Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

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* Report News

Port Reports -  July 31

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors had no traffic on Sunday. The boat schedule shows two boats scheduled for Monday, but currently the Algoma Transport is in the Straits and the American Integrity is upbound on Lake Michigan, meaning no traffic for Monday. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay will see the H. Lee White arrive Sunday evening coming from the Twin Ports. During the day on Monday Silver Bay will also see the arrival of the American Spirit.

Marquette, Mich. – Rod Burdick
Sunday evening, tug and barge Clyde S. VanEnkevort and Erie Trader arrived at LS&I to load ore for the first time since being renamed.

St. Marys River
Upbounders Sunday included Erie Trader/Clyde S. VanEnkeovrt early, followed by the saltie Shoveler (went to the Essar Export Dock), passenger ship Victory 1, Federal Margaree, Cuyahoga (to Essar), Stewart J. Cort, Baie St. Paul, American Spirit, Algolake and Paul R. Tregurtha. Downbound traffic included Federal Nakagawa early, followed by Algoma Olympic, Great Republic, James L. Kuber/Victory, Victory 1, Kaye E. Barker, Cuyahoga and Atlantic Huron.

Port Inland, Mich.
Wilfred Sykes departed in the early evening and Menominee/Olive L. Moore took her place at the loading dock.

Milwaukee, Wis. – Paul Erspamer
Sharon M I & barge Huron Spirit, as well as Samuel de Champlain and cement barge Innovation, were in port unloading on Sunday.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
John D. Leitch departed Sunday for Superior, Wis. The saltie Wicko was still in port in the evening.

Indiana Harbor, Ind.
James R. Barker was at the ArcelorMittal dock Sunday night. Indiana Harbor is due next.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Mariner was at the Sifto dock Sunday night. Radcliffe R. Latimer departed earlier in the day downbound.

Saginaw River – Todd Shorkey
On July 28th, the tug Zeus and her tank barge, Robert F. Deegan, called on the Port Fisher dock in Bay City with a cargo of liquid calcium chloride. Later that evening, the tug Defiance and her self-unloading barge, Ashtabula, arrived at the Port Fisher/Bay Aggregates dock in Bay City to unload. On July 29th, Manitoulin was back for her second trip in three days, calling again at the Sargent dock in Zilwaukee.

Regional and Welland Canal transits – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrivals: Algonova at 0132 on July 28. Frontenac at 0950 and Algocanada at 1210 and Thunder Bay at 1936. Departures: Algoma Hansa at 0046 and Frontenac at 1855 both westbound. At anchor: Algoscotia at 1024 on July 29

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at 0353, Whitefish Bay at 0421, COE Leni (Lbr) (ex Marselisborg-16, Clipper Anne-14, Marselisborg-12) at 0835, sailing vessel Denis Sullivan at 0840, CSL Laurentien at 0737, Greta C (IOM) at 1429 and tug Rebecca Lynn at 2030

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Harvester at 0531, Algoma Enterprise at 0724, Spruceglen at 1110, Tim S. Dool at 1550, Algosteel at 2130

Welland Canal docks:
At dock: tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD, arrived on June 20 at 1046. Barge MM Newfoundland at PWDD July 28

Hamilton:
Arrivals: Azoresborg (Nld) at 0015 and CSL St. Laurent at 1128 and Algoma Enterprise at approximately 2150. Departures: tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at 2332 on July 29. At docks: Tundra (Cyp) at 1134 on July 23, tug Evans McKeil at 0953 on July 27, tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 2206 on July 28 and Arctic (ex Flinter Arctic-17) on July 28 at 2047. At anchor: Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 0512 on July 24

Bronte:
Arrival: Bro Anna (Sgp) at 0012

Clarkson:
At dock: Adfines Star (Mlt) at 0652 (ex Osttank Sweden-11) on July 27

Toronto:
Arrivals: Stephen B. Roman at 0159 and Torrent (Cyp) at 0108 on July 28 to unload at Redpath

Oshawa:
Departure: COE Leni (Lbr) (ex Marselisborg-16, Clipper Anne-14, Marselisborg-12) at 0604 for the Welland Canal

 

The SS Columbia, ghost ship on the Buffalo River

7/31 - Buffalo. N.Y. – The tattered SS Columbia looks like a ghost ship. The three-deck steamboat that last transported passengers a quarter-century ago between Detroit and an amusement park in Canada now sits docked on the Buffalo River in the middle of the old grain silos.

Peeling paint, rotted wood and rust mark the once-gleaming boat. The ballroom on the second deck could have staged the ballroom-dancing ghouls in the cult classic “Carnival of Souls.”

The boat arrived here about two years ago to undergo restoration. When the crew’s work is eventually completed – 2023 or 2024 is the current timeline – the plan is for the boat to once again carry on open waters. But not here or elsewhere on Lake Erie.

“The whole mission of the project is to restore the tradition of the day-liners, that grand tradition of excursion boats on the Hudson River,” said Liz McEnaney, an architectural and urban historian who serves as executive director of the SS Columbia Project.

The steam engine is also envisioned as a teaching lab for science and math students, and a floating platform for arts and cultural programming.

“This is a regional story of generations who remember what it was like to be on these boats, escape the city and see the shoreline slipping away without a care in the world,” McEnaney said. “It was more about the journey than the destination. This was the vehicle for escape.”

Before the boat can return to the water, more money will be needed. The cost is pegged at $18 million, with just $4.4 million raised to date. Those funds have been used to scrape 2 tons of zebra mussels off the hull below the waterline, shore up decks, clean the engine room and remove asbestos.

Most of the restoration work will be done in a Kingston boatyard. To prepare for its planned transport in 2019, the ship is being stabilized in Buffalo.

But step aboard, and the boat reveals its aging beauty, from her long corridors and ornate mahogany markings, to the old-school engine room, a deck level below water.

Read more and view photos at this link: http://buffalonews.com/2017/07/29/steamboat-past-charges-future/

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 31

On this day in 1948, in a total elapsed time of 19 hours, the JAMES DAVIDSON of the Tomlinson fleet unloaded 13,545 tons of coal at the Berwind Dock in Duluth and loaded 14,826 tons of ore at the Allouez Dock in Superior.

On this day in 1955, Al A. Wolf, the first Chief Engineer of a Great Lakes freighter powered by a 7,000 hp engine, retired as Chief Engineer of the WILFRED SYKES. Chief Wolf started as an oiler on the POLYNESIA in 1911, became Chief Engineer in 1921, and brought out the SYKES in 1948.

Sea trials took place for the JAMES R. BARKER this day in 1976. She was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flagship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.). She was built at a cost of more than $43 million under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. She was the third thousand-footer to sail on the Lakes and the first built entirely on the Lakes.

On July 31, 1974, the Liberian vessel ARTADI approached the dock at Trois Rivires, Que. where she damaged the docked GORDON C. LEITCH's stern.

The CEDARBRANCH was damaged and sunk by an explosion on July 31, 1965, several miles below Montreal, Quebec resulting in a loss of one life. Repaired and lengthened in 1965, she was renamed b.) SECOLA in 1978, and c.) KITO MARU in 1979, and scrapped at Brownsville, Texas, in 1985.

On 31 July 1849, ACORN (wooden schooner, 84 foot, 125 tons, built in 1842, at Black River, Ohio) was struck amidships by the propeller TROY near West Sister Island in Lake Erie. She sank quickly, but no lives were lost since all hands made it to the TROY.

On 31 July 1850, AMERICA (wooden side-wheeler, 240 foot, 1,083 tons, built in 1847, at Port Huron, Michigan) suffered a boiler or steam pipe explosion while sailing on Lake Erie. The explosion immediately killed nine persons and scalded others who died later. The vessel was repaired and sailed for three more seasons.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

New Desgagnés tanker launched in Turkey

7/30 - Launching of M/T Paul A. Desgagnés (Canadian Groupe Desgagnés-owned, duel fuel LNG IMO-II chemical tanker) was successfully completed on July 29. She is the third of four units which were ordered by the Canadian owners to Besiktas Shipyard in Turkey.

Damia Desgagnés, world’s first duel fuel LNG asphalt tanker, was delivered in April this year. Mia Desgagnés, same design duel fuel LNG IMO-II chemical tanker, has been launched on 10th of December 2016 and currently on sea trials before the delivery to her owners. Another sister chemical tanker is currently on the blocks for the ongoing hull construction

Watch the launch at this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b4LuzfBv2Fw

 

Port Reports -  July 30

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
The CN ore dock in Two Harbors saw the arrival of the Edgar B. Speer at 12:03. As of 20:30 she was still loading. Her AIS is showing a destination of Gary. Two Harbors has no scheduled inbound traffic for Sunday. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay had no traffic on Saturday and no traffic is scheduled for Sunday.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic Saturday included Fuldaborg early, John G. Munson, Baie Comeau, CG cutter Alder (heading for Grand Haven), American Century, Roger Blough and, after dark, Edwin H. Gott. Upbound traffic included H. Lee White, Kaye E. Barker, Burns Harbor, Algoma Discovery and Federal Saguenay. Kaministiqua, Lee A. Tregurtha and Federal Margaree were all approaching DeTour at 10 p.m.

Green Bay, Wis. – Paul Erspamer Furuholmen was docked in the Fox River south of Prairie Avenue on Saturday.

Milwaukee, Wis. – Paul Erspamer
Prentiss Brown & barge St. Marys Challenger arrived from Charlevoix about 1 p.m. Saturday, proceeding to their terminal on the Kinnickinnic River. Algoway was expected with salt from Goderich Saturday evening. Sharon M I & barge are expected from the Canadian Soo on Sunday morning.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
John D. Leitch and the saltie Wicko were in port Saturday evening.

Indiana Harbor, Ind.
American Integrity was in port Saturday night.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas Algosteel cleared with salt at 4 pm Saturday, downbound for Montreal, Quebec.

Saginaw, Mich.– Logan Vasicek
Manitoulin was outbound on the Saginaw River Saturday evening.

Regional and Welland Canal transits – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrival: Algoscotia at 1024 July 29 anchored and Algonova at 0223 on July 28. At dock: Algoma Hansa since July 27 at 1609

Buffalo:
Departure: Grande Mariner (passenger vessel) at 1507 Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Federal Schelde (Bds) at 2315 on July 28. On July 29 CSL Niagara at 0802, tug Leo A. McArthur & barge John J. Carrick at 0837, Evans Spirit at 0856 and Edenborg (Nld) at 1110,

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Spirit at 0447, Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin at 0920 and Azoresborg (Nld) at 1252

Welland Canal docks:
At docks: tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD, arrived on June 20 at 1046; barge MM Newfoundland at PWDD July 28

Hamilton:
Arrivals: none. Departures: Federal Schelde (Bds) at 2111 on July 28 - on July 30 - tug Leo A. McArthur & barge John J. Carrick at 0327, CSL Niagara at 0331 and Capt. Henry Jackman at 0513 eastbound. At docks: Tundra (Cyp), tug Evans McKeil at 0953 on July 27 and Arctic (ex Flinter Arctic-17) on July 28 at 2000. At anchor: Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 0512 on July 24

Clarkson:
At dock: Adfines Star (Mlt) at 0652 (ex Osttank Sweden-11) on July 27

Toronto:
Arrivals: Torrent (Cyp) at 0108 on July 28 to unload at Redpath and on July 29, sailing vessel Denis Sullivan at 0344 on July 28, departed at 0501 and anchored Humber Bay at approximately 0923 on July 29

Oshawa:
At dock: COE Leni (Lbr) (ex Marselisborg-16, Clipper Anne-14, Marselisborg-12) at 1442 on July 27

Oswego, N.Y. – Ned Goebricher
0n Friday, Evans Spirit was loading loaded grain.

 

Have you toured Port McNicoll's historic SS Keewatin yet?

7/30 - Port McNicoll, Ont. – The SS Keewatin isn’t going anywhere. Ever since Skyline Investments sold its 334-hectares along the Port McNicoll waterfront, rumours have been swirling about what might happen with the historic ship. Eric Conroy has squashed those rumors.

“My plan is to stay here. I didn’t go to all that trouble to build that million-dollar dock to move,” said Conroy. “We have no plans to do anything other than what we have been doing,”

Conroy, president and CEO of the Friends of the Keewatin, , a charitable foundation established in 2012 when the ship was brought back to Port McNicoll, says the ship has been averaging 10,000 visitors a year since it came back into the Port McNicoll harbour in 2012.

In early July, a brand new dock was unveiled in front of the Keewatin down at 453 Talbot Street. The dock is just one of the many projects the Friends of the Keewatin has undertaken over the past six years to improve the ship. “This has very much been a community project,” said Conroy.

Volunteers are currently working on repainting the entire ship. The far side of the Keewatin will be repainted over the course of the summer months, before the dock side of the vessel gets a new coat in the fall. All of the hard work from the foundation and its many volunteers has paid off.

In 2012, Skyline invested a total of $2.5 million to purchase the ship, get it seaworthy and tow it from Michigan to its current location.

“Last year we had it appraised by the Smithsonian’s marine division and they appraised it at $32.5 million,” said Conroy. Part of the reason its value is so high is due to its deep, often unknown, connection to Canadian history.

Simcoe.com

 

A Closer Look: SS Columbia

7/30 - The Buffalo News recently posted a series of photos of the former Great Lakes passenger vessel Columbia, which is now in New York state awaiting restoration. View the images at this link: http://galleries.buffalonews.com/default.aspx?id=8808#/28

 

Time is running out to get reservations in for our Detroit River Cruise August 12

7/30 - On Saturday, August 12, we will repeat the popular Boatnerd Detroit River Cruise aboard the Friendship. This year’s cruise will be four hours and will go up the Detroit River, and hopefully into the Rouge River. A pizza lunch will be delivered by the J. W. Westcott mail boat, with a cash bar onboard. Cost is $38 per person and we are coming close to the limit on the boat.  The cruise departs at 10 a.m. from the Portofino Restaurant in Wyandotte, Mich.
Click here for the Reservation form

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 30

July 30, 1996 - CSL's self-unloader H.M. GRIFFITH, which was off Whitefish Bay in Lake Superior, and bound for Nanticoke, Ontario, with a load of 22,775 tons of western coal, had a spontaneous combustion fire in her number 2 cargo hold. Water was used to cool the fire and the GRIFFITH used her unloading boom to dump 3,000 tons of coal into Lake Superior. After an inspection by the USCG at the Soo the following day, revealed only minor damage, the vessel was cleared to proceed on her journey. Reconstructed and renamed b.) RT HON PAUL J. MARTIN in 2000.

This News Page on the BoatNerd site was launched in 1996, reporting the coal fire aboard the GRIFFITH.

GORDON C. LEITCH (Hull#36) was launched July 30, 1952, at Midland, Ontario, by Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd. for the Upper Lakes & St. Lawrence Transportation Co. Ltd., Toronto, Ontario.

The Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker C.C.G.S. ALEXANDER HENRY entered service July 30, 1959. Since 1985, the HENRY has served as a museum in Kingston, Ontario.

On 30 July 1871, the 162-foot bark HARVEY BISSELL was carrying lumber from Toledo to Tonawanda, New York. When she was on the Western end of Lake Erie, she sprang a leak. Although the crew worked the hand-powered pumps constantly, the water kept gaining at a rate of about a foot an hour. The tug KATE WILLIAMS took her in tow, intending to get her to Detroit to be repaired, but this proved impossible. So the BISSELL was towed close to Point Pelee and allowed to sink in 14 feet of water. The WILLIAMS then left for Detroit to get steam pumps and other salvage equipment. On returning, they pumped out the BISSELL, refloated and repaired her. She lasted until 1905.

On 30 July 1872, the Port Huron Dry Dock launched SANDY, a lighter. Her dimensions were 75 feet x 20 feet x 5 feet.

On 30 July 1873, George Hardison of Detroit announced the beginning of a new shipyard in Port Huron, Michigan. It would be located above the 7th Street Bridge on the Black River on land owned by J. P. Haynes, accessible by River Street. Within 30 days of this announcement, the new yard had orders for two canalers three-and-aft rig for delivery in the spring of 1874. Their dimensions were to be 146 feet overall, 139 feet ¬keel, 26 foot beam and 11 foot 6 inches depth.

On 30 July 1866, CITY OF BUFFALO (wooden propeller, 340 foot, 2,026 tons, built in 1857, at Buffalo, New York as a side-wheeler) was unloading 72,000 bushels of wheat at the Sturgis Elevator at Buffalo, New York, when arsonists set fire to the complex. The fire destroyed the wharf, the elevator, several businesses and the ship. The arsonists were caught. Incidentally, the CITY OF BUFFALO was converted from a passenger side-wheeler to a propeller freighter during the winter of 1863-64. After the conversion, she was dubbed "the slowest steam-craft on the Lakes".

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Lake Huron Lore Sociery, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Port Reports -  July 29

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors saw the arrival of the John G. Munson at 21:24 Thursday and she departed Friday at 06:14 after loading at the gravity dock North of #2. Her destination is Gary. Edwin H. Gott arrived Two Harbors at 10:13 from Duluth. She departed at 19:41 for Detroit. Due around midday Saturday is the Edgar B. Speer. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the American Century at 12:30 for Cleveland. There is no scheduled traffic on Saturday for Silver Bay.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Baie Comeau departed Friday early evening, while Atlantic Huron arrived. Eemsborg and Federal Nakagawa were at docks.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic Friday included Algoma Harvester, Huron Spirit/Sharon M. 1, Spruceglen, Hon. James L. Oberstar, Frontenac, James R. Barker, Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and Indiana Harbor. Upbounders included Edgar B. Speer, Anglian Lady / Ironmaster, Cedarglen, Victory/James L. Kuber and, late, Mesabi Miner. BBC Campana was inbound DeTour around 11 p.m.

Ludington, Mich.
Mississagi arrived to unload around 7:30 p.m. Friday.

Green Bay, Wis. – Paul Erspamer
Tanker Furuholmen was in Lake Michigan's Green Bay Friday evening, expected overnight Friday night in a berth along the Fox River within the Port of Green Bay.

Milwaukee, Wis. – Paul Erspamer
Wicko departed onto Lake Michigan after 1 p.m. Friday, headed south for Burns Harbor. Samuel de Champlain / barge Innovation remained in the inner harbor Friday, delivering cement. Prentiss Brown / barge St. Marys Challenger were expected Saturday morning with cement from Charlevoix.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Federal Margaree and Stewart J. Cort were at docks Friday evening. John D. Leitch and Algoma Transport were still at anchor offshore.

Indiana Harbor, Ind.
American Spirit was in port Friday night.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoway departed with salt for Milwaukee Friday morning.

Toledo, Ohio
The saltwater vessel Federal Bristol is bound for Toledo with an ETA of late Saturday or during the day on Sunday. She may be loading grain. Also, the saltwater vessel Greta C is due in Toledo next Tuesday sometime. It is unknown which dock she is bound for.

Regional and Welland Canal transits – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrival: Algonova at 0240 on July 28. Departure Algolake at 0004 July 28. At dock: Algoma Hansa since July 27 at 1609

Buffalo:
Departure: English River at 0815 westbound. At dock: Grande Mariner (passenger vessel)

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Shoveler (Cyp), Baie St. Paul at 0719, Algoma Mariner at 1522, Algoscotia at 2010 and Federal Schelde (Bds) at 2315

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: CSL Niagara, Whitefish Bay, tug Jarrett M with barge MM Newfoundland, Capt. Henry Jackman, tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at 0750, Arctic (Nld) (ex Flinter Arctic-17) at 0830, tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 0915, tug Spartan & barge Spartan II at 1000, Robert S. Pierson at 1326,

Welland Canal docks:
Arrival: tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement stopped wharf 16 at 2010 on July 27 and tug Jarrett M & barge MM Newfoundland stopped at PWDD yard to drop off barge at 1247. Departure: light tug Jarrett M at 1446 approx left PWDD for Hamilton and tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement left wharf 16 at 1936 on July 28 westbound. At dock: tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD - arrived on June 20 at 1046 and barge MM Newfoundland

Port Weller anchorage:
Arrival: Mandarin (Cyp) approximately 0715 and departed at 2320 eastbound

Hamilton:
Arrivals: tug Evans McKeil at 0953, tug Leo A. McArthur & barge John J. Carrick at 1657, CSL Niagara at 1326 and Capt. Henry Jackman at 1854. Departures: Federal Schelde (Bds) at 2110. At docks: Tundra (Cyp). At anchor: Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 0512 on July 24

Bronte:
Departure: Algonova at 1008 westbound

Clarkson:
Departure: Algoma Mariner at 1321. At dock: Adfines Star (Mlt) at 0652 (ex Osttank Sweden-11) on July 27

Toronto:
Arrivals: Torrent (Cyp) at 0108 to unload at Redpath and sailing vessel Denis Sullivan at 0300 on July 29. Departure: Mandarin (Cyp) at 0131 for Port Weller anchorage July 28

Oshawa:
At dock: COE Leni (Lbr) (ex Marselisborg-16, Clipper Anne-14, Marselisborg-12) at 1442 on July 27

 

A memorable day with a Chicago tugboat crew

7/29 - Chicago, Ill. – I knew we had to get to the front of the barge. Cameraman Tom Siegel and I had been riding all day on the tugboat Kimberly Selvick. We interviewed Captain Larry Van Dusen and filmed as he and his two-man crew did the challenging and skilled work of moving barges on the Calumet River.

One thing we learned was that when a barge is attached to the tug and moving down the river, one deckhand rides at the front of the barge to offer the captain an extra set of eyes. As they pass other barges or bridges, deckhand Bill Hruska radios the caption. “Fifteen wide,” he might say, then “Ten” and “Five” to help the captain know distance from the barge to an obstacle.

We heard Hruska radio the information to the captain, but if we wanted to film him doing that part of his job, we had to make the long walk ourselves – roughly 200 feet as the barge moved down the river. We’d seen the deckhands do it. The ledge was narrow, but they seemed to walk comfortably. And we were wearing life vests!

So we ventured out. The only thing to hold on to was the top of the empty, but coal-dust-covered, barge. Luckily Siegel had brought a camera much smaller and lighter than the typical Chicago Tonight news camera. But, still, this was not the kind of casual stroll we’d seen the deckhands making all day. We moved slowly and got filthy, but we made it to the front and got the shot.

We also got to see the remarkable view back at the tugboat’s pilothouse, peering over the massive, empty barge.

Spending the day with a tugboat crew was a remarkable experience. Adding a little fear and coal dust only made it more memorable.

See the video at this link: http://chicagotonight.wttw.com/2017/07/27/day-chicago-tugboat-crew#.WXshHLjpMmJ.facebook

 

Manitou Island lighthouse, sold at auction, will open to public in 2021

7/29 - N. Manitou Island, Mich. – As cleanup and renovation jobs go, this one will be a doozy. But its work crews will have some of the best views in Northern Michigan.

The North Manitou Shoal Light, sold at government auction to the highest bidder last year, is seeing its first flurry of activity in decades. The lighthouse sits in Lake Michigan off the coast of Leland, where for years it warned ships away from the dangerous shallow shoals of the Manitou Island passage.

A nonprofit group that formed specifically to purchase the light announced earlier this month that restoration work has already begun on the historic structure, with an eye toward opening it to public tours and viewing on July 4, 2021.

Read more and view a photo gallery at this link: http://www.mlive.com/news/index.ssf/2017/07/manitou_island_lighthouse_sold.html

 

Maintain Lake Huron sanctuary size, urge Congress members

7/29 - Washington, D.C. – A bipartisan group of Congress members from Michigan are urging the U.S. Department of Commerce to maintain the size of the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary in Lake Huron, which is lumped into a review of protected ocean areas that President Donald Trump ordered with the goal of expanding offshore oil and gas drilling.

Michigan's U.S. House Republicans Dave Trott, Jack Bergman and Fred Upton joined Democrats Brenda Lawrence, Dan Kildee and Debbie Dingell on the letter to Trump's Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, which was also signed by Michigan's two U.S. Senate Democrats, Debbie Stabenow and Gary Peters.

"We strongly urge you to maintain the expanded boundaries of Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary," wrote the lawmakers. "Michigan depends on its marine sanctuary to support the rural and coastal communities of northeast Michigan and preserve this unique area and cultural artifacts for future generations."

Read more and view photos at this link: http://www.mlive.com/news/index.ssf/2017/07/thunder_bay_defenders.html

 

Unique three-masted Great Lakes schooner makes stop in Ogdensburg

7/29 - Ogdensburg, N.Y. – The world’s only re-creation of a 19th century three-masted Great Lakes schooner was in Ogdensburg Thursday on its way from Quebec City on a return voyage to its home port in Milwaukee, Wis.

The crew of the Denis Sullivan stopped in Ogdensburg for some needed shore time and to pick up a group of high school students from Chicago who had made the trip to Ogdensburg by van. The students will learn leadership skills and sailing techniques on the way to their destination of Erie, Pa.

Chief Mate Jonny Slanga said the tall ship is the world’s only replica of a three-masted schooner that in its heyday was a familiar sight on the Great Lakes. He said the three-mast design allowed the ship to be more versatile in a variety of weather conditions, and allowed for a smaller crew to maneuver the ship.

He said the schooners were used from the 1850s through the 1930s on the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River, before the country’s growing rail system began putting them out of business.

“This vessel would carry anything; lumber, salt. There was even a fleet that carried nothing but ice for ice boxes,” Mr. Slanga said. “Pretty much anything you can think of was hauled on these vessels before the railways expanded across the Midwest.”

As tall ships go, Mr. Slanga said the three-masted schooners were designed for their ability to carry a variety of cargo and their sailing versatility, but unlike some other ship designs from the period, they were not built for speed.

“Think 18-wheeler when you look at this, not necessarily sports car,” he laughed.

Mr. Slanga said the Denis Sullivan and its crew is returning from a festival in Quebec City as part of celebrations marking the 150th anniversary of Canada’s founding. He said the trip one way from Milwaukee to Quebec City takes about one month.

“We were part of a group of 40 other tall ships that took part in the festival,” he said.

Although in the past the three-masted schooners were a work horse of the shipping industry, today the only remaining vessel of its kind is used for a variety of purposes, including ceremonies and as an educational tool and scientific work station.

“The ship is a floating classroom,” Mr. Slanga said. “We teach a fresh water sciences course on board looking at invasive species and plankton and water quality — that sort of stuff,” he said.

The Denis Sullivan was completed in Milwaukee in the year 2000 by professional shipwrights and a team of nearly 1,000 volunteers. The schooner is also equipped with two diesel engines, a scientific laboratory, two computer workstations, and modern communication and navigation equipment.

The vessel can carry up to 50 passengers on day sails and 21 participants overnight.

 

Help wanted: Algoma Central

7/29 - Algoma Central is searching for qualified senior officers for our dry-bulk and tanker fleets.

Chief Mate positions are available on our dry bulk fleet and 2nd Engineers are needed in our tanker fleet. Algoma offers a competitive wage and compensation package to shipboard employees. In order to be considered for these Chief Mate positions candidates must posses a minimum of Chief Mate, Near Coastal and for engineer positions, candidates must possess a minimum of a 2nd Class Engineer, Motor Certificate and Advanced (Specialized) Oil Tanker endorsement.

If you are interested in a seagoing career with Algoma and meet the profile described within please submit your resume in confidence to Human Resources at careers@algonet.com. Algoma Central Corporation encourages applications from designated group members identified under the Federal Employment Equity Act. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 29

OTTERCLIFFE HALL cleared Lauzon, Quebec, July 29, 1969 on her maiden voyage as the last "straight deck" Great Lakes bulk freighter built with a pilothouse forward.

While at the Manitowoc Ship Building Co. for general repairs and engine overhaul, the CITY OF SAGINAW 31 caught fire on July 29, 1971, destroying her cabin deck and rendering her useless for further use. The blaze was caused by an acetylene torch, and caused over $1 million in damage. She was not repaired. The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 was sold to Marine Salvage Ltd., Port Colborne, Ontario, for scrapping.

On July 29, 1974 the W.W. HOLLOWAY grounded in Lake St. Clair off the Grosse Pointe Yacht Club while running downbound with stone. Lightering into the J.F. SCHOELKOPF JR was necessary before she was freed by four tugs on July 31st.

ENDERS M. VOORHEES departed Great Lakes Engineering Works, River Rouge, Michigan, on her maiden voyage July 29, 1942, bound for Duluth, Minnesota, to load iron ore. She was the second of five "Supers" for the Pittsburgh fleet to enter service.

July 29, 1974 - PERE MARQUETTE 21 was towed to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to be reduced to a barge.

The steam barge MARY ROBERTSON burned near Mackinac on 29 July 1872. Her crew escaped to a schooner-barge they were towing.

The MATERIAL SERVICE foundered in a heavy summer gale in 1936, off the South Chicago lighthouse. She was a canal motor barge not designed for open-lake use.

The side-wheel river steamer DOMINION burned to the water's edge at her dock in the Thames River near Chatham, Ontario, on 29 July 1875. She was built in 1867, at Wallaceburg, Ontario.

1912 – REPUBLIC stranded at Point Louise in the St. Marys River and sustained bottom damage.

1930 – The sandsucker GEORGE J. WHALEN capsized and sank off Dunkirk, N.Y., in heavy seas and 15 sailors perished. Only 6 were rescued and taken aboard the AMASA STONE.

1942 – The first PRESCODOC was torpedoed and sunk by U-160 off Georgetown, British Guiana, with the loss of 15 lives. The bauxite-laden steamer went down quickly, bow first, while enroute to Trinidad and only 5 were saved.

1943 – LOCKWELL and KEYBELL collided above Bridge 11 of the Welland Canal. The former was repaired at Port Dalhousie with $13,450 in damages.

1946 – TEAKBAY went aground on Featherbed Shoal off Carleton Island in the St. Lawrence while bound for Montreal with a load of coal. This member of the C.S.L. fleet was released, with the aid of tugs, the next day and proceeded to Kingston for repairs.

1971 – While undergoing a major refit at Manitowoc, fire broke out aboard the CITY OF SAGINAW 31 destroying the top deck and accommodation area. The damage was listed as between $450,000 and $700,000 and the vessel became a total loss. It was towed to Castellon, Spain, for scrapping.

1979 – The Cayman Islands registered QUIDNET came through the Seaway in 1978 but sank, in a collision with the SEA TIDE at Mamei Curve in the Panama Canal while enroute from Callao, Peru, to Trinidad. The hull was abandoned as a total loss and had to be cut in two before being towed away to a dumping ground. The ship had also been a Great Lakes visitor as b) LUDMILLA C. in 1968.

1993 – The second FEDERAL SCHELDE to visit the Great Lakes was built in 1977 and came inland that year on its maiden voyage with sugar for Montreal and Toronto. The ship received major bow damage after striking the ARARAT in the Orinoco River of Venezuela. It went to Hamburg, Germany, for repairs and resumed service. It became b) TRIAS in 1994 and continued Seaway service until 1999. The ship arrived at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, for scrapping on December 12, 2000.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jerry Pearson, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series, Marine Historical Society of Detroit

 

Port Reports -  July 28

Duluth-Superior
Fuldaborg arrived Duluth just after midnight Thursday morning, and headed to CHS to load wheat. The saltie Pride was inbound a few hours later with cement to discharge at the Holcim dock. American Century arrived mid-morning to fuel before departing for Silver Bay a few hours later. Edwin H. Gott arrived early Thursday afternoon and eased into the Port Terminal slip for some sort of repair work. John G. Munson departed during the evening after discharging limestone at Hallett 5. In Superior, Thunder Bay loaded at BN throughout the day Thursday before departing during the evening. Roger Blough then arrived from anchor and began loading.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors saw the arrival of the James R. Barker at 00:34 Thursday and she departed at 10:30 showing an AIS destination of "Indy Burns." Originally scheduled for Two Harbors Thursday night was the Algoma Olympic, but her AIS just changed to Duluth. Departing Duluth at 19:45 was the John G. Munson for Two Harbors. Originally the schedule showed her loading at BNSF. Due Two Harbors Friday is the Edwin H. Gott that is currently taking a delay at the Duluth Port Terminal. American Century arrived Northshore Mining in Silver Bay at 15:08 coming from Duluth after fueling. She was originally scheduled for Two Harbors. Wednesday night saw the departure of the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader at 22:34 from Northshore Mining. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Friday in Silver Bay.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Algoma Harvester and Spruceglen departed downbound on Thursday. Baie Comeau and Federal Nakagawa were at docks.

St. Marys River
Thursday’s downbound traffic included Lee A. Tregurtha, Mississagi (from Essar for Blind River) and Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin. Upbounders included CCGS Samuel Risley, Eemsborg and St. Clair. Atlantic Huron was inbound at DeTour about 9 p.m.

Port Inland, Mich.
Manitowoc departed the stone dock Thursday evening, and Wilfred Sykes headed in.

Milwaukee, Wis. – Paul Erspamer
Wicko arrived off Milwaukee just after midnight on Wednesday night, turned inside the breakwater and backed into a slip at Terminal 2 in the outer harbor. Minutes later, G.L. Ostrander & barge Integrity departed onto the lake for the Calumet River. Samuel de Champlain & barge Innovation were expected with a load of cement from Alpena later Thursday.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Federal Margaree, Federal Saguenay and Burns Harbor were at docks Thursday evening. John D. Leitch, Algoma Transport and Stewart J. Cort were offshore, waiting to go in.

Indiana Harbor, Ind.
American Spirit and John J. Boland were in port Thursday night.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoway arrived to load salt Thursday.

Regional and Welland Canal transits – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Departure: Algosea at 0438 westbound. Arrivals: Algolake at 0556 and Algoma Hansa at 1300

Buffalo:
Arrival: Grande Mariner (passenger vessel) at 1605

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Azoresborg at 0155, Algoma Hansa at 0400, Ina (Lbr) at 0527, Grande Mariner (passenger vessel) at 0637. Radcliffe R. Latimer at 0727, English Rover at 0800, tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 1101, Algonova at 1215, Algoma Discovery at 1322, Kaministiqua at 1607, Shoveler (Cyp) at 1944

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: tug Wilf Seymour & barge Alouette Spirit, Algoma Mariner at 2317 on July 26, Capt. Henry Jackman at 1750, CSL Niagara at 2045 and Whitefish Bay at 2210

Welland Canal docks:
At dock: tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD - arrived on June 20 at 1046

Hamilton:
Departures: Azoresborg (Nld) at 2159 on July 26, Ina (Lbr) at 0031 on July 27 and Algoma Discovery at 1124 on July 27. At docks: Tundra (Cyp) at 1134 and Federal Schelde. At anchor: and Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 0512 on July 24

Bronte:
Departure: Algonova at 1008 westbound

Clarkson:
Departure: Radcliffe R. Latimer at 0530 westbound. Arrivals: Adfines Star (Mlt) at 0652 (ex Osttank Sweden-11) and Algoma Mariner at 1321

Toronto:
At dock: Mandarin (Cyp) unloading at Redpath nearly completed, tugs Ocean A. Simard and Laprairie standing by

Oshawa:
COE Leni (Lbr) (ex Marselisborg-16, Clipper Anne-14, Marselisborg-12) at 1442 on July 27

Rochester (with Tom Brewer): Arrivals: US Brig Niagara and the Stephen B. Roman on Thursday. Departure: Grande Mariner (passenger vessel) at 0315 westbound

 

A rare voyage from Port Inland to Grand Haven on the Kaye E. Barker

7/28 - For years I have stood on the shores of Lake Michigan watching freighters travel up and down, wishing that I could experience what it was like to be onboard. I finally got that chance.

This past Sunday evening, I found myself at Carmuse Lime and Stone’s Port Inland operation near Gulliver, in the Upper Peninsula. I was meeting up with the motor vessel Kaye E. Barker at the stone export dock, as I had been given the opportunity to ride aboard the vessel on one of her trips by her owner, the Interlake Steamship Co.

The trip, No. 35 on the Barker’s season, was a 223-mile journey down Lake Michigan beginning at Port Inland and ending at the Verplank dock in Ferrysburg. The Kaye towered above me as she was tied up at the dock. Once secured, the crew positioned a ladder to the ground and to the side of the ship. I ascended to the deck, where loading operations were already in full swing.

The Barker would be taking on two different types of stone, 6AA and Ohio 8s. Stone is classified by grade and size, but I really couldn’t see the difference.

Read more and see photos at this link: http://www.grandhaventribune.com/Transportation/2017/07/27/Ships-Log-1.html?ci=stream&lp=1&p=1

 

Four Michigan lighthouses for sale

7/28 - If you've ever wanted to buy a lighthouse, now is your chance. The U.S. General Services Administration has announced that four Michigan lighthouses are for sale. They are the Detroit River Light, Fourteen Foot Shoal Light, Lansing Shoal Light and Poe Reef Light. The sale is part of the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act.

9&10 News

 

History project to mark off ship lengths along St. Clair boardwalk

7/28 - St. Clair, Mich. – The longest freighter on the Great Lakes is the Paul R. Tregurtha at 1,013 feet and six inches, which regularly traverses the St. Clair River hauling coal and iron ore. But how long is 1,013 feet really?

“A thousand feet is a long ways,” said Chrissy Gorzen, a member of the St. Clair Historical Commission.

Gorzen is about to show visitors to St. Clair’s Palmer Park the length of contemporary and historical Great Lakes ships by physically marking off their sizes in increments along the boardwalk. The St. Clair City Council recently approved the test project to be painted on the boardwalk this summer. The boardwalk is scheduled to be replaced next spring.

“At the museum, I design the maritime room and set it up and when children come in, I love teaching them about ships that were built in St. Clair, ships in general and the common freighter nowadays — what’s on the water, what it might be carrying, how to tell the difference between a laker and a salty,” Gorzen told the St. Clair City Council at its regular meeting on July 17.

Gorzen’s demarcation of ship lengths would begin near the St. Clair Garden Club’s perennial garden, where there is a jog in the seawall, and proceed south toward the Voyageur restaurant. “I thought we could start there and mark off different lengths, so eventually (visitors) would walk 1,013 feet,” said Gorzen.

A number of ships were built in St. Clair, beginning around 1820 and continuing for a century. Those ships could be marked along the boardwalk, too.

“At 133 feet, you might see the Agnes Potter,” said Gorzen. “It carried stone for the Cleveland breakwater in 1880.” At 140 feet, you might see the Nipigon, built in St. Clair in 1883; at 151 feet, the Langell Boys, built in town in 1890; and at 440 feet, the freighter Normania, built in St. Clair in 1908 with a carrying capacity of 7,500 tons.

At 1,000 feet, visitors might see the Indiana Harbor, built in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, launched in 1979 and still working the lakes.

“I wanted to do it now so that, if it does go over well, when we have the new boards on the boardwalk, maybe we could do little plaques or something,” said Gorzen. “Right now, I would just paint in on.”

“Basically, the idea is that we’re going to try this out and when we replace the boardwalk, hopefully next spring, then we’ll come back and revisit the issue and see what we think about it,” said Mayor Bill Cedar.

Besides their names, where would visitors find the other information about the boats? asked council member Tom McCartney.

Some of it could be displayed in the showcase bulletin board in the park, Gorzen said. Other information could be posted on the city’s website or the historical museum’s website or Facebook page.

The Downtown Development Authority constructed historical markers along Clinton Avenue that visitors can scan with their cell phones to pull up the history of the local Langell Shipyard or specific ships built in St. Clair, said McCartney. Would something like that be possible? That could be considered for the permanent project if the trial project works well, said Gorzen.

The council unanimously supported Gorzen’s project by voice vote.

The Voice

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 28

On July 28, 1973, the ROGER M. KYES (Hull#200) was christened at Toledo, Ohio by American Ship Building Co. by Mrs. Roger Kyes for the American Steamship Co. Renamed b.) ADAM E. CORNELIUS in 1989.

B.A. PEERLESS (Hull#148) was launched July 28, 1952, at Collingwood, Ontario, by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd. for British American Transportation Co. Ltd. Renamed b.) GULF CANADA in 1969, and c.) COASTAL CANADA in 1984.

The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was delivered on July 28th to the Buckeye Steamship Co. (Hutchinson & Co., mgr.), Cleveland. The HUTCHINSON was part of a government program designed to upgrade and increase the capacity of the U.S. Great Lakes fleet during World War II. In order to help finance the building of new ships, the U.S.M.C. authorized a program that would allow existing fleets to obtain new boats by trading in their older boats to the Government for credit. The vessel was the ninth Maritimer and fourth of the six L6-S-Al types delivered. "L6" meant the vessel was built for the Great Lakes and was 600 to 699 feet in length. The "S" stood for steam power and "Al" identified specific design features.

On 28 July 1854, BOSTON (wooden propeller, 134 foot, 259 tons, built in 1847, at Ohio City, Ohio) was bound from Chicago for Ogdensburg, New York, with pork, corn, whiskey and produce. On Lake Ontario, about 20 miles off Oak Orchard, New York, she collided with the bark PLYMOUTH and sank in about 20 minutes. No lives were lost. The crew and passengers made it to shore in three lifeboats. The boat that the captain was in sailed 50 miles to Charlotte, New York.

In 1900, the freighter PRINCETON (Hull#302) was launched at Lorain, Ohio, by American Ship Building Co. for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.

On 28 July 1862, CONVOY (2-mast wooden schooner, 130 foot, 367 tons, built in 1855, at Buffalo, New York) was sailing downbound on a dark night on Lake Erie with 18,000 bushels of wheat when she collided with the empty bark SAM WARD and sank quickly in 12 fathoms of water. Her wreck drifted along the bottom and during the shipping season several vessels collided with her.

1922 – The wooden passenger and freight carrier CARIBOU went aground in the North Channel of Georgian Bay near Richards Landing.

1923 – The wooden steamer W.J. CARTER, enroute from Oswego to Cobourg with a cargo of coal, began leaking and sank in Lake Ontario 20 miles south of Point Peter. Nine crewmembers were rescued by the KEYPORT.

1929 – The newly-built canaller C.H. HOUSON was in a collision with the collier WABANA off Cap au Saumon on the St. Lawrence in heavy fog. The investigation of the accident was critical of the operation of both vessels. The former served in the Misener fleet, becoming b) PAUL MANION in 1949, and was scrapped at Deseronto, Ontario, in 1961.

1949 – NORMAN J. KOPMEIER was holed by an underwater obstruction entering Muskegon with a cargo of coal from Chicago. The vessel had to be beached and almost capsized. It was later refloated and repaired. The ship last sailed as e) PINEDALE in 1976 and was scrapped at Hamilton in 1981.

