Great Lakes NEWS & RUMOR Archive

* Report News


Duluth Activity

07/31:
Fred R. White Jr. departed from Fraser Shipyards sometime overnight of July 29.

Kinsman Independent looked right at home July 30 as it loaded at the AGP grain elevator in Duluth. Kinsman boats for years loaded regularly at AGP, which is formerly known as Cap 6. In the past few years, however, their visits to AGP have become increasingly uncommon, and the vessels now call almost exclusively at the Peavey Connors Point grain elevator in Superior.

Reported by: Al Miller




Milwaukee gets run on cement

07/31:
Yesterday the Port of Milwaukee saw a run on cement carriers. Arriving were: the tug Jacklyn M and barge Integrity, the tug Triton and barge St. Marys I, and the Medusa Challenger.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Rouge Steel dissatisfies EPA

07/31:
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accused Rouge Steel of violating the Clean Air Act at its Dearborn mill. The EPA said the percentage of light obscured by smoke, dust and ash exceeds the state's limit of 20 percent.

Reported by: the Detroit News




Canadian Coast Guard sues to recover Irving Whale salvage cost

07/31:
The Canadian Coast Guard has filed a lawsuit to recover the cost of the recovery of the 7,000-ton tank barge Irving Whale. The claim for Canadian$42,447,638.75/U.S.$30,651,439.94 was filed in federal court in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, on 29 July. Those named include Atlantic Towing Ltd. (the operator of the tug towing the barge), J.D. Irving Ltd. (the owner of the barge), Irving Oil Co. Ltd. (owner of the cargo), Universal Sales Ltd. (the firm whose tug was towing the barge) and the administrator of the Canadian Ship-Source Oil Pollution Fund. A bill was presented in April and talks began soon after without success. The Irving Whale was raised from the Gulf of St. Lawrence 60 kilometers/37 miles northeast of Prince Edward Island, or 100 kilometers/62 miles southwest of the Magdalen Islands, at 0854 30 July, 1996. It sank in a storm 7 Sept., 1970, in 67 meters/220 feet of water with 3,100 tons of Bunker C oil and 6,800 liters/1,800 gallons or 7.2 tons of polychlorinated biphenyls. Following testing of the site in 1992, the decision was made to raise the barge. J.D. Irving contends that it has already paid for salvage of the Irving Whale though contributions to the Ship-Source Oil Pollution Fund in the 1970s and 1980s. J.D. Irving includes interest on the amount contributed.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





USS Niagara in the Welland Canal

07/31:
The 1812 era brig USS Niagara was in the Welland Canal yesterday at the east side wharf below lock 1. The Niagara is scheduled to be in the St. Catharines area again for the weekend of Aug 8-10 when she will be in Port Dalhousie for The Henley Regatta. Shaker Cruise will run special ferries for that event for information call 1-888-842-5253

Reported by: Roger Tottman




New rules for Dockworkers

07/31:
U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexis M. Herman and Acting U.S. Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Gregory R. Watchman announced new working rules for dockworkers on 18 July. Issued by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the new rules are expected to save more than 30,000 lost work days annually. In addition to updating existing regulations, some standards for terminals were amended so that ship and port rules are the same. As an example of the updates incorporated, former dockworker rules referred to the International Labor Organization convention of 1932, while the new rules refer to the most recent convention of 1979. OSHA estimates that the additional cost of compliance, per year, will total U.S.$3.1 billion, but savings due to avoided injuries will be U.S.$7 billion. States with OSHA-approved programs that affect dockworkers must revise their standards within six months, or show why there is no need, in the event that the existing state rules are at least as effective as the new federal ones. Specific changes include mandated locking devices and above-deck cell guides for containers to reduce the hazard of working on top of stacked containers, along with the use of gantry cranes. Those regulations will be phased in over two years. In the meantime, fall protection systems will be required, a requirement that also extends to working of containers with non-container gantry cranes. The trigger height for fall protection equipment will be 2.4 meters/eight feet. In other changes, testing and inspection rules for lifting equipment were changed, with one-year phase-in for testing and four years for inspection. Other changes involve acceptable conditions for non-vertical lifting of containers (non-gantry), ro/ro ramp traffic patterns and loading logs from water. OSHA updated the rules in conjunction with the American Association of Port Authorities, the International Cargo Handling Coordination Association, International Longshore and Warehouse Union, the International Longshoremen's Association, the International Maritime Organization, the International Standards Organization, the National Maritime Safety Association and the Pacific Maritime Association.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - July 31

Sea trials took place for the JAMES R. BARKER this day in 1976. She was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flag ship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.). She was built at a cost of more than $43 million under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. She was the third thousand footer to sail on the Lakes and the first built entirely on the Lakes.

On July 31, 1974 as the Liberian vessel ARTADI approached the dock at Trois Rivières, Que. where she damaged the docked GORDON C. LEITCH's stern.

The CEDARBRANCH (2) was damaged and sunk by an explosion on July 31, 1965 several miles below Montreal, Que. resulting in a loss of one life.

Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Great Lakes News & Rumor page celebrates its first anniversary

07/30:
One year ago today I open the page with a story about a coal fire aboard the H. M. Griffith. In its first year the page has had over 31,000 visits, a huge success and I'd like to thank all who have contributed!

Neil




MACKINAW's days may be limited

07/30:
The House Subcommittee on Coast Guard Maritime Affairs has approved $2 million "for concept exploration to refine the specifications and costs for a heavy icebreaking replacement vessel, including a multi-mission vessel, for the 53-year old MACKINAW."

The Coast Guard Authorization Act of 1996 directed the service to develop a plan and cost estimate for modernizing the MACKINAW, the only heavy icebreaker stationed on the Great Lakes. The study projected modernizing the vessel would cost close to $100 million and only extend the icebreaker’s life for 20 years, and so concluded that modernization was not the most cost-effective option.

Icebreaking has become one of the U.S. Coast Guard’s most important missions on the Great Lakes. To meet the needs of commerce in an efficient manner, the Great Lakes dry-bulk shipping season now begins in early March and can extend into early February. During the past three ice seasons, U.S.-Flag lakers have carried more than 45 million tons of iron ore and other cargos. In the severe winters that have characterized much of the 1990s, the MACKINAW has been fully utilized and even had to lead convoys across a frozen Lake Superior.

The House and Senate Appropriations Committees must still approve the $2 million for preliminary design of a new heavy icebreaker. It is estimated that the new vessel may not be in commission until the year 2006, so the MACKINAW will be fully maintained until replaced.

Report by: Lake Carriers Assocation




Fred R. White Jr. enters Fraser shipyards

07/30:
After unloading stone at the Northland Constructors dock in Duluth, Fred R. White Jr. proceeded to Fraser Shipyards in Superior, where July 29 it is docked and ballasted down by the bow. No word yet on the reason for the visit. This may be the White's first call ever at Fraser.

Reported by: Al Miller




News from the Seaway

07/30:
Small vessel activity in Seaway East - The Danish registered EMILIE K, built 1982, and of 1510 dwt is one of the smallest salties to visit the Lakes this year. She arrived in Montreal June 29th with destination Cleveland

The psuedo sailing vessel GRANDE HERMINE was a tourist attraction in Montreal until withdrawn in 1996 and berthed on Lake St Francis. She departed June 26th for Grassy Island ONT under tow of the Cdn tug GLENSIDE and assisted by tug CAROLYN JO

The 1984 built accomodation vessel MACASSA BAY (210 tons) owned by McKeil Marine Departed the Seaway in 1994 for Cheticamp NS. She returned to the Seaway July 24 this year bound for Valleyfield under the tow of JERRY NEWBERRY. The towed vessel showed no visible names on entering the Seaway. The tug is returning to the Gulf of St Lawrence

The large tugs ATLANTIC CEDAR and ATLANTIC OAK departed the Montreal area for the CDN Arctic and passed Lat 66w passage east at 2017 and 2018 respectively July 27th. Large long boom crane fitted barges have been used in the Arctic sealift in previous years

HMCS ATHABASCAN has entered the Seaway for a Lakes port

HMCS CORMORANT which visited Lakes ports early this year has been paid off in Halifax NS

Reported by: John Whitehead




Jones Act Resolution Steaming Toward A Majority

07/30:
As of July 29, 197 members of the House of Representatives have signed House Continuing Resolution 65, a statement of full support for the Jones Act. Joining the list of Great Lakes legislators are Rivers (Michigan) and from New York - McCarthy, McNulty and Schumer.

