Great Lakes Shipping News Archive

* Report News


Oglebay Norton Reports Strong Second Quarter Revenues and Earnings

07/31:
Oglebay Norton Company announced Wesdnesday revenues increased 46% to $63,726,000 in the second quarter of 1998, compared with $43,576,000 in the second quarter of 1997.

Operating margin (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization) increased 58% to $16,777,000, compared with $10,623,000 in the second quarter of 1997. Net income increased 7% to $5,449,000 ($1.13 per share, assuming dilution) compared with $5,108,000 ($1.06 per share, assuming dilution) in the same period one year ago.

In the first half of 1998, revenues increased 38% to $78,034,000 from $56,362,000 in the first half of 1997. Operating margin for the six-month period was up 40% to $18,198,000, compared with $12,974,000 in the first half of 1997. Net income for that period decreased 12% to $5,229,000 ($1.08 per share, assuming dilution) compared with $5,961,000 ($1.23 per share, assuming dilution) in the same period one year ago. This reduction in net income is due primarily to the fact that in the first half of 1997 the Company recorded a gain and other income of $1,272,000 ($.26 per share, assuming dilution) from the sale of marketable securities and the receipt of insurance proceeds.

Marine Transportation revenues and operating margin for both the second quarter and the first half of 1998 were improved over the same periods in 1997 as a result of strong customer demand, good operating conditions on the Great Lakes, and lower fuel costs.

The Company also said that its Marine Transportation business continues to have an outstanding year and anticipates that if normal weather conditions persist through the second half of 1998 the division could deliver record profits. Marine Transportation handles and transports bulk materials, principally iron ore, coal and limestone.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




Waterways to Dock in Port Dalhousie

07/31:
Waterways Transportation Services have been granted permission to use Port Dalhousie as a docking location for their 300-passenger Catamaran.

Waterways made a presentation to St. Catharines City Council on Monday, July 27, and were granted permission to dock on a 3-month trial basis by unanimous vote.

Waterways had previously docked in Jordan Harbour.

Reported by: Erin Diel & Peter Green




Today in Great Lakes History - July 31

Sea trials took place for the JAMES R. BARKER this day in 1976. She was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flag ship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.). She was built at a cost of more than $43 million under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. She was the third thousand footer to sail on the Lakes and the first built entirely on the Lakes.

On July 31, 1974 as the Liberian vessel ARTADI approached the dock at Trois Rivières, Que. where she damaged the docked GORDON C. LEITCH's stern.

The CEDARBRANCH (2) was damaged and sunk by an explosion on July 31, 1965 several miles below Montreal, Que. resulting in a loss of one life.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Transfer to Move from Dry Dock

07/30:
The newly constructed Canadian Transfer will be moved from her Port Weller Dry Dock to the fit-out berth on Saturday at 1:00pm.

Reported by: Roger Tottman




Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival

07/30:
In attendance for the Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival are:
the MACKINAW (in red), ACACIA, KATAMI BAY, MOBILE BAY WITH CG 12002 (buoy barge), BUCKTHORN and scheduled to arrival yesterday, the ELM. Also on display is one of the new 47 foot rescue boats (all silver).

Reported by: Tom Gerger




Boatnerd Re-fit Almost Complete

07/30:
Be sure to stop by this coming Monday (8/3) to see the new look of the Boatnerd web site. I have not updated the appearance since I started the page in 1995.

The new Boatnerd site will feature an updated look and an easier to navigate lay-out.




Who will be the 100,000th Visitor?

07/30:
Please take a look at the bottom of the page and see what number the counter shows. Started in August 1996 this page is poised to hit the 100,000 visitors mark some time this week.

If you are the 100,000th please e-mail and let me know, no prizes just curious..

Thanks to all who visit and contribute!!!




Today in Great Lakes History - July 30

Two years ago, on July 30, 1996, a portion of a coal cargo aboard the H. M. Griffith caught on fire while the vessel was approaching Whitefish Point. The burning cargo was dumped into Lake Superior after the vessel's unloading boom was swung outward.

The GORDON C. LEITCH (1) was launched July 30, 1952 for the Upper Lakes & St. Lawrence Transportation Co. Ltd., Toronto, Ont.

The Ice Breaker ALEXANDER HENRY entered service July 30, 1959

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Inland boats Sold

07/29:
Netherlands-based Ispat International has sold its three Inland Steel lake freighters to a newly created U.S. company to comply with the Jones Act.

The ships - Ryerson, Block and Sykes - will continue to load taconite pellets in Duluth for shipment to Inland's steel complex in East Chicago, Ind. The 140 crew members and related personnel will remain employees of Inland Steel.

The ships' new owner is named Indiana Harbor Steamship Co. Another new company, Central Marine Logistics, manages the ships.

Inland officials said the new arrangement won't cause many changes for the lakers. Inland will lease the ships on a daily basis and Central Marine Logistics will handle crew matters, scheduling and mechanical concerns.

Inland's Minorca Mine taconite operation is operating a full capacity this year and plans to produce 2.7 million tons of pellets. That amounts to 38 percent of the 7 million tons used by Inland's mill each year.

Reported by: Al Miller




Detroit River Sightings

07/29:
Observed in the Ojibway Slip at Windsor yesterday was activity on ALGOSOUND. Her engine room gangway doors were open, overboard discharge from port and starboard and the pilothouse door and windows were open.

The temporary Windsor casino boat NORTHERN BELLE was backed in the slip just astern of the ALGOSOUND. The J. W. Westcott's boat crew reports that the ship sailed down to Ojibway on Friday 7/24. Windsor's permanent casino opened on Monday night.

The small Barbados registered CHERYL C departed Nicholson's Terminal downbound at 19:00 yesterday. She will fuel at Port Colborne and deliver her cargo of machinery to Russia.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Today in Great Lakes History - July 29

The OTTERCLIFFE HALL cleared Lauzon July 29, 1969 on her maiden voyage as the last "straight deck" Great Lakes bulk freighter built with a pilot house forward.

While at the Manitowoc Ship Building Co. for general repairs and engine overhaul, the CITY OF SAGINAW caught fire on July 29, 1971 and destroyed her upper deck and forward section. Damages were estimated from $450,000 to $750,000 and were not repaired. The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 was sold to Marine Salvage Ltd., Port Colborne, Ont. for scrap.

On July 29, 1974 the W.W. HOLLOWAY grounded in Lake St. Clair off the Grosse Pointe Yacht Club running downbound with stone. Lightering into the J.F. SCHOELKOPF,JR. was necessary before she was freed by four tugs on July 31st.

ENDERS M. VOORHEES departed River Rouge on her maiden voyage July 29, 1942 bound for Duluth, MN to load iron ore. She was the second of five "Supers" for the Pittsburgh fleet to enter service.

July 29, 1974 - The "PERE MARQUETTE 21" was towed to Milwaukee on July 29, 1974 and reduced to a barge.

July 29, 1971 - A fire broke out on the City of Saginaw 31, destroying her cabin deck and rendering her useless for further use. The blaze was caused by an acetylene torch, and caused over $1 million in damage.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - July 28

ALGOWEST passed Detroit, Mich. downbound on July 28, 1982, she had departed on her maiden voyage July 26 from Thunder Bay, Ont. to Quebec City with a 27,308 tonne load of barley.

b) ADAM E. CORNELIUS was christened July 28, 1973 at AmShip by Mrs. Roger Kyes as the a) ROGER M. KYES

COASTAL CANADA was launched July 28, 1952

The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was delivered on July 28th to the Buckeye Steamship Co. (Hutchinson & Co., mgr.), Cleveland. The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was part of a government program designed to upgrade and increase the capacity of the U.S. Great Lakes fleet during World War II. In order to help finance the building of new ships, the U.S.M.C. authorized a program that would allow existing fleets to obtain new boats by trading in their older boats to the Government for credit. The JOHN T. HUTCHINSON was the ninth Maritimer and fourth of the six L6-S-Al types delivered. "L6" meant the vessel was built for the Great Lakes and was 600 to 699 feet in length. The "S" stood for steam power and "Al" identified specific design features.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




New Visitor to Manistee

07/27:
Great Lakes Transport's tug Atlantic Hickory and barge Sarah Spencer arrived in Manistee on Thursday with what appeared to be either limestone or Gypsum for the Seng #2 dock at around noon. This is the vessels first ever trip into Manistee in its present state. It's old self, the Adam E.Cornelius came in the 80's with coal for Morton Salt. The vessel made an extremely slow departure on Friday morning around 0800 heading out for Lake Michigan.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




Shipwreck Society to Search for Minesweepers

07/27:
Copper Harbor - Shipwreck historians believe there are two sunken l9l9 French minesweepers in the waters off Copper Harbor. "Our plans are to come out (and search for the ships) the second or third week of August if everything goes right," said Tom Farnquist, director of the Great Lakes Shipwreck Society Museum in Sault Ste. Marie. "But this is a needle in a haystack. It could take days, months or years. Your have to be very, very patient." Farnquist said his crew is serious about searching for the ships this summer, but weather could be a limiting factyor. The weather was also a factor nearly 80 years ago when the three minesweepers, the Sebastopol, Inkermann and the Cerisoles, set out from Thunder Bay to France for some post-World War 1 clean-up. "The Sebastopol made it, Farnquist said. It almost went down too. It was leading the way." The Sebastopol made it around the Keweenaw Peninsula but nearly turner over on its side as it maneuvered through the violent water. The l43-foot vessel then waited out the storm anchored off Bete Gris. The other two sank attempting to travel around the peninsula, and all hands on board - 70 French officers and four Canadian pilots went down with their ships. Franquist and his crew will search a l00-square-mile area from five to l5 miles off the coast. "We have a side scanning sonar (to help detact the ships). We grid off an area and mow the lawn," Franquist said. "And it could turn out that they're not there, but all the clues point to that area." French government documents helped the crew zero in on Copper Harbor as the side of the wrecks. Grant Township officals are enthusiastic about the possible historic find off their shores. "We have this Lake Superior Heritage Society up here," said Don Kilpela, a member of the Grant Township Downtown Development Authority. "The intent of the society is to work with other groups interested in maritime history. This is the first attempt for us to form a working relationship with one of those groups. Farnquist is one of the most prominent figures in shipwrecks history." Franquist plans to share images of their search with Grant Township for display in a maritime museum officals hope to build in the next couple of years. The minesweepers themselves are especailly meaningful to historians because there are none like them anywhere in the world, Farnquist said. There are bow and stern guns mounted," Farnquist said. "Looking for minesweepers is something I've been thinking about for a number of years." Shipwreck searchers in Marquette have identified an object off the waters there that appears to be the 525-foot lake freighter, the HENRY B. SMITH, which sank there, with all hands on board in November l9l3. "That will be an easy target," Farnquist said. "If it's where they say it is we will find it without question."