1961 – After loading a cargo of scrap steel for Japan on its first visit to the Great Lakes, the Greek freighter MIHALIS ANGELOS ran aground leaving Toronto harbor. The ship had been one of the “Empire Class” ships of World War Two, being built as a) EMPIRE MASEFIELD. It arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, for scrapping as f) GLORIA on December 6, 1967.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series, from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Port Reports -  July 27

Duluth-Superior
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was loading coal at SMET Wednesday night. Thunder Bay and Indiana Harbor were on the Duluth side. John G. Munson was headed for Duluth with limestone in the late evening, while Frontenac was arriving in Superior to load ore.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
The CN ore dock in Two Harbors saw no traffic on Wednesday. Due early Thursday is the James R. Barker. Also scheduled is the American Century (although she may load in Duluth instead) and later in the day Algoma Olympic. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader at 12:45. As of 20:30 she was still loading. She is due out late Wednesday/early Thursday. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Northshore Mining on Thursday. Edwin H. Gott is scheduled for Duluth, but could be switched to Two Harbors.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Federal Nakagawa, Algoma Harvester and Spruceglen were at docks on Wednesday. Baie Comeau is expected Thursday morning.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic on a slow Wednesday included Joseph L. Block in the early afternoon and Erie Trader/Clyde S. VanEnkevort after dark, followed by Ashtabula/Defiance out of Essar. Roger Blough, Algoma Olympic, Great Republic and, late, Mississagi were upbound. The latter was headed to Essar.

Port Inland, Mich.
Kaye E. Barker was loading limestone at Carmeuse on Wednesday night. American Mariner left and headed eastbound in the late afternoon. Manitowoc will follow the Barker at the loading dock.

Milwaukee, Wis. – Paul Erspamer
Federal Saguenay departed Tuesday night onto Lake Michigan for Burns Harbor. G.L. Ostrander and barge Integrity were unloading cement at their terminal on Jones Island in the inner harbor on Wednesday.

South Chicago, Ill.
The saltie Eemsborg departed on Wednesday, headed for Thunder Bay.

Gary, Ind.
Edgar B. Speer was unloading Wednesday night.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Federal Margaree, Federal Saguenay and Burns Harbor were all in port late Wednesday.

Saginaw River
Manitoulin arrived Wednesday, bound for the Sargent dock in Zilwaukee. This was her first visit to the Saginaw River.

Regional and Welland Canal transits – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrivals: Atlantic Huron at 1735 on July 25, departed at 0313 on July 26 westbound

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Cedarglen at 0340, Algolake at 0448, Tim S. Dool at 0558, Robert S. Pierson at 0706,

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Federal Biscay (Mhl), Algoma Equinox at 0529, CSL Assiniboine at 0632, Algoma Discovery at 0657, CSL Laurentien at 0816. CSL Welland, tug Wilf Seymour & barge Alouette Spirit at 1900 and Algoma Mariner at 2130

Welland Canal docks:
Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD; arrived on June 20 at 1046

Hamilton:
Departures: Tim S. Dool at 0243 westbound. Arrival: Algoma Discovery at 2034. At docks: Azoresborg (Nld) on July 21 at 0954, Ina (Lbr) at 1754 on July 22; on July 23 Tundra (Cyp) at 1134. At anchor: Federal Schelde at 1405 on July 23 and Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 0512 on July 24

Bronte:
Arrival: Algonova at 1939

Clarkson:
Arrival: Radcliffe R. Latimer at 0513

Toronto:
Departure: tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 0755 for Bowmanville. At dock: Mandarin (Cyp) unloading at Redpath since July 12 at 0336

Oshawa:
Arrival: Robert S. Pierson at 1325 on July 25, departed on July 26 at 0144 for the Welland Canal

Bowmanville:
Arrival: tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 1150

Oswego:
Arrival: Grande Mariner (passenger vessel) at 2027 on July 25, departed at 0611 on July 26 for Rochester

Rochester:
Arrival: Grande Mariner (passenger vessel) at 1640

 

New salties in the Great Lakes/Seaway system so far this year

7/27 - New foreign flag ocean-going freighters (under their present name) in the Seaway/ Great Lakes system so far this year include Adfines Sun,Alina, Arctic, Azoresborg, BBC Alberta, BBC Brazil, BBC Weser, Bro Anna, Chembulk Kobe, Fairchem Friesian, Federal Mosel, Federal Ruhr, Frieda, Horin Trader, HR Constellation, Pia, Pride, Riga, Rotterdam, SCL Anita, Selasse, Silda, Solando, Taïga Desgagnés, Thamesborg and Tiberborg. As of July 26, no other new ones are expected in the coming days.

Rene´ Beauchamp

 

Divers chronicle Great Lakes shipwreck that left 32 dead

7/27 - There’s more than just fish and sand in the Great Lakes. According to the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum in Michigan, there are over 6,000 shipwrecks in the lakes – and an estimated 30,000 lives lost.

About 13 miles from Cleveland, the tug boat Admiral sits on the bottom of Lake Erie. It sank in a storm in December of 1942, and its entire crew, 14 men, died. The 18 men on the Cleveco, the oil barge it was towing also died.

Carrie Sowden, archeological director for the National Museum of the Great Lakes, is taking a group of volunteer divers out to the Admiral to help with a site survey.

“What we're trying to do is take a snapshot of what's down there at the moment, to get an understanding of how the boat lies, what remains of the vessels are left, what has fallen apart, what hasn't. Any clues to what may or may not have happened the night that it sank,” she says.

Listen to the story and view photos at this link: http://radio.wosu.org/post/divers-chronicle-great-lakes-shipwreck-left-32-dead#stream/0

 

Lake Superior Day draws crowds despite the rain

7/27 - Copper Harbor, Mich. – The 5th annual Lake Superior Day celebration in Copper Harbor drew in crowds today despite the weather. Rain forced the cook-out under a pavilion in the park, and cancelled the canoe races, but the spirits were still high in celebrating the life blood of so many people in the UP.

The celebration of Lake Superior started in Thunder Bay, Minn., and five years ago, Copper Harbor became the first city in Michigan to hold a festival.

Organizers say the tone of Lake Superior day is for people to gain a deeper appreciation of the lake "I call it an environmental awareness picnic activity celebrating the greatest lake in the world," Lake Superior Day organizer and captain of Isle Royal Queen IV Don Kilpela Jr. said.

"I want them to recognize how precious this is, so we're going to explore the lake today aboard the research vessel Agassiz," Michigan Tech professor emeritus of Civil and Environmental Engineering Dr. Martin Auer said.

The research vessel took out 17 people for 40 minutes at a time. Guests were shown how the clarity of the water is tested, as well as the temperatures from the surface to the lake floor, and the biomes of creatures supporting the whitefish population.

Speakers in the past have talked about the impact of zebra mussels in the lake. This year a speaker talked about the geo-heritage of Superior, and a photographer displayed his work showing the shores of the largest body of fresh water in the world.

WLUC

 

Help wanted: Fettes Shipping Inc.

7/27 - Fettes Shipping Inc. offers full-time permanent employment opportunity for an AB for our Canadian flag Great Lakes self-unloading tug/barge cement carrier. We are looking for an experienced AB with strong communication skills and good work ethic. Candidates must be able to travel to the US portion of the Great Lakes area and must have a valid Canadian passport.

AB with Bridgewatch STCW-II/4

Please send your resume to Human Resources
Fettes Shipping Inc.
3385 Harvester Rd. Suite 250
Burlington, ON L7N 3N2
Fax: 905 333-6588
email: fettes-glits@fettesshipping.com

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 27

On 27 July 1884, ALBERTA (steel propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 264 foot, 2,282 gross tons, built in 1883, at Whiteinch, Scotland, by C. Connell & Co.) collided in fog six miles north north west of Whitefish Point on Lake Superior with the JOHN M. OSBORNE (wooden propeller "steam barge", 178 foot, 891 tons, built in 1882, at Marine City, Michigan. The OSBORNE had two barges in tow at the time. ALBERTA stayed in the gash until most of OSBORNE's crew scrambled aboard, then pulled out and the OSBORNE sank. ALBERTA sank in shallow water, 3 1/2 miles from shore. 3 or 4 lives were lost from the OSBORNE, one from ALBERTA in brave rescue attempt while trying to get the crewmen off the OSBORNE. This was ALBERTA's first year of service. She was recovered and repaired soon afterward. She was the sister of the ill-fated ALGOMA which was lost in her first year of service. The wreck of the OSBORNE was located in 1984, 100 years after this incident.

On 27 July 1900, the steel freighter RENSSELAER (Hull#402) was launched in Cleveland, Ohio, by the American Ship building Co. for the Pittsburgh Steamship Company.

1897 – SELWYN EDDY and MARIPOSA collided head-on in dense fog off Manitou Island, Lake Superior. The damage was light, as both ships were proceeding slowly due to the conditions.

1912 – G. WATSON FRENCH, later the first ALGOWAY, was in a collision with the MATAAFA in Lake St. Clair and the latter was heavily damaged and almost sank.

1931 – The Canada Steamship Lines bulk canaller BARRIE went aground at Les Ecureuils Shoal in the St. Lawrence while enroute to Quebec City.

1944 – The FORT PERROT was damaged by a torpedo in the English Channel south of Hastings, while providing support for the ongoing invasion of Normandy and the liberation of Europe. As c) DORION, this ship made two trips to the Great Lakes in 1959. The vessel was scrapped at Yokohama, Japan, as e) ANTONIOS S. after arriving on June 17, 1963.

1987 – The ANDREW H. went aground off Cornwall Island, in the St. Lawrence, after experiencing steering problems. The ship, loaded with steel for Dofasco in Hamilton, was lightered by MAPLEHEATH and released on August 2. The cargo was reloaded at Valleyfield. The ship first came inland as EKTOR in 1976. It arrived at Alang, India, for scrapping as e) BLUEWEST on January 31, 1998.

1999 – The SPIRIT OF 98 went aground on a rock in the Gulf of Alaska 40 miles southeast of Juneau, forcing the passengers to abandon the ship. Flooding was checked and the ship released and repaired. As c) VICTORIAN EMPRESS, the ship saw passenger service on the St. Lawrence and came into the Great Lakes to Lake Ontario beginning in 1990.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Port of Toledo posts big increase in cargo for first half of 2017

7/26 - Toledo, Ohio – A Cleveland-based company is making a big investment in northwest Ohio. Cliffs Natural Resources is building a $700 million facility along Front Street. The plant will create 130 full time jobs, and about 1,200 construction jobs.

In addition to that news, the Port of Toledo has more to celebrate today. The port is on track to post big numbers this year. 2017 is on track to be a banner year. In the first six months of the year, cargo moving in and out of the port is up more than 60 percent.

A look at the freighter and barge traffic moving through the city is a good economic indicator for the region. Joe Cappel is the Vice President of Business Development for the port. "Through the end of June, we have already handled 3.5 million tons of cargo. That's a lot of cargo, and it's our best start since 2012. That's a good sign of the economy picking up and a lot of people going back to work."

Speaking of work, Cappel says studies show that about 7,000 jobs are tied to the port both directly and indirectly. It also has a one billion dollar economic impact on the region. The goal is to keep growing those numbers, "We've made a lot of improvements that will allow us to expand and modernize the port. Every year we handle 8-12 million tons of cargo. With the expansion of the Ironville dock, and the new Cliffs facility, we will be moving another 2 million tons on top of that 8-12 million tons."

Cappel says the port has a good balance of inbound and outbound cargo – staples like iron ore, coal and grain. But the port also handles commodities like salt, liquid products and general cargo from lumber to construction aggregates. "One of the unique things about the port is our diversity of commodities we handle. So when one thing is down, we hope that 2-3 others are up. It all balances out and we usually have a net gain at the end of the season."

One of the big gains at the port this year is tied to the steel industry, "I think with some of the tariffs against foreign steel dumping, we are starting to see a real resurgence in US steel making. The Port of Toledo is a good example of that. Our iron ore tonnage is way up from last year."

Port leaders are now working to make sure the numbers keep going that way through the end of the year and beyond.

13 ABC Action News

 

Port Reports -  July 26

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
American Integrity arrived Two Harbors at 09:19 for the ore dock. As of 21:00 she was still loading. Due Two Harbors on Wednesday is the James R. Barker later in the day. At Northshore Mining in Silver Bay the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader arrived Monday night at 20:03 and departed Tuesday at 16:11 for Indiana Harbor. Due Wednesday in Silver Bay is the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Federal Nakagawa was the only vessel in port Tuesday, according to AIS. Algoma Harvester and Spruceglen are due Wednesday.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic on Tuesday included Indiana Harbor, Great Lakes Trader/Joyce L. VanEnkevort, saltwater vessel Pride (headed to Superior to discharge cement), Algoma Harvester, Walter J. McCarthy Jr., Thunder Bay, John G. Munson, training vessel State of Michigan, Spruceglen, Frontenac, Sharon M and barge, Lee A. Tregurtha, James R. Barker and Fuldaborg at dusk. Downbounders included Burns Harbor, Mesabi Miner, Cason J. Callaway, cruise ship Pearl Mist, Innovation/Samuel de Champlain and, after dark, American Spirit. John J. Boland arrived at Drummond Island to load in the afternoon. Blacky spent the day at anchor above DeTour waiting for Algoma Enterprise to leave the Export Dock.

South Chicago, Ill.
The saltie Eemsborg remained in port on Tuesday.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Federal Margaree and tug Anglian Lady/barge were in port on Tuesday.

Alpena, Mich. – Ben & Chanda McClain
On Sunday afternoon, the tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 tied up at Lafarge to unload cargo. The tug G.L Ostrander and barge Integrity took on a load of cement at Lafarge on Monday. The Alpena is expected in port on Tuesday night.

Sandusky, Ohio
Algoma Mariner arrived early Tuesday and spent the day loading.

Regional and Welland Canal transits – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrivals: Algosea anchored at 1104 and Atlantic Huron at 1735. Departure: Algosea at 1859 for Bronte and Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08) at 2017 for Sarnia

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Victory I (Bhs) at 2029 on July 24, sailing vessels Nina (Ame) & Pinta (Ame)

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Robert S. Pierson at 0012, English River at 0034, Algoma Strongfield at 1020, Stephen B. Roman at 1130 and Edzard Schulte (IOM) at 1640 and Federal Biscay (Mhl)

Welland Canal docks:
Arrival: Victory I (Bhs) at 0438, departed at 1650 westbound, and Federal Kumano (Mhl) at 1650 from wharf 11 downbound. At docks: tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD - arrived on June 20 at 1046

Hamilton:
Arrival: Tim S. Dool at 0807, Algonova at 0957 anchored and light tug Ocean A. Simard at 2037. Departed: Algonova at 1859 for Bronte. At docks: Azoresborg (Nld) on July 21 at 0954, Ina (Lbr) at 1754 on July 22; on July 23 Tundra (Cyp) at 1134. At anchor: Federal Schelde at 1405 on July 23 and Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 0512 on July 24

Bronte:
Departure: Bro Anna (Sgp) at 1916. Arrival: Algonova at 1939

Toronto:
At docks: tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 0608 on July 24 and Mandarin (Cyp) unloading at Redpath since July 12 at 0336

Oshawa:
Arrival: Robert S. Pierson at 1325

Kingston:
Departed: light tug Ocean A. Simard on July 25 at 0534 for Hamilton

 

Gary looks to establish a port authority

7/26 - Gary, Ind. – Lake freighters routinely chug into Gary to deposit iron ore at the Gary Works steel mill. But outside of the lake boats that keep the mill churning, the city that sits on the south shore of Lake Michigan does not see commercial vessels come in. That potentially could change.

After receiving inquiries about establishing stevedoring or dockworking operations, Gary is looking to establish a port authority, a quasi-government agency that would operate a port on Lake Michigan or other transportation infrastructure throughout the city. Both Gary and East Chicago have floated the idea of adding a second major commercial port in Northwest Indiana, an idea that at least one local union has advocated for because it would mean jobs for longshoremen.

Gary's Municipal Code has allowed for the creation of a Port Authority since 1982.

“As we look to additional development opportunities to grow and create businesses in the city of Gary, our research has identified the activation of the Port Authority as a valuable tool," Gary Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson said. "While this is not a port in the traditional sense, the authority may certainly determine the creation of a traditional port to be in the city’s best interest.”

Under the proposal, "all of Gary would be considered a port."

"The Port Authority will additionally develop detailed provisions by which the authority shall be governed and will oversee development, construction and operations of port-related facilities, as well [as] subsequent agreement and revenues," the city said in a press release. "Ports located in the cities have been a tremendous revenue source for cities through tax revenue alone. Many of the goods and foods we use every day are in and out of our communities through global trade via ports. Additionally, ports attract business development, create jobs and a variety of skilled trades."

Freeman-Wilson has tapped Gary City Councilman Ron Brewer, Lake County Commissioner Kyle Allen, Delta Walker and Ken Stalling as potential members of a Port Authority. She plans to bring those appointments before the Gary City Council at the Council Finance meeting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at City Hall, 401 Broadway.

NW Indiana Times

 

Republic Steel’s Lorain mill to produce pig iron

7/26 - Lorain, Ohio – Republic Steel will partner with a mining firm on a joint venture to process iron in Lorain to feed steel mills of other producers. On July 25, Republic Steel and ERP Iron Ore LLC announced a memorandum of understanding to partner on producing up to 1 million net tons of pig iron a year at Republic Steel’s Lorain mill.

The joint venture will serve the increasing demand for virgin iron required to produce steel in the electric arc furnace, or EAF, sector, according to the companies.

ERP Iron Ore will send iron ore pellets to Lorain via rail from its plant in Reynolds, Ind., which was built at a cost of more than $400 million, according to the companies.

“We are excited to announce this new venture and look forward to utilizing our assets in Lorain, Ohio, to bring back production of pig iron which was previously displaced by foreign imports,” said Republic President and Chief Executive Officer Jaime Vigil.

A tentative schedule is to begin production in July 2018, company spokesmen said. They added it is too soon to tell how many jobs could come to Lorain with the work.

The mood at ERP is “very excited” but “cautiously optimistic,” said company spokesman Mike Luther.

Based on the history of steelmaking in Lorain, there are a lot of people who want to get back to work, he said. “I think people are cautiously optimistic that we’re going to do something good,” Luther said. “We have to take baby steps on this. It’s just the right project at the right time.”

In an era when traditional blast furnace steel production is being displaced by state-of-the art EAF production, the Republic-ERP pig iron Joint Venture represents an important step in protecting North American independence in steel production, according to a joint statement from the companies.

In the 21st century, some companies continue to use blast furnaces for “old school” steel production, Luther said. Those also are called basic oxygen furnaces, or BOFs, said Republic spokesman Ted Thielens.

However, other businesses have created “mini-mills” with electric arc furnaces that use different metals, or feed stock, to create steel, Luther said.

About 60 percent of American steelmaking is done with electric arc furnaces and about 40 percent is done with basic oxygen furnaces, according to the American Iron and Steel Institute. The mini-mills can melt down recycled and scrap metal, from items such as old cars or refrigerators, to create steel, Luther said.

“It tends to be cleaner, it tends to be more efficient in terms of cost,” he said. “It’s the modern way of steel production.”

However, steelmakers using electric arc furnaces also use pig iron to blend with the recycled metal feed stock to create steel, Luther said. Pig iron is an intermediate product of smelting iron ore with a high-carbon fuel, according to the International Iron Metallics Association.

It takes its name from the traditional shape of molded ingots branching off a central runner, “similar in appearance to a litter of piglets suckling on a sow.”

Morning Journal

 

Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center lecture series scheduled in August

7/26 - Duluth, Minn. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, has announced a lecture series for the month of August at the Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center in Duluth, Minn. This lecture series “Fathom That!” will highlight the history of the Duluth parks and shipwrecks and lighthouses near Isle Royale.

Dates are Aug. 9, 16 and 23 at 7 p.m. Admission is free. The Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center is located at 600 Canal Park Drive in Duluth.

On August 9, Nancy Nelson will present "The Parks of Park Point.” She will reveal the fascinating history of two of Duluth's oldest parks on Park Point. These parks have been home to Duluth's first life-saving station, an early cemetery, a two-room schoolhouse, and a community club. Nancy Nelson is co-author of "Duluth's Historic Parks: Their First 160 Years."

August 16: Retired Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center Director Thom Holden presents "Above and Below; An Overview of Isle Royale's Shipwrecks and Lighthouses.” His love of maritime history is rooted in Isle Royale. He will share this passion with a glimpse into the history that he loves. August 23: Cmdr. Erin Williams, U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit, MSU, Duluth, will present "Coast Guard operations in Western Lake Superior" – a discussion about the U.S. Coast Guard’s role on Lake Superior. MSU Duluth conducts a variety of marine safety and environmental response missions including: vessel inspections; foreign vessel compliance examinations; maritime pollution and security contingency planning and response; marine casualty investigations; waterfront facility inspections; marine event permitting; and fishing vessel safety.

 

Ship trip auction to benefit Port Colborne Historical and Marine Museum

7/26 - Ever wanted to take a trip on a working Great Lakes freighter?

Usually trips onboard working freighters are only available to shipping company customers, families of crewmembers or industry officials. Before this charity auction, the only way for the general public to take a cruise on a working Great Lakes freighter was to take a chance in a raffle drawing.

Lower Lakes Towing Co. has donated a trip for two on a working freighter. Proceeds go to support the Port Colborne Historical and Marine Museum. If you are the highest bidder, you and a guest will rest comfortably in a private stateroom and view the scenery from the guest lounge.

The auction ends August 6 at 5 p.m. (EDT).

Find out more or bid at this link: http://www.boatnerd.com/trips/auctionsaginaw2017.htm

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 26

On July 26, 2005, the salty ORLA ran aground at Kahnawake, Quebec, and the passing rum tanker JO SPIRIT made contact with her. Both vessels were damaged and repaired in Montreal.

ALGOWEST sailed on her maiden voyage in 1982 from Thunder Bay, Ontario, to Quebec City with a 27,308 ton load of barley.

On July 26, 1943 the BRUCE HUDSON caught fire while loading gasoline at East Chicago, Illinois, and four people lost their lives.

CONALLISON departed Windsor, Ontario on her first trip for Johnstone Shipping Ltd. on July 26, 1981.

WILLIAM A. McGONAGLE (Hull#154) sailed light on her maiden voyage from Great Lakes Engineering Works at Ecorse, Michigan on July 26, 1916, to Duluth, Minnesota, to load iron ore. Renamed b.) HENRY STEINBRENNER in 1986. She was scrapped at Port Maitland, Ontario, in 1994.

On 26 July 1885, ISLE ROYALE (wooden propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 92 foot, 92 gross tons, built in 1879) sprang a leak near Susick Island near Isle Royale on Lake Superior. She sank but her passengers and crew made it to the island. She was owned by Cooley, Lavague & Company of Duluth. She was originally built as the barge AGNES.

1910 ZENITH CITY went aground at Au Sable Reef, near Marquette, due to fog. The ore-laden steamer sustained damage to 60 planes.

1943 The Canadian tanker BRUCE HUDSON caught fire loading high-octane gasoline at Phillips Petroleum in South Chicago. The Captain, his son and 2 crewmen were killed. The ship was rebuilt and eventually scrapped at Cartagena, Colombia, by 1983 as c) WITCROIX.

1948 ROGN, a Norwegian tanker, went aground in the St. Lawrence at Toussant Island, near Iroquois, after the steering gear failed. The tugs SALVAGE PRINCE and SALVAGE QUEEN pulled the vessel free. It was in ballast and operated on charter to the McColl-Frontenac Oil Company. The ship was scrapped at Piraeus, Greece, as c) PIRAEUS III in 1981.

1965 The Canada Steamship Lines bulk carrier GEORGIAN BAY stood by the small wooden pulpwood carrier PRINCE QUEBEC on Lake Ontario. Cables were strung to the small ship, enroute to Tonawanda, NY with a cargo of pulpwood, to help keep it afloat. PRINCE QUEBEC was later taken to La Petite Riviere, Quebec, beached and never repaired. Apparently the hull was burned by vandals in the 1970s.

1983 PRA RIVER was registered in Ghana when it came to the Great Lakes in 1963. It went aground, enroute from Las Palmas, Canary Islands, to Lagos, Nigeria, as c) MAYON II on this date in 1983 and was abandoned.

2000 HIAWATHA, a ferry dating from 1895, was sunk by vandals at Toronto. It operated between the mainland and a Toronto Island yacht club. The hull was refloated July 28 and taken to Hamilton for restoration, repairs and a return to service.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series, published by the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

World's largest liquid argon particle hunter arrives at Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor

7/25 - Burns Harbor, Ind. – Icarus famously flew too close to the sun, but ICARUS, the world's largest liquid argon particle hunter, is safe and secure in Portage.

The ocean vessel Frieda brought the massive scientific instrument, called ICARUS, from Europe to the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor last week. It's headed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois, where particle physicists will use it to study neutrinos, elementary particles that help make up the universe.

"The Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor is a major hub for large-dimensional and mega project cargo shipments," said Ian Hirt, port director.

"The port's facilities and location allow companies to ship cargoes by water directly into the Midwest, which can significantly reduce the transportation costs and permitting requirements for moving large loads over the highway. Because of the experience of Federal Marine Terminals, our general cargo terminal operator, this port has developed an enviable track record for handling large cargoes and established a worldwide reputation as a port-of-choice for specialty shipments."

Fermilab, the nation's premier national laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research, will use the liquid argon particle-hunter in some of the world's most advanced scientific experiments as it tries "to solve the mysteries of matter, energy, space and time for the benefit of all."

The national laboratory said on its website researchers will use the ICARUS, or Imaging Cosmic and Rare Underground Signals, detector to seek evidence of a fourth type of neutrino that scientists previously have not been able to detect.

"As neutrino detector, ICARUS' job is to observe and record the results of neutrino collisions with particles of matter set in motion by another scientific instrument, an accelerator," the Ports of Indiana said in a press release.

"By studying how neutrinos interact, scientists hope to understand more about the universe at the smallest scales. When reassembled at Fermilab and filled with 760 tons of liquid argon, ICARUS will be the world's largest particle-hunter of its kind and will also be the biggest of three neutrino detectors at the facility."

ICARUS, which is the size of two semi-trucks, had to be divided into two containers, each 66-feet long and 63 tons, as it began its journey in Geneva, Switzerland last month. It was trucked to a port at Antwerp, Belgium, where it sailed across the Atlantic Ocean, through the St. Lawrence Seaway, into Lake Michigan and onto Northwest Indiana.

The particle-hunter, which records collisions on neutrinos, will be loaded onto semi-trucks and is slated to arrive at Fermilab on July 26.

NW Indiana Times

 

Port Reports -  July 25

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Correction: When the Joseph L. Block arrived the Twin Ports Sunday it unloaded stone at Graymont-Superior before going to Hallett #5.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors saw the arrival of the Cason J. Callaway Sunday night at 21:53 and she departed Monday at 07:22 for Gary. No other traffic was in Two Harbors on Monday, but Tuesday the American Integrity is due mid-morning. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Mesabi Miner at 08:39 for Cleveland. Due Monday evening in Silver Bay is the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Tuesday.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Federal Nakagawa was the only vessel in port Monday, according to AIS.

St. Marys River
Michipicoten was upbound for Superior, Wis., early Monday afternoon. Coast Guard cutter Alder was in the locks headed for Duluth at 7 p.m. Saltie Blackie was inbound at DeTour around 9 p.m. Downbound traffic included Algoma Equinox, Algoma Discovery, James L. Kuber/Defiance and CSL Welland. Tanker Algocanada was downbound from Thunder Bay around noon, and went to the Purvis dock in Soo, Ont., to unload. Algoma Enterprise was at the Export Dock. The training vessel State of Michigan was at the U.S. Coast Guard base.

Milwaukee, Wis. – Paul Erspamer
Federal Saguenay arrived from Cleveland on Sunday and was still in port on Monday.

Grand Haven, Mich.
Kaye E. Barker was due in Monday night with stone from Port Inland.

Holland, Mich.
Manitowoc was in port Monday night unloading stone.

South Chicago, Ill.
The salties Eemsborg and Arctic were in port on Monday.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Federal Margaree was still in port Monday night. She was joined sometime during the day by Algowood.

Gary, Ind.
Roger Blough arrived to unload late Monday evening.

Toledo, Ohio
Cuyahoga was due around 6 p.m. Monday for the Midwest Stone Dock to unload.

Sandusky, Ohio
Algoma Mariner is due in sometime Tuesday on what may be her first trip to Sandusky.

Regional and Welland Canal transits -  Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Departure: Frontenac at 0344 westbound. At dock: on July 20, Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08) at 0041

Buffalo:
Arrival: English River at 1813 on July 23. Departure: English River at 2019 on July 24 eastbound

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Furuholmen (Pa) ex CF Zachary-11, Algoma Mariner, Algoma Olympic at 0552, Baie Comeau at 0642, tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at 1106, tug Everlast & barge Norman McLeod at 1446 and Victory I (Mhl) at 2029

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Victory I (Bhs) passenger vessel at 0655, BBC Alberta (Atg) at 0808 (ex BBC Celina-15, Beluga Firmament-11, Beluga Maturity-10 and Tim S. Dool at 1937

Welland Canal docks:
At docks: Federal Kumano (Mhl) at wharf 11 Robin Hood Mill in Port Colborne, arrived approximately 2014 on July 18. Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD - arrived on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Departed: Bro Anna (Sgp) from anchorage at approximately 0714 for Bronte

Hamilton:
Arrival: Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 0512 anchored. At dock: Azoresborg (Nld) on July 21 at 0954, Ina (Lbr) at 1754 on July 22; on July 23 Tundra (Cyp) at 1134 and Federal Schelde at 1405 (anchored)

Bronte:
Arrival: Bro Anna (Sgp) at 1129

Clarkson:
Departure: Algoma Olympic at 0221 westbound

Toronto:
Arrival: Victory I (Bhs) at 0435, departure 1842. Departure: Baie Comeau at 0343 for PW. At dock: Mandarin (Cyp) at 0336 on July 22.

Kingston:
At dock: light tug Ocean A. Simard on July 22 at 2053

 

Record Lake Ontario outflows continues

7/25 - Buffalo, N.Y. – As wet weather persists in the Great Lakes basin, the U.S.-Canadian agency that sets the rate of water flows out of Lake Ontario has decided to maintain the record flow levels it began in the second week of June.

The International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board of Control continues to allow nearly 2.75 million gallons of water per second to flow into the St. Lawrence.

The record outflows were begun in response to complaints of flooding along the New York shore of the lake. The board said Friday it can't allow more water to leave the lake without risking more flooding in the Montreal area and endangering safe navigation in the St. Lawrence.

Lake levels are now 7.9 inches below their May 29 peak, but the amount of water entering Lake Ontario from rain, the Niagara River and other streams continues to exceed the outflows, the board reported.

The Buffalo News

 

BoatNerds welcome the Alpena to Green Bay

7/25 - View a photo gallery at this link: http://www.greenbaypressgazette.com/picture-gallery/news/2017/07/24/boat-nerds-welcome-the-alpena-to-green-bay/103954322

 

Get your reservations in now for our Detroit River Cruise August 12

7/25 - On Saturday, August 12, we will repeat the popular Boatnerd Detroit River Cruise aboard the Friendship. This year’s cruise will be four hours and will go up the Detroit River, and hopefully into the Rouge River. A pizza lunch will be delivered by the J. W. Westcott mail boat, with a cash bar onboard. Cost is $38 per person and we are coming close to the limit on the boat.  The cruise departs at 10 a.m. from the Portofino Restaurant in Wyandotte, Mich.
Click here for the Reservation form

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 25

In 1991 the 16-man crew of the ocean-going tug PACIFIC TIDE NO 3 were arrested at Montreal on charges of smuggling drugs. The tug had arrived from the Philippines to tow the damaged Spanish vessel MILANOS to Spain.

Algoma Central Marine's former ALGOCEN departed Montreal on July 25, 2005, under tow of the tugs ATLANTIC OAK and ANDRE H bound for Keasby, New Jersey. She was renamed b.) VALGOCEN and was registered in Panama. She later sailed as J.W. SHELLEY and PHOENIX STAR.

The bow section of the ROGER BLOUGH (Hull#900) was floated into the new American Ship Building Co. Lorain dry dock on July 25, 1970, and was joined with the 421-foot stern section. The launch of the completed hull was scheduled for July 1971, but a fire broke out in the engine room on June 24, 1971, killing four yard workers and extensively damaging her Pielstick diesel engines. Extensive repairs, which included replacement of both engines, delayed the launch for nearly a year.

CANADA MARQUIS was upbound at Detroit, Michigan on July 25, 1983, on her maiden voyage for Misener Holdings Ltd. She sails today as CSL's e.) BIRCHGLEN. July 25, 1983 - A wedding was held aboard the BADGER. Chris Gebhart and Pat Sroka of Ludington were married by Rev. John Christensen.

The wooden lumber tug CYGNET, which worked on the Shiawassee and Bad Rivers and Lake Huron, was destroyed when her boiler exploded in "Blow-up Bayou" on the Shiawassee River in 1875.

The wooden bulk freighter D C WHITNEY was launched at Langell's shipyard in St. Clair, Michigan on 25 July 1882. Her dimensions were 229 feet x 40 feet x15 feet, 1090 gross tons.

1911: Efforts to beach the leaking wooden, coal-laden, freighter RAPPAHANNOCK failed and the ship sank off Jackfish Point, Lake Superior after an unsuccessful battle with 75 mph winds. All on board were saved

1964: SUNNABRIS made 4 trips through the Seaway in 1959 and returned as c) SEA FRIEND in 1961 and d) DEMOKRITOS in 1962. The ship dated from 1929 and it went aground, while inbound at Alexandria, Egypt, on this date and was abandoned as a total loss. The hull was sold to Yugoslavian salvors and cut up for scrap where it was.

1991: YANKCANUCK (ii) went aground in the St. Marys River about four miles from DeTour. The ship was carrying a cargo of scrap steel for Chicago and was operating as a barge under tow of the ANGLIAN LADY. The vessel was lightered and released.

1994: GEORGE A. STINSON, downbound with a cargo of iron ore for Detroit, went aground in the St. Clair River but was refloated.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Lake Huron Lore Society, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series, Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Port Reports -  July 24

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Cason J. Callaway arrived Duluth early Sunday with limestone for Hallett 5. She departed light for Two Harbors during the early evening. Joseph L. Block also arrived during the evening to load blast furnace trim at Hallett 5. American Spirit was inbound late Sunday to load ore at CN. Burns Harbor was at Burlington Northern in Superior loading ore.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
The CN ore dock in Two Harbors saw the arrival of the Edgar B. Speer at 10:32 and she departed at 20:50 for Gary. Due late Sunday night in Two Harbors is the Cason J. Callaway coming from Duluth after unloading limestone. Her departure on Monday is the only scheduled traffic. As of 21:00 the Mesabi Miner was still at Northshore Mining in Silver Bay. She is due out late Sunday night. Due late in the day on Monday are the Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
CSL Assiniboine departed downbound early Sunday, followed later by Algoma Equinox, Algocanada and CSL Welland. Federal Nakagawa appeared to be only vessel loading.

Marquette, Mich. – Rod Burdick
A busy Sunday at the harbors in Marquette found Hon. James L. Oberstar and James L. Kuber loading ore at LS&I and Herbert C. Jackson unloading stone at Shiras.

St. Marys River
Roger Blough was downbound in the late morning on a quiet and rainy Sunday, while Stewart J. Cort was upbound in the early afternoon. Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader were upbound in the later afternoon followed by the Algoway, which went to Essar’s Export Dock to unload salt from Goderich. Algoma Enterprise anchored at Nine Mile about 8:30 p.m. to await Algoway’s departure, which will be downbound in ballast for Calcite. Atlantic Huron was downbound for Nanticoke at dusk, while Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin and Algoma Spirit were nearing DeTour upbound at the same time.

Port Inland, Mich.
Manitowoc departed Sunday evening with stone and Kaye E. Barker took her place at the dock, loading for Grand Haven.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis.
Manitowoc left Bay Ship on Saturday evening at 2000 hours and headed out to the bay of Green Bay for Port Inland.

Milwaukee, Wis. – Paul Erspamer
Undaunted and its barge were at Jones Island in Milwaukee's inner harbor, unloading on Friday. They departed onto Lake Michigan for Alpena at about 11 p.m. Friday. John J. Boland was expected early Saturday morning, from Waukegan. Anglian Lady and its barge were expected in Milwaukee Saturday afternoon. Federal Saguenay arrived from Cleveland on Sunday.

Waukegan, Ill.
John J. Boland was inbound on Sunday night.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Federal Margaree was still in port Sunday night.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrival: Frontenac at 1853. Departure: Algoscotia at 1517. At dock on July 20, Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08) at 0041

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: tug Evans McKeil & barge MM Newfoundland, tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II, Algoma Transport, English River at 0401, Spruceglen at 0538, Stephen B. Roman at 0756, John D. Leitch at 0810, Thunder Bay at 0650, Furholmen (Pa) ex CF Zachary-11 at 2001 and Algoma Mariner at 2115

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Victory I (Mhl) passenger vessel at 0655, Baie Comeau at 0751, Baie St. Paul at 0718 and Algoscotia at 1517,

Welland Canal docks:
At docks: Federal Kumano (Mhl) at wharf 11 Robin Hood Mill in Port Colborne, arrived approximately 2014 on July 18. Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD - arrived on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Arrival: Bro Anna (Sgp) from Bronte for weather at approximately 2238

Hamilton:
Arrival: tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at 0807, Tundra (Cyp) at 1134 and Federal Schelde at 1405 (anchored). Departure: Thunder Bay at 0037 and Algoma Harvester at 1147- at dock - Azoresborg (Nld) on July 21 at 0954, Ina (Lbr) at 1754 on July 22

Bronte:
Arrival: Bro Anna (Sgp) at 1822, departed approximately 2000 for Port Weller

Clarkson:
Arrival: Algoma Olympic at 0728

Toronto:
At dock: Mandarin (Cyp) at 0336 on July 22, Baie Comeau on July 23 at 1957 and light tug Evans McKeil at 2359

Picton:
Arrival: Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 0400. Departure: Federal Biscay at approximately 1400 westbound

Kingston:
Arrival: light tug Ocean A. Simard on July 22 at 2053

 

Freighter raffle to benefit Soo Locks Visitors Center Association

7/24 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. – The Soo Locks Visitors Center Association is raffling off a round-trip for four persons aboard an Interlake Steamship vessel. The drawing will be held on September 5 at 11 a.m., at the Soo Locks Visitors Center.

The winner and three guests will take their trip with Interlake during the summer of 2018. 2nd Prize: Overnight stay at Whitefish Point. 3rd Prize: Overnight stay at Ramada Plaza Ojibway Hotel

Visit the raffle page located here: http://www.saultstemarie.com/win-trip-freighter-raffle

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 24

On July 24, 1980, 34 ships were delayed when the BALTIC SKOU, a 595 foot Danish-flag freighter built in 1977, ran aground after losing power three miles east of the Snell Lock, near Massena, New York. The ship, loaded with sunflower seeds, was headed for Montreal and the Atlantic Ocean when the grounding occurred. No injuries or pollution resulted from the accident and the vessel did not take on any water.

ALGOSOO (Hull#206) was launched July 24, 1974, at Collingwood, Ontario by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd. for Algoma Central Railway, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. BURNS HARBOR’s sea trials were conducted on July 24, 1980, during which she performed an emergency stop in 3,160 feet loaded to a depth of 25/26 feet. She was the third 1,000-footer built for Bethlehem and the tenth on the Great Lakes.

ST. CLAIR (Hull#714) was launched July 24, 1975, at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, by Bay Shipbuilding Corp. for the American Steamship Co.

WILLIAM G. MATHER left River Rouge, Michigan, on her maiden voyage July 24, 1925, for Ashtabula, Ohio to load coal for Port Arthur/Fort William, Ontario.

The wooden steamer OSCAR TOWNSEND was launched at 2:20 p.m. at E. Fitzgerald's yard in Port Huron on 24 July 1873. The launch went well with a few hundred spectators. She was built for use in the iron ore trade by the Lake Superior Transportation Co. Her dimensions were 210 feet overall, 200 foot keel, 33 foot 10 inches beam and 15 foot depth. She had three masts and was painted deep green.

On 24 July 1847, CONSTITUTION (wooden passenger/package freight side-wheeler, 141 foot, 444 tons, built in 1837, at Charleston, Ohio) struck a pier in Sandusky harbor, stove a large hole in her bow and sank. Her machinery was later recovered and installed in J D MORTON.

1915: EASTLAND rolled over and sank on her side at Chicago with the loss of 835 lives. It was the worst marine accident in Great Lakes history.

1960: The idle tanker COASTAL CASCADES was being used for occasional storage when she sank at the dock at Montreal. The hull was salvaged in August and dismantled at Montreal in 1961-1962.

1970: The 226-foot Danish freighter NORDLAND SAGA made one trip through the Seaway in 1965. It was wrecked off Oman as c) ADEL of the Dubai National Shipping Corp., while enroute from Bombay, India, to Dubai with a cargo of steel bars and generals.

1974: The former GRAINMOTOR left the Great Lakes in 1966 for saltwater service. It was lost as c) ANDY enroute from Pensacola, Fla., to Guayaquil, Ecuador, in the Caribbean on this date off Isla de Providencia.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Windsor Port Authority reports increase in shipping activity

7/23 - Windsor, Ont. – There's been more shipping activity on the Great Lakes so far this season compared to last year. The president and CEO of the Windsor Port Authority says the port has seen a 10 percent increase in shipments this year.

David Cree says the Windsor port is handling more salt, petroleum, steel and grain. Volume of stone was down, but Cree thinks that will change next year when work is expected to pick-up for the Gordie Howe International Bridge. Meanwhile, the St. Lawrence Seaway reports a 20 per cent increase in shipments.

Seaway management says the increased volume is a reflection of economic conditions.

CTV News Windsor

 

Lightning strike knocks Northshore Mining offline; repairs underway

7/23 - Silver Bay, Minn. – A lightning strike at the power plant that serves Northshore Mining in Silver Bay knocked the taconite processing plant offline Friday night.

Northshore’s operations remained shut down on Saturday as crews worked to resolve the issues caused by the strike that hit the coal-fired power plant as storms moved through the region late Friday, said Patricia Persico, a spokeswoman for Cliffs Natural Resources, which owns and operates Northshore Mining.

“Maintenance crews are in the process of restoring service. … We expect power to be restored by the end of today, and we’re also then working on an orderly startup of the plant,” she said. “ … We expect to be up and running, production-wise, (Sunday) morning.”

There were no reports of injuries and no environmental issues from the incident, Persico said.

Cliffs is in the process of transitioning its electrical supply for Northshore Mining from its own subsidiary, Silver Bay Power, to Duluth-based Minnesota Power.

Under the terms of a deal announced last year, Minnesota Power will supply electricity for the Silver Bay plant through 2031; it paid Cliffs $31 million for those rights. It's expected that the coal burners at Silver Bay eventually will be phased out, with Minnesota Power providing electricity from its other generating sources.

When the deal was announced in 2016, Minnesota Power officials noted that Northshore, when it's operating at full capacity, uses energy equivalent to a city the size of Superior.

