Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

Copyright N. Schultheiss. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

* Report News


Twin Ports Report

08/31:
Duluth boatwatchers got a treat Wednesday morning when the arriving Cason J. Callaway met the Alpena in the Duluth harbor basin. Callaway was inbound through the ship canal loaded with stone for delivery to the DMIR dock. Alpena was crossing the harbor from Superior bound for the LaFarge dock in Duluth. Because they were about to meet at the critical turn to the ship canal, the Alpena apparently came to a stop to allow the Callaway to pass slowly and turn into the harbor basin.

Other vessel traffic include the Stewart J. Cort arriving at BNSF ore dock and Algobay loading coal at Midwest Energy Terminal. Montrealais was at General Mills, Ziemia Tarnowska was at Cargill and Lake Erie was loading at Cenex Harvest States #2.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

08/31:
Wednesday the Algomarine was loading coal at the CSX Docks with the H. Lee White waiting to follow. The saltie Fossnes was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The tanker GEMINI was at the B-P Oil dock.

The "G" tug Ohio with her barge Milwaukee has departed the Toledo Shipyard in the past several days.

The Algosteel was at Andersons "K" Elevator unloading wheat from Canada, she departed for Huron, Ohio early in the morning to finish the unload there. The Mantadoc was at Andersons "E" Elevator loading grain.

The next round of boats scheduled to load in Toledo are expected today. The Algosteel was scheduled to load at 5:00 a.m. and the CSL Niagara will follow at 7:00 a.m. The next scheduled ore boat will be the Middletown expected to load at the Torco Dock Friday morning at 8:00 a.m.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Report

08/31:
The Wolverine departed the LTV Steel Mill at 4:00 a.m. Wednesday morning assisted by a G tug. The vessel was upbound on the Cuyahoga at Eagle at 8:00 p.m. She is working the Lorain to LTV shuttle.

The Buffalo was upbound in the river heading to LTV at 3:00 a.m. and waited at CBS II for the Wolverine to clear. The Southdown Challenger came into her dock at 6:00 a.m. the Calcite II in for the Salt Dock after the Wolverine and the tug Frank Palladino Jr. and barge Kellstone I cleared NS. The Calcite II continued to unload at the Cargill salt mine Wednesday evening.

Pictures by TZ
Calcite II arrives.
Tug Washington towing the Calcite II.
Crew on the Calcite II watches over the vessel.
Close up of her stern.
Washington at the stern of the Calcite II.

Video of the tow. 1.3 meg

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Whistles Return

08/31:
On Aug. 29, for the first time in 19 years, the whistles aboard the historic tug Edna G. sounded across Agate Bay in Two Harbors, Minn.

The tug's whistles had been silent since the vessel was retired in 1981 from its role of assisting ore boats in and out of the ore docks at Two Harbors. Several local volunteers and businesses donated time, money and labor to restore the whistles of the 104-year-old vessel. Because the tug's boilers are no longer fired, the whistles were converted from steam to compressed air, giving them a somewhat higher tone than they had originally.

The tug's whistle was used over the weekend to salute the John G. Munson and two other vessels arriving in Two Harbors. At ceremonies Tuesday, the whistle was officially unveiled and sounded by Adolph Ojard, son of the Edna G.'s last master and the general manager of USS Great Lakes Fleet and the DMIR Railway.

"It' doesn't sound quite like the old whistles, but it still sounds great," Ojard told the Duluth News Tribune. "I had been on that vessel many, many times when I was a young boy. There are a lot of fond memories there. The fellows who worked on this project did an outstanding job. The community can be very proud."

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - August 31

On August 31, 1977, the Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. (formerly Belle River) entered service, departing Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, for Superior.

In mid-August 1987 a peregrine falcon whom had disappeared from Regina, Saskatchewan two weeks earlier landed on the deck of a lake freighter on Lake Huron. The bird was captured and taken to a bird sanctuary in Vineland, Ontario. The vessel name is unknown.

In mid-August 1985, the Belgium saltie Federal Thames loaded 25,400 tons of low-concentrate chrome ore at Duluth's Hallett Dock and was bound for Sweden. This ore dates back to World War II when she was mined in Montana. Other shipments were to have been made later as well.

On 31 August 1906, CAVALIER (3-mast wooden schooner, 134'/268GT, built in 1867 at Quebec City as a bark) was carrying cedar lumber when she struck a reef off Chantry Island in Lake Huron and sank. Her crew was rescued by the Chantry Island Lightkeeper. She was bound from Tobermory for Sarnia, Ontario.

On 31 August 1869, the schooner W. G. Keith was launched at the Muir & Stewart yard in Port Huron, Michigan. She was named after her skipper/owner. Her dimensions were 126' x 26' x 8'6". She was built for the lake Michigan lumber trade.

On 31 August 1900, one hundred years ago, the efforts to free the newly launched steel steamer CAPTAIN THOMAS WILSON from the mud in the Black River at Port Huron, MI. Continued throughout the day. The launch had been watched by thousands the previous day and the vessel's stern stuck in the mud. On this date, the tugs BOYNTON and HAYNES tried to pull her free but were unable to do so. Finally 14 hydraulic jacks were used to lift the vessel and at 6:00 PM she was ready to be pulled by tugs. After a 15 inch hawser was broken in the first attempt, the tug PROTECTOR finally pulled the vessel free.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Poe Lock Damaged

08/30:
Early Monday morning crews working at the Soo Locks noticed a damaged corner block at the lower end of the large Poe Lock. Crews switched to using the lock's intermediate lower gates, this quick action only delayed traffic for about 90 minutes. The intermediate gates will continue to be used until repairs can be made to the primary gates. Officials are not sure if the repairs will be made during the shipping season or once the locks have closed for the winter.

The corner block is a large steel block that is formed in a convex shape to conform with a curved steel post in the hinge area of the lock wall when the gate is fully closed, this according to the Soo Evening News. The cause of the damage is unknown but is reported to be to a 7-foot section of the block. Engineers surveyed the lower gate using an underwater camera.

The lock will continue to operate raising and lower the largest of the Great Lakes vessels from the level of Lake Huron to Lake Superior. The only difference a vessel could see is a slightly slower locking process. A major failure in the Poe Lock could have catastrophic results on the shipping industry. This lock is the only one capable of handling vessels over 730-feet, including the fleet of 13 thousand-foot vessels. If the Poe was to be taken out of service these giants would be left trapped above or below the locks.

Reported by: Dave Wobser and Andrew Severson




McCarthy Heading for Canada

08/30:
The 1000-foot Walter J. McCarthy is expected to take on a load of 63,000 tons of coal for delivery to Nanticoke, ON. She is due in Superior, WI. on Thursday to load for the Lake Erie port. This is believed to be the McCarthy's first trip carrying coal to the Ontario Power Generating Plant. 1000-footers including the Presque Isle and Edwin H. Gott from the USS Great Lakes Fleet, and the Burns Harbor from Bethlehem Steel have made this trip in the past.




Slow Unload in St. Clair, MI.

08/30:
The Walter J. McCarthy recently spent 26 hours unloading at the coal dock at the St. Clair Edison Power Plant. Problems with the dock's hopper system are believed to have caused the delay. The 1000-foot Oglebay Norton, also loaded with coal, arrived early Tuesday morning and was forced to anchor in the river and await the McCarthy's departure. She was able to dock about 8:00 a.m. Tuesday and began unloading. A normal unload time is about ten hours.




Oglebay Norton Arrives, Captain Departs

08/30:
When the Oglebay Norton arrived in St. Clair her captain was making his final trip before retirement. Capt. Constantine (Gus) Markakis is retiring after sailing for Oglebay Norton for the past twenty-eight years. Born in Greece, the captain started sailing on the lakes as a deck hand aboard the Henry Phipps. He is looking forward to a comfortable retirement spent between Florida and the Greek Isles.

Capt. Markakis watches over the Oglebay Norton while passing through the Soo Locks. N. Schultheiss




Shipwreck Found

08/30:
The wreck of the Wexford, a 250-foot steel hull, bulk freight that was lost in the "great Storm of 1913" has been found. The British cargo ship was found by divers resting in excellent condition, on the bottom of Lake Huron, sitting upright with only its stacks missing. The ship was discovered by a local salmon fisherman who noticed a bump on the bottom with his sonar. The wreck lies 11 kilometers offshore between Grand Bend and Bayfield.

The vessel was overwhelmed and sunk on November 10, 1913 while carrying a cargo of steel rails. Her crew of 17 were lost in the sinking.

Reported by: Ron Konkol and David Swayze




John W. Brown Returns Home

08/30:
The World War II Liberty Ship John W. Brown returned to her home port of Baltimore Tuesday after spending her summer on the lakes. The historic vessel left many fond memories on the lakes and Seaway.
Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com

Reported by: D. J. Kohls




Busy Holland

08/30:
The Lake Michigan port of Holland has seen a busy start to the week. On Monday the Fred R. White arrived with a load of coal for the James DeYoung power plant. Also in port was the barge Pere Marquette 41 and tug Undaunted at Verplanks Dock. Tuesday the Joseph H. Frantz arrived to unload at Brewers.

The Fred R. White is expected to return from Port Inland with a split load for Muskegon and Holland. The Earl W. Oglebay is scheduled to arrive with a cargo of stone over the weekend.

Reported by: Bob Vande Vusse




Cleveland Report

08/30:
Monday was another busy day in Cleveland. Vessels in Port included the David Z. Norton carrying a cargo from Lorain and the Saginaw unloading.

Pictures by TZ
Saginaw arrives.
Saginaw passes the breakwall light.
A bow view of the Saginaw from the tug assisting her into port.
Saginaw unloading.
David Z. Norton is towed stern first past the Saginaw.
Working with the Norton.
Closer view.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Monthly Tonnage Report

08/30:
The Lake Carriers' Association has posted the Monthly Tonnage Report for Cleveland Harbor.

Visit www.lcaships.com for complete details




Today in Great Lakes History - August 30

The CHARLES E. WILSON was christened August 30, 1973 at Bay Ship and completed her sea trials on September 6th.

On August 30, 1942, the A. H. Ferbert (2) ran aground in the St. Mary's River, just a day old. The vessel returned to the builder's yard in River Rouge, Michigan for repairs.

On August 30, 1988, the Willowglen made its first visit to Duluth-Superior under that name. She loaded grain at Harvest States in Superior, arriving early in the morning and departing in the early evening the same day. Her last visit to Duluth before this was in 1981 under the name Joseph X. Robert.

The H.G. DALTON entered service on August 30, 1903.

On August 30, 1985 the tug CAPTAIN IOANNIS S. departed Quebec city with MENIHEK LAKE and LEON FALK, JR. in tow, bound for Spain to be scrapped.

On 30 August 1873, CAMBRIDGE (3-mast, wooden schooner, 162'/445T, built in 1868 at Detroit, MI) was bound from Marquette, MI for Cleveland, OH with a load of iron ore. In rough seas, she was thrown onto the rocky shore near Marquette where she broke up. No lives were lost.

On 30 August 1900, one hundred years ago, thousands of people gathered at the Jenks Shipbuilding Company near the Grand Trunk Bridge on the Black River in Port Huron, MI to watch the launching of the large steel steamer CAPTAIN THOMAS WILSON. Superintendent Andrews gave the word and the blows were struck simultaneously at the bow and stern. Slowly the vessel started quivering slightly from deck to keel and then with a mighty rush, slid sideways into the river. Her stern stuck in the mud. Mrs. Thomas Wilson christened the ship.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




U.S.-Flag Float Up For First Time This Season

08/29:
Cargo movement in U.S.-Flag lakers totaled 13.2 million tons in July. That total represents the first time this season U.S.-Flag carriage outpaced the corresponding period last year.

Two major factors figure in the increase. A new vessel, the Great Lakes Trader, entered service. The self-unloading barge has a per-trip capacity of nearly 40,000 tons. Also, there were less split loads in the long-haul coal trade.

Iron ore cargoes for the steel industry increased nearly 1.1 million tons in July. Steel production rates remain high and transshipments were much stronger this July compared to 1999. For the season, the U.S.-Flag ore float stands at 28.3 million tons, an increase of 3.5 percent.

July coal loadings were down by 320,000 tons and for the season they trail last year's end-of-July total by 1.1 million tons. While low water levels account for some of this decrease, a major U.S. utility has increased rail deliveries to one of its power plants.

The U.S.-Flag stone trade registered a small increase in July and for the season is 125,000 tons ahead of last year's pace.

Reported by: the Lake Carriers' Association




Hoyt Departs the Rouge River

08/29:
On Monday afternoon the steamer Elton Hoyt 2nd called for a Gaelic Tugboat Company tugboat to assist the ship stern first from the Rouge Steel plant, through six draw bridges to the Detroit River. Gaelic dispatched the 2,000 hp tug Patricia Hoey at 2:00 p.m. for the towing job. With no other traffic in the Rouge River the tow continued on, arriving in the Detroit River about one and a half hours from when it began.