Click here for a list of Great Lakes legislators that have signed H. Con. Res. 65. Including links to web pages and e-mail

Visit the Lake Carriers Association for more information




Today in Great Lakes History - July 30

One year ago, on July 30, 1996, a portion of a coal cargo aboard the H. M. Griffith caught on fire while the vessel was approaching Whitefish Point. The burning cargo was dumped into Lake Superior after the vessel's unloading boom was swung outward.

The GORDON C. LEITCH (1) was launched July 30, 1952 for the Upper Lakes & St. Lawrence Transportation Co. Ltd., Toronto, Ont.

The Ice Breaker ALEXANDER HENRY entered service July 30, 1959

Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Algoma awards $5.5 million contract to Port Weller Dry Docks

07/29:
(St. Catharines, Ont.) July 25, 1997 - Algoma Central Marine has awarded a $5.5 million contract to Port Weller Dry Docks for a major refit of the self-unloader M.V. Algorail. Improvements to the Algorail are part of Algoma's $85 million modernization program for its 23-vessel fleet. In addition to the Port Weller refit, other improvements to the Algorail during the winter works program will bring total investment this year in the ship to $7.2 million.

"This significant investment in the Algorail demonstrates our confidence in Port Weller Dry Docks, and in the long-term viability of Great Lakes shipping," said Tim Dool, Vice President, Marine Group. "We're confident that this investment will ensure the Algorail will serve our customers well for the next 20 years," added Dool. This is the second modernization of this type for the Algoma fleet. Last year, the M.V. Algoway underwent a similar mid-life refit at Port Weller.

Both the Algorail and the Algoway are part of St. Catharines-based Seaway Self Unloaders' fleet of 19 vessels. "These ships serve an important niche in Great Lakes shipping, and can reach docks that larger, full seaway-sized vessels cannot," said Wayne Smith, Vice President and General Manager of Seaway Self Unloaders, a partnership of Algoma Central Corporation that commercially manages Algoma's self-unloading vessels.

The Algorail will arrive at Port Weller December 3. Major components in the cargo holds will be replaced, and the ship's self-unloading equipment will be modernized. The ship will be delivered April 3, 1998 to coincide with the beginning of the shipping season. The 640-foot M.V. Algorail, a self-unloading bulk carrier with a 20,828-tonne cargo capacity, was built in 1968 at Collingwood Shipyards. Established in 1899, and with offices in St. Catharines and Sault Sainte Marie, Ont., Algoma Central Marine owns and operates the largest Canadian fleet on the Great Lakes. On completion of the Algorail, the value of Algoma Central contracts to Port Weller Dry Docks since the fall of 1995 will total $40 million.

Contact:
Tim S. Dool Algoma Central Marine (905) 687-7878

Wayne Smith Seaway Self Unloaders (905) 988-2620




Rare call in Duluth

07/29:
Fred R. White Jr. paid a rare call July 28 to the Northland Constructors dock in Duluth to unload stone.

Reported by: Al Miller




Imperial St. Lawrence stops for repairs

07/29:
Imperial St Lawrence spent the weekend in Port Colborne for repairs. (Warf 16) unconfirmed reports say her pumps are down. This tanker is flying the ESSO flag. She is x Le Brave and x Texaco Brave. Unknown how long she will be in Port for repairs.

J. J. Van Volkenburg




GATX Corporation Announces Second Quarter and First Half Earnings


EPS Increases 15 Percent Over 2nd Quarter 1996
General American Transportation and GATX Capital Show Continued Strength

CHICAGO, July 22 /PRNewswire/ -- GATX Corporation {parent company of American Steamship} (NYSE:GMT) today announced that second quarter earnings were $30.2 million or $1.21 per common share, fully diluted. This compares to 1996 second quarter earnings of $25.7 million or $1.05 per share, fully diluted.

Earnings for the first six months of 1997 were $61.4 million or $2.47 per share, fully diluted. Earnings for the first six months of 1996 were $50.4 million or $2.06 per share, fully diluted.

Cash flow from operations and portfolio proceeds was $159.3 million for the second quarter compared to $111.1 million a year ago. For the six months ended June 30, 1997, cash flow from operations and portfolio proceeds reached $377.6 million compared to $238.0 a year ago.

American Steamship Benefits from Favorable Weather

American Steamship, GATX's Great Lakes shipping operation, achieved net income of $3.3 million in the second quarter of 1997 compared to $1.3 million a year ago. The second quarter of 1997 includes a $1.3 million after-tax gain related to a transaction in which American Steamship partnered with GATX Capital in a third-party vessel financing and remarketing. Excluding this gain, American Steamship achieved net income of $2.0 million. Favorable weather conditions in the Great Lakes region resulted in a more normalized shipping season during the second quarter this year compared to the difficult conditions experienced in 1996. Demand for iron ore, coal, and limestone, American Steamship's primary cargoes, remains strong as customers continue to replenish inventories.

Reported by: GATX home page




Today in Great Lakes History - July 29

The OTTERCLIFFE HALL cleared Lauzon July 29, 1969 on her maiden voyage as the last "straight deck" Great Lakes bulk freighter built with a pilot house forward.

While at the Manitowoc Ship Building Co. for general repairs and engine overhaul, the CITY OF SAGINAW 31 caught fire on July 29, 1971 and destroyed her upper deck and forward section. Damages were estimated from $450,000 to $750,000 and were not repaired. The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 was sold to Marine Salvage Ltd., Port Colborne, Ont. for scrap.

On July 29, 1974 the W.W. HOLLOWAY grounded in Lake St. Clair off the Grosse Pointe Yacht Club running downbound with stone. Lightering into the J.F. SCHOELKOPF,JR. was necessary before she was freed by four tugs on July 31st.

ENDERS M. VOORHEES departed River Rouge on her maiden voyage July 29, 1942 bound for Duluth, MN to load iron ore. She was the second of five "Supers" for the Pittsburgh fleet to enter service.



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Integrity visits Duluth

07/28:
Tug-barge Jacklyn M. and Integrity paid another call to the LaFarge Cement terminal in Duluth on July 26. J.A.W. Iglehart, which once carried the bulk of LaFarge's Cement to the Twin Ports, has been seldom seen this year.

Reported by: Al Miller




Vessels arrive for Coast Guard festival

07/28:
The cutter Biscayne Bay was scheduled to arrive at Grand Haven's Escanaba Park, next to Coast Guard Station Grand Haven, at 7 a.m. Saturday.

The cutter Bramble is scheduled in Grand Haven at 9 a.m. Wednesday July 30.

Both vessels will be open for public tours 1-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. during most days of the festival, which kicks off July 26 and continues through Aug. 3. Exact tour hours will be posted outside both ships.

Reported by: Steve Vanden Bosch




2nd load for McAshalt barge 401

07/28:
McKeil Marine tug, John Spence pushed McAshalt barge 401, which entered Port Stanley harbor at 16:00 hours on Monday, July 21, with 2,000 tons of hot ashpalt for McAshpalt Industries,Marine Terminal, West Pier. The captain of the John Spence did an excellent job spinning the full barge at the mouth of the harbor so he could back her in. They were finished at 22:00 hours that day.

Reported by: Richard Hill




Electric barrier to be placed in Chicago canal

07/28:
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is planning to build an underwater electric barrier in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal in order to prevent the round goby from spreading to the Mississippi River from the Canadian/U.S. Great Lakes. From the Mississippi, the round goby could spread throughout waterways in the eastern United States. The round goby is a 13-centimeter/5-inch to 15 centimeter/6-inch, pug-nosed fish that is a bottom feeder. It came into the Great Lakes about seven years ago in ballast tanks of ships. The fish have threatened native species, often by eating fish eggs. To prevent them from spreading, wires and electrodes, measuring 50 meters/165 feet long by 7.0 meters/23 feet deep, will be installed in an area of the canal. The water above the grid will become charged, which, it is hoped, will stop the round goby. The current is not lethal to other fish. Construction could begin next year pending testing in the coming weeks.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





HCMS Athabaskan arrives Port Weller

07/28:
HCMS ATHABASKAN arrived at Port Weller Dry Docks at 1700hrs Saturday July 26 for refit.

Reported by: Roger Tottman




Model ship contest

07/28:
A model ships and boats contest will be held 2 Aug. and 3 Aug. at the Wisconsin Maritime Museum in Manitowoc, Wis. The public will vote and a people's choice award will be given. For information, telephone 414-684-0218.