Reported by: Jim Grill




U.S. Steel results lower, hurt by GM strike

07/27:
U.S. Steel Group on Thursday reported its second-quarter results fell slightly from a year earlier, hurt by the General Motors Corp. (GM - news) strike and competition from steel imports.

U.S. Steel, the steel segment of USX Corp., said its operating income was down 2 percent, to $108 million, or $1.16 per diluted share. However, the earnings beat Wall Street estimates of $1.13 per share.

Revenues slipped to $1.73 billion from $1.74 billion a year earlier.

Net income, including the favorable effect of an insurance litigation settlement, rose to $136 million, or $1.46 per diluted share, from $97 million, or $1.06 per share, a year earlier.

USX Chairman Thomas Usher said in a statement that U.S. Steel results were hurt by outages at its Gary, Ind., blast furnaces, the GM strike, and a sharp increase in steel imports.

``Domestic steel producers are facing a difficult environment in the third quarter,'' he said.

U.S. Steel said it expects lower third-quarter steel shipments due to the GM strike and strong imports. It also expects lower production levels and higher manufacturing costs due to continued outages at the Gary furnaces.

Usher said U.S. Steel is prepared to file anti-dumping petitions against foreign steel producers, particularly in Russia and Asia, if it sees evidence that imported steel is being sold at unfairly low prices in the United States.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




New Feature on this Web Site

07/27:
The Great Lakes Shipwreck File: Total Losses of Great Lakes Ships, 1679 - 1997. This new page includes vessels which were total losses or were declared total losses and later recovered, plus a few wrecks which were significant for other reasons (e.g. loss of life), but were later recovered.

Click here to visit this new section.





Today in Great Lakes History - July 27

In heavy fog on 27 July 1884, ALBERTA (a steel, propeller passenger/package freight steamer, 264"/2282GT, built in 1883 at Glasgow, Scotland) collided with the JOHN M. OSBORNE (propeller, wooden steambarge, 178'/891GT, built in 1882 at Marine City) which had two barges in tow. The ALBERTA stayed in the gash until most of OSBORNE's crew scrambled aboard. 3 or 4 lives lost from the OSBORNE, and one from ALBERTA in a brave rescue attempt. This accident occurred about 6 miles NNW of Whitefish Point in Lake Superior. The wreck of the OSBORNE was located in 1984, 100 years after she sank.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - July 26

The William A. McGonagle departed Ecorse, MI on her maiden voyage on July 26, 1916 bound for Duluth, MN to load iron ore. In 1986 she would become the Henry Steinbrenner (4)- see historic photo gallery. Retired from service in 1989, she was scrapped in Port Maitland in 1994.

ALGOWEST sailed on her maiden voyage in 1982 from Thunder Bay, Ont. to Quebec City with a 27,308 tonne load of barley. She was the first straight deck bulker built for Algoma since the 1968 launch of ALGOCEN (2), as well as the last ship built for this fleet. The ALGOWEST has set several cargo records, including a 27,517 tonne load of grain down the Seaway October 16, 1982 to Port Cartier, Que.

On July 26, 1943 the COASTAL CLIFF under the name a) BRUCE HUDSON caught fire while loading gasoline at East Chicago, IL and four persons lost their lives. She proceeded under her own power on August 10, 1943 to Muir Bros. at Port Dalhousie, Ont. for repairs.

The WILLIAM A. McGONAGLE (2) sailed light on her maiden voyage from the shipyard on July 26, 1916 to Duluth, MN to load iron ore.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




The Welding of the Century

07/25:
The Upper Lakes Group vessel M.V. Canadian Transfer will be re-commissioned in a ceremony Tuesday, August 4, 11 a.m. at Port Weller Dry Docks Lock 1, Welland Canal, St. Catharines, Ont.
Special Guest: The Honourable Tony Clement, Minister of Transporation.
For more information, please contact: Laura Bruce or John Klassen OEB International (905) 682-7203




Michigan Limestone Plant recovering

07/25:
The Michigan Limestone Plant is recovering after the July 5th fire. As of Sunday night one of two main conveyors used to transport limestone to top floor of the 12 story mill house was back in operation. The fire nearly totally destroyed the other 1/4 mile long conveyor and is in the process of being demolished prior to being rebuilt. Limestone shipments from the Calcite plant in Rogers City were not impacted as Michigan Limestone had approximately 800,000 tons in storage piles.

Reported by: D. Ocean




Today in Great Lakes History - July 25

The bow section of the ROGER BLOUGH was floated into the new Lorain dry dock on July 25, 1970 and was joined with the 421 foot stern section. The launch of the completed hull was scheduled for July, 1971 but a fire broke out in the engine room on June 24, 1971 killing four yard workers and extensively damaging her Pielstick diesel engines. Extensive repairs, which included replacement of both engines, delayed the launch for nearly a year.

The CANADA MARQUIS (c) FEDERAL MACKENZIE) was upbound at Detroit, Mich. on July 25, 1983 on her maiden voyage.

July 25, 1983 - A wedding was held aboard the Badger during the sailing of "Love Boat II". Chris Gebhart and Pat Sroka of Ludington were married by Rev John Christensen.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Ore and Stone Lead June Increase

07/24:
Led by strong increases in iron ore and stone cargos, U.S.-Flag lakers moved 13.9 million net tons of dry-bulk cargos in June, an increase of 5.4 percent compared to the same period last year. For the season, U.S.-Flag carriage stands at 44,251,492 tons, an increase of 7.8 percent over the benchmark 1997 shipping season. If this pace continues for the remainder of the '98 season, last year's modern-day record of 125.2 million tons in U.S. bottoms will be easily eclipsed.

Iron ore cargos for the booming steel industry totaled 7 million tons in June, an increase of 8.3 percent over the corresponding period last year. Since the resumption of iron ore shipments in early March, loadings in U.S.-Flag lakers stand at 23,353,570 tons, an increase of 7.8 percent.

Strong demand from steel and the construction industry pushed stone cargos in U.S. bottoms over 3.7 million tons, an increase of 9.7 percent. With the mild winter allowing the stone trade to resume weeks ahead of schedule, the season-to-date total, 11.3 million tons, represents an increase of 19.4 percent.

Coal loadings in U.S.-Flag lakers, both in June and for the season, are slightly behind last year. The mild winter reduced coal consumption at power plants, so there has not been so great a need to replenish stockpiles. The heat wave that embraced the Great Lakes region in July could increase the coal float.

U.S.-Flag operators continue to utilize virtually every serviceable hull. The only vessels not to sail so far this season are a small cement carrier (E. M. FORD) and a grain carrier (KINSMAN ENTERPRISE). Lack of cargo idled the one U.S.-Flag grain carrier activated this spring in early June. No firm sail date has been announced for the KINSMAN INDEPENDENT.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Great Lakes Stone Trade Off A Few Boatloads In June

07/24:
Shipments of stone and gypsum from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 4.6 million net tons in June, a slight decrease compared to the same period last year. For the season, the Lakes stone trade stands at 14.2 million tons, an increase of 13.2 percent compared to the same point in the 1997 shipping season.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Weekend Events

07/24:
The Great Lakes Clipper Preservation Association is hosting a Steak Fry on Saturday, July 25 from 4:00-? at Hagar's Hideaway, 3156 Lakeshore Dr. Muskegon (just west of the Clipper's dock). Entertainment will also be provided. Learn more about the SS Milwaukee Clipper and Upcoming Events! Souvenir and Raffle items! Meal tickets are $12.50, beverages are extra (Beer, Wine, Pop). For information call (616) 755-8066. Tickets are available at the Clipper Security Trailer, Walt Plant Appliances or Grand Industries.

The Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival begins today. See the official Festival web site at http://www.grandhaven.com/ghcgfest.

Reported by: Max Hanley




The Winner is..

07/24:
The winners in the International Ship Masters' Association Cleveland Lodge #4 raffle are:

GRAND PRIZE: Fred & Laurabelle Riebel, Chesterfield, MI
2nd Prize: David Colucci, Ashtabula, OH
3rd Prize: Philip Zelinski, Alma, MI
4th Prize: Marlyn Gang, Elyria, OH

Congratulations to all!
Fred and three friends will be treated to a cruise aboard the Kaye E. Barker this September.

If you ticket wasn't a winner there is still the chance to win a trip on the Courtney Burton! Click here for more details

Reported by: C. Hilston




U.S. Steel Gary Works Hits 90th Year Milestone

07/24:
A group of U.S. Steel officials, United Steelworker representatives, political and civic leaders and other guests gathered today to commemorate the 90th anniversary of the arrival of the first ore boat at the company's Gary Works -- an event which began one of the most significant manufacturing sagas in world history.

On July 23, 1908, the 12,000-ton steamer Elbert H. Gary entered the new steel plant's harbor at the southern tip of Lake Michigan loaded with iron ore and 500 passengers and accompanied by a convoy of U.S. Navy gunboats to help mark the historic occasion. As a ceremony and parade proceeded down Broadway through the fledgling City of Gary, the iron ore was unloaded for charging into Gary Works' blast furnaces, beginning operations of the most productive steel facility ever built.

Since then, more than 370 million tons of ore have been delivered, and Gary Works has produced 435 million tons of steel, more than any plant in the world. That much steel would:

Build 480 million cars - enough to go around the equator more than 60 times lined up bumper to bumper.
Build enough steel framed homes to house every one of America's 75 million families.
Build 6 quadrillion steel food cans - or 1,000 for every single person on earth.

Yesterday's commemorative ceremonies at the plant's dock included tours by the participants of a modern 1,000-foot long, 73,000-ton ore boat -- the Motor Vessel Edgar B. Speer -- in the slip where the Elbert Gary was unloaded nine decades earlier.

``The arrival of the first ore boat to Gary Works in 1908 marked not just the start of operations at U.S. Steel's flagship mill, but also the birth of the first truly integrated major steel facility in America. It also represented an early milestone in Northwest Indiana's rich steel heritage,'' said Raymond R. Terza, plant manager of primary operations at Gary Works.