Duluth News Tribune

 

Port Reports -  July 23

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Neither Two Harbors nor Silver Bay saw any boats loading Saturday. Mesabi Miner was due at Northshore Mining late Saturday with coal from SMET. After unloading she will load pellets at Northshore. No other traffic is scheduled for Silver Bay on Sunday. The CN ore dock will see the Edgar B. Speer arrive late morning to mid-day on Sunday. Also due on Sunday will be the Cason J. Callaway coming from the Twin Ports after unloading stone.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Algoma Equinox, Federal Nagakgawa and CSL Welland were in port Saturday evening. Algocanada was due late Saturday night or early Sunday to unload.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Indiana Harbor, Blacky and Federal Margaree were in port Saturday night.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoway was loading salt Saturday at Sifto.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Departures: Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on July 22 at 0117 and Algoma Olympic on July 22 at 0308. Arrival at docks: on July 20, Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08) at 0041 and Algoscotia on July 22 at 0544

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Spirit, light tug Jarrett M, Mississagi at 0815, BBC Campana (Atg) (ex Asian Cruiser-04, BBC Campana-04) at 1325, Pride (Mlt) (ex Polaris Pride-16, Avenue Pride-13) at 1345, Robert S. Pierson at 1355, tug Evans McKeil & barge MM Newfoundland at 1400, tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 1500, Algoma Transport at 1600 and English River at 2045

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: CSL St. Laurent at 0548, Algoma Olympic at 0720, G3 Marquis at 1130 and tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at 1700

Welland Canal docks:
At docks: Federal Kumano (Mhl) at wharf 11 Robin Hood Mill in Port Colborne, arrived approximately 2014 on July 18, and tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD, arrived on June 20 at 1046

Hamilton:
Arrival: Algoma Harvester at 0804 and Ina (Lbr) at 1754. Departure: Kaministiqua at 0004 eastbound and Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 1637 eastbound. At dock: Azoresborg (Nld) on July 21 at 0954

Toronto:
Arrival: Mandarin (Cyp) at 0336

Bowmanville:
Departure: tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 1005 westbound

 

Coast Guard rescues 2 boaters near Grand Haven

7/23 - Cleveland, Ohio – A Coast Guard Station Grand Haven response boat-small crew rescued two injured boaters near Grand Haven, Mich., Saturday.

Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan watchstanders received a mayday call from a good Samaritan reporting a boating collision with injuries. Watchstanders then launched the Grand Haven boatcrew, an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Facility Muskegon, and issued an urgent marine information broadcast.

The vessel had reportedly struck a wave while transiting at a high rate of speed causing the operator and passenger to be thrown into the console.

Both boaters embarked the Coast Guard response boat. They were then transferred to an Ottawa County Fire Department marine unit and transported ashore to awaiting emergency medical services.

USCG

 

Help wanted: Western Great Lakes Pilots Association

7/23 - There are near future applicant pilot openings at Western Great Lakes Pilots Association. Visit WGLPA.com to learn about District #3, consisting of the St. Marys River and lakes Huron, Michigan and Superior.

Experienced Great Lakes Masters/First Mates preferred. Send resumes and application information requests to: President1@wglpa.com

Send by mail to WGLPA, P.O.Box 248, Superior, WI 54880-0248.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 23

On this day in 1908, the 556-foot ELBERT H. GARY arrived to a 21-gun salute to deliver the first cargo of Minnesota ore at the new United States Steel mill in Gary, Indiana.

The keel for the TEXACO CHIEF (Hull#193) was laid July 23, 1968, at Collingwood, Ontario, by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd., for Texaco Canada Ltd. Renamed b.) A.G. FARQUHARSON in 1986, and c.) ALGONOVA In 1998. She was sold for further service overseas in 2007.

CANADOC sailed on her maiden voyage July 23, 1961.

Upper Lakes Shipping Co. Ltd.'s, RED WING was christened on July 23, 1960, as the first all-welded vessel to emerge from Port Weller Dry Docks.

On 23 July 1878, H R PRESTON (wooden quarter-deck canal boat built in 1877, at Oneida Lake, New York) was carrying 250 tons of ashes from Picton, Ontario to Oswego, New York, in tow of the tug ALANSON SUMNER along with three other canal boats when they encountered a storm on Lake Ontario. About 15 miles from Oswego, the PRESTON broke her towline and was taken alongside the SUMNER with some difficulty. About a mile out of port she lost her hold tarps and began to sink quickly. She was cut loose from the tug and her two crewmen were saved by the Oswego tug WM AVERY. Though she was lying heavily on the bottom in 50 feet of water, her wreckage came ashore near 4 Mile Point in early September.

1918: PETER REISS and the GLENSHEE were in a collision at the #3 ore dock at Duluth. Fog and the current were blamed for the accident, with only limited damage to both ships.

1934: An explosion and fire aboard the tanker barge EN-AR-CO during fit-out at Toronto resulted in the loss of 4 lives. The ship was rebuilt as a coal barge and was finally scrapped at Hamilton in 1969.

1955: The tug HELENA capsized at South Chicago while taking on coal from a scow and two sailors were lost. The vessel was refloated on July 26. It survives today as c) DANIEL McALLISTER, a museum ship on display in the Lachine Canal at Montreal.

1968: The former tanker ORION was operating as a sand barge when it sank in Lake Erie about 1,000 feet off the Lorain lighthouse due to choppy seas. The hull was raised by the Corps of Engineers, beached August 2 and assumed to have been subsequently scrapped.

1985: FOTINI D.E. first came through the Seaway in 1976 and, in 1980, became the first overseas vessel to load grain at the port of Goderich. It ran aground on this date in 1985, enroute from Venezuela to a U.S. Gulf coast port, and was abandoned as a total loss on July 31.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Port Reports -  July 22

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
The CN ore dock saw the departure of the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader at 01:14 on Friday for Cleveland. A correction to my post from Thursday, the Edwin H. Gott arrived Friday, not Thursday. She arrived Two Harbors at 04:39 and after another fast load departed at 14:12 for Conneaut. Two Harbors has no scheduled traffic for Saturday. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Lee A. Tregurtha at 09:01 for Cleveland. An update on the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. that departed on Thursday. She loaded for Ashtabula. Mesabi Miner is due the Twin Ports Saturday morning to load coal for Northshore Mining. She's due Silver Bay Saturday evening.

Sarnia, Ont. – Marc Dease
Saginaw has arrived at the north slip at Point Edward for unspecified repairs. She is tied up astern of the Ojibway.

Toledo, Ohio
Friday night Algoma Enterprise arrived with cargo loaded at Thunder Bay, Ont. She was headed upriver to the Consolidated (A.R.M.S.) dock to unload.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrival at docks: Algoma Olympic at 2220 on July 20, Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08) at 0041 and Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin at 1400. Anchored: Algosea on July 17 at 0010 and Algoscotia on July 18 at 0800

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Algowood, tug Wilf Seymour & barge Alouette Spirit at 0056, Algoma Strongfield at 0619, Whitefish Bay at 0815 and Algoma Spirit at 1843

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: July 20 - Damia Desgagnes at 2115, Algoma Guardian at 2120 and tug Jarrett M & barge HM7 at approximately 2359, Argentia Desgagnes at 0010, tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 0845, Federal Champlain (Mhl) at 1046 and Federal Yukon (Mhl) at 1130

Welland Canal docks:
At docks: Federal Kumano (Mhl) at wharf 11 Robin Hood Mill in Port Colborne, arrived approximately 2014 on July 18, and tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD - arrived on June 20 at 1046

Hamilton:
Arrival: Algoma Spirit at 0104, Azoresborg (Nld) at 0954. Departure: Algoma Spirit at 1612. At docks” Federal Biscay (Mhl) on July 15 at 0310 and Kaministiqua on July 19 at 1440

Bronte:
Departure: Algonova at 0250 eastbound

Bowmanville:
At dock: tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 1255 on July 20

 

S.S. City of Milwaukee to hold open house and history event

7/22 - Manistee, Mich. - On Saturday, August 5, the museum ship S.S. City of Milwaukee in Manistee, Mich. will host Marine Enthusiasts Weekend/Open House starting at 10 a.m. The public is invited to come on board the historic Lake Michigan car ferry and share their maritime and railroad related videos, pictures, slides and stories. There will also be display space for items related to maritime and railroad history.

For the event, the museum ship is offering special overnight pricing to stay on board the City of Milwaukee for Friday, August 4 and Saturday, August 5. The rate will be $30 per person per night (plus tax). Most of the ship's cabins can accommodate 1-2 people with one room capable of accommodating four guests.

When making reservations, please mention your participation in our event, so we can give you this pricing. Phone 231-723-3587 for more information and reservations.

www.carferry.com

 

Twin Ports Lighthouse Days at Corps’ Duluth Visitor Center celebrates 15 years

7/22 - Duluth, Minn. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, announces the 15th annual Twin Ports Lighthouse Days at the Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center in Duluth, Minn.

Twin Ports Lighthouse Days is a celebration of five unique Twin Ports lighthouses with presentations about other lighthouses around Lake Superior. This annual event is being held in conjunction with the anniversary of the date President George Washington signed the Ninth Act of Congress making our nation’s lighthouses federal assets - August 7, 1789.

The Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center’s Twin Ports Lighthouse Days, August 3 – 7, hosts several events at and around the visitor center. These events, free and open to the public, feature lighthouse films, history walks and various children’s activities from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day.

There is no admission charge to the visitor center operated by the Corps of Engineers in Canal Park and personnel will be on hand with inked stamps to add to visitor’s lighthouse passport book stamp collections. As a reminder, the lighthouses in Canal Park are actually closed to the public, although they be viewed and photographed from the exterior.

Visitors are cautioned that the Superior Entry is a rubble mound breakwater and not intended for pedestrian traffic. Also poison ivy has been spotted near the Minnesota Point Lighthouse.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

 

Sturgeon Bay mariner and coast guard awards to be given at dinner

7/22 - Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – The public is invited to join the Door County Maritime Museum, Sturgeon Bay Yacht Club and the Sturgeon Bay Coast Guard Committee in honoring all nominees for the Mariner Award and the Sturgeon Bay area Coast Guard Person of the Year. The award presentation dinner takes place Monday, August 7, at the Sturgeon Bay Yacht Club. Social hour begins at 5:30 p.m. followed by the award dinner at 6:30 p.m.

Presented jointly by the Door County Maritime Museum and Sturgeon Bay Yacht Club, the Mariner Award recognizes individuals who have had a significant positive and lasting impact on the Door County maritime community. One living and at least one posthumous award are presented each year. All nominees are recognized and honored during the award ceremony.

The living recipient receives the Mariner Award trophy, a hand-crafted original work by noted Door County wood carver David Frykman. The posthumous award recipients receive special recognition at the dinner and their names are permanently displayed on the Mariner Award plaque that is prominently featured in the upper lobby of the Door County Maritime Museum in Sturgeon Bay. The award is intended to be very inclusive, recognizing nominees who have contributed significantly and positively to any segment of the local maritime community.

The living nominees for the 2017 Mariner Award are Steve Brunstrom, Martha Burress , Dennis Hickey, Bill Parsons, Ken Schmidtke, William “Curly” Selvick, Leathem “Tim” Stearn and Todd Thayse.

Nominees in the posthumous award category are Minnie Hesh Cochems , Joseph Harris, Jr., Clifford B. Hart, Ingar Olsen, George Pinney, John Thenell and Arthur Zuehlke.

Sponsored by the City of Sturgeon Bay Coast Guard Committee, Greater Green Bay Council of the United States Navy League, Sturgeon Bay Yacht Club and Door County Maritime Museum, the Coast Guard Person of the Year award recognizes a local active duty Coast Guardsman who exemplifies the Coast Guard’s core values of Honor, Respect and Devotion to Duty. The honoree is selected from among nominees submitted by the three local Coast Guard units—USCGC Mobile Bay, Marine Safety Detachment Sturgeon Bay, and the Canal Station. All nominees are recognized and the winner announced at the award dinner.

This year’s nominees are Petty Officer Ross Hughes, stationed at Coast Guard Station Sturgeon Bay; Petty Officer Jacob Whitsell, USCGC Mobile Bay; and Chief Warrant Officer Jim Condra, U.S. Coast Guard (Retired), Marine Safety Detachment.

Reservations are required. Please contact the Door County Maritime Museum at (920) 743-5958 no later than Friday, July 28, to make your reservation.

The Coast Guard Person of the Year and Mariner Award dinner is part of the Sturgeon Bay Maritime Week: A Salute to the United States Coast Guard celebration. This unique festival brings together many long-standing annual events along with new and exciting activities to celebrate Sturgeon Bay’s rich maritime heritage and honor local Coast Guard personnel and their families.

Information on other Maritime Week events can be found on the Door County Maritime Museum’s website, www.dcmm.org.

 

Boat tour shows progress of Black River restoration

7/22 - Lorain, Ohio – The Black River Advisory Committee showed off the progress that has been made in and along the river during its annual summer potluck meeting, which included a boat tour.

In 2015, Lorain was awarded a $15 million Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Grant by the Great Lakes National Program to fund projects that would restore an area of Black River near Lake Erie.

It was the largest such grant awarded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and work began almost immediately on environmentally sensitive or damaged areas.

According to Chairman Don Romancak, all projects within the Lower Black River Restoration Project have a target finish date of Sept. 30, 2019.

In addition to the restoration work funded by the grant, local residents also have helped to improve the river. This year’s Black River Clean-Up drew 320 volunteers over two days who removed more than 250 tires and 1,300 pounds of scrap metal from the river and the land along it. In the past five years, the annual cleanup has removed more than 72 tons of trash and more than 1,000 tires from the river.

On Tuesday, a three-hour boat ride took guests down the Black River past sites such as Lorain Lighthouse, Lorain Sailing & Yacht Club, U.S. Steel Corp., Republic Steel and the heron rookery.

According to representatives from Coldwater Consulting, fish habitat components will be added along the river near the yacht club this winter. Hollow pipes filled with woody debris will help algae, which could help the fish in the area reproduce more frequently.

The slope near Black River Landing was graded in fall 2015 so it wouldn’t have the tendency to erode. Two years later, erosion has decreased dramatically, and the land is covered in flowers, chokecherries and other shrubs and trees.

The heron rookery boasts eagles, blue herons and other wildlife. Work in the rookery included building out the bank and adding prevegetated filter socks, native plants and boulder clusters, making it an aquatic habitat.

“The density of birds we have here is amazing. I’m just amazed by it,” said Ron Mantini, of the Lorain Port Authority. “It’s a biodiversity hotspot as is. Anything we can do to accentuate that is all the better.”

Members of the Black River Advisory Committee are proud of the improvements made so far, but they know they aren’t finished. They are awaiting word on if they will be awarded money when the Dominion Watershed Mini Grant winners are announced at summer’s end.

The Chronicle

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 22

On this day in 1961, the barge CLEVECO, originally lost with a crew of 22 during a December 02, 1942, storm on Lake Erie, was floated by salvagers, towed outside the shipping lanes, and intentionally sunk.

PERE MARQUETTE 22 (Hull#210) was launched on July 22, 1924, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin, by Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co. for the Pere Marquette Railway Co. One hundred years ago on 22 July 1900, the tug MATT HESSER was launched at Lorain, Ohio, by H. D. Root for Captain Burke of Erie.

The M.I. MILLS (wooden propeller tug, 122 foot, 152 tons, built in 1867, at Marine City, Michigan), which sank in a collision with the bark UNADILLA on 9 May 1873, was found on 22 July 1873, in 90 feet of water in Lake Huron off Sand Beach, Michigan. Plans were made to raise her at the cost of $5,000. This effort was unsuccessful as was another abortive attempt in 1895.

1965 MARIVIKI dated from 1940 as a) TEMPLE INN and visited the Seaway in 1960. The ship was beached in Colla Bay, near Mormugao, India, after developing leaks on a voyage from Madras, India, to Constanza, Romania. The hull later broke in two and was a total loss.

1967 A small fire erupted in the machine shop of the West German freighter TRANSAMERICA while a crewman was welding in Milwaukee. The blaze was soon brought under control. The ship last operated in 1978 as f) ARISTOTELES before being broken up at Gadani Beach, Pakistan.

1968 The Paterson bulk carrier CANADOC, loading at the Continental Elevator in Chicago, was struck on the starboard side by the Belgian vessel TIELRODE as it passed upsteam under tow. The latter returned through the Seaway as c) GEORGIOS C. in 1977 and was scrapped at Huangpo, China, as e) OPORTO in 1985.

1970 ULYSSES REEFER caught fire in Toronto resulting in an estimated $30,000 in damage. The ship first came inland in 1969 and returned as c) ITHAKI REEFER in 1972 prior to being scrapped at Blyth, Scotland, in 1973.

1989 MAR CATERINA, downbound at the Snell Lock, struck the fender boom and all Seaway navigation was temporarily delayed. The ship began Seaway trading as b) ASTORGA in 1985. As of 2012, the vessel is apparently still operating as e) ASPHALT TRADER.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Seaway cargo up 20 percent as waterway supports economic growth

7/21 - Total cargo shipments through the St. Lawrence Seaway are up 20 per cent this year as the marine highway supports business growth from key sectors of the North American economy.

According to The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation, total cargo tonnage from March 20 to June 30 reached 12 million metric tons – two million metric tons more compared to the same period in 2016.

“Seaway cargo shipments are a reflection of North American and global economic conditions in industries such as auto manufacturing, construction, mining and agriculture. Cargo volumes have improved in almost every category from iron ore and grain to road salt and construction materials compared to last spring,” said Terence Bowles, President and CEO, The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation. “Great Lakes-Seaway shipping is supporting domestic economic growth and international trade from provinces across Canada by providing reliable, efficient and sustainable transportation.”

Canadian grain totaled 2.4 million metric tons, up 14 per cent, with vessels shipping a large carry over of Prairie and Ontario grain products from the fall harvest to overseas markets.

G3 Canada is a growing grain company that has a significant investment in grain handling facilities located at various points along the St. Lawrence Seaway. In June, G3 Canada Limited's staff and customers, as well as other dignitaries gathered to celebrate the grand opening of G3's $50 million new lake terminal at the Port of Hamilton. The terminal is the centrepiece of G3’s entrance into the southern Ontario grain handling market. G3 Hamilton features technology that maximizes facility load and unload speed.

"Fundamental to the business case for the new terminal is access to the St. Lawrence Seaway as the intent is to load both Great Lakes lakers and inbound salties to ship volume through this facility. The St. Lawrence Seaway is strategic to G3's western Canadian infrastructure as well as our facilities at Hamilton, Quebec City and Trois-Rivières,” said Karl Gerrand, CEO, G3 Canada Limited. “The Seaway is critical to the expansion of our business of exporting Canadian grain to world markets. G3 Hamilton loaded its first vessel in the month of June and is gearing up for a strong fall program when farmers begin to harvest this year's crops."

Year-to-date iron ore shipments totaled 2.8 million metric tons, up 65 per cent over 2016 levels. Canadian domestic carriers are loading U.S. iron ore pellets at Minnesota ports/docks to ship via the Seaway to the Port of Quebec, where it is then transferred to larger ocean-going vessels for onward transport to Japan and China.

Dry bulk cargo (including materials like stone, cement, gypsum, road salt and potash) shipments from March 20 to June 30 totaled 3.4 million metric tons, up 17 per cent over the same period last year. General cargo shipments including specialized steel and aluminum ingots destined to be used in the automotive and construction industries also topped 1.1 million metric tons, up 29 per cent.

Trade through the Port of Thunder Bay to and from Western Canada has been strong through the month of June. Year-to-date, 3.15 million metric tons of cargo have moved across Thunder Bay docks, which is 16 per cent higher than the 10-year average. Outbound shipments of the port’s mainstay cargo, prairie grain, are well ahead of normal (2.5 million MT vs. 2.2 million MT).

Tim Heney, CEO of the Thunder Bay Port Authority, added: “Potash has also been one of the highlights of the 2017 shipping season so far in Thunder Bay. As of June 30, potash shipment volumes are double what they usually are, and almost three times as much as last year at this time (252,000 MT vs. 90,000 MT). There has been a large increase in direct-export shipments to Brazil and Europe via ocean-going vessels. Thunder Bay is the only potash load point on the Great Lakes – St. Lawrence Seaway System.”

The port’s Keefer Terminal also had a very successful month. The terminal handled a variety of dimensional cargoes including electrical transformers, windmill components, conveyor belt coils, modular buildings, and a large shipment of steel beams and rail. With the exception of the modular buildings which were outbound, these cargoes were offloaded to Keefer’s vast laydown area before being transferred to truck and rail for furtherance to Western Canada.

Chamber of Marine Commerce

 

Lake Huron, Georgian Bay continuing to rise

7/21 - Owen Sound, Ont. – A wet and rainy spring has left water levels in Lake Huron and Georgian Bay well above their long-term average, and they are continuing to rise. As of Tuesday, the water levels on Lake Huron were 41 centimetres above average, the highest they have been at this time of year since 1997.

"They are high for sure," said Derrick Beach, a senior water resources engineer with Environment and Climate Change Canada. "It is at levels where you have to go back to the late 90s to see higher levels."

Beach said at the end of June the levels in the basin – which includes Lake Michigan, Lake Huron and Georgian Bay – were 34 centimetres above average, the highest they have been since 1998, which marked the tail end of a period of high lake levels. Beach said in June alone, the water levels on Lake Huron rose 12 centimetres, when on average they rise five centimetres.

"That is due to the precipitation you are seeing," Beach said.

From July 1 to 18, the lake rose another three centimetres. Usually in the month of July is when the lakes level off and start to decline through August and into the fall. "The fact that it is still rising is an indication we are getting the wet weather," said Beach. "It has been very wet from April right through to now."

The high levels in the late 1990s was followed by a slow decline over the next 15 years to where the lakes reached record lows in December 2012 and January 2013. The lakes then again began to rise, reaching their average levels in September 2014. "They kept rising and stayed above average since then," said Beach. "It has taken another jump up since then, through June and July."

Along with the wet weather over the basin, it has also been wet in the Lake Superior basin as well, which affects the levels in Lake Huron and Georgian Bay, Beach said. "You are getting the higher outflows from Superior as well," said Beach. "It is kind of that whole cascading effect."

All the Great Lakes are experiencing higher levels and remain above average. In May, Lake Ontario reached its highest levels since records started being kept in 1918. That has led to flooding in communities that sit on the lake as well as on the St. Lawrence River. Lake Ontario peaked on May 29, and has dropped 18 centimetres since then, but still remains above the record high for the time of year.

Lake Huron and Georgian Bay have some ways to go before they reach their record high for the month. While the long-term average for the month is 176.57 metres, as of July 18 they were at exactly 177.00 m. The record long-term average for the month was set back in 1986 when the levels for Lake Huron and Georgian Bay reached 177.39 m.

Beach said the lake levels are expected to remain above average at least for the rest of the year. "They are going to stay above average right through to December," said Beach. "Even if we got pretty dry conditions, it is not going to bring it down to below average."

Erinn Lawrie, executive director of the Lake Huron Centre for Coastal Conservation in Goderich, said Tuesday that with the rising water levels they are hearing growing concerns from property owners and others who use the shoreline.

"Quite a lot of people are having issues with erosion on their shoreline properties," said Lawrie. "There are concerns as well that people don't really have the beach space they are used to having. They have a really narrow beach and plants are growing right down to the water so there is a reduced space for people to use their own shoreline."

Owen Sound Sun Times

 

Port Reports -  July 21

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
The CN ore dock in Two Harbors saw the arrival of the Baie St. Paul at 00:03, and after a fast load, she departed at 06:45 for Quebec City. Two Harbors also saw the arrival of the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader at 17:25 arriving from the Twin Ports. She originally was on the schedule to load in Silver Bay. Thursday inbound traffic for Two Harbors is the Edwin H. Gott due early in the morning. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. on Thursday at 08:30 and the arrival of the Lee A. Tregurtha at 09:30. As of 20:30 she was still at the ore dock. Northshore Mining has no inbound traffic scheduled for Friday.

St. Marys River
Dowbound traffic Thursday included Erie Trader/Clyde S. VanEnkevort, CSL St.-Laurent, Paul R. Tregurtha, USCG Alder (headed for Sturgeon Bay according to AIS), Algoma Enterprise (headed for Toledo), Kaye E. Barker and G3 Marquis. Upbounders included CCGS Samuel Risley, CSL Assiniboine, Samuel deChamplain / barge Innovation and, late, Mesabi Miner. The Canadian Coast Guard research vessel Kelso has been working in the river.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis.
Manitowoc was at BayShip for unknown reasons on Thursday.

Alpena, Mich. – Ben & Chanda McClain
The Calumet brought a load of coal to Lafarge and departed on Wednesday morning On Thursday the tug Samuel de Champlain and barge Innovation loaded cement for Lake Superior. Fleetmate tug G.L Ostrander and barge Integrity arrived later in the day to tie up under the silos to load product.

Saginaw River
BBC Alberta arrived in Bay City on Thursday.

Toledo, Ohio
Tugs assisted the Federal Yukon outbound at 6:15 pm Thursday. She is bound for Montreal. Joseph H. Thompson was taken to the CSX #2 Dock when she left the shipyard. Work crews are on board and it appears they are replacing steel inside the cargo holds.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Departure: tug Leo A. McArthur & barge John J. Carrick at 2334 on Jul 19. Arrival: Algosea at 0010. Anchored on July 18, Algoscotia at 0800. Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08) since July 14 at 0753

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Olympic, Wicko (Bhs), Oborishte (Mlt) (ex Marbioko-16, Luebbert-14) at 0020, Edzard Schulte (IOM) at 1035, Baie Comeau at 1126, Capt. Henry Jackman at 1149, Algowood at 1820and tug Wilf Seymour & barge Alouette Spirit at 2310

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Hansa at 0145, Cedarglen at 0316, Manitoulin at 0501, Frieda (Atg) at 0607, tug Leo A. McArthur & barge John J. Carrick at 0853, Robert S. Pierson at 0900, Algoma Spirit at 1348, Damia Desgagnes at 2115, Algoma Guardian at 2120 and tug Jarrett M & barge HM7 at approximately 2359

Welland Canal docks:
Arrivals: Manitoulin at wharf 6 Thorold at 0803 approximately. Departed early evening upbound. At docks: Federal Kumano (Mhl) at wharf 11 Robin Hood Mill in Port Colborne, arrived approximately 2014 on July 18, and tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD, arrived on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
At anchor: Federal Barents (Mhl) at 0402 eastbound

Hamilton:
Arrival: tug Everlast & barge Norman McLeod on July 19 at 2316. On July 2, Algoma Strongfield at 0313 and Algoma Spirit at approximately 2355, departure on July 20, tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 0700 and tug Everlast & barge Norman McLeod at 1404 eastbound. At docks: Federal Biscay (Mhl) on July 15 at 0310 and Kaministiqua on July 19 at 1440

Bronte:
At dock: Algonova at 1520 on July 19

Oshawa:
Arrival: Federal Mackinac on July 17 at 0759, departed July 20 at 0641 eastbound

Bowmanville:
Departure: Capt. Henry Jackman at 1141. Arrival: tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 1255

Picton:
Arrival: Whitefish Bay at 0734 - departed at 2026 westbound

 

Former Magnetation owners move to Canadian mine

7/21 - Duluth, Minn. – The former owners of the Magnetation iron ore processing operations on Minnesota's Iron Range are moving north, starting a new company working to reopen an idled iron ore mine in eastern Canada.

Matt and Larry Lehtinen have formed Tacora Resources Inc. and on Tuesday announced the new company has acquired "substantially all of the assets associated with the Scully Mine located in Wabush, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada,'' the company said in its inaugural press release.

The acquisition comes after an "asset purchase agreement" that Tacora reached in June with Wabush Iron Co. Limited, Wabush Resources Inc. and Wabush Lake Railway Company Limited under Canadian corporate reorganization regulations.

The Scully mine was formerly owned and operated by Cliffs Natural Resources, which closed operations and walked away from what it called an unprofitable venture in early 2014.

The Lehtinens say they have a signed purchase agreement from Minnesota-based Cargill to buy all of Scully's iron ore through 2022. The Scully operations can produce up to 6 million tons of finished iron ore annually.

The ore likely won't compete with Minnesota ore at U.S. steel mills but instead will go mostly to Asia and Europe through a deep-water port in Quebec, Matt Lehtinen told the News Tribune. Tacora also has an agreement with the United Steelworkers union to operate the facility.

Duluth News Tribune

 

Michigan lawmakers tour Soo Locks

7/21 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. – State Representative Lee Chatfield and State Senator Wayne Schmidt took a tour of the Soo Locks on Tuesday. Following the tour, the state lawmakers saw the inner workings of the locks and demonstrated the need for a new lock at the Sault Ste. Marie facility.

The tour was to show the state legislatures the details of the passageway linking Lake Superior and the Upper Peninsula to the lower Great Lakes.

The locks, which were built between 1896 and 1943, are vital to the national economy with an annual cargo of 75.1 million metric tons going through every year. Chatfield stressed the need for a new lock, which was authorized by Congress in 1986 but has been delayed because of a lack of federal funding.

“Of the four locks, only one is large enough for today’s massive tankers to navigate, and if that were to be damaged or break down, the economic ramifications would be massive,” said Chatfield. “Senator Schmidt and I arranged this tour so other state legislators can see how the locks operate and how critically important a new lock is to our state.”

“We are not alone in this,” said Schmidt. “Other states have also approved similar resolutions urging the federal government to act because of the tremendous economic impact a failure could have on the entire Great Lakes region.”

Both lawmakers say they hope the tour accentuates the vital need to fully fund construction of a new lock to replace two of the older, unused locks.

WPBN/WGTU

 

Coast Guard, good Samaritans rescue boater near Milwaukee

7/21 - Cleveland, Ohio – A Coast Guard Station Milwaukee response boat-Medium crew and good Samaritans rescued a man on Lake Michigan near Milwaukee Harbor, Wisconsin, Wednesday.

Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan watchstanders received notification of a 17-foot Alumacraft under power with no persons aboard, and they issued an urgent marine information broadcast, directed a Coast Guard Station Milwaukee boatcrew, and a Coast Guard Air Facility Waukegan MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew to search for a potential person in the water.

A good Samaritan stopped the unmanned Alumacraft. Another good Samaritan notified the Coast Guard via VHF Channel 16 radio that they had located an unresponsive man in the water in the approximate area where the Alumacraft was reported.

The Coast Guard Station Milwaukee boatcrew arrived on-scene, retrieved the man from the water, administered CPR and transferred him to local emergency medical services. He was then transported to Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center for treatment.

The Coast Guard confirmed with the man’s family that he was the only person aboard the vessel and stood-down search assets.

"The Coast Guard often relies on the willingness of the boating community to assist with search and rescue cases to keep fellow mariners safe in the vast area of the Great Lakes," said Lt. Cmdr. Bryan Swintek, Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan search and rescue coordinator. "The successful resolution of this case started with the man wearing his life jacket. The good Samaritans who reported and responded to the case were also essential in rescuing the man."

The Coast Guard urges the boating public to always wear a Coast Guard-approved, properly-fitted and functioning life jacket while on the water.

USCG

 

You can help give USCG Mackinaw museum ship a new coat of paint

7/21 - From the Icebreaker Mackinaw web site: “Time and weather have taken their toll on this grand lady and she is need of serious repairs and painting; she needs a bit more than a new coat of lipstick! Here is your chance to be a part of getting her back into ship-shape.

“The scope of the work requires all exterior surfaces be sandblasted, primed and painted – stem to stern, top to waterline. In her current condition, she has large amounts of peeling and faded paint, rust, and deteriorated deck surfaces. It has been determined that a full renovation at one time is required and that a piecemeal process will not be in her best long-term interest. We are seeking multiple sources for funding this important endeavor. The entire project will require approximately $365,000.”

To that end, the Mackinaw group is selling a t-shirt to help support the project. View the shirt, and find out more at this link: http://www.themackinaw.org/paintthemac-24

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 21

The JAMES DAVIDSON and KINSMAN INDEPENDENT arrived under tow at Santander, Spain, on July 21, 1974, for scrapping.

On July 21, 1975, the GEORGE D. GOBLE arrived at Lorain, Ohio, with an unusual deck cargo loaded at American Ship Building Company's yard at South Chicago, Illinois. She was carrying the deckhouses for two Interlake Steamship Company thousand-foot self-unloaders being built at AmShip's Lorain yard. These vessels were completed as the JAMES R. BARKER and MESABI MINER.

On 21 July 1875, the schooner ELVA, which was built in Port Huron, Michigan, in 1861, for Capt. Sinclair, was sailing from Holland, Michigan, for Milwaukee, Wisconsin loaded with stove bolts. She capsized 12 miles from Milwaukee. Her crew took to the boats and made a landing in Kenosha and then rowed to Milwaukee. A tug was sent for the schooner and she was recovered.

In 1900, R. J. GORDON (wooden propeller passenger-package freighter, 104 foot, 187 gross tons, built in 1881, at Marine City, Michigan) was placed back in service carrying freight and passengers between Chicago and Grand Haven. She had burned in September 1899 at Chicago but was rebuilt during the winter.

On 21 July 1875, the old barge HURON, which had been in use for a number of years as a car ferry for the Grand Trunk Railroad at Port Huron/Sarnia, was sold to Sandie and Archie Stewart. They planned to convert her to a dry-dock by adding three feet to her sides and removing her arches. The sale price was $1,500 in gold.

1910 TRUDE R. WIEHE was destroyed by a fire at Portage Bay, Green Bay.

1911 Thirty plates were damaged when the WACCAMAW went aground in the St. Lawrence. The ship was later repaired at Buffalo.

1959 A collision in western Lake Erie between the CHARLES HUBBARD and the Swedish freighter SIGNEBORG resulted in damage to both ships. Both were repaired and continue in service. The latter is scrapped at La Spezia, Italy, after arriving as d) ALFREDO, on November 10, 1971. The former was sunk as a breakwall at Burns Harbor in 1966 after being idle at Milwaukee for several years. The hull was reported to have been subsequently scrapped there.

1964 The French freighter MARQUETTE began Great Lakes trading in 1953 and was lengthened in 1959 with the opening of the Seaway. Fire erupted enroute from Chicago to Marseilles, France, and the vessel was abandoned in the Atlantic. The gutted ship was towed to Brest, France, and was sold to French shipbreakers. All on board were saved.

1965 A smoky fire, that could be seen for miles, broke out in the cargo of rubber aboard the ORIENT TRADER at Toronto and the hull was towed into Toronto Bay and beached while firefighters battled the blaze. The Greek flag vessel was sold for scrap but before it departed for overseas, is was used in several episodes of the CBC television series “Seaway.” The hull was towed into Valencia, Spain, on July 11, 1966, for dismantling.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

U.S.-flag shipping on lakes in June little changed from a year ago

7/20 - Cleveland, Ohio – U.S.-flag Great Lakes freighters moved 9.7 million tons of cargo on the Great Lakes in June, a virtual repeat of a year ago. However, this June’s shipments were down 3.6 percent from the month’s long-term average.

Iron ore cargos for steelmaking totaled 4.9 million tons, an increase of 3.5 percent compared to a year ago. Coal loadings rose 8.1 percent to 1.6 million tons. The increase was almost entirely due to higher shipments of low-sulfur coal from Superior, Wisconsin.

Limestone cargos hauled in U.S. bottoms totaled 2.6 million tons, a decrease of 10.6 percent compared to a year ago.

Year-over-year U.S.-flag cargos total 30.6 million tons, again a virtual tie with the same point in 2016. Iron ore shipments have increased 5.7 percent to 17.9 million tons. Coal cargos have risen 3.2 percent to 4.5 million tons. However, shipments of aggregate, fluxstone and scrubber stone – 6.5 million tons – have dipped more than 13 percent.

Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Great Lakes Towing’s new tug Cleveland completes first harbor assist

7/20 - Cleveland, Ohio – The Great Lakes Towing Company has announced the first harbor assist for its tug Cleveland, the first tugboat to be built in the United States to meet the new USCG Subchapter M Regulations.

On Monday, July 17, the Cleveland assisted the M/V Federal Saguenay for Montreal-based Fednav, Canada's largest ocean-going dry-bulk shipping company. The vessel arrived at the Cleveland Main Entrance at 0600 hours, where the new harbor tug began the assistance, turning the bulk carrier with fleetmate tug Illinois for a stern first placement at the Port of Cleveland Dock 26. The Federal Saguenay originated from Ebsjerg, Denmark, and made a stop in Cleveland while en route to Milwaukee, Wis.

The Cleveland’s crew included Capt. Brad Sheppard and deckhand Tim McKenna and tug Illinois included Capt. Scott Baker, crewmen Branden Fadenholz and Aaron Burnett.

The Great Lakes Towing Company’s shipyard, known as Great Lakes Shipyard, launched tug Cleveland at the company’s headquarters on May 25, 2017 and the shipyard delivered the tugboat on June 30. Present on the port side and starboard side of the Cleveland is a white “workhorse” logo, paying homage to The Great Lakes Towing Company’s tugs from the early 1900s, which were known as the “workhorses of the Great Lakes.”

The Great Lakes Towing Company

 

Port Reports -  July 20

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Paul R. Tregurtha departed Duluth at sunrise on Wednesday with coal from Midwest Energy, and American Integrity was inbound during the afternoon to load the same cargo. Fleetmate Indiana Harbor departed from the BN dock in Superior early Wednesday evening.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. at 10:00. She should depart Thursday. The Lee A. Tregurtha is expected to arrive early Thursday morning. Also due on Thursday is the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader late in the day arriving from the Twin Ports after unloading limestone. The CN ore dock in Two Harbors should see the arrival of the Baie St. Paul either late Wednesday/early Thursday morning. There is no other inbound traffic scheduled for Thursday in Two Harbors.

St. Marys River
CSL Laurentien was downbound Wednesday morning. Tim S. Dool was upbound in the early afternoon, followed by CCSG Samuel Risley. Roger Blough was upbound in the evening, followed by Ashtabula/Defiance and Federal Nakagawa. Federal Champlain was downbound in the early evening, followed by Hon. James L. Oberstar and Stewart J. Cort.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Departure: Algoma Hansa at 0252 eastbound. Arrivals at dock: tug Leo A. McArthur & barge John J. Carrick at 0255. Anchored on July 17, Algosea at 0819. July 18, Algoscotia at 0800. Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08) since July 14 at 0753 anchored off dock

(Buffalo) - Tonawanda:
Departure: tug Calusa Coast & barge Delaware at 0859 westbound

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Arctic (Nld) (ex Flinter Arctic-17), Algoma Discovery, Algoma Equinox at 2245 on July 18, Eemsborg (Nld) at 0449, CSL Welland at 0715, Algoma Olympic at 2140 and Wicko (Bhs) at 2200

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Olympic, Algoma Hansa at 0546, Whitefish Bay at 0700, tug Everlast & barge Norman McLeod at 0900, Evans Spirit at 1250, Algolake at 1445 Welland Canal docks:
Arrivals: Federal Kumano (Mhl) down to Port Robinson, turned at 1819 headed back up to Robin Hood Mill in Port Colborne, arrived approximately 2014 on July 18. Algoma Hansa Wednesday at 0713. Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD; arrived on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Arrivals: Federal Barents (Mhl) at 1930 on July 18. Departures: Bluewing (Cyp) at 0210, Sichem Defiance (Mhl) at approximately 0420,

Port Colborne anchorage:
Arrival: Arctic (Nld) (ex Flinter Arctic-17) at 0406, departed at 1358 westbound

Hamilton:
Arrival: Algoma Olympic at 0533, Kaministiqua at 1440, tug Everlast & barge Norman McLeod at approximately 2248. Departures: Algoma Olympic at 1927. At docks: Federal Biscay (Mhl) and tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II

Bronte:
Arrival: Algonova at 1520

Oshawa:
Arrival: Federal Mackinac at 0759

Bowmanville:
Arrival: Capt. Henry Jackman at 0700

 

Help wanted: Full-time AB position on tug / barge

7/20 - Fettes Shipping Inc. offers full-time permanent employment opportunity for an AB for our Canadian flag Great Lakes self-unloading tug/barge cement carrier. We are looking for an experienced AB with strong communication skills and good work ethic. Candidates must be able to travel to the US portion of the Great Lakes area and must have a valid Canadian passport.

AB with Bridgewatch STCW-II/4

Please send your resume to Human Resources
Fettes Shipping Inc.
3385 Harvester Rd. Suite 250
Burlington, ON L7N 3N2
Fax: 905 333-6588
email: fettes-glits@fettesshipping.com

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 20

LEON FALK JR. was christened at Cleveland, July 20, 1961, after one trip to Duluth, Minnesota, for ore.

HORACE JOHNSON (Hull#805) was launched July 20, 1929, at Lorain, Ohio, by American Ship Building Co. for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.

JAY C. MORSE (Hull#438) was launched on July 20, 1907, at Cleveland, Ohio by American Shipbuilding Co. for the Mesaba Steamship Co. (Pickands & Mather & Co., mgr.) Sold Canadian in 1965, renamed b.) SHELTER BAY, used as a storage barge at Goderich, renamed c.) D. B. WELDON in 1979. In 1982, her pilothouse was removed and is used as a museum in Goderich Harbor. The WELDON was scrapped at Thunder Bay in 1984.

At the end of June, 1877, the ferry MYRTLE began running between Port Huron and Sarnia. However, on 20 July 1877, The Port Huron Times reported that "The ferry MYRTLE has been taken off the route on account of the extreme dullness of the times."

The scow DIXIE burned during the night of 20 July 1875, while lying at Kenyon's dock in East China Township on the St. Clair River.

1940: The first LACHINEDOC ran aground at Ile-aux-Coudres but was refloated the same day after 600 tons of coal were jettisoned. The vessel became b) QUEENSTON in 1946 and was sunk as a dock facing at Bob-Lo Park in 1962.

1963: Thick fog prevailed overnight on the St. Lawrence contributing to three accidents. The TRITONICA sank after a collision with the ROONAGH HEAD off Ile d'Orleans with the loss of 33 lives. To the west, the Swiss freighter BARILOCHE ran into the CALGADOC (ii) and then veered into the CANADOC (ii) before all ships on the water went to anchor. BARILOCHE later visited the Seaway as b) ST. CERGUE in 1967 and as c) CALVIN in 1978. It was scrapped at Shanghai, China, in 1985.

ROONAGH HEAD received significant bow damage in her collision but was repaired and operated until she arrived at Castellon, Spain, for scrapping on September 14, 1971.

1964: ZENICA went aground in the Straits of Mackinac enroute to Chicago and was lightered by the MARQUIS ROEN and released. She passed downbound at Port Huron under tow. This vessel was beached at Karachi, Pakistan, for scrapping as f) CONSTANZA on June 1, 1980.

1965: The Norwegian freighter LYNGENFJORD sustained stern damage when it backed into the SALMELA while leaving the dock at Montreal. The former made 35 trips to the Great Lakes from 1959 through 1967 and was scrapped at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, after arriving prior to May 3, 1980, as c) EASTERN VALOUR. The latter, a British vessel, began Great Lakes service in 1965 and arrived at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, for scrapping on April 21, 1985, as c) ELENI.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Green Bay’s City Deck concerns go back nearly a decade

7/19 - Green Bay, Wis. – Before the City Deck was even built, some concerns were raised about how close it was the Fox River shipping channel. “I think it's just a disaster waiting to happen,” alderman Guy Zima said in 2008.