The Hoyt sailed upbound for Superior where she will load another cargo of grain for Buffalo.

Pictures by Roger Break
Deckhand Jason D. picking up the towline from the Hoyt.
Jason D and engineer Vern Holton make up the tow line to the bits.
The stern first tow begins out of the Ford slip.
Tight squeeze through the Fort Street bridge, one of six such bridges.
Under the I-75 freeway bridge
Ships towline off just through the Short Cut Bridge
Elton Hoyt 2nd backs out of the Rouge Short Cut.
Hoyt in the Detroit River

Reported by: William Hoey Sr.




Saturn Unloads In Hamilton

08/29:
The tanker Saturn was in Hamilton, Ontario Monday at the UM Canada slip unloading oil for Colombian Chemicals. The U.S. tanker arrived early Monday morning and was expected to depart at 12:00am this morning.

Reported by: Wally




Twin Ports Report

08/29:
The Twin Ports grain trade remains brisk at the start of this week. On Aug. 28, Goldeneye remained at Peavey Connors Point and Montrealais was still at General Mills while Lake Erie arrived for the tight squeeze into Cenex Harvest States 2 and the familiar Ziemia Tarnowska arrived for Cargill B1. Apparently waiting for cargo to arrive, the Montrealais is due to depart until Wednesday.

Charles M. Beeghly called at Duluth to fuel on Monday afternoon, then proceeded to BNSF ore dock in Superior for a rare visit there.

DMIR ore dock is scheduled to load the Edwin H. Gott and Indiana Harbor on Aug. 29. It's unusual to see two 1,000-footers at the dock the same day.

Reported by: Al Miller




Show Cancelled

08/29:
For unknown reasons this year's Toledo Marine Mart and Model Ship Building Competition have been cancelled. The group hopes to reschedule the event during the spring of 2001.

For more information contact:
Mr. E. Goyette
419-936-3070 ,or:
S.S. Willis B. Boyer
P.O. Box 50406
Toledo, OH 43605

Reported by: C. Grasser




Today in Great Lakes History - August 29

On August 29, 1942, the A.H. Ferbert (2) entered service.

On her maiden voyage August 29, 1979 the INDIANA HARBOR sailed for Two Harbors, MN to load iron ore pellets for Indiana Harbor, IN. In August, 1982 INDIANA HARBOR became the first U.S. flag laker to receive satellite communication.

On August 29, 1972 the lightship HURON was placed in an earth embankment at Port Huron's Pine Grove Park along the St. Clair River and was opened to visitors on July 13, 1974.

Canada Steamship Lines' ATLANTIC SUPERIOR returned from Europe on August 29, 1985 with a cargo of gypsum for Picton, Ontario.

On 29 August 1871, GEORGE M. ABEL (2-mast wooden schooner) broke up on a reef near Port Burwell, Ontario.

On 29 August 1858, CANADA (3-mast wooden bark, 199', 758 t) was carrying a half million board feet of lumber to Chicago in bad weather when she settled just north of downtown Chicago. The next day during a salvage attempt, she blew southward, struck a bar off the old waterworks, broke her back, then broke up. She had been built in Canada in 1846 as a sidewheeler and was seized by the U.S. in 1849 and rebuilt as a bark in 1852.

August 29, 1998 - The BADGER was designated a spur route on the Lake Michigan Circle Tour.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Max Hanley, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Closing of the Seaway

08/28:
The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation will carry out a number of major structural restoration projects in the Welland Canal during the 2000/2001 non-navigation season. Because of the volume of work, and in order not to delay the opening of the 2001 season, it is necessary that these projects start as early as possible. The closing of the Welland Canal is scheduled to take place at 8:00 a.m. on December 24. Transits of the canal beyond the closing date and time may be allowed depending on demand and operating conditions.

The Seaway will be open to shipping next year on March 23, the earliest opening date in the Seaway's 42 years of operation, according to the Aug. 25 Duluth News Tribune.

Reported by: Al Miller and Ron Walsh




C Columbus Returns

08/28:
The cruise ship C Columbus was westbound in the Welland Canal Sunday. She carefully entered the locks as she begins another round of Great Lakes Cruises.

Also in the Canal Sunday was the Canadian Progress. She was delayed for about two hours at Lock 7 for what appeared to be repairs to the canal.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Crewman Removed from Boland

08/28:
On Friday a crew member was taken off the John J. Boland at the St. Clair Edison dock for some kind of medical emergency. The Boland was upbound and stopped at the dock to remove the ill crew member.

Reported by: Andrew Severson




Cleveland Report

08/28:
The Myron C. Taylor depart Ontario 4 Sunday morning sailing out onto Lake Erie. The tug John Spence and her barge finished unloading and was heading out bound shortly before noon. The Saginaw was scheduled to arrive 10:00 p.m. for a partial unload at Ontario 1. She was expected to then shift to West Third to finish unloading.

Today should see a trio of Oglebay Norton boats in port. The David Z. Norton, Earl W. Oglebay, and Wolverine are all scheduled to visit the port. What makes the trio even more interesting is that they are virtually identical to one another. Each is of the 630-foot river class built in 1973 and 1974 by the American Shipbuilding Co., Lorain, OH.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Lighthouse Tour around the Keweenaw

08/28:
The Keweenaw Star will be sailing around the Keweenaw Peninsula in Michigan's Upper Peninsula on Sept. 30 and Oct. 1. The Star will depart her dock in Houghton, MI. and travel out the north entry of the Keweenaw waterway going up the northshore of the peninsula. Those on board will see several lighthouses and then stop in Copper Harbor for the night. The next morning the Star will depart Copper Harbor and continue around the south shore of the peninsula visiting several more lighthouses before returning to the Houghton dock. There are 10 lighthouses in the full trip around the Keweenaw. Anyone interested should call Keweenaw Excursions at (906) 482-0884

Reported by: Kraig Funkey




Today in Great Lakes History - August 28

EDWIN H. GOTT, 78, of Pittsburgh, died on August 28, 1986. The namesake of the 1,000 footer, he retired as Chief Executive Officer of U.S. Steel in 1973.

On August 28, 1962, the Edward L. Ryerson set a Great Lakes cargo record for iron ore. The Ryerson loaded 25,018 gross tons of iron ore in Superior, Wisconsin, breaking by 14 tons the record held by the Canadian bulk freighter Red Wing which was set in the 1961 season. The Ryerson held this record well into 1965.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 was repowered with two 2,850 ihp four cylinder Skinner Uniflow steeple compound steam engines, 19 1/2", 43" dia. x 26" stroke, built in 1953 by the Skinner Engine Co., Erie, PA and four coal-fired Foster-Wheeler water tube boilers with a total heating surface of 25,032 sq. ft. built in 1953. The repowering work was completed on August 28, 1954. Her 1954 tonnage was 3551 GRT, 1925 NRT, 2450 dwt. A new starboard tail shaft was installed at this time. Her service speed increased to 18 knots (20.7 mph).

The JOHN ANDERSON was outbound through the Duluth Ship Canal on August 28, 1928, the ANDERSON struck the north pier suffering $18,000 in damage.

The REGENT entered service on August 28, 1934. She was built for low clearances on the New York State Barge Canal and was equipped with five cargo tanks and one dry cargo hold.

The WILLIAM A. REISS (2) was laid up for the last time on August 28, 1981 at Toledo, OH and remained idle there until July 15, 1994 when she was towed to be scrapped.

On 28 August 1870, CHASKA (wooden scow-schooner, 72'/50T, built in 1869 at Duluth originally as a scow-brig) was wrecked in a northwesterly storm near Duluth. Reportedly she's the first vessel built at Duluth.

On 28 August 1763, BEAVER, an armed wooden British sloop built the previous year, was carrying provisions to Detroit to relieve the fort there which was under siege by the Indians led by Pontiac. however the vessel foundered in a storm at Cat Fish Creek, 14 miles from the site of Buffalo. 185 barrels of her cargo were salvaged and went on to Detroit on the schooner GLADWIN.

Data from: Joe Barr, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Al Miller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Twin Ports Report

08/27:
Perhaps as a sign of the waning summer, grain vessels were busy loading in Duluth and Superior even on Saturday. Fleetmates Canadian Miner and Montrealais were side by side for a time as Canadian Miner finished loading wheat at Cargill B1 in Duluth and Montrealais arrived to begin loading at General Mills. In Superior, Goldeneye arrived for the Peavey Connors Point elevator. As expected, Midwest Energy Terminal was busy much of the day loading Oglebay Norton. The 1,000-footer was departing under Duluth's Aerial Bridge in late afternoon as Canadian Enterprise arrived from Lake Superior. Joe Thompson was due in later in the evening, and expected to tie up at the port terminal until the Canadian Enterprise finished loading.

Reported by: Al Miller




Cleveland Report

08/27:
Traffic in Cleveland remain busy, on Friday the Algoway arrived early morning with a load of coke for lower LTV. It is rare to see the Algoway or other Canadian vessel travel all the way up the Cuyahoga River. After unloading, she depart with one tug Friday afternoon.

The Fred R. White Jr. was unloading at Mid Continent (Breckling dock) and was passed by the Algoway on the way up.

Saturday the tug John Spence and barge McAsphalt 401 arrived heading for East LTV at 11:30 a.m. That afternoon the G tug Washington assisted the tug Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys Cement II in to Blue Circle. The American Mariner was unloading at the Lake Front Ore Dock and the American Republic continues on the Lorain to LTV shuttle.

The John Spence and barge was expected to depart today by 7:00 a.m. Schedule to arrive Sunday is the Saginaw some time this evening, an unknown saltie due for the Lake Front and a USS boat for one of the Ontario docks.

Pictures by TZ
Tug Washington assists the Sea Eagle II and her barge.
Another view of the Sea Eagle II and her barge.
Close up of the tug Washington assisting the pair.
John Spence pushing the McAsphalt 401.
Close up of the tug John Spence.
American Republic on the Cuyahoga.
Stern view of the American Republic.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - August 27

The AGAWA CANYON was launched in 1971 at Collingwood Shipyards Ltd.

The SAMUEL RISLEY arrived at Toronto, Ont. on August 27, 1985 on her way to Thunder Bay, Ont. where she replaced the retired CCGC ALEXANDER HENRY.

ELMGLEN (2) was launched August 27, 1952 as a) JOHN O. McKELLAR (2) for the Colonial Steamship Co. Ltd. (Scott Misener, mgr.), Port Colborne, Ont.

The WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) then renamed US.266029 departed her lay-up berth at the Rouge slip on August 20, 1986 in tow of Gaelic tugs and she was taken to Detroit Marine Terminals on the Rouge River, where her pilothouse was removed to be displayed at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Detroit's Belle Isle. The hull was moved to Nicholson's River Rouge dock on August 27th.

MERLE M. McCURDY was launched August 27, 1910 as a) WILLIAM B. DICKSON for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

The U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tender (WAGL-305) MESQUITE was commissioned on August 27, 1943 and served on the Pacific Ocean in the 7th Fleet in 1944 and 1945.

On August 27, 1940, the William A. Irvin set the Great Lakes record for the fastest unloading of an iron ore cargo using shoreside equipment. The Irvin unloaded 13,856 gross tons of iron ore in 2 hours, 55 minutes (including the time to arrive and depart the dock!) in Conneaut, Ohio. This record still stands, and consequently the Irvin is one of the few Great Lakes vessels to be retired while still holding a Great Lakes cargo record.

On August 27, 1929, the Myron C. Taylor entered service.

On Aug. 25, 1923, the Duluth, Missabe & Northern ore dock in Duluth loaded 208,212 tons of ore into 23 ships.

On 27 August 1924, CITY QUEEN (wooden propeller steam tug, 71'/69GT, built in 1900 at Midland, Ontario) burned to a total loss ¼ mile east of the Manitou Dock in Georgian Bay.

The keel for the tug CRUSADER was laid on 27 August 1873 at the Leighton & Dunford yard in Port Huron. The tug's dimensions were 100' keel, 132' overall, and 23' beam. She was built for George E. Brockway.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Al Miller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Saltie Loses Power in Lake Huron

08/26:
The Dutch registered Kasteelborg anchored in lower Lake Huron north of Buoys 11 and 12 around 6:00 p.m. Friday night. 427-foot vessel suddenly lost power on Friday morning while sailing downbound about 16 miles off Pointe Aux Barques. The vessel drifted in Lake Huron until power was restored. The Kasteelborg will wait at anchor until the U.S. Coast Guard inspects the vessel and clears her to sail.