``Today, Northwest Indiana has become the world's steel-making capital, as well as the focal point of the 1990's dramatic re-birth of America's steel industry as a high-tech, globally competitive leader,'' Terza said. ``The 7,800 men and women of Gary Works are proud of the plant's status as the largest steel mill in North America, and even prouder of its status as one of the most modern and efficient facilities in the world.

``Therefore -- as we look ahead to the task of keeping Gary Works at the forefront of quality steel-making into the 21st century -- it's appropriate that we pause to remember the arrival 90 years ago of the first raw materials for iron and steel production here,'' he added.

Terza noted that the Elbert Gary's entry into the new steel mill harbor was a major event in 1908. Excavation of the site and construction of facilities had taken a little more than two years, a project compared in scope with construction of the Panama Canal.

Eager to be part of the historic day, thousands of people -- dignitaries, workers and citizens -- lined the plant's docks and greeted the incoming steamer with cheering and songs. Three Navy gunboats marked the opening of the new harbor and the arrival of the first vessel with a 21-gun cannon salute. The keynote address was delivered by John W. Kern, the Democratic nominee for vice president, running with William Jennings Bryan.

Gary Works represented the vision of Judge Elbert H. Gary, elected the first chairman of U.S. Steel when it was founded in 1901. Judge Gary conceived of a completely new steel plant on an undeveloped site which would incorporate all the elements of an integrated facility, from raw materials through a range of finished steel products.

The site was chosen and on March 12, 1906, surveyors drove stakes into the expanse of swamp and dune land, and construction began. The project included elevating the entire mill site by 15 feet; digging a three-mile long tunnel for water, 80 feet down and extending a mile into the lake; laying 51 miles of railroad track; building houses for thousands of workers, and constructing the essential services for a city of 250,000 residents, in addition to all the plant's processing facilities.

Following arrival of the first iron ore, Gary Works produced its first blast furnace iron on Dec. 21, 1908. The first heat of steel was tapped on February 3, 1909.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




U.S. Steel Gary Works Hits 90th Year Milestone

07/24:
USX-U.S. Steel Group (NYSE: X) recorded second quarter 1998 net income of $136 million, or $1.46 per diluted share, on revenues of $1.7 billion. Second quarter 1997 net income was $97 million, or $1.06 per diluted share, on revenues of $1.7 billion.

U.S. Steel Group's second quarter 1998 net income adjusted for special items was $108 million, or $1.16 per diluted share. These results exclude the favorable effects of an insurance litigation settlement pertaining to the Gary (Ind.) Works No. 8 blast furnace and a foreign tax adjustment. The aftertax effect of these special items was $28 million. Second quarter 1997 net income adjusted for special items was $110 million, or $1.20 per diluted share. These results exclude a net unfavorable aftertax effect of $13 million from several special items.

Income from operations in second quarter 1998 was $217 million, or $76 per ton, which includes approximately $30 million (net of related charges and reserves) for the settlement of litigation against the company's property insurers to recover losses related to a 1995 explosion at the Gary Works No. 8 blast furnace. Income from operations in second quarter 1997 was $193 million, or $66 per ton. Shipments were 2.9 million tons in both periods.

U.S. Steel's facilities operated at 91 percent of raw steel capability in second quarter 1998, compared with a 99 percent operating rate in second quarter 1997. Operations in second quarter 1998 were affected by a planned outage at the Gary Works No. 6 blast furnace and an unplanned outage at the Gary Works No. 13 blast furnace, U.S. Steel's largest furnace.

The No. 6 blast furnace was taken off line in mid-May for a scheduled reline which is expected to be completed in mid-August. The No. 13 blast furnace was idled in June for 10 days as the result of a tap hole breakout.

USX Board Chairman Thomas J. Usher said, "The Steel Group continued its strong financial performance in the second quarter. The effects of the Gary blast furnace outages, the General Motors strike and a sharp increase in steel imports prevented even better second quarter results.

"Domestic steel producers are facing a difficult environment as we enter the third quarter," Usher said. "The U.S. Steel Group is experiencing reduced order backlogs for most products due to the effects of the strike at General Motors, sharply increased imports, selected customer inventory reduction plans (especially distributors of oil country tubular goods), and normal seasonal patterns. These factors are expected to result in lower shipments in the third quarter. In addition, we anticipate production levels and manufacturing costs will be unfavorably affected by the continuation of the No. 6 blast furnace reline and the lingering effects of the No. 13 blast furnace breakout," said Usher.

The USX chairman noted that the order backlog for plate products, which accounted for approximately 9 percent of shipments in 1997, remains strong. U.S. Steel earlier this year completed a $40 million modernization at its plate mill at Gary Works. A price increase on plate products took effect in late June.

A second hot-dip galvanizing line is scheduled to come on stream in late third quarter at the PRO-TEC Coating Company in Ohio, a joint venture between U.S. Steel and Kobe Steel of Japan. The expansion will add 400,000 tons of capacity, bringing annual capacity at PRO-TEC to more than one million tons. Usher said the recent and significant increase in steel imports into the domestic market, particularly from Russia and Asia, is of growing concern. "We are paying close attention to this disturbing trend. We have an obligation to our U.S. Steel Group stockholders and employees to insure that they do not suffer from improperly traded steel imports. We stand ready to file anti-dumping and countervailing duty petitions if we see evidence that foreign producers are violating our nation's trade laws by causing or threatening injury to U.S. Steel with dumped or unfairly subsidized steel," he said.

U.S. Steel's second quarter 1998 provision for estimated income taxes has been decreased by a $9 million foreign tax adjustment as a result of a favorable resolution of foreign tax litigation. U.S. Steel's second quarter 1997 provision for estimated income taxes included the six month effect of a reduction in estimated tax credits for 1997.

This release contains forward-looking information with respect to shipments, production levels and manufacturing costs. These forward-looking statements can be affected by the length of the General Motors strike, import levels, domestic production capacity and customer demand.

This forward-looking information may prove to be inaccurate and actual results may differ significantly from those presently anticipated. USX has included in its Form 10-K, for the year ended December 31, 1997, cautionary language identifying other important factors, though not necessarily all such factors, that could cause future outcomes to differ from those set forth in forward-looking statements.

For more information on USX Corporation and A HREF ="http://www.ussteel.com">U.S. Steel Group please visit their web sites.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 24

The ALGOSOO (2) was Launched July 24, 1974 for Algoma Central Railway, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

The BURNS HARBOR sea trials were conducted on July 24, 1980 during which she performed an emergency stop in 3,160 feet loaded to a depth of 25/26 feet. She was the third thousand footer built for Bethlehem and the tenth on the Great Lakes.

ST.CLAIR (2) was launched July 24, 1975

The WILLIAM G. MATHER (2) left the River Rouge on her maiden voyage July 24, 1925 for Ashtabula, OH to load coal for the Canadian lakehead at Port Arthur/Fort William, Ont.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




U.S.-Flag Cruise Industry

07/23:
Great Lakes Maritime Task Force Supports U.S.-Flag Cruise Industry

The Senate Commerce Committee may next week consider a bill (S. 803) that would allow foreign-flag cruise ships into the U.S. market. The Great Lakes Maritime Task, the largest coalition of Great Lakes maritime interests, has sent the following letter to Arizona Senator John McCain, Chairman of that Committee, and other Committee members, opposing S. 803 or similar legislation. For more complete details, please read the letter from the Maritime Cabotage Task Force, the national organization promoting the U.S. Cabotage laws.

July 21, 1998
The Honorable John McCain
United States Senate
Washington, DC 20510-0303

Dear Senator McCain:

The Great Lakes Maritime Task Force champions a healthy U.S.-Flag merchant marine and related maritime activity on the Great Lakes. The Task Force is comprised of labor and management representing ship operators and merchant mariners; shipyards; longshoremen, terminal operators, ...

On July 29, the Senate Commerce Committee will consider legislation, S. 803, that purports to increase the opportunities for Americans to cruise between our nation’s riparian cities. The goal is worthy, but is being presently accomplished under existing law, the Passenger Vessel Services Act. Right now there are approximately 30 large U.S.-Flag passenger vessels under construction or in advanced design. When these ships are christened in the next 5-10 years, tens of thousands more Americans will join the 100 million citizens who annually cruise our waters in vessels that are U.S.-owned, U.S.-crewed, and U.S.-built.

There is no reason to support S. 803 or similar legislation, but there is a great need to oppose this bill, as it would set a dangerous precedent. S. 803 would allow foreign corporations and workers to compete in American domestic commerce, yet exempt them for virtually all our laws and regulations. Not only would S. 803 create an unlevel playing field, the absence of compliance with the full scope of American laws would endanger that most precious of cargos — human beings. On July 17, 1998, NBC Nightly News broadcast a report on the state of cruising from American ports and an official of the National Transportation Safety Board stated bluntly that in many instances, passengers on older foreign-flag ships would be safer "in a cheap roadside motel."

In short, the American-Flag cruise ship industry is rebuilding itself at a record pace. S. 803 will scuttle that revival once and for all. I urge you to oppose this bill or similar legislation.

Sincerely,
George J. Ryan
President.

If you would like to help scuttle this bill e-mail your Senators and let them know your concern on S. 803.


Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Today in Great Lakes History - July 23

The Keel for the TEXACO CHIEF (2) was laid July 23, 1968

CANADOC (2) sailed on her maiden voyage July 23rd.

The RED WING (2) was christened on July 23, 1960 as the first all-welded vessel to emerge from Port Weller Dry Docks.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Barge makes First Trip

07/22:
The Pere Marquette 41 left Ludington last night around 10:45 PM, bound for Manitowoc for a load of stone for the new marina at Ludington. The trip to Manitowoc was expected to take around 7 hours.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Algowest update

07/22:
It was reported last week that the Algowest was docked in Hamilton with Engine troubles, she was in Hamilton only for one day. She left for Goderich to load salt, and was to be unloading in Buffalo last night (July 21).

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




U.S. Steel Names New Gary Works General Manager

07/22:
Leonard H. Chuderewicz, 49, has been named general manager of U.S. Steel's Gary Works. He succeeds John F. Kaloski, who retired. The appointment of Chuderewicz was announced by Paul J. Wilhelm, president of the U.S. Steel Group of USX Corporation.