FOX 11 highlighted some of the concerns in November of 2008, a full year before the City Deck opened. “The port just wanted to make sure that whatever was constructed there was compatible with maritime commerce,” port director Dean Haen said at the time.

Haen had raised concerns about the possible impact of bow thrusters on the City Deck while it was being planned. Bow thrusters are used to help ships maneuver.

FOX 11 Investigates sat down with Haen to talk about what happened Sunday when the Kaye E. Barker cargo ship hit a dock as it tried to make its way through the Main Street bridge.

When asked if he was surprised about the incident Haen replied, “Well, we haven't had an incident since I've been here. So, we've got a great track record. Great Lakes water transportation is very safe. But I can tell you in Green Bay if we were to have an incident, we could pinpoint that it was going to be at this location.”

Haen says the location of the City Deck, coupled with the angle of the Main Street bridge make the area challenging for ships.

“I would speculate that they encountered some unique currents there which brought them closer to the east bank. Captain tried to straighten out the vessel and hit the bow thrusters which caused problems at City Deck,” Haen said.

Green Bay mayor Jim Schmitt says everyone was aware that the area is difficult to navigate. But he points out that there have not been any problems up until now.

“When we built the City Deck, as well as when the bridge was built, we understood that that's not a straight line. Then you get a ship that's over 700 feet. You have to know what you're doing to maneuver through there. But we've been doing it successfully for many years so I'm not sure why this happened,” Schmitt said.

“(The captain) had to use his bow thruster to bring the bow back in line with the channel,” said Thomas Wynne, vice-president and general counsel for The Interlake Steamship Company, which owns the ship. Wynne says while the area is challenging for large ships, it's not necessarily unique.

“It's certainly not uncommon for ships that deliver cargo around the Great Lakes to encounter curvy rivers and angled bridges,” Wynne said. “This is just one of those spots where it's close. It's an angled draw and that City Deck is fairly close to the edge of the channel." While no one was injured, Haen says it's important for everyone to learn from this. “It was bad but it could've been worse,” Haen said. “I think we should chalk it up to an opportunity to learn and hope we never have the occurrence happen again.”

WLUK

 

Sen. McCain introduces Jones Act repeal legislation again

7/19 - Last week Sen. John McCain, R-Az., introduced legislation that would repeal the Jones Act, which requires that all goods shipped between U.S. ports be moved by U.S.-built, owned and operated vessels. It is the second time in about 18 months that McCain has introduced a Senate bill to amend or repeal the act.

“I have long advocated the repeal of the Jones Act, an archaic and burdensome law that hinders free trade, stifles the economy, and ultimately harms consumers,” McCain said in a statement. “My legislation would eliminate this regulation, freeing American shippers from the requirement that they act against their own business interests. By allowing U.S. shippers to purchase affordable foreign-made carriers, this legislation would reduce shipping costs, make American farmers and businesses more competitive in the global marketplace, and bring down the cost of goods and services for American consumers.

“The protectionist mentality embodied by the Jones Act directly contradicts the lessons we have learned about the benefits of a free and open market. Free trade expands economic growth, creates jobs, and lowers costs for consumers. I urge my colleagues to support this bill and finally repeal the outdated and protectionist Jones Act.”

McCain has been working for years to reform and repeal the Jones Act. He first introduced legislation to repeal the Jones Act in the Senate in 2010, and most recently introduced an amendment in the 114th Congress in January 2016 that would waive Jones Act requirements for oil and gas tankers.

WorkBoat

 

Port Reports -  July 19

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Tug/barge combo Erie Trader/Clyde S. VanEnkevort arrived Duluth early Tuesday morning with limestone for Hallett 5. She then shifted to the CN dock during the early afternoon to load ore. American Century also arrived during the morning to load coal at Midwest Energy. She was outbound mid-afternoon Tuesday. She passed the inbound Paul R. Tregurtha just outside of the harbor, which headed to Midwest Energy to load. Indiana Harbor was expected in Superior late Tuesday night to load at BN. Correction: Algoma Enterprise did not load in the Twin Ports, as reported Monday. The Canal Park schedule had her loading at the CN dock. She in fact brought in a load of salt and departed light Monday morning for Thunder Bay.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
The CN ore dock in Two Harbors saw no traffic on Tuesday and none is scheduled for Wednesday. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw no traffic on Tuesday, but on Wednesday the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. is scheduled to load pellets.

St. Marys River
CSL Laurentien ran aground while departing the Essar Steel Export dock in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., late Tuesday morning. She was freed later in the day by Purvis Marine tugs Adanac III and Anglian Lady and went to anchor in Waiska Bay for inspections. She is expected to be there overnight.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algolake cleared downbound early Tuesday morning with salt. Algosteel was backing in to Sifto Dock Tuesday morning to load.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrivals: anchored - July 14 at 0753 - July 17 - Algosea at 0819, tug Leo A. McArthur & barge John J. Carrick at 2316 - July 18 - Algoscotia at 0800 Algoma Hansa at dock - anchored off dock - Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08) since July 14 at 0753

Tonawanda:
Arrivals: tug Calusa Coast & barge Delaware at 0614

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Algoscotia. Atlantic Huron at 2235 on July 17, tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit 0029, CSL Assiniboine at 0220, Algonova at 0238, Robert S. Pierson at 0732, Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin at 0924, BBC Alberta (Lbr) (ex BBC Celina-15, Beluga Firmament-11, Beluga Maturity-10) at 1206, Arctic (Nld) (ex Flinter Arctic-17) and Algoma Discovery at 2030,

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Thunder Bay, Sichem Defiance (Mhl) at 0845, Federal Barents (Mhl) at 0930, Mississagi at 1000, Federal Kumano (Mhl) at 1355, Algoma Olympic at 1415

Welland Canal docks:
Federal Kumano (Mhl) down to Port Robinson, turned at 1819 headed back up to Robin Hood Mill in Port Colborne, arrived approximately 2014. Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD - arrived on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Arrivals: Bluewing (Cyp) at 2124 on July 17 - Tuesday at 1730, Sichem Defiance (Mhl) at 1930. Departures: Bluewing (Cyp) at 0200 on July 19

Hamilton:
Departures: Rotterdam (Nld) at 1935 on July 17. tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at 2214, Rt. Hon Paul J. Martin at 0703, light tug Evans McKeil at 1033 eastbound, Arctic (Nld) (ex Flinter Arctic-17) at 1535. At docks: Algoma Equinox, at 0210 on July 18, Federal Biscay (Mhl), and tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II

Bronte:
Arrivals: Bro Alma (Sgp) on July 17 at 0703, departed at 2012 Tuesday eastbound

Oshawa:
Arrivals: Federal Mackinac at 0759

 

St. Lawrence Seaway management agreement extended

7/19 - St. Catharines, Ont. – The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp. will continue to manage, maintain and operate the 3,700-kilometre long St. Lawrence Seaway until at least March 31, 2023. It’s a five-year extension of a 20-year agreement between the federal government and the corporation that was to end on March 31, 2018, said management corporation spokesman Andrew Bogora.

“In 1998, the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority ceased to exist,” said Bogora, Monday. He said the management corporation, made up of industry users, replaced the government-run authority and was given a 20-year mandate to operate the waterway, which contributes $35 billion in economic activity, $14.6 billion in wages, and 227,000 jobs in Canada and the U.S.

He said the extension does not include any meaningful changes “as per the initial mandate” to the non-for-profit corporation that operates 13 locks in Canada, including eight in Niagara alone.

The announcement, which said the government recognizes the “Seaway is an important, competitive and sustainable transportation corridor that provides economic opportunities …,” was made last week by federal Minister of Transport Marc Garneau.

"The government of Canada is committed to the safe, reliable and environmentally responsible movement of goods along the Seaway. We look forward to our continued collaboration with the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp. to ensure this strategic transportation corridor remains competitive now and in the future,” Garneau said in a release.

It will, the release said, provide stability for the Seaway and marine industry. It also said to ensure the Seaway continues to be positioned as a critical transportation corridor for North America, Transport Canada will conduct a review to examine further opportunities for increased economic and commercial development, the waterway's competitiveness and sustainability, and the Seaway's governance structure.

Canadians, provincial and municipal governments, Indigenous communities, international partners, users and stakeholders will be invited to provide input on the future of the Seaway in the coming months, the government said.

"Since commercialization 20 years ago, the corporation has delivered safe, reliable and environmentally friendly navigation. The corporation has made excellent progress in strengthening the Seaway's competitive position,” said corporation president and CEO Terence Bowles in the release.

“The Seaway's modernization program, representing the greatest change to operations since the waterway's inception in 1959, allows the corporation to continue serving its many stakeholders and fulfilling its vision of providing a responsive and highly competitive transportation system which connects the heartland of North America to over 60 markets around the world,” Bowles said.

St. Catharines Standard

 

Five rescued after boat engulfed in flames, sinks on Lake Michigan

7/19 - Ludington, Mich. – Flames engulfed a 31-foot Tiara recreational fishing boat out of Ludington, which then sank in Lake Michigan Tuesday morning. All five occupants aboard the ship, "Hands Free," were rescued, including one who was treated for smoke inhalation.

A crew on a fishing boat nearby, off Ludington State Park, pulled the occupants off the boat after it was apparent the vessel was in trouble. The U.S. Coast Guard arrived shortly after, followed by Ludington's response boat and the Mason County Sheriff's Office, who all assisted, the Coast Guard told the Ludington Daily News. The call came in just before 11 a.m.

Smoke was visible at a distance from M-116 off Ludington State Park, where many park visitors pulled onto the shoulder to watch events unfold and call 911.

The Coast Guard arrived at 11:01 a.m., then the Ludington rescue boat, which reported the vessel was "fully involved."

Flames were visible for about 30 minutes from the state park beach house, visitors said, and blazed several feet above the boat. The fire was knocked down by 11:40 a.m.

Ludington Daily News

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 19

On this day in 1970, ARTHUR B. HOMER established a new Great Lakes loading record when she loaded 27,530 tons of ore at Escanaba. This eclipsed the previous record of 27,402 tons set by the EDMUND FITZGERALD.

EDWIN H. GOTT (Hull#718) was float launched July 19, 1978, at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin by Bay Shipbuilding Co. for U. S. Steel Corp.

CLARENCE B. RANDALL sailed light on her maiden voyage July 19, 1943, from Ashtabula, Ohio, bound for Two Harbors, Minnesota. She was renamed b.) ASHLAND in 1962. The ASHLAND was scrapped at Mamonel, Columbia, in 1988.

N. M. Paterson & Sons, CANADOC (Hull#627) was christened on July 19, 1961. The registry of GORDON C. LEITCH, of 1954, was closed on July 19, 1985, as 'sold foreign'. She was scrapped at Setubal, Portugal, in 1985.

JOHN P. REISS in tandem tow with the carferry CITY OF SAGINAW 31 arrived at Castellon, Spain, prior to July 19, 1973, for scrapping.

JOSEPH S. YOUNG, a.) ARCHERS HOPE, was christened at Buffalo, New York, on July 19, 1957. The YOUNG was the first of seven T2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service.

On 19 July 1831, the wooden schooner HENRY CLAY was carrying 800 barrels of salt and passengers from Oswego, New York to the Welland Canal on her maiden voyage when she capsized in a squall and sank about 10 miles off Port Dalhousie, Ontario, on Lake Ontario. About 11 persons were aboard and at least 6 of them lost their lives. Three were saved by the steamer CANADA.

On 19 July 1900, the name of the Toledo tug A. ANDREWS JR was changed to PALLISTER.

On 19 July 1871, J. BARBER (wooden propeller steamer, 125 foot, 306 tons, built in 1856, at Cleveland, Ohio) was carrying fruit from St. Joseph, Michigan, to Chicago when she caught fire and sank 14 miles off Michigan City, Indiana. Five lives were lost.

1893: LIZZIE A. LAW stranded in the Pelee Passage, Lake Erie, following a collision with the DAVID VANCE. It was refloated September 14.

1921: After losing her way in fog, the BINGHAMPTON stranded on Gannet Rock Ledge, near Yarmouth, NS enroute from Boston to Reval, France, and Riga, Latvia, with relief supplies. The vessel was abandoned and later caught fire. The ship had been built at Buffalo as H.J. JEWETT in 1882 and left the lakes, in 2 pieces, in 1915 for saltwater service.

1981: BERGFALCK was registered in Singapore when she first came through the Seaway in 1976. The ship was sailing as b) BERGLIND when in a collision with the CHARM off Cape Breton Island. It was taken in tow but sank July 20. The hull was later refloated and taken out to sea and scuttled in the fall.

1982: FARO, a Norwegian freighter dating from 1960, visited the Seaway in 1970. It was gutted aft from a fire that began in the galley at Ghazawet Roads, Algeria, as b) ARGOLICOS GULF. It was sold for scrap and arrived as Castellon, Spain to be dismantled on October 1, 1982.

1992: ROSARIO, a Greek flag SD 14, visited the Great Lakes in 1978. It began leaking in the Indian Ocean as c) AL RAZIQU on this date in 1992 and was escorted into Mombasa, Tanzania, on July 29. The ship was allowed to sail to Alang, India, for scrapping and, after a resale, to Karachi, Pakistan. However, the vessel was sold again, taken to Dubai for repairs, and resumed trading as d) DELTA III. It developed a heavy list as e) CHALLENGE on August 2, 1993, after leaving New Mangalore, India. Attempts to tow the ship to shallow water fell short when the hull rolled over and sank with the loss of 3 lives.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Lake Huron Lore Society, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Green Bay’s CityDeck docks closed for ship damage investigation

7/18 - Green Bay, Wis. – CityDeck docks are closed indefinitely after an incident Sunday involving the lake freighter Kaye E. Barker. The vessel was caught by strong currents and struck the dock, destroying a small, unoccupied boat. Although it was closed for three hours for inspection, the Coast Guard said a maintenance walkway was the only part of the Ray Nitschke Memorial Bridge to be damaged.

Over the next few days, investigators will pull the docks out and tow them to Leicht Park for inspection out of the water.

Police and the U.S Coast Guard are investigating the incident. The Coast Guard says investigators have spoken to all people involved, including the crew on the ship, bridge operators and the owner of the small boat that was damaged.

The Coast Guard said the investigation would take "some time." They are not aware of mechanical failure on the ship.

Green Bay police say the ship left red paint transfer on a CityDeck railing, then its thrusters stirred up the water under the floating dock, pushing the dock up 3-4 feet.

Green Bay Police say no one was hurt thanks to people's awareness.

"This is a pretty big event here on CityDeck, and for a freighter of that size to crash into CityDeck and for people to be situationally aware and escape that area, escape any injuries, and thankfully, no one's injured in this incident," said Capt. Kevin Warych, Green Bay Police Dept.

WBAY

 

Port Reports -  July 18

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Herbert C. Jackson arrived Duluth early Monday, discharged limestone, and departed mid-morning to load ore in Silver Bay. Joseph L. Block was outbound with ore from CN before sunrise, and Algoma Enterprise then began loading. She departed just before noon. In Superior, Stewart J. Cort arrived Monday evening to load at BN.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors saw the arrival of the Edgar B. Speer at 02:35 and departed at 11:30 for Gary. There is no scheduled traffic for Two Harbors for either Tuesday or Wednesday. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the American Spirit at 08:38. Arriving Silver Bay from Duluth at 13:40 was the Herbert C. Jackson. As of 20:00 she was still loading. Like Two Harbors, Silver Bay has no scheduled traffic either Tuesday or Wednesday.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis.
Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoway cleared upbound during early morning Monday with salt. Algolake arrived, with Algosteel to follow.

Milwaukee, Wis. – Paul Erspamer
G.L. Ostrander & barge Integrity delivered cement at their terminal on Jones Island in Milwaukee's inner harbor Sunday afternoon. Prentiss Brown and barge St. Marys Challenger departed onto Lake Michigan northbound just after 3 p.m. Sunday. Undaunted & barge Pere Marquette 41 departed from Milwaukee Saturday for Charlevoix and Port Inland.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Kingsville:
Arrival: Mississagi at 2026 on July 16, departed at 0043

Nanticoke:
At dock: Algosea at 0819, Algoma Hansa at 1140. Anchored off dock: Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08). Departure: Algocanada at 1925 westbound

Buffalo:
Arrival: tug Calusa Coast & barge Delaware at approximately 1800 (delayed)

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Damia Desgagnes at 0558, Tim S. Dool at 1028, Federal Bristol (Mhl) at 1208, and Algoscotia at 1608, Atlantic Huron at 2235

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Capt. Henry Jackman at 0421, Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin at 0631, Spruceglen at 0700, Bluewing (Cyp) at 0845 and Thunder Bay at 2015

Welland Canal docks:
Manitoulin at wharf 12 on July 16 at 2222. Departed at 1323 July 17. Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD - arrived on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Departures: Harbour Pioneer (Por) at 0144. At anchor: Dimitrios K (Mhl) (ex Ladytramp-13, Atlantic Castle-07, Cedar-03), etd at 2110 eastbound

Port Colborne anchorage:
Departure: Federal Yoshino (Mhl) at 0524 approximately westbound

Hamilton:
Arrival: tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at 2108 on July 16. Departures: Tim S. Dool at 1028 and Rotterdam (Nld). At docks: Federal Biscay (Mhl), Arctic (Nld) (ex Flinter Arctic-17), Rotterdam (Nld) and tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II

Oshawa:
Arrival: Federal Mackinac at 0759

Picton:
Departure: CSL Assiniboine at approximately 1322 westbound

Oswego:
Arrival: English River at 1646 approximately

 

Rand Logistics to donate $0.05 per ton of August cargoes to benefit children’s charities

7/18 - Jersey City, NJ – Rand Logistics, Inc., a provider of bulk freight shipping services throughout the Great Lakes region, has announced the launch of its second annual Marine Miracle Month, a program to benefit children’s charities.

As the cornerstone of the 2017 Marine Miracle Month program, Rand will donate $0.05 for every ton of cargo carried by its fleet during the month of August to non-profit organizations with a primary focus on the health and well-being of children.

The donation amount will be based upon the total tons each customer ships during the program month. Rand’s goal is to exceed the total donations raised during the 2016 Marine Miracle Month program. In 2016, more than $125,000 was raised, with more than 30 customers participating in the program and just as many charities benefiting.

Customers will work with their Rand representatives to select a qualifying not-for-profit organization. Selected organizations must hold 501(c)(3) status in the U.S. or be a registered charity in Canada providing services and benefits to children.

“Marine Miracle Month creates a vehicle for Rand to give back to our communities and expand the reach of our corporate social responsibility efforts, while strengthening partnerships with our valued customers,” said Ed Levy, Rand’s President and CEO.

“Last year’s Marine Miracle Month was a great success, and we are pleased to make it an annual event for Rand, our customers and the organizations and children in the communities that it positively impacts,” he added.

Rand Logistics, Inc.

 

Restoration begins on historic Lake Michigan lighthouse

7/18 - Leelanau County, Mich. – Restoration work has started on an historic lighthouse in Lake Michigan known as "The Crib." The non-profit group North Manitou Light Keepers finalized the acquisition this week.

The group has big plans to fully restore the lighthouse near Leelanau County and offer public tours by July 2021. Restoration plans for this summer include cleaning and stripping the exterior, weatherproofing it, repairing any damage and doing an underwater evaluation of the structure and the land it sits on.

Videos are available at this link: http://upnorthlive.com/news/local/the-crib-restoration-begins-on-historic-lighthouse-in-lake-michigan

 

Safety concerns at Fraser: Documents in worker's death reveal reactive workplace

7/18 - Superior, Wis. – Even after he'd been badly burned in a workplace incident at Fraser Shipyards in February, Joseph Burch figured he hadn't seen the last of his welding torch. "He was always optimistic," said Burch's sister-in-law Stacy Mackie. "He would talk about going back to work."

The reunion between the welder and the tools of his trade never happened as Burch, 53, died in April — two months after the incident aboard the docked freighter Roger Blough. Burch succumbed to sepsis, Mackie said, which had been the result of infections to the burn wounds on his legs.

A Superior resident, Burch was a single man who doted on his nieces and loved to camp. But after the incident, he never left Essentia Health's burn unit at the Miller-Dwan Building — except to spend his last days at Solvay Hospice House.

The incident led to the second federal fine levied against Burch's employer, the Superior-based Fraser Shipyards, within the past year. A 127-year-old shipping industry mainstay in Howard's Bay and one of a roster of companies belonging to the Duluth-based holding company Capstan Corp., Fraser is a stranger neither to the work it performs, nor to scrambling to provide a safe workplace in which to perform it.

Documents obtained by the News Tribune using a Freedom of Information Act request reveal that the company has been inspected by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration 30 times since 1972, with 19 of the inspections resulting in citations.

The company's track record of playing catch-up in the safety arena was on display again in the Burch case. Only after Burch was burned did the company begin to provide fire-retardant clothing and require workers wear it while performing the "hot work" involved in welding and the use of cutting torches.

"The reason for his death could have been prevented by something simple," Mackie said. "If they were just too worried about the money, that's irresponsible to say the least."

While operational year-round, the shipyard is particularly busy in the winter, during the shipping offseason, when a couple hundred workers or more can be employed to conduct the maintenance and repair of Great Lakes freighters in layup.

During that time, it is a vital workplace for welders, riggers and other tradespeople who appreciate the winter paycheck and the respite from factory and refinery work that marks their other seasons.

Despite the recent violations, Fraser remains in the eyes of its employees an important option.

"We understand they've made some mistakes," said Mark Garrett, the Kansas City-based director of health and safety services for the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, the union that represents a large swath of the shipyard's workers. "We're going to make sure they're held responsible, but it wasn't going to be something like a nail in the coffin for the shipyard. It's an important industry for our members."

After initially agreeing to an interview for this story, Fraser officials ultimately declined to answer questions. In canceling a scheduled News Tribune interview with Fraser officials, spokesman Rob Karwath cited the advice of attorneys due to an ongoing civil lawsuit stemming from scores of workers at Fraser being exposed to toxic lead in 2016.

Instead, James Farkas, president and chief operating officer, issued a full-page statement extolling the company's attention to safety which said, in part, "We have developed a strong safety culture," while repeatedly citing the "unique" and "special safety challenges" presented by shipyard work.

But it was a Farkas quote during the OSHA investigation into Burch's injuries and subsequent death that revealed the apparent fault at the heart of the company's poor safety record — that despite performing its unique brand of tasks for more than a century, Fraser's approach to workplace safety is inherently reactive.

"When something happens you ask how can we prevent — what else can we do?" Farkas told the investigator.

OSHA issued a strongly-worded news release in August 2016, in the wake of the lead exposure investigation, in which Dr. David Michaels, assistant secretary of labor for the agency, claimed that in that case Fraser had "accepted a contract with a very low profit margin and penalties for delayed completion, but could not meet the schedule without endangering its workers. This employer was unwilling to pay the necessary costs to protect employees from lead exposure."

Ken Atha, OSHA's regional administrator in Chicago, said in the same release that "Fraser ignored federal regulations, its own corporate safety manuals and worker concerns."

Farkas, in a responding news release, disputed those claims. "We take the health and safety of our people and our community seriously. We acted to protect our people as soon as we learned of the problems. ... We strongly disagree with OSHA's statement that any of the issues were caused or worsened by business or profit motivations."

When Burch was burned on Feb. 7, he'd been engaged in a practice called "washing welds." He was using an oxygen-acetylene torch to clean off old welds from a cargo hold on the Roger Blough, so that rusting sheets of steel could be replaced with new ones.

The OSHA documents said that in addition to being underprotected from molten metal, sparks and flames, Burch was wearing a jacket and cold-weather coveralls that were "allowed to have holes and frayed fabric."

In justifying its penalties against Fraser, OSHA said in its summary that "severe thermal burns are most likely to occur when protective clothing is compromised and employees are engaged in hot work."

At 11 a.m., Burch reached down to wash welds at foot-level, the OSHA summary said, "when flames traveled up the victim's insulated coveralls to the chest." Coworkers rushed to help Burch out of the coveralls and put out the fire. He suffered severe burns to both thighs that for the following months would cause him excruciating pain whenever the dressings were changed, Mackie said.

During interviews with Fraser management, OSHA learned that employees wore their own gear — none of it required by the company to be fire retardant — and that "the injured employee's coveralls ... were bad with holes all over."

One Fraser manager, whose name was redacted in the summary, seemed to blame Burch when the manager filed a company incident report that said, "This incident could have been prevented if the employee would not have been performing hot work while wearing frayed coveralls."

Fraser's environmental health and safety manager, Clyde Gruebele, told the investigator, "Holes in clothing is (the) nature of the business."

In addition to the issue of protective clothing, OSHA also explored the practice of weld-washing, and learned "the employees performing washing each utilized a different technique." Some "washed the welds individually while standing on the other side of the rib," the summary said. Others, such as Burch, "stood on the same side as the welds and washed them in one vertical motion from top to bottom" — a practice OSHA said placed workers closer to the hot work.

In OSHA's follow-up interviews, company officials appeared to learn their lesson from the Burch incident. The OSHA summary said Fraser adopted a weld-washing practice "to operate (a) torch in a manner to direct any molten material away from the body." Additionally, Farkas told OSHA, "We think (fire retardant) clothing is the right thing to do."

In order for a company to fall on OSHA's inspection radar, something has to trigger a response — a complaint, a fatality, a worker hospitalization.

"So you can see by those priorities that there could be several facilities that are not inspected by OSHA, because they have met no criteria to cause an inspection to happen," said U.S. Department of Labor spokeswoman Rhonda Burke in an email to the News Tribune.

Simply put, there are too many worksites out there to require inspection of all workplaces. Conversely, Fraser — with multiple incidents across several years — has found it difficult to remove itself from the OSHA spotlight.

The mass exposure of workers to toxic levels of lead in 2016 initially elicited a nearly $1.4 million penalty — one of the largest fines assessed in the country in the past two years, according to a state-by-state review of penalties outlined on the U.S. Department of Labor website.

In that case, workers had been crawling all over the freighter Herbert C. Jackson in order to change out its steam engine for twin diesels. It was a landmark job — the first repowering at the shipyard since the 1980s. The company was eager and justifiably proud to tell about it, inviting the News Tribune aboard the ship for what would become a feature story and video in February 2016. Just weeks later, the job was abruptly halted after workers began to fall ill and the company's lead-abatement practices scrutinized. Wisconsin Public Radio later reported that 171 of 233 workers on the site had tested positive for lead exposure.

"When I first went into the facility, it was not good," Garrett said. "They were into something bigger than they really understood."

According to OSHA documents and a Fraser news release, only after the job was up and running again did it include the protective suits, breathing equipment, air monitoring, air scrubbers, decontamination and changing trailers and cleaning supplies required for safe lead abatement.

Fraser later agreed to pay OSHA $700,000 as part of a settlement agreement that included the development of a new safety plan in exchange for not having to admit fault or liability. In an August 2016 news release, company officials described the new safety plan as one that included "protections for how employees, laborers and contractors prepare for work, conduct work and clean up after work."

The new safety plan didn't help Burch, who was burned six months later.

Fraser has already settled with OSHA and paid a $7,530 fine in the Burch case, which is officially closed. But the lead-exposure case lingers, subjecting the company to three years of additional OSHA oversight, including the possibility of random safety audits. A civil trial in the lead-exposure case between one of the workers and Fraser is also scheduled for February 2018.

Mackie said she didn't want to comment on the possibility of civil action by the Burch family against Fraser, and no complaint has been filed.

Meanwhile, Garrett said he has no compunction about sending his workers Fraser's way. He explained that while he engages Fraser with "a watchful eye," he also appreciates the shipyard's willingness to bring in outside experts to help advance its safety practices, like it did when it brought him to Superior in 2016 during the lead-exposure incident. Not all companies would do that, he said.

"As far as I know, they've got a lot of work coming up," Garrett said. "We work together, and we want them to stay in business. We also want to protect our members."

Fraser's current family ownership group has been in place since 1976, Farkas said in his written statement to the News Tribune, meaning it has been responsible for the company's seemingly reactive posture to 30-plus years of safety issues.

"I hate to say it," Garrett said, "but that's probably the majority of employers in the U.S. All old OSHA regulations have been written based on reaction."

Midway through its summary on the Burch case, an OSHA investigator described a follow-up visit to the worksite. By that time the company had already reacted to the Burch incident by providing fire-retardant coveralls to its workers.

"One employee was viewed wearing the now-provided and required green fire retardant coveralls," the investigator wrote. "There was a tear in the backside."

Duluth News Tribune

 

Get your reservations in now for our Detroit River Cruise August 12

7/18 - On Saturday, August 12, we will repeat the popular Boatnerd Detroit River Cruise aboard the Friendship. This year’s cruise will be four hours and will go up the Detroit River, and hopefully into the Rouge River. A pizza lunch will be delivered by the J. W. Westcott mail boat, with a cash bar onboard. Cost is $38 per person and we are coming close to the limit on the boat.  The cruise departs at 10 a.m. from the Portofino Restaurant in Wyandotte, Mich.
Click here for the Reservation form.

 

Updates -  July 18


News Photo Gallery  
Saltie Gallery updated with pictures of the Alina, Arctic, Argentia Desgagnes, BBC Volga, Bluewing, Chembulk Kobe, Dimitrios K, Federal Baltic, Federal Mayumi, Federal Mosel, Federal Nakagawa, Federal Weser, Federal Yoshino, Fivelborg, Frieda, Furuholmen, Golden Oak, Harbour Pioneer, HHL Amur, HR Constellation, Iryda, Isadora, Lake St Clair, Oborishte, Pia, Reggeborg, Rosaire A Desgagnes, Rotterdam, Sally Ann C, SCL Anita, Selasse, Thamesborg and Vlieborg.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 18

On this day in 1974, Interlake Steamship decommissioned the COLONEL JAMES PICKANDS after 48 years of service due to continuing problems with her boilers and engines.

AGAWA CANYON struck an abutment at Welland Canal's Bridge 11, at Allanburg, Ontario, on July 18, 1977, while downbound with salt for Kingston, Ontario, and sustained a 30-foot gash just above the waterline at the port bow.

The canal tanker COMET (Hull#705) of the American Ship Building Co., at Lorain, Ohio, entered service on July 18, 1913, for ocean service. Sold Mexican and renamed b.) COMETA in 1928. She returned to the lakes in 1936, renamed c.) COMET for Cleveland Tankers. She was lengthened in 1940. She was scrapped at Ashtabula, Ohio, in 1973.

The WILLIAM J. FILBERT was in collision with the KINSMAN INDEPENDENT, of 1907, at the Burlington Northern Dock on July 18, 1970, when the Steel Trust steamer lost control in the current entering the slip.

The entire forward superstructure of the b.) JOHN DYKSTRA, a.) BENSON FORD of 1924, including the forecastle deck, was delivered to South Bass Island in Lake Erie on July 18, 1986, on the barge THOR 101 towed by the tug GREGORY J. BUSCH. The superstructure was moved for use as a summer home where it remains. The hull of the DYKSTRA was sold to Marine Salvage, Port Colborne, Ontario and was towed from Cleveland, Ohio, July 10th by the tugs ARGUE MARTIN and GLENBROOK to Ramey's Bend arriving there on July 12, 1986, where she was scrapped.

WILLIAM A. REISS was launched July 18, 1925, as a.) JOHN A. TOPPING (Hull#251) at River Rouge, Michigan, by Great Lakes Engineering Works for the Columbia Steamship Co.

WILLIAM G. MATHER completed her sea trials on July 18, 1925.

On 18 July 1858, ANDROMEDA (2-mast wooden schooner, 112 foot, 568 tons, built in 1848, at Madison Dock, Ohio) was carrying 800 barrels of salt from Oswego to Chicago. She sprang a leak suddenly and foundered 20 miles from Sheboygan, Wisconsin. The crew escaped in her boat, many just in their underwear. They arrived at Manitowoc the next day.

On 18 July 1872, the schooner D. L. COUCH of Detroit (formerly AVCORN) sank about 10 miles from Long Point on Lake Erie. Two lives were lost.

The wooden propeller freigjhter N. K. FAIRBANK (205 foot, 980 gross tons) was launched in Marine City, Michigan by W. B. Morley on 18 July 1874. She was then towed to Detroit, where her engines were installed by William Cowie. She had two direct-acting condensing engines 34 foot x 32 inches on one shaft and her boiler was installed on her main deck. She only lasted until 1895, when she stranded and burned near Port Colborne, Ontario. The remains of the hull were sold to Carter Brothers of Port Colborne and it was rebuilt and enrolled as a new vessel with the name ELIZA H. STRONG. The STRONG lasted until she burned in 1904.

1911: The wooden steamer TAMPA sank in the Detroit River after a collision with the JOHN W. GATES of U.S. Steel. The former was raised and moved to Marine City and then, after being partially dismantled, was sunk in 1915 as a breakwall to halt erosion off the Belle River.

1938: ISLET PRINCE (ii), enroute to Owen Sound for a new service, stopped for the night behind Chantry Island, Southampton, and was struck by lightning. The ship caught fire, but all on board were rescued before the vessel sank the next day.

1954: LAKE GADSDEN was built at Manitowoc, in 1919, and lost near Corrubedo Light, off the coast of Spain, as g) SAN NICOLAS after going aground. The vessel slid back into deep water and sank.

1960: IRISH MAPLE, a Great Lakes visitor beginning in 1966, sank the 479 gross ton DENBIGH COAST in the River Mersey after a collision. IRISH MAPLE remained in service until reaching the scrapyard at Karachi, Pakistan, as c) ANNOOR on October 24, 1981.

1967: NEW YORK NEWS (iii) buckled and sank while loading salt at Pugwash, NS. The ship was raised and towed to Halifax in two sections for repairs. It survives in 2012 as e) WOLF RIVER, but has not operated for years.

1984 PANAGIOTIS S., a Seaway trader beginning in 1975, suffered severe fire damage aft in the Gulf of Aden, while on a voyage from Antwerp, Belgium, to Calcutta, India. The ship was a total loss and, while sold and renamed d) OTIS, it was taken to Gadani Beach, Pakistan, for scrapping. PANAGIOTIS S. had also visited the Great Lakes as a) VIZCAYA in 1972 and EMILIA LOVERDOS in 1975.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Currents blamed for bridge incident in Green Bay; Coast Guard investigating

7/17 - Green Bay, Wis. – An official of the company that owns the Great Lakes ship Kaye E. Barker said the vessel’s captain encountered "unexpected and strong currents" that caused trouble for his vessel Sunday afternoon.

The more than 700-foot-long Barker flattened a small boat that was tied up on the edge of the Fox River outside a restaurant, then struck the Ray Nitschke Memorial Bridge, putting the span out of commission for more than three hours

Currents "pushed him to port as he was backing toward the bridge," said Tom Wynne, vice president and general counsel for The Interlake Steamship Co. of Ohio. "My understanding is that he came up against the fendering, but not the bridge itself."

Witnesses said a U.S. Coast Guard crew was on scene almost immediately after the incident. Green Bay Metro firefighters were at the scene just before sunset Sunday dealing with gas and oil that had leaked from the destroyed boat, which had two outboard motors, Battalion Chief Steve Sellin said.

Before the incident, the Barker had unloaded its cargo of coal to the C. Reiss Coal Co on the river's western shore just south of the Tilleman Bridge at Mason Street, and was scheduled to head to Michigan.

The Barker was docked Sunday evening at the Fox River Terminal, on the river's west shore just north of the Frigo bridge. That was done so the Coast Guard could continue its investigation, Wynne said.

Curt Cornell has worked at Green Bay's Hagemeister Park for six summers, but he'd never seen anything like what happened Sunday afternoon.

"The boat was coming in, we had a full patio, and everyone was taking pictures — the usual drill," said Cornell, Hagemeister's general manager. "We were in the piano bar and noticed the boat was really close. Then people just started screaming and yelling."

The owner of the destroyed boat had been enjoying lunch at Hagemeister when the incident occurred, Cornell said. He said a woman told him, "We have a tab open, but we're going to take care of this first" before running to the river's edge to speak with the Coast Guard.

As Hagemeister's patio full of stunned patrons watched, the Barker struck the CityDeck, left a boat of 16 to 18 feet in pieces, and sent kayaks tumbling from the dock into the water. The Barker then smacked the Nitschke bridge.

The incident, which happened about 3:30 p.m., left the bridge stuck in the open position and forced city police to detour east-west traffic to the nearby Walnut Street Bridge. Crews were raising and lowering the Nitschke bridge as of 6 p.m., but had not allowed traffic to cross.

"It was crazy," said Elizabeth Feldhausen, who watched the incident while at Hagemeister to celebrate her cousin's 24th birthday. "Everybody started running; this family ran out yelling, 'That's our boat!' "It literally was gone in 30 seconds."

Like many others at Hagemeister, Feldhausen recorded camera-phone video of the incident.

No injuries were reported. Cars and trucks, meanwhile, backed up on both sides of the bridge. The other bridges in Green Bay — the Walnut Street, Don A. Tilleman and Leo Frigo Memorial — remained open.

The city of Green Bay on Thursday had closed the CityDeck and Leicht docks because of high water levels made access difficult

After striking the one boat, the ship missed a larger boat tied to the City Deck, Feldhausen said. She said a child had been playing near the water's edge minutes before the incident.

The Barker, built in 1952 as the Edward B. Greene, is 767 feet long and can carry 25,900 gross tons of cargo, according to the company's website. The Barker was renamed the Benson Ford in 1985, and the Kaye E. Barker — honoring the wife of Interlake's chairman — in 1989. It has undergone work at Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay in 2012, according to the website.

Green Bay Press Gazette

 

Port Reports -  July 17

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Joseph L. Block arrived Duluth early Sunday to discharge limestone at the CN dock. Mesabi Miner departed a few hours later with coal from Midwest Energy. After completing her discharge, the Block began loading ore at CN. Algoma Enterprise arrived during the evening for the same cargo. At Burlington Northern in Superior, Burns Harbor loaded throughout the day Sunday and departed during the evening. Algoma Spirit arrived from anchor shortly after and began loading.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors saw the arrival of the Cason J. Callaway Saturday at 23:06. Her past two trips into Two Harbors she loaded at the gravity docks. This trip she loaded at the shiploader. The Callaway departed Two Harbors at 08:06 for Gary. The Edgar B. Speer is due in Two Harbors late Sunday/early Monday. There is no other traffic scheduled for Two Harbors on Monday. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the American Spirit at 15:14. She is due out Monday. Due to arrive on Monday is the Herbert C. Jackson coming from the Twin Ports after unloading limestone.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis.
Stewart J. Cort left BayShip Saturday night around 1900 hours and sailed out into the bay of Green Bay during a severe thunderstorm. She had been in port for self unloader repairs.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Kingsville:
Arrival: Mississagi at approximately 2115

Nanticoke:
Arrivals: Algocanada at 0209 and Algoma Hansa anchored off Port Dover at 1359. Anchored off dock: Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08)

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Hansa, Algoma Olympic, tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 0415, Federal Yoshino (Mhl) at 0650, Manitoulin at 1239, Baie St. Paul at 1630 and Whitefish Bay at 1725

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Tim S. Dool at 0240, Algoma Transport at 0423, Dimitrios K (Mhl) (ex Ladytramp-13, Atlantic Castle-07, Cedar-03) at 0649 and John D. Leitch at 1350

Welland Canal docks:
Argentia Desgagnes (ex Ofmar-17) departed wharf 16 at 0503 westbound. Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD - arrived on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Departures: HHL Rhine (Lbr) (ex Beluga Feasibility-11) at 1625 eastbound - anchored on July 14, Harbour Pioneer (Por) at 1035 and Thamesborg (Nld) at 2316, departed 2130 eastbound. On July 16: Dimitrios K (Mhl) (ex Ladytramp-13, Atlantic Castle-07, Cedar-03) at 1633

Port Colborne anchorage:
Federal Saguenay (Bbs) at 1245 on July 15 and Federal Yoshino (Mhl) at 1600 Sunday: Departure: Federal Saguenay (Bbs) at 1855 Sunday westbound

Hamilton:
Arrival: tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 2320 on Jul 15, Tim S. Dool at 1424 and tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at approximately 2147. At docks: Federal Biscay (Mhl), Arctic (Nld) (ex Flinter Arctic-17) and Rotterdam (Nld)

Clarkson:
Arrival: Robert S. Pierson at 0446. Departure: Robert S. Pierson at 1408 westbound,

Toronto:
Arrivals (updated): Stephen B. Roman on July 14 at 1019. On July 15, English River at 1604 and Manitoulin at 1713. Departures July 15: Stephen B. Roman 1828 and tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 2348. July 16: English River at 0711 eastbound and Manitoulin at 1101

Colborne:
Arrival: Robert S. Pierson at 2100

Picton:
Arrivals: Stephen B. Roman at 0600 and CSL Assiniboine at approximately 1950

Bath:
Arrival: English River eta for 2300 approximately

 

Reserve now for Grosse Ile Lighthouse September 10

7/17 - Nearly every year the Grosse Ile Historical Society sponsors a tour of the Grosse Ile Lighthouse. This year’s tour will be Sunday, September 10, from noon to 4 p.m. Take one of three tours of the 1906 island lighthouse. Cost is $5 for members, $10 for non-members. Tours are limited to 60 people. Contact Sue Zink 734-552-7914 for tour details, reservations and tickets.

Grosse Ile Historical Society

 

5 people rescued during Chicago Yacht Club race to Mackinac

7/17 - Cleveland, Ohio – Five people were rescued in two separate cases during the annual Chicago Yacht Club Race to Mackinac Sunday on Lake Michigan. One person was rescued by a Good Samaritan after falling overboard during the race and four people were rescued by the Coast Guard after their sailing vessel capsized during the race.

The first case took place shortly after midnight local time, approximately 40 miles east of Port Washington, Wisconsin. The person was wearing a life jacket and a personal locator beacon and was in good condition despite being in the water for over an hour. The Good Samaritan who rescued the person was also competing in the race.

In the second case, three red flares were reported approximately 30 miles east of Fox Point, Wisconsin, shortly after 1 a.m local time. The rescuer, who was a part of the race, arrived on the scene of the flare's origin and reported that the vessel had capsized and four people were on top of the vessel's hull. The rescuer was unable to render assistance due to weather conditions.

The vessel had capsized due to a series of 35 mile-per-hour winds that shifted from the south to the northwest very quickly. Only two of the four people on the vessel's hull were wearing life jackets. They did have an electronic position indicating radio beacon and flares.

The Coast Guard cutter Biscayne Bay, which was near to assist in cases of distress, and an Air Facility Waukegan MH-65 helicopter crew was diverted and arrived on scene simultaneously. The MH-65 helicopter hovered over the distressed vessel and provided assistance with their spotlight while a small boat from the Biscayne Bay rescued the four people and transferred them to the cutter.

All four people were reported to be in good condition and did not require medical attention.