Reported by: Steve Schultz




Today in Great Lakes History - July 28

ALGOWEST passed Detroit, Mich. downbound on July 28, 1982, she had departed on her maiden voyage July 26 from Thunder Bay, Ont. to Quebec City with a 27,308 tonne load of barley.

b) ADAM E. CORNELIUS was christened July 28, 1973 at AmShip by Mrs. Roger Kyes as the a) ROGER M. KYES

COASTAL CANADA was launched July 28, 1952

The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was delivered on July 28th to the Buckeye Steamship Co. (Hutchinson & Co., mgr.), Cleveland. The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was part of a government program designed to upgrade and increase the capacity of the U.S. Great Lakes fleet during World War II. In order to help finance the building of new ships, the U.S.M.C. authorized a program that would allow existing fleets to obtain new boats by trading in their older boats to the Government for credit. The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was the ninth Maritimer and fourth of the six L6-S-Al types delivered. "L6" meant the vessel was built for the Great Lakes and was 600 to 699 feet in length. The "S" stood for steam power and "Al" identified specific design features.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




CSL Trillium arrives at Port Weller Drydocks

07/26:
At 16:50 on Sunday July 20th, the barge CSL Trillium arrived at Port Weller drydocks under tow of Glenside and Glenevis.

Reported by: Jeff Cameron




KAYE E. BARKER Boat Trip Raffle winners

07/26:
Grand Prize - Charles L. Anderson, Ashtabula, OH
2nd Prize - Al Wolfe, Olmsted Falls, OH
3rd Prize - Nancy Slusser, Rocky River, OH
4th Prize - Robert L. Stausmire, Oregon, OH

Thanks to everyone who bought tickets. Stay tuned -- we're planning another in 1998!

Reported by: Christine Hilston




Today in Great Lakes History - July 26

The William A. McGonagle departed Ecorse, MI on her maiden voyage on July 26, 1916 bound for Duluth, MN to load iron ore. In 1986 she would become the Henry Steinbrenner (4)- see historic photo gallery. Retired from service in 1989, she was scrapped in Port Maitland in 1994.

ALGOWEST sailed on her maiden voyage in 1982 from Thunder Bay, Ont. to Quebec City with a 27,308 tonne load of barley. She was the first straight deck bulker built for Algoma since the 1968 launch of ALGOCEN (2), as well as the last ship built for this fleet. The ALGOWEST has set several cargo records, including a 27,517 tonne load of grain down the Seaway October 16, 1982 to Port Cartier, Que.

On July 26, 1943 the COASTAL CLIFF under the name a) BRUCE HUDSON caught fire while loading gasoline at East Chicago, IL and four persons lost their lives. She proceeded under her own power on August 10, 1943 to Muir Bros. at Port Dalhousie, Ont. for repairs.

The WILLIAM A. McGONAGLE (2) sailed light on her maiden voyage from the shipyard on July 26, 1916 to Duluth, MN to load iron ore.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Richard Jenkins, and Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Update on accident aboard the Badger

07/25:
Edith Lambert, 84, died in an accident aboard the Badger (U.S.-registry 4,244-gt, 2,033-nt, 125-meter/410-foot ferry built in 1953 by Christy Corp. at Sturgeon Bay, Wis., operated by Lake Michigan Carferry Service Inc.) when the Pullman-style bed she was sleeping in flipped up and trapped her against the wall of her cabin. Lambert, a former teacher from Mount Vernon, Wash., was found about 0130 22 July, an hour after the ferry left Manitowoc, Wis., for Ludington, Mich. The Badger sailed back to Manitowoc where Lambert was pronounced dead at 0213. She had boarded with two daughters and three grandchildren, and were on their way to eastern Michigan where she had lived in the 1950s. A daughter, aided by a member of the housekeeping staff, found Lambert trapped in the bed and administered CPR. The funeral will be held 25 July in North Carolina, where she was born and raised. Lambert taught elementary school in California, Michigan, North Carolina and on a Native American reservation in Arizona. She divorced in the 1960s and was a constant traveler. A family reunion had been planned in North Carolina this weekend. The Badger later sailed for Ludington, two hours late, with the remaining 69 passengers and 27 vehicles.

Reported by: Steve Schultz and Andy LaBorde




Busy evening in Duluth

07/25:
It was a busy evening at the D. M. & I. R. ore docks in West Duluth Thursday evening. The Adam E. Cornelius was backed into the east side of #6 (unusual to see a boat backed into East of #6), while the Presque Isle and the John G. Munson occupied West of #6. The Presque Isle was unloading limestone into the hopper, while the Munson was under the chutes.

Reported by: Jody L. Aho




Sanders interim administrator

07/25:
David G. Sanders has been appointed acting administrator of St. Lawrence Seaway Devlopment Corp. It is the second time in five years Sanders, 37, has served in the capacity. He has been deputy administrator since January 1996.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Passenger vessel strikes elevator bridge

07/25:
The American vessel GRANDE CARIBE- built 1997 is reported to have struck an elevator bridge over the Piscataqua River connecting New Hampshire and Maine. The vessel, on a cruise from the St Lawrence was freed by a tug. No injuries to the 100 passengers were reported. The vessel is owned by the American Canadian Caribbean Line and is on her first year of cruises

Reported by: John Whitehead




Today in Great Lakes History - July 25

The bow section of the ROGER BLOUGH was floated into the new Lorain dry dock on July 25, 1970 and was joined with the 421 foot stern section. The launch of the completed hull was scheduled for July, 1971 but a fire broke out in the engine room on June 24, 1971 killing four yard workers and extensively damaging her Pielstick diesel engines. Extensive repairs, which included replacement of both engines, delayed the launch for nearly a year.

The CANADA MARQUIS (c) FEDERAL MACKENZIE) upbound at Detroit, Mich. on July 25, 1983 on her maiden voyage.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Seaway Queen Departs Port Weller

07/24:
At 11:30 a.m. yesterday, the tugs, Argue Martin, Glenevis and Glenside towed the Seaway Queen away from the fitout wall at Port Weller drydocks and proceeded downbound through lock one of the Welland Canal. The tow was destined for Toronto where Seaway Queen will remain laid up likely until the autumn. Glenevis and Glenside towed Seaway Queen across Lake Ontario while Argue Martin returned to Port Weller Drydocks.

Report by: Jeff Cameron




Sheriff investigating death on the Badger

07/24:
A woman was found dead about 0130 22 July aboard the Badger (U.S.-registry 4,244-gt, 2,033-nt, 125-meter/410-foot ferry built in 1953 by Christy Corp. at Sturgeon Bay, Wis., operated by Lake Michigan Carferry Service Inc.) 90 minutes after it sailed from Manitowoc, Wis., for Ludington, Mich. The Manitowoc County Sheriff's Department is investigating, but criminal activity is not suspected. The woman is believed to be in her 80s and from Washington state.

{This report comes from a passenger on board during the trip} A passenger's sudden and severe illness forced the car ferry Badger to return to Manitowoc approximately an hour after departing on the overnight Manitowoc-to-Ludington run on July 22. As a result, the car ferry was running about 2 1/2 hours behind schedule when it arrive in Ludington July 22. By limiting the Ludington turnaround to just an hour, the Badger was able to make up much of the time lost, arriving in Manitowoc just an hour behind schedule on the next trip.

They did a creditable job of trying to get back on schedule. They had every one just drive their own vehicles (big trucks, mostly) right off the car ferry. Then the kids literally ran as they loaded the inbound cars.

Reported by: Steve Schultz and Al Miller




Pride of Baltimore II to visit Milwaukee

07/24:
The Pride of Baltimore II will visit the Wisconsin Lake Schooner Education Association in Milwaukee during the first weekend of August. The Pride of Baltimore II will be open for public tours at a cost of $5 per person from 1100 to 1800 3 Aug. The association, which is building a schooner, is at 500 N. Harbor Dr., between the festival grounds and the Milwaukee Art Museum/War Memorial. Telephone 414-276-7700 for more information.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Hibbing Taconite to lay off employees

07/24:
Hibbing Taconite will lay off about 70 hourly employees over the next year as it reduces pellet production for the remainder of this year and cuts production by 10 percent in 1998.

Company officials said the production cuts reflect reduced needs by the three steelmakers that own the taconite mine and mill near Hibbing, Minn. The open market for pellets is also glutted right now.