A veteran of 27 years with U.S. Steel, Chuderewicz has served since late 1996 as president of USS/KOBE Steel Company in Lorain, Ohio, a joint venture of USX Corporation and Kobe Steel of Japan.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




Cuyahoga River Report

07/22:
Visit the Lake Carriers' Assocation home page for the June Cargo report.




GATX sees H2, H1 earnings similar, FY record

07/22:
Logistics and transportation company GATX Corp. said Tuesday it expects earnings in the second half of 1998 to be similar to the first half when it earned $1.35 a share.

``At the present time, we believe that the second half of 1998 will produce earnings at similar levels to the first half, and that the third quarter will be stronger than the fourth quarter due to the anticipated timing of remarketing gains,'' Ronald Zech, chairman and CEO, said in a statement.

``Based on these factors, we expect full-year results for 1998 to set a new record,'' he added.

Analysts were expecting earnings for the full year of $2.68 a share, according to First Call estimates.

Yesterday, GATX reported second quarter earnings of $0.61 a share on sales of $437.6 million, little changed from year ago earnings of $0.61 and sales of $434.7 million. The earnings fell short of a First Call estimate of $0.70 a share, although only one analyst was included in that survey.

General American Transportation, GATX Capital, and GATX Terminals all reported higher net income in the second quarter compared to last year, GATX said.

GATX Logistics' results were hampered by a $1.6 million after-tax write-off of a customer receivable. Although operations were at record levels, American Steamship reported net earnings for the quarter below year ago.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




Today in Great Lakes History - July 22

PERE MARQUETTE 22 was launched in 1924 by the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI as Hull #210 she was Christened by Muriel Badger, daughter of A.E. Badger. First Master Esten Bayle.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Busy Day in Harbour

07/21:
The busiest days in Midland Harbour in the last ten years happened between Wenesday & Friday of last week (July 15-18). In the harbour on those days were the Sarah Spencer & Atlantic Hickory at the Town House Elevator with grain. The Algorail was at the Indusmin plant unloading stone and the CGS Cove Isle was doing her monthly rounds of the area.

Reported by: Chris Dunn




Inland Steel Sale Complete

07/21:
Ispat International N.V. has completed its purchase of Inland Steel Co. from Inland Steel Industries Inc. for U.S.$1.43 billion. The deal was announced 17 March. The merged firm will be the world's eighth-largest steel producer with more than 12.5 million tons manufactured annually. It will have a revenue of more than U.S.$4.6 billion. Ispat International plans U.S.$100 million in cost savings. Inland Steel Industries, meanwhile, will merge with Ryerson Tull Inc., a subsidiary in which it owns 87 percent. Ryerson Tull is the largest U.S. metals and industrial plastics service center.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - July 21

The SPRUCEGLEN, then named c) GEORGE D. GOBLE , was used to transport two pilot houses built at American Ship Building's South Chicago yard to the AmShip yard at Lorain, OH on July 21, 1975 where Interlake Steamship's thousand foot Lake freighters JAMES R. BARKER and MESABI MINER were being completed.

July 21, 1998 the Pere Marquette 41 departed Ludington bound for Manitowoc for a load of stone for the new marina in Ludington. She arrived Ludington with her first load of cargo on July 26.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Sundew visits Mackinac Island

07/20:
The Sundew paid a rare call to Mackinac Island this past week after supervising the Port Huron to Mackinac Island yacht race. After leaving Tuesday the Sundew headed to the Soo and tied up there on Wednesday. She is reported to have work on Lake Superior before heading back to Duluth.

Reported by: David F.




USS boats making rare runs

07/20:
USSGLF's Presque Isle and Edwin H. Gott are making some rare calls. The Edwin H. Gott will be calling on Silver Bay on it's next run while the Presque Isle will be arriving at the D.M.&I.R. dock in Duluth on the July 20th.

Reported by: David F.




Activity aboard the the L .E. Block

07/20:
Seen in Escanaba over the weekend was activity on the L .E. Block. Several men were walking the cargo deck pointing to different areas. Could this be a sign that her owners are planning something for the 1927 built steamer?

Reported by: David F.




Today in Great Lakes History - July 20

The LEON FALK, JR. was christened at Cleveland, July 20, 1961 after one trip to Duluth, MN for ore.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Port of Buffalo news

07/19:
The Founder's Sand Dock on the Buffalo Ship Canal is now taking loads of Gypsum. The George A Sloan unloaded there on the 18th. The Taylor has been in once as well. In other news the work on the ADM Elevator is progressing. The hopper for self unloaders is starting to take shape . Work looked like it had stalled out for a few weeks but construction is again underway. This should bring in some interesting traffic in the Fall.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Forebody Spotted

07/19:
The forebody of CANADIAN EXPLORER was seen at the Government Dock at Hamilton, ON on 7/4/98. The original plan was to use the Explorer's forebody as a storage barge for Upper Lakes Group. No word if this is why she is there.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Today in Great Lakes History - July 19

The first cargo of low sulfur Western coal in Great Lakes history was loaded in Superior, Wisconsin on July 19, 1971 aboard the Samuel Mather for delivery to Taconite Harbor, Minnesota. The 5,040 ton cargo was a test cargo to see how this type of coal would perform in power plants. This particular cargo was loaded at the Burlington Northern ore docks in Superior, which also makes this one of the few (if not the only??) times that an ore dock has loaded some cargo other than some form of iron ore.

The EDWIN H. GOTT was float launched July 19, 1978

CONSUMERS POWER (3) had her last five-year inspection at Port Weller on July 19, 1985.

In 1957 JOSEPH S. YOUNG (1) was christened at Buffalo, NY. The JOSEPH S. YOUNG (1) was the first of seven T2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - July 18

The AGAWA CANYON struck an abutment at Welland Canal's Bridge 11 at Allanburg, Ont. on July 18, 1977 while downbound with salt for Kingston, Ont. and sustained a thirty foot gash just above the waterline at the port bow. Her cargo of salt was unloaded at Toronto, Ont. and she returned to the Port Weller Dry Dock on the Welland Canal for repairs.

The BENSON FORD's (then renamed b) JOHN DYKSTRA (2) cabin was delivered to South Bass Island July 18th on the barge THOR 101 towed by the tug GREGORY J. BUSCH. The entire forward superstructure of the DYKSTRA (2), including the forecastle deck, had been removed at Cleveland, July 2, 1986 for use as a summer home on Lake Erie's South Bass Island where it remains.

The WILLIAM G. MATHER (2) completed her sea trials today in 1925.

On 18 July 1858, ANDROMEDA (2-mast, wooden schooner, 112'/568T, built in 1848 at Madison Dock, OH) was sailing from Oswego, NY to Chicago with 800 barrels of salt. 20 miles from Sheboygan, WI in Lake Michigan, she sprang a leak and quickly foundered. The crew, some still in their underwear, escaped in the life boat and arrived in Manitowoc, WI the next day.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News from the Seaway

07/17:
Arriving on her maiden trip in Montreal on July 5 from the Seaway was the small American-flag cruise ship GRANDE MARINER. She is registered at Warren, R.I. where she was built earlier this year by Blount Marine. She is operated by American Canadian Caribbean Line Inc. When she transited St. Lambert Lock, CANADIAN EMPRESS was in the same lock, a rare occurence two see two overnight cruise ships in the same lock.

Leaving Montreal on July 6 for overseas was the Greek-flag tanker LACONIA which delivered a cargo of molasses at section 58.Despite she was built 38 years ago, she was in spotless condition. She had the name Texaco Bogota until 1990 and had been lenghtened in 1968. Entering the Seaway on July 13 for Toronto from Sorel was the Egyptian-flag ALEXANDRIA. This is her first visit to the Great Lakes. She is not to be confused with another ship of the same name, the Greek bulker Alexandria, a regular caller, which completed a trip last month. She is not to be confused either with a third Alexandria which did her first trip to the Lakes last year. That one was flying the flag of Antigua & Barbuda.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Algowest docked with Engine troubles

07/17:
After leaving the Port Weller Shipyard on Tuesday evening, the Algowest headed downbound to Lake Ontario. Since then she has been in Hamilton at Pier 26 assessing some sort of engine damage. No other details are available at this time.

The engines, incidentally, are one of the few things that Port Weller Dry Docks did not work on during the conversion of the ship.

Reported by: Andy Torrence




Another Cruise Ship on the Lakes

07/17:
The Nantucket Clipper was docked in Windsor On. last night, the second stop on her 11 day cruise of the lakes. She has completed a 12 day cruise arriving in Toledo to take on a load of new passengers departing on Wednesday. The 100 passenger vessel departed Windsor at 11:15 P.M, her next stop is Goderich.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Today in Great Lakes History - July 17

In 1973 the "PERE MARQUETTE 21" and the "PERE MARQUETTE 22" were sold to Construction Aggregates Corp.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Final Wreckage Arrives

07/16:
The salvage of the Grampa Woo has come to an end for now. The second salvage barge came into Thunder Bay on Saturday with the last remains of the tour boat that sank on Lake Superior fall 1996.

Reports from the salvage crew state that this was all of the wreckage they could retreive.

Some of the wreckage is too far away for the crain reach, while other pieces are jammed in the rocks and can not be removed. The latest pile of wreckage consists of: the top deck, bits of hull, pieces of railing and other small metal. Some of the metal is already loaded into a container ready for the scrapyard.

Salvage crews spent a total of fourteen days on the site.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Tall Ships Chicago '98

07/16:
Tall Ships Chicago '98 will be held from 16 July to 20 July at the city's Navy Pier. Sponsored by the American Sail Training Association and AT&T Wireless, the event coincides with the 100th anniversary of the Chicago Yacht Club Race from Chicago to Mackinac, Mich. At least eight ships will be present though boarding will not be allowed. Entertainment and other activities will also be part of the event. For information, telephone 800-595-7437 or view (www.navypier.com).

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





LCA Applauds Environment Protection Efforts

07/16:
On July 15, the House Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Marine Transportation held a hearing on the Coast Guard's Marine Environmental Protection and Compliance Programs. Lake Carriers' Association testified and praised the Coast Guard for its efforts in protecting the Great Lakes environment. The U.S. Coast Guard and industry have worked closely to develop guidelines and regulations that safeguard the Great Lakes environment while allowing commerce to continue as efficiently as possible.
Please visit the LCA's home page for the complete testimony.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Today in Great Lakes History - July 15

On July 15, 1961, the Walter A. Sterling (now Lee A. Tregurtha) entered service on the Great Lakes after conversion from a tanker. The next day, on July 16, 1961, the Pioneer Challenger (now Middletown) entered service.