The Coast Guard strongly recommends boaters wear their life jacket at all times while underway in case of unexpected weather conditions. Additionally, a personal locater beacon and signaling devices, like flares, can greatly reduce search time and increase rescue probability.

USCG

 

Updates -  July 17

News Photo Gallery  

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 17

On this day in 1902, the JAMES H. HOYT, the first boat with hatches constructed at 12-foot centers, loaded 5,250 tons of iron ore in 30.5 minutes on her maiden voyage. Several days later, the cargo was unloaded at Conneaut in three hours and 52 minutes.

On this day in 1961, the C&P dock in Cleveland set a new unloading record when they removed more than 15,000 tons of ore from the holds of the E. G. GRACE in 3 hours and 20 minutes.

The ASHCROFT was towed out of Quebec City on July 17, 1969, in tandem with the steamer SIR THOMAS SHAUGHNESSY by the Polish tug JANTAR for scrapping at Castellon, Spain.

The BROOKDALE, of 1909, lost her self-unloading boom overboard in the Detroit River during a wind and rainstorm on July 17, 1980, while loading salt at the Canadian Rock Salt Dock at Ojibway, Ontario.

The Cleveland Tanker's COMET was towed from Toledo to Ashtabula, Ohio, on July 17, 1973, where she was broken up during the summer and fall of 1973.

WILLIAM J. FILBERT was launched in 1907, as a.) WILLIAM M. MILLS (Hull#348) at Lorain, Ohio by American Ship Building Co. for the Weston Transit Co. (William M. Mills, mgr.).

On her last trip, the COLONEL JAMES PICKANDS arrived at Cleveland, Ohio on July 17, 1974, with a load of iron ore.

Mohawk Navigation's GOLDEN HIND loaded her first dry bulk cargo on July 17, 1954. She had been rebuilt from the Imperial Oil Ltd.'s tanker a.) IMPERIAL WOODBEND.

On 17 July 1856, TINTO (wooden propeller, 135 foot, built in 1855-56, at Sorel, Quebec) caught fire and burned to a total loss only 2 miles from shore. She was between Snake Island and Nine Mile Point on Lake Ontario. 18 lives were lost. The survivors jumped into the water and were picked up by a boat from shore. A newspaper article stated that she had no lifeboat aboard. Her machinery was later recovered and installed in the AVON.

On 17 July 1883, B PARSONS (2-mast wooden schooner, 218 tons, built in 1856, at Vermilion, Ohio) struck the north pier while entering the harbor at Charlevoix, Michigan during a gale. She sank crosswise in the channel and blocked passage into the harbor for two weeks until she broke up enough to allow vessels to pass. In December, the steam tug S S COE towed the hulk a half mile down the beach and abandoned it.

The Canada Steamship Line's HAMONIC burned at her pier at Point Edward bear Sarnia, Ont., on July 17, 1945. A warehouse next to the HAMONIC 's pier burst into flames from a fire that began from a gasoline motor for conveyor equipment being repaired by workmen. The flames and smoke were carried by a breeze to the HAMONIC. Almost in a matter of minutes the HAMONIC was doomed. She was aflame at dockside. The captain and the engineer were able to move the ship down the dock from the raging flames from the warehouse. Many of the passengers were able to get ashore. Some passengers went ashore by climbing into the bucket of a crane, which hoisted them on shore to safety. Every one of the passengers and crew were saved.

1933: SONORA and WILLIAM NELSON were in a collision in the Bar Point Channel, Lake Erie. The two ships were found at equal fault. The former was scrapped at Ashtabula in 1961 while the latter arrived at Bilbao, Spain, for dismantling as c) BEN E. TATE on July 12, 1969.

1989: SHEILA YEATES, a tall-ship visitor to the Great Lakes, hit an ice pack in fog on the North Atlantic and eventually sank 430 miles south of Greenland after an attempt to tow the leaking ship to safety failed. All on board were saved.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Green Bay's Nitschke bridge stuck in open position after being struck by ship

7/16 - Green Bay, Wis. – The bridge connecting Main and Dousman streets at the Fox River was closed to traffic Sunday afternoon when it was struck by the Kaye E. Barker and became stuck in the open position.

People in the area at the time said the Ray Nitschke Memorial Bridge was struck by a ship that had been heading north through the city.

Vehicular traffic was backed up on both sides of the bridge. At 4:40 p.m., officials said in a news release they expect the bridge to be closed for more than two hours.

The Barker had earlier delivered coal to the C. Reiss Coal Co on the river's western shore just south of the Don A. Tilleman Bridge at Mason Street. The other bridges in Green Bay — the Walnut Street, Tilleman and Leo Frigo Memorial — remained open.

A boat about 16 to 18 feet long was destroyed when it was struck by the ship. The small boat had been tied to the CityDeck near Hagemeister Park, a restaurant on the river's east shore.

"The boat was coming in, we had a full patio, and everyone was taking pictures — the usual drill," said Curt Cornell, Hagemeister's general manager. "We were in the piano bar and noticed the boat was really close. Then people just started screaming and yelling."

The owner of the destroyed boat had been enjoying lunch at Hagemeister when the incident occurred, Cornell said. He said a woman told him, "We have a tab open, but we're going to take care of this first."

The ship, built in 1952 as the Edward B. Greene, is 767 feet long and can carry 25,900 gross tons of cargo, according to the website of the Interlake Steamship Co., its owner. The ship was renamed the Benson Ford in 1985, and the Kaye E. Barker — honoring the wife of Interlake's chairman — in 1989. It has undergone work at Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay, according to the website.

Green Bay Press Gazette

 

Port Reports -  July 16

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors saw the departure of the St. Clair at 01:32 for Conneaut. The Edwin H. Gott arrived at the CN ore dock at 11:25 and departed at approx. 21:10 for Detroit. Cason J. Callaway is due late Saturday night after departing Duluth at approx. 21:15 after unloading stone. Due late Sunday night is the Edgar B. Speer. Northshore Mining saw no traffic on Saturday, but on Sunday the American Spirit is due to load.

Detroit, Mich.
Downbound traffic Saturday afternoon included Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder, Algosteel (moored in Windsor to unload), Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and Indiana Harbor. Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder returned upbound later in the day.

Fairport/Grand River, Ohio – Dave Merchant
The big Clyde dredge Luedtke Derrick Boat No. 16"has been working well upriver at restaurant row on the Grand River side. This is an excellent chance to see it working up close. Normally, the annual dredging only goes up to the turning basin, but every few years they dredge up past the old Diamond Alkalai stone dock to reduce ice jams.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Anchored off dock: Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08)

Buffalo:
Departure: passenger vessel Grande Caribe (Ame) at 1849 for Cleveland

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Everlast & barge Norman McLeod, Mississagi, Algolake, and Argentia Desgagnes (note - 1st trip into Great Lakes), Federal Saguneay (Bbs) at 0220, Blacky (Cyp) at 0400, Fuldaborg (Nld) at 1220, G3 Marquis at 1444 and Algoma Hansa at 2030

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Algowood, Oakglen at 1146, tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 1215 Baie Comeau at 1410 and Algoma Transport at 2340

Welland Canal docks:
Argentia Desgagnes delayed at wharf 16 at 0950. Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD - arrived on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Departures: Federal Seto (Mhl) at 2100 on Jul 15, Lake St. Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) at 1302, Federal Columbia (Mhl) at 1400, HR Constellation (Lbr) (ex Beluga Constellation-08, Beluga Constitution-06) at 2100 and Fivelborg (Nld) at approximately 1832. Anchored on Jul 14 Harbour Pioneer (Por) at 1035, HHL Rhine (Lbr) (ex Beluga Feasibility-11) at 2142 and Thamesborg (Nld) at 2316

Hamilton:
Arrivals: Manitoulin on Jul 14 at 2209, Federal Biscay (Mhl) at 0310 and Arctic (Nld) (ex Flinter Arctic-17) at 0813 and tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 2320. Departures: G3 Marquis at 1242, Manitoulin at 1507. At dock: Rotterdam (Nld)

Clarkson:
Arrival: Algoma Olympic docked at 0450. Departures: Algoma Olympic at 2039 and Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 2120

Toronto:
Arrival: Manitoulin at 1713. At docks: tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement and Stephen B. Roman at 1019

 

Two Navy ships arrived in Buffalo 40 years ago, kicking off the waterfront's revival

7/16 - Buffalo, N.Y. – Two decommissioned Navy ships, towed by tugboats, arrived at a desolate stretch of downtown Buffalo's waterfront 40 years ago this summer. One city official described the arrivals as "instant urban renewal."

The remark proved prophetic. The USS The Sullivans and the even bigger USS Little Rock were intended as memorials on an empty waterfront. They are currently major destination points that contributed to the waterfront's rebirth.

Hundreds of couples have married aboard them. Veterans celebrate reunions. Business groups hold parties. There are even weekend scouting camp-outs aboard the vessels.

And Saturday morning, the 19 volunteers who served as the crew members who delivered the ships to Buffalo in the summer of 1977 were honored. Most of those 19 volunteers have died, but not all who made the park possible are gone.

"We still have people like Anthony LoRusso, who is the father of the park," said retired Coast Guard Capt. Brian W. Roche, executive director of the Buffalo and Erie County Naval & Military Park. "But it was these fellows who volunteered and made the park come to life. They went and picked up the Sullivans and Little Rock."

The idea of the naval park started with LoRusso. He was visiting a friend, a Marine pilot, in North Carolina in 1975 when the friend suggested he visit the USS North Carolina, a decommissioned battleship, that had been designated a National Historic Landmark and turned into a museum in Wilmington, N.C.

"I saw the USS North Carolina and said, 'God, I wish something like that could happen in Buffalo.' When I came home, I spoke with Mayor Stanley Makowski and he said, "Anthony, that's an interesting idea. Why don't you see what you can do?' " recalled the 76-year-old LoRusso, a retired judge.

Two summers later, as he stood on the waterfront adjacent to War Memorial Auditorium with Urban Renewal Commissioner Richard L. Miller, they marveled as the Little Rock arrived in August 1977, one month after the Sullivans had moored beside a seawall and bollards the city constructed especially for the two ships.

"I remember Richard Miller was standing next to me and looking up at the huge mass in front of us and he exclaimed, 'Instant urban renewal!' But for years the only thing that was down there were the ships. The park survived on fees from a parking lot we had that was used by people going to Buffalo Braves and Sabres games," LoRusso said.

The decommissioned ships were docked near the area where the Canadiana years earlier had ferried generations of Buffalonians across Lake Erie to Crystal Beach Amusement Park. But when the Canadiana stopped, the waterfront turned desolate, LoRusso said.

Read more and view photos at this link: http://buffalonews.com/2017/07/14/navy-ships-arrived-40-years-ago-canalside-superstar-attractions/

 

Sault Ste. Marie celebrates 100 years for SS Valley Camp

7/16 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. – An icon in Sault Ste. Marie, and all of the Great Lakes celebrated its 100th birthday Friday. The steamship Valley Camp was put into service on this date back in 1917 as the SS Louis W. Hill. She became the SS Valley Camp in 1955, then a museum in the Soo in 1972.

As part of the celebration, the last survivor of the Carl D. Bradley tragedy was on hand to sign copies of his book about the disaster. Touring the SS Valley Camp brought back memories of his day on the Bradley.

“I went up in the number one cargo hold, I looked around and said "boy, I remember this down here shoveling and then looking around. You just don't know just how big these ships are until you get aboard and see all of this,” Frank Mays, survivor of Carl. D. Bradley sinking said.

The Jim Robertson Art Gallery was unveiled in the bow of the museum.

View a video at this link: http://www.9and10news.com/story/35890801/sault-ste-marie-celebrates-100-years-for-ss-valley-camp

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 16

DETROIT EDISON, of 1955, departed Quebec City July 16th 1986, along with former fleet mate SHARON, in tow of the U.S. tug PRUDENT, to Brownsville, Texas for scrapping.

The SAGINAW BAY departed Quebec City on July 16, 1985, in tandem with the E.B. BARBER, towed by the Polish tug KORAL for scrapping at Vigo, Spain.

NORTHERN VENTURE, a.) VERENDRYE of 1944, entered Great Lakes service July 16, 1961, upbound light for the Canadian lake head to load grain.

On July 16, 1935, the BRUCE HUDSON capsized on Lake Ontario off Cobourg, Ontario, while in tow of the wooden-hulled tug MUSCALLONGE.

Keel-laying of the CHI-CHEEMAUN (Hull#205) was on July 16, 1973, at Collingwood, Ontario by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd. for Ontario Northland Transport Commission.

CATARACT (wooden propeller, 15 foot', 352 tons, built in 1852, at Buffalo) caught fire on 16 July 1861, 5 miles off Erie, Pennsylvania. She became an inferno astern in just a few minutes and this prevented her boats from being launched. Four died. Some were saved by clinging to floating wreckage and some others were rescued by a small fishing boat. The schooner ST PAUL picked up some survivors. Among those picked up by Captain Mosher of the ST PAUL, were Captain McNally and the CATARACT's carpenter. Capt. Mosher had rescued these same two men in 1858, when the propeller INDIANA was lost in Lake Superior.

On 16 July 1873, the new barge MINNEAPOLIS was towed to Detroit for outfitting. She had just been launched four days earlier at Marine City, Michigan. While on the way to Detroit, a Canadian man named Sinclair fell overboard and drowned. On 16 July 1874, The Port Huron Times reported that "the old steamer REINDEER has been rebuilt to a barge by L. C. Rogers at H. C. Schnoor's shipyard at Fair Haven, [Michigan]. Her beautiful horns have been taken down, [she carried a set of large antlers], her machinery and cumbersome side-wheels removed, and she has been fully refitted with center arch and deck frame complex."

July 16, 1961, the PIONEER CHALLENGER entered service. Built in 1943, as a T-3 tanker a.) MARQUETTE, renamed b.) U.S.S. NESCHANIC (AO-71) in 1943, c.) GULFOIL in 1947, d.) PIONEER CHALLENGER in 1961, e.) MIDDLETOWN in 1962, and f.) AMERICAN VICTORY in 2006.

1911 ¬ MAINE, upbound with a load of coal, caught fire in the St. Clair River and was run aground on the Canadian shore. The crew escaped.

1958 ¬ The Swedish freighter ERHOLM and the FRANK ARMSTRONG of the Interlake fleet were in a collision in northern Lake St. Clair with minor damage to both ships. ERHOLM had earlier been a Great Lakes caller as a) ERLAND and later came through the Seaway in 1959-1960. It returned inland again in 1961 and 1962 as c) OTIS. The ship arrived at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, for scrapping as h) DIMITRA K. on August 25, 1980.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series – Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Decisions linger regarding Alexander Henry

7/15 - Thunder Bay, Ont. – A new fundraising campaign for the Alexander Henry kicks off on Saturday at the Thunder Bay Country Market.

The campaign is called Henry Needs You, said Charlie Brown, president of the Lakehead Transportation Museum Society. “We still need to raise the rest of the $50,000 for matching funds from our private donor,” said Brown, adding that they are accepting all donations. “Every donation that’s made is doubled by a private donor up to $50,000.”

Even though the retired icebreaker is still waiting for a permanent home, work continues to make the ship a viable tourist attraction for the city. The Alexander Henry is currently tied up at the old ore dock south of the marina. Museum society board members, with a portable power source, are already beginning work to get her ready for the public.

“We’re trying to do some basic cleaning,” said Brown. “She’s been sitting for years so she’s kind of dirty and disorganized.” Brown said they will do as much as they can while they wait for a decision to be made by city council if the retired coast guard vessel will find a home at Pool Six or the Kam River Park.

With city council out until July 24, Brown said the initial plan to open for the August long weekend is off the table and it will most likely be closer to the end of that month. There is still much to do, said Brown. Once a site is chosen they will have to arrange for the ship to be towed there, hook up electrical, have mooring surveys done and assessment surveys.

“I’m sure we’re going to have the health inspectors and the fire marshals in just to do a preliminary check for us before we open to the public,” said Brown. “And then of course the site prep itself, depending on where we are, we’re going to need fencing, security cameras and general cleanup as well.”

The museum society is looking for volunteers for all those types of projects, said Brown, hoping to have people in place to get to work the minute they get the go-ahead from the city.

Visit www.ltms.ca to help The Chronicle-Journal

 

Port Reports -  July 15

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Lee A. Tregurtha arrived Duluth just after midnight on Friday morning, and discharged limestone at Graymont before shifting down to Burlington Northern in Superior to load. Thunder Bay arrived later in the morning to load iron ore pellets at CN. Roger Blough arrived early in the afternoon, and docked at Calumet to wait for the Tregurtha to finish loading at BN. During the evening, sisters Philip R. Clarke and Cason J. Callaway arrived with limestone to discharge at Hallett 5 and Hallett 8, respectively. Lee A. Tregurtha was expected to depart via the Superior entry late Friday evening.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
The CN ore dock in Two Harbors saw the departure of the American Integrity at 02:00 for Gary. The St. Clair arrived at 02:30 and as of 21:00 she was still at the shiploader. On Saturday the Edwin H. Gott should arrive around midday. Also due on Saturday is the Cason J. Callaway arriving from the Twin Ports after unloading limestone. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the James R. Barker at 18:26 for Indiana Harbor. Silver Bay has no scheduled traffic for Saturday.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Departure: CSL Niagara at mid-day westbound. Anchored off dock: Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08)

Buffalo:
Arrival: passenger vessel Grande Caribe (Ame) at 1713

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: CCGS Limnos, passenger vessel Grande Caribe (Ame) at 0645, Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin at 0750 fog delay, CSL St. Laurent at 1320, tug Everlast & barge Norman McLeod at 1939, Mississagi at 2029, Algolake at 2117 and Argentia Desgagnes at 2240 (first trip into Great Lakes)

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Olympic, Algoma Harvester at 0557, G3 Marquis at 0245, CSL Welland, Manitoulin at 0745, HHL Rhine (Lbr) (ex Beluga Feasibility-11) at 1000, Thamesborg (Nld) at 1045, Algowood at 1600,

Welland Canal docks:
Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD - arrived on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Departure: BBC Volga (Mlt) at 0420, Federal Mosel (Mhl) at 0725 and Federal Seto (Mhl) at 2100. Arrivals: on July 12, Federal Columbia (Mhl) at 2057 and Federal Seto (Mhl) at 2345. On July 13, Harbour Pioneer (Por) at 1005, HR Constellation (Lbr) (ex Beluga Constellation-08, Beluga Constitution-06) at 1530 and Fivelborg (Nld) at approximately 1832. On July 14, HHL Rhine (Lbr) (ex Beluga Feasibility-11) at 2142 and Thamesborg (Nld) at approximately 2251. Awaiting orders: Lake St. Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16)

Hamilton:
Arrivals: Algolake at 0348, G3Marquis at 1738 and Manitoulin at 2205 approximately. Departures: Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin at 0602 and Algolake at 1842. At docks: Fuldaborg (Nld) and Rotterdam (Nld)

Clarkson:
Arrival: Robert S. Pierson at 1852 and Algoma Olympic anchored awaiting dock. At dock: Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12)

Toronto:
Arrivals: tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 0621 and Stephen B. Roman at 1019

 

Coast Guard rescues 2 people after boat sank in Lake Michigan

7/15 - Cleveland, Ohio – The U.S. Coast Guard rescued two men from the water after their boat sank while on a fishing trip near Waukegan Harbor, Illinois, Friday. The two men, 29 and 31 years old, were approximately one mile east of Waukegan Harbor when their 15-foot bass boat began taking on water and sank in approximately 10 minutes.

Shortly after noon, central time, the Coast Guard received a call from one of the men in the water who was using his partially waterproof cell phone. Coast Guard Station Kenosha launched a 45-foot response boat-medium and rescued the two men from the 58 degree water.

The first person rescued did not have a life jacket on and was treading water while holding onto a small boat fender. The second person had his life jacket on backwards and was holding his cell phone above his head to keep it dry while treading water. Both men were exhausted and cold from being in the water nearly 45 minutes.

The men had bought a new plug for their boat and thought that it fell out while they were driving onto the lake, resulting in water quickly coming in once they anchored according to their statements. The men did not have a float plan and no one knew they were going out on the water.

The Coast Guard urges boaters to have a plan when they go out on the water, to carry multiple signaling devices, to have enough working life jackets, and to bring an electronic position indicating radio beacon.

USCG

 

Port Authority may help with jurisdictional ‘logjam' of Hamilton lighthouse

7/15 - Hamilton, Ont. – Surprise talks with the Hamilton Port Authority are resurrecting stalled hopes to restore the historic Beach Canal Lighthouse. Volunteers with the Beach Canal Lighthouse Group have negotiated with various levels of government for more than a decade to try to secure ownership of the 1858 lighthouse and its keeper's cottage, with an eye to restoring the heritage landmarks and allowing public access.

But until recently, those efforts were stuck in a jurisdictional quagmire, said group chairperson Sandy Thomson. He said the federal department responsible for the land under the lighthouse doesn't want to turn it over to a private group of volunteers — but the most likely government candidates to take over the property, Hamilton and Burlington, are not interested.

"It's been 10 years of frustration," said Thomson, who is the great-great grandson of one of the lighthouse keepers from the 1850s. "A lot of people were ready to give up … I could see no solution."

But recently, Thomson said he has been in talks with port authority head Ian Hamilton about the prospect of the federal agency taking over ownership of the lighthouse property to break the jurisdictional "logjam."

"It came out of nowhere," said Thomson. "I was very surprised — but obviously, very pleased." Hamilton confirmed Monday the agency is talking with both the lighthouse group and federal government.

He said he would love for the port authority to help fill a "gap" created by the shuttering of maritime museums in other Great Lakes cities. He suggested such a museum would pair well with a restored and publicly accessible heritage lighthouse. "We would very much love to help celebrate Hamilton's rich maritime history," he said.

Hamilton Spectator

 

Scientists expect 'significant' algae bloom on Lake Erie

7/15 - A "significant" harmful algae bloom is expected to form in western Lake Erie this summer, though it probably won't be as large as some previous formations that posed health risks and hampered tourism, scientists said Thursday.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and research partners released their annual algae forecast for the shallowest and warmest of the Great Lakes, where massive algae formations are a recurring threat to the environment and the economy.

Toxic contamination from a 2014 bloom prompted a two-day shutdown of tap water systems for 400,000 people in Toledo, Ohio, and southeastern Michigan.

"It'll be large, green and ugly and will cause the same kinds of issues it has in the past for charter boat captains trying to get people out to fish," said Don Scavia, a University of Michigan scientist.

It's unlikely to create another drinking water crisis like the one three years ago. It resulted from a rare combination of factors, including high levels of toxins generated by the bloom and its location near Toledo's offshore water intake facility, NOAA oceanographer Rick Stumpf said.

Monitoring has been stepped up since then and early-detection devices installed, he added. Still, the situation underscores the need to reduce the flow of nutrients into the lake that feed algae and similar bacteria, primarily from farms but also sewage treatment plants and other sources, Stumpf said.

Researchers have developed a scale for rating the severity of a bloom based on how much algae it contains over a sustained period. They predict this year's will register a score of 7.5, though it could range anywhere from six to 9.5.

A rating above five indicates a potentially harmful level, meaning such blooms could do damage by producing toxins or sucking enough oxygen from the water to cause fish kills.

When they developed the scale, researchers thought the maximum score would be a 10. A 2011 bloom reached that mark and a 2015 bloom exceeded it, registering a 10.5 as the biggest on record. It's worth noting that a bloom's size doesn't necessarily reflect its toxicity.

The 2016 bloom rated a mild 3.2, which experts credited largely to dry weather. Spring and summer rainfall plays a key role in bloom formation by washing fertilizers from croplands into streams and rivers that flow into the lake. Phosphorus in chemical fertilizers and livestock manure promotes algae growth.

The weather has been significantly wetter this year, and the bloom size is expected to reflect that.

Recent algae formations in western Lake Erie have taken shape in late July and grown bigger in early August. A similar pattern is expected in coming months.

"A bloom of this size is evidence that the research and outreach efforts currently underway to reduce nutrient loading, optimize water treatment, and understand bloom dynamics need to continue," said Christopher Winslow, Ph.D., director of the Ohio Sea Grant College Program.

But he added that despite its anticipated size, "much of the lake will be algae-free throughout the bloom season and the lake remains a key asset."

Michigan, Ohio and the Canadian province of Ontario have agreed to cut phosphorus going into the lake by 40 per cent over the next decade.

CBC

 

Obituary: Jack E. Hunger

7/15 - The global and Great Lakes shipping industries lost one of its early pioneers recently with the passing of Jack E. Hunger of Cleveland, Ohio. A graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy (Kings Point) in 1957, Hunger later formed World Shipping, Inc., one of the industry’s pioneering companies in the Great Lakes vessel and liner agency business. Over the years, World Shipping represented many premier liner companies in the U.S. Midwest. The company now has a global reach through its forwarding operations and is active in the warehousing and trucking sectors though its subsidiary operations.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 15

July 15, 1991 - The Spanish, 1975-built, 7,311 gross ton, ocean motor bulk carrier MILANOS, anchored in the Detroit River since July 2, began the long slow trip home. Auxiliar de Transporte Maritimos, the ship’s owners, decided it would be cheaper to tow the crippled ship home for repairs rather than have the repairs performed locally. The ship's engine seized after the crankshaft broke. She departed Detroit, bound for Montreal under tow of Malcolm Marine's TUG MALCOLM and McKeil's tug ARGUE MARTIN. The tow passed down the Seaway on July 19.

On July 15, 1961, the d.) WALTER A. STERLING, now f.) LEE A. TREGURTHA), entered service on the Great Lakes for Cleveland Cliffs Steamship Co., after conversion from a T-3 tanker. The next day, on July 16, 1961, the d.) PIONEER CHALLENGER, now f.) AMERICAN VICTORY, entered service for the Pioneer Steamship Co (Hutchinson & Co., mgr.).

The CHICAGO TRADER was launched as a.) THE HARVESTER (Hull#391) at Lorain, Ohio, by American Ship Building Co. in 1911, for the Wisconsin Steel Co.

In 1946, the NORISLE (Hull#136) was launched at Collingwood, Ontario, by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd. for the Dominion & Owen Sound Transportation Co. Ltd. In 1934, the ANN ARBOR NO 4 collided with the steamer N. F. LEOPOLD in a heavy fog.

On Saturday, 15 July 1871, an argument between Captain James Bradley and Mate John Reed started while the schooner ROBERT EMMETT was docked at Erie, Pennsylvania unloading iron ore. They were still shouting at each other as the ship sailed out of the harbor. In short order, the ship turned around and anchored in the harbor. At 3 the following morning, Reed rowed ashore, went directly to the police station and charged that Capt. Bradley had assaulted him with a knife. At dawn, as the police were on their way to question Capt. Bradley, they found him stepping ashore from the deck of a tug, fuming that Reed had stolen the ship's only small boat. Bradley and Reed were at each other again and the police arrested both men. Bradley then filed charges against Reed for mutiny, assault and theft of the ship's boat. The case went to court the very next day. Justice of the Peace Foster saw his courtroom packed with curious sailors and skippers. Reed and Bradley were both still fuming and after listening to just a little testimony, Foster found both men guilty, fined them both and ordered both to pay court costs. The matter didn't end there since Reed later had to get a court order to get his personal belongings off the EMMETT. There is no record of what the disagreement was that started this whole mess.

The iron side-wheel steamer DARIUS COLE (201 foot, 538 gross tons) was launched at the Globe Iron Works (Hull #10) in Cleveland, Ohio on 15 July 1885. During her career, she had two other names b.) HURON 1906 - 1921, and c.) COLONIAL 1921 - 1925. She burned off Barcelona, New York, on Lake Erie on 1 September 1925, while on an excursion. The hull was beached and later towed to Dunkirk, New York, for scrapping.

1885: The rail car ferry LANSDOWNE and the CLARION were in a collision on the Detroit River.

1895: CIBOLA caught fire and burned at the dock at Lewiston, NY, with the loss of one life. The hull was towed to Toronto and used in a fill project.

1943: GEORGE M. HUMPHREY sank off Old Point Mackinac Light following a collision with the D.M. CLEMSON. The ship was salvaged in 1944 and rebuilt at Sturgeon Bay as b) CAPTAIN JOHN ROEN in 1945 and became c) ADAM E. CORNELIUS in 1948 and d) CONSUMERS POWER in 1958.

1977: The ore- laden CADILLAC went aground in the St. Marys River after missing a turn in fog. It was released the next day with the help of 3 tugs.

1986: The C.S.L. self-unloader MANITOULIN went aground at Sandusky, off Cedar Point, after losing power. The ship was released with the help of tugs.

1998: LITA hit the knuckle at the Eisenhower Lock and sustained damage to the starboard side. The vessel later hit bottom of the channel near the Snell Lock but there was no additional damage. The ship was enroute from Toledo to Algeria. The 11,121 gross ton saltwater vessel was still in service as of 2012.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Lake Huron Lore Society, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit

 

Great Lakes steel production falls by 14,000 tons

7/14 - Great Lakes steel production dropped to 654,000 tons last week, a decrease of just over 2 percent. Steel mills in the Great Lakes region cranked out 668,000 tons of metal the previous week, according to the American Iron and Steel Institute. Most of the steel made in the Great Lakes region is produced in Lake and Porter counties in Northwest Indiana.

So far this year, U.S. steelmakers have produced 46.8 million tons of steel, about 2.2 percent more than they did during the same period in 2016. Steel mills have been running at a capacity of 74.4 percent so far this year, up from 72.4 percent through the same time last year.

Domestic steelmakers used about 74.3 percent of their steelmaking capacity in the week that ended July 8, up from 73.6 percent the previous week, according to the American Iron and Steel Institute. Some analysts say 90 percent would be considered healthy for the industry.

Steelmaking capacity utilization was just 71.3 percent during the same time period in 2016. Overall, U.S. national steel output rose by 16,000 tons last week to 1.73 million tons, a 0.9 percent increase, according to the American Iron and Steel Institute.

Production in the Southern District, nearly always the country's second-largest steel-producing region, which spans mini-mills across the South, rose to 630,000 tons last week, up from 608,000 tons the previous week.

NW Indiana Times

 

16 giant beer fermentation tanks arrive by boat in Milwaukee from Germany

7/14 - Milwaukee, Wis. - Beer brewers in Wisconsin got some help from Germany Sunday, July 9, and it arrived by water. Sixteen giant fermentation tanks pulled into the Port of Milwaukee Sunday morning on board the saltwater vessel Frieda, and they'll eventually head to their new home at New Glarus Brewing Company. The tanks were manufactured in Germany.

Each tank is capable of holding 600 barrels of beer -- more than 18,000 gallons. The tanks may now be in Milwaukee, but there's still a long road ahead.

"From conception to completion, takes in excess of a year. In fact, the tanks will be moved on the backs of large trucks to New Glarus. Then they will be installed in a building that's only half finished. When they're in place, they'll finish the building around those tanks," Jeff Fleming, Port of Milwaukee spokesman said.

Read more and see photos and a video at http://fox6now.com/2017/07/09/16-giant-beer-fermentation-tanks-arrive-in-milwaukee-from-germany-for-new-glarus-brewing-co/

 

Port Reports -  July 14

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
The CN ore dock in Two Harbors saw the departure of the Tim S. Dool Wednesday night at 22:09 for Hamilton. The American Integrity arrived Two Harbors at 13:20 for the shiploader. The St. Clair is due in Two Harbors late Thursday night/early Friday. She is currently, as of 20:00, running checked down SE of Tofte, MN. There is no other traffic scheduled on Friday. Norhshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. at 04:56. The H. Lee White arrived Silver Bay at 10:00 on Thursday and she departed at 17:10 for Cleveland. The James R. Barker left anchored off Sand Island early afternoon and arrived Silver Bay at 18:45. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Northshore on Friday.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrival: Algoma Olympic on Jul 12 at 1845, CSL Niagara at approximately 2100 – Departure: Algoma Olympic at 1658. At dock: Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08)

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Pearl Mist (Mhl), Algoma Spirit, CCGS Limnos at 0915, Algosea @ 1106 and Algoma Guardian at 1800

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: English River, Algoscotia at 0710, Algoma Discovery at 0805, Kaministiqua at 1050, Algolake at 1052, Radcliffe R. Latimer at 1300, CSL Welland at 1504 and Algoma Olympic at 2139

Welland Canal docks:
Arrival: Pearl Mist (Mhl) at wharf 16 with passengers on tour of Niagara Falls. Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Departure: Arneborg (Nld) at 0540 and Bro Alma (Sgp) at 0730. Arrivals: on July 12, Federal Mosel (Mhl) at approximately 0420, Ganges Star (Mlt) at approximately 1523, BBC Volga (Atg) at 1709, Federal Columbia (Mhl) at 2057 and Federal Seto (Mhl) at 2345 on Jul 13 - HR Constellation (Lbr) (ex Beluga Constellation-08, Beluga Constitution-06) at 1530 and Fivelborg (Nld) at approximately 1832. Awaiting orders: Lake St. Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16)

Hamilton:
Arrivals: tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 2331 on July 12 and Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin at 0509. Departure: tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 0225 eastbound and Fivelborg (Nld) at 1648. At docks: Fuldaborg (Nld), Harbour Pioneer (Por) and Rotterdam (Nld)

Clarkson:
Arrival: Robert S. Pierson at 0818. Departures: Robert S. Pierson at 1831 eastbound. At dock: Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12)

Toronto:
Arrivals: tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 0621

Oshawa:
Arrival: HR Constellation (Lbr) (ex Beluga Constellation-08, Beluga Constitution-06) on July 11 at 1702. Departure: HR Constellation (Lbr) at 1219

Oswego:
Departure: passenger vessel Grande Caribe (Ame) at 0613 westbound

Rochester:
Arrival: passenger vessel Grande Caribe (Ame) mid-day

 

Partnership aims to help students better prepare for maritime careers

7/14 - Toledo, Ohio – The Maritime Academy of Toledo (TMAT) and the See School announced a partnership on Wednesday. The two entities say the team-up will make a significant impact on the city of Toledo.

TMAT uses a hands-on curriculum to teach students in grades 5-12. The school focuses on maritime courses, allowing kids to prepare to attend a maritime college and to train for other seafaring careers.

Sea School is an organization headquartered in Florida. It offers training and ongoing education courses and trains members of the United States Coast Guard. The facility teaches and trains more than 10,000 mariners each year.

The partnership between the schools allows mariners from across the country to visit to Toledo for continuing education courses throughout the next year. TMAT will be hosting some mariners within the school dormitories, and others will stay at local hotels.

"We are proud to host Sea School, and excited to offer our high-tech virtual reality simulator to make their education as immersive as possible," said Tom Shafer, superintendent, TMAT. "The funds will be used by the foundation for future college scholarships, to help with building expansion, to purchase supplies and equipment for students and teachers and will allow our CTE students to gain some insight by mariners in the field and to keep our foundation thriving."

According to a news release, TMAT was chosen because of its location on the Maumee River and its accessibility to the Great Lakes. In addition, Greg Kelly, Sea School's chief executive officer, says he feels deeply connected to the school's mission

"I am passionate about what TMAT does for many of their students, which is getting them jobs, in the water, upon graduation. They have has offered us key tools and accommodations that will be of great use to our mariners in continuing their education," Kelly said.

Some of the classes that the mariners will be taking include Able Seaman, Assistance Towing, CPR/First Aid, Auxiliary Sail and Personal Survival Techniques.

"The purpose of Sea School and its value to mariners are many. Charter Boat captains can upgrade licenses, mariners can take classes to upgrade their credentials and move up in pay-grade," said Kelly. "Mariners have to take these classes to advance to different jobs on a vessel."

Maritimeacademy.us

WTVG

 

Museum ship Valley Camp celebrates 100th birthday on Friday

7/14 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. – On Friday, July 14, the marine museum Valley Camp will be celebrating its 100th birthday with events from noon to 6 p.m. Featured will be a Sault Historic Sites, Inc. jubilee, a tour of the ship, speeches, refreshments and the dedication of the Jim Robertson Art Gallery.

Free Admission to Soo Historical Members; Non-Members/General Public: Adults $14. Children 5-17, $7

For more information, visit: the Facebook Event page

 

Once a hub for building cities, Muskegon could become one for taking them apart

7/14 - Muskegon, Mich. – Muskegon once was called the “Lumber Queen of the World.” It has been called “the Port City” and the “Riviera of the Midwest.” Now, city officials hope to add “Deconstruction Hub of the Great Lakes” to the city’s titles.

In the mid-1880s, the peak of the lumbering era, Muskegon was a bustling hub for processing logs into timber shipped across the Great Lakes region. Chicago was rebuilt after the fire of 1871 with timber from Muskegon.

Advocates of the city’s port would like to see some of that timber come back. That could happen if Muskegon became a hub for deconstructing some of those same cities it helped build.

Deconstruction is taking apart abandoned buildings and salvaging usable parts—as opposed to simply demolishing them. It is part of the larger study of domicology, which looks at the political, technological, sociological and economical aspects of structural abandonment. And Muskegon has motivation to lead the way.

The city lost 8,500 tons of coal a year that once moved through its port after the B.C. Cobb coal-fired power plant was shut down in 2016, said Erin Kuhn, the executive director of the West Michigan Shoreline Regional Development Commission.

Losing the coal shipments through the port threatened to dip tonnage below the minimum required for the Army Corps of Engineers to dredge the channel, said Rex LaMore, the director of Michigan State University’s Center for Community and Economic Development.

The community was worried about losing the port and needed something else to ship through it, Kuhn said. Domicology researchers from Michigan State were asked to evaluate transporting deconstruction materials through the port, Kuhn said.

It was a perfect petri dish—the city has identified abandoned structures, money was coming into the community for demolition, Muskegon County has a strong sustainability focus and the port needed business, Kuhn said.

The researchers evaluated the efficiency of shipping to 10 ports in the Midwest and found that the most appropriate method of shipping deconstruction material is by containers—the large metal boxes that hold cargo on both ships and trucks.

Shipping in containers is safest because materials from abandoned buildings may contain lead, asbestos and other harmful substances, the report said. Ideally, the material could be loaded onto dedicated containers then trucked to the port, where it could be loaded and shipped around the Great Lakes. The problem?

There is no container shipping industry established in the Great Lakes, LaMore said. And the infrastructure to build containers is expensive.

“The potential to succeed is there, but the efficiency is not,” LaMore said. The material salvagers would be moving through the port by ship is high volume, but low quality.

These are materials such as the wood frames of houses, cement bricks and shingles—things that as of right now are heading to landfills, LaMore said.

Muskegon could still make its way as a deconstruction hub by trucking the material, which was shown to be more economically efficient than shipping by boat for every city except Milwaukee. Then eventually the port could build the infrastructure needed to ship the deconstruction material, LaMore said.

And Muskegon may be able to do that, thanks to a recent lowering of the port tonnage threshold for dredging and the road aggregate and salt now making up for the lost coal tonnage, Kuhn said.

The community is keeping its options open in terms of trucking versus shipping, Kuhn said. “Just because the threshold has been lessened, the existing port operators and the community are still looking at diversifying,” she said.

However, no action has been taken yet toward Muskegon becoming a deconstruction hub, Kuhn said. Right now, deconstruction in Muskegon is purely private. The county has been unable to work out a way to do deconstruction without opening up the floodgates to people illegally scavenging from the buildings, said Tim Burgess, the land bank coordinator for the Muskegon County Land Bank Authority.

“The researchers are still getting the findings of the study out there so the community and county can identify the next steps,” Kuhn said.

All of Michigan’s old growth forest is in its old homes—so if we value that wood we need to find ways to collect and reuse it, LaMore said.

To make Muskegon a viable deconstruction hub, the price or method of conveying the material must be changed, said Burgess. At the moment there is not enough high-volume, low-cost deconstruction products moving through the supply chain to create a steady market, according to the study.

Perhaps through moving this deconstruction material, Muskegon can reprise its role as “Lumber Queen of the World.”

Great Lakes Echo

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 14

The AMERICAN REPUBLIC (Hull#724) was launched July 14, 1980, by the Bay Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, for the American Steamship Co. She was renamed b) GREAT REPUBLIC in 2011.

While upbound in the St. Lawrence River on July 14, 1970, for Saginaw, Michigan, with a load of pig iron from Sorel, Quebec, the EASTCLIFFE HALL, of 1954, grounded in mud near Chrysler Shoal six miles above Massena, New York, at 03:00 hours but was able to free herself. A few hours later, approaching Cornwall, Ontario, she struck a submerged object and sank within a few minutes in 70 feet of water only 650 feet from the point of impact. The submerged object was believed to be an old aid to navigation light stand. Nine lives were lost. Divers determined that her back was broken in two places. After salvaging part of the cargo, her cabins were leveled and her hull was filled.

In 1988, the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON and tow mate CONSUMERS POWER passed through the Panama Canal heading for the cutter’s torch in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. On 14 July 1908, MENTOR (wooden propeller tug, 53 foot, 23 gross tons, built in 1882, at Saugatuck, Michigan) burned south of Chicago, Illinois. No lives lost. Her original name was HATTIE A. FOX.

On 14 July 1891, T H ORTON (wooden barge, 262 gross tons, built in 1873, at Buffalo, New York) anchored off Marblehead, Ohio, on Lake Erie to ride out a storm. She dragged her anchors and was driven ashore where she was declared a total wreck. She may have been recovered though. Just two years earlier, this vessel went through a similar incident at the same spot.

1891: ATHABASCA and PONTIAC collided head-on in the Sugar Island Channel of the St. Marys River and the latter settled on the bottom. The former arrived at Sault Ste. Marie, with wreckage draped across her bow. Both ships were repaired and returned to service.

1931: The bulk canaller TEAKBAY hit a rock in the Brockville Narrows of the St. Lawrence and went aground while enroute from Sandusky to Quebec City with coal. It was refloated but was listing and in need of repairs.

1964: DANIEL PIERCE, a former Great Lakes tanker, ran aground at Guanica, Puerto Rico. The ship was leaking sulphuric acid into the bilges mixing with salt water. The town was evacuated due to the potential for an explosion. The hull was condemned and eventually scrapped.

1966: The Israeli freighter ELAT, on her second trip to the Great Lakes, and LEMOYNE were in a collision near Lock 2 of the Welland Canal, with only minor damage. ELAT arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, for scrapping by September 7, 1982, while LEMOYNE was broken up at Santander, Spain, in 1969.

1993: CALCITE II lost steering and ran aground in the Amherstburg Channel of the Detroit River. The ship was lightered, released with the help of the tugs PATRICIA HOEY, OREGON and STORMONT and, after unloading at Ecorse, headed for Toledo to be repaired.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Dave Wobser, Mike Nicholls, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series – Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Port Reports -  July 13

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Wednesday saw the Oakglen depart Two Harbors at 11:06 for Quebec City. On departing she backed out, turned, and headed down the lake. Arriving Two Harbors from anchorage was the Tim S. Dool at 13:15. She had anchored at 23:48 on Tuesday. She was assisted to the dock by the newly stationed Heritage Marine tug Edward H. The Dool could depart late Wednesday or early Thursday, weather permitting. Due Thursday in Two Harbors are the American Integrity and the St. Clair. Currently the St. Clair is still in Marquette. Northshore Mining saw the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. at the dock waiting on weather. Due in Silver Bay on Wednesday was the James R. Barker, but she's been anchored off Sand Island in the Apostle's since 23:00 waiting on weather. Also due in Silver Bay on Thursday is the H. Lee White that is presently taking the Canadian shore to Silver Bay.