An official of the Steelworkers Union said much of the decision to cut production was steered by Bethlehem Steel, one of Hibbing Taconite's three owners. Bethlehem will soon begin relining one of its blast furnaces in Burns Harbor, Ind., reducing the amount of pellets it can use there.

The production cuts will take Hibbing Taconite from about 8.3 million tons of pellets a year, to about 7.3 to 7.5 million tons. Hibbing Taconite ships through the BNSF dock in Superior, Wis. Much of Bethlehem's tonnage is handled by Stewart J. Cort.

Report by: Al Miller
From a story appearing in the Duluth News Tribune




David Norton at Alabaster

07/24:
The David Norton arrived at Alabaster Michigan on 6/22 to load gypsum for the Detroit United States Gypsum dock. This run was made by the George A. Sloan earlier this year.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




New container service to call on Montreal

07/24:
Maersk Line, P&O Nedlloyd Container Line Ltd. and Sea-Land Service Inc. will begin a direct route between northern Europe and Canada in September. The weekly container service will use three ice-class containerships with 1,000-TEU capacity. Calls will be made at Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Bremerhaven, Germany; Felixstowe, England; and Montreal.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - July 24

The ALGOSOO (2) was Launched July 24, 1974 for Algoma Central Railway, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

The BURNS HARBOR sea trials were conducted on July 24, 1980 during which she performed an emergency stop in 3,160 feet loaded to a depth of 25/26 feet. She was the third thousand footer built for Bethlehem and the tenth on the Great Lakes.

ST.CLAIR (2) was launched July 24, 1975

The WILLIAM G. MATHER (2) left the River Rouge on her maiden voyage July 24, 1925 for Ashtabula, OH to load coal for the Canadian lakehead at Port Arthur/Fort William, Ont.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




American Mariner in Welland Canal

07/23:
AMERICAN MARINER followed her fleet mate H. LEE WHITE (July 2) in a two way transit of the Welland Canal. She passed downbound yesterday, clearing lock 3 about 1500, with iron ore pellets for Stelco Hamilton. She arrived light about 12 hours later to proceed upbound. The MARINER'S and WHITE's passage are charters of Canada Steamship Lines who usually have the exclusive contract to carry ore and coal for Stelco. Stelco's other steel mill at Nanticoke on Lake Erie has been receiving shipments of U.S. ore by 1000 footer this year. CSL presently has three self-unloaders ATLANTIC HURON, ATLANTIC ERIE and NANTICOKE busy in ballasting the 600,000 ton oil production platform HIBERNIA in the Altlantic Ocean off the coast of Newfoundland. (News and Rumour 06/10) There might be more trips down the Welland Canal by American Steamship Company vessels on this trade in the near future.

Report by: David Bull




Elton Hoyt 2nd visits Carrollton, Mich [Saginaw]

07/23:
On Monday the Elton Hoyt 2nd was being guided backwards to be turned around,at the airport turning basin , south of Middleground Island, by Tug Gregory Busch. This ship is seldom seen in these waters,she looks real good!

Report by: Dan Maus




CSL TRILLIAM

07/23:
CSL TRILLIAM has now arrived at Port Weller Dry Docks and is rafted to the SEAWAY QUEEN at the fit out dock.

Report by: Roger Tottman




Major Dry-Bulk Trades Approach 17 Million Tons In June

07/23:
Shipments of iron ore, coal and stone from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 16.9 million net tons in June, the highest monthly total recorded this season, and an increase of 6.8 percent compared to last year.

Iron ore loadings at Great Lakes ports totaled 7.6 million tons, essentially unchanged from a year ago.

Coal shipments totaled 4.6 million tons, an increase of 13.8 percent. Stone loadings at U.S. and Canadian ports neared 4.7 million tons, an increase of 13.7 percent.

For the season, shipments of iron ore, coal and stone stand at 49.4 million tons, an increase of 11.2 percent. All three trades are experiencing significant increases compared to 1996's end-of-June tally.

Report by:Lake Carriers Assocation




Society for the Preservation of the S.S. City of Milwaukee events

07/23:
"Annual Meeting, Sleepover, Other Events Planned for Labor Day Weekend"

"The SPCM will be hosting a variety of events during Labor Day weekend. Members and guests are invited to bring a sleeping bag and spend part of the weekend aboard our historic carferry (no charge SPCM members, $5.00 non-members). The ship will be open from noon Saturday, August 30th until noon Monday, September 1st.

Saturday will be "Railroad Day", with members from various groups throughout the state invited. Those attending are invited to bring their own slides and carousel trays (Kodak carousel projector and screen will be available). This event will run from 1:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m.

Sunday, the SPCM will host its annual meeting. Highlights of the meeting will be the SPCM's status at Elberta, election of at least 3 board positions, and status of the ships restoration projects. The meeting portion will be held from 1:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m.

Tours of the ship will be available Saturday and Sunday, immediately after the meetings. Various restoration projects will take place during the weekend, and members are encouraged (but not required) to lend a hand. There is no working plumbing aboard the ship, but we do have a port-a-john nearby and arrangements for showering facilities. All parties boarding must agree to and have a representative sign the SPCM's liability waiver.

Cost to attend any of the events is $5.00 for non-members, and no charge for members. SPCM memberships begin at only $10.00 per year (individual) and $25.00 per year (family). Food and refreshments will be available during the meetings (donation). SPCM carferry souvenirs will also be available.

For more information visit the Society's home page or contact
George Micka at (616) 755-8755 (sscitymilw@aol.com)
Kirk Lorenz at (616) 882-9688 (brookside@brooksideinn.com).




Today in Great Lakes History - July 23

The Keel for the TEXACO CHIEF (2) was laid July 23, 1968

CANADOC (2) sailed on her maiden voyage July 23rd.

The RED WING (2) was christened on July 23, 1960 as the first all-welded vessel to emerge from Port Weller Dry Docks.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




07/22:
On the Lake Carriers Assocation home page: Annual Report Highlights, LCA Objectives for 1997 And Beyond




Today in Great Lakes History - July 22

PERE MARQUETTE 22 was launched in 1924 by the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI as Hull #210.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Chi-Cheemaun suffers engine troubles

07/21:
The car ferry "Chi-Cheemaun" has suffered its second major breakdown in less than a year. The vessel was on a return trip to Tobermory when the engines apparantly failed again. This is the second time they have failed, and sources say that the ship is due to be replaced next year for the 1998 season, by a slightly smaller vessel. Last October, the vessel was taken out of service for the remainder of the 1996 sailing season because of major mechanical failure. There are also unconfirmed reports that Ontario Northland is in financial difficulties, and questions surrounding its future are uncertain. However, Ontario Northland said that all sailings for Thursday, July 17, and Friday, July 19, were cancelled, and normal service will resume on Saturday, July 19, barring any other failure aboard the vessel. This is from BBS news broadcast which aired Thursday, July 17.

Reported by: Brad Gagner




Today in Great Lakes History - July 21

The SPRUCEGLEN, then named c) GEORGE D. GOBLE , was used to transport two pilot houses built at American Ship Building's South Chicago yard to the AmShip yard at Lorain, OH on July 21, 1975 where Interlake Steamship's thousand foot Lake freighters JAMES R. BARKER and MESABI MINER were being completed.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Four dive rescue personnel injured in training

07/20:
Four personnel of the Milwaukee Fire Department's Dive Rescue Team were injured 18 July during a training exercise in Lake Michigan. Three men and one woman were diving from the department's Boston Whaler fireboat, the Phoenix, to a shipwreck 12 meters/40 feet to 21 meters/70 feet down, just east of U.S. Coast Guard Station Milwaukee. The four were injured between the surface and the top of the wreck about 2130. They were taken to St. Luke's Medical Center in Milwaukee and treated in a hyperbaric chamber for "dive-related injuries."

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - July 20

The LEON FALK, JR. was christened at Cleveland, July 20, 1961 after one trip to Duluth, MN for ore.



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Great Lakes Delegation Lining Up Behind Jones Act

07/19:
As of July 17, 187 members of the House of Representatives have signed House Continuing Resolution 65, a statement of full support for the Jones Act. Joining the list of Great Lakes legislators are Levin (Michigan) and Vento (Minnesota).