The CHICAGO TRADER was launched (as THE HARVESTER) in 1911 by the American Ship Building Co., Lorain, OH.

In 1946 the NORISLE was launched for the Dominion & Owen Sound Transportation Co. Ltd

In 1934 the Ann Arbor #4 collided with the steamer N.F. Leopold in a heavy fog.

Data from: Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

07/14:
St. Clair is making an unusual appearance in the Twin Ports July 13, arriving to unload at the Reiss Inland dock and then shifting to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal.

While other elevators are seeing few vessels in recent weeks, the Harvest States elevator in Superior has a backlog of ships to load. One saltie is loading at the gallery July 13 and three more are anchored off Duluth waiting for that berth.

Reported by: Al Miller




Sault Canadian Lock Re-opens

07/14:
After eleven years of inactivity the Canadian Sault Canal will be rededicated today (14th) at 13:30. The lock will operate only for recreational vessels. The tourboat Chief Shingwauk will be used for the official opening.

Reported by: Scott McLellan




Pipe for Sumbawa

07/14:
Greek-registered Arabella is docked at the Duluth Port Terminal this week while workers load a cargo of pipe bound for the island of Sumbawa in the Indonesian archipelago.

BendTec Inc., a custom pipe fabricator, is shipping the cargo of 44-inch-by-60-foot lengths of pipe to a gold mine being built in Indonesia by Newmont Mining of Denver. The pipe will carry tailings from the mine.

This is BendTec's first cargo to move by ship, and it will fill the vessel. The company said the lower cost of moving the cargo by ship helped the company win the contract. The pipe is being hauled by truck from BendTec's plant near the port terminal to the dock, where workers are loading it aboard the 539-foot ship. Loading is expected to be completed by Friday.

Reported by: Al Miller




W.&L.E. Receives Pellet Cargos

07/14:
During the last week of June and the first week of July, the Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway handled two cargos of iron ore pellets, both delivered to its ore dock in Huron, Ohio, on Lake Erie, in the str. ELTON HOYT 2nd of the Interlake Steamship Company. On June 24, the ship discharged 21,045 gross tons of Empire Royal fluxed pellets and on July 6 was scheduled to unload 21,700 tons of Empire Royal fluxed pellets.

From Huron, the pellets are transported 300 miles via Wheeling & Lake Erie to Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Steel Corp's Studenville works in eastern Ohio.

These are the 4th or 5th loads delivered by the HOYT to Huron since the receiving facility was established on the site of a former coal loading dock.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Solveig Departs Buffalo

07/14:
After 4 days of engine trouble at the Gateway Metroport docks the saltwater vessel Solveig finally left Buffalo at 6pm on the 13th. She made it as far as Port Colborne Anchorage where the engine broke down again. She will spend the night at the Anchorage while the crew tries to repair the engine and the captain calls headquarters in Oslo for further advice.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Elm visits Green Bay

07/14:
The U.S. Coast Guard's Juniper-class Seagoing Buoy Tender Elm (WLB 204) docked in Green Bay, Wis., over the weekend for free public tours. Built by Marinette Marine Corp. in Marinette, Wis., the vessel was delivered two weeks ago and will operate from Chesapeake Bay to South Carolina. The U.S.$26 million tender was launched 30 Aug.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Montrealais fits out

07/14:
The Montrealais fit out on Friday from her Toronto lay up berth. She headed downbound in the Canal enroute to a Duluth with cement. She then will sail for a St Lawrence River Port. Her sistership, the Quebecois is in Montreal and has yet to fit out this year. Several other steamers have yet to come out because of the decreased call for grain.

Reported by: J J Van Volkenburg




Today in Great Lakes History - July 14

The AMERICAN REPUBLIC was launched July 14, 1980 by the Bay Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

While upbound in the St. Lawrence River on July 14, 1970 for Saginaw, MI with a load of pig iron from Sorel, Que., the EASTCLIFFE HALL grounded in mud near Chrysler Shoal six miles above Massena, NY at 0300 hours but was able to free herself. A few hours later, approaching Cornwall, she struck a submerged object and sank within a few minutes in 70 feet of water only 650 feet from the point of impact. The submerged object was believed to be an old aid to navigation light stand. Nine lives were lost. Divers determined that her back was broken in two places. After salvaging part of the cargo, her cabins were leveled and her hull was filled.

In 1988 the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON and "tow mate" CONSUMERS POWER passed through the Panama Canal heading for the cutters torch in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

From Skillings Mining Review - 40 Years Ago
July 4, 1958 - The keel for the second of two new bulk freighters for Interlake Steamship Co. was laid at Great Lakes Engineering Works shipyard ar River Rouge, Michigan on Wednesday morning June 25. Now known as Hull 302, the ship will be 689 ft. long, 75 ft. beam and 37-1/2 ft. molded depth with a designed maximum cargo capactiy of about 24,000 tons. H. C. Downer & Associates of Cleveland did the design work. The ship will be powered by a 6,000 shp steam turbine main engine with caol-fired boilers. Interlake's other new ship, the 710-ft. flagship JOHN SHERWIN, joined the Great Lakes bulk cargo fleet in May of this year.
Hull 302 was eventually named HERBERT C. JACKSON.

Data from: Dave Wobser, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Sykes Flying Super Bowl Flag

07/13:
Captain Eric Treece is proudly flying the 1998 Super Bowl Championship flag of his favorite team, the Denver Broncos, while sailing as relief Captain on the Wilfred Sykes this month. It did not go unnoticed by the citizens of Green Bay when the Sykes sailed up the Fox River with a cargo of stone on Saturday, July 11. The sarcastic comment, "Nice flag!" was the most often heard comment from shore.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Vessels in Attendance at The International Year of the Ocean

07/12:
Vessels lined up at the Government Dock at Sarnia included the CCGS Samuel Risley, USCGC Mackinaw, U.S. Sea Cadet vessel Gray Fox, U.S. scientific research vessel Lake Guardian and the RV Mudpuppy. The USCGC Mackinaw was especially attractive in her new colors and outstanding flag display.

Other docked vessels in the immediate area included the tug Menasha and bulk carrier Canadian Venture.

Reported by: John Meyland & David Michelson




Today in Great Lakes History - July 12

The BELLE RIVER (WALTER J. McCARTHY JR.) was christened on July 12, 1977 as American Steamship's first thousand-footer and the first thousand-footer built at Bay Ship.

The H.M. GRIFFITH was launched July 12, 1973 for the Canada Steamship Lines.

In 1986 The ENDERS M. VOORHEES was chained together with her sisters, A.H. FERBERT (2) and IRVING S. OLDS, a severe thunder storm struck Duluth pushing the trio across St. Louis Bay eventually grounding them near Superior, WI. It was discovered that the force of the storm had pulled the bollards out of the Hallett Dock No.5 thus releasing the ships.

On July 12, 1958, the Frank A. Sherman entered service, departing Port Weller, Ontario, for Duluth and a load of iron ore on its maiden voyage.

On 12 July 1871, ADVANCE (wooden scow-schooner, 49T, built in 1847 at Fairport, OH), was bound for Detroit from Cleveland with a load of coal. She and the steamer U.S. GRANT collided near South Bass Island (Put-in-Bay) in Lake Erie and ADVANCE sank. Her crew escaped in the yawl.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Freighter Aground In Lake St. Clair (Update)

07/11:
On Thursday the TADOUSSAC had run aground in lower Lake St. Clair, just off Wind Mill Point on the Canadian side above buoy 2.

The vessel was refloated at 12:51 A.M. this morning with the help of a number of tugs. The tug Carolyn Hoey with a barge was called in to lighten the stranded vessel. Other tugs that worked to pull the vessel free were: the Patricia Hoey, Shannon, Illinois, Wyoming and Pennsylvania.

The tug Illinois delivered Coast Guard officials to the Tadoussac to inspected the vessel. Some time after 1:30 A.M. the vessel was cleared by officials and proceeded to the Lambton Power station on the St. Clair River.

Reported by: Neil Schultheiss




Mackinaw makes U-Turn

07/11:
The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw past downbound throught Port Huron yesterday morning, only to turn around at Harsens Island in the lower St. Clair river. She then proceded back up the river to secure at the government dock in Sarina . Tied up in front of her was the C.C.G. Samuel Risely. With the new red color on the mighty Mac she looks like she belongs to the Canadian Coast Guard.

Reported by: Andrew Severson




St. Clair River News

07/11:
The Canadian Venture went into tempory lay-up in Sarnia somtime early this morning in the North Slip. Also the Canadian Navigator was unloading stone at the Blue Water Agg. dock in Marysville. She then proceded upbound to Goderich for a load of salt.

Reported by: Andrew Severson




U.S. Coast Guard proposes oil spill response changes

07/11:
The U.S. Coast Guard announced 10 July that it will hold three workshops as it considers whether to revise its oil spill response plan regulations. The workshops will be held 24 July in Oakland, Calif.; 19 Aug. in Houston; and 16 Sept. in Washington, D.C. The workshops are meant to gather comments on potential mechanical recovery and dispersant requirements. A notice was published in the U.S. Federal Register on 24 June (www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/regs/reghome.htm) and a conceptual document is available at (www.uscg.mil/vrp). Written comments are being accepted and should include names, addresses, the notice in question (USCG-1998-3350) and the specific topic to which each comment applies as well as the reason for each. Comments should be sent to Docket Management Facility (USCG-1998-3350), U.S. Department of Transportation, Room PL-401, 400 Seventh Street S.W., Washington, D.C. 20590-0001. Additional information is available from Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. John Caplis, project manager, Plans and Preparedness Division, Office of Response (G-MOR-2), 2100 Second St. S.W., Washington D.C. 20593-0001. He can be telephoned at 202-267-6922. All relevant information, as well as all comments received, will be available at (dms.dot.gov).