Reported by: Andrew Severson




Twin Ports Report

08/26:
Midwest Energy Terminal is expecting a line-up of vessels Saturday. Oglebay Norton is due at 6 a.m. to load for Detroit Edison in St. Clair; Columbia Star is due at 8 a.m. to load for Consumers Power in Muskegon; Canadian Enterprise is scheduled to arrive at 7 p.m. to load for Ontario Power Generating in Nanticoke; and Joe Thompson is expected at 10 p.m. to load for LTV Steel's power plant in Taconite Harbor.

Reported by: Al Miller




Busy Day on the Rouge River

08/26:
Shortly after noon Friday, the Earl W. Oglebay had completed unloading at the Detroit Lime Company and turned to head out river. When the Earl was abeam of the Gaelic Tugboat Company yard she stopped to wait for traffic to clear down the river.

Crews onboard had a front row view of the work in the Gaelic Yard. The Detroit Fire Department boat Curtis Randolph was docked for hull repairs. A short distance away the mechanics at Gaelic were installing air conditioning on the big tug Roger Stahl. The Earl W. Oglebay was able to depart a short time later. As crews continued working in the Gaelic Yard, the Kaye E. Barker departed Rouge Steel and passed at 2:30 p.m.

Earl W. Oglebay stopped in the Rouge River.
Tug Roger Stahl in the yard as crews install a new central air conditioning cabinet on the Texas Deck.
Curtis Randolph at the Gaelic Tugboat Company in Detroit.
Kaye E. Barker passes.

Reported by: William Hoey Sr.




Toledo Update

08/26:
On Friday the Cuyahoga was loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator, she was scheduled to depart later in the evening. The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Acacia departed Toledo Friday morning.

The tanker Saturn was at the Sun Oil Company Dock loading cargo. The "G" tug Ohio with her barge Milwaukee remains at the Shipyard.

The Algosoo was loading coal at the CSX Docks. The next scheduled coal boat was expected to be the CSL Niagara arriving last night. She will be followed by the Fred R. White Jr. who is expected to arrive at 6:00 p.m. today.

The next ore boat scheduled to load will be the Courtney Burton due to arrive tonight at 10:00 p.m.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - August 26

The Edgar B. Speer's sea trials were successfully completed on August 26, 1980.

The BEECHGLEN was towed out of Owen Sound by the McKeil tug KAY COLE on August 26, 1994 en route to Port Maitland, Ont. for scrapping.

The MICHIPICOTEN (2) was launched August 26, 1905 as a) HENRY C. FRICK.

EMORY L. FORD (b RAYMOND H. REISS) entered service on August 26, 1916 to load iron ore at Marquette, MI.

SILVERDALE was launched August 26, 1925 as the straight decker a) GLENEAGLES

The CHIEF WAWATAM was launched on August 26, 1911. She was built with three large propellers, two in the stern for propulsion and one in the bow for icebreaking.

The passenger-cargo ship FEDERAL PALM was christened August 26, 1961. She was built on the Great Lakes, but never served their ports.

On August 26, 1934, while on a Sunday sightseeing cruise, MIDLAND CITY damaged her bottom on a shoal near Present Island. She settled with her stern under water and her bow high in the air.

On 26 August 1875, COMET (propeller passenger/package freight, 181'/744T, built in 1857 at Cleveland, OH) was carrying ore and pig iron in Lake Superior on a foggy night. While trying to pass the Beatty Line steamer MANITOBA, 7 miles SE of Whitefish Point, signals were misunderstood and COMET veered into the path of MANITOBA. COMET was rammed amidships and sank in ten minutes. 11 of the 21 aboard lost their lives. This wasn't the first such accident for COMET. In October 1869, she suffered a similar mishap with the propeller HUNTER and that time both vessels sank.

The schooner MATTHEW McNAIR was launched at the Lee & Lamoree shipyard in Oswego on 26 August 1857. Her dimensions were 103' keel, 24'6" beam and 9'6" depth.

August 26, 1911 - The CHIEF WAWATAM was launched by the Toledo Shipbuilding Company.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Saltie Adrift in Lake Huron

08/25: 10:00 a.m. update
The U.S. Coast Guard reports that the Dutch registered Kasteelborg is a drift about 16 miles off Pointe Aux Barques in Lake Huron. A problem in the fuel system is the likely cause for the vessel's sudden loss of power.

The 427-foot vessel poses no danger to other vessels and is not obstructing other traffic. The Kasteelborg was downbound in the lake after loading in Duluth on Wednesday.

Reported by: Stephen Hause




McKee Sons Update

08/25:
Thursday work continued on the tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons where the pair are docked in Sarnia's North Slip. The pair are expected to depart on their maiden voyage this weekend.

McKee Sons moving from the Government dock, Aug. 14. Steve Vanden Bosch

Below are pictures of the pair at the Government Dock taken in July by Matt Miner
McKee Sons at dock.
Tug Invincible from the McKee Sons.
Stern view of the pair.
Long view showing the Government Dock.

Reported by: Barry Hiscocks




Salties Boarded By Coast Guard

08/25:
Wednesday night, boardings were conducted on two foreign flagged freighters at their first U.S. port of call after stopping in Brazil. The bordings were conducted by the U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Customs, INS and a local police department canine unit searching for drugs.

The Hong Kong flagged Darya Kamal was boarded Wednesday evening in Marinette, WI. Crews search the vessel but found no signs of narcotics. The Greek flagged Morias was boarded in Burns Harbor, also with negative results.




Tall Ship Rendezvous at South Haven

08/25:
Six tall ships are expected to arrive in South Haven, Michigan Friday, August 25 for Rendezvous 2000. The six vessels expected are: the 118-foot top sail schooner True North; the 125-foot schooner Tecumseh; the 90-foot four master Nina; the 155-foot S. V. Highlander; the 120-foot Fair Jeanne; and the 175-foot Picton Castle. A limited number of boarding passes will be available ($15.00) which will allow tours between 9:30 am and 5:00 pm Saturday, Sunday and Monday. The event will conclude Tuesday when the vessels depart in a "Parade of Sail" at 1:00 pm. For more information, or to order boarding passes, call the South Haven Chamber of Commerce at 616.637.5171

Reported by: Bob Vande Vusse




Ludington Update

08/25:
On Wednesday the Agawa Canyon arrived in Ludington, MI. with a load of trap rock and limestone for Laman's Asphalt. She unloaded overnight and departed Thursday morning.

Also in port was the tall ship True North who made an overnight stop at Ludington on her way to South Haven.

Agawa Canyon arrives.
Agawa Canyon departs.
True North docked in Ludington.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Milwaukee Clipper Open for Tours

08/25:
The S. S. Milwaukee Clipper officially opened for tours for the public on Saturday, August 19, 2000. Through an agreement reached between the City of Muskegon Fire Marshall and S. S. Milwaukee Clipper Preservation, Inc., the ship, for the first time since it arrived in Muskegon on December 2, 1997, welcomed visitors aboard to see the restoration in progress.

By 9:30 Saturday morning a line of cars had formed at the security gates to wait for the gates to be opened, signaling the official start of the tours. Visitors to the ship, some of whom waited as long as an hour and a half to get aboard, were given 45 minute guided tours, and taken through the public areas of the ship, including cafeteria, main lounge, stateroom area (where one completely restored stateroom was displayed), club lounge, marine lounge (with its horseshoe bar and polished dance floor), movie theatre, and children's play room, and the pilot house where Capt. Robert Priefer, who was master of the ship from 1960 through 1967 greeted visitors in his Captain's "Summer" uniform.

Big band sounds played through the ship's PA system, displays of historical memorabilia, including original brochures, menus, and post cards from the ship's days as Juniata; brochures of her days in operation as Milwaukee Clipper, souvenirs and post cards that were sold aboard the ship when she was in service, were set up in showcases, and high atop her foremast flew the original red and white swallowtail pennant with the wording "Clipper Line". The flag, which flew aboard the Milwaukee Clipper on her maiden voyage June 3, 1941, and then placed in storage, was recently discovered aboard Highway 16 (now being restored as LST 393) and was presented to Capt. Priefer by Robert Morin of the USS Silversides.

Although the wait was long at times, people leaving the vessel said that the wait was worth it, and everyone had high praise for the group's effort in restoring the vessel. Cars in the parking lot came from other areas of Michigan, including Grand Rapids and Grand Haven, as well as one which had a Tennessee license plate. By the time the Milwaukee Clipper closed late Sunday afternoon a total of approximately 1,450 people had toured the ship, exceeding the "MCPI's" expectations.

Tours of the ship will continue through mid-October, operating weekends from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. on Saturdays and 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Cost of the tour is $5.00 for adults, $2.50 for children between the ages of 5 and 11, and children under five are free."

Visitors line up to tour the Clipper.

Reported by: Charles Truscott




Work Continues on Highway 16

08/25:
A report in the Aug. 18 edition of the Muskegon Chronicle indicated that the old carferry Highway 16, in lay-up there since 1973, is now being scraped and painted traditional Navy "haze gray" in preparation for her new role as a marine museum. The Highway 16 is the former LST 393, which participated in the D-Day invasion at Normandy. At least one stateroom has also been restored.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




50 Years Ago

08/25:
August 12, 1950 - The str. Wilfred Sykes on the Inland Steel Co., newest of the bulk carriers operating on the Great Lakes, took the largest cargo of iron ore ever handled in a single boatload Wednesday, August 9, 1950. Loading at the Great Northern Railway Ore dock No. 1 at Superior (Allouez) Wisconsin, the Sykes loaded 18,821 gross tons of iron ore, bill of lading weight (19,011 long tons) eclipsing the record set by the Pittsburgh Steamship Company str. B enjamin F. Fairless in 1947 of 18,725 gross tons, bill of lading weight (18,913 long tons). The ore, which originated on the Mesabi iron range, was destined for Inland Steel's Indiana Harbor plant. The Wilfred Sykes began operations only this season (1950) and has been taking increasing tonnages on its regular haul between Superior and Indiana Harbor as limiting drafts in the St. Marys River are increasing.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Today in Great Lakes History - August 25

On August 25, 1984 the hard luck ROGER M. KYES (b ADAM E. CORNELIUS) grounded off McLouth Steel and ended crosswise in the Detroit River's Trenton Channel.

The GEORGE M. STEINBRENNER (2) arrived at Port Colborne, Ont. on August 25, 1978 in tow of the tug WILFRED M. COHEN for scrapping.

On 25 August 1919, CABOTIA (formerly HIAWATHA, wooden propeller freighter, 235'/1299GT, built 1880 at Gibraltar, MI) went ashore on Main Duck Island in Lake Ontario and split her hull, becoming a constructive loss.

August 25, 1981 - The first of the famous "Love Boat" cruises was made. The BADGER carried 520 passengers, the largest number of passengers for a carferry up to that time. It was sponsored by the Ludington Area Ambassadors.

On 25 August 1873, JOURNEYMAN (wooden schooner, 129', 235 gt, built in 1873 at Wenona, Michigan) was put in service. Her first cargo was 225,770 feet of lumber. She was built for Whitehead & Webster of Bay City and lasted until 1896.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Kinsman Independent to Sail

08/24:
The Kinsman Independent is scheduled to depart her lay-up dock in Buffalo in early September. She entered short term lay-up in early July. Recent trips by the Elton Hoyt 2nd carrying grain to Buffalo had led some to question the future of the Independent, the last active U.S. straight decker.




Grain in Quebec City

08/24:
A rare caller was unloading grain Wednesday in Quebec City harbor. Upper Lake's Gordon C. Leitch docked at Bunge grain terminal - pier 18 - to deliver a cargo of wheat that will be loaded on an ocean going bulker, probably the Malta registered Lancelot which was loading wheat at pier 28. The Leitch is frequently passing by Quebec on her way to other ports but rarely stops by to unload.

Pier 18 is normally used by classic straight deckers such as P&H's Mapleglen and Oakglen, Algoma's Algocen and Algocape or Upper Lake's Canadian Miner and Montrealais. The Algoville, another rare visitor is scheduled to unload at pier 18 on the 24th.

Reported by: Jean-François Boutin




Rouge Area Traffic

08/24:
Traffic in the Rouge River resulted in five tugs operating in the area at the same time on Tuesday night. The Algolake departed the new Rouge Dock with assist of the Gaelic tug Carolyn Hoey. Shortly after, the George A. Stinson began backing out of the old Rouge River assisted by the G tugs Vermont and Wyoming. Both the Stinson and Algolake were upbound in the Detroit River. At the same time, the G tugs Kansas and Pennsylvania were taking the lines of the upbound Manitoulin and entered the Rouge Short-cut after the Algolake cleared, heading for Rouge Steel.