The Jones Act is one of several U.S. "Cabotage" laws and reserves the movement of cargo between U.S. ports to ships which are U.S.-owned, U.S.-built and U.S.-crewed. Although the Jones Act dates from 1920, the United States has had Cabotage laws since 1789 and these laws have fostered a domestic fleet second to none. The U.S.-Flag Great Lakes is the largest assemblage of self-unloading vessels in the world. For information on how the Jones Act benefits other regions of the country, please visit the homepage of the Maritime Cabotage Task Force, the national organization promoting the U.S. Cabotage laws.

Legislation to largely repeal the Jones Act was introduced in the House by Michigan Congressman Nick Smith, but the bill (H. R. 1991) has a mere 11 co-sponsors and no hearings are scheduled.

Click here for a list of Great Lakes legislators that have signed H. Con. Res. 65. Including links to web pages and e-mail

Visit the Lake Carriers Association for more information




Today in Great Lakes History - July 18

The EDWIN H. GOTT was float launched July 19, 1978

CONSUMERS POWER (3) had her last five-year inspection at Port Weller on July 19, 1985.

In 1957 JOSEPH S. YOUNG (1) was christened at Buffalo, NY. The JOSEPH S. YOUNG (1) was the first of seven T2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Salty Dog in Manistee

07/18:
On July 12th, the Salty Dog #1 and the Evans Mckeil arrived in Manistee for the Ambar plant to load calcium chloride for Thunder Bay, this is the first Canadian tank barge in to Manistee to load.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Booming Western Coal Float Leads Increases in June U.S.-Flag Float

07/18:
Lead by a significant increase in western coal cargos, U.S.-Flag Great Lakes fleets hauled 13.5 million net tons of dry- and liquid-bulk cargo in June, an increase of 2.2 percent compared to the corresponding period last year.

Cargos of western coal loaded in U.S. bottoms in June totaled 1,765,651 tons, an increase of 27.8 percent compared to last year. For the season, the western coal trade in Jones Act lakers stands at 4.7 million tons, again an increase of 27 percent.

The June U.S.-Flag stone float totaled 3.4 million tons, an increase of 7.5 percent. There was a slight dip in iron ore loadings, but that reflects the capacity working the western coal trade.

For the season, U.S.-Flag carriage stands at 42.1 million tons, an increase of more than 4.4 million tons. Salt cargos have decreased slightly, but only because salt shipments from Cleveland did not resume until June.

With the June 13 sailing of the CALCITE II (USS Great Lakes Fleet, Inc.), all boom-type self-unloaders are in service. The only U.S.-Flag ships yet to sail this year are the small cement carriers E. M. FORD and S. T. CRAPO (both of which are currently holding storage cargos of cement) and the straight-decker KINSMAN ENTERPRISE.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers Association




Today in Great Lakes History - July 18

The AGAWA CANYON struck an abutment at Welland Canal's Bridge 11 at Allanburg, Ont. on July 18, 1977 while downbound with salt for Kingston, Ont. and sustained a thirty foot gash just above the waterline at the port bow. Her cargo of salt was unloaded at Toronto, Ont. and she returned to the Port Weller Dry Dock on the Welland Canal for repairs.

The BENSON FORD's (then renamed b) JOHN DYKSTRA (2) cabin was delivered to South Bass Island July 18th on the barge THOR 101 towed by the tug GREGORY J. BUSCH. The entire forward superstructure of the DYKSTRA (2), including the forecastle deck, had been removed at Cleveland, July 2, 1986 for use as a summer home on Lake Erie's South Bass Island where it remains.

The WILLIAM G. MATHER (2) completed her sea trials today in 1925.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Desgagnes fleet

07/17:
The veteran canadian coasters J.A.Z. and Jacques Desgagnes, built in Holland in 1960 are open hatch log carriers formerly engaged in St Lawrence timber trades. Both vessels were in the Seaway at Cote St Catherine Wharf in 1996 to load for the Arctic sea lift. The Jacques Desgagnes arrived yesterday at section 52 Arctic loading site in Montreal Harbour. The J.A.Z. Desgagnes has been registered with LLoyds as the Sea Land of Panama and a delivery crew is sought for a voyage to Madagascar

Reported by: John Whitehead




Great Lakes Naval Architect/Marine Engineer

07/17:
Richard Riley, a respected naval architect and marine engineer, passed away July 16 in Minneapolis MN after a courageous battle with cancer. He was a naval architect in the 60's and 70's for Defoe Shipbuilding in Bay City, MI where he was involved in the design of many US and Australian naval vessels as well as several oceanographic vessels. One of his vessels, the Knorr of Woods Hole Oceanographic discovered the wreck of the Titanic. In the late 70s through 1993 he was a marine engineer with USS Great Lakes Fleet in Duluth MN. He was a memeber of the international shipmaster's association Detroit Lodge No. 7. His love for the Great Lakes and Great Lakes shipping will always be remembered.

Reported by: Robyn Riley




Today in Great Lakes History - July 17

The first cargo of low sulfur Western coal in Great Lakes history was loaded in Superior, Wisconsin on July 19, 1971 aboard the Samuel Mather for delivery to Taconite Harbor, Minnesota. The 5,040 ton cargo was a test cargo to see how this type of coal would perform in power plants. This particular cargo was loaded at the Burlington Northern ore docks in Superior, which also makes this one of the few (if not the only??) times that an ore dock has loaded some cargo other than some form of iron ore.

Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Algobay in for repairs

07/16:
Algoma's Algobay is at warf 16 the old R and P dock Port Colborne for repairs. She has been their since 0400 Sat July 12. An unconfirmed report she had major engine trouble with one of her engines. It is unclear how long she will be in Port Colborne.

Reported by: J.J.Van Volkenburg




Seway Queen to Toronto

07/16:
The Seaway Queen will be shifting to the fit out berth at Port Weller Drydock this Friday and is planned to be towed to Toronto the following week.




Barge headed for drydock

07/16:
The barge CSL Trillium, owned by Mckeil Marine may be going to Port Weller Drydock over the weekend. She will be going up for initial assessment of general condition and to see the extent of damage that was done to her when she ran aground three years ago. The incident occurred while entering St John's Harbour under tow (not a McKeil tug) when the tugs towline parted. McKeil Marine purchased her in that condition and are keenly interested to see her bottom. She spent most of her life in the grain trade in the Gulf and was then converted to haul cement for the Hibernia Project.




Port Weller Dry Docks to work on destroyer

07/16:
The Port Weller Dry Docks Division of Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd. in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, has won a contract to refit the Canadian Maritime Command Iroquois-class Destroyer H.M.C.S. Athabascan (DDH 282). The work will employ 125 people and will cost Canadian $6.4 million/U.S.$4.7 million.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Tugs to the rescue

07/16:
The tugs used in the refloating of the Canadian Navigator last weekend included the John Spence, Paul E no.1 and Lac Como as well as the hopper barge AGS 359. There were also the American tugs Malcolm and Kodiak (ex CN ferry tug). The Menasha may have also been on scene.




Delivery to Louisiana

07/16:
The tug Doug Mckeil was succesfully delivered to her New Owners in Morgan City, Louisiana on Monday. It appears that she will be used in the offshore industry in the Gulf and will be based out of Mexico. There is talk that her new name will be the "Doug" but this is unconfirmed as yet. She spent most of her life in the North Sea as the "Mammoth" before being purchased by McKeil's last year. Her time with McKeil Marine was short and consisted of working on the Fixed Link Project in PEI.




Update on the Canadian Navigator

07/15:
The CANADIAN NAVIGATOR ran aground at 9:30pm pm July 10, 1997 in the St Clair River across from St Clair, Michigan. The ship was enroute to the stone dock at Courtwright, Ontario where it was to unload a partial load of stone, then continue up to the Mueller dock in Sarnia to unload the remainder.

Upon grounding the CANADIAN NAVIGATOR swung lengthwise across the river, but did not block shipping traffic, although passing traffic did check down when passing. Reason for the accident has initially been blamed on the malfunction of a bow thruster.

Throughout Friday tugs attempted to pull the vessel off of its perch, without success. The ALGORAIL made an attempt to pull along side of the CANADIAN NAVIGATOR late Friday evening to take on some of the grounded vessel

Reported by: Ray Bawal Jr




Today in Great Lakes History - July 15

In 1978 GEORGE A. STINSON was launched at the American Ship Building Co., Lorain, OH. The cargo mid-body was built at AmShip's Toledo, OH yard and towed to Lorain on November 15, 1977. The bow and stern sections were built at Lorain.