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





U.S.S. Samuel Eliot Morison schedule

07/11:
The schedule of the U.S. Great Lakes voyage of the U.S. Naval Reserve's Oliver Hazard Perry-class Guided-Missile Frigate U.S.S. Samuel Eliot Morison (FFG 13) is:

Milwaukee 2 - 9 July
Chicago 9 - 15 July
Muskegon, Mich. 15 - 20 July
St. Ignace, Mich. 20 - 23 July
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 20 - 23 July and 3 - 7 Aug.
Duluth, Minn. 24 - 29 July
Port Huron, Mich. 7 - 10 Aug.
Erie, Pa. 11 - 18 Aug.
Cleveland 18 - 24 Aug.
Oswego, N.Y. 26 - 31 Aug.
Ogdensburg, N.Y. 31 Aug. - 3 Sept.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - July 11

The INDIANA HARBOR was christened July 11, 1979.

On July 11, 1943 the ENDERS M. VOORHEES became the first downbound vessel to transit the newly built MacArthur Lock at the Soo.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




$20 million self-unloader joins Great Lakes fleet

07/10:
(St. Catharines, Ont.) July 10, 1998 –The Algoma Central Marine vessel M.V. Algowest became the newest self-unloading ship on the Great Lakes when it was re-dedicated in a ceremony today at Port Weller Dry Docks. The $20 million conversion of the ship to a self-unloader from a bulk-carrier was completed by 400 shipbuilders at Port Weller Dry Docks during the past eight months.

In attendance to witness the re-dedication of the Algowest was Canada's Deputy Prime Minister, the Hon. Herb Gray. Also in attendance was Chairman of Algoma Central Corporation, and former Ontario Lieutenant-Governor Henry N.R. Jackman.

"This investment in the Algowest is the fourth such conversion that Algoma Central has contracted with Port Weller in recent years – the first three were the Algomarine, the Algosteel, and the Capt. Henry Jackman. These investments in our fleet are a testimony to our belief in the future of self-unloader trade and to the shipping industry as a whole on the Great Lakes," said Peter R. Cresswell, president and CEO of Algoma Central Corporation.

Charles Payne, general manager of Port Weller Dry Docks said, "We're proud to have completed the conversion of the Algowest on time and on budget. Conversions such as this, combined with ongoing repair work, keep our shipyard busy, and are appreciated by our more than 400 employees."

The Algowest is 222.5 metres in length and 23.13 metres wide and has an unloading capacity of 5,440 tonnes per hour. The Algowest will join the Seaway Self Unloaders fleet, a partnership of Algoma Central Marine, St. Catharines, Ont. and Upper Lakes Group Inc., Toronto.

Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd. (CSE) is the parent company of Port Weller Dry Docks. CSE is one of Canada's premier shipbuilding and repair companies, with operating divisions at Port Weller, Canal Marine and CSE Marine Services, St. Catharines; Pascol Engineering, Thunder Bay, Ont.; and, Lansdowne Technologies Inc. in Ottawa.

Port Weller Dry Docks Fact Sheet

  • the only Canadian shipyard on the Great Lakes.
  • employs approximately 400 people; 1997 payroll totaled more than $18 million.
  • certified ISO 9002-4 in 1997.
  • in 1998, will complete a $5 million technology investment.
  • founded in 1946 by Charles A. Ansell, former General Manager of the Muir Bros. Dry Dock at Port Dalhousie. Port Weller celebrated its 50th anniversary in 1996.
  • located above Lock One on the Fourth Welland Canal connecting Lake Ontario and Lake Erie.
  • equipped to build or convert vessels while retaining the capability of the full-service repair facility.
  • the dry docks are unique because they flood and empty by gravity rather than by the traditional method of pumping water. The yard itself consists of two parts, a deep dock for maximum-size Seaway vessels with a water depth of 26 feet -- equal to the Welland Canal -- and a shelf with a water depth of 14 feet.
  • from 1950 to 1985, Port Weller built 65 ships totaling more than 800,000 tonnes deadweight. During that time, Port Weller, then a division of Upper Lakes Shipping, was the second-largest employer in the Niagara Peninsula, with a workforce peaking at 1200.
  • in 1986, Canada Steamship Lines and Upper Lakes Shipping -- then the two largest great Lakes fleets -- merged their shipbuilding and ship repair assets to create Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd.
  • Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd. is the parent company of Port Weller Dry Docks.
  • CSE is one of Canada's premier shipbuilding and ship repair companies, with operating divisions at Port Weller, Canal Marine and CSE Marine Services, St. Catharines, Pascol Engineering, Thunder Bay, and Lansdowne Technologies Inc., Ottawa.


M.V. Algowest

  • The M.V. Algowest was built at Collingwood Shipyards in Collingwood, Ont. as hull no. 226. The Algowest was christened July 13, 1982, and sailed from Collingwood July 15 on sea trials. Capt. Reg Hatcher was Master of the vessel from 1982 until his retirement last year.
  • The Algowest was built to transport, and named in honor of, western grain.
  • M.V. Algowest sailed its maiden voyage on July 22, 1982 from Thunder Bay, Ont. to Baie Comeau, Que. carrying a then-record 27,308-tonne (1,254,243-bushel) cargo of barley.
  • The vessel's self-unloading equipment is a single-belt gravity system with a single-loop belt. It will unload at a rate of 5,440 tonnes per hour.
  • The M.V. Algowest has a crew of 24, including 8 officers and 16 crew. Capt. Almer Strong, of Midland, Ont. is Master of the vessel. Stefan Danielski of Peterborough, Ont. is Chief Engineer.
  • The principal dimensions of the M.V. Algowest are:
    Overall length 222.5 metres
    Beam 23.13 m
    Depth 12.8 m
    Deadweight 27,100 tonnes
    Horse power 10,200 BHP
    Unloading capacity 5,440 short tonnes per hour

  • Algoma Central Corporation owns and operates Canada's largest fleet on the Great Lakes. With the addition of the Algowest, the number of self-unloading vessels in the Algoma Central Marine fleet increases to 14, with an additional 9 bulk carriers. Algoma recently acquired a ship tanker division, based in Halifax, N.S.

For more information:
Charles Payne Peter Cresswell Laura Bruce
Port Weller Dry Docks Algoma Central CorporationOEB International
(905) 934-2582(705) 946-7237(905) 682-7203





Fire at Calcite Processing plant

07/10:
One of two newly installed main limestone conveyor belts caught fire and did appoximately 250,000 dollars in damage temporarily halting limestone production at Calcite plant in Rogers City, MI sunday July 5th. Calcite has approximately 800,000 tons in storage piles so shipping from the plant will not be impacted at the present time as most limestone carriers carry approximately 20,000 tons. It took 3 - 4 hours to put the fire out and was hot enough that that the top 3 floors of the facility fell to the floors below.

Reported by: D. Ocean




So Long Tug Malcolm

07/10:
An article appearing in the Lightship(Lake Huron Lore publication), reports that Malcolm Marine of Port Huron has sold the Tug Malcolm to Beyel Bros. Carane and Rigging of Cocoa Florida. The Tug Malcolm departed her Port Huron berth on July 4th under command of L.H.L. member Capt. Robert Greene, a retired Shipping Pilot, assisted by Capt. John Wellington. The tug is to be delivered to her new crew in Montreal.

Reported by: Andrew Severson




Today in Great Lakes History - July 10

HENRY R. PLATT, JR. (2) was launched as a) G.A. TOMLINSON (1) at the American Ship Building Co., Lorain, OH - July 10, 1909

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Freighter Aground In Lake St. Clair

07/09:
CSL self-unloader TADOUSSAC is reported run aground approx. 3.5 kilometers ( 2 miles) east of Peche Island, near Windsor, Ontario. She is loaded with coal and is apparently being assisted by the Canadian Coast Guard.

Reported by: Mike Gibson




Algowest to be Re-dedicated

07/09:
The Algoma Central Marine vessel M.V. Algowest will be re-dedicated in a ceremony Friday, July 10 beginning at noon at the Port Weller Dry Docks Lock 1, Welland Canal, St. Catharines, Ont.

Special guest: Hon. Herb Gray, Deputy Prime Minister.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




Taconite Production Resumes

07/09:
EVTAC Mining Co. near Eveleth, Minn., is recalling all employees and will resume taconite production July 15, a little more than two weeks after a fire damaged two conveyor belts that carry crude ore to the plant's processing facilities. The plant ships taconite pellets through the DMIR ore dock in Duluth.

Reported by: Al Miller




Lake Erie Coal Up

07/09:
Coal shipments from the Lake Erie ports of Toledo, Sandusky, Ashtabula and Conneaut totaled 2.3 million tons in June, an increase of 5.1 percent compared to the same period last year. For the season, the revived Lake Erie coal trade stands at 8 million tons, an increase of 18.7 percent compared to the same point in the 1997 navigation season, itself one of the best years for Lake Erie coal in recent times.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Today in Great Lakes History - July 9

WILLIAM R. ROESCH (DAVID Z. NORTON 2) loaded her first cargo in 1973 at Superior, WI where she loaded 18,828 tons of iron ore bound for Jones & Laughlin's Cuyahoga River plant at Cleveland.

The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS and her fleetmate IRVING S. OLDS passed through the Panama Canal on July 9, 1988 under tow by the German tug OSA RAVENSTURM. The pair was on a 14,000 mile journey to Kaohsiung, Taiwan arriving there on November 8, 1988 for scrapping by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

07/08:
Twin Ports boatwatchers generally see only the biggest ships calling here, so the 322-foot saltie Edda looks out of place loading at Cargill B1 elevator. The vessel was built in 1985 and is registered in the British West Indies.

Meanwhile, the saltie Arabella is well into its second week anchored on Lake Superior waiting to load pipe in Duluth.

Superior Midwest Energy Terminal is expecting a heavy line-up this week. It includes: Columbia Star, Canadian Enterprise, Walter J. McCarthy jr., Paul R. Tregurtha and Joe Thompson, all on July 8; Canadian Transport, July 12; and James R. Barker, July 13. The Canadian vessels are hauling 1.5 million tons of coal to Nanticoke, Ontario.

Reported by: Al Miller




Pilot regulation transferred

07/08:
Regulation of pilots on the North American Great Lakes has been transferred from St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. to the U.S. Coast Guard, it was announced 29 June. In 1994, responsibility for such things as registration and rates was transferred from the Coast Guard to the corporation, but a court ruled last year that the transfer was not allowed.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





U.S. and Canadian Ports Ship Nearly 18 Million Tons in May

07/08:
Shipments of iron ore, coal and stone from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 17,922,092 net tons in May, the highest monthly total for these commodities in recent memory.