Marquette, Mich. – Rod Burdick
On her first trip since reactivation, St. Clair unloaded coal at the Lower Harbor on Wednesday.

Milwaukee, Wis. – Paul Erspamer
Algosteel was expected in Milwaukee Wednesday afternoon with salt from Goderich. Federal Nakagawa departed onto Lake Michigan southbound for Burns Harbor just after 9 Tuesday evening.

Gary, Ind.
Edwin H. Gott and Mesabi Miner were in port Wednesday night.

Indiana Harbor
Wilfred Sykes was unloading Wednesday. She departed in the late afternoon for Port Inland.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoma Enterprise was loading at the Sifto Dock Wednesday.

Toledo, Ohio
Federal Yukon and Evans Spirit were in port Wednesday evening.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Departure: Talia H (Che) (ex SCL Anita-17, Safmarine Anita-13, Safmarine Andisa-08) at 0111 westbound (appears to have been renamed while at anchor in Long Point Bay) and Algocanada at 0226 westbound- at dock - Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08)

Port Dover anchorage:
SCL Anita (Che) (ex Safmarine Anita-13, Safmarine Andisa-08) renamed Talia H (Che)

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Olympic at 1105, yacht Jamaica Bay (Mhl) at 1239, Pearl Mist (Mhl) at 1634 and Algoma Spirit at 2010

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Strongfield at 2253 on July 11, BBC Volga (Atg) (Ocean Breeze-09, BBC Volda-09) at 0717, Federal Columbia (Mhl) at 1015, Federal Seto (Mhl) at 1210, Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin at 1432

Welland Canal docks:
Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Departure: Beatrix (ex Fivelborg-09) at 0930. Arrivals: on July 11, Arneborg (Nld) at 1617. Bro Alma (Sgp) at 2115, on Jul 12 - Federal Mosel (Mhl) at approximately 0420, Ganges Star (Mlt) at approximately 1523, BBC Volga (Atg) at 1709, Federal Columbia (Mhl) at 2057 and Federal Seto (Mhl) at approximately 2320 awaiting orders, Lake St. Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16)

Hamilton:
Departure: Federal Mosel (Mhl) at 0204 for Port Weller. At docks: Fuldaborg ( Nld), Harbour Pioneer (Por), Fivelborg (Nld). Anchored: Rotterdam (Nld)

Bronte:
Departure: Algonova at 0019 eastbound

Clarkson:
Arrival: Robert S. Pierson on Jul 11 at 2257. Departures: Robert S. Pierson at 0807 eastbound and Ganges Star (Mlt) at 1305 for Port Weller anchorage. At dock: Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12)

Oswego:
Arrival: Stephen B. Roman at 1036 and passenger vessel Grande Caribe (Ame) at 1202. Departure: Stephen B. Roman at 2048 eastbound

 

What are you doing on Lake Superior Day?

7/13 - Superior, Wis. – For more than two decades, the third Sunday in July has been a day to celebrate the largest freshwater lake in the world. This year, Lake Superior Day is on July 16 — and there will be many events around the big lake all weekend long.

Are you celebrating Lake Superior Day by fishing, boating or swimming in the lake? While you are out there, you might think about posting some photos on social media using the hashtag #LakeSuperiorDay2017. The third Sunday in July would also be a great time to post favorite Lake Superior photos that you took in the past.

If your business involves tourism, commercial fishing, shipping or some other activity tied to the lake you have a lot to celebrate on Lake Superior Day. Your posts using #LakeSuperiorDay2017 will help raise awareness about the critical role Lake Superior plays in our economy. Cities and towns along the shoreline may wish to add their voices.

Social media posts on Lake Superior Day are also an effective way to raise concerns about threats to the lake, such as invasive species and warming water temperatures. And, it's an opportunity to highlight the progress that has been made cleaning up contaminated sites on Lake Superior — including the St. Louis River Estuary, which is the largest "Area of Concern" identified under the U.S.-Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

Whether you decide to help with a beach cleanup or go to a festival, please let the world know by using social media to post photos with the hashtag #LakeSuperiorDay2017.

The Telegram

 

200 years later, game-changing Erie Canal traffics in tourists

7/13 - Earlier this year, Jim and Jan Donnelly sold or stored what they owned in Annapolis, Md., and shoved off for New York's Hudson River with son AJ, a dog and a cat.

They moored their 36-foot catamaran in this small town north of Albany to do some sightseeing, tidy their boat and plot their course west on the Erie Canal. It's the second leg of a yearlong adventure that's taking them to the Great Lakes, down the Mississippi, along the Gulf Coast and up the Eastern Seaboard.

The Donnellys, like many people these days, are using the Erie Canal for pleasure, not business — a sea change from the original intent of this historic waterway that altered the face of commerce across New York and the Midwest by linking the Hudson River to the Great Lakes. Construction on this engineering feat began 200 years ago this month.

Though superseded by the railroads and New York State Thruway, both of which mirror the canal's route up the Mohawk River valley and west to Buffalo, N.Y., it still carries barges hauling freight too large to ship by land or air. But the canal is primarily for pleasure craft that glide through stunning countryside. The recreational boats are lifted or lowered through 35 elevation locks, docking at towns built along the celebrated thoroughfare of water.

Read more and view photos, video at this link: http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/travel/sc-erie-canal-travel-0718-20170707-story.html

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 13

Algoma's straight-deck bulk freighter ALGOWEST was christened at Collingwood on July 13, 1982. She was converted to a self-unloader in 1998, and renamed b.) PETER R. CRESSWELL in 2001.

SASKATCHEWAN PIONEER (Hull#258) was launched July 13, 1983, at Govan, Scotland, by Govan Shipbuilders Ltd. for Pioneer Shipping Ltd. (Misener Transportation Ltd., mgr.). Renamed b.) LADY HAMILTON in 1995. Purchased by Voyageur Marine Transport in 2006, she now sails as KAMINISTIQUA.

The LIGHTSHIP 103 was opened to visitors on July 13, 1974, at the city's Pine Grove Park along the St. Clair River.

The rebuilt BOSCOBEL was launched at the Peshtigo Company yard at Algonac, Michigan, on 13 July 1876. Originally built in 1867, as a passenger/package freight propeller vessel, she burned and sank near Ft. Gratiot in 1869. The wreck was raised, but no work was done until January 1876, when she was completely rebuilt as a schooner-barge at Algonac. She sank again in the ice on Lake Erie in 1895, and was again raised and rebuilt. She lasted until 1909, when she sank in the middle of Lake Huron during a storm.

On 13 July 1876, the Port Huron Weekly Times listed the following vessels as being idle at Marine City, Michigan: Steam Barges BAY CITY, D W POWERS and GERMANIA; steamer GLADYS; schooners TAILOR and C SPADEMAN; and barges MARINE CITY and ST JOSEPH.

On 13 July 1876, The Detroit Tribune reported that "the captain of a well-known Oswego vessel, on his last trip to Oswego, found that the receipts of the trip exceeded the expenses in the neighborhood of $250, and stowed $210 of the amount away in a drawer of his desk on the schooner. The money remained there some days before the captain felt the necessity of using a portion of it, and when he opened the drawer to take out the required amount he found that a family of mice had file a pre-emption claim and domiciled themselves within the recess, using the greenbacks with the utmost freedom to render their newly chosen quarters absolutely comfortable. A package containing $60 was gnawed into scraps the size of the tip of the little finger, while only enough of the larger package containing $150 remained to enable the astonished seaman to determine the numbers of the bills, so that the money can be refunded to him by the United States Treasury Department. The captain made an affidavit of the facts, and forwarded it and the remnants of the greenbacks to Washington, with the view of recovering the full value of the money destroyed. He is now on the way to Oswego with his vessel, and no doubt frequently ruminates over the adage, "The best laid schemes of mice and men . . .”

1941: The first COLLINGDOC was inbound with coal for the Thames River when it struck a mine off Southend, England, and sank. There were at least two casualties. The hull was later refloated and sunk along with another ship, believed to be the PONTO, as part of the Churchill Barriers off Scapa Flow, in the northern United Kingdom. In time, sand has blown in and covered much of the hull with only the cement-encased pilothouse visible at last report.

1978: OLAU GORM, best remembered as one of 4 freighters that had to spend the winter of 1964-1965 on the Great Lakes due to ice closing the Seaway, ran aground as f) FAST BREEZE in the Red Sea. The ship was enroute to from Piraeus, Greece, to Gizan, Saudi Arabia, and was refloated, with severe damage, on July 16. It was soon sold to Pakistani shipbreakers and was broken up at Gadani Beach in 1979.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Port Reports -  July 12

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
The USCG Hollyhock arrived Duluth early Tuesday morning for repair work at Fraser Shipyards. A few hours later, Oakglen arrived and fueled at Calumet before departing for a Two Harbors to load. Later in the morning, John G. Munson arrived to discharge stone at the C. Reiss dock. Algoma Transport arrived mid-afternoon Tuesday to load iron ore pellets at CN. Baie Comeau was expected late Tuesday night to fuel and then load iron ore pellets at the BN dock in Superior. Indiana Harbor was also due near midnight to load coal.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
The CN ore dock in Two Harbors saw the departure of the Algowood at 04:31 for Quebec City. The Clyde S. VanEnkevort/Erie Trader arrived Two Harbors at 05:52 and departed at 13:38 for Detroit. Arriving at 14:32 from Duluth after fueling at the Calumet dock was the Oakglen. As of 21:00 she was still at the shiploader. Due late Tuesday night/early Wednesday morning is the Tim S. Dool. There is no other traffic scheduled for Two Harbors on Wednesday. Arriving Northshore Mining at 11:49 was the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. As of 21:00 she was still loading. Due late Tuesday night/Wednesday morning is the James R. Barker. She is the only inbound traffic scheduled for Wednesday. Also, Tuesday saw Heritage Marine change out their tugs in Two Harbors. The Nancy J. departed Two Harbors for the Twin Ports mid-morning and saw the arrival of the Edward H. mid-afternoon.

Alpena, Mich. – Ben & Chanda McClain
On Tuesday the Alpena was port loading cement at Lafarge. The tug Samuel de Champlain and barge Innovation waited out in the bay Tuesday evening for the Alpena's departure. It was a sunny day but fog rolled in on the lake making the de Champlain blow its fog signal while anchored. The Alpena left by early evening and passed the de Champlain on its way into Lafarge.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algosteel cleared during early morning Tuesday with salt for Milwaukee Wis. Algoma Enterprise arrived to load later the same day.

Toledo, Ohio
Federal Yukon was on eastern Lake Erie Tuesday night with an ETA for Wednesday mid-afternoon. She will be loading soybeans.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrival: Golden Oak (ex Marida Maguerita -13, Sichem Berlin-08) - anchored off Port Dover at 2007 on Jul 10 and Algocanada docked at 0226

Port Dover anchorage:
SCL Anita (Che) (ex Safmarine Anita-13, Safmarine Andisa-08)

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Thunder Bay on July 10 at 2315 Algolake, tug Leo A. McArthur & barge John J. Carrick, Cedarglen at 0208, Federal Yukon (Mhl) at 0840, Evans Spirit at 0628, Algoma Olympic at 0933 and tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at 1949

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Beatrix (Nld) (ex Fivelborg-09) at 2039, Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 2115, HR Constellation (Lbr) (ex Beluga Constellation-08, Beluga Constitution-06) at 0255, Arneborg (Nld) at 0704, Pearl Mist (Mhl) at 0742, Esta Desgagnes at 0825, Bro Alma (Sgp) at 1035, Baie St. Paul at 1330, Whitefish Bay at 1615 and Algoma Strongfield at 2210

Welland Canal docks:
Arrival: Pearl Mist (Mhl) wharf 16 at 0804, departure 1358. At docks: tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Departures: Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17) at 0714. Arrivals: Beatrix (Nld) (ex Fivelborg-09) at 0720, Arneborg (Nld) at 1617 and Bro Alma (Sgp). Awaiting orders: Lake St. Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16)

Hamilton:
Departure: Thunder Bay at 2150 on July 10. Arrivals: tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at 2135 July 10, departed at 1629. Arrivals: Rotterdam (Nld) at 0130 - anchored, Fuldaborg ( Nld) at 1552 and Harbour Pioneer (Por) at 1644. At docks: Federal Mosel (Mhl) and Fivelborg (Nld),

Bronte:
At dock: Algonova at 0600

Clarkson:
At docks: Ganges Star (Mlt) and Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12)

Toronto:
Departure: Thunder Bay at 2150 - departure - tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 0744 eastbound

Rochester, N.Y. – Tom Brewer
Departure: Steven B. Roman departed early Tuesday morning.

 

Lake Ontario outflows unchanged by IJC board

7/12 - Massena, N.Y. – Lake Ontario’s release valve will not be widened or reduced beyond the current maximum, as near-record high water levels continue to decrease, the International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board announced Friday. Water flows out of the lake and into the St. Lawrence River system near Massena at a rate of 10,400 cubic metres per second at the Moses-Saunders Dam, board members agreed.

“This outflow continues to be the highest ever released from Lake Ontario on a sustained basis,” the ILOSLRB, which regulates water levels as a sub-committee of the International Joint Commission, said in a statement. “The Board reviewed current conditions of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River, and despite efforts to provide relief by releasing record-high outflows, recent wet conditions continue to sustain high water levels, causing continued severe impacts to Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River property owners, recreational boaters, businesses and tourism.”

Lake Ontario’s water levels fell by 3.5 inches overall in the last month, but underwent a temporary elevation following showers and thunderstorms on June 22.

While the outflow of the lake is remaining steady, pressure on the binational entity has ramped up. Gov. Andrew Cuomo, in the process of signing a scaled-down lakeshore property relief bill last week, called on President Trump to remove American IJC commissioners Lana Pollack of Michigan and Rich Moy of Montana, arguing they are not qualified for the role.

“I think at a minimum, their actions should be studied with the advantage of hindsight because my guess is something like this happens again and we don’t want to have the same mistakes again,” he said, during an event on Thursday in Irondequoit.

He argued the appointees “should know the Great Lakes, they should know the environmental issues they’re dealing with so when they make these judgments they’re making these judgments in the most informed way.”

Pollack of Michigan, told Great Lakes Today that she and fellow Obama-appointee Moy both expect to be replaced by Trump. Pollack said they have offered letters of resignation, but hope their replacements are found before they depart.

The governor said Thursday that he will write a letter to the Federal Emergency Management Agency with the belief that New York and the counties surrounding the lake have hit thresholds necessary to receive federal support.

The Daily News of Bataia and the Watertown Daily Times

 

Lake Erie and Lake Ontario are about to take on more water

7/12 - Buffalo, N.Y. – Forecasts suggest one of the Buffalo Niagara region's driest starts to July is about to become one of its wettest in just a matter of days. The early part of this week has been rainy, with more to come. More than an inch of more rain is expected between later Wednesday and Thursday morning with yet more showers and thunderstorms forecast.

In all, more than 2 inches of rain is forecast across the Buffalo Niagara region with even higher amounts – upward of 3 inches or more – to the west near Erie, Pa. and to the east near Syracuse, according to projections. As if Lake Erie and Lake Ontario aren't high enough, most of Lake Erie will add 3 more inches this week from rainfall into its basin alone.

Lake Erie is just 8 inches off its all-time July water level, set in 1986, and more than 19 inches higher than its long-term average, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Lake Ontario is 2½ feet above its long-term average and is at its highest July average on record so far.

The first half of 2017 went down as the third-wettest on record at the Buffalo Niagara International Airport, with more than 24 inches of total precipitation measured. As of Monday, only 0.16 inch of rain was reported at the Buffalo airport, which is nearly three-quarters of an inch below average.

Conversely, only 10 times since World War II has 2.5 inches of rain fallen at the airport during the first two weeks of July, according to weather service records.

Buffalo News

 

Milwaukee Coast Guard unit to hold change of command ceremony

7/12 - Milwaukee, Wis. – Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan will hold a change of command ceremony at which time Capt. Amy Cocanour will be relieved of command by Capt. Thomas Stuhlreyer, Thursday at 9 a.m. Rear Adm. June Ryan, commander, Ninth Coast Guard District, will preside over the ceremony.

Cocanour, a native of Wisconsin, served as commander of Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan since 2014 overseeing 23 Coast Guard units, more than 500 active duty members, 200 reservists and 1200 Auxiliary personnel conducting search and rescue, law enforcement, marine safety and homeland security missions in Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana and Michigan.

Following the change of command ceremony, Cocanour will retire from the Coast Guard after serving for 25 years.

The change of command ceremony is a time-honored military tradition that represents a formal transfer of authority and responsibility for a unit from one commanding officer to another.

USCG

 

County plans work to stabilize Fort Gratiot beach

7/12 - Port Huron, Mich. – St. Clair County is moving forward with plans to limit further erosion of the beach at Fort Gratiot County Park. “We’ve lost probably between 50 and 60 feet of the beach,” said Parks and Recreation Director Mark Brochu. “That’s pretty consistent down the shoreline.”

He said the sand along the beach has been washed away both because of current high water levels in Lake Huron and also because of unusual weather last year. On Monday, Brochu said the goal is to install five jetties “above the ordinary high-water mark to slow down the migration of the sand from the north or to the south.”

Last week, he told county commissioners a firm will engineer the project, bid out construction and administer that contract sometime this fall “to stabilize the soil.”

As of Sunday, Lake Huron’s water levels were about half a foot above the monthly average this time last year, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory.

According to a memo to board members, necessary permits from both the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Michigan Department of Environmental Quality were received by the county within the last six months.

Engineering service proposals were solicited from two firms, and county officials are recommending a $22,340 bid from Project Control Engineering Inc., with a 10 percent contingency for a total not to exceed $24,574. Commissioners moved the item to the full board meeting this Thursday.

Because the actual work won’t occur until the fall, Brochu said beach-goers won’t notice anything particularly different. And they might not notice any changes in beach depth either.

“That’s going to be a function of Mother Nature. What we’re going to do is prevent it from going further upland (or south),” Brochu said. “… People shouldn’t be expecting to get 40 or 50 (feet) of beach depth back. We’re trying to (prevent it) from affecting the buildings there.”

The Times Herald

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 12

On this day in 1978, the keel for Hull #909 was laid at Toledo, Ohio, after Interlake Steamship and Republic Steel signed a 25-year haulage contract. Hull#909 was to be named WILLIAM J. DE LANCEY and renamed PAUL R. TREGURTHA in 1990.

On July 12, 2005, the DAY PECKINPAUGH, under tow of the tug BENJAMIN ELLIOT, departed the lakes through the New York State Barge Canal to Lockport, New York for a new life as a traveling history museum.

The BELLE RIVER, renamed b.) WALTER J. McCARTHY JR in 1990, was christened on July 12, 1977, as American Steamship's first thousand-footer and the first thousand-footer built at Bay Shipbuilding.

The H. M. GRIFFITH (Hull#203) was launched July 12, 1973, at Collingwood, Ontario by Collingwood Shipyards for Canada Steamship Lines. Rebuilt with a new cargo section in 2000, renamed b.) RT. HON. PAUL J. MARTIN.

In 1986, when ENDERS M. VOORHEES was chained together with her sisters, A.H. FERBERT and IRVING S. OLDS, a severe thunderstorm struck Duluth, Minnesota, pushing the trio across St. Louis Bay, eventually grounding them near Superior, Wisconsin. It was discovered that the force of the storm had pulled the bollards out of the Hallett Dock No. 5, thus releasing the ships.

On July 12, 1958, Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd.'s FRANK A. SHERMAN entered service, departing Port Weller Dry Docks, for Duluth and a load of iron ore on its maiden voyage.

On 12 July 1871, ADVANCE (wooden scow-schooner, 49 tons, built in 1847, at Fairport, Ohio), was bound for Detroit from Cleveland with a load of coal. She and the steamer U S GRANT collided near South Bass Island (Put-in-Bay) in Lake Erie and ADVANCE sank. Her crew escaped in the yawl.

On 12 July 1852, CITY OF OSWEGO (wooden propeller passenger-package freight vessel, 138 foot, 357 tons, built in 1852, at Buffalo, New York) collided with the steamer AMERICA and sank off Willoughby, Ohio, a few miles east of Cleveland. 15 lives were lost. This was CITY OF OSWEGO's first season of operation.

On 12 July 1889, T.H. ORTON (wooden barge, 262 gross tons, built in 1873, at Buffalo, New York) anchored off Marblehead, Ohio on Lake Erie to ride out a storm. She dragged her anchors and was driven ashore where she was declared a total wreck. She was recovered and just two years later, at the same place, this incident was repeated.

190:9 The ore laden JOHN B. COWLE (i) was struck amidships by the ISAAC M. SCOTT off Whitefish Point, Lake Superior, and sank with the reported loss of 11 lives. 1917: GEORGE N. ORR was wrecked at Savage Point in the Strait of Northumberland, Prince Edward Island, on her way to New York City and wartime saltwater service. The vessel had been cut in two and towed from the lakes to be rejoined at Montreal. 1969: The deep-sea tug MISSISSIPPI arrived at Bilbao, Spain, with the lakers DONNACONA (ii) and BEN E. TATE, for scrapping.

1977: The stern section of the former canaller BIRCHTON was raised at Halifax after the two parts, which had been created for use as pontoons in the construction of offshore drilling platforms, sank at the dock.

1985: MONTY PYTHON first visited the Great Lakes as a) MONTE ZALAMA in 1970. It returned as b) MONTY PYTHON after being renamed in 1985. The ship drifted aground in the St. Lawrence off La Ronde while loading scrap at Montreal and had to be lightered to P.S. BARGE NO. 1 before floating free on July 18. This saltwater vessel was sold for scrap before the year was out and arrived at Dalian, China, on November 3, 1985, to be dismantled.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Lakes limestone trade down 7.3 percent in June

7/11 - Cleveland, Ohio – Shipments of limestone on the Great Lakes totaled 3,455,019 tons in June, a decrease of 7.3 percent compared to a year ago. June’s loadings were also 8.9 percent below the month’s 5-year average.

Loadings from U.S. quarries totaled 2.8 million tons, a decrease of 5.5 percent compared to a year ago. Shipments from Canadian quarries totaled 668,000 tons, a decrease of 14.3 percent.

Year-to-date the Lakes limestone trade stands at 8.8 million tons, a decrease of 10.4 percent compared to a year ago. Loadings from Michigan and Ohio quarries total 7.1 million tons, a decrease of 9.2 percent. Shipments from Ontario quarries total 1.6 million tons, a decrease of 15.5 percent.

Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Port Reports -  July 11

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
St. Clair arrived Duluth late Monday morning to load coal at Midwest Energy. Her fleetmate American Century departed with coal a few hours later. In Superior, CSL Niagara loaded throughout the morning Monday, and departed just after noon. G3 Marquis arrived early in the afternoon and began loading at Burlington Northern.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors saw the departure of the Edwin H. Gott at 21:25 Sunday night for Gary. Edgar B. Speer arrived Two Harbors at 03:02 and departed at 14:45 on Monday for Conneaut. Algowood arrived and went to anchor off Two Harbors at O7:30 and arrived at the shiploader at 15;10 after the departure of the Speer. As of 21:00 she was still loading. Tentatively scheduled for Tuesday are the Clyde S. VanEnkevort / Erie Trader and Oakglen. Both are due in the morning. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of Algoma Discovery Sunday night at 20:26 and she departed at 13:31 for Contrecoeur, Quebec. Tentatively schedule for Northshore Mining on Tuesday is the Walter J. McCarthy Jr.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic Monday included Federal Seto, Hon. James L. Oberstar, John J. Boland, Joseph L. Block and Burns Harbor. Upbounders included Algoma Transport, Walter J. McCarthy Jr., Baie Comeau, Tim S. Dool and James R. Barker. CSL Laurentien was at the Export Dock on the Canadian side.

Port Inland, Mich.
Great Republic was loading Monday night.

Menominee, Mich.
The HHL Rhine arrived Monday at the KK docks with a load of wind turbine components from Canada.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis.
Stewart J. Cort remained at Bayship Monday having repairs done to her unloader.

Milwaukee, Wis. – Paul Erspamer
Manitoulin was expected Monday afternoon with salt from Goderich. Federal Nakagawa shifted inside from its anchorage to a berth at Terminal 2 in the outer harbor. Frieda departed for Burns Harbor Sunday night.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algosteel was loading salt on Monday.

Saginaw River – Todd Shorkey
There have been a number of vessel passages on the Saginaw River the past few days. Olive L. Moore - Menominee arrived on July 9th, calling on the Buena Vista Dock. Indiana Harbor arrived later in the day, unloading coal at the Consumers Energy dock in Essexville. Overnight on the 10th, Alpena arrived, calling on the Lafarge Cement dock in Essexville. During the afternoon on the 10th, the tug Zeus and tank barge Robert F. Deegan tied up at the Port Fisher dock, taking the spot recently vacated by the BBC Volga, who departed the Saginaw River just before, with the assistance of the tug Manitou.

Toledo, Ohio
Joseph H. Thompson tug and barge were taken out of the drydock at Ironhead Marine on Monday, and the Tecumseh took their place.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Departures: Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin at 0138 and Frontenac at 0643 - arrival - Golden Oak anchored off Port Dover at 2007

Port Dover anchorage:
CL Anita (Che) (ex Safmarine Anita-13, Safmarine Andisa-08)

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Enterprise at 2000, Golden Oak (ex Marida Marguerita-13, Sichem Berlin-08), English River at 1121, Federal Margaree (Mhl) at 1517, Algolake at 1815 and tug Leo A. McArthur & barge John J. Carrick at 2010,

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: tug Everlast & barge Norman McLeod, Lake Ontario (Atg) (ex Federal Manitou-11 completed as Lake Ontario) at 2110 , Thunder Bay Jul 9 at 2349, CSL Assiniboine at 0404, Algoma Equinox at 0523, tug Leonard M & barge Delaware at 0415, Rotterdam (Nld) (ex Flinter Atlantic -16, Flinter Africa-11) at 0100 - delayed - in bound 1032, Beatrix at 2039 and Selasse (Gib) at 2115

Welland Canal docks:
Arrival: Isadora (Cyp) delayed at wharf 2 at 0016, departed at 1742 to anchorage. Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Departure upbound: Golden Oak (ex Marida Marguerita-13, Sichem Berlin--08) at 0531. Arrival upbound: Federal Margaree (Mhl) at 0623 departed at 1450. Arrival downbound: Federal Kushiro (Mhl) at 0205 departed at 0345. Anchored awaiting orders: Lake St. Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16)

Port Colborne anchorage:
Arrival: SCL Anita (Che) at 1906 on July 9, departed at 0856 westbound. Rotterdam (Nld) at 0106, departed anchorage at 1007

Hamilton:
Arrivals: Thunder Bay at 2130 and tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at 2135. At docks - Federal Mosel (Mhl) and Fivelborg (Nld)

Bronte:
Arrival: Algonova at 0600

Clarkson:
Arrivals: Ganges Star (Mlt) at 2321 on July 9 and Robert S. Pierson at 1402. At dock: Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12)

Toronto:
Arrival: Thunder Bay at 1317. Departure: tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 0744 eastbound

Oshawa:
Arrival: tug Everlast & barge Norman McLeod at 1310. Departed at 1953 eastbound, Monday evening tug Frances and barge Weeks 188 arrived with transformers.

Bowmanville:
Arrival: Algoma Olympic at 0830

Oswego (with Ned Goebricher):
Arrival: Evans Spirit at 1136. Departed at 2013 westbound

Rochester (with Tom Brewer):
Arrival: Stephen B. Roman at Lehigh's Dock Monday at 1100.

 

Coast Guard rescues, assists 29 people over busy weekend across Great Lakes

7/11 - Cleveland, Ohio – The U.S. Coast Guard rescued 13 people and assisted 16 others over the past busy weekend across the Great Lakes.

In one instance, Coast Guard Station Buffalo launched a 25-foot response boat-small boatcrew in response to a notification of a person in the water near Bird Island Pier, Buffalo, New York, shortly after midnight Monday. Local fishermen had thrown the individual a net but were unable to get the person into their vessel. The Coast Guard rescued the exhausted individual and brought the survivor to Erie Basin Marina for medical evaluation.

In the remaining cases, the Coast Guard rescued or assisted boaters across the Great Lakes taking on water or beset by weather.

USCG

 

Algoma Equinox: Part of the new breed of lake freighter

7/11 – The Algoma Equinox, under the command of Peter Schultz, is one of the newer ships on the Great Lakes. Recently, it was loading grain at an elevator on the Mission River. Captain Schultz took the time to give NetNewsLedger a captain’s tour of the ship.

Read more and view photos at this link: http://www.netnewsledger.com/2017/07/10/algoma-equinox-part-new-breed-lake-freighter/

 

Help wanted: Algoma Central Corporation

7/11 - Algoma Central Corporation has an immediate opening for a Captain. The successful candidate will be responsible for the following:

• The safety of the crew and the safe operation of the vessel.
• Override authority and responsibility to make decisions with respect to safety and pollution prevention and to request the Company's assistance as may be necessary.
• Implement the Safety and Environmental Protection Policy of the Company.
• Verify that all specified Company rules and regulations are observed.
• Issue appropriate orders in a clear and simple manner.
• Reviewing the Company's Quality / Safety Management System.
• Ensure that all flag state, international, local, and classification society rules, laws and regulations are adhered to.
• Maintain effective communications and working relationships.
• Responsible for reviewing and collating all work request reports for the vessel and for ensuring they are complete and are forwarded to the appropriate Operation's Manager.

Candidates must have a Master Near Coastal. Master Mariner is preferred. A valid Transport Canada Marine Medical. The candidate must be able to travel without restriction globally. The candidate must have successfully directed with strong organization, good judgment, reliability and attention to detail. The candidate will also need to demonstrate the ability to be a team player and be client focused. Excellent verbal and written communication skills and proficiency in using computerized applications is essential. In order to be considered for employment, applicants must be able to work in Canada.

If interested in a rewarding career with Algoma Central Corporation, please send your application to careers@algonet.com. Please include "Captain" in the subject line of your email. Algoma Central Corporation encourages applications from designated group members identified under the Federal Employment Equity Act.

Algoma Central Corporation

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 11

On this day in 1962, the EDWARD L. RYERSON carried a record cargo of 24,445 tons of iron ore through the newly opened Rock Cut Channel. The new channel increased allowable depths by 26 inches to 25 feet 7 inches.

On this day in 1943, the new MacArthur Lock was formally opened to traffic. The first boat to lock through during the ceremonies was the upbound CARL D. BRADLEY, Captain F. F. Pearse. There were 250 dignitaries and passengers aboard the Bradley during the lockage. The first downbound vessel was the new Leon Fraser of the Pittsburgh Steamship fleet.

The INDIANA HARBOR was christened July 11, 1979.

On 11 July 1888, the 2-mast wooden schooner JOHN TIBBETS was carrying coal on Lake Erie when she foundered in the shallows near Clear Creek, 7 miles west of Port Rowan, Ontario and then broke up in the storm waves. Her crew made it to shore in the yawl. She was built in 1863, at Clayton, New York on the hull of the Canadian schooner PERSEVERANCE, which was originally built in 1855.

The PERSIA, a 150-foot passenger/package freight vessel, was launched at Melancthon Simpson's shipyard at St. Catharines, Ontario, on 11 July 1873. She was built at a cost of $37,000. She lasted until the 1920's when she was converted to a barge and then abandoned.

MONTEZUMA (3-mast wooden schooner-barge, 341 feet, 2,722 gross tons) was launched at the John Davidson shipyard (Hull #102) in West Bay City, Michigan, on 11 July 1903. She was one of the largest wooden vessels ever built. It was later stated in the press that the reason Davidson's last large vessels took so long to build was the difficulty in obtaining the required large oak timbers and their expense. As steel went down in price, wood went up, and Davidson's last hulls cost as much as comparably-sized steel ones. At the time of launching this vessel the Davidson shipyard announced that it would not build any more wooden freight vessels. 1915: CHOCTAW, enroute from Cleveland to Duluth with a cargo of coal, sank following a collision with the WAHCONDAH in foggy Lake Huron. All on board were saved.

1940: WILLIAM F. STIFEL ran aground in the St. Clair River near Port Lambton and was struck by the ALBERT E. HEEKIN. 1964: CHEMBARGE NO. 4, formerly a) JUDGE KENEFICK and b) H.J. McMANUS was towed out into Lake Huron by ATOMIC and ABURG and scuttled in deep water about 16 miles off Goderich after sulphuric acid began leaking into the bilges of the recently-converted tanker barge.

2007: CANADIAN NAVIGATOR lost power and went aground in mud off Courtright and six tugs were needed to pull the ship free.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series, Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Port Reports -  July 10

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
There was no traffic in the Duluth harbor until late Sunday night, when American Century arrived to load coal. At Burlington Northern in Superior, Burns Harbor departed mid-morning Sunday, and American Spirit began loading. CSL Niagara was due late evening to load after American Spirit.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors saw the departure of the Algoma Strongfield at 01:17 for Quebec City. Joseph L. Block arrived at 03:19 for the shiploader and she departed at 09:50 for Gary. Edwin H. Gott arrived Two Harbors at 10:50. She will depart late Sunday night or early Monday morning. Edgar B. Speer is expected to arrive late Sunday/early Morning. Due mid-day Monday in Two Harbors is the Algowood. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of John J. Boland at 01:05 and she departed for Cleveland at 11:49. Due Sunday evening is the Algoma Discovery. There is no inbound traffic scheduled in Silver Bay on Monday.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic Sunday included Federal Columbia early, followed by Lee A. Tregurtha, American Integrity, Baie St. Paul, Roger Blough and Whitefish Bay. Upbound vessels included St. Clair, Radcliffe R. Latimer, G3 Marquis, Algoma Harvester, CSL Laurentien, Saginaw, USCG Hollyhock (for Duluth), Michipicoten and Federal Champlain.

Port Inland, Mich.
Philip R. Clarke was loading Sunday night.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis.
At approximately 6:15 a.m. Sunday the Stewart J.Cort passed through the Michigan Street Bridge and backed into the slip next to the graving dock at Bay Shipbuilding. Workers could be seen on the unloading system.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Saltwater bulker Frieda entered Milwaukee's harbor a little after 6 p.m. Saturday, proceeding with G-tug assistance to the Heavy Lift Dock in the inner harbor. Federal Champlain was unloading at Terminal 2 in Milwaukee's outer harbor Saturday, before departing onto Lake Michigan for Thunder Bay at about 6:30 p.m. Federal Nakagawa arrived off Milwaukee from Detroit Saturday and went to anchor outside the breakwater. Samuel de Champlain and barge Innovation finished their delivery of cement at Jones Island during the very early hours Saturday, departing onto the Lake southbound for Calumet Harbor.

Manistee, Mich.
Great Republic arrived late Sunday night.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Manitoulin cleared upbound early Sunday, laden with salt for Milwaukee, Wis.

Monroe, Mich.
Paul R. Tregurtha arrived Sunday night to unload coal at DTE.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrivals: Frontenac at 1107, Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin at 1500

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: John D. Leitch at 0432, Sichem Defiance (Mhl) at 0619, SCL Anita (Che) (ex Safmarine Anita-13, Safmarine Andisa-08) at 0700, Spruceglen at 0900, Golden Oak (ex Marida Marguerita-13, Sichem Berlin--08) at 1215. Anchored: Algoscotia at 1245 and Algoma Enterprise at 2000

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Fivelborg (Nld), Mississagi at 0133, Silda (Mlt) (ex Alaya-16) at 0257, Algoma Hansa at 0522, Isadora (Cyp) at 0910, Lake Ontario (Atg) (ex Federal Manitou-11 completed as Lake Ontario) at 1130 - anchored, Federal Kushiro (Mhl) at 1015, Algoma Olympic at 1410, tug Everlast & barge Norman McLeod at 1751 and Thunder Bay at 2110

Welland Canal docks:
Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Arrival upbound: Golden Oak (ex Marida Marguerita-13, Sichem Berlin--08) at 1346 Arrival downbound: Silda (Mlt) at 1235. Departed at approximately 1900 eastbound. At anchor awaiting orders: Lake St. Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16)

Port Colborne anchorage:
Arrival downbound: Lake Ontario (Atg) ex Federal Manitou-11 completed as Lake Ontario) at 1153. Arrivals upbound: Sichem Defiance (Mhl) at 1701 and SCL Anita (Che) at 2010

Hamilton:
Departures: John D. Leitch at 0219, Vlieborg (Nld) at 0653 eastbound, tug Evans McKeil & barge Metis at 1537 and Algoma Enterprise at 1846. Arrivals: Algoma Enterprise at 0900, Fivelborg (Nld) at 0956. At docks: Federal Mosel (Mhl)

Bronte:
Departure: Maria Desgagnes at 1224 eastbound

Clarkson:
Arrivals: Adfines Sea (Mlt) (ex Osttank Norway-12) at 0242 and Robert S. Pierson at 0429. Departure: Robert S. Pierson at 1343 eastbound

Toronto:
At dock: tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement

 

New Port of Ludington Maritime Museum now open

7/10 - Ludington, Mich. – After more than eight years of planning and a $5.2 million dollar fundraising campaign – almost all of it local donations – the Great Lakes museum fraternity has a new addition. The Port of Ludington Maritime Museum opened to the public earlier this summer.

Exhibitions, stretched over three levels, tell the stories of schooners, railroad car ferries, the U.S. Coast Guard, and the many other maritime activities of the region. High tech installations that include holograms, a piloting simulator, and numerous hands-on experiences are getting the most attention. Executive director Dr. Rick Plummer and his team have also liberally leveraged artifacts of all descriptions, from lenses to life rings.

Using an army of volunteers, the museum will be open every day from 10 am-5 pm. Admission is $12.50 for adults, $11.50 for seniors, $9 for children 6-17 years, or $39 for a family ticket. For more information, call 231-843-4808 or visit the web: http://ludingtonmaritimemuseum.org

Association for Great Lakes Maritime History

 

Goodtime III captain Jordan Kit shows off Cleveland sights

7/10 - Cleveland, Ohio – Cleaning the toilets wasn't exactly the "fun summer job" that college student Jordan Kit imagined when he applied to work as a deckhand on Cleveland's sightseeing pleasure ship, the Goodtime III.

But that's the only job that was available and he took it, swabbing toilets, vacuuming the main deck and doling out popcorn and Pepsi at the snack bar. He did windows. Lots of them.

It was the summer after the West Geauga High School grad's final full year at Baldwin Wallace, where he majored in International Relations and planned to work after graduation in the fall as a teacher near Beijing, educating the children of migrant workers. But his China plans fell through -- the financing didn't work -- and he found himself after graduation back on the Goodtime III, doing winter maintenance and helping to build a new bar. And before he knew it, May was coming and another sailing season, so he re-upped, this time as a deckhand.

As summer waned and the college kids on the ship headed back to school, Kit stayed on and turned into what he calls an "hour hound," working every available shift doing any available job. By the time the season ended in September, he was working as an assistant manager.

He grew up in Boston and Cleveland, never far from water, but he'd spent his life as a landlubber. And now, just on the horizon, his new life's goal was coming into focus: He wanted to become the captain of the ship.

Read more, and view a photo gallery, at this link: http://www.cleveland.com/tipoff/index.ssf/2017/07/goodtime_iii_captain_26_naviga.html#incart_river_home

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 10

On this day in 1979, Captain Thomas Small had his license for Master of Steam and Motor Vessel of any gross tonnage renewed at the St. Ignace Coast Guard Station. Captain Small, a retired Pittsburgh Steamship employee and 106 years of age, was the oldest person to be licensed and the issue number of his license is the highest ever issued by the Coast Guard 14-17 (14th masters license and 17th license as a pilot, mate, or master).

On July 10, 2005, noted marine photographer Paul Wiening passed away at his residence in Port Washington, Wisconsin.

G. A. TOMLINSON (Hull#370) was launched at the American Ship Building Co., Lorain, Ohio, on July 10, 1909, for the Douglas Steamship Co (J.J.H. Brown, mgr.), renamed b.) HENRY R. PLATT JR in 1959. The hull was used as a breakwater in Burlington Bay, Ontario, in 1971.

In 1998, the ALGOWEST was re-dedicated at Port Weller Dry Docks. The $20 million conversion of the ship to a self-unloader from a bulk-carrier was completed by 400 shipbuilders at Port Weller Dry Docks during the previous eight months. Renamed in 2001, she sails for Algoma today as b.) PETER R. CRESSWELL.

On 10 July 1866, COQUETTE (1-mast wooden scow-sloop, 90 foot, 140 tons, built in 1858, at Perry, Ohio as a schooner) capsized in a storm on Lake Michigan and was lost with her crew of four. She had originally been built for the U.S. Government.

On 10 July 1911, JOHN MITCHELL (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 420 foot, 4,468 gross tons, built in 1907, at St. Clair, Michigan) was carrying wheat off Whitefish Point on Lake Superior when she was rammed broadside by the coal-laden steel steamer WILLIAM HENRY MACK (steel propeller bulk freighter, 354 foot, 3781 gross tons, built in 1903, at Cleveland, Ohio). The MACK tried to keep her bow in the hole, but the MITCHELL still sank in 7 minutes. Quick work saved most of her crew and all 7 passengers. Three of the 34 onboard were lost. The MACK got most of the blame for the accident. The MITCHELL's wreck was discovered upside-down on the bottom in 1972. (Note: Bowling Green's database gives the date of this accident as 19 July 1911 and Dave Swayze's Shipwreck database gives the date as 10 July 1911.)

1930 YORKTON was beached with only the top of the pilothouse above water after a head-on collision in fog on Whitefish Bay with the MANTADOC. The ship was later salvaged and repaired at Collingwood.

1938 RAHANE ran aground on a shoal in the American Narrows of the St. Lawrence while downbound with steel, package freight and grain. Some cargo was removed by the lighter COBOURG and the ship was refloated with major bottom damage. The vessel last sailed on the lakes as A.A. HUDSON before departing for saltwater service in the fall of 1965.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series - Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Port Reports -  July 9

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
The CN ore dock in Two Harbors saw the departure of the American Integrity at 06:12 for Zug Island. Roger Blough arrived Friday night at 22:44 and went to North of #2. After the departure of American Integrity, the Blough went to the shiploader and completed her load there and departed at 12:36 for Conneaut. Algoma Strongfield arrived off Two Harbors at 07:48 and went to anchor in the lake. After the Blough departed, Algoma Strongfield backed in from the lake into Agate Bay where it turned and went bow first to the shiploader. As of 20:30 she was still loading. Due Sunday morning is the Joseph L. Block. Due late Sunday morning is the Edwin H. Gott, and finally due Sunday night is the Edgar B. Speer. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw no traffic on Saturday. Due Sunday morning is the J.J. Boland and Sunday night the Algoma Discovery is due in Silver Bay.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic Saturday included Paul R. Tregurtha, Algoma Equinox, Beatrix, Arnesborg, and HL Constellation late. Upbounders included American Century, CSL Niagara, Algoma Discovery and, after dark, Edgar B. Speer and Algowood. Algocanada, downbound from Thunder Bay, tied up at the Purvis Dock in Soo harbor to continue her unload. She was downbound for Sarnia around 9:30 p.m.

