR. Her towline broke in a storm and she was driven ashore near Oswego, NY where the waves broke her up. No lives were lost. At the time of her loss, even though she was over 40 years old, she was still fully rigged as a 3-mast schooner.

    On 8 July 1863, ALMIRA (2-mast wooden scow-schooner, 85', 80 t, built in 1849 at Black River, Ohio) was dismasted and capsized in a violent squall on Lake Ontario. All hands were lost. On 27 July, the cargo of barreled fish was found by the schooner M. L. COLLINS. The ALMIRA was found still afloat by the schooner PETREL on 30 July. She was rebuilt and sailed until December 1871 when she foundered in the ice.

    On 8 July 1920, MARY WOOLSON (3-mast wooden schooner, 179', 709 gt, built in 1888 at bay City, MI) was being towed by the wooden steamer CHARLES D. BRADLEY along with the schooner-barge MIZTEC, when the BRADLEY slowed in mid-lake, causing both tows to ram her. The WOOLSON's bow was heavily damaged and she quickly sank 8 miles northeast of Sturgeon Point on Lake Huron. No lives were lost.

    Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Coast Guard Excerise

    07/07
    The Canadian Coast Guard ship Griffon was at the Soo Saturday and tied at Roberta Bondar Marina.That evening, the 234-foot vessel will lock upbound into Lake Superior. The vessel conducted a search and rescue exercise above the locks including a heloicopter.

    The vessel then passed upbound for maintence work on aids to navigation, including the Thunder Bay area.

    Also at the Bondar Marina was the Coast Guard vessel Shark. The USCG cutter Acacia was also at the Soo Saturday and was expected to stop at the Soo Michigan base.

    Pictures by Jerry Masson
    Griffon at Roberta Bondar Marina.
    Stern view. Shark at dock.

    Reported by: Jerry Masson and Brian Kloosterman




    Water Levels

    07/07
    Despite record-breaking snowfall in the basin last winter and more than 7 inches more precipitation than usual, Lake Superior is no higher than it was last year.

    According to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Lake Superior' s water level was at about 601.54 feet last Thursday -- 3 inches above May' s level but the same depth as June 2001.

    That level is 5 inches below the long-term monthly average for June.

    Drought-like conditions in the region were blamed for low water levels last summer, which prompted the dredging of several harbors. But over the winter, snowfall totaled 319.8 inches, almost double the seasonal average of 172.2 inches.

    Precipitation recorded at the National Weather Service in Negaunee, Mi. so far this year has totaled 24.2 inches -- 7.54 inches above the normal 16.66 inches at this time of year.

    " We had just a little above average snowfall and above average rainfall (in the Superior basin), but we' re still playing catch up, " Army Corps hydraulic engineer Carl Woodruff told the Mining Journal Tuesday.

    Lakes Michigan and Huron are 10 inches higher than last year and 5 inches higher than in May. They are still 10 inches below the long-term monthly average for June.

    Lake Erie is 8 inches higher than last year, but an inch below May. Erie is just an inch below the long-term monthly average for June. Lake Ontario is 13 inches higher than last year, and 2 inches higher than May. Ontario is 11 inches above the long-term monthly average for June.

    Woodruff said the lower lakes have been getting more precipitation in their watersheds, boosting their levels. While the Marquette County area offered greater than normal precipitation, other parts of the Lake Superior watershed did not provide as much.

    " We really need to get washed out this summer to get back to average, " Woodruff said.

    Despite the higher lake levels downstream from Superior, the Lake Superior Board of Control, which controls the outflow through devices in the St. Marys River near Sault Ste. Marie, has been increasing the amount of water moving out of Superior.

    Still, Woodruff said the outflow is below the level called for in the Lake Superior regulation plan.

    The plan calls for an outflow at Sault Ste. Marie of 2, 460 cubic meters per second. On Monday, the board limited July outflow to 2, 230 cubic meters per second.

    " When we' re at low levels, we don' t want to be draining the lake too quickly, " Woodruff said.

    Glen Nekvasil, spokesman for the Lake Carriers' Association, said the higher lake levels are allowing ships to carry more cargo.

    " It' s still not what are vessels are capable of, but the lake levels are improving, " Nekvasil said. " We' re finding them a bit more hospitable."

    Forecasters are expecting seasonal rises of Superior, Huron and Michigan to continue for the next month, with Superior rising 2 inches and Michigan and Huron rising 1 inch. Lakes Erie and Ontario are expected to drop 2 inches by the end of this month, The Mining Journal reported.






    Toledo News

    07/07
    There were no active vessels in port at the time of this report. The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Calumet, and Algosteel on Monday, followed by the Middletown on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Courtney Burton on Tuesday followed by the Armco on Weds.

    The American Republic remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing survey/repairs. The Joseph H. Frantz, Saturn, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in layup at there respective docksites.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Lighthouse for Sale

    07/07
    The Stony Point lighthouse on Lake Ontario is for sale. With an asking price of $295,000 the 1869 built lighthouse (plus a modern 2 bedroom year-round ranch home w/two-car garage) is located on 2.25 private acres with nearly 600-feet of Lake Ontario shoreline.The light is located 4 miles from Henderson Harbor, NY

    Call 877-874-8860 for more details




    Today in Great Lakes History - July 7

    The BURNS HARBOR's sea trials were conducted on July 7, 1980.

    JEAN PARISIEN was launched July 7, 1977.

    The DAVID Z. NORTON sailed on her maiden voyage July 7, 1973 as the WILLIAM R. ROESCH. She sailed light from Lorain to Superior, WI where she loaded 18,828 tons of iron ore on July 9th bound for Jones & Laughlin's Cuyahoga River plant at Cleveland.