The Lakes stone trade totaled 5.2 million tons in May, a new monthly record for that cargo. Strong demand from Canadian and American utilities pushed the coal trade to 4.6 million tons, an increase of 17.2 percent compared to last year. Iron ore cargos for the steel industry totaled 8.1 million tons, an increase of 3.2 percent.

For the season, shipments of the "Big 3" cargos stand at 38.2 million tons, an increase of 17.3 percent. The stone trade has increased 22 percent to 9.7 million tons. The coal trade has increased 25.3 percent to 10.1 million tons. Iron ore cargos stand at 18.4 million tons, an increase of 11 percent.



Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




More on Duluth cargo

07/08:
As of the end of May, 96 percent of the cargo moving through the Seaway Port Authority in Duluth, Minn., was iron ore, coal and grain. Iron ore accounted for 48 percent at 4.1 million tons followed by coal at 40 percent or 3.4 million tons. Eight percent of the cargo was 685,785 tons of grain.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Memorial Service this Weekend

07/08:
This Sunday, July 12, 1998 open to those who have sailed. Coast Guard memorial and commemorative service aboard the Huron Lightship. This event will finally honor and pay proper tribute to the late Robert J. Gullickson who's supreme sacrifice forty years ago (May 7th, 1958) is now being recognized for his unselfish devotion to duty in attempting to save two shipmates lives. The other survivor has authored a beautiful poem honoring this event and ship.

Anyone needing any additional information or other assistance please call (810) 987-9659 (Don Thurow, Curator)




Today in Great Lakes History - July 8

LOUIS R. DESMARAIS was launched July 8,1977.

In 1918 a slip joint on the main steam line of the Ann Arbor #5 let go, killing four men and badly scalding one other. The dead were: Lon Boyd, W.T. Archie Gailbraith, 1st assistant engineer Arthur R. Gilbert, coal passer William Herbert Freeman, 2nd engineer.

In 1984 the Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Company (MWT) resumed service to Milwaukee with disappointing results.

On 8 July 1908, JAMES G. BLAINE (formerly PENSAUKEE, wooden schooner-barge, 177'/555GT, built in 1867 at Little Sturgeon Bay, WI) was being towed in Lake Ontario by the tug WILLIAM G. PROCTOR. Her towline broke in a storm and she was driven ashore near Oswego, NY where the waves broke her up. No lives were lost. At the time of her loss, even though she was over 40 years old, she was still fully rigged as a 3-mast schooner.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Challenger Flying new flag

07/07:
The Medusa Challenger arrived in Milwaukee early Sunday evening flying their brand new Southdown flag from the forward mast. The flag is the Southdown logo. Three horizontal bars on a white field that form a stylized "S". The bars are blue, green and black. No official word on a new name or paint scheme for the Challenger has been announced as of yet. The familiar Medusa logo is still on the stack.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Crewman Injured in Windsor

07/07:
A 32 year old man lost a leg and severely injured his other when a shipboard crane's cable snapped while unloading steel coil from the GÜNAY A at Morterm Limited in Windsor, Ontario on Monday July 6th. The man was in the hold when the incident occured, it is unclear whether the coil or the chain block made contact with the employee. Transport Canada is investigating the incident.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




Comments on barge numbering

07/07:
The U.S. Coast Guard announced 6 July it is seeking comments regarding the formation of a numbering system for undocumented barges operating in the United States are are more than 100 gross tons. The Coast Guard is seeking to determine how many such barges there are and what potential costs are involved in a numbering systen, which is required by the U.S. Abandoned Barge Act of 1992. An advance notice of proposed rulemaking was published in the U.S. Federal Register the day of the announcement.

People that to provide information or comments should include their names and address, identify the notice (USCG-1998-3798) and the specific section or questions in the notice to which each comment applies in addition to the reason for each comment. Written comments will be excepted until 3 Nov. by mailing the Docket Management Facility (USCG-1998-3798), U.S. Department of Transportation, Room PL-401, 400 Seventh St., S.W., Washington, D.C., 20590-0001. Additional information is available from Thomas Willis, the director of the U.S. National Vessel Documentation Center, at 304-271-2506..

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Carferry Fireworks a Success

07/07:
Over 260 people attended the annual 4th of July event aboard the S.S. City of Milwaukee, making this the most popular year to date. Photos of the event are posted in the SPCM's Photo Gallery.

Members grilled brats and hot dogs in the "Aft-Pilot House Grill", while others led tours of the ship. Souvenier items were available in the ship's store, while videos played in the "Ship's Theatre". The highlight, of course was the Frankfort fireworks from the decks of the S.S. City of Milwaukee.

Reported by: Max Hanley SPCM President




Today in Great Lakes History - July 7

The BURNS HARBOR's sea trials were conducted on July 7, 1980.

JEAN PARISIEN was launched July 7, 1977.

The DAVID Z. NORTON sailed on her maiden voyage July 7, 1973 as the WILLIAM R. ROESCH. She sailed light from Lorain to Superior, WI where she loaded 18,828 tons of iron ore on July 9th bound for Jones & Laughlin's Cuyahoga River plant at Cleveland.

In 1971 the City of Saginaw 31 went to Manitowoc for a thorough overhall. While there, a fire broke out July 29 destroying her cabin deck and rendering her useless for further use. The blaze was caused by an acetylene torch, and caused over $1 million in damage.

On 7 July 1895, IDA MAY BROWN (wooden schooner, 53'/20GT, built 1884 at Charlevoix, MI) was carrying gravel when her cargo shifted in heavy weather. She capsized and later drifted to the beach near Michigan City, IN. Her crew was rescued by the U.S. Lifesavers.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - July 6

The CACOUNA's bow was damaged in a collision with the Greek tanker CAPTAIN JOHN on the fog-shrouded St. Lawrence River July 6, 1971. The CACOUNA was repaired by replacing her bow with that of her near sistership the SILLERY which was being scrapped.

ASHCROFT was used to haul ore, grain and coal only on the upper Great Lakes until July 6, 1932 when she was able to enter Lake Ontario through the newly expanded Welland Canal. On that trip ASHCROFT, loaded with grain from Fort William, Ont. for Kingston, Ont., was the largest vessel to traverse the canal to date.

The keel was laid for the GOVERNOR MILLER in 1937.

The COLUMBIA STAR set a record for the Head-Of-The-Lakes coal trade. The vessel loaded 70,903 net tons of low-sulfur coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wisconsin, on July 6, 1997.

On 6 July 1836, YOUNG LION (2-mast, wooden schooner, 73"/83T, built in 1830 at buffalo, NY) was carrying railroad iron and lumber. About 12 miles from Erie, PA, in rough weather, her seams opened and she quickly sank with just her topmasts left above the water. 3 died, but 5 managed to clamber up the masts and hold on until the schooner NEW YORK rescued them.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II

Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Cutters in Grand Traverse Bay

07/05:
The US Coast Guard cutters Bristol Bay and Acacia will be on station in West Grand Traverse bay for the opening of the 1998 Cherry Festival. The cutters will be in the bay till Monday acting as markers for the Blue Angel's air show Saturday and Sunday. The shows will also include a F117 fly by and a Mig 21 demo. Also, the USCG helicopters will put on a demo. The shows start at 2:30 PM both days on West Grand Traverse Bay. The narrations will be on WLDR FM ( 101.9 FM ).

Reported by: Mike Dell




Today in Great Lakes History - July 5

PAUL H. CARNAHAN was launched in 1945 as a) HONEY HILL, a T2-SE-Al World War II Fuel Tanker, for U.S. Maritime Commission.

July 5, 1991 - Charles Conrad annouced he had formed a corporation to purchase he Ludington carferry operation from Michigan-Wisconsin Transportation Company.

Data from: Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





Demolition Continues

07/04:
Demolition work appears ready to resume on the former Cargill C and D elevators in Duluth. On July 3, two large section of concrete were missing from a cluster of storage silos between the two elevators. This appears to have been done in preparation for blasting of the entire structure. Meanwhile, the partially demolished silos of Cargill C's south end remain standing.

Reported by: Al Miller




Indiana Harbor update

07/04:
The Edward L. Ryerson and ULS bulker Canadian Miner are both docked at Inland Steel's #2 dock this afternoon. Both vessels can be seen from the Dickey Road bridge in East Chicago.

Reported by:Gary R. Clark




Cargo Closes Road

07/04:
The Seaway Port Authority of Duluth announced recently that it would close the access road to its port terminal in mid-July after receiving a cargo of ammonium nitrate on July 15. Ammonium nitrate commonly is used as a fertilizer, but it also can be used as an ingredient in explosives, so the terminal road must be closed as a security measure. The cargo is arriving in bags and will be stored in an area approved by the Coast Guard and local fire department.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - July 4

The WILLIS B. BOYER museum ship was opened to the public in 1987.

In 1976 the SAM LAUD grounded entering Buffalo, NY. She was dry docked at Lorain, OH for repairs to bottom plates of No. 1,2 and 3 port and starboard tanks.

Also on this day in 1976, the H. Lee White struck the Algoma Steel plant dock at the Canadian Soo resulting in damages to her stern amounting to $108,000 at the repair yard of Sturgeon Bay.

The JOSEPH S. YOUNG (1) was commissioned July 4, 1957. She was the first of seven T2 tanker conversions for Great Lakes service.

On July 4, 1953, the John G. Munson set a Great Lakes record for limestone by loading 21,011 tons of limestone at Calcite, Michigan. This record for limestone stood until being broken by the Canada Steamship Lines self-unloader Manitoulin late in the 1966 season.

July 4, 1952 - The Pere Marquette 18 (II) was laid up due to railroad strike. She was never to operate again.