Port Inland, Mich.
Herbert C. Jackson was loading stone Saturday night. Algoway will be next once the Jackson leaves.

Sturgeon Bay, Wis.
Stewart J. Cort was expected Sunday morning at Bayship for unspecified repairs.

Milwaukee, Wis.
The salties Federal Nakagawa and Frieda were in port on Saturday.

Gary, Ind.
Cason J. Callaway was unloading late Saturday evening. Mesabi Miner was arriving.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Radcliffe R. Latimer departed and Manitoulin arrived on Saturday.

Monroe, Mich.
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was unloading coal Saturday evening.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Federal Barents (Mhl), HHL Rhine (Lbr) at 0030, Federal Kumano (Mhl) at 0536, tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at, Baie Comeau at 1544 and Tim S. Dool at 1617

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: English River, CSL St. Laurent at 0150, Algoma Guardian at 0527, tug Wilf Seymour & barge Alouette Spirit at 1055, Algoma Enterprise at 1555, Fivelborg (Nld) at 1905, Mississagi at approximately 2350 and Silda (Mlt) (ex Alaya-16) at approximately 2358

Welland Canal docks:
Departure: (update) tug Sharon M I & barge Huron Spirit at 1752 on July 7, returned to dock at 1855 on July 7; tug Sharon M I & barge Huron Spirit at 1658 westbound and tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
At anchor: Lake St. Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16)

Hamilton:
Arrivals: John D. Leitch at 0259. Departure: Tim S. Dool at 1425 and tug Evans McKeil & barge Metis at 1358 . At docks: Federal Mosel (Mhl) and Vlieborg (Nld)

Bronte:
Arrival: Maria Desgagnes at 0955

Clarkson:
Departure: Robert S. Pierson at 0420 eastbound

Toronto:
Departure: tug Evans McKeil & barge Metis at 1358 - arrival - tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 1442

Colborne:
Arrival: Robert S. Pierson at 1100 - departure - Robert S. Pierson at 2120 westbound

Bath:
At docks: sailing vessels Empire Sandy, Denis Sullivan (Ame) and Wylde Swan (Nld) (ex Jemo-09, Gaupoy-74, Are-60, Harriet-49, Ursula-39, Bromberg-39, Ursula-20)

Correction: St. Clair, originally headed for Calcite on her first trip since fitting out for the season, had her orders changed. She is now bound for Duluth. Late Saturday she was approaching DeTour upbound.

 

Halifax ferry set to make slow, long journey to Toronto

7/9 - Halifax, N.S. – The Dartmouth III has been sold to the Toronto Island Transit Service, a privately owned company that also runs the amusement park on Toronto's Centre Island.

The decommissioned Dartmouth III made headlines in Dec. 2016 when it went up for sale and was briefly posted on the classified ad site Kijiji. The ferry was sold "as is" for $100,000.

The ferry is currently being retrofitted in Sambro, N.S. The refresh of the boat involves a complete rebuild of the twin engines and generators, a new paint job and recertification. Sea trials will take place next week.

"We've pretty near got the overhaul complete. Any luck, it might be on its way to Toronto by maybe next Friday, if weather and everything goes fine," said Kendall McCulloch, who works for Toronto Island Transit Service and is overseeing the repair work.

Once the work is complete, the ferry will travel under its own power to Halifax, then northeast to Canso, through the Strait of Canso, around the Northumberland Strait, along the coasts of New Brunswick and Quebec, and then pass through the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario before it reaches Toronto.

McCulloch estimates the journey could take a minimum of two weeks if the weather co-operates, or as much as a month if the ferry has to stay put at ports along the way. The ferry's top speed is about 13 km/h.

"It's meant for pretty flat going and pretty smooth water," said McCulloch. "There's no keel on these boats, so they don't handle waves and heavy water. "So there will be a lot of limitations put on the weather it can travel in. If the weather's bad, it'll have to be in a harbor ... [it] could be a marathon."

Once in Toronto, the new owners intend to use it to supplement the existing city-run ferry service to Centre Island, said McCulloch.

"We have about four months where it's very busy over on Toronto Island, and [there's] a little bit of a shortage getting people over there. There's big lineups," he said. The ferry will also be renamed, although for the journey to Toronto, it will sail one last time as the Dartmouth III.

CBC

 

Indiana considers adding fourth shipping port

7/9 - Indiana may be landlocked by most definitions but its waterborne cargo traffic still ranks 11th in the nation — a position that might rise if the state expands its port system as planned. Gov. Eric Holcomb is pushing forward with a proposal to locate a port along the Ohio River in southeastern Indiana, likely in Lawrenceburg, where officials hope to redevelop the site of a former power plant.

If successful, the move would give Indiana its third port on the Ohio River and fourth port overall. Already, ports in Jeffersonville and Mount Vernon move goods to and from Indiana along the Ohio, downstream to the Mississippi River and out to the Gulf of Mexico.

The state’s oldest port, at Burns Harbor on Lake Michigan, welcomes ocean vessels that make their way through the Great Lakes.

Combined, the ports — through water, rail and road — are a pass-through point for 25 million tons of cargo each year and form an important — if not little known — part of Indiana’s infrastructure system. Grain, coal, steel, fertilizer, limestone, ethanol, salt and other products move by ship to and from the state.

“Waterborne (transportation) is really important to Indiana, and most people don’t even think about it,” said David Holt, vice president of operations and business development at Conexus Indiana, the Indianapolis-based group that supports the state’s logistics and advanced manufacturing industries.

Still, the group hasn’t yet taken a position on whether to support the proposal to build a fourth port. Holt said his organization is doing its due diligence on the topic now, and he plans to bring it up at a board meeting later this year to determine how Conexus might get involved.

Already, the state’s three existing public ports contribute more than $6 billion annually to the state economy, supporting more than 51,000 jobs around the state, according to the Ports of Indiana, the regulatory agency that oversees the locations.

And the impact is not only limited to the state’s northern and southern borders.

From aggregates used in road construction to steel for automakers and fertilizer for crops, things that arrive in Indiana via port make their way all over the state, officials said. Likewise, the ports also serve as a departure point for Indiana products bound for other states and other countries.

“Absolutely, cargos moving to and from our ports now do move through Indianapolis on a regular basis,” said Ports of Indiana Vice President Jody Peacock.

Indianapolis Business Journal

 

Photos: Life aboard a Great Lakes freighter

7/9 - In the July/August 2017 issue of Canadian Geographic, writer Ian Coutts and photographer Thomas Fricke delve into the largely hidden, multi-billion-dollar business of shipping goods through the Great Lakes. They were aboard the G3 Marquis, a 226 metres long freighter that's roughly the same size as Toronto's TD Ban Tower when laid on its side. It is one of a new generation of bulk carriers, and built to the absolute maximum size the seaway allows (also faster, less polluting and require smaller crews than their predecessors.)

View the images at this link. https://www.canadiangeographic.ca/article/photos-life-aboard-great-lakes-freighter

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 9

WILLIAM R. ROESCH, renamed b.) DAVID Z. NORTON in 1995, loaded her first cargo in 1973, at Superior, Wisconsin where she took on 18,828 tons of iron ore bound for Jones & Laughlin's Cuyahoga River plant at Cleveland.

The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS and her fleet mate IRVING S. OLDS passed through the Panama Canal on July 9, 1988, under tow of the German tug OSA RAVENSTURM. The pair was on a 14,000-mile journey to Kaohsiung, Taiwan, arriving there on November 8, 1988, for scrapping by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.

On 9 July 1876, ST CLAIR (wooden propeller freighter with some passenger accommodations, 127 foot, 326 gross tons, built in 1867, at Algonac, Michigan) had 14 crew and 18 passengers aboard along with cargo of flour, feed and deck loads of cattle as she sailed on Lake Superior. At 2:00 a.m., she caught fire about five miles off shore from 14 Mile Point. She was a wood burner and had a history of shipboard fires. The fire spread so quickly that only one boat could be launched and being overloaded, it capsized. The cries of those left on the vessel, along with the bellowing of the cattle, were heart rending. Only six survived in the one lifeboat since the cold water took its toll on those who clung to it. Eventually they righted the boat and paddled to shore, leaving the ST CLAIR burned to the waterline.

On 9 July 1891, W A MOORE (wood propeller tug, 119 foot, 212 gross tons, built in 1865, at Detroit, Michigan) burned to a total loss at Cleveland, Ohio.

1917: The bulk carrier WILLIAM S. MACK collided with the passenger freighter MANITOBA in fog off Whitefish Point and had to be beached. It was subsequently refloated and repaired. The ship was renamed HOME SMITH on October 10, 1917, and last sailed as ALGORAIL in 1963 before being scrapped at Toronto.

1967: The NEW YORK NEWS (iii) and the saltwater ship NORDGLIMT collided off Escoumins, QC, with only minor damage.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series – Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Firefighter injured while battling blaze in galley of docked Ojibway

7/8 - Sarnia, Ont. – A firefighter has been taken to hospital after fire crews responded to a blaze in the galley of a large freighter that was docked in Sarnia.

Over 20 firefighters from Sarnia Fire and Rescue along with Point Edward Fire and Rescue responded on Thursday at around 4:37pm, to the Ojibway, which was docked along Exmouth St. in the north slip.

The fire was quickly contained and extinguished, but not before it caused around $80,000 to $100,000 in damages. One firefighter was taken to hospital suffering from unknown injuries. Fire officials say the injuries are not life threatening.

There were 29 crew members on the ship at the time of the fire and all are accounted for. None were injured. The cause of the fire is unknown at this time, but investigators have attended the scene. The blaze it not believed to be suspicious.

Blackburn News

 

Rand Logistics sees wider loss in fiscal 2017

7/8 - Rand Logistics, which operates 15 bulk carriers in the Great Lakes region, reported a wider fiscal year 2017 loss amid a drop in revenue and higher interest expenses. The Jersey City-based company reported a fiscal 2017 net loss of $19.9 million, including restructuring charges and lender fees, compared to a loss of $5.57m in the 2016 fiscal year. Revenue dropped to $110.5m from $123.6m a year earlier. The revenue fall came as sailing days dropped from 3,911 to 3,601.

Tradewinds

 

NovaAlgoma Cement Carriers awarded long-term charter by Lafarge Canada Inc.

7/8 - Lugano, Switzerland – NovaAlgoma Cement Carriers Limited has announced that NACC Shipping Canada Limited, its wholly owned subsidiary, has been awarded a long term time charter agreement with Lafarge Canada Inc., for the provision of a modern pneumatic cement carrier early in 2018.

To create the new cement carrier, a modern bulk carrier owned by NACC will be converted into a state of the art and energy efficient pneumatic cement carrier. The converted cement carrier will have maximum cargo deadweight in excess of 12,500 tonnes.

The cement carrier conversion process will take place over the next 10 months, following which the vessel will immediately commence transportation service for Lafarge Canada, under Canadian flag. The vessel will primarily carry cement from Lafarge Canada’s production facility located in Bath, Ont., to distribution facilities throughout the Great Lakes but the vessel will be capable of other services for Lafarge. NACC Shipping Canada will operate and manage the vessel in Canada.

NACC is a joint venture of Algoma Central Corporation and Nova Marine Holding SA. NACC was created in early 2016 to build a global fleet of cement carriers supporting infrastructure projects worldwide. Starting with just three operating vessels and two projects under development, NACC now has a fleet of nine cement carriers and three cement vessel projects are under development.

NovaAlgoma Cement Carriers Limited

 

Port Reports -  July 8

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Great Republic arrived Duluth early Friday morning with limestone she discharged at Hallett #5. She then shifted to Midwest Energy, and was outbound with coal during the late afternoon. HR Constellation continued loading bentonite at Hallett #5, and Federal Colombia remained docked at CHS. Whitefish Bay was due in late Friday night to load ore at CN.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Joyce L. VanEnkevort / Great Lakes Trader at 02:00 Friday. There is no traffic scheduled for Saturday, but there is a chance the John J. Boland could arrive late. If not, she'll arrive early Sunday. The CN ore docks in Two Harbors saw the arrival of the American Integrity at 19:15. Due late Friday night is the Roger Blough. Due Saturday morning is the Algoma Strongfield, which will probably go to anchor.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic on a busy Friday included Kaye E. Barker, Cason J Callaway, Indiana Harbor, Mesabi Miner, James R. Barker, Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin, Lake Ontario and Frontenac. Upbounders included Algoma Strongfield, American Spirit, Kaministiqua, tug Victory / barge James L. Kuber (to Essar), Joseph L. Block and John J. Boland.

Goderich, Ont.
Radcliffe R. Latimer arrived and was at the grain dock Friday.

Toledo, Ohio
St. Clair departed layup Friday afternoon and was upbound in the Detroit River in the evening for Calcite, Mich. She is expected Saturday at the South Dock to load. St. Clair did not run in 2016.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Buffalo:
Departure: English River at 1327

Nanticoke:
Arrival: CSL Laurentien at 0342. Departures CSL Niagara at 2353 on July 6, CSL Laurentien at 1240 westbound and Bro Alma (Sgp) from anchorage at 1342 westbound

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Victory I (Mhl), Esta Desgagnes, tug Spartan & barge Spartan II at 0153, Thunder Bay at 0310, tugs Seahound & Vac with barge HM-7 at 2059 July 6 - delayed, G3 Marquis at 0537, Algoma Harvester at 0758, CCGS Samual Risley at 0813, Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17, Yildirim-08) at 0935, and Federal Barents (Mhl) at 1045

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Spirit at 0143, Solando (Swe) (ex Soley I-13, Messinia-09) at 0338 and Sharon Mi & barge Huron Spirit at 0743

Welland Canal docks:
Departure: G3 Marquis from wharf 2 early morning and tug Sharon M I & barge Huron Spirit at 1752 for Sarnia. At dock: tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
At anchor: Lake St. Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) at 1025 approximately. Departure: Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17, Yildirim-08) at 0957

Hamilton:
Arrivals: Tim S. Dool at 0802. Departure: Algoma Harvester at 0426. At docks: Federal Mosel (Mhl) and Vlieborg (Nld)

Toronto:
Departures: Stephen B. Roman at 2259 on July 6 eastbound and HMCS Toronto #333 at 1852 eastbound

Bath:
Sailing vessels: Empire Sandy, Denis Sullivan (Ame) and Wylde Swan (Nld) (ex Jemo-09, Gaupoy-74, Are-60, Harriet-49, Ursula-39, Bromberg-39, Ursula-20)

 

High water levels impacting shipping industry on the St. Lawrence Seaway

7/8 - The historically high water levels on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River this year have presented those in the shipping industry with both challenges and opportunities.

Bruce Burrows, president of the binational Chamber of Marine Commerce, says $50 million in economic activity is generated each day on the St. Lawrence Seaway. That's been disrupted this year thanks to the record sustained outflows of water passing from Lake Ontario to the St. Lawrence River.

"Well, it’s certainly an unusual year," Burrows said. "The output is about equivalent to four Olympic swimming pools per second of water now flowing."

The draining of Lake Ontario is meant to provide some relief to shoreline communities experiencing flooding. It's doing the opposite for captains who are now dealing with strong currents and speed restrictions. Burrows says that has slowed down cargo deliveries along the St. Lawrence River and Seaway. But it has not stopped shipping like it did in 1993 when water levels were also very high. Burrows credits that to advancements in technology and other innovations.

"We have ships which are much more sophisticated and able to manage these sorts of conditions the safety systems and navigation's systems are all much improved," Burrows said.

Elsewhere in the Great Lakes, the higher water levels are actually an asset for pilots. Capt. George Haynes with the Lakes Pilot Association, says that's because there's less of a risk of running aground. And in Lake Erie, Haynes says the deeper water level is allowing freighters to load ships with more cargo than he's ever seen before.

"There’s more economic benefit, more efficiency for the freighters moving cargo," Haynes said. "So it’s good in that way."

Whether on Lake Erie or the St. Lawrence River, Haynes says all captains are proceeding with caution because of high currents and the risk of causing wakes that could cause damage along the shoreline.

WRVO

 

New Sault Ste. Marie dock site now hosting cruise ships

7/8 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. – With the arrival of the first cruise ship last month at a new site, City Manager Oliver Turner is optimistic that this move will provide a significant benefit to the local business community.

Two cruise ships — Victory 1 and the Pearl Mist — have been using the new site located in close proximity to the Valley Camp and George Kemp Downtown Marina, said Turner, anticipating more than a dozen visits throughout the 2017 season.

“It’s more inviting,” said Turner, expressing the belief that passengers will more readily leave the ship to make the short walk to visit downtown as opposed to the former location at the Carbide Dock, now closed due to dock deterioration. “Overall, we wanted to make these improvements.”

Turner also added it appears as though cruise ship activity is growing on The Great Lakes and the city has already fielded inquiries from those exploring ventures to Sault Ste. Marie in 2018 and 2019.

“The city could not be more pleased with the partnerships that made the new site a reality,” he said, giving credit to the various parties that came together over the last six months. “We appreciate the efforts of our staff, Sault Historic Sites, Famous Soo Locks Cruises, the U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, MCM Marine, the Sault Ste. Marie Police Auxiliary, the cruise ship companies, Roen Salvage Company, and many others to make this economy-boosting project a reality.”

Citing a recent Great Lakes Cruising Coalition report which shows that each cruise ship passenger and crew member has the potential to spend approximately $75 to $150 for an average visit into port, city officials are hoping to see future dividends from this effort. Using the average 140 to 210 passengers as a multiplier, the sustained mooring site could theoretically inject an extra $1 million into the local economy over the next four or five years.

Soo Evening News

 

Obituary: Captain Anthony "Tony" Peter Gozanski

7/8 - Captain Anthony "Tony" Peter Gozanski, 73, passed away Tuesday, June 27, 2017, at his home after a long struggle with heart disease.

He was born on November 11, 1943 to parents Thadius "Ted" Gozanski and Mildred "Millie" Gozanski. He grew up in Superior, Wis., where he would live his whole life. His family played a large role in the local maritime community, including starting the harbor excursion boat business (which today is known as the "Vista fleet") and operating the bumboats (which were floating convenience stores for the ships).

During his youth, Tony began working on the bumboats, later captaining the excursion boats, and finally becoming a well-known tugboat captain. He piloted tugboats across all five Great Lakes and the entire Eastern Seaboard. He served as captain on the tugboats of the Zenith Dredge Company (which practically built the Twin Ports harbor) then became a ship-docking captain for the North American Towing Company. When Zenith Dredge closed operations in 1993, Tony continued as captain for their predecessor-Marin Tech. In the late 1990s, he also worked for TNT Dredging, towing their hydraulic dredge from port to port on Lake Superior.

In 2001, Tony was instrumental in the formation of the Zenith Tugboat Company, and was their primary tugboat captain, docking ships and ice-breaking, for the nine years they were in business. Tony also worked as an independent captain for other maritime companies whenever called upon. His abilities as an excellent single-screw tug operator were widely known.

He is survived by his sons Tim Gozanski and Chris Gozanski, their mother Janet Gozanski (all of Superior) and his lifelong friends Bob Eliason, Brian Soland, and Jim "Kimo" Androski. A private family service was held for immediate family only. Per the family's wishes, a Celebration of Tony's life will be held at a later date.

The Lenroot-Maetzold Funeral Home, 1209 East Fifth Street, Superior, is assisting the family with arrangements. To leave a condolence or sign the guestbook, please visit our website at http://www.lenroot-maetzold.com.

 

Help wanted: Algoma Central Corporation

7/8 - Algoma Central Corporation has an immediate opening for a Captain. The successful candidate will be responsible for the following:

• The safety of the crew and the safe operation of the vessel.
• Override authority and responsibility to make decisions with respect to safety and pollution prevention and to request the Company's assistance as may be necessary.
• Implement the Safety and Environmental Protection Policy of the Company.
• Verify that all specified Company rules and regulations are observed.
• Issue appropriate orders in a clear and simple manner.
• Reviewing the Company's Quality / Safety Management System.
• Ensure that all flag state, international, local, and classification society rules, laws and regulations are adhered to.
• Maintain effective communications and working relationships.
• Responsible for reviewing and collating all work request reports for the vessel and for ensuring they are complete and are forwarded to the appropriate Operation's Manager.

Candidates must have a Master Near Coastal. Master Mariner is preferred. A valid Transport Canada Marine Medical. The candidate must be able to travel without restriction globally. The candidate must have successfully directed with strong organization, good judgment, reliability and attention to detail. The candidate will also need to demonstrate the ability to be a team player and be client focused. Excellent verbal and written communication skills and proficiency in using computerized applications is essential. In order to be considered for employment, applicants must be able to work in Canada.

If interested in a rewarding career with Algoma Central Corporation, please send your application to careers@algonet.com. Please include "Captain" in the subject line of your email. Algoma Central Corporation encourages applications from designated group members identified under the Federal Employment Equity Act.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 8

An apparent steering gear or engine failure caused the salty ORLA, built in 1999, to ground off Marysville on the St. Clair River on July 8, 2005. She was able to dislodge herself. LOUIS R. DESMARAIS (Hull#212) was launched July 8,1977, at Collingwood, Ontario, by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd. for Canada Steamship Lines Ltd. Cargo hold replaced at Port Weller Drydocks Ltd., and renamed b.) CSL LAURENTIEN in 2001.

In 1918, a slip joint on the main steam line of the ANN ARBOR NO 5 let go, killing four men and badly scalding one other. The dead were Lon Boyd, W.T. Archie Gailbraith, 1st assistant engineer Arthur R. Gilbert, coal passer William Herbert Freeman, 2nd engineer. In 1984, the Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Company (MWT) resumed service to Milwaukee with disappointing results.

On 8 July 1908, JAMES G. BLAINE (formerly PENSAUKEE, wooden schooner-barge, 177 foot 555 gross tons, built in 1867, at Little Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin) was being towed in Lake Ontario by the tug WILLIAM L. PROCTOR. Her towline broke in a storm and she was driven ashore near Oswego, New York where the waves broke her up. No lives were lost. At the time of her loss, even though she was over 40 years old, she was still fully rigged as a 3-mast schooner.

On 8 July 1863, ALMIRA (2-mast wooden scow-schooner, 85 foot, 80 tons, built in 1849, at Black River, Ohio) was dismasted and capsized in a violent squall on Lake Ontario. All hands were lost. On 27 July, the cargo of barreled fish was found by the schooner M. L. COLLINS. The ALMIRA was found still afloat by the schooner PETREL on 30 July. She was rebuilt and sailed until December 1871, when she foundered in the ice.

On 8 July 1920, MARY WOOLSON (3-mast wooden schooner, 179 foot, 709 gross tons, built in 1888, at Bay City, Michigan) was being towed by the wooden steamer CHARLES D. BRADLEY along with the schooner-barge MIZTEC, when the BRADLEY slowed in mid-lake, causing both tows to ram her. The WOOLSON's bow was heavily damaged and she quickly sank 8 miles northeast of Sturgeon Point on Lake Huron. No lives were lost.

1899: The schooner SOPHIA MINCH, under tow of the JOHN N. GLIDDEN,was is caught in a wild Lake Erie storm and is cut loose. The vessel was blown ashore west of Ashtabula and declared a total loss only to be salvaged July 24, 1899, and repaired.

1923: EDWARD L. STRONG and GLENDOCHART collided between Locks 17 and 18 of the Cornwall Canal with minor damage. The former was scrapped at Port Dalhousie as e) WELLANDOC (ii) in 1963 while the latter was broken up at Hamilton as f) MANCOX in 1970-1971.

1949: NEW YORK NEWS (ii) ran aground on a shoal at the east entrance to Little Current, Manitoulin Island, due to low water and misplaced channel markers. About 800 tons of coal were lightered and the ship is refloated on July 9.

1973: The former BROMALM, a Swedish flag Seaway trader in 1963 and 1964, hit bottom, began leaking and was beached off Kuantan, Western Malaysia, as c) ARISAIOS. On a voyage to Osaka, Japan, with 9,700 tons of iron ore it was completely flooded and a total loss.

1977: AGAWA CANYON hit the abutment to Bridge 12 of the Welland Canal after losing power while downbound with salt for Kingston. The gash in the port bow was repaired by Port Weller Dry Docks.

1992: COMEAUDOC lost power and struck the seawall at Port Huron while upbound, resulting in significant damage to the wall.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Canadian registry closed for two Desgagnés bulk carriers

7/7 - Anna Desgagnés had her Canadian registry closed on June 22. She has been renamed Anna at her Montreal layup dock, where she has been laid up since late 2015. The Canadian registry of fleetmate Amelia Desgagnés, which is laid up at Quebec City, was closed the day before. Her name has been shortened to Amelia. Both have been re-registered at Malakal Island, which is in the state of Koror, Palau. It is unlikely they will operate there, and may instead be bound for scrap.

Anna Desgagnés was built by Warnowerft, Warnemunde, East Germany, in 1986. It was launched as Trustkavets for the Soviet-owned, Cypriot-flagged, Baltic Shipping fleet. Amelia Desgagnés was launched as Soodoc (2) for N.M. Paterson & Sons Ltd., Thunder Bay, Ont., on April 29, 1976. She was built to Ice Class 3 standards by Collingwood Shipyards, Collingwood, Ont.

René Beauchamp

 

Port Reports -  July 7

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Federal Columbia arrived Duluth from anchor at sunrise on Thursday to load wheat at CHS. Great Lakes Trader/Joyce L. VanEnkevort departed light for Silver Bay after unloading stone. Paul R. Tregurtha arrived later in the morning to load coal. She was followed into port by the saltie HR Constellation, which headed to Hallett #5 to load bentonite. During the afternoon, CSL Assiniboine departed with ore from the CN dock. Beatrix was at CHS loading on Thursday, and was expected to depart during the evening. In Superior, Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin departed with ore early Thursday morning, and Frontenac arrived from anchor to load. She was outbound at noon.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors saw the departure of the Cason J. Callaway at 00:58 from North of #2 and the Mesabi Miner at 04:40 from the shiploader both showing a destination of Gary. Friday traffic will be both the American Integrity and the Roger Blough. Both are due Friday evening. Silver Bay saw the departure of the James R. Barker at 10:25 for Indiana Harbor. Northshore Mining saw the arrival of the Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader at 13:10. She is due out late Thursday night/early Friday morning. There is no scheduled traffic for Silver Bay on Friday.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic Thursday included an early passage by Clyde S. VanEnkevort / Erie Trader, followed by CSL St. Laurent. Algoma Guardian, Radcliffe R. Latimer and Walter J. McCarthy were downbound in the early afternoon. Upbounders included Algocanada, Bluewing, American Integrity, Whitefish Bay (went to anchor at Nine Mile for several hours waiting for traffic to clear), Baie St. Paul, CSL Welland and Roger Blough.

Milwaukee, Wis. – Paul Erspamer
Herbert C Jackson arrived off Milwaukee just at dusk on Wednesday evening, moving upriver to a berth in the inner harbor. Jackson departed in the very early hours Thursday, for Port Inland. Algosteel backed into the slip at the Bulk Cargo Dock in the outer harbor at about 9 Thursday morning, unloading salt from Goderich, Ontario.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Wilfred Sykes departed with slag for Grand Haven Thursday in the early evening. Federal Champlain remained in port.

Gary, Ind.
Edwin H. Gott was unloading Thursday night at the U.S. Steel Works.

Alpena, Mich. – Ben & Chanda McClain
Vessels have been coming into Lafarge throughout the week. The tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 unloaded at Lafarge on Saturday. On Monday G.L Ostrander and barge Integrity took on cement under the silos. Fleetmate Samuel de Champlain and barge Innovation were in port Wednesday night. The Calumet was anchored off Alpena Wednesday night as well, likely waiting for the Innovation to leave before heading in to unload coal. The Alpena loaded cement on Thursday and the Calumet finished unloading and departed.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Buffalo:
Arrival: English River at 1318

Nanticoke:
Arrival: CSL Niagara at 1248. At anchor: Bro Alma (Sgp) at 1438

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Thamesborg (Nld), English River, Algoma Enterprise, Capt. Henry Jackman at 1038, tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at 1050, Algoma Discovery at 1535, Esta Desgagnes at 2034, G3 Marquis at 1954, tugs Seahound & Vac with barge HM-7 at 2059, Victory I (Mhl) at 2055, tug Spartan & barge Spartan II at 2155, and Thunder Bay at 2230

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Reggeborg (Nld) at 1100, light tug Vac at 1022, tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 1225

Welland Canal docks:
Arrival: G3 Marquis at wharf 2 at 2045. Departure: Federal Cedar (Mhl) from wharf 2 at approximately 0040 eastbound. Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Arrival: Lake St. Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16) at 1025 approximately and Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17, Yildirim-08)

Hamilton:
Arrivals: Vlieborg (Nld) at 0642. Departures: tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at 0732, Lake St. Clair (Atg) at 0831, Algoma Discovery at 1345 and Federal Weser at 1830 eastbound. At docks: Algoma Harvester and Federal Mosel (Mhl)

Bronte:
Departure: Algonova at 2328 on July 5 eastbound

Clarkson:
Arrival: Robert S. Pierson at 0811, departed at 1835 eastbound

Toronto:
Arrivals: Stephen B. Roman at 1626 on July 5 and passenger vessel Victory I (Mhl) at 0523. Departure: Victory I (Mhl) at 1905 for the canal. At dock: HMCS Toronto #333

Bowmanville:
Departure: Capt. Henry Jackman early morning westbound

Picton:
Arrival: Thunder Bay at 0216. Departed at 1153 westbound

Oswego:
Departure: sailing vessel Appledore V at 1152 eastbound

 

Coast Guard looks at voiceprint technology to end hoax distress calls

7/7 - The U.S. Coast Guard has been flooded with prank distress calls in recent months, sometimes receiving multiple calls in a single day in what authorities say is a bad joke. In the Great Lakes region alone, more than 160 phony calls for help have been received so far this year, nearly triple the 55 such calls received in the same period in 2016.

The Coast Guard is obligated to respond to all calls. Hoax calls may delay response to legitimate water emergencies, and depending on whether aircraft is deployed, it could cost up to $16,000 an hour and affect departures and arrivals at nearby airports, the Coast Guard says.

“False distress and hoax calls expose not only Coast Guard rescuers, but our partner agencies and other mariners to unnecessary risks, and potentially take away personnel and resources from real emergencies," Capt. Joseph McGilley, chief of incident management for the Ninth Coast Guard District, said.

Tracing the bogus mayday calls is a complicated affair, dependent on the signal strength of VHF radio stations dotting the coastlines, some of them more than 50 miles apart. The Coast Guard is also looking for clues in social media, but voice recognition technology may offer the best chance to track them down, according to Coast Guard Lt. Gianfranco Palomba, a U.S. Homeland Security liaison in charge of stemming the problem.

“We’re just getting more hoaxes every day,” he said. “We’re seeing a direct impact, not just on man-hours but on assets.”

Authorities think there are only a handful of people making multiple prank calls each. Voice recognition technology may not be enough for agents to gain a search warrant, but it does give them a clear voice sample that would help them match callers.

Voiceprint technology isn’t new. Large call centers use it in anti-fraud efforts, Citizen and Immigration Services is considering adding the technology to its call centers, and last week, Google announced a Google Home product that can identify the voices of up to six people using a single account, based on locally stored voiceprints.

Those systems can build a voiceprint in 40 seconds of conversation, but the Coast Guard hoax calls often are only a few seconds long. There’s another problem, too.

Carnegie Mellon University research professor Rita Singh, who has been analyzing Coast Guard hoax calls since 2014 under a separate partnership, said it’s generally simple to distinguish male and female voices, but callers may attempt to mask their voices, effectively overriding automated voice readers.

“Although probably not aware of the biometric potential of their voice, they instinctively attempt to hide their identity by disguising it,” Singh and her research colleagues wrote in Profiling Hoax Callers. “They try to sound like a real – albeit fictitious – person other than themselves.”

As the Coast Guard looks for a new technology solution, it is going old school in the meantime, aiming for a high-profile arrest, Palomba said. Conviction carries a $250,000 fine, a $5,000 civil penalty and time in prison.

“People still see that wiggle room, just because they haven’t been reminded of a really big prosecution lately,” Palomba said. “We’re looking for that deterrent effect.”

Detroit Patch

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 7

July 7, 1939 - The Bureau of Lighthouses was merged into the U. S. Coast Guard.

The BURNS HARBOR's sea trials were conducted on July 7, 1980. JEAN PARISIEN (Hull#684) was launched July 7, 1977, at Lauzon, Quebec, by Davie Shipbuilding Company Ltd. for Canada Steamship Lines. Port Weller Drydocks replaced her entire forward section and she was renamed b.) CSL ASSINIBOINE in 2005.

The DAVID Z. NORTON sailed on her maiden voyage July 7, 1973, as the a.) WILLIAM R. ROESCH. She sailed light from Lorain to Superior, Wisconsin where she loaded 18,828 tons of iron ore on July 9th bound for Jones & Laughlin's Cuyahoga River plant at Cleveland, Ohio. She now sails as d.) CALUMET.

In 1971, the CITY OF SAGINAW 31 went to Manitowoc for a thorough overhaul. While there, a fire broke out July 29, destroying her cabin deck and rendering her useless for further use. The blaze was caused by an acetylene torch, and caused over $1 million in damage.

On 7 July 1895, IDA MAY BROWN (wooden schooner, 53 foot, 20 gross tons, built 1884, at Charlevoix, Mich.) was carrying gravel when her cargo shifted in heavy weather. She capsized and later drifted to the beach near Michigan City, Indiana. Her crew was rescued by U.S. Lifesavers.

On 7 July 1851, GALLINIPPER (wooden schooner, 95 foot, 145 tons, built in 1846 at Milwaukee on the hull of NANCY DOUSMAN) capsized and foundered in a white squall in Lake Mich. The wreck drifted to a point about 10 miles SSE of Manitowoc, where it sank.

1963: The Canadian coastal tanker SEEKONK first came to the Great Lakes in 1951 on charter to the British-American Oil Co. It was later part of the Irving fleet and caught fire in the galley at Charlottetown, PEI. The ship was pulled from the pier by CCG TUPPER and beached at Governor's Island. The blaze burned itself out but the SEEKONK was a total loss and was towed to Buctouche, NB, and scrapped in 1964. 1970: PRINSES EMILIA made 3 trips through the Seaway for the Oranje Lijn in 1967. It sank as c) BOULGARIA on this date 25 miles off Cherbourg, France, after a collision with the HAGEN in dense fog. The vessel was enroute from Hamburg to Istanbul and 17 on board were lost.

1978: The British freighter BEECHMORE began Great Lakes service in 1959 and returned as c) MANDRAKI in 1971 and d) NAFTILOS in 1973. It was sailing as f) MARI when fire broke out on a voyage from Rijeka, Yugoslavia, to Alexandria, Egypt, on July 7. The ship was beached near Dugi Otok Islands the next day and eventually abandoned. The hull was refloated in 1979 and taken to Split with scrapping getting underway on July 19, 1979

1981: CONDARRELL, upbound below Lock 2 of the Welland Canal, lost power and hit the wall, resulting in bow damage. The ship returned to Toronto for repairs but only finished the season before tying up. The vessel, built in 1953 as D.C. EVEREST, has been unofficially renamed K.R. ELLIOTT by International Marine Salvage.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Port Reports -  July 6

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin arrived Duluth early Wednesday morning and fueled at Calumet before shifting down to Burlington Northern in Superior to load ore. Frontenac arrived later in the morning, fueled, and then departed and anchored off the Superior entry to wait for her fleetmate to complete loading. Indiana Harbor arrived just after noon to load coal. Early in the evening, CSL Assiniboine arrived to load ore at CN, and was quickly followed into port by the saltie Beatrix, which headed to CHS to load wheat. Great Lakes Trader/Joyce L. VanEnkevort also arrived during the evening with limestone for Hallett #5. Also in port Monday was Isadora, which was loading at CHS. Federal Columbia was at anchor off Duluth, waiting for a dock at the CHS terminal to open up.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
 Arriving Two Harbors from Duluth at 10:55 on Wednesday was the Cason J. Callaway. She was coming from Duluth after unloading limestone. The Callaway docked at South of #1 pocket dock. She loaded there until early afternoon and then shifted to North of #1 pocket dock. Late afternoon she shifted again to North of #2 pocket dock. As of 21:30 she was still at that dock. The Mesabi Miner arrived Two Harbors at 19:15 for the shiploader. Departing Two Harbors briefly was Heritage Marine's tug Nancy J. After going out into the Lake she turned around and returned to her dock. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Thursday. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the James R. Barker at 15:10. She is expected to depart Thursday. There is no inbound traffic for Thursday.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Radcliffe R. Latimer departed Wednesday afternoon. Vessels in port included Arneborg, Algoma Transport and Algoma Equinox.

St. Marys River
On a slow Wednesday, HR Constitution, Great Republic and Kaye E. Barker were upbound. American Century, Lee A. Tregurtha and Edgar B. Speer were downbound. Due downbound early Tuesday were Hon. James L. Oberstar and Stewart J. Cort.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Herbert C. Jackson was due late Wednesday or early Thursday. Algosteel is expected Thursday with salt from Goderich.

Southern Lake Michigan
Silda and Wilfred Sykes were in Burns Harbor Wednesday evening. American Spirit was at Indiana Harbor. Salties Rotterdam and Dimitrios K were at S. Chicago.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algoway was loading on Wednesday.

Toledo, Ohio
The barge Joseph H. Thompson has gone into drydock at Ironhead Shipyard. Tecumseh remains docked at Ironhead and will possibly go in for her five-year-survey after the Thompson comes out. H. Lee White and James J. Kuber/Victory were also in port Wednesday.

Regional and Welland Canal transits – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrival: Bro Alma (Sgp) at 0638 Buffalo:
Arrival: State of Michigan Jul 4 at 1252. Departure: State of Michigan at 1113 westbound

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Mississagi at 0030, Algoma Strongfield at 0611, Kaministiqua at 0550. BBC Volga (Atg) (ex Ocean Breeze-09, BBC Volga-09) at 0730, Frieda ( (Atg) (ex BBC Colorado-17) at 0752, tug Bradshaw McKee & barge St. Marys Conquest at 1256, Thamesborg (Atg) at 2200, English River at 2230 and Algoma Enterprise at 2300

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Thunder Bay at 0100, Algolake at 0615, tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 0830, Victory I (Mhl) at 0641, tug Leo A. McArthur & barge John J. Carrick at 0825, Federal Baltic (Mhl) at 1400 and Vlieborg (Nld) at 1630

Welland Canal docks:
Departure: Algoma Olympic dep wharf 16 at approximately 0451. At docks: Federal Cedar (Mhl) at wharf 2 unloading. Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17, Yildirim-08)

Niagara-on-the-Lake:
Departures: sailing vessels Denis Sullivan (Ame) and Mist of Avalon late afternoon eastbound

Hamilton:
Arrivals: Algoma Harvester at 0245, Algoma Enteprise at 0634. Departures: Algoma Strongfield at 0203, Algoma Enterprise at 2115, Drawsko (Bhs) at approximately 2225 eastbound. At docks: Federal Weser (Mhl), Lake St. Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16), Algoma Discovery and Algoma Harvester. At anchor. Federal Mosel (Mhl)

Bronte:
At dock: Algonova

Toronto:
At dock: HMCS Toronto #333

Bowmanville:
At dock: Capt. Henry Jackman

Oswego:
At dock: sailing vessel Appledore V

 

Coast Guard rescues 8 family members from water near Youngstown

7/6 - Cleveland, Ohio – The U.S. Coast Guard rescued eight people from the water near Fort Niagara State Park in Youngstown, New York, Wednesday. The eight family members were in a 14-foot aluminum boat heading to Porter on the Lake park in Youngstown, N.Y., when a wave came over the bow and the boat started taking on water.

A watchstander at Coast Guard Station Niagara saw the family waving for help at approximately 4:54 p.m., and Station Niagara launched a 25-foot response boat crew to assist. The boat crew rescued the four children and four adults. The four children all had life jackets on; the adults' life jackets had floated away with the waves. There were no reported injuries.

The Coast Guard urges boaters to always wear life jackets while on the water, have signaling devices on board, and obey the boat manufacturer's suggested maximum occupancy.

USCG

 

Updates -  July 6

News Photo Gallery  

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 6

CACOUNA's bow was damaged in a collision with the Greek tanker CAPTAIN JOHN on the fog-shrouded St. Lawrence River July 6, 1971. The CACOUNA of 1964, was repaired by replacing her bow with that of her near sistership the SILLERY, which was being scrapped. Later renamed b.) LORNA P and c.) JENNIFER, she foundered 20 miles Northeast of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on December 1, 1974.

Canada Steamship Lines’ ASHCROFT was used to haul ore, grain and coal only on the upper Great Lakes until July 6, 1932, when she was able to enter Lake Ontario through the newly expanded Welland Canal. On that trip ASHCROFT, loaded with grain from Fort William for Kingston, Ontario, was the largest vessel to traverse the canal to date.

The keel was laid for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.'s, GOVERNOR MILLER (Hull #810) in 1937, at Lorain, Ohio, by American Ship Building Company.

COLUMBIA STAR set a record for the Head-Of-The-Lakes coal trade. The vessel loaded 70,903 net tons of low-sulfur coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wisconsin, on July 6, 1997. She was renamed b.) AMERICAN CENTURY in 2006.

On 6 July 1836, YOUNG LION (2-mast, wooden schooner, 73 foot, 83 tons, built in 1830, at Buffalo, New York) was carrying railroad iron and lumber. About 12 miles from Erie, Pennsylvania, in rough weather, her seams opened and she quickly sank with just her topmasts left above the water. 3 died, but 5 managed to clamber up the masts and hold on until the schooner NEW YORK rescued them.

On 6 July 1871, CASTALIA (2-mast wooden schooner, 119 foot, 242 gross tons, built in 1847, as a brig at Sandusky, Ohio) was on her way to pick up lumber at the camp at Bying Inlet, Georgian Bay, when she came too close to Cove Island Reef and stranded in 3 feet of water. Although not badly damaged, she was about a mile from deep water. Tugs could not get to her and she was sailing light, so there was no cargo to lighten. She was stripped and abandoned. She finally broke up in a storm on 12 July 1871.

On 6 July 1871, the Detroit newspapers (Detroit Free Press and Detroit Daily Post) both published articles stating that there were rumors on the docks regarding the tug TAWAS having her boiler explode on Saginaw Bay. The rumors originated with sailors from Port Huron and proved to be unfounded. However, in a sense this rumor turned into a prediction since TAWAS did blow her boiler about three years later (14 May 1874) on Lake Huron off Rock Falls, Michigan. At that time 6 crewmembers perished.