The Mesabi Miner was downbound in the Detroit River just after the departure of the Stinson and Algolake and passed them both on two whistles.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




New Dock Receives Cargo

08/24:
Harry Warner's new Rouge Dock, a bulk stone dock on the Rouge River was formerly the Shell Oil Company dock. On Tuesday August 23 the Gaelic Tugs, Carolyn Hoey and Patricia Hoey assisted the Algolake with a cargo of stone from the Detroit River through three draw bridges up the Rouge River to the new dock.

Photos by Jason Dmitruchina
Algolake upbound the Detroit River to meet the tugs.
Tug Carolyn Hoey takes the bow tow line.
Pilot house of the Carolyn Hoey with tow astern.
Tug Carolyn Hoey guides the Algolake through Short Cut bridge into the forks.
Tug Patricia Hoey begins pulling the ship stern first up the Rouge River.
Tug Patricia Hoey guides the Algolake stern first into the new "Rouge Dock".

Reported by: William Hoey Sr.




150-Foot Scow Capsized

08/24:
On Tuesday a 150-foot dump scow capsized on the Black River near Lorain, Ohio, spilling approximately 1,000 cubic yards of dredge spoils adjacent to the Lorain Pellet Terminal dock. No contaminants are believed to be in the spoils and no one was injured in the accident.

A depth survey was conducted in the area of the spill with no changes noted. The U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Office Cleveland will monitor salvage plans.




Algorail Delivers Salt

08/24:
The Algorail delivered a cargo of salt to Gladstone, MI. Wednesday evening. The vessel arrived in just minutes before the sun went down behind the bluff.

The Algorail arrives at sunset.

Report and picture by: Sandy Chapman




Halifax Sails

08/24:
The SS Halifax had completed engine repairs after spending 10 days in Port Colborne. She was expected to head downbound sometime Sunday afternoon or evening.

She looked as crisp and clean as she did when she was repainted CSL red two years ago. The deck hands and day workers had been painting her since she was in Port August 18.

Unlike her fleet mate M/V Frontenac she does not make the cement run that dulls the paint because of the product. Now is a good time to get pictures, the vessel is scheduled to haul cement clinkers in November.

Reported by: J J Van Volkenburg




Twin Ports Report

08/24:
Algobay was proceeding bow-first up St. Louis Bay before winding off the end of the DMIR ore dock and proceeding into the loading berth at Midwest Energy Terminal. This maneuver has become less common in recent years as a growing number of ship masters -- particularly on the 1,000-footers -- prefer to wind in the Duluth harbor basin and proceed up St. Louis Bay stern first into the dock.

The Twin Ports grain trade remained busy Aug. 23. Kasteelborg remained at General Mills in Duluth. In Superior, Windoc was loading at Peavey Connors Point elevator, and Duden was at Cenex Harvest States No. 1 and Canadian Voyager was at Cenex Harvest States No. 2.

More grain traffic is expected later this week, with salties Konigsborg and Goldeneye, and the welcome sight of Canadian straightdeckers Canadian Miner and Montrealais.

Reported by: Al Miller




Saginaw Update

08/24:
The motor vessel Buffalo paid an unusual visit to the Valley Asphalt dock near Saginaw on Wednesday afternoon. The Valley Asphalt dock is on the west side of the river, opposite the Saginaw Rock Products dock where the Buffalo normally calls, and adjacent to the First Street turning basin in Saginaw. Unloading operations at this dock require some maneuvering by the vessel and at one point, the Buffalo eased herself out into the shipping channel, with most of her boom extended out over the water and just the tip over the dock.

As if supervising a familiar operation, the Joseph H. Frantz was tied up a short distance downstream, awaiting access to the turning basin. In recent years, the Frantz has been the only vessel seen making deliveries to Valley Asphalt.

The Buffalo had called at the Sargent dock near the I-75 bridge earlier in the day, where she apparently off-loaded part of her cargo. The Frantz had delivered a cargo to the Wirt stone dock at Saginaw.

The Buffalo finished unloading about 7:30 p.m. and was turned and outbound about 15 minutes later. Once she cleared, the Frantz turned and followed her out the river. On their outbound passage during the evening, both vessels maintained radio contact with the tanker Gemini, which was docked in Bay City.

Reported by: Stephen Hause




Toledo Update

08/24:
On Wednesday the Algosteel was loading at the Coal Docks with the Manitoulin waiting to follow. The Algomarine was at the new stone dock at the CSX Docks unloading stone.

The tanker Gemini departed Toledo on Tuesday evening after loading a petroleum cargo at the B-P Oil dock. The tanker Saturn was at the Sun Oil Dock loading.

The G tug OHIO with the barge Milwaukee are still at Toledo Shipyard yet undergoing painting and load lines being installed on the barge. The U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Acacia was at the Port Authority Dock.

The saltie Olympic Mentor was at Andersons "E" Elevator loading grain.

The next scheduled coal boat will be the Algosoo with an e.t.a. of 3:00 a.m. Friday morning. The next ore boat will be the Reserve scheduled to arrive at 2:00 a.m. Thursday morning.

The CSL Niagara is scheduled to arrive on Saturday at 2:00 a.m. and then return on Thursday, Aug. 31 at 8:00 a.m.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Report

08/24:
The English River arrived in Cleveland at 1:00 p.m. Wednesday sailing for the Lafarge dock. She was assisted in by the tug Delaware and is expected to be in port unloading for about 18 hours.

The tugs Delaware and Washington assisted the salty Millenium Osprey into 32 East.

The Myron C. Taylor came in about 10:00 a.m. docking at to Ontario 4 expected to depart 6:30 p.m. The Cuyahoga was due in at 6:00 p.m. for the Ontario 4 dock but may wait for the Taylor to depart.

In Ashtabula the Middletown was due to arrive at the Pinney dock Wednesday evening. She will shift to load at the coal dock some time early morning.

Pictures by TZ
English River arrives.
Stern view working with the tug Delaware.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - August 24

LEON SIMARD was launched August 24, 1974.

On August 24, 1910 the THOMAS F. COLE ran aground on a shoal in the St. Marys River severely damaging her hull plates.

The C.H. McCULLOUGH, JR was launched on August 24, 1907 as a) WARD AMES .

On August 24, 1985, PAUL H. CARNAHAN arrived for her final lay up at Nicholson's in Ecorse, Michigan. Ironically, only a few hours later, her near sister LEON FALK, JR. departed the same slip on her final trip bound for Quebec City and overseas scrapping.

The BURLINGTON burned to the water's edge in Mississauga Strait near Manitoulin Island on August 24, 1895.

On 24 August 1885, IOSCO (wooden schooner-barge, 124'/230GT, built at Alabaster, MI in 1873) was heavily damaged by fire. She was rebuilt as an unrigged barge and lasted until 1912.

On 24 August 1882, the Port Huron Times reported that "the long looked for launch of the Stave Company's new river steamer MARY took place this afternoon between 4 and 5 o'clock and was witnessed by hundreds of spectators. The last support being knocked away, she slid very gracefully as far as the ways reached and then landed anything but gracefully in the mud where she now lies." She remained stuck in the mud until she was pulled free five days later.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Grand Haven Update

08/23:
In a very quick turnaround, the Fred R. White Jr. returned from Port Inland on northern Lake Michigan with a load of stone for Grand Haven and Muskegon Monday. This was her second trip within three days. Her quick return is very unusual for the port of Grand Haven/Ferrysburg. The tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 were loaded and docked at the upper Meekhof's dock. It is likely the pair are waiting for the white to clear the Verplanks dock.

Reported by: David Swain




Coast Guard Called to Assist Divers

08/23:
Friday afternoon, U.S. Coast Guard Station Port Huron was notified by a diveboat that two divers had been down on a Lake Huron wreck dive for over an hour with only one hour of air supply. A Station Port Huron rescue boat and an Air Station Detroit helicopter were enroute the scene when one of the divers was recovered deceased. Surface searches for the second diver were ongoing when divers found him deceased in the wreck.




Stone Trade Up Again Slightly In July

08/23:
Shipments of limestone and gypsum from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 4.7 million tons in July. As in June, the July total represents a slight increase compared to the corresponding period last year. For the season, the Lakes stone trade stands at 17.7 million tons, an increase of 1.7 percent compared to the same point in the 1999 navigation season.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Today in Great Lakes History - August 23

The GEMINI sailed on her maiden voyage August 23, 1978 from the shipyard to load fuel oil at Baytown, TX, for delivery at Detroit, MI.

The wooden-hulled steamer AURORA was launched on August 23, 1887.

On August 23, 1979, KINSMAN ENTERPRISE was towed out of the Frog Pond, having escaped the scrapper's torch, and sold to the Port Huron Seaway Terminal to be used as a storage barge.

On 23 AUG 1887, CLARA (2-mast, wooden scow-schooner) was carrying a load of hardwood lumber bound from Manistee for Chicago when she was caught in a storm and capsized. Her hull later washed ashore upside-down near Miller's Station, IN.

August 23, 1901 - The PERE MARQUETTE 17 arrived Ludington on her maiden voyage with Captain Peter Kilty in command.

On 23 August 1875, PERSIAN (wooden propeller freighter, 1630 t, built in 1874 at Cleveland) caught fire off Long Point on Lake Erie. The Propeller EMPIRE STATE came alongside and tried to put out the fire with streams of water from her hose, but when this failed, she took PERSIAN in tow in an attempt to get her to shore. This too failed when the tow line burned through. PERSIAN burned to the waterline and sank 10 miles from land in about 30 fathoms of water. No lives were lost.

On 23 August 1900, one hundred years ago, ARGONAUT (wooden propeller freighter, 213', 1119 gt, built in 1873 at Detroit, MI) was raised by an expensive salvage operation at the Escanaba ore dock where she had previously sunk. She lasted another six years.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Twin Ports Report

08/22:
Monday morning saw a smattering of grain traffic in the Twin Ports. Algocen was at General Mills after cleaning its holds on the lake. It loaded Sunday and resumed Monday after the rain stopped. The distinctive saltie Irma -- with its purple hull above the waterline and pinkish red below -- was at Cenex Harvest States. Kasteelborg was anchored on the lake waiting for General Mills.

Midwest Energy Terminal was busy all weekend. Walter J. McCarthy Jr. cleared the dock the afternoon of 19th to be quickly replaced by Oglebay Norton. Canadian Transfer cleared the morning of Aug. 21 to be replaced by CSL Niagara while Columbia Star waited at the Duluth port terminal.

In addition to its usual traffic from USS Great Lakes Fleet, the DMIR dock in Two Harbors is scheduled to handle occasional callers Charles M. Beeghly on Aug. 22 and St. Clair on Aug. 24. The lineup at DMIR Duluth includes Arthur M. Anderson unloading and loading Aug. 21; Indiana Harbor, Aug. 23; Joe Block, Aug. 26, Saginaw, Aug. 27; Indiana Harbor and Edwin H. Gott, Aug. 29; and Cason J. Callaway to unload and load, Aug. 30.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

08/22:
On Monday the Adam E. Cornelius was loading coal at the CSX Docks with the Sam Laud and Catherine Desgagnes waiting to load coal. The Courtney Burton was at the Torco Dock unloading ore. The tanker Gemini remains in temporary lay-up at her dock near the Shipyard.

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Acacia was at the Port Authority Dock and the saltie Olympic Mentor was loading grain at Anderson’s "E" Elevator.

The Cuyahoga is scheduled to arrive around September 1 to load grain.

The next scheduled coal boats will arrive on Wednesday. The Manitoulin is expected with an ETA of 5:00 a.m. and the Algosteel with an ETA of 8:00 a.m. The next scheduled ore boat will be the Armco due in today at 5:00 p.m.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Update

08/22:
On Sunday the J.A.W. Iglehart was docked at the Lafarge terminal. The American Republic was downbound from LTV at the Carter Road bridge. The Saginaw was being towed stern first by the Delaware under the I-90 overpass. The Sam Laud was also downbound close behind at West 3rd. The Laud is a rare visitor to Cleveland. The St. Marys II was still berthed at her regular river dock.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Ship Model Competition

08/22:
The S.S. Willis B. Boyer Museum Ship, International Park of Greater Toledo, and the Western Lake Erie Historical Society are sponsoring a model ship competition on 8-9 September 2000 aboard the WILLIS B. BOYER. There will also be a Marine Mart on 9 September.

For more information on submitting a ship model for the competition, write or phone:
Mr. Edward O. Goyette
S.S. Willis B. Boyer Museum Ship
P. O. Box 50406
Toledo, OH 43605
(419) 936-3070

Reported by: Joe Barr




Boatnerd Clearance Sale

08/22:
The first run of merchandise was so popular, we are preparing for our new Fall line of Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping merchandise. Force 5 Trading and Promotions must make room in there warehouse. Below is a list of all items at reduced prices. Once these items are gone the new merchandise will return to normal prices. First Come first buy.