Data from: Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





Salties in the Detroit River

07/03:
The Belle Isle anchorage in the Detroit River has been home to several salt water vessels for some time. The M/V Mikhail Kutuzov arrived 2250LT (local time) June 16, 1998 and the M/V Dmitriy Domskoy arrived 1541LT on June 17 (both owned by Murmansk Shipping). The M/V Kapitonas Sevcenko arrived 1549LT July 1, 1998. All vessels are awaiting orders from their agents.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit




More Wreckage Arrives

07/03:
More wreckage from the Grampa Woo arrived in Thunder Bay early Thursday afternoon. It arrived on the barge AGOMING pulled by the GLENADA. They tied up at Sask. Pool 7A. Later in the day they tied up the barge AGOMING to the old Thunder Bay Elevator Dock, behind the tugs GLENADA and POINT VALOUR. This wreckage consists of small pieces of broken metal from various parts of the ship, a large piece of the wheelhouse and lower deck. One engine still in it's engine mount, parts of the hull, the largest piece is the stern end about 20' long. The wreckage is fairly complete consisting from the keel to the main deck and the width of the ship. This piece has a large hole in it on the port side, stern end.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Parade of Sail in Milwaukee

07/03:
The Wisconsin Lake Schooner Education Association in Milwaukee will present "A Parade of Sail" with sailing vessels from the North American Great Lakes on 30 July. Afterwards, a reception will be held from 1600 to 1800 at the restaurant Pieces of Eight. The ships will dock at the Municipal Pier and will be open four tours from 1100 to 2200 31 July and 1 Aug. and 1200 to 1900 2 Aug.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - July 3

The JOHN B. AIRD was christened June 3, 1983 at Thunder Bay for Algoma Central Marine, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

The ROGER BLOUGH was moved out of the dry dock on June 3, 1972.

In 1954 the CLIFFS VICTORY successfully completing her sea trials.

The FRANK ARMSTRONG departed light from Ashtabula, OH on her maiden voyage in command of Captain H. Chesley Inches June 3, 1943 bound for Superior, WI to load iron ore.

The PATERSON (1) entered service on June 3, 1954 with 440,000 bushels of wheat from Port Arthur.

Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Ryerson Sails

07/02:
The Edward L. Ryerson departed Bayship early yesterday morning. They will be back for another 3 week lay up in September.

Reported by: Dan Ocean




Wreckage Arrives

07/02:
Wreckage from the Grampa Woo arrived in Thunder Bay early Tuesday afternoon. A tug and barge came into port with the remains of the Woo it consisted of: the top part of the wheel house, part of the forward bow section, both engines, gear boxes with shafts attached and other small pieces. Other pieces will also arrive in port during the next few days weather permitting.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Twin Ports Report

07/02:
Wolf River arrived in the Twin Ports June 30. The Duluth News-Tribune reported last week that the vessel would be unloading pulp wood from Canada - the first inbound wood shipment to arrive in here in several decades. Apparently Canadian wood is cheaper and more readily available at this time than wood from U.S. forests.

Saltie Arabella remains anchored off Duluth after about 10 days. The vessel reportedly is waiting to load pipe at the Duluth port terminal.

Reported by: Al Miller




Green Bay Report

07/02:
The night of June 30th was a busy one for the usually quiet Port of Green Bay. The Earl W. Oglebay was unloading coal while the George A. Sloan finally departed after being broken down for a couple days. Also, the S.T. Crapo is still laid up at the LaFarge dock at the foot of Ninth Street and shows no signs of sailing anytime soon.

Reported by: Chris Edyvean




Conveyor Fire

07/02:
Fire broke out June 29 in a conveyor gallery at the EVTAC taconite plant near Forbes, Minn., damaging two critical conveyor belts and forcing the plant to shut down. EVTAC, formerly Eveleth Taconite, had been on track for a month of record production when the fire occurred. The damaged conveyor belts carry raw taconite into the plant from rail cars and from stockpile. Plant officials said they hope to get plant back in operation by mid-July. EVTAC is owned by three companies, including Rouge Steel and Stelco. Pellets are shipped through the DMIR ore dock in Duluth. There was no word on how the shutdown would affect pellet shipments.

Reported by: Al Miller




July 1 Vessel Report

07/02:
The Lakes Jones Act fleet totaled 65 active vessels on July 1, a decrease of one vessel compared to a year ago. However, a cement carrier will return to service this month and bring the active fleet up to the same level as last July. An idled straight-decker may return to service in August if demand for grain rebounds.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers' Association




Medusa Acquired By Southdown

07/02:
July 1, 1998, Southdown Inc. and Medusa Corp. announced that effective June 30 they completed a merger transaction that resulted in MSA becoming a subsidiary of SDW.

As reported, under terms of the agreement, MSA shareholders will receive 0.88 of an SDW share for each MSA share held.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




New Executives at Oglebay

07/02:
CLEVELAND, July 1 Oglebay Norton Company, Cleveland, Ohio announces that Rochelle (Shelly) Walk has joined the company as Corporate Secretary and Director of Corporate Affairs effective June 15, 1998, and that William (Bill) Conboy joined the Company as Director of Environmental Health and Safety effective May 1, 1998. Both Walk and Conboy will report to Jeffrey Gray, Vice President Corporate Development and General Counsel.

Walk, an attorney with substantial marketing and business experience, has spent the last eight years with The Sherwin Williams Company in a variety of positions including Corporate Counsel, Director of Advertising and Marketing Communications, and, most recently, Business Unit Director for Licensed Brands. Prior to joining The Sherwin Williams Company, Walk was a business attorney with the law firm of Ulmer & Berne. She is a graduate of Colgate University and Case Western Reserve University School of Law. Her new role as Director of Corporate Affairs will include managing internal and external communications and coordinating investor relations matters. She will also have the duties of corporate secretary and responsibility for certain corporate transactions. Walk resides with her husband, Steven, and 2 children in Highland Heights, Ohio.

Conboy most recently served as the Director of Human Resources for Port Inland Limestone Operations of Specialty Minerals, Inc. (SMI) in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Oglebay Norton acquired this operation from SMI at the end of April 1998. In his new role, Conboy will oversee the environmental, health and safety matters for mining operations. Prior to joining SMI, he worked for the Budd Company in quality engineering. A graduate of Duquesne University and LaSalle University, Conboy is certified as a Quality Engineer by the American Society for Quality. He will be relocating with his wife, Vallie, and two daughters to the Cleveland area later this summer.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




Today in Great Lakes History - July 02

On July 2, 1966, the Simcoe (later Algostream) entered service. Another Canadian straight decker retired before its time.

Data from: Jody Aho

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Duluth-Superior cargo increases

07/01:
The Seaway Port Authority of Duluth, Minn., has reported that cargo amounts moving through Duluth and Superior, Wis., are ahead 14 percent from last year. The authority contributed the increase to a mild winter and an early opening to the navigation season on the North American Great Lakes.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Position Open

07/01:
Interlake Steamship has immediate openings for licensed 3 A/E's (unlimited horsepower rating). Qualified candidates (with current z-card), please fax resumes to 216-694-4316 or call Mr. Branden O'Connor (personnel Supervisor) at 216-694-4000.

Reported by: Interlake Steamship Company




U.S. Coast Guard seeks fishing industry members

07/01:
The U.S. Coast Guard is seeking applications for people to serve on its Commercial Fishing Industry Vessel Advisory Committee. The committee has 17 members that serve three-year terms. Applications are being accepted for six positions that become vacant in October 1999. Four are for commercial fishing positions, one is a public position and one is for a fishing equipment manufacturer. Travel and per diem expenses are reimbursed but they are otherwise unpaid positions. For information write: Commandant (G-MSO-2), U.S. Coast Guard, Room 1210, 2100 2nd St. S.W., Washington, D.C. 20593-0001; telephone 202-267-0214; or fax 202-267-4570. Information is also availble from Lt. Cmdr. Randy Clark, assistant executive director of the committee, at (rclark@comdt.uscg.mil) or from Lt. j.g. Lt. Karen Weaver at (kweaver@comdt.uscg.mil). They can also be reached by telephone at 202-267-0214 or by facsimile at 202-267-4570.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Sunken ship's debt landing at city's door

07/01:
From the June 30, 1998 Milwaukee Journal Sentinel By Mike Nichols

Almost 19 years after the freighter E.M. Ford sank in Milwaukee's harbor after a Christmas Eve storm, the city will likely be forced to pay the ship's owner about $7 million in interest on a $1.7 million 1992 court settlement.

City officials to this day express amazement that they have been found liable for damages to a ship they believe was inadequately manned and improperly moored. Years of protest, however, have only made matters worse. Much worse. Deputy City Attorney Rudolph Konrad told aldermen on the Judiciary & Legislation Committee on Monday that in addition to the $1.7 million already paid to the ship's owner, National Gypsum Co., in 1992, the city must now likely pay as much as $7.1 million in interest.

The committee, essentially given no choice, on Monday recommended borrowing money to pay the claim -- a suggestion the Common Council will probably take up in July. Ald. Don Richards suggested that the legal reasoning forcing the city to pay was "stupid."

The 406-foot freighter carrying 7,000 tons of dry concrete was left in Milwaukee's outer harbor. After breaking free in high winds on Dec. 24, 1979, it slammed into a dock at Jones Island and sank in 28 feet of water. National Gypsum sued for more than $6 million, claiming the city failed to provide the ship with a safe berth. City attorneys countered that ship's operators should have been in the best position to make safety decisions, and counter-sued for $250,000 in damages to a pier.

In a 1989 decision, U.S. District Judge Thomas Curran found that the city was only 4% at fault, but an appeals court later raised that percentage to 33%, and in 1992 the city paid National Gypsum almost $1.7 million.

Since then, the two parties have been fighting in both the federal district and appeals courts over interest on the $1.7 million. Harney Stover, a Milwaukee attorney who represented National Gypsum in the case, could not be reached for comment. Konrad has long argued that the city should not be liable for interest because National Gypsum was itself found to be two-thirds responsible for the accident. A federal judge initially agreed but was reversed by the U.S. Court of Appeals in Chicago. In 1995, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld that reversal.

Since then, the two sides have been fighting over how the interest should be calculated -- a battle the city also has apparently lost. Just last month the federal appellate court in Chicago upheld a determination that, based on the prime interest rate, the city owed National Gypsum $6.5 million in interest as of Jan. 31, 1997. That award is now itself growing at a rate of 5.64% until paid. "Every delay on this will cost us a lot of money," Ald. Wayne Frank said. Konrad has filed a motion for rehearing, but he concedes that such motions are rarely granted. He said he wants aldermen to be ready to pay the bill when and if the rehearing is denied.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Today in Great Lakes History - July 01

On July 1, 1940, the Harry Coulby (now Kinsman Enterprise) became the first Great Lakes vessel to load in excess of 16,000 tons of iron ore when it loaded 16,067 tons of iron ore in Ashland, Wisconsin.

Data from: Jody Aho

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





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