    In 1971 the City of Saginaw 31 went to Manitowoc for a thorough overhaul. While there, a fire broke out July 29 destroying her cabin deck and rendering her useless for further use. The blaze was caused by an acetylene torch, and caused over $1 million in damage.

    On 7 July 1895, IDA MAY BROWN (wooden schooner, 53'/20GT, built 1884 at Charlevoix, MI) was carrying gravel when her cargo shifted in heavy weather. She capsized and later drifted to the beach near Michigan City, IN. Her crew was rescued by the U.S. Lifesavers.

    On 7 July 1851, GALLINIPPER (wooden schooner, 95', 145 t, built in 1846 at Milwaukee on the hull of NANCY DOUSMAN) capsized and foundered in a white squall in Lake Michigan. The wreck drifted to a point about 10 miles SSE of Manitowoc where it sank.

    On 7 July 1895, I. MAY BROWN (wooden schooner, 53', 20 gt, built in 1884 at Charlevoix, MI) was near Michigan City, Indiana with a load of gravel when her cargo shifted in heavy seas and she capsized, later drifting to the beach. Her crew was rescued by the U. S. Lifesavers.

    Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Locomotives Loaded in Erie

    07/06
    Crews were busy at work throughout Thursday and Friday loading locomotives onto a Jumboship Heavy-Lift Vessel. The Stellaprima arrived in Erie and docked at the Mounfort Terminal late Wednesday night and loading began Thursday afternoon.

    The 12 GE Transportation Systems AC 4400 locomotives weigh 420,000 pounds each, and are worth about $12 million dollars all together, or $1 million each. The 4400 horsepower locomotives are destined for Quebec Cartier Mining Company, the leading iron ore producer in North America. They can travel at up to 75 mph and will be used to transport iron ore from Mines at Mont Wright to Port-Cartier, Québec on the North shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The pellets are then loaded aboard ships and delivered to ports around the Great Lakes and the world.

    GE last shipped locomotives from the Port of Erie in 1997, to Companhia Vale do Rio Doce in Brazil. While a small order for GE, this represents a major investment for Cartier Mining, which will use these to replace their current locomotive fleet, and a new customer for GE's Lawrence Park plant can mean a parts stream for the Erie plant for 20-30 years, a GE spokesman said. The spokesman said this is an important order for GE, which recently laid off dozens of employees from its Lawrence Park plant.

    Jumbo has been the fleet of choice to haul locomotives from Erie, as last time the locomotives were shipped by vessel the Fairload was used to transport them. This is the third saltie to visit Erie in 2002, which is an improvement over the past two years, which each saw one saltie visit Erie. Locomotive loading is a slow process, as each must be carefully loaded and chained to the bottom of the cargo hold.

    Stellaprima at dock.
    Close Up.
    Another View.
    Close up of the counter weight platform used to balance the vessel during loading.
    Close Up of the AC 4400 Locomotives .

    Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




    Replacement For Jiimaan

    07/06
    Ferry Amherst Islander is expected to transit the Welland Canal today on the way to Leamington to cover for the downed Jiimaan.

    Last month the Jiimaan suffered a mechanical failure and needs a new engine. The vessel could be out of commission for another six weeks. The Pelee Islander, the only ferry with daily trips from the United States, moved from Sandusky to Leamington, Ontario, to replace the Jiimaan.

    Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt




    Kent Unloads

    07/06
    The saltie Kent was unloading in Marinette, Wi. on Thursday. The vessel is carrying a load of pig iron for Marinette Fuel & Dock Co. The Kent is registered in Hong Kong.

    Wide view of the Kent unloading.
    Close up.
    The soon-to-be-launched (Marinette Marine) ocean-going tug, "Ocean Reliance".
    Another view.

    Reported by: Dick Lund and Scott Best




    Soo Update

    07/06
    Below are recent images of traffic in Sault Ste. Marie.

    Algosoo meets John G Munson between Six and Nine Mile points Friday evening.
    Joseph L Block upbound in early evening.
    Block, stern view.
    Courtney Burton upbound Friday morning.
    Burton, stern view.
    Adam E Cornelius - bow view.
    Cornelius - stern.
    David Z. Norton makes an unusual passage through the St Marys River.
    J.A.W. Iglehart upbound at Nine Mile.
    Iglehart - stern.
    John G Munson, up at Nine Mile Point.

    Reported by: Roger LeLievre




    Marquette Update

    07/06
    The Reserve arrived at Marquette about noon on Thursday, but didn't begin loading until later in the evening. Fireworks at Marquette's lower harbor included some spectacular ones set off inside the abandoned ore dock in the lower harbor.

    The Lee A. Tregurtha was due Friday, with the Algomarine making a return trip.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe




    Toledo News

    07/06
    Friday the Armco was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore. There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

    The American Republic remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing survey/repairs. The Joseph H. Frantz and Saturn remain in layup at there respective dock sites.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Calumet on Sunday. The Algosteel on Monday, followed by the Middletown on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Courtney Burton on Tuesday.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Today in Great Lakes History - July 6

    The CACOUNA's bow was damaged in a collision with the Greek tanker CAPTAIN JOHN on the fog-shrouded St. Lawrence River July 6, 1971. The CACOUNA was repaired by replacing her bow with that of her near sistership the SILLERY which was being scrapped.

    ASHCROFT was used to haul ore, grain and coal only on the upper Great Lakes until July 6, 1932 when she was able to enter Lake Ontario through the newly expanded Welland Canal. On that trip ASHCROFT, loaded with grain from Fort William, Ont. for Kingston, Ont., was the largest vessel to traverse the canal to date.

    The keel was laid for the GOVERNOR MILLER in 1937.

    The COLUMBIA STAR set a record for the Head-Of-The-Lakes coal trade. The vessel loaded 70,903 net tons of low-sulfur coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wisconsin, on July 6, 1997.