All items feature the popular Edward L. Ryerson logo embroidered on high quality clothing.

New Jackets Fleece lined, regular $50.00 now $38.00
Sizes and color available.
Green - 2 XL
Navy fleece lined jacket 1 - XL
Black fleece lined 1 - L
Red fleece lined 1 - L
Green hooded 1 -L

1/4 zip fleece pull over, off white
Regular $45.00 now on sale for $30.00
L -1
XL -1
XXL - 1
Great items to wear for fall boatwatching.

T-shirt Inventory
All Sizes $10.00 Regular $15-22
Sizes and color available.
White
Med - 1
Large - 2
XL - 1
XXL -1

Natural
XXL- 1

Navy
Large- 2

Black
XXL - 1

Grey ash
Med - 1

DENIM SHIRTS LONG SLEEVED Regular $28.00 - $38.00, on sale for $20.00 Sold out

Click here to view merchandise or send you order by e-mail




Service Outages

08/22:
Due to a service upgrade the News Page and Vessel Passage sections may experience temporary outages Wednesday morning. The page will still be available for viewing but there may be short delays in content updates. This outage may also effect my ability to respond to e-mail. I will still receive but may not be able to send.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 22

The ALGOPORT left Collingwood August 22, 1979 on her maiden voyage for Calcite, MI to load limestone bound for Spragge, Ont.

ONTADOC was launched August 22, 1903 as a) R.L. IRELAND.

The ENDERS M. VOORHEES was towed out of Duluth on August 22, 1987 by the tugs AVENGER IV and CHIPPEWA, and was the first of the 'Supers' towed off the Lakes for scrap.

The a) ROGER M. KYES (b ADAM E. CORNELIUS) sailed on her maiden voyage on August 22,1973 from Toledo to load iron ore at Escanaba, MI. She was built under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. This program allowed U.S. shipping companies to construct new vessels or to modernize their existing fleet by government guaranteed financing and tax deferred benefits. The KYES was the second of ten ships launched for American Steamship but the first to enter service under this arrangement. The total cost of the ten ships was more than $250 million.

On 22 August 1863, WILLIAM S. BULL (wooden propeller steam tug, 16T, built in 1861 at Buffalo) waterlogged and went down in a storm 40 miles east of Erie, PA. She was in company of the tug G.W. GARDNER and the canal boat M.E. PAINE, who saved her crew.

On 22 August 1876, the Canadian schooner LAUREL sank off Big Sandy Creek on Lake Ontario. The crew made it to shore in the yawl. The LAUREL was bound from Kingston to Charlotte with iron ore.

On 22 August 1900, one hundred years ago, SPECULAR (wooden propeller freighter, 264', 1742 gt, built in 1882 at Cleveland) was carrying iron ore when she was a "hit & run" victim by the steamer DENVER at 2:00 AM and sank in 6 minutes in the Pelee Passage on Lake Erie. 15 of her crew abandoned in her yawl and were saved. The remaining 5 scrambled up into the rigging and clung there until they were rescued four hours later by the steamer MARITANA and brought to Detroit. Salvagers worked on the wreck continuously until they gave up on 28 September. Wreck lies 3.16 miles SE from Pelee Passage light. She was owned by Republic Iron Co. of Cleveland.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algolake Rescues Boaters

08/21:
Late Saturday night crews aboard the Algolake spotted a flare while traveling on Lake Huron. The flare was launched by two men drifting in a 18-foot powerboat that had lost power. The crew carefully maneuvered to the small boat and tied it to the Algolake. The two men on the boat waited aboard the Algolake for the Coast Guard to arrive on scene and tow the powerboat back to shore.

The men on the small boat report they had been adrift for six hours and had no marine radio or cell phone to call for help.

Reported by: Donna Hastings




Oglebay Norton Arrives

08/21:
The Oglebay Norton arrived in Duluth Sunday afternoon bound for the Midwest Energy Terminal. She passed through the Duluth Entry piers sounding a long salute to the Aerial Lift Bridge and large crowd that had gathered to watch the 1000-footer arrive.

Capt. Gus Markakis skillfully turn the vessel in the inner harbor and backed the Oglebay Norton under the Blatnik Bridge to the coal dock. The captain is completing his final trips before retirement after twenty-eight years sailing with Oglebay Norton.

The vessel was expected to finish loading and depart by 3:00 a.m. She will unload the cargo of coal at the St. Clair Edison Power Plant later this week.

Pictures and Video by Al Miller
Oglebay Norton heading for the Duluth Entry.
Sailing under the Aerial Lift Bridge.
Video of the Oglebay Norton sailing under the bridge.




New Load for Niagara

08/21:
The CSL Niagara is schedule to load coal on Friday, August 25 in Toledo. The vessel has been to Toledo to load grain but this will be the vessel's first load of coal carried from the port.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Fairport Harbor Sightings

08/21:
With the Grand River regatta underway the Fairport/Grand River, OH. area was very busy Saturday. The Wolverine was unloading stone and departed at noon for Conneaut to load coal. The Richard Reiss arrived off Fairport at 10:00 a.m. and went upriver to unload gravel. Her prop wash made for interesting docking for the regatta fleet. The sand suckers Osborne and Carey were also in port. There were also several dredges and barges at work in the river.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy and Mike M.




Cleveland Update

08/21:
Cleveland was a busy port Saturday afternoon. On the lakefront the Millennium Raptor was berthed as the Lady Hamilton was departing. The Kellstone barge was unloading at Osborne as the St. Marys II was discharging cargo at Blue Circle. The Cuyahoga was upbound at Eagle as the American Republic was downbound at West 3rd.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - August 21

The BUFFALO's sea trials were conducted from August 21 through August 24, 1978.

The GEORGE A. STINSON was christened at Detroit, MI on August 21, 1978.

The f) CEDARGLEN arrived under tow at Port Maitland, Ont. on August 21, 1994 where she was scrapped.

THE HARVESTER cleared Lorain August 21, 1911 on her maiden voyage loaded with coal for Duluth, MN.

IMPERIAL QUEBEC was launched August 21, 1957

The KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1) encountered steering problems downbound at the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River on August 21, 1973. She avoided hitting the stone embankments but ran aground after clearing the cut. The damage sustained in this grounding ended her career.

The VENUS was sold to Acme Metals Inc. and was towed to Ashtabula, OH on August 21, 1975 where she was broken up in 1976.

On August 21, 1971 the CHARLES DICK severed two underwater cables in the Maumee River, cutting off power to east Toledo and the Cherry Street Bridge. Massive traffic jams developed on Toledo's streets.

The graceful schooner HUNTER SAVIDGE was launched on August 21, 1879 by the Grand Haven Ship Building Company.

On 21 August 1856, CHARTER (wooden, propeller vessel, 132'/197T, built in 1849 at Huron, OH as a sidewheeler) was bound from Cleveland for Buffalo with flour, oats and rye. She swamped and sank in a storm 6 miles above Fairport, OH. By the end of August, she had been damaged beyond repair but her machinery was recovered as she lay in relatively shallow water.

On 21 August 1861, BANSHEE (wooden propeller freighter, 119', 166 t, built in 1852 at Portsmouth, Ontario, named HERO in 1860-61) was carrying wheat, flour and butter to Montreal when her engine failed (broken shaft) and she was helpless in a storm on Lake Ontario. She foundered near Timber Island on Lake Ontario. One passenger died, but the crew of 10 made it to Timber Island. She was owned by Howard & Rowe of Quebec.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Second Trip With Grain

08/20:
The Elton Hoyt 2nd arrived in Buffalo yesterday carrying her second load of grain. The grain was loaded in Superior, Wisconsin and she will unload at the ADM Standard Elevator. Their arrival in Buffalo was uneventful. During the last trip in early August the vessel was delayed at the Ohio St. Bridge. Then while passing through the lift span at very slow speed, vandals threw rocks and other debris at the vessel.

The Hoyt is expected to depart sometime today. The Hoyt could have as many as seven more loads of grain this season. The Herbert C. Jackson may be pressed into the grain service to assist the Hoyt.

Below are pictures of the Hoyt waiting to load in Superior on Wednesday. Al Miller
Elton Hoyt II at the Peavey Connors Point elevator.
Elton Hoyt II at the Peavey terminal.
Kaye E. Barker fueling at the Duluth port terminal.
Close-up of the Barker's pilothouse




Saltie Anchors

08/20:
On Thursday night the Indian saltie Lok Prem anchored for approximately one hour four miles north north west of Pelee Island in Lake Erie for repairs. The vessel reported they would be replacing a "pressure valve" in the engine room.

She reported to Sarnia Traffic that she was at anchor at 8:30 p.m. and was underway downbound again at 9:44 p.m.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Twin Ports Report

08/20:
Traffic was brisk in Duluth harbor on the morning of Aug. 19. Joe Block arrived about 8 a.m. to unload stone at Hallett dock before shifting over to load pellets at DMIR. About an hour behind the Block was Canadian Transfer, which came in Duluth entry so it could fuel at the Murphy Oil dock before proceeding to BNSF ore dock. James R. Barker followed Canadian Transfer into the fuel dock in late morning. The Barker was bound for DMIR ore dock and had to wait for Algoport to finish at the shiploader. Departing about mid-morning was Algocen from St. Lawrence Cement.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - August 20

The INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORT arrived at Toronto, Ont. August 20, 1969 on her maiden voyage with fuel oil.

The R. BRUCE ANGUS in tandem tow with the ULS steamer GORDON C. LEITCH behind the tug IRVING CEDAR arrived at Setúbal, Portugal August 20, 1985 where they were broken up.

August 20, 1920 the WILLIS L. KING, upbound light in Whitefish Bay, was in collision with and sank the downbound Steel Trust steamer SUPERIOR CITY. The SUPERIOR CITY was struck nearly amidships and when the cold water reached her engine room, her boilers exploded. She sank immediately with 29 of her 33 crew members aboard.

The US.266029 (a.WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) departed her lay-up berth at the Rouge slip on August 20, 1986 in tow of Gaelic tugs and she was taken to Detroit Marine Terminals on the Rouge River, where her pilothouse was removed to be displayed at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Detroit's Belle Isle.

The TEXACO WARRIOR (1) punctured her tank in a grounding accident in the Welland Canal near Bridge 10 on August 20, 1964.

On 20 August 1899, HUNTER SAVIDGE (2-mast, wooden schooner, 117'/152GT, built in 1879 at Grand Haven, MI) capsized in a squall or tornado in Lake Huron. 5 survivors, including Capt. Fred Sharpstein, were rescued from the overturned schooner by the steamer ALEX McVITTIE. However, 5 lost their lives, including the captain's wife and their son, the ship's owner's wife and daughter, and the Mate. Capt. Sharpstein patrolled the beaches looking for the bodies of his wife and son for months but they were never found. The wreck was found in 1987 near Grindstone City, MI.

On 20 August 1852, ATLANTIC (wooden sidewheeler, 267', 1155 t, built in 1849 at Detroit) was loaded with immigrants when she collided with the propeller freighter OGDENSBURG and quickly sank south of Long Point on Lake Erie at about 2:30 AM. Of the 600 on board, estimates of death range from 150 to 250. Numerous salvage attempts have been made through the years up through 1989 since there were supposed to be valuables on board when she went down.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Randy Johnson, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




John W. Brown arrives in Quebec City

08/19:
The World War II Liberty Ship John W. Brown arrived in Quebec City Old Port on Friday morning. The historic vessel is docked at Pier 21, usually used by ocean going cruise ships. The Brown will stay in port until Sunday evening. The public will be allowed to tour this living memory of naval warship.

Quebec City is the final stage of an acclaimed journey into the Great Lakes and St-Lawrence system by the John. W. Brown.

For additional details, call 410 558-0164. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com

Reported by: Jean-François Boutin




Twin Ports Report

08/19:
The Cenex Harvest States elevator in Superior continued its busy pace Aug. 18, loading salties Luckyman and Chios Pride. The cement trade also was busy, with Alpena completing its unloading at the Lafarge terminal in Duluth early in the morning, and Algocen unloading at St. Lawrence Cement in Duluth.

Stewart J. Cort, a regular visitor to the BNSF ore docks, was loading Aug. 18. Canadian Transfer, an infrequent visitor, is scheduled to load at BNSF on Aug. 19.

Reported by: Al Miller




More Duluth News

08/19:
The bust pace continued Friday in the Duluth Harbor. At about 4:00 p.m. the Philip R. Clarke and the Paul R. Tregurtha passed each other just off of the George A. Stinson, which was fueling at the Murphy Fuel dock. The sight of two thousand footers "sandwiching" an older-style freighter was quite impressive.