On July 15, 1961, the Walter A. Sterling (now Lee A. Tregurtha) entered service on the Great Lakes after conversion from a tanker. The next day, on July 16, 1961, the Pioneer Challenger (now Middletown) entered service.

The CHICAGO TRADER was launched (as THE HARVESTER) in 1911 by the American Ship Building Co., Lorain, OH.

In 1946 the NORISLE was launched for the Dominion & Owen Sound Transportation Co. Ltd

Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Southern Lake Michigan Report

07/14:
On Sunday 7-13-97 Indiana Harbor Ship Canal will be visited by the WILFRED SYKES, the EDWARD L. RYERSON,both ships unloading their cargo's at Inland Steel. Also on Sunday the ITB JACKLYN M/ BARGE INTEGRITY will be unloading in Lake Calumet,South Chicago.On Monday 7-14-97 the COLUMBIA STAR will be arriving at LTV STEEL at 08;00 in Indiana Harbor.This is the first of two trips schedualed for this week.The CHARLES M. BEEGHLY is due at 15:00 on Monday at ACME STEEL in the CALUMET RIVER,then shifting across the river to load coal at KCBX. This is the second trip to south Lake MI.since early SAT. morning, when they discharged cargo atLTV STEEL in IN. HRB.. Quickly looking back at Fri. 7/11/97 the MEDUSA CHALLENGER was in Lake Calumet unloading.Now quickly looking ahead this week, the region will be visited by; THE ITB JOESPH H. THOMPSON, HERBERT C. JACKSON, BURNS HARBOR, STEWART J. CORT, KAYE E. BARKER (2) and MESABI MINER.

One final note of interest; The TANKER JOS. F. BIGANE said good bye to their long time captian Richard (Dick) Symanski. He gave the company 20+ years of dedicated service. Before working for the Bigane Fueling Co., he skippered the tanker GARY until it was condemmed. Congradulations on a job well done. The new captian on the tanker JOS.F.BIGANE is William (Zeke) Zucollo formerly of Hanna Marine.

Reported by: Kevin Kelley




Today in Great Lakes History - July 14

The AMERICAN REPUBLIC was launched July 14, 1980 by the Bay Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

While upbound in the St. Lawrence River on July 14, 1970 for Saginaw, MI with a load of pig iron from Sorel, Que., the EASTCLIFFE HALL grounded in mud near Chrysler Shoal six miles above Massena, NY at 0300 hours but was able to free herself. A few hours later, approaching Cornwall, she struck a submerged object and sank within a few minutes in 70 feet of water only 650 feet from the point of impact. The submerged object was believed to be an old aid to navigation light stand. Nine lives were lost. Divers determined that her back was broken in two places. After salvaging part of the cargo, her cabins were leveled and her hull was filled.

In 1988 the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON and "tow mate" CONSUMERS POWER passed through the Panama Canal heading for the cutters torch in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Canadian Navigator aground

07/12:
The Canadian Navigator (Canadian-registry 18,788-gt, 31,650-dwt, 12,830-nt, 222.2-meter/729.0-foot motor bulk carrier built in 1967 by J. Readhead & Sons Ltd. at South Shields, England; operated by Upper Lakes Group Inc.'s ULS Corp.) ran aground in the St. Clair River on 10 July. The ship, carrying stone, reportedly grounded on a soft bottom.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Toronto Harbour ferry Accident

07/12:
Radio reports yesterday had the Toronto Island Ferry,Thomas Rennie, crashing into the dock at about 1030. Apparently she was going too fast and could not stop in time. One crew member and several passengers were injured. The crewman and one passenger went to hospital. The Transportation Safety Board was investigating the accident.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Bluenose II in Thunder Bay

07/12:
The famed schooner, Bluenose II arrived in Thunder Bay on Thursday, July 10. It will be on display at Keefer Terminal until 5:00 pm Saturday. Tours are free. Today, Friday, July 11, the schooner took a number of children for a sail around Thunder Bay harbour. The children were chosen through a contest based on their service and involvement in the community. Also on board for the excursion are a number of scouts who are in Thunder Bay for the Scouts Canada Jamboree which officially gets underway on Saturday, July 12.

Reported by: Richard Boon




Today in Great Lakes History - July 12

The BELLE RIVER (WALTER J. McCARTHY JR.) was christened on July 12, 1977 as American Steamship's first thousand-footer and the first thousand-footer built at Bay Ship.

The H.M. GRIFFITH was launched July 12, 1973 for the Canada Steamship Lines,

In 1986 The ENDERS M. VOORHEES was chained together with her sisters, A.H. FERBERT (2) and IRVING S. OLDS, a severe thunder storm struck Duluth pushing the trio across St. Louis Bay eventually grounding them near Superior, WI. It was discovered that the force of the storm had pulled the bollards out of the Hallett Dock No.5 thus releasing the ships.

On July 12, 1958, the Frank A. Sherman entered service, departing Port Weller, Ontario, for Duluth and a load of iron ore on its maiden voyage.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




U.S. Records on the Lakes

07/10:
Even though the 1997 Great Lakes shipping season is just 4 months old,U.S.-Flag "lakers" have already set new cargo records for two commodities. On July 6, the 1,000-foot-long COLUMBIA STAR (Oglebay Norton Company) set a new benchmark for the Head-of-the-Lakes coal tradewhen she loaded 70,903 net tons of low-sulfur coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wisconsin. The cargo was delivered to Detroit Edison's powerplant in St. Clair, Michigan.

In April, the 767-foot-long PHILIP R. CLARKE (USS Great Lakes Fleet, Inc.) upped the salt record to 27,621 tons when she loaded a Buffalo-bound cargo at Fairport Harbor, Ohio.

"While cargo records provide a great sense of accomplishment for the ship's crew and operator, their true value is a measure of the ever-increasing efficiency of the Lakes Jones Act fleet," said George J. Ryan, President of Lake Carriers' Association. "Competition from the railroads and other modes of domestic transportation, as well as overseas suppliers of raw materials, demands that U.S.-Flag Great Lakes fleets constantly raise the standard of excellence. In reviewing cargo records over the years, it becomes obvious that each time technology permitted bigger ships, the Lakes Jones Act fleet seized the opportunity to better serve its customers."

An analysis of record cargos for the three major commodities, iron ore, coal and stone, shows that since 1940, the benchmark cargo has increased by as much as 328 percent.

"There is one story that cargo records don't tell," Ryan continued. "Today's record cargos are discharged in less than 8 hours without any assistance from shoreside personnel or equipment. It would have taken days to unload 71,000 tons of coal from the straight-decker vessels which once ruled the Great Lakes."

Ryan further noted that the current record cargos for the iron ore and coal trades represent in one trip more cargo than a ship could carry in a whole season a century ago. "According to LCA's 1890 Annual Report, 'one of the largest ore carriers on the Great Lakes made 30 trips, moving 66,000 tons, or an average of 2,200 per trip.' Few industries can boast of such dramatic increases in efficiency."

Reported by: the Lake Carriers Association




Today in Great Lakes History - July 11

The INDIANA HARBOR was christened July 11, 1979.

On July 11, 1943 the ENDERS M. VOORHEES became the first downbound vessel to transit the newly built MacArthur Lock at the Soo.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Interlake tug Drawings

07/10:
The first "SEAWAY" Class design is underway for Interlake Transportation Inc. This 126'-6" AT/B TM tug will be used to push the new bulk barge "PATHFINDER", currently being created from the ex-steamer "J.L. MAUTHE" at Bay Shipbuilding. The yet unnamed tug will be the most innovative tug ever created for a tug/barge unit. Designed specifically with Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway service in mind, this class of tug from Ocean Tug & Barge Engineering has a number of features designed to enhance safety, operation and efficiency.

Please visit the Ocean Tug & Barge Engineering home page for more details and images of the new tug.




Columbia Star sets new record for head-of-the- lakes coal trade

07/10:
The 1,000-foot-long COLUMBIA STAR has set a new record for the Head-Of-The-Lakes coal trade. The vessel loaded 70,903 net tons of low-sulfur coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wisconsin, on July 6 and discharged the cargo at Detroit Edison's St. Clair, Michigan, power plant today (July 9). The previous record coal cargo for the Head-Of-The-Lakes trade (Lake Superior to lower Lakes ports) was 70,706 tons, again carried by the COLUMBIA STAR in 1986.