    On 6 July 1836, YOUNG LION (2-mast, wooden schooner, 73"/83T, built in 1830 at buffalo, NY) was carrying railroad iron and lumber. About 12 miles from Erie, PA, in rough weather, her seams opened and she quickly sank with just her topmasts left above the water. 3 died, but 5 managed to clamber up the masts and hold on until the schooner NEW YORK rescued them.

    On 6 July 1871, CASTALIA (2-mast wooden schooner, 119', 242 gt, built in 1847 as a brig at Sandusky, Ohio) was on her way to pick up lumber at the camp at Byuing Inlet, Georgian Bay, when she came too close to Cove Island Reef and stranded in 3' of water. Although not badly damaged, she was about a mile from deep water. Tugs could not get to her and she was sailing light, so there was no cargo to lighten. She was stripped and abandoned. She finally broke up in a storm on 12 July 1871.

    On 6 July 1871, the Detroit newspapers (Detroit Free Press and Detroit Daily Post) both published articles stating that there were rumors on the docks regarding the tug TAWAS having her boiler explode on Saginaw Bay. The rumors originated with sailors from Port Huron and proved to be unfounded. However, in a sense this rumor turned into a prediction since TAWAS did blow her boiler about three years later (14 May 1874) on Lake Huron off Rock Falls, Michigan. At that time 6 crew members perished.

    Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    American Republic Expected to Sail

    07/05
    The American Republic is expected to return to service early next week. The vessel was originally scheduled to sit out the 2002 season due to lack of demand and dry dock work that was needed.

    Demand for the vessel allowed its owners to place the Republic in the Toledo Dry Dock for survey and repairs.

    Reported by: Brad Nelson




    Twin Ports Report

    07/05
    Algosoo kicked off the Fourth of July for Twin Ports boatwatchers when it departed early Thursday with coal from Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior.

    The terminal appears to have a busy and steady schedule through July. Canadian Transport, Oglebay Norton and Mesabi Miner are due there July 5; James R. Barker, fresh out of layup, is scheduled to arrive at 0400 Saturday to load 60,000 tons of coal for delivery to Presque Isle near Marquette. Also Saturday, Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and Algowood are scheduled to load. H. Lee White is scheduled to make a rare call at the dock on July 11 to load for Marquette.

    The Barker's return to service means all three Interlake Steamship Co. 1,000-footers are scheduled to be mainly in the coal trade in July. In addition to its July 5 trip, the Barker is scheduled to load at SMET on July 16, 21, 24 (a short trip to Taconite Harbor, Minn.) and 26. The Paul R. Tregurtha also currently is scheduled to take five loads from SMET this month, and the Mesabi Miner is scheduled for three loads.

    Also heavily involved in the coal trade for July are some of the big boats from the Oglebay-Norton and American Steamship combo. Walter J. McCarthy Jr. is scheduled for four loads, Indiana Harbor for three, Columbia Star for two, Oglebay Norton for five and H. Lee White for one.

    The power plant in Nanticoke, Ontario, has been a big SMET customers the past couple seasons. This month it's scheduled to receive cargoes carried by Algosoo, Canadian Transports, Algowood, Canadian Enterprise, Algolake and CSL Laurentian.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Lakes Visitors in Belgium

    07/05
    The Mackenzie remained in drydock at Antwerp, Belgium last weekend. Her propeller had been removed and possibly taken in for repairs.

    Also on Sunday the lakes visitor Daviken was leaving the port of Antwerp.

    Mackenzie in Dry Dock.
    Another view.
    Close up.
    Daviken departing.
    Entering the Berendrecht Lock. Note the amount of room in the lock
    Bow view.
    Close up.

    Reported by: Chris Rombouts




    Buffalo Update

    07/05
    On Sunday the Herbert C. Jackson was inbound Buffalo with a load of grain for the ADM Standard Elevator.

    Monday the barge Integrity and tug Jacklyn M. were in port with a cargo of cement. The tug and barge departed Monday afternoon. Wednesday afternoon the English River was in port. She was followed by the tug Karen Andrie and barge that came into the Black Rock Canal after the English River left the North Entrance.

    Jackson at the Erie Basin.
    Another view with the Kinsman Independent in the background.
    Unloading.
    Close up.
    Outbound with the tug New Jersey.
    Integrity bow view.
    Stern view.
    Close up of Jacklyn M.
    English River.
    Karen Andrie and barge.

    Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




    Today in Great Lakes History - July 5

    PAUL H. CARNAHAN was launched in 1945 as a) HONEY HILL, a T2-SE-Al World War II Fuel Tanker, for U.S. Maritime Commission.

    July 5, 1991 - Charles Conrad announced he had formed a corporation to purchase the Ludington carferry operation from Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Company.

    JUSTIN R. WHITING was launched on 5 July 1874 at Langell's yard at the mouth of the Pine River in St. Clair, Michigan. Her dimensions were 144' x 26'2" x 11'6". Although built to be a self-powered steam barge, she was towed as a regular barge during her first season of operation.

    IDA CORNING (2-mast wooden barge, 168', 444 gt) was launched in E. Saginaw, Michigan on 5 July 1881. She was built for L. P. Mason & Company of E. Saginaw. In 1858, her rig was changed to that of a 2-mast schooner. She lasted until abandoned at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin in 1928.

    Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Heavy Lift Vessel in the Welland

    07/04
    On Wednesday the heavy-lift vessel Stellaprima traveled through the Welland Canal. The vessel is on its way to Erie, PA. to pick up a cargo of locomotives. Also in canal was the Halifax with a load of coal, downbound below Lock 1.