Also close by at the time was the Utviken, loading wheat at the AGP elevator.

The Tregurtha was heading out of the harbor loaded with coal and the Clarke was headed up the St. Louis River to unload limestone at DM&IR #6.

About two hours later the George A. Stinson, having finished at Murphy, moved up along the front face of the Port Terminal to allow the Algoport to come in behind her and fuel. The Stinson remained there waiting for the Stewart J. Cort to finish loading taconite.

Shortly after the Algoport joined the Stinson at the Port Terminal, both vessels were passed by the Luckyman, which was departing from Harvest States #2 loaded with wheat.

As the saltie passed, the two G-tugs that had helped her out of her berth made their way between her and the two stationary lakers, headed for their berth behind the stern of the Algoport.

A short time later the tour boat Vista King and the freighter Philip R. Clarke made an interesting trade while the Clarke was docked at DM&IR preparing to unload. The King placed its bow inches from the side of the Clarke, allowing crew members from both boats to exchange several candy bars (from the King's concession stand) for several chunks of limestone (from the Clarke's cargo hold). The candy bars were quickly consumed by the Clarke's crew, while the limestone was passed around to the passengers on the King so that they could get a hands-on look at limestone.

Reported by: Eric Holst




Tall Ships at Sarnia

08/19:
This weekend at the Government Dock in Sarnia, Ontario a marine heritage festival continues with seven Tall Ships. The complete three-day program includes entertainment, music, displays, demonstrations and games.

Public Boarding of the ships from 10am until 6pm each day.
Admission charge is $8.00 per person per day.
Admission for children 10 and under is $5.00. (Children 2 and under are free.)
www.tallshipssarnia.com

Reported by: Joe Barr




Work Shop Scheduled

08/19:
Flint Public Library and the Flint Genealogical Society will host Katharine G. Orr, UE, of Toronto on Saturday, October 7, to lead a workshop on searching Ontario, Canada genealogy. Ms. Orr is a member of the Unity of the Empire, and is a genealogist who specializes in teaching and lecturing. The workshop will be held at 9:30am-5:00pm and is free to the public.

The workshop will be held in room B-1 of the Flint Public Library, 1026 E. Kearsley St, Flint, MI 48502.

Reported by: Sarah Brooks




Today in Great Lakes History - August 19

The JOHN E.F. MISENER (2) grounded near Hard Island on the St. Lawrence River August 19, 1966 suffering bow damage.

The ROBERT S. PIERSON was sold to P & H. Shipping Ltd. on August 19, 1982 and renamed e) SPRUCEGLEN.

The ARIZONA was launched on August 19, 1868.

On August 19, 1915, the HENRY PEDWELL burned at Wiarton.

CARDINAL (3) was towed to the Strathearne Terminal in Hamilton, Ont. on August 19, 1974 for scrapping.

On 19 August 1909, CITY OF GREENBAY (wooden propeller passenger/package freight, 134'/257GT, built in 1880 at Fort Howard, WI as the sidewheeler M. C. HAWLEY) caught fire while crossing Saginaw Bay, burned to the waterline and sank.. This wasn't her first experience with this type of accident since on 17 November 1887, she had burned to a "total loss" in Lake Michigan.

August 19, 1930 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 7 towed the disabled tug GREILING from Frankfort to the Manitowoc shipyards.

The propeller QUEBEC was launched at the Chisholm & Simpson yard at Chatham, Ontario on 19 August 1874. She was built for the Beatty Line and designed to run between Sarnia and Duluth.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Tregurtha Arrives

08/18:
Lee A. Tregurtha arrived at Superior Entry about 11:15 a.m. Aug. 17 bound for Midwest Energy Terminal to load coal for the LTV power plant at Taconite Harbor. Lee A. Tregurtha will be followed at the coal dock by Paul R. Tregurtha, which was scheduled to arrive at the Duluth port terminal late on Aug. 17 for a couple hours of repairs before proceeding to the loading berth.

The Lee A. Tregurtha was scheduled to load at Midwest Energy Terminal at midday, but at 5:00 p.m. it was docked at the Duluth port terminal for undetermined reasons.

Lee A. Tregurtha proceeding up Superior's Front Channel
Close-up of the Tregurtha's bow
Stern view of the Tregurtha.

Report and pictures by: Al Miller




Marinette - Menominee Update

08/18:
Thursday the Catherine Desgagnes returned to the Lake Michigan port for its fifth visit of the season with Pig Iron for Marinette Fuel and Dock. Crews were working to repair an unloading crane on the unloading vessel William H. Donner. These repairs may delay the Desgagnes.

Reported by: Scott Best




Cleveland Report

08/18:
Thursday morning the Earl W. Oglebay was completing the fifth in a series of runs on the Lorain to Cleveland shuttle. Vessel on this run will load ore in Lorain, OH. for delivery to the LTV Steel Mill on the Cuyahoga River.

Other traffic in port included the Algoway departing from West 3rd and the saltie Lady Hamilton arriving at dock 32E.

The Earl W. Oglebay and tug Frank Palladino Jr. with the barge Kellstone I waited outside the river until the Algoway cleared. The Earl W. then lead the way with the tug and barge following close behind.

Pictures by TZ
Earl W. Oglebay approaching the Columbus Road Bridge.
Bow-on view.
Turning under the bridge.
The Captain maneuvering the vessel from the bridge wing.
Stern view as she sails up river for the LTV Steel Mill.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - August 18

CANADIAN ENTERPRISE was float launched on August 18, 1979.

On August 18, 1972, $50,000 in bottom damage occurred when the CHAMPLAIN (3) hit an obstruction in the Trenton Channel, on the lower Detroit River.

The KINSMAN ENTERPRISE (1) was launched August 18, 1906 as a) NORMAN B. REAM for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

On 18 August 1907, KATE WHITE (wooden propeller steam tug, 62'/28GT, built at Erie, PA in 1885 as a yacht) sank near the harbor entrance at Fairport, OH.

On 18 August 1878, JAVA (iron twin propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 232', 1525 gt, built in 1873 at Buffalo) was sailing from Bay City for Chicago and Milwaukee with mixed merchandise, including 300 tons of fine household goods, parlor stoves, salt, etc. She was a twin-screw and the main theory of her loss in good weather was that her starboard shaft coupling came loose and the shaft slid out the stern, allowing water to flood through the sleeve. nevertheless, she sank quickly, 15 miles off Big Sable Pointe on Lake Michigan in over 300 feet of water. The crew escaped in lifeboats and were picked up by passing steamers.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Fleet Mates Visit

08/17:
A pair of attractive Interlake boats were in the Twin Ports early Aug. 16. Kaye E. Barker was fueling at the Murphy Oil terminal before proceeding to its dock to unload stone. Elton Hoyt II was tied up at the Peavey Connors Point grain elevator waiting to begin loading its second grain cargo of the season from Superior. The Peavey terminal was once frequented by the Kinsman boats, but no American grain vessel has called there for a couple years.

Elton Hoyt II at the Peavey Connors Point elevator.
Elton Hoyt II at the Peavey terminal.
Kaye E. Barker fueling at the Duluth port terminal.
Close-up of the Barker's pilothouse

Report and pictures by: Al Miller




Drilling Rig

08/17:
Wednesday morning the Trailer Company called for the tug Patricia Hoey to spot their drill rig in the Detroit River. The rig is working off Zug Island near the entry to the Rouge River Shortcut installing a new waste water outfall for the City of Detroit. The rig needed to be precisely spotted at the drilling location for the outfall. Gaelic's tug Patricia Hoey is equipped with special air controls to assist the captain to maneuver the rig. The job was completed in a few hours with the assistance of Trailer's tug Eagle shifting the rig sideways while the Patricia Hoey held the rig in the Detroit River current.

The Patricia Hoey along side the rig.
A view of the Patricia from the rig.
Side view.
Spotting the rig.
Onboard the tug.

Reported by: William Hoey Sr.




Carferry Cargo

08/17:
The Lake Michigan Carferry departed her dock in Ludington, MI. Wednesday morning with a Coast Guard boat onboard. The Coast Guard vessel took the short cut across Lake Michigan arriving from the Coast Guard Station at Grand Haven, MI. From Manitowoc, WI. the boat will be towed to Green Bay for an unknown destination

Loading the boat into the Badger.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Toledo Update

08/17:
Wednesday was a busy day for both the CSX and Torco Docks in Toledo. At the CSX Docks the Algobay was loading with the John J. Boland, Arthur M. Anderson, John G. Munson and Middletown all scheduled to load after her.

At the Torco Ore Dock the Courtney Burton was unloading ore with the Middletown to follow. The tanker Gemini returned to her temporary lay-up berth at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock near Toledo Shiprepair.

The saltie Kasteelborg is scheduled in at the T.W.I. Docks to unload steel products within the next few days.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Update

08/17:
Wednesday evening the cement boat J.A.W. Iglehart was docked at the Lafarge terminal. The Earl Oglebay departed Cleveland at 6:30 p.m. and appeared to be bound for Lorain. An unidentified salty departed soon after heading up the lakes.

The Algoway made a rare trip up the Cuyahoga about 10 p.m. She is reported to have a cargo of fluxstone. The American Republic was following close behind the Algoway heading for the LTV steel mill.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - August 17

On August 17, 1987, CADILLAC was towed by the tugs GLENADA and ELMORE M. MISNER, from Toledo's Frog Pond on the first leg of her journey to be scrapped.

At 4:00 PM on 17 August 1869, the schooner CARLINGFORD was launched at the Fitzgerald and Leighton yard in Port Huron, Michigan with plenty of spectators on hand. Robert Montgomery of Buffalo, the owner, built the vessel for the grain trade. her capacity was 30,000 bushels of grain. After launching, she still had to have her masts (96', 98' and 94') and rigging installed. At the time, she was the largest sailing vessel built in Port Huron. her dimensions were 155' keel, 165' overall, 31'6" beam and 12'8" depth. 50 men worked on her and she cost $35,000.

Data from: Joe Barr, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Saltie Loses Steering

08/16:
Tuesday about 8:00 p.m. the Indian-flag Lok Prem lost steering control while downbound in the upper St. Marys River near Ile Parisienne. Radio reports indicated the helm was locked at about five degrees starboard. Repairs were made within the hour and the vessel proceeded to anchor above the locks until morning, when a U.S. Coast Guard inspection was scheduled. No other vessel traffic was affected by the incident.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




McKee Sons Update

08/16:
On Monday the tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons moved the short distance from the Government Dock to the North Slip in Sarnia. The pair are expected to depart on their maiden voyage sometime this month.

The tug and barge moved to clear the dock which will host a marine heritage festival with seven Tall Ships August 18, 19 and 20. A complete three-day program of entertainment, music, displays, demonstrations, games and tours of the Tall Ships.
www.tallshipssarnia.com

McKee Sons moving from the Government dock, Aug. 14. Steve Vanden Bosch

Below are pictures of the pair at the Government Dock taken in July by Matt Miner
McKee Sons at dock.
Tug Invincible from the McKee Sons.
Stern view of the pair.
Long view showing the Government Dock.

Reported by: Steve Vanden Bosch




Twin Ports Report

08/16:
The Cenex Harvest States elevator in Superior remains busy serving saltwater vessels. Hilal II was loading there Aug. 15 while Lita waited for its chance at a berth. Chios Pride was expected late in the day for the same elevator.

Also in the grain business is Elton Hoyt 2nd. She arrived in Duluth Tuesday evening for the Peavey Connors Point grain elevator. The Hoyt is expected to begin loading at 9:30 a.m. today.

Several vessels are scheduled to shuttle about western Lake Superior in the next two days:
--Indiana Harbor was due in Silver Bay on Aug. 15 with coal loaded at Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior. From there it was expected to return to the DMIR ore dock in Duluth on Aug. 16 to load a downbound cargo.
--Kaye Barker was due in late Aug. 15 to unload stone at the CLM dock in Superior, then proceed to Silver Bay to load.
--Buckeye is expected to arrive Aug. 16 with stone for the CLM dock in Superior. After unloading it's scheduled to load at Midwest Energy Terminal with coal destined for Taconite Harbor.

Reported by: Al Miller




Saginaw Update

08/16:
Tuesday was a busy day in Saginaw with the arrival of three vessels at local docks.

The Agawa Canyon and the Buffalo both entered the river during the night and were docking at their destinations in Saginaw in the early morning hours. The Agawa Canyon reported her arrival at the old General Motors dock at 6:20 a.m. The Buffalo, following behind her, proceeded further upriver to the Saginaw Rock Products dock.

Both vessels had completed their unloading operations and were preparing to depart shortly after noon when the Algorail arrived, also going to the GM dock. The Algorail tied up temporarily at the Sargent dock near the I-75 bridge to wait for the other vessels to clear.