The COLUMBIA STAR is one of two supercarriers in the 12-ship Oglebay Norton Company fleet. In terms of vessels, Oglebay Norton is the largest U.S.-Flag carrier on the Great Lakes. Oglebay Norton's other 1,000-footer, the OGLEBAY NORTON, holds the record for the Lakes largest stone cargo - 59,078 net tons.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers Association




Today in Great Lakes History - July 10

HENRY R. PLATT, JR. (2) was launched as a) G.A. TOMLINSON (1) at the American Ship Building Co., Lorain, OH - July 10, 1909

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




U.S. Stone Ports Heading For Big Month

07/09:
Although not all docks have reported, June stone shipments from U.S. Great Lakes ports will likely top 4.1 million net tons, an increase of 14.6 percent compared to a year ago and one of the highest monthly totals on record. For the season, stone shipments from U.S. ports will approach 10.8 million tons, an increase of 15.5 percent compared to the end-of-June total in 1996.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers Association




Jones Act debate continues

07/09:
Please visit the Lake Carriers Association home page for the LCA's response to the Steel Manufacturers Association's criticism of the Jones Act




Today in Great Lakes History - July 9

WILLIAM R. ROESCH (DAVID Z. NORTON 2) loaded her first cargo in 1973 at Superior, WI where she loaded 18,828 tons of iron ore bound for Jones & Laughlin's Cuyahoga River plant at Cleveland.

The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS and her fleetmate IRVING S. OLDS passed through the Panama Canal on July 9, 1988 under tow by the German tug OSA RAVENSTURM. The pair was on a 14,000 mile journey to Kaohsiung, Taiwan arriving there on November 8, 1988 for scrapping by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Weekend activity at Holland

07/08:
The Joseph H. Frantz paid an Independence Day visit to Holland. She arrived early enough in the day to make it to Brewer's Dock on the far east end of Lake Macatawa, before the holiday rush of recreational boaters became too thick. She was joined in port by the tallship Madeline of Traverse City, which spent the weekend in Holland as part of the city's ongoing sesquicentennial celebration. Beginning in the afternoon, Lake Macatawa filled with boats to watch the evening fireworks, which are launched from a barge in the middle of the lake. Thousands of people lined the shores to see them. The Frantz remained until after the show.

Also on the 5th, Project Lakewell sponsored a wooden boat gathering that drew about two dozen vessels.

Reported by: Bob Vande Vusse




New Canadian Tanker Named

07/08:
The brand new Canadian flagged/crewed tanker "KOMETIK" was named at Samsung Heavy Industries in Korea on July 3rd. The tanker was built to shuttle oil from Hibernia in the Grand Banks to the Newfoundland mainland. The tanker is double-hulled, has a length of 716', a beam of 138', has a deadweight tonnage of 127,000 and can carry 850,000 barrels of crude oil per trip.
KOMETIK is Inuit for "sled".

Reported by: James Neumiller




CORRECTION II: M.V. Joseph H. Frantz grazes bridge

07/08:
On June 17 it was reported that the Joseph H. Frantz dragged her stern anchor in order to keep from hitting the bridge.The stern anchor was dropped and the engines reversed, but the anchor was weighed before proceeding to Wirt Stone Dock.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 8

LOUIS R. DESMARAIS was launched July 8,1977



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Paint and the City of Milwaukee

07/07:
The Society for the Preservation of the S.S. CITY OF MILWAUKEE would like to thank Rust-Oleum, Sherwin-Williams, and society members for their recent paint donations. The society ended it's paint donation campaign with over 2500 gallons of paint, three times more than the society hoped to receive. The paint donations will allow the society to repaint the decks and hull of the ship, and begin interior restoration as well. The restoration schedule now depends upon obtaining the necessary volunteers and equipment to complete this project.

A portion of the paint can be used as is. For the hull color, the society will need to tint the paint. Since we will need 700 gallons to paint the hull, uniform tinting will be a challenge. Right now we are considering dumping the paint into a clean dumpster, then mixing it up to the desired tint. After tinting, the paint would then be returned to it's 55 gallon drum containers. A barge and scaffolding will also have to be obtained. Deck painting will be completed first, since this is not as difficult as painting the hull.

Painting the ship will help our efforts to open her as a maritime museum. The village of Elberta recently purchased adjacent property, and hopes to develop it as a combination museum, condominium and business district. We have begun discussions with the village, and hope to reach a mutually beneficial arrangement. In the interim, the ship is open to society members by arrangement and during special events (eg. July 4th fireworks, annual meeting, restoration work sessions, etc).

The society is currently seeking donations of the following equipment:
welder, power washer, air compressor, needle guns, painting equipment, lighting, electrical supplies, and other tools. Monetary donations are also welcome (donors may specify how their donations will be used). We are a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, and donations are tax-deductible in accordance with U.S. tax laws. The society also believes in working with other maritime organizations.

At this time we are entirely membership and donor supported. We have members from 17 different States and the Canadian Province of Quebec.

For more information on The Society for the Preservation of the S.S. CITY OF MILWAUKEE please contact:
sscitymilw@aol.com
SPCM, P.O. Box 506, Beulah MI 49617.
By phone please contact Kirk Lorenz at (616) 882-9688, fax (616) 882-4600.
Our internet site is http://www.t-one.net/~msh/spcm

S.S. CITY OF MILWAUKEE is a 1931 triple expansion steam railroad carferry, now berthed at Elberta MI (former home port of the Ann Arbor Railroad carferry fleet).

George P. Micka IV. Volunteer Restoration Coordinator, S.S. CITY OF MILWAUKEE




Twin Ports report

07/07:
Alpena departed Fraser Shipyards sometime over July 4th.

Ontonagon received one of its infrequent visitors July 6 when John G. Munson arrived.

Myron C. Taylor paid a rare call to Marblehead July 6 to load stone.

A pair of unusual callers at the DMIR ore dock in Duluth July 6 were Algobay and tug/barge Atlantic Hickory and Sarah Spencer.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - July 7

The BURNS HARBOR's sea trials were conducted on July 7, 1980.

JEAN PARISIEN was launched July 7, 1977.

The DAVID Z. NORTON sailed on her maiden voyage July 7, 1973 as the WILLIAM R. ROESCH. She sailed light from Lorain to Superior, WI where she loaded 18,828 tons of iron ore on July 9th bound for Jones & Laughlin's Cuyahoga River plant at Cleveland.



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News from the Seaway

07/05:
The American flagged replica aux. sailing vessel NINA is reported heading west in the Seaway. The 66ft long 100 ton vessel built in Brasil, arrived Sorel QC with an American and Brasilian crew where her masts were re-set after a transit of the Champlain canal from Albany and the Hudson river. She entered the Seaway for Cornwall and other exotic places on July 02/97 and is reported to have met with time delays as a result of grounding of the Laker ALGOSOUND in the Beauharnois Canal area and due to Seaway equipment mechanical delays There are no formal reports on the vessel

The salty SPRING LAKER-PA is on her first trip to the Lakes and will visit Cleveland.

The Arctic Sea Lift for 1997 is now under way with vessels loading in Montreal and at Cote St Catherine wharf

The reported departure of laker MONTREALAIS for the gulf was in-correct . She headed down river to Elevator #4, made the turn and entered the Seaway. She is now past Detroit and headed for Thunder Bay

The St Lawrence Water Control Board report the weekly drop in Lake Ontario Water levels was 3 cm this week compared to only 1 cm last week. Maximum outflows and velocities will be maintained which do not hazard ship traffic further down river

Reported by: Rene Beauchamp and John Whitehead




Yacht launched at Burger Boat

07/05:
The Evelyn-U, a 26-meter/85-foot yacht, was launched by crane recently at Burger Boat Co. in Manitowoc, Wis. It is the seventh vessel built by Burger Boat since February 1993. The firm had been declared bankrupt in 1990.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - July 5

PAUL H. CARNAHAN was launched in 1945 as a) HONEY HILL, a T2-SE-Al World War II Fuel Tanker, for U.S. Maritime Commission.



Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports report

07/04:
Tug Evans McKeil paid another of its rare visits to Duluth on July 2, arriving with a tank barge for the Hallett 6 dock.

Hospital ship Carribbean Mercy arrived in Duluth today and docked behind the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center. It's open for tours July 4-27

Several Canadian vessels have called at Midwest Energy Terminal in the past few weeks. The latest is Canadian Olympic, due in July 3 or 4.