    Stellaprima departing Lock 7.
    Close up of the bridge.
    Profile.
    Cranes.
    Stack marking.
    Web address on the side of the ship.
    Close up of stern.
    Heading for Port Colborne and Lake Erie.
    Halifax downbound.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Alex Howard




    Twin Ports Gets Rare Callers

    07/04
    Although a trip to the head of the lakes for the Algosoo is not a rare thing, the Canadian laker managed to make things interesting Wednesday afternoon. Instead of following its usual route to Midwest Energy in Superior, the vessel stopped first at the Cargill B1 berth in Duluth. Repeating a move made several times over the last few years by American lakers, the Algosoo unloaded a cargo of limestone across the Cargill slip onto the adjacent pier, which has been used recently to store and distribute limestone, sand and gravel. This is the first time in many years, if ever, that Duluth-Superior has received a cargo of Canadian limestone. The Algosoo was scheduled to load at Midwest Energy later in the evening.

    Also in a rare appearance, the David Z. Norton is venturing up to the Twin Ports on July 4th to load ore at Burlington Northern #5.

    Reported by: Eric Holst




    Marquette Report

    07/04
    The barge Great Lakes Trader and tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort loaded at Marquette's ore dock Wednesday. The Algomarine arrived but didn't begin loading.

    It was an unusual sight to see no rail cars visible on the ore dock, one train did arrive later in the day. Trains pull onto the dock and drop the taconite into the dock pockets. These pockets are then emptied into the waiting vessel.

    The Reserve is due in Marquette on Thursday morning.

    Great Lakes Trader loads with no rail cars on the dock.
    Close up.
    Algomarine docked.
    Bow view.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe




    Saginaw News

    07/04
    The CSL Tadoussac arrived at the Lafarge Terminal in Essexville early Wednesday morning unloading clinker through the day. The Tadoussac departed by early evening on her way to the lake.

    The Brig Niagara arrived in the Saginaw River during the afternoon tying up in Wenona Park next to Bay City's own tall ship the Appledore. The dock is now full for the weekend in Wenona Park with the Appledore, Princess Wenona, Grey Fox, and Niagara all tied up there.

    Pictures by Todd Shorkey
    CSL Tadoussac unloading at Essroc.
    Another Tadoussac view.
    Brig Niagara upbound firing her cannons.
    Brig Niagara close up.
    Niagara, Princess Wenona, and Grey Fox.
    Brig Niagara passing the Appledore.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Busy Weekend Expected in Hamilton

    07/04
    This weekend is expected to be busy for ship traffic in Hamilton, Ont. United Storage is scheduled for a ship load of Rum for Bacardi. Stelco has three ships coming in for Furnace Coke for National Steel. The three ships are reported to be the Saginaw, CSL Laurentien and Rt. Hon Paul J. Martin. The loading is to start Saturday in the early morning.

    Reported by: Wally Wallace




    Toledo Update

    07/04
    Wednesday afternoon there were no active coal, grain, overseas, or ore vessels in port. The American Republic remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing survey/repairs. The Joseph H. Frantz and Saturn remain in layup at there respective dock sites.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Calumet on Sunday, followed by the Algosteel on Monday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Armco on Friday, followed by the Courtney Burton on Tuesday.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Fawn Island Gathering

    07/04
    A day of boat watching and river cruising is planned for July 13. Ron and Shari Schwartz and George Lee from Hammond Bay River Cruises are hosting the exclusive "Boatnerd" outing. Click here for Details




    Today in Great Lakes History - July 4

    The WILLIS B. BOYER museum ship was opened to the public in 1987.

    In 1976 the SAM LAUD grounded entering Buffalo, NY. She was dry docked at Lorain, OH for repairs to bottom plates of No. 1, 2 and 3 port and starboard tanks.

    Also on this day in 1976, the H. Lee White struck the Algoma Steel plant dock at the Canadian Soo resulting in damages to her stern amounting to $108,000 at the repair yard of Sturgeon Bay.

    The JOSEPH S. YOUNG (1) was commissioned July 4, 1957. She was the first of seven T2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service.

    On July 4, 1953, the John G. Munson set a Great Lakes record for limestone by loading 21,011 tons of limestone at Calcite, Michigan. This record for limestone stood until being broken by the Canada Steamship Lines self-unloader Manitoulin late in the 1966 season.

    July 4, 1952 - The Pere Marquette 18 (II) was laid up due to railroad strike. She was never to operate again.

    The wooden propeller freighter MAINE, owned by Northern Transportation Co., had sailed from Chicago and was on Lake Ontario on 4 July 1871, when Fireman Orsebius Kelley stoked the fire at 8:00 PM and went to the porter's room to get a lamp. When he returned, the boiler exploded with such force that Kelley was mortally wounded and died later. The blast also killed Engineer M. H. Downer, deckhand Joshua Kelley (the fireman's brother), Halbert Butterfield (a 13 year old passenger) and his mother. The MAINE still floated after the blast. She was repaired and put back in service. Including this boiler explosion, she had four major mishaps in her career. She sank in 1872, burned in 1898, and finally burned again in 1911.

    One hundred years ago, on 4 July 1900 during her maiden voyage from St. Clair, Michigan to Cleveland, Ohio, the wooden steam barge ALFRED MITCHELL ran aground at Bar Point Light. It was claimed that the steering gear broke which rendered the boat unmanageable. Later that same day the MITCHELL was released by the wrecker SAGINAW.

    About 9:00 PM on 4 July 1874, the steam barge W. H. BARNUM, with the schooner THOMAS W. FERRY in tow, collided with the bark S. V. R. WATSON near Point Pelee on Lake Erie. The WATSON sank in 28' of water. She was raised about two weeks later by the Coast Wrecking Company.