The Buffalo was the first to depart, and was outbound after turning at about 1:30 p.m. Once she had passed, the Agawa Canyon moved up to the turning basin, turned, and started outbound. After the Agawa Canyon was clear, the Algorail was able to move up to take her place at the GM dock. She departed the dock at 11:00 p.m.

Considerable radio traffic could be heard throughout the day as the three vessels coordinated their movements.

Reported by: Stephen Hause




Medical Evacuation

08/16:
On the morning of Saturday August 12, The Tadoussac had a medical emergency. An object reportedly fell in the engine room striking a crew member. Apparent head injuries and a broken ankle were sustained by the crew member. No other information is available at this time.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Final Bells

08/16:
Captain Morgan L. Howell passed away early Tuesday morning, August 15, 2000, at the age of 96.

Captain Morgan held one of the largest U.S. Coast Guard licenses on record, which included pilotage for many harbors and rivers throughout the United States. When renewing his license in the late 1980's, he had the honor f having it signed by then President George Bush. Although he continued to sail on various vessels into the late 1980's, Morgan is well known as being Captain of the S/S AQUARAMA, which was under his command for many years. He was in the tug business for many years on the Great Lakes having bought the Ford tug Dearborn, then the captain on the Put-In-Bay, Aquarama, tug Minn, Medusa Challenger, a pilot for District 2 of the Lake Pilots and then Marine Surveyor.

In recent years, he was a student at St. Clair County Community College, where he earned five degrees since beginning classes in the fall of 1982. He was a longtime member of the International Shipmasters Detroit Lodge No. 7, having joined the lodge on February 23, 1960.

Visitation will be on Thursday, August 17, from 2-4 PM and 7-9 PM at the Fredericks Funeral Home; 214 Trumbull; St. Clair, Michigan. (810) 329-4222.

Church Services will be held in Brantford, Ontario on Saturday, August 19 at 1 PM. One of Morgan's last requests was to have uniformed ISMA members serve as pallbearers at his funeral. Anyone who is able to help in this regard is urged to telephone Captain Pat Owens as soon as possible: (810) 364-8374.

Captain Howell on the tug Tipperary in June 1982. William Hoey Sr.

Reported by: Paul M. Jagenow




Today in Great Lakes History - August 16

On 16 August, 1890, ANNIE WATT (wooden propeller, passenger and package freight "packet", 75'/62GC, built in 1884 at Lion's Head, Ontario) collided with the ship ALDERSON and sank. off of Gunn Point, Ontario. Just the previous year (8 November 1889), ANNIE WATT had burned and been declared total loss, but she was rebuilt.

The captain of the 2 year old, 125' wooden schooner-barge JOHN F. RITCHIE brought his wife, two other women and several small children as guests on a voyage from Bay City to Buffalo. The RITCHIE was one of a string of four barges loaded with lumber in tow of the tug ZOUAVE. As the tow entered Lake Erie, they were struck by a terrifying storm. The RITCHIE broke her tow line and was cast adrift. The deck load of lumber broke loose and everyone was in danger. The women and children were brought out of the cabin since it was considered to be a death trap and they were lashed on deck for safety. Soon the vessel was waterlogged and the cabin was actually washed away. On 17 August, a passing steamer took everyone aboard and towed the RITCHIE in to Cleveland where she was repaired. Amazingly, no lives were lost.

August 16, 1902 - The PERE MARQUETTE 18 (I) launched at Cleveland, Ohio.

Data from: Joe Barr, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




News from Port Colborne

08/15:
Canada Steamship Lines' SS Halifax has been at Wharf 16 in Port Colborne since Friday. She was downbound in the Welland Canal with iron ore for Hamilton when she experienced engine trouble. She backed out of the Lock and went to Wharf 16. Yesterday both engines were being repaired by Fraser. They expect to leave sometime mid-week.

While in Port the deck hands and day workers have been painting her bow and her letters Halifax. Two of them were in a small dingy with long rollers. While the others were painting from the deck and from shore. It is a great photo opportunity to see her look so nice. Crews report that she is expected to start hauling cement in November.

Reported by: J. J. Van Volkenburg




Busy Day In Indiana Harbor

08/15:
On Monday evening Metron Shipping's the saltie Pontokratis was assisted by two Great Lake Tugs into the ISPAT Inland #2 Ore Dock. This is the first time in recent memory that an ocean going vessel has unloaded at the dock.

Within a half hour the Joseph Block departed the #7 blast furnace and the Charles M. Beeghly departed LTV.

Reported by: TT




Twin Ports Report

08/15:
Duluth-Superior was host to several salties the morning of Aug. 14. In Duluth, Ziemia Chelminska was loading at Cargill B1, Federal MacKenzie was loading at AGP and Lita was unloading steel coils at the port terminal. In Superior, Lok Prem was loading at Cenex Harvest States. For the lakers, Canadian Transport was completing its load at Midwest Energy Terminal as the Oglebay Norton was approaching from the lake.

Also scheduled Aug. 14 for Midwest Energy Terminal, Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was due to arrive to load for Detroit Edison in St. Clair, and Indiana Harbor was scheduled to load for the power plant in Silver Bay, Minn.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

08/15:
On Monday morning the Wolverine was loading coal at the CSX Dock with the Jean Parisien at the #2 Dock waiting to load.

The next scheduled coal boat will be the Algoport who was expected to arrive about 1:00 a.m. this morning. The next scheduled ore boat will be Courtney Burton due in at the Torco Dock with an e.t.a. of 4:00 a.m. Wednesdays.

The saltie Olympic Mentor was unloading cargo at the T.W.I. Dock. There were no grain boats in port.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Buffalo Update

08/15:
The Richard Reiss developed mechanical problems while unloading coal at the Huntly Plant at Tonawanda on Sunday evening. She was expected to be delayed until 7:00 a.m. this morning. The crew will work through out the night and the Reiss will sail to the Black Rock Lock and then Lake Erie at dawn.

The Buffalo firetug Edward M. Cotter came back from her weekend at the Public Pier in Dunkirk Harbor on the Sunday. She was inbound at the North Entrance at 7:00 p.m. last night.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Coast Guard Halts Sailing

08/15:
The U.S. Coast Guard Group Sault Ste Marie received an anonymous report stating that the sailing vessel Attitude, a 72-foot uninspected sailing vessel was underway with six or more passengers onboard for hire. The reporting source provided copy of brochure advertising price lists for charters, which include parties of up to 18. U.S. Coast Guard Station Charlevoix's rescue boat located the Attitude underway on Little Traverse Bay in Lake Michigan and conducted a boarding.

The sailing vessel had 14 people onboard. The operator reported the Coast Guard that four of the people were crew members and the other 10 were non-paying guests of the Bay Harbor Association. No Coast Guard license was held by the operator or crewmembers.

After further investigation the Attitude's voyage was terminated and vessel was escorted vessel to dock. The Coast Guard notified the Michigan Department of Natural Resources due to possible violations of state laws. The Coast Guard continues to investigate the incident.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 15

The JOSEPH L. BLOCK sailed light on her maiden voyage from the Bay Ship Building Co., Sturgeon Bay, WI to load 32,600 long tons of taconite ore pellets at Escanaba, MI for delivery to Indiana Harbor, IN on August 15, 1976.

The OTTERCLIFFE HALL, the last "straight deck" Great Lakes bulk freighter built with a pilot house forward was bare boat chartered to Misener Transportation Ltd. on August 15, 1983.

Under threat of a strike on August 15, 1978, the GEORGE A. STINSON was towed out of Lorain before her completion by six tugs and was taken to Detroit's Nicholson's Terminal & Dock to finish her fit-out.

The LEON FALK, JR. was laid up for the last time August 15, 1980 at the Great Lakes Engineering Work's old slip at River Rouge, MI.

On August 15, 1985 the MENIHEK LAKE sailed under her own power to Quebec City (from there by tug), the first leg of her journey to the cutter torch in Spain.

J.P. MORGAN, JR. arrived in tow of Hannah Marine's tug DARYL C. HANNAH at Buffalo, NY on August 15th where she was delayed until she could obtain clearance to transit the Welland Canal. Permission to pass down the Canal was refused because of the MORGAN, JR.'s improper condition after a collision with the 480 foot Interlake steamer CRETE on June 23, 1948 in dense fog off Devils Island, in the Apostle Islands, on Lake Superior.

On 15 August 1856, WELLAND (sidewheel steamer, wood, passenger & package freight, 145'/300T, built 1853 at St. Catharine's, Ontario) burned to a total loss at her dock. at Port Dalhousie, Ontario. She was owned by Port Dalhousie and Thorold Railroad Co.

On 15 August 1873, Thomas Dunford and Frank Leighton announced a co-partnership in the shipbuilding business in Port Huron, Michigan. Their plans included operating from Dunford's yard. When they made their announcement, they already had an order for a large tug from Mr. George E. Brockway. This tug was the CRUSADER with the dimensions of 132' overall, 100' keel, and 23' beam.

August 14, 1899 - W.L. Mercereau, known as the "Father of the Fleet", became superintendent of steamships (Pere Marquette Railway).

In 1914 the Panama Canal was officially opened to maritime traffic.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Jim Olsson, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Farewell John W. Brown

08/14:
The World War II Liberty Ship John W. Brown has bid farewell to the lakes and is heading out the St. Lawrence Seaway. Sunday evening the Brown was sailing through the Seaway at the Iroquois Lock. Her next stop will be Montreal where she is expect to arrive today. She will be open for tours in Montreal departing on the 17th for a stop in Quebec.

Be sure to stop by, for a $5.00 donation you can tour a piece of history that will never again be seen on the lakes.

For additional details, call 410 558-0164. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com

Brown passing Blockhouse Island at Brockville.
Approaching the International Bridge at Ogdensburg.
Approaching the Iroquois Lock.
Departing the lock.
The Brown steams on as the sunsets.

For more pictures of the Brown click here

Report and pictures by: Peter Carter




Interlake Steamship ISO 9002 and ISM Certification Achieved

08/14:
The American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) has awarded The Interlake Steamship Company with ISO 9002 and ISM Code certification. Upon completion of the ABS audit process, Interlake Steamship’s quality system received multiple accolades. In a brief ceremony to be held at Interlake’s offices in Richfield, Ohio, on Tuesday, August 15, 2000, Interlake Steamship will be honored with several firsts in quality.

Interlake Steamship is the first US shipping company on the Great Lakes to become certified under both the ISO 9002 standards and the International Management Code for the Safe Operation of Ships and for Pollution Prevention (ISM Code). Interlake is also the first American vessel operating company, and only the second company in the world, to receive the “SQ” notation for the more stringent safety and quality standards endorsed by ABS.

Rear Admiral James Hull, Commander, Ninth Coast Guard District, and Lenny Pendexter, Vice President of the American Bureau of Shipping, will present James R. Barker, Interlake Steamship’s Chairman of the Board, with the certificates marking this historic achievement in a ceremony at 2:00 pm on August 15. The event will take place at Interlake’s Corporate Center, 4199 Kinross Lakes Parkway, Richfield, Ohio.

Interlake Steamship operates a fleet of eight self-unloading bulk cargo ships and one self-unloading tug-barge unit on the Great Lakes. The nine vessels, with cargo capacities ranging from 21,000 to 68,000 gross tons, serve customers in the iron ore, coal, aggregate, and grain trades.

Reported by: Interlake Steamship Company




Roger Stahl Arrives in Holland

08/14:
Captain Bill Cline guided the big tug into Holland Michigan harbor at 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning. By 1:00 p.m. Capt. Cline had shifted his tow and attached the tow wire and departed for Detroit. The big barge still has part of its last cargo of sand on board. If the weather holds the tow should arrive back into Detroit on Tuesday evening.

Tug Roger Stahl passes the historic Red Lighthouse entering Holland harbor.
Stern view of the tug in the harbor
Shifting the tow to make up with the towing machine.
Col. Don Andrew USA (Ret) watches Vern Holton handle lines as the tug maneuvers the tug into position.
Captain Cline (left to right) watches Jim Salisbury, Dave Jones, and Andy Trynka make up the tow.
The tow departs the Holland Dock.
Crew members Andy Trynka, Vern Holton, and Dave Jones wave goodbye.
The tow headed across Lake Macatawa.
Headed for the harbor entrance.
Out into the open Lake Michigan.
Letting out the tow wire for the long trip to Detroit.

Reported by: William Hoey Sr.