Reported by: Al Miller




Algobay arrives Port Stanley

07/04:
June 28 at 19:00 hours the "ALGOBAY" entered Port Stanley Harbor with 20,000 metric tons of coal for Lakes Terminal & Warehousing. They had engine trouble on the way in and were operating with only one engine. They were finished at 01:00 hours Sunday morning. It is the second coal shipment this year.

Reported by: Richard Hill




July Fourth Fireworks aboard the CITY OF MILWAUKEE

07/04:
Society for the Preservation of the S.S. CITY OF MILWAUKEE members and non-members are invited to an annual Frankfort's Fourth of July fireworks gathering aboard the former railroad carferry. The fireworks outing is the society's largest event, with over forty members attending. Brats, pop, coffee, and other food items are available for donation. Society T-Shirts, Fredericksons History of the Ann Arbor Auto and Train Ferries book and other souvenir items are available. The event is included in society membership, which is $10.00 per person or $25.00 per family (annual). Non-members may attend for a cost of $5.00. If the ship becomes open to the public, additional details will be made available.

Click here for more information: S.S. City of Milwaukee




Today in Great Lakes History - July 4

The WILLIS B. BOYER museum ship was opened to the public in 1987.

In 1976 the SAM LAUD grounded entering Buffalo, NY. She was dry docked at Lorain, OH for repairs to bottom plates of No. 1,2 and 3 port and starboard tanks.

Also on this day in 1976, the H. Lee White struck the Algoma Steel plant dock at the Canadian Soo resulting in damages to her stern amounting to $108,000 at the repair yard of Sturgeon Bay.

The JOSEPH S. YOUNG (1) was commissioned July 4, 1957. She was the first of seven T2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service.

On July 4, 1953, the John G. Munson set a Great Lakes record for limestone by loading 21,011 tons of limestone at Calcite, Michigan. This record for limestone stood until being broken by the Canada Steamship Lines self-unloader Manitoulin late in the 1966 season.



Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




H. Lee White passes down Welland Canal

07/03:
H. LEE WHITE passed downbound through the Welland Canal early yesterday morning (July 2). To my knowledge it is the first time this ship has transited the canal. The last U.S. ship with her beam (78 feet) to pass through the canal was her fleet mate AMERICAN REPUBLIC in 1993. On the Canadian side the ALGOVILLE was rebuilt last year at Port Weller Dry Docks to 78 foot beam.

Reported by: David Bull




Tadoussac at wharf 16

07/03:
CSL's self-unloader Tadoussac spent over 2 days at wharf 16 the old R+P Dock in Port Colborne because of a failed steering gear. She arrived on Sat 0800 and did not leave until 1500 hours on Monday. She was loaded with stone enroute to Port Cartier, PQ. The whole side port side of the ship was repainted by a number of deck hands during her time in port. This included the bill board letters CANADA STEAMSHIP LINES. I was told she had been well cared for over the years because she had a mate that was very fussy. CSL's Frontenac passed among many others and one could not help notice the stark difference in the 2 vessels which are just a year apart. The Tadoussac looked flawless in contrast to the very dirty Frontenac which is larely engadged in the cement and iron ore trade.

Reported by: J. Joseph Van Volkenburg




Alpena enters Fraser Shipyards

07/03:
After unloading cement at the LaFarge terminals in Superior and Duluth, the Alpena steamed into Fraser Shipyards late in the afternoon of July 2. No word on how long it intends to be there or the reason for the visit.

Reported by: Al Miller




Storms delay traffic in the Rouge

07/03:
High winds and storms ripped through the Great Lakes on Wednesday, these storms cut off power to the lift bridges in the Rouge River, Detroit, MI. This has caused the delay of one tug boat and any other traffic for an undetermined amount of time. Some 100,000 homes in the area are reported to be without power.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Pathfinder and Playfair

07/03:
The sail training vessels Pathfinder and Playfair sailed out of Toronto and entered the Welland Canal yesterday morning. The vessels are upbound for their annual cruise to the upper lakes.

Reported by: Roger Tottman




Big Month For Superior Coal

07/03:
Superior Midwest Energy Terminal shipped 1,829,889 net tons of coal in June, an increase of 17.2 percent compared to a year earlier.

For the season, shipments of low-sulfur coal from SMET's Superior, Wisconsin, dock total 4.7 million tons, an increase of 820,000 tons compared to the end-of-June tally in 1996.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers Association




Today in Great Lakes History - July 3

The JOHN B. AIRD was christened June 3, 1983 at Thunder Bay for Algoma Central Marine, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

The ROGER BLOUGH was moved out of the dry dock on June 3, 1972.

In 1954 the CLIFFS VICTORY successfully completing her sea trials.

The FRANK ARMSTRONG departed light from Ashtabula, OH on her maiden voyage in command of Captain H. Chesley Inches June 3, 1943 bound for Superior, WI to load iron ore.

The PATERSON (1) entered service on June 3, 1954 with 440,000 bushels of wheat from Port Arthur.

Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




July 1 Vessel Report

07/02:
More than 97 Percent of Jones Act Fleet In Service - July 1 Vessel Report

On July 1, U.S.-Flag Great Lakes carriers had 66 of their 70 ships and tug/barge units in service. These vessels represent 97.2 percent of available carrying capacity

Vessels yet to see service this season are the straight-decker KINSMAN ENTERPRISE and the small cement carriers S. T. CRAPO and E. M. FORD. The ships could be activated if demand warranted.

The straight-decker J. L. MAUTHE is currently undergoing conversion to a self-unloading tug/barge at Bay Shipbuilding Company in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers Association




Open Letter

07/02:
The Lake Carriers Association now offers a copy of their open letter to Jones Act opponent Congressman Nick Smith at this URL: http://www.lcaships.com/ns1997.html I encourage all to visit the page.






Lake Guardian to hold open house

07/02:
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ship Lake Guardian will hold an open house from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday and Saturday in Bay City. It shoves off again around July 14.

The 180-foot ship returned to its home port here near Veterans Memorial Bridge on June 26.

Reported by: the Dan Maus




Pride of Baltimore II

07/02:
Pride of Baltimore II is currently transiting the "Upper St. Lawrence. Last night, she was anchored between Mary Island and Club Island in the vicinity of the American narrows for the night. ETD is not known. Destination remains unchanged as far as I Know.

Reported by: David A Aitcheson




Today in Great Lakes History - July 2

On July 2, 1966, the Simcoe (later Algostream) entered service. Another Canadian straight decker retired before its time.

Data from: Jody L. Aho

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




J.A.W. Iglehart loads in Montreal

07/01:
Inland Lakes' J.A.W. Iglehart loaded a cargo of cement in Montreal yesterday. Reports are that she will make the trip down the Seaway for a possible delivery to Cleveland.

Reported by: Industry source




Weather cooperates for Engineers Day 1997

07/01:
This years Engineers Day at the Soo couldn't have been more perfect. It was sunny, 78 degrees and the Edward L. Ryerson was in the Mac lock at 1:00 PM. A rarity at the Soo were three days of perfect weather. The only cloud to appear all weekend decided to show up just as the Ryerson approached the Mac lock. There was a unanamous groan of dismay from all the boat watchers who had assembled in the west observation platform to photograph the Ryerson. The cloud soon passed and the cameras started clicking. Engineers Day always takes place the last Friday in June. The Corps of Engineers holds an open house and allows the public to cross over the first lock and tour the first floor of the administration building.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Cuyahoga to load in Toledo

07/01:
The Cuyahoga was scheduled to load roughly 420,000 bu. corn at Toledo's Anderson's elevator on June 30. The cargo is destined for Port Colborne, Ont

Reported by: Mark Shumaker




Miller Lines takes delivery of new ferry

07/01:
Miller Boat Lines new ferry M/V Put-In-Bay was delivered to Catawba Island on May 12 from Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. Christening was held on May 31. The vessel is an exact duplicate of the 100' M/V Wm. Market and M/V Islander. The ferry is running opposite the M/V Wm. Market between Catawba Island and Put-In-Bay.

Reported by: Mark Shumaker




Today in Great Lakes History - July 1

On July 1, 1940, the Harry Coulby (now Kinsman Enterprise) became the first Great Lakes vessel to load in excess of 16,000 tons of iron ore when it loaded 16,067 tons of iron ore in Ashland, Wisconsin.



Data from: Jody L. Aho

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





Return to the News Archive

Return to Great Lakes Vessel Passage

Comments, news, and suggestions to: moderator@boatnerd.net