    July 4, 1958 - The keel for the second of two new bulk freighters for Interlake Steamship Co. was laid at Great Lakes Engineering Works shipyard at River Rouge, Michigan on Wednesday morning June 25. Now known as Hull 302, the ship will be 689 ft. long, 75 ft. beam and 37-1/2 ft. molded depth with a designed maximum cargo capacity of about 24,000 tons. H. C. Downer & Associates of Cleveland did the design work. The ship will be powered by a 6,000 shp steam turbine main engine with coal-fired boilers. Interlake's other new ship, the 710-ft. flagship JOHN SHERWIN, joined the Great Lakes bulk cargo fleet in May of this year.
    Hull 302 was eventually named HERBERT C. JACKSON.

    Data from: Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Busy Day in the Twin Ports

    07/03
    The Duluth Superior harbor was full on Tuesday, with ten active freighters in port during the afternoon. The Darya Ma, Ziemia Tarnowska, and Brunto were anchored outside the Duluth piers awaiting grain loading berths. The Veeresborg was loading beet pulp pellets at General Mills in Duluth after unloading German lumber on Monday. The Federal Polaris was loading at the AGP grain elevator after loading bentonite at Hallett #6 on Monday. The Gunay A was loading grain at Cenex Harvest States, and the Canadian Prospector was doing the same at Peavey. The Stewart J. Cort was loading taconite pellets at BNSF #5, and the Columbia Star was loading coal at Midwest Energy, while the Indiana Harbor was laying by at Hallett #5, waiting for the Star to finish.

    A full harbor in the afternoon meant a busy evening at the Duluth piers. The Canadian Prospector departed first from Peavey. Then the Federal Polaris departed from AGP and the Ziemia Tarnowska arrived to replace it there. Next, the Gunay A and the Brunto performed the same switch, passing each other and exchanging salutes off the Port Terminal. As the Gunay A sailed underneath the Aerial Bridge, the Columbia Star departed the coal dock to become the last in the parade of outbound ships. The Indiana Harbor pulled right in behind her to load for Consumers Energy in Muskegon.

    Reported by: Eric Holst




    Green Bay News

    07/03
    Saturday was a busy day in Green Bay. The Paul H. Townsend had arrived Friday afternoon and departed about 11:00 a.m. Saturday morning from the Lafarge dock. The David Z. Norton arrived about 8:00 a.m. Saturday morning at the Georgia Pacific slip to unload a cargo of coal from Sandusky. The Norton had to pass through six bridges to get up to the Georgia Pacific slip. On Monday afternoon the Maumee delivered another cargo of coal to Georgia Pacific.

    David Z Norton turning in Fox River for the Georgia Pacific slip
    Entering the slip
    Preparing to land the line handlers at the dock
    Docked at the Georgia Pacific slip
    Stern view of David Z Norton unloading
    Paul H Townsend and ST Crapo docked at Lafarge
    Paul H Townsend outbound at the RR swing bridge
    Stern view passing through Mason St. Bridge Paul H Townsend near Walnut St. Bridge
    Passing through the Main St. Bridge outbound

    Reported by: Scott Best




    Conquest Unloads in Owen Sound

    07/03
    The cement barge Southdown Conquest and tug Susan W. Hannah were unloading cement at the Miller cement dock Tuesday afternoon.

    Reported by: David Shearman




    Alpena News

    07/03
    The Paul H. Townsend came into port Tuesday evening to load cement. The Sam Laud is due in Wednesday morning to unload coal at the Lafarge dock.

    The Alpena is in Milwaukee and the J.A.W Iglehart is heading for Waukegan. The Jacklyn M barge Integrity is going to Detroit.

    Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




    Saginaw Update

    07/03
    The Paul H. Townsend was outbound from the Lafarge Dock early Tuesday morning after unloading throughout the night.

    Also in the Saginaw River is the largest sea cadet training ship in the United States, the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Ship Grey Fox. The Grey Fox arrived in Bay City Monday night and is scheduled to depart Sunday. Cruises are being given to various youth groups and she is open for tours from 1pm to 7pm daily through Sunday. The Grey Fox is docked in Downtown Bay City at Wenona Park

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Toledo News

    07/03
    The Reserve was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore. The Arthur M. Anderson was at the CSX Docks loading coal. The Cuyahoga was at Andersons "E" Elevator loading grain. The tug Jacklyn M with her barge Integrity at the Lafarge Dock unloading cement.

    The American Republic remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing survey/repairs. The Joseph H. Frantz and Saturn remain in layup at there respective dock sites.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel on Thursday. The Calumet on Sunday, followed by a return visit of the Algosteel on Monday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Armco on Friday, followed by the Courtney Burton on Tuesday.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    North East Ohio ports

    07/03
    Monday night the Sam Laud was loading coal in Conneaut at 10:00 p.m. The Halifax was due in at 3:00 a.m.

    Ashtabula was empty all evening, but the rail side was busy stockpiling coal. Fairport was empty from 5pm to midnight, except the suction dredge Atchafalya, which was still working at midnight. The Corps derrick McCauley and tug Koziol are still in port.

    Reported by: Dave Merchant




    Hamilton Report

    07/03
    Canada Day, Monday afternoon saw limited commercial vessel traffic in the Harbor. Two salties, the Arizona Dream and the Kapitonas Marcinkus were moored at Piers 12 and 14 with no unloading activity seen. Kapitonas Marcinkus, the deck crew were repainting the vessel's name on the starboard bow.

    Over at Dofasco, an Algoma vessel, possibly the Algocen was unloading iron ore pellets.

    The Canadian Provider is again in lay-up and moored at Pier 25. The pilothouse windows are papered over.

    There were many pleasure craft using the Burlington Ship Canal. Jet skis exceeding the speed limit through the canal and nearly causing a collision with another pleasure craft necessitated a call from the bridge operators to the Hamilton Police. Shortly after, a marine unit arrived to patrol the canal.