1893: ROSEDALE, upbound and light, ran aground off Knife River, Lake Superior, in dense fog and was almost on dry land. The vessel was released July 10 and went to Superior for repairs. It combined Great Lakes and ocean service until sunk in the Bristol Channel, via collision, on April 8, 1919.

1941: RAPIDS PRINCE, enroute from Prescott to Montreal, went aground in an awkward position in the Lachine Rapids and was stuck for 2 months. The 218 passengers were removed in motorboats.

1965: LAKE TRAVERSE, built at Duluth in 1918, sank off Tortuga Island, in the Caribbean after hull plates were sprung.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Port Reports -  July 5

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Edgar B. Speer departed the CN ore dock in Two Harbors Tuesday at 09:20 showing a destination of Gary. The Hon. James L. Oberstar had arrived Two Harbors at 22:06 Monday night and went to North of #2 for lay by. After the Speer departed the Oberstar shifted over to the shiploader and departed Two Harbors at 19:54 for Indiana Harbor. Two Harbors traffic for Wednesday includes the Cason J. Callaway that should arrive in the morning coming from Duluth after unloading limestone. An evening arrival for Two Harbors will be the Mesabi Miner. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw no traffic on Tuesday. Wednesday the James R. Barker is due and should arrive early evening.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Algoma Equinox arrived in the evening Tuesday. CSL St. Laurent, Arneborg and Radcliffe R. Latimer were at docks.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic on the morning of July 4 included Lee A. Tregurtha, Frontenac, Indiana Harbor, CSL Assiniboine and Great Lakes Trader all in a row. James R. Barker was upbound in the afternoon, followed by Algoma Transport, Mesabi Miner and Federal Seto late. Downbounders included James L. Kuber/Victory, Reggeborg, CSL Niagara, Michipicoten, Joseph L. Block and Olive L. Moore/Menominee (with slag for Ludington).

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Burns Harbor was heading into her namesake port Tuesday evening. Silda remained at one of the docks.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Algosteel was loading salt Tuesday. Algoway was waiting outside of the harbor entrance for her turn at the Sifto dock.

Toronto, Ont. – Jens Juhl
Workers at Toronto Drydock are preparing to launch the steam ferry Trillium after several months in drydock. The ferry was too wide to fit in the floating dry dock so the engineers devised a way to raise the vessel using the heavy lift vessel Titan and a large steel barge. Each end of the barge was attached to the hoisting gear of one Titan's two heavy lift derricks using a heavy bridle and shackles. With carefully positioned keel blocks and hull chocks the barge was flooded and sunk to just below the Trillium’s draught. With the ferry maneuvered into position, the barge was de-ballasted and with the Titan providing stabilizing and guiding lift the ferry was raised out of the water. Launching will require reversing the procedure.

Buffalo, N.Y.
The former submarine surveillance ship turned training vessel State of Michigan arrived for the Visiting Ship's Dock at noon Tuesday where they remain tied up at 5 p.m. Calusa Coast / Delaware departed Noco in Tonawanda for Detroit Tuesday morning at 8, clearing the Buffalo Piers at 9:45.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Departure: Algocanada early afternoon

Buffalo:
Departure: tug Calusa Coast & barge Delaware at 1013 from Tonawanda

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Bluewing (Cyp) at 2002 on July 3, Whiteifish Bay at 1130, Baie St. Paul at 1356. Bro Alma (Sgp) at 1502, Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17, Yildirim-08) at 1822

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Atlantic Huron at 0841, Algoma Enterprise at 1607, Cedarglen at 1903 and tug Salvage Monarch

Welland Canal docks:
Arrivals: Algoma Olympic at wharf 16 N at 0523. At docks: Federal Cedar (Mhl) at wharf 2 unloading; tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17, Yildirim-08) for Port Weller anchorage at 1833

Niagara-on-the-Lake:
At dock: sailing vessels Denis Sullivan (Ame) and Mist of Avalon

Hamilton:
Arrival: Capt Henry Jackman at 0224, Algoma Harvester at 0245, and Algonova at 1021. Departures: Algoma Mariner at 0632, Capt. Henry Jackman at 1338, Stella Polaris (Ndl) at 1632 and Algonova at 1742 eastbound. At docks: Drawsko (Bhs), Algoma Discovery, Algoma Strongfield, tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit, Federal Weser (Mhl), and Lake St. Clair (Atg). At anchor: Federal Mosel

Bronte:
Arrival: Algonova at 1817

Clarkson:
Departure: Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17, Yildirim-08) at 1505

Toronto:
At dock: HMCS Toronto #333 Bowmanville:
Departure: tug Bradshaw McKee & barge St. Marys Conquest at 2045 westbound. Arrival: Capt. Henry Jackman at 2100

Oswego:
At dock: sailing vessel Appledore V

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 5

PAUL H. CARNAHAN was launched in 1945, as a.) HONEY HILL, a T2-SE-Al World War II tanker, for U.S. Maritime Commission.

July 5, 1991 - Charles Conrad announced he had formed a corporation to purchase the Ludington, Michigan, carferry operation from Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Company.

JUSTIN R. WHITING was launched on 5 July 1874, at Langell's yard at the mouth of the Pine River in St. Clair, Michigan. Her dimensions were 144 feet X 26 feet 2 inches X 11 feet 6 inches. Although built to be a self-powered steam barge, she was towed as a regular barge during her first season of operation.

IDA CORNING (2-mast wooden barge, 168 foot, 444 gross tons) was launched in East Saginaw, Michigan, on 5 July 1881. She was built for L. P. Mason & Company of East Saginaw. In 1858, her rig was changed to that of a 2-masted schooner. She lasted until abandoned at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, in 1928.

1940: MAGOG, part of convoy HX-52, was hit by gunfire from U-99, torpedoed and sank stern first. The crew was eventually rescued by the Finnish freighter FIDRA. There are conflicting dates for this event but many sources agree on this date for the loss of the former C.S.L. canaller.

1969: The crew of the W.F. WHITE rescued eight from a foundering pleasure boat off Southeast Shoal, Lake Erie.

1973: The British freighter TRELEVAN visited the Seaway in 1961. It caught fire while pumping oil bilge in the engineroom at Halifax as d) BAFFIN BAY and was a total loss. The ship was sold for scrap to Marine Salvage of Port Colborne but resold to Spanish shipbreakers and arrived at Valencia, Spain, under tow for dismantling, on October 4, 1973.

1975: The T-2 tanker NASSAU CAY, formerly the IMPERIAL TORONTO, visited the Seaway in 1960. It was converted to a dry bulk carrier in 1961 and was abandoned by the crew, in sinking condition, as f) NICHOLAS C. some 200 miles off Beira, Somalia, and was not seen again. The ship was enroute from Sorel to Basrah, Iraq, when it ran out of fresh boiler water and had been drifting.

1979: The Swedish freighter MONICA SMITH was built in 1952 and came to the Great Lakes that year. It returned on a regular basis through 1966 and again, as b) MONICA S. in 1967. It sank in the Mediterranean soon after leaving Cartagena, Spain, for Port Said, Egypt, as c) MESSINA II.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series – Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Another freighter strikes dock at Shooters in Cleveland

7/4 - Cleveland, Ohio – Shortly after 6 p.m. Sunday evening the freighter Great Republic struck the dock of Shooters on the Water and a recreational vehicle on the Cuyahoga River while making a turn, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

The recreational vehicle was moored in a no-mooring zone – one of the 10 or so safety locations along the river where boats are prohibited from anchoring or tying up as to provide ships, like the Great Republic, which clocks in at 625 feet in length, ample space to make turns on the tight and twisty waterway.

The boat didn't sustain any damage, nor did the freighter, and there were no injuries. The collision did do some damage to Shooter's dock, a Coast Guard spokesperson said. An investigating officer was dispatched to the scene and is waiting on an estimate from the riverside restaurant.

It's at least the fourth time in the past two years that a freighter has collided with the dock.

Cleveland Scene

 

Port Reports -  July 4

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors saw the arrival of the Edwin H. Gott at 06:50 Monday. She loaded thru the day and departed for Gary at 20:24. Arriving Two Harbors at 21:14 was the Edgar B. Speer. Also due Monday night was the Hon. James L. Oberstar. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Tuesday. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the Joseph L. Block at 11:59 for Indiana Harbor. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Silver Bay on July 4th.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic Monday included CSL St. Laurent, Radcliffe R. Latimer, Cason J. Callaway and Walter J. McCarthy Jr., with Algoma Equinox entering the river after dark. Downbound traffic included Kaye E. Barker, Burns Harbor, Federal Baltic and Roger Blough.

Saginaw, Mich.
The saltewater vessel HR Constellation was unloading wind turbine nacelles at the Port Fisher Dock on Monday.

Regional and Welland Canal transits – Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrival: Algocanada on July 2 at 2359 - Long Point Bay (Port Dover) anchorage at 1330

Buffalo:
Arrivals: tug Calusa Coast & barge Delaware at 0733 Jul 2 for Tonawanda and tug Defiance & barge Ashtabula at 1630 on July 2. Departure: tug Defiance & barge Ashtabula at 0319

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Oakglen at 1700 and Bluewing (Cyp) at 2002

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrival: tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit, tug Spartan & barge Spartan II at 0735, Prosna (Bhs) at 0602, Stephen B. Roman at 0703, Iryda (Cyp) at 0915, tug Bradshaw McKee & barge St. Marys Conquest at 0427, Capt. Henry Jackman at 0900, Chembulk Kobe (Mhl) at 1015, Baie Comeau at 1845,

Welland Canal docks:
Arrivals: Algoma Olympic at wharf 16 N at 0523, tug Bradshaw McKee & barge St. Marys Conquest at 0533 delayed. At docks: Federal Cedar (Mhl) at wharf 2 unloading. Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD on June 20 at 1046

Niagara-on-the-Lake:
At dock: sailing vessels Denis Sullivan (Ame) and Mist of Avalon

Hamilton:
Arrival: tug Leonard M & barge Niagara Spirit at 1730 (anchored). Departure: Bluewing (Cyp) at 1821. At docks: Algoma Discovery, Lake St. Clair (Atg) (ex Federal Miramichi-16), Algoma Mariner, Federal Weser (Mhl), Algoma Strongfield, Drawsko (Bhs) and Stella Polaris (Nld). At anchor: Federal Mosel (Mhl). Departures: U.S. brig Niagara at 1037 and Wylde Swan (Nld) (ex Jemo-09, Gaupoy-74, Are-60, Harriet-49, Ursula-39, Bromberg-39, Ursula-20) at 1056 for Quebec City

Clarkson:
Arrival: Selasse (Gib) (ex Selay S-17, Yildirim-08) at 0841 and Robert S. Pierson at 1115. At anchor: Maria Desgagnes on July 1 at 1600. Departed at 1713 eastbound

Toronto:
Arrival: English River at 0527- departed at 2005 eastbound. At dock: HMCS Toronto #333

Oswego:
Arrival: sailing vessel Appledore V at 2010

 

Vessels with Great Lakes / Seaway connections reported as a Casualty or Demolition

7/4 - The following information taken from July 2017 issue of Marine News – Journal of the World Ship Society

Casualties: none
Demolitions:
Amal Star (7229758; Sierra Leone) (Adelaide-10, Leo Schroder-83 - 1st trip into Seaway 1974) - 5,202 / 1972 general cargo. By Conroy Navigation Ltd., (ISM Group Inc) Marshall Islands to Kathlawar Steels, India and arrived Alang 31/12/2016 - commenced demolition 6/01/2017

Atlantic Navigator (8902292; Malta) (Lykes Energizer-04 - 1st trip into Seaway 2000, Thorsriver-00 - 1st trip into Seaway 1999, Kovrov-97) 16,075 / 1992 general cargo / Ro-Ro capability). By Atlantic Energy Navigation Ltd., Atlantic Ro Ro Carriers Inc. (ARRC), Malta to Premium Trade Corp Ltd. Bangladesh and arrived Chittagong 5/01/2017 - commenced demolition 15/01/2017

Lamar (7638959; Tanzania) Wael F-11, Petuna-02, Apollonia Nobility-99, Mouna-88, Bravoexporter-83 - 1st trip into seaway 1978) - 3,885 / 1977 general cargo. By Jarina Maritime Co. Marshall Islands, to Shiv Marine Industries Pvt., India and arrived Alang 29/12/2016 - commenced demolition 4/01/2017

Zen Vibe (8002781; Panama) (Stheno-14, Mariella-07, Claudia M-99, Claudia I-97 - 1st trip into Seaway 1993, Claudia Smits-88 - 1st trip into Seaway 1986) 3,702 / 1981 self-discharging bulk carrier. By Med Services Co. ShPK (San Nikolla Shipmanagement SA), Albania to Ege Gemi Sokum San Ve Tic AS Turkey, and arrived 28.12.2016 - commenced demolition 31.12.2016

Information compiled by Barry Andersen and René Beauchamp

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 4

July 4, 1996 - The veteran Buffalo fireboat EDWARD M. COTTER, built in 1900, was designated a National Historic Landmark by the U. S. National Parks Service.

The WILLIS B. BOYER museum ship was opened to the public at Toledo, Ohio in 1987. She was built by Great Lakes Engineering Works (Hull#82) in 1912 as a.) COL. JAMES M. SCHOONMAKER. Renamed b.) WILLIS B. BOYER in 1969 and COL. JAMES M. SCHOONMAKER in 2011.

In 1976, the SAM LAUD grounded entering Buffalo, New York. She was dry docked at Lorain, Ohio, for repairs to bottom plates of No. 1, 2 and 3 port and starboard tanks. Also on this day in 1976, the H. LEE WHITE struck the Algoma Steel plant dock at the Canadian Soo resulting in damage to her stern amounting to $108,000 at the repair yard of Sturgeon Bay.

The JOSEPH S. YOUNG, a.) ARCHERS HOPE of 1945, was commissioned July 4, 1957. She was the first of seven T-2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service. The YOUNG was renamed c.) H. LEE WHITE in 1969 and d.) SHARON in 1974. She was scrapped at Brownsville, Texas in 1986.

On July 4, 1953, the JOHN G. MUNSON set a Great Lakes record for limestone by loading 21,011 tons of limestone at Calcite, Michigan. This record for limestone stood until being broken by the Canada Steamship Lines self-unloader MANITOULIN late in the 1966 season.

July 4, 1952 - The PERE MARQUETTE 18 of 1911, was laid up due to railroad strike. She was never to operate again and was scrapped at Hamilton, Ontario, in 1957.

The wooden propeller freighter MAINE, owned by Northern Transportation Co., had sailed from Chicago and was on Lake Ontario on 4 July 1871, when Fireman Orsebius Kelley stoked the fire at 8 p.m. and went to the porter's room to get a lamp. When he returned, the boiler exploded with such force that Kelley was mortally wounded. The blast also killed Engineer M. H. Downer, deckhand Joshua Kelley (the fireman's brother), Halbert Butterfield (a 13 year old passenger) and his mother. The MAINE still floated after the blast. She was repaired and put back in service. Including this boiler explosion, she had four major mishaps in her career. She sank in 1872, burned in 1898, and finally burned again in 1911.

On 4 July 1900, during her maiden voyage from St. Clair, Michigan, to Cleveland, Ohio, the wooden steam barge ALFRED MITCHELL ran aground at Bar Point Light. It was claimed that the steering gear broke which rendered the boat unmanageable. Later that same day the MITCHELL was released by the wrecker SAGINAW.

About 9 p.m. on 4 July 1874, the steam barge W H BARNUM, with the schooner THOMAS W FERRY in tow, collided with the bark S V R WATSON near Point Pelee on Lake Erie. The WATSON sank in 28 feet of water. She was raised about two weeks later by the Coast Wrecking Company.

July 4, 1958 - The keel for the second of two new bulk freighters for Interlake Steamship Co. was laid at Great Lakes Engineering Works shipyard at River Rouge, Michigan on Wednesday morning June 25. Assigned Hull 302, the ship will be 689 feet long, 75 feet beam and 37-1/2 feet molded depth with a designed maximum cargo capacity of about 24,000 tons. H. C. Downer & Associates of Cleveland did the design work. The ship will be powered by a 6,000 shp steam turbine main engine with coal-fired boilers. Hull 302 was eventually named HERBERT C. JACKSON.

Interlake's other new ship, the 710-ft. flagship JOHN SHERWIN (Hull#192) at Toledo, Ohio, joined the Great Lakes bulk cargo fleet in May of that year. 1959: The tug GRAND BANK, pushing a barge, sank in Lock 4 of the Welland Canal and the captain was lost. The vessel, built at New Orleans in 1940 as SST-123, was salvaged and, as of 1997, was operating out of Delta, BC.

July 4, 1995 - While the United States celebrated its Independence Day, a small fleet gathered 20 miles off of Whitefish Point in Lake Superior as the bell from the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald was raised and taken aboard the Purvis Marine Tug Anglian Lady. The bell would later be taken to Michigan State University in Lansing where it would be cleaned with the name EDMUND FITZGERALD applied on the bell once again. The bell was later to taken to the museum at Whitefish Point and put on display as a memorial to remember the 29 men crew. The next day divers placed a new bell inscribed with the names of the 29 men lost in the sinking.

1973: The Liberian flag bulk carrier Florence visited the Great Lakes in June 1973. The ship was outbound when it collided, in fog, with the tanker St. Spyridon, inbound from Venezuela with 32,500 tons of Bunker C oil, off Les Escoumins, QC. Both ships were damaged. All on board were rescued and the two vessels were ultimately repaired. Florence was scrapped at San Esteban de Pravia, Spain, in 1976 and St.Spyridon at Vigo, Spain, as f) Globe Maritima in 1982.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Denny Dushane, Lake Huron Lore Society, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

Local official worries about Goderich grain elevator’s future

7/3 - Goderich, Ont. – The reeve of Ashfield-Colborne-Wawanosh says unless somebody gives a little he believes the grain elevator in Goderich owned by Parrish and Heimbecker could be in jeopardy.

Ben Ven Diepenbeek says the problem is dust that’s created when a ship is being loaded with grain. Van Diepenbeek says some neighbors have started complaining to the Environment Ministry about the dust, but he says it’s a natural by-product anytime grain is moved or handled. He adds that it’s been that way for as long as the grain elevators have been there 150 years.

Van Diepenbeek says the company has spent millions of dollars on systems, like hoods over their conveyor belts, to collect the dust, and he says that gets a lot of it. But he admits some the dust escapes and becomes airborne and if the wind is right, that dust is blown towards some of the neighbors.

Van Diepenbeeek says at least two ships have been turned back from the elevators in Goderich and the grain they were going to pick up has been trucked to the Parrish and Heimbecker elevators in Hamilton.

He says the elevators provide jobs and taxes to the municipality, but it’s not sustainable to continue to spend about $14 a ton to ship corn to Hamilton because it can’t loaded in Godeirch. Van Diepenbeek adds the loading only takes place at certain times of the years and only becomes a significant problem when the wind is from the northwest.

Blackburn News

 

Port Reports -  July 3

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors saw the arrival of the American Spirit at 04:00. After loading through the day, she departed at 17:05. Due Monday at the CN ore dock is the Edwin H. Gott arriving in the morning. Arriving later in the day is the Edgar B. Speer, currently running checked down on Lake Superior. Finally, due Monday night is the Hon. James L. Oberstar. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the arrival of the Joseph L. Block at 10:25. She is due out Monday. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Monday in Silver Bay.

Thunder Bay
Reggeborg, Arneborg and Federal Baltic were at docks Sunday. Lake Ontario was at anchor.

St. Marys River
Atlantic Huron was downbound Sunday morning, with the tug Zeus and barge following in the early afternoon. Cedarglen, Algoma Enterprise and Philip R. Clarke were downbound in the late afternoon. Upbound traffic included the barge Menominee (ex Lewis J. Kuber, on her first trip up the St. Marys River under that name) / tug Olive L. Moore and Hon. James L. Oberstar. Federal Columbia departed the Essar Export Dock headed upbound at 9 p.m., just as Marinette/Olive L. Moore was arriving at the steel plant to unload.

Cedarville, Mich.
Wilfred Sykes was arriving to load Sunday evening.

Port Inland, Mich.
American Mariner was loading Sunday night, with the tug Undaunted and her barge next in line.

Southern Lake Michigan
Algoma Transport and Silda were at Burns Harbor on Sunday. James R. Barker was unloading Sunday night at Indiana Harbor. Vlieborg and Dimitros K were at S. Chicago.

Toledo, Ohio
Joseph H. Thompson was at Ironhead Shipyard Sunday. Tecumseh has been there for several days but has yet to enter the drydock.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Buffalo:
Arrival: tug Defiance and barge Ashtabula at 1630

Nanticoke:
Departure: tug Leo A. McArthur & barge John J. Carrick at 0024, Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin at 0938 and Algosteel at 1503. Arrival: Algocanada at 2359

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Equinox at 2338 July 1, CSL Assiniboine at 0336, tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 0536, Thunder Bay at 0441, Algoma Hansa at 1843, Algoma Olympic at 1824 and Fivelborg (Nld) at 1852

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Discovery at 2345 on July 1, Alina (Atg) at 0100, Spruceglen at 1140, HHL Amur (Lbr) at 1445, sailing vessel Appledore V at 0712. Delayed: Edzard Schulte (IOM) at 1821

Welland Canal docks:
At docks: Federal Cedar (Mhl) at wharf 2 unloading, tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD on June 20 at 1046

Niagara-on-the-Lake:
Arrivals: sailing vessels Denis Sullivan (Ame) and Mist of Avalon, gave destination as Niagara-on-the-Lake, eta July 3 in the morning

Hamilton:
Departures: Algoma Equinox at 2150 on July 1 and Algoma Olympic at 1508 - tall ships - Empire Sandy at 1253, St. Lawrence 2 at 1415, Denis Sullivan at 1913 and Mist of Avalon at 1924. Arrivals: Lake St. Clair (Atg) ex Federal Miramichi-16 at 0435. Anchored: Federal Mosel (Mhl) July 1 at 1839 and Algoma Discovery at 1222. At docks: Algoma Strongfield, Federal Weser (Mhl), Algoma Mariner, Federal Mosel (Mhl). Sailing vessels at docks: Wild Swan (Nld) (ex Jemo-09, Gaupoy-74, Are-60, Harriet-49, Ursula-39, Bromberg-39, Ursula-20) and U.S. brig Niagara,

Bronte:
Departure: Bro Anna (Sgp) at 1215 eastbound

Clarkson:
Anchored: Maria Desgagnes on June 30 at 2254, out to anchorage July 1 at 1600

Toronto:
Arrivals: Radium Yellowknife July 1 at 0207 and M.R.Kane at 0207. Departure: tug Radium Yellowknife at 0850. At dock: HMCS Toronto #333

Bowmanville:
Departure: tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 0352 westbound

 

Updates -  July 3

News Photo Gallery  

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 3

On this day in 1943, the J. H. HILLMAN JR (Hull#524), the 14th of 16 Maritime-class ships being built for Great Lakes Service, was launched at the Great Lakes Engineering yard at Ashtabula, Ohio. After having the stern of the CANADIAN EXPLORER, ex CABOT of 1965, attached, her forward section still exists today as the ALGOMA TRANSFER.

The JOHN B. AIRD was christened June 3, 1983, at Thunder Bay, Ontario for Algoma Central Marine, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.

U.S. Steel's ROGER BLOUGH was moved out of the dry dock at Lorain, Ohio, on June 3, 1972.

In 1954, CLIFFS VICTORY successfully completed her sea trials.

FRANK ARMSTRONG departed light from Ashtabula, Ohio, on her maiden voyage in command of Captain H. Chesley Inches June 3, 1943, bound for Superior, Wisconsin, to load iron ore.

PATERSON (i) entered service on June 3, 1954, with 440,000 bushels of wheat from Port Arthur, Ontario. She was scrapped at Thunder Bay, Ontario, in 1985.

On 3 July 1872, the wooden steam barge MARY MILLS was launched at P. Lester's yard at Marysville, Michigan.

On 3 July 1872, GRACE DORMER (wooden propeller passenger & package freight ferry, 71 foot, 66 gross tons, built in 1868, at Buffalo, New York) had just finished loading a cargo of fish at St. James, Beaver Island, when she caught fire and burned. One life was lost. The vessel was rebuilt and lasted until she burned at the bone-yard at Grand Island, New York in 1925.

1964: The A. & J. FAITH, idle at Cleveland and under arrest, was struck by the MIKAGESAN MARU when the latter was caught by a wind gust. The former sustained $5,000 in damage. This ship was sold and renamed c) SANTA SOFIA at Cleveland in August 1964. It arrived for scrapping at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, as d) COSMOS MARINER in August 1970. The latter, a Japanese freighter that made 6 trips to the Great Lakes from 1962 to 1966, was scrapped at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, as b) UNION SINGAPORE in 1979.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series from the Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 

U.S.S. Billings littoral combat ship christened, launched Saturday

7/2 - Marinette, Wis. – On Saturday, an American tradition continued, as the newest littoral combat ship out of Fincantieri Marinette Marine was christened and launched after months of production.

Named after Montana’s largest city, the U.S.S. Billings will carry two crews, at about 75 sailors each. For more than a year, crews have been hard at work on the ship, but there’s still more to be done.

“They will complete the construction of the ship. As you can see, compared to other ships that are already further along in the cycle, there’s more equipment that needs to be installed on there,” says Nathan Rowan, the Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Billings LCS 15. “That's going to take roughly a little over a year.”

For now, onlookers are marveling at the work done so far.

“My heart right now is with those who will be serving on her,” says Sharla Tester, the Ship Sponsor. “For however long she's going to be in the waters. Montana's a proud state. We're going to make sure that she's taken care of, and the crew is too.”

At the christening and launch, Wisconsin politicians from both sides came out, bringing their congratulations and support. They say shipyards like Marinette Marine benefit the local economy, while working to maintain the United States’ freedom. The estimated cost of the U.S.S. Billings is more than $300 million.

Watch a video of the launch at this link: http://www.wbay.com/content/news/USS-Billings-littoral-combat-ship-christened-and-launched-432016773.html

 

Port Reports -  July 2

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Roger Blough arrived Duluth early Saturday morning and docked at Calumet to fuel. Joseph L. Block arrived with limestone to discharge at CN during the afternoon. In Superior, Burns Harbor arrived before sunrise on Saturday and was still loading at Burlington Northern Saturday night. Roger Blough was due to load after Burns Harbor departed.

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors saw no boat traffic on Saturday. Due early Sunday morning is the American Spirit. She is the only traffic for Sunday in Two Harbors. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the American Integrity loading thru the day and departing at 19:17. Sunday Northshore Mining will see the arrival of the Joseph L. Block, arriving from Duluth after unloading limestone.

St. Marys River
Traffic Saturday included the upbound Erie Trader/Clyde S. VanEnkevort, and Stewart J. Cort. Downbounders included Indiana Harbor, Lee A. Tregurtha, Iryda, Mesabi Miner, Paul R. Tregurtha, Cuyahoga, CSL Welland and, after dark, Baie Comeau.

Cedarville, Mich. – Denny Dushane
The barge Menominee and tug Olive L. Moore were expected to arrive during the early evening hours on Saturday to load. Due in for Sunday is the Wilfred Sykes in the late evening. The barge Great Lakes Trader along with the tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort are due Monday in the early morning.

Port Inland, Mich. – Denny Dushane
Manitoulin arrived on Saturday, Canada Day, in the early morning hours. Two vessels are due for Sunday, the first being the Sam Laud in the early morning followed by the American Mariner in the late afternoon. Due in for Monday is the barge Pere Marquette 41 and tug Undaunted in the early morning.

Stoneport, Mich. – Denny Dushane
There were no vessels loading on Saturday and none are due until Sunday when the Cason J. Callaway is expected in the morning to load. Due in for Monday is the Herbert C. Jackson in the early evening. There are no vessels scheduled for July 4, Independence Day. Two vessels are scheduled for Wednesday with the Kaye E. Barker due first during the early afternoon followed by the Calumet in the late evening. Rounding out the schedule and due in for Thursday, July 6 is the Algosteel arriving in the late afternoon.

Calcite, Mich. – Denny Dushane
John G. Munson and the Calumet loaded at Calcite's loading docks on Saturday. The Munson at the North Dock with an ETD posted for 6 p.m. while the Calumet at the South Dock did not have an ETD posted. Due in for Sunday is the Manitowoc at noon for the North Dock.

Toledo, Ohio – Denny Dushane
Mesabi Miner is expected at the Torco Dock to unload a cargo of iron ore pellets on Sunday in the late evening. Also due at Torco is the barge James L. Kuber and tug Victory on Wednesday arriving during the mid-afternoon. They are due to return to Torco on July 11 in the morning. There is nothing due in or scheduled at the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock. At the CSX Coal Dock, the barge James L. Kuber and tug Victory are due on Thursday, July 6 in the early morning to load. Also due at the CSX Coal Dock to load is Algoma Olympic on Thursday, July 6 arriving during the late morning. Algolake is due at CSX on Sunday, July 9 arriving in the early evening hours to load. Vessels in port for Saturday included the tug Genesis Victory and barge GM 6506 along with the H. Lee White. A recap of vessel traffic in Toledo for the past few days includes the following vessels arriving and departing: Manitowoc arrived and departed on July 1, the tug G.L. Ostrander/barge Integrity, Tug Calusa Coast and barge Delaware arrived June 30 and departed on July 1. Tug Victory and barge James L. Kuber arrived and departed on June 30. The Saginaw arrived on June 29 with a grain cargo from Thunder Bay and departed on June 30. The Joseph H. Thompson arrived at Torco Dock on June 29 and departed the same day. The Tecumseh arrived on June 29 and the tug Genesis Victory and barge GM 6506 arrived on June 29. Evans Spirit arrived on June 26 and departed on June 28. Work also continues on the St. Clair, as they are expected to sail sometime around July 4.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Departure: Algosea at 0333. Arrival: tug Leo A. McArthur & barge John J. Carrick at 0900, Algosteel at 1803 and Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin at 1900

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Everlast & barge Norman McLeod at 0021, Stephen B. Roman at 0526, Federal Cedar at 0904

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Olympic June 30 at 2340, Algoscotia at 0200, Algosea at 0646, Federal Mosel (Mhl) at 0653, Mississagi at 1017 and Algoma Discovery at 2100

Welland Canal docks:
Arrival: Federal Cedar (Mhl) stopped wharf 2 at 0926 to unload. Tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD on June 20 at 1046

Hamilton:
Arrivals: Algoma Strongfield at 1305, Federal Weser (Mhl) at 1319, Algoma Mariner at 1341, Federal Mosel (Mhl) at 1839 and Algoma Olympic at 1857. At docks: Bluewing (Cyp) since June 24 at 0430, Algoma Equinox, Stella Polaris (Nld) and Drawsko (Bhs). Sailing vessels at docks: Wild Swan (Nld) (ex Jemo-09, Gaupoy-74, Are-60, Harriet-49, Ursula-39, Bromberg-39, Ursula-20), U.S. brig Niagara, Denis Sullivan, Mist of Avalon, St. Lawrence 2 and Empire Sandy on June 30 at 1134

Bronte:
At dock: Bro Anna (Sgp)

Clarkson:
Arrival: Maria Desgagnes on June 30 at 2254. Moved to anchorage at 1600

Toronto:
Departure: English River at 0627 eastbound. At dock: HMCS Toronto #333 at 1629 Oshawa:
Departure: Federal Weser (Mhl) at 0804 for Hamilton

Bowmanville:
Arrival: tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 0600

Oswego:
Departure: Evans Spirit at 1655 eastbound

 

Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center presents: “Fathom That!”

7/2 - Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center is hosting the free evening lecture series “Fathom That!” offered Wednesdays at 7 p.m. in the lecture hall. Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center is located at 600 Canal Park Drive in historic Canal Park in Duluth. Admission is free.

This month’s programs are: • July 12th – Tall Waters, Steel Ships: LSMVC Park Ranger India takes a look at the Mataafa storm of 1905 that wrecked 29 vessels.

• July 19th – With All Hands: LSMVC Park Ranger Alyssa shares the tragic last days of the Edmund Fitzgerald.

• July 26th – Eastland Disaster: On July 24, 1915 tragedy struck families preparing for a fun excursion on Lake Michigan. Join LSMVC Ranger Denise and learn about the shipwreck that took 844 lives but never left the dock.

Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 2

In July 2, 1966, the SIMCOE entered service for Canada Steamship Lines. Renamed b.) ALGOSTREAM in 1994, she was scrapped at Alang, India in 1996, as c.) SIMCOE. The railroad carferry TRANSIT was launched at Walkerville, Ontario, on 2 July 1872, at the Jenkins Brothers shipyard.

Before noon, Saturday, 2 July 1870, several attempts were made to launch the barge AGNES L POTTER at Simon Langell's yard at St. Clair, Michigan. Nothing happened until 3 p.m. when the vessel moved about 100 feet but still was not launched. The tug VULCAN arrived at 8 a.m. the following day and broke the line on the first attempt to pull the vessel off the ways. A 10-inch line was obtained in Port Huron and at 2 p.m. a second effort only moved the barge about four feet. Finally, on the third attempt, the VULCAN pulled her into the water. The POTTER's dimensions were 133 feet X 27 feet X 9 feet, 279 gross tons and she was built for the iron ore trade. She was named for the daughter of the general superintendent of Ward's Iron Works of Chicago. She lasted until 1906.

1990 CUNARD CAVALIER first visited the Great Lakes in 1978 and returned later that year as b) OLYMPIC HARMONY. The ship went aground off Port Muhammad Bin Asimov, Pakistan, on this date in 1990 as d) VILLA while en route to West Africa. It was abandoned July 13. The hull was refloated November 30, 1990, and arrived at Singapore, under tow, on May 16, 1991. The ship was declared a total loss and reached Alang, India, for scrapping on February 2, 1992.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series, Marine Historical Society of Detroit. This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Updates -  July 2

News Photo Gallery  - Additional photos submitted during the past month.

 

Cliffs Natural Resources to invest $70 million in upgrades to taconite plant

7/1 - Cliffs Natural Resources Inc. will modify one of its taconite facilities to support its planned hot-briquetted iron plant (HBI) with better-quality pellets, chairman and chief executive officer Lourenco Goncalves said Wednesday.

Speaking at the 32nd annual Steel Survival Strategies conference in New York, N.Y., USA, Goncalves said the US$70 million project is designed to reduce silica content of the pellets being produced at its Northshore Mining operation in Silver Bay, Minn.

Goncalves said that through the project, Cliffs will install a dedicated line for low-silica pellets, ensuring a more stable production flow.

From the sidelines of the conference, Clifford T. Smith, executive vice president for business development, said the project will progress in parallel with the HBI plant. Engineering has begun, he said, and the new equipment will be started up to coincidence with the opening of the HBI plant.

Cliffs revealed the location for the $US700 million plant earlier this month, saying it had chosen a plot of land along the Maumee River in Toledo, Ohio, near the southwestern shores of Lake Erie. The plant is being designed to produce 1.6 million tons annually and is to enter production in 2020.

Goncalves told conference attendees that the target market for the plant’s output is the electric arc furnaces in the Great Lakes region. Cliffs also could barge briquettes through the Great Lakes and down the Mississippi Rivers to southern EAF operators, he said, although the transportation costs would reduce some of the cost advantages that the northern operators will enjoy.

Source: AIST

 

Port Reports -  July 1

Two Harbors/Silver Bay, Minn. – Gary A. Putney
Two Harbors saw the departure Friday morning of Indiana Harbor at 02:20 for Zug Island. Arriving Two Harbors at 12:30 and departing at 20:17 was the Baie Comeau with pellets for Quebec City. There is no traffic scheduled for the CN ore dock on Saturday. Northshore Mining in Silver Bay saw the departure of the James R. Barker at 01:55 for Indiana Harbor. Due late Friday night is the American Integrity coming from Marquette after unloading coal. There is no inbound traffic scheduled for Silver Bay on Saturday.

St. Marys River
Traffic on a slow Saturday included Joseph L. Block upbound in the morning and the barge PML 900/Anglian Lady up in the early afternoon. CSL Niagara was upbound at dusk. Spruceglen, tug Sharon M 1 / barge and HHL Amur were downbound in the evening. Federal Columbia remained at the Essar Export Dock.

Fairport, Ohio – John Unterwagner
Thursday evening, Manitowoc was backed into the Morton Salt dock to load salt. Friday afternoon she was still loading, when the Joseph H Thompson pulled in with a load of limestone from Marblehead, Oh. The Thompson was nose to nose with the Manitowoc at about 2:15 p.m. Friday.

Regional and Welland Canal transits - Barry Andersen

Nanticoke:
Arrival: tug Leo A. McArthur & barge John J. Carrick - anchored Long Point Bay at 1840. At dock: Algosea

Welland Canal upbound:
Arrivals: Algoma Guardian, tug Leo A. McArthur & barge John J. Carrick at 0238, Rotterdam (Nld) (ex Beluga Constellation-16, Beluga Constitution-11) at 0402, Federal Nakagawa (Mhl) at 0825, tug Petite Forte & barge St. Marys Cement at 1705, Solando (Swe) at 1707. Delayed: tug Wilf Seymour & barge Alouette Spirit at 1900, tug Everlast & barge Norman McLeod at 2100

Welland Canal downbound:
Arrivals: G3 Marquis at 0527, HHL Rhine (Lbr) (launched as Beluga Feasibility) at 0835, Furuholmen (Pan) (ex CF Zachary-11) at 0835, Pia (Atg) (ex BBC Alabama-17) at 1303, tug Sea Eagle II & barge St. Marys Cement II at 1005,

Welland Canal docks:
Departure: Frontenac at 0643 on June 29 westbound. At dock: tug Presque Isle in deep dock at PWDD on June 20 at 1046

Port Weller anchorage:
Departure: Drawsko (Bhs) at approximately 0735 bound for Hamilton

Port Colborne anchorage:
Arrival: Federal Nakagawa (Mhl) at 1755

Hamilton:
Arrivals: Stella Polaris (Nld) at 0830 and Drawsko (Bhs) at 1129. Departure: correction Algolake on June 28 at 2139 westbound and today Floretgracht (Nld) at 0905 eastbound. At docks: Bluewing (Cyp) since June 24 at 0430, Algoma Equinox, sailing vessel Wild Swan (Nld) (ex Jemo-09, Gaupoy-74, Are-60, Harriet-49, Ursula-39, Bromberg-39, Ursula-20), brig Niagara and sailing vessel St. Lawrence 2

Oakville:
Departure: Algonova at 0940 eastbound

Toronto:
At dock: HMCS Toronto #333 at 1629

Oshawa:
Arrival: Federal Weser (Mhl) @ 1042

Oswego:
Arrival: Evans Spirit at 1036

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  July 1

July 1, 1991 - The automobile/passenger ferry DALDEAN celebrated its 40th year in operation between Sombra, Ontario and Marine City, Michigan. She was built by Erieau Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company, Erieau, Ontario, for Bluewater Ferry Ltd. Service started between the two communities on July 1, 1951.

On this day in 1943, the nine loading docks on Lake Superior loaded a combined 567,000 tons of iron ore into the holds of waiting freighters.

At 16:00 hours on July 1, 2005, an explosion hit the Cargill elevator in Toledo, Ohio, which collapsed on one of the silos and fire was found in five of the silos.

On July 1, 1940, the HARRY COULBY became the first Great Lakes vessel to load in excess of 16,000 tons of iron ore when it loaded 16,067 tons of iron ore in Ashland, Wisconsin. Renamed b.) KINSMAN ENTERPRISE in 1989, she was scrapped at Port Colborne, Ontario in 2002.

On 1 July 1927, ROBERT C. WENTE (wooden, propeller, bulk freighter, 141 foot, 336 gross tons, built in 1888, at Gibraltar, Michigan) burned to a total loss in the St. Clair River. In 1911, she sank in Lake Michigan, but was raised and refurbished.

July, 1983 - The C&O sold its remaining 3 car ferries to Glen Bowden and George Towns. They begin operating cross-lake service between Ludington and Kewaunee under the name Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Co. (MWT)

On 1 July 1852, CASPIAN (wooden side-wheeler, 252 foot, 921 tons, built in 1851, at Newport, Michigan) foundered a short distance off Cleveland's piers. Some of her gear and structural material were salvaged in the Spring of 1853, and the wreck was then flattened with dynamite.

July 1, 1900, the new wooden steam barge ALFRED MITCHELL started her maiden voyage from St. Clair, Michigan for Cleveland, Ohio, to load coal. She was owned by Langell & Sons.

On 1 July 1869, the wooden schooner GARROWEN was carrying coal from Cleveland to Toronto when she sprang a leak and sank in 60 feet of water about 10 miles from shore off Geneva, Ohio. The crew escaped in the yawl. She was only 19 years old and some of the crew claimed that she was scuttled as an insurance scam. However, a number of divers visited the wreck on the bottom of the Lake at the time and that claim was refuted.

On 1 July 1875, the iron carferry HURON (238 foot, 1052 gross tons, built at Point Edward, Ontario, with iron plates prefabricated in Scotland) made her trial voyage between Fort Gratiot, Michigan, and Point Edward, Ontario, across the St. Clair River. This vessel served the Grand Trunk Railway and ran between Windsor and Detroit for over a century.

In 1876, a 25-square-mile ice field was still floating at the head of Lake Superior in northwest Wisconsin.

1918: The wooden steam barge CREAM CITY stranded on Wheeler Reef in upper Lake Huron due to fog while towing the barge GRACE HOLLAND. All were rescued but the ship was abandoned. The hull caught fire and was destroyed in 1925. 1939: ALGOSOO (i) arrived at Collingwood for hull repairs after hitting bottom, in fog, near Cape Smith, Georgian Bay.

1964: WHITEFISH BAY went aground off in the St. Lawrence off Whisky Island while bound for Montreal with a cargo of grain. Six tugs pulled the ship free on July 3.

1975: VALETTA first came to the Great Lakes in 1962 and returned as c) ORIENT EXPORTER in 1966 and d) IONIC in 1972. The leaking ship was beached at Cheddar, Saudi Arabia, with hull cracks. It slipped off the reef July 11, 1975, and sank.

1972: H.M.C.S. COBOURG was built at Midland as a World War Two corvette and rebuilt as a merchant ship about 1947. It caught fire and burned as d) PUERTO DEL SOL at New Orleans while undergoing repairs and the upper works were gutted. The ship was sold for scrapping at Brownsville, TX, later in the year.

1980: The Swedish-flag freighter MALTESHOLM first came through the Seaway in 1963. It began leaking in the engine room as c) LITO on this date while bound from Kalamata, Greece, to Vietnam with bagged flour. It was abandoned by the crew and then sank in the eastern Mediterranean. The ship had been sold to Taiwan ship breakers and was likely bound for Kaohsiung after unloading in the Far East.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Lake Huron Lore Society, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series – Marine Historical Society of Detroit.

 



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