    Reported by: Patricia Burgon




    Toronto News

    07/03
    Canada Day celebrations had a Boatnerd twist Monday night. On Sunday the McKeil tugs towed Canadian Mariner out into Humber Bay and anchored it off Ontario Place. Before the tow her decks were loaded with fireworks and Monday night her decks were ablaze with rocket fire. She was expected to be towed back to her lay-up berth Tuesday.

    The tug Patricia D. and barge Rock Prince headed for Oshawa harbor late Monday night. The barge was loaded with fireworks for the Canada Day celebrations in Oshawa.

    The Toronto Island ferry strike continues - now in its 8th day.

    The USCG Bramble and barge were in Toronto for a couple of days doing public tours at the dock. They were expected to leave Tuesday for the canal.

    Reported by: Gerry O.




    Rains bring Alang to a halt, Monsoons slow ship breakers in India

    07/03
    Ship breakers in Alang at the world's largest scrap yard have been forced to temporarily halt vessel demolitions due to monsoon rains. A ship-breaker said Alang was at standstill June 27 and 28, but is limping back to normalcy.

    This year, "rains have been unprecedented," a breaker told Fairplay Daily News. Yard workers fled after the sea became extremely rough. Wages have gone up as many workers have left the towns.

    There are about 95 units functioning at Alang, and every unit has vessels waiting for demolition. Prices are also favorable, with a breaker purchasing a 7,000-LDT bulker for $130-$140 per ton.

    Many Great Lakes vessels met their end on the beaches of Alang. It is unclear if this rise in scrap prices will see a renewed demand for hulls from the Great Lakes.

    Reported by: Dave Cooper




    Book Signing in Duluth

    07/03
    Jody Aho, author of "The Steamer William A. Irvin: Queen of the Silver Stackers", will be the guest at a book signing in Duluth on Saturday, July 20 from 2-3 p.m. The signing is being hosted by The Bookstore At Fitger's, located in the lower level of the Fitger's Brewery Complex, 600 East Superior Street, Duluth.

    A regular contributor to this site, Jody has also participated in several other publications dealing with Great Lakes shipping history. His "Marine Milestones" have been a fixture in "Know Your Ships" since 1998. He has also contributed to "Ships of the Great Lakes Cookbook: Discover Their Culinary Legends". Jody has also written articles for or contributed his photography to "The Nor' Easter", the journal of the Lake Superior Marine Museum Association; "Great Laker"; and "Great Lakes Photo Magazine."




    Ryerson Tour

    07/03
    The Door County Maritime Museum will be offering tours of the Edward L. Ryerson on Saturday July 20th and Sunday July 21st. Tickets for the hour long tour are $10.00 per person and are limited. Contact the museum at (920) 743-5958 or visit www.dcmm.org




    Weekly Updates

    07/03
    The weekly updates have been uploaded. Click here to view




    Today in Great Lakes History - July 3

    The JOHN B. AIRD was christened June 3, 1983 at Thunder Bay for Algoma Central Marine, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

    The ROGER BLOUGH was moved out of the dry dock on June 3, 1972.

    In 1954 the CLIFFS VICTORY successfully completing her sea trials.

    The FRANK ARMSTRONG departed light from Ashtabula, OH on her maiden voyage in command of Captain H. Chesley Inches June 3, 1943 bound for Superior, WI to load iron ore.

    The PATERSON (1) entered service on June 3, 1954 with 440,000 bushels of wheat from Port Arthur.

    On 3 July 1872, the wooden steam barge MARY MILLS was launched at P. Lester's yard at Marysville, Michigan.

    On 3 July 1872, GRACE DORMER (wooden propeller passenger & package freight ferry, 71', 66 gt, built in 1868 at Buffalo, NY) had just finished loading a cargo of fish at St. James, Beaver Island, when she caught fire and burned. One life was lost. The vessel was rebuilt and lasted until she burned at the bone-yard at Grand Island, New York in 1925.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Active Fleet Tops Last Year For First Time This Season

    07/02
    For the first time this season, the number of U.S.-Flag Great Lakes vessels in service has exceeded the corresponding point in the 2001 navigation season. On July 1, the major U.S.-Flag Lakes lines had 57 of their 67 vessels in operation, an increase of three hulls compared to a year ago.

    The increase is, however, somewhat misleading. Last year a number of vessels were withdrawn from service for varying periods of time during the summer as demand for iron ore withered from the heat of unfair trade in steel. This season, vessels delayed their sailing. For example, the Buckeye and the Courtney Burton (both Oglebay Norton Marine Services Company) only returned to service in mid-June. Interlake Steamship did not sail its 1,000-footer James R. Barker until June 30. Still to sail this season are the American Republic (American Steamship); Richard Reiss (Erie Sand Steamship); Edward L. Ryerson (Central Marine Logistics); Elton Hoyt 2nd (Interlake Steamship); and Joseph H. Frantz (Oglebay Norton Marine Services Company).

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




    Provider Enters Lay-up

    07/02
    The Canadian Provider was spotted last week in Hamilton Harbor with its bridge windows covered. There is no indication how long the vessel will be in Lay-up or if it or the Canadian Miner will sail again this season.

    Reported by: Jon van Staalduinen




    Duluth Tonnage

    07/02
    The Port of Duluth-Superior handled five percent less waterborne commerce through May than during the same period in 2001, a slight improvement from the eight percent deficit realized in early season commerce.

    Year-to-date cargo totaled 7.8 million metric tons compared with 8.2 million tons in 2001. Total cargo trailed the five-year average of 8.4 million tons by six percent.

    The Port’s top two cargoes of coal and iron ore each experienced four percent declines from the previous season, not quite as negative as the 16 percent decline reported by The Lake Carriers’ Association for all U.S.-flag carriage of iron ore in May. The LCA report showed coal on U.S. bottoms holding even for the season, with shipments of western coal down by nearly 12 percent.

    Port officials said, however, that iron ore is expected to make a modest recovery as the North American Steel industry continues to rebound from its recent slump, while western coal shipments by the end of the season are still expected to exceed last year’s levels.

    Bulk grain, historically the Port’s third-leading commodity, experienced a 21 percent decline. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s May supply and demand outlook predicted the lowest level of U.S. wheat exports since the 1970s due to smaller U.S. crop, the strong U.S. dollar, shrinking global imports and intense competition.

    Total international cargoes of 2.9 million tons surpassed 2001’s 2.1 million tons by 43 percent. Domestic trade of 4.9 million tons represented a 21 percent decrease from last year’s figure of 6.2 million tons.

    The Port’s three principal cargoes of coal, iron ore and grain combined equaled 93 percent of total commerce-coal with 3.5 million tons (44 percent), iron ore running a close second at 3.3 million tons (42 percent), and grain rounding up the top three with 575,633 tons (seven percent).

    Vessel calls through May reached 226, a decrease of 10 less from last year’s total of 236. Making up that total were 125 U.S.-flag, 77 Canadian-flag and 24 overseas vessels.

    Reported by: Lisa Marciniak, Duluth Seaway Port Authority




    Duluth - Superior Update

    07/02
    The Joseph H. Thompson/Jr. made an interesting trip to the Twin Ports this weekend. In what may be a first for the Thompson, she delivered salt to the Cutler Magner Duluth dock. She unloaded slowly, for much of Friday night directly through the roof Cutler's storage building, and then unloaded some of the cargo in a pile outdoors next to the building Saturday morning. A crane from a local construction company was alongside for much of the process, helping to break up the sticky cargo. Next the Thompson was scheduled next to load at Burlington Northern #5 in Superior, once the Buckeye finished loading late Saturday. In a very rare move, the Thompson chose the west side of old Burlington Northern #4 as a layby berth to wait for the Buckeye to finish. It has most likely been many years since a vessel has tied up there.

    In other Saturday traffic, the Capt. Ralph Tucker unloaded calcium chloride at Hallett #6, the Veeresborg arrived to unload German lumber at the Port Terminal, and the Courtney Burton arrived to unload limestone at the Northland Bituminous pier. The Burton is also scheduled to load at Burlington Northern. Since the reopening of the International Steel mills, Burlington Northern has seen a considerable increase in traffic, especially from Oglebay Norton steamers.

    Reported by: Eric Holst




    Marquette News

    07/02
    The Lee A. Tregurtha arrived as scheduled at 6:00 p.m. Monday, followed by John J. Boland at 7:30 p.m. The Lee A. had nearly completed loading by 10:30 p.m. and was taking on her final chutes and preparing to get under way. Loading had not yet started on the Boland.

    Charles M. Beeghly is due at 8:00 a.m. Tuesday morning, with the Great Lakes Trader, Algomarine, and Adam E. Cornelius scheduled for Wednesday. This will be a busy holiday week for the ore docks.

    Pictures by Lee Rowe
    Lee A. loading.
    Close up.
    John J. Boland on the other side of the dock.
    Bow view.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe and Dave Wobser




    Saginaw Update

    07/02
    The Paul H. Townsend was inbound the Saginaw River early Monday morning passing the Pump-Out Island at 5:45 a.m. She was inbound with cement for the Lafarge Terminal in Carrollton.

    The Wolverine was outbound early in the morning, departing the Buena Vista Dock at 7:30 a.m. for the 6th Street Turning Basin. After turning, she was downbound for the lake passing through Bay City around 11:00 a.m.

    Pictures by Todd Shorkey
    Paul H. Townsend inbound clear of the Liberty Bridge.
    Stern view.
    Close up approaching Lafayette Bridge.
    Approaching Independence Bridge.
    Close up at Smith Park
    Stern View

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Toledo Report

    07/02
    The American Republic remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing survey/repairs. The tug Everlast with her barge Norman McLeod was at the Sun Dock and departed Monday afternoon. The Gemini was at the B-P Dock and departed Monday afternoon.

    The Joseph H. Frantz, Saturn, and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in lay-up. There were no coal, grain or ore vessels in port at the time of this report.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Arthur M. Anderson on Tuesday. The Algosteel on Thursday, followed by the Calumet on Sunday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Reserve on Tuesday. The Armco on Friday, followed by the Courtney Burton on Monday.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Quedoc Tow

    07/02
    Below are images from Last week's Quedoc tow from Thunder Bay to the Soo.

    Departing Thunder Bay
    Pictures by Rob Farrow
    Tugs waiting for the tow to begin
    Preparing the tow
    Tow departs old Paterson dock.
    Quedoc heading backwards down the Kaministiqua River.
    Point Valour leads the way.
    Another shot of Point Valour on lead.
    Point Valour reattaching tow line.
    Tow rounding corner with Mount McKay in background.
    Making the turn down the Mission River as the Sun breaks out.
    They say there's a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.
    Passing Ontario Hydro's generating Plant at the Mouth of the Mission River.
    Moving out through the Mission Piers.
    Where she belongs...on open lake.
    Avenger IV attaching the main tow line to her stern.
    Point Valour taking in her tow line.
    Avenger IV turning the Quedoc towards home.
    Heading for the Soo and probably her last port ever.
    Goodbye Quedoc.

    Photos by John Kuzma
    Tugs waiting to begin.
    Crew rigs the bow tow line.
    Close up as the crew drags the line up the ladder.
    The tow begins as Avenger IV pulls on the bow of Quedoc.

    On Thursday afternoon June 27 the Quedoc tow arrived off Pt. Louise with the Purvis tug Avenger IV at the bow and the Scott Purvis at the stern. The Ivan Purvis assisted, taking over at the bow from the Avenger IV. The Quedoc was quickly brought to the dock near the Vandoc. Both boats can be viewed from Sherman Park in Sault Ste. Marie, MI

    Photos by: Herm Klein
    Quedoc towed to Algoma Steel on Thursday
    At Point Louise
    Tugs Ivan Purvis and Avenger IV
    Off Shermin Park
    Turning for the dock

    At the dock Saturday N. Schultheiss
    Quedoc ready for possible scrapping
    Close up of the name on her bow
    Stern view
    Close up

    Reported by: Rob Farrow and Andy LaBorde




    Soo Gathering Pictures

    07/02
    Visit the link below for pictures from the Soo Locks Gathering.

    My thanks to everyone who joined us at the Soo and those who made the weekend possible.

    Dave and Janet Wobser for planning and organizing the events. Captain John Chomniak, Pauline Chomniak and the friendly crew aboard Soo Lock Tours Canada's Chief Shingwauk. Each year Lock Tours Canada has treated us to an unforgettable cruise.

    Click here to view




    Updates

    07/02
    I am processing the updates I couldn't download for the past few days, please continue to send pictures and updates, I should be caught up by the end of the week.




    Today in Great Lakes History - July 2

    On July 2, 1966, the Simcoe (later Algostream) entered service. Another Canadian straight decker retired before its time.

    The railroad carferry TRANSIT was launched at Walkerville, Ontario on 2 July 1872 at the Jenkins Brothers shipyard.

    Before noon, Saturday, 2 July 1870, several attempts were made to launch the barge AGNES L. POTTER at Simon Langell's yard at St. Clair, Michigan. Nothing happened until 3:00 PM when the vessel moved about 100' but still was not launched. The tug VULCAN arrived at 8:00 AM the following day and broke the line on the first attempt to pull the vessel off the ways. A 10" line was obtained in Port Huron and at 2:00 PM a second effort only moved the barge about 4 feet. Finally , on the third attempt, the VULCAN pulled her into the water. The POTTER's dimensions were 133' x 27' x 9', 279 gt and she was built for the iron ore trade. She was named for the daughter of the general superintendent of Ward's Iron Works of Chicago. She lasted until 1906.

    Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Barker Loads

    07/01
    The James R. Barker returned to service Sunday loading taconite in Escanaba, Mi. This marks a very late start to the 2002 season for the modern 1000-footer.

    The Barker will unloading in Chicago and then head to load coal in Superior, Wi. for the St. Clair Edison Coal Dock on the St. Clair River.

    Barker loading.
    Another view.

    Reported by: Sandy & Eric Chapman and Andy LaBorde




    Marquette News

    07/01
    Temperature topped 100 degrees between Munising and Marquette Sunday, and was as high as 98 next to Lake Superior at the Marquette ore dock. It was still in the high 90's at 9:00 pm. Taconite dust was flying in the brisk wind as the railroad ore cars were dumped into the dock bins.

    American Mariner had loaded early in the day and left Marquette around 3:00 p.m. Algosteel was loading as Middletown arrived following the Mariner's departure. Algosteel was nearly finished loading at 9:00 p.m. She was scheduled to receive 451 cars, 26,900 tons of taconite.

    The dock advised Middletown they would begin loading her at midnight. Evidently it is not possible to load both sides of the dock at the same time.

    Lee A. Tregurtha is due at 6:00 p.m. Monday followed by John J. Boland an hour later.

    The Paul R. Tregurtha unloaded coal at Marquette's upper harbor on Saturday.

    Pictures by Lee Rowe
    Paul R. Tregurtha unloading.
    Algosteel loading for Algoma Steel in the Soo.
    Close up of workers on the dock and train cars.
    Middletown loading on the other side of the dock.
    Middletown loading.
    Bow view.

    Reported by: Lee Rowe and Dave Wobser




    Updates

    07/01
    I am processing the updates I couldn't download for the past few days, please continue to send pictures and updates, I hope to be caught up Monday night including pictures from the Gathering.




    Today in Great Lakes History - July 01

    On July 1, 1940, the Harry Coulby (Kinsman Enterprise) became the first Great Lakes vessel to load in excess of 16,000 tons of iron ore when it loaded 16,067 tons of iron ore in Ashland, Wisconsin.

    On 1 July 1927, ROBERT C. WENTE (wooden, propeller, bulk freighter, 141'/336 GT, built in 1888 at Gibraltar, MI) burned to a total loss in the St. Clair River. In 1911, she sank in Lake Michigan, but was raised and refurbished.

    July, 1983 - The C&O sold it's remaining 3 carferries to Glen Bowden and George Towns. They begin operating cross-lake service between Ludington and Kewaunee under the name Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Co. (MWT)

    On 1 July 1852, CASPIAN (wooden side-wheeler, 252', 921 t, built in 1851 at Newport, Michigan) foundered a short distance off Cleveland's piers. Some of her gear and structural material were salvaged in the Spring of 1853 and the wreck was then flattened with dynamite.

    July 1, 1900, the new wooden steam barge ALFRED MITCHELL started her maiden voyage from St. Clair, Michigan for Cleveland, Ohio to load coal. She was owned by Langell & Sons.

    On 1 July 1869, the wooden schooner GARROWEN was carrying coal from Cleveland to Toronto when she sprang a leak and sank in 60' of water about 10 miles from shore off Geneva, Ohio. The crew escaped in the yawl. She was only 19 years old and some of the crew claimed that she was scuttled as an insurance scam. However, a number of divers visited the wreck on the bottom of the Lake at the time and that claim was refuted.

    On 1 July 1875, the iron carferry HURON (238', 1052 gt, built at Point Edward, Ontario with iron plates prefabricated in Scotland) made her trial voyage between Fort Gratiot, Michigan and Point Edward, Ontario across the St. Clair River. This vessel served the Grand Trunk Railway and ran between Windsor and Detroit for over a century.

    Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




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