USCG SPAR Launched

08/14:
The latest U. S. Coast Guard Cutter named SPAR was launched Saturday at Marinette Marine, Marinette, WI. This is the second CG Cutter named SPAR. It is named SPAR for the women in the Coast Guard known by the acronym SPARs (based on the Coast Guard motto: Semper Paratus-Always Ready)

Appropriately, the SPAR was christened & launched by the first woman Attorney General of the United States, Janet Reno. Per Lt. Com. Janet Nunan, Prospective Commanding Officer, the Spar will be stationed in the Bering Sea off Alaska. Her missions will be Aids to navigation, Marine environmental protection, Search & Rescue, & Domestic ice breaking,

The USCG cutter SPAR is the sixth Juniper Class Seagoing Buoy Tender constructed by Marinette Marine. She measures 225 ft. in length, 46 ft. beam, & only 13 ft. draft. Propulsion is by two 3,100hp CAT engines & bow (460hp) & stern (550hp) thrusters.

The SPAR before launch. Pat Pavlat
Close up of rudder, prop, & stern thruster on the ways. Pat Pavlat
Beginning to slide down the ways. Pat Pavlat
Entering the water. Scott Best
SPAR comes to rest in the slip. Scott Best
Tugs Escort & Apache steady the SPAR during her first ever mooring. Pat Pavlat
The SPAR at her first ever mooring awaits completion of fitout & sea trials. Pat Pavlat

Reported by: Scott Best and Pat Pavlat




ASC in the Saginaw

08/14:
Fleet mates Adam E. Cornelius and American Mariner called on the Saginaw River Sunday. The Adam E. Cornelius was unloading near Zilwaukee, and the American Mariner was docked at Bay Aggregate. Both vessels were still unloading at 8:00 p.m.

Reported by: Brian Ferguson, Stephen Hause and Lon W. Morgan




Today in Great Lakes History - August 14

Sea trials for the HENRY FORD II took place on August 14, 1924 and shortly after she left on her maiden voyage with coal from Toledo, OH to Duluth, MN and returned with iron ore to the Ford Rouge Plant at Dearborn.

Having been sold for scrap, the GOVERNOR MILLER was towed down the Soo Locks on August 14, 1980 for Milwaukee, WI to load scrap.

On 14 August 1873, CHESTER B. JONES (3-mast, wooden schooner, 167'/493GT) was launched at E. Saginaw, MI. She was built by Chesley Wheeler. The spars and top hamper ordered for her were broken in a log jam, so the 3-master received her spars at Buffalo, NY on her first trip.

The 149' bark MARY E. PEREW was found floating west of the Manitou Islands by the propeller MONTGOMERY on 14 August 1871. The PEREW had been sailing to Milwaukee with a load of coal when a storm came upon her so quickly on 8 August (nearly a week before MONGOMERY found her) that the crew did not have time to trim the sails. All three masts were snapped and the mizzen mast fell on the yawl, smashing it. So the crew was stuck on the ship, unable to navigate. The MONTGOMERY towed her to Milwaukee where she was rebuilt and she lasted until 1905.

The schooner CHESTER B. JONES was launched at Saginaw on 14 August 1873. She was a three-and-aft rig.

On 14 August 1900, one hundred years ago, the tug WILLIAM D. of the Great Lakes Towing Company got under the bow of the steamer WAWATAM at Ashtabula, Ohio and was rolled over and sank. One drowned.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Cleveland Update

08/13:
Traffic remained heavy in Cleveland Friday night and Saturday.

Friday night the Richard Reiss departed Ontario 4 at 7:00 p.m. Tugs assisted the Rubin Stork into the Lake Front dock.

Saturday the St. Marys II was unloading at the Blue Circle cement dock on the Cuyahoga River.

The Canadian tall ships remain in Cleveland drawing huge crowds to tour the vessels. They are open for tours through today and will be departing Monday.

The Myron C. Taylor departed late Saturday night after spending several days in the river due to engine problems. She was preparing to depart Thursday afternoon from USS/Kobe Steel around 4:00 p.m. She reported problems with her turbocharger and at that time expected to be delayed about four hours. Crews took advantage of the down time and were seen painting her boom on Saturday.

The Taylor's location and the tug Frank Palladino and barge Kellstone I, which was tied up across the river and just around the corner from the Taylor, created close quarters for the Agawa Canyon. The Canyon was heading up river and passed the two about 8:00 a.m. Saturday. She unloaded at the West 3rd Street Bridge. She was cabled to both banks in order to discharge stone in the proper site and had the entire river blocked. The Canyon departed down around 3:00 pm.

The J.A.W. Iglehart was in bound for Lafarge, but decided to stay out in the lake until the Canyon got out of the river.

The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder delivered a load of coal just above Collision Bend, arriving Friday night around 6:00 pm and leaving by midnight.

Pictures by TZ
Agawa Canyon in Cleveland.
The Agawa Canyon squeezes past the barge Kellstone II.
J.A.W. Iglehart is towed stern first by the tug Delaware.
Close up of the tug Delaware's pilothouse towing Iglehart.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy and Dave Wobser




Twin Ports Report

08/13:
Duluth boatwatchers got a treat Saturday morning when Armco arrived about 10 a.m. to unload stone at the Cutler dock and then shifted to Midwest Energy Terminal to load coal. Middletown, another unusual caller, is due Sunday to load at DMIR ore dock in Duluth.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - August 13

Operated by a crew of retired Hanna captains, chief engineers and executives, the GEORGE M. HUMPHREY departed Great Lakes Engineering Works under her own power on August 13, 1986 for Lauzon, Que. The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY cleared Lauzon September 3rd with the former Hanna steamer PAUL H. CARNAHAN in tow of the Dutch tug SMIT LLOYD 109. The tow locked through the Panama Canal, September 27th through 30th, and arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan December 10, 1986 completing a trip of over 14,000 miles. The HUMPHREY was scrapped in 1987 by Shiong Yek Steel Corp.

On 13 August 1899, H. G. CLEVELAND (wooden schooner, 137'/264T, built in 1867 at Black River, OH) sank with a full load of limestone, 7 miles from the Cleveland harbor entrance.

August 13, 1980 - The ARTHUR K. ATKINSON returned to service after repairing a broken crankshaft suffered in 1973. She brought 18 railcars from Manitowoc to Frankfort.

The 272'/1740 gross ton, wooden propeller freighter SITKA was launched by F. W. Wheeler (hull # 32) at W. Bay City, Michigan on 13 August 1887.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Departs

08/12:
Gaelic Tugboat's twin screw tug Roger Stahl departed her dock at 11:00 a.m. Friday morning bound for Holland, Michigan. An 800 ton capacity deck barge has been purchased from Lake Michigan Contractors for use at Detroit for the transportation of heavy equipment and bulk commodities.

The availability of this barge to Gaelic Tugboat's customers will make it possible for Gaelic to continue to provide the most economical transportation of these various special cargos.

Under the command of Captain Bill Cline, the tug should arrive in Holland by noon on Sunday to take the barge into tow for Detroit. Captain Cline has been with Gaelic Tugboat for over 20 years and is the past Grand President of the International Shipmasters Association.

Icebreaking tug Roger Stahl backs away from Gaelic's dock in Detroit
Tug Roger Stahl outbound the Rouge River.
Stahl outbound the Rouge River at the Fort Street Bridge.

Reported by: William Hoey Sr.




GTS Katie Update

08/12:
The unloading of the ammunition was completed Friday without further delay. The GTS Katie departed later in tow for the last leg of this unusual trip to the Port of Montreal 130 km westward. A Canadian Armed Forces spokesperson indicated Friday that the remaining military cargo on board will be unloaded Sunday or Monday and that it should be completed within 48 hours. On the dock yesterday in Becancour, the owner of the GTS Katie once again accused the Canadian Government and Armed Forces of piracy. He indicated his intention to bring this case up in International Court.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




Twin Ports Report

08/12:
Duluth's grain elevators remained busy Aug. 11 with Lake Carling at AGP loading soybeans bound for Antwerp and Ziemia Chelminska at Cargill B1 loading wheat for delivery to Italy. The elevators in Superior had no ships but Cenex Harvest States had railcars unloading on both sides, and General Mills (formerly Great Northern) also was unloading cars -- a sign that another vessel is expected fairly soon.

Canadian Enterprise was due at Midwest Energy Terminal at noon on Aug. 11 and Mesabi Miner was expected about 11 p.m. It appears that this season there are fewer vessel backups at the dock, compared to last season when one or two vessels frequently had to wait to load.

Work is proceeding rapidly on redevelopment of the former Cargill C and D grain elevators in Duluth. A new contractor was brought into the project earlier this year and that resulted in a sizeable increase in the amount of heavy equipment and workers at the site. The former Cargill D site has been cleared down to a concrete pad. Cargill D is rubble, and inroads are being made in reducing the debris to a useable size. The annex of silos that once stood between the two elevators is now a huge mound of crushed concrete. The site is expected to be cleared and leveled this fall. The Duluth Seaway Port Authority is seeking a company that will use the site for waterborne commerce.

Reported by: Al Miller




Cleveland Update

08/12:
The Cuyahoga River in Cleveland was a busy place early Friday morning. The Cuyahoga moved down from the West Third Dock to the Salt Dock with the tug Delaware shortly after 7:00 a.m. The tug Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys Cement II were inbound heading to Blue Circle Cement at 4:30 a.m. and passed the Cuyahoga at Collision Bend. The Myron C. Taylor remained at the West Third Dock.

Also in port are two Canadian tall ships docked on the west side of the Cuyahoga River. A third tall ship, the Highlander, could not clear the bridges and is docked near the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The tall ships are open for tours from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. They will depart some time on Monday and will be open for tours in Sarnia next weekend.

Pictures by TZ
Cuyahoga heads for the Salt Dock.
The tug Delaware working the Cuyahoga's stern.
A close up of the Cuyahoga's bow at the Lafarge Dock.
The tall ships Picton Castle and True North at dock.
Close up of the Picton Castle.
Close up of the True North
The barge St. Marys Cement II passes the Cuyahoga early Friday morning.
Early morning stern view of the tug Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys Cement II.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - August 12

The C&O carferry S.S. Spartan, in a heavy fog while inbound from Kewanee on the morning of August 12, 1976, struck rocks at the entrance to the Ludington harbor. She suffered severe damage to about 120 feet of her bottom plating. She was taken to Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay on August 18th for repairs. There were no injuries as a result of this incident.

The TOM M. GIRDLER was christened August 12, 1951, she was the first of the C4 conversions.

The MAUNALOA II was launched August 12, 1899

The RIDGETOWN (a WILLIAM E. COREY) sailed from Chicago on her maiden voyage August 12, 1905 bound for Duluth, MN to load iron ore.

On 12 August 1882, FLORIDA (3-mast wooden schooner, 352 t, built in 1875 at Batiscan, Ontario) was carrying 662 tons of coal from Black River to Toronto when she sprang a leak and sank 12 miles from Port Maitland. She hailed from Quebec and was constructed mostly of pine and tamarack.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Anderson Unloads in Escanaba

08/11:
USS Great Lakes Fleet's Arthur M. Anderson made an uncommon visit to Escanaba on August 10 delivering eastern coal from Toledo to the North Reiss Dock. A more common visitor, the Joseph L. Block was also in port loading Empire pellets at the ore dock.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Toledo Update

08/11:
On Thursday the salties Langenes and Oak were at T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The tanker Gemini remains in lay-up at the old Interlake Iron company Dock. The next coal boat scheduled to load is the Earl W. Oglebay with an e.t.a. of 11:00 p.m. on Saturday. The next ore boat scheduled to load will be the Reserve with an e.t.a. of 9:00 p.m. on Saturday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Ashtabula, Ohio update

08/11:
The Middletown arrived in Ashtabula Thursday morning to unload at the Pinney Dock. Following the Middletown was the American Mariner who unloaded across from her. The Middletown had finished unloading and departed by 5:30 p.m. while the American Mariner continued to unload. The Buffalo was expected to arrive in Ashtabula late Thursday.

Pictures by TZ
Middletown arrives.
A close up of her name.
Middletown's bow passes the lighthouse.
Stern passing the light.
Bow view entering.
Looking aft from the Middletown's forward cabins.
Looking forward from the rear cabins.
Looking down the Middletown's boom.

American Mariner arrives.
Approaching the dock.
Close up of the American Mariner's cabins.
American Mariner swings her boom out to unload.
A view of the American Mariner's Unloading boom from the Middletown.

View of both vessels from the dock.
Both vessels unloading.




GTS Katie Tow Arrives

08/11:
The GTS Katie reached the port of Bécancour Thursday. It will unload 50 containers of ammunition. The Port of Bécancour was selected for security reasons. The army vehicles and other military material will then be unloaded in Montreal.

The GTS Katie is American owned but registered in Kingstown, capital of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Earlier this week the ship's Captain had voiced concern that the present contract conflict may have a bearing on the ship's capacity to pay the crew's wages. He had expressed the desire to voice this concern with the harbour workers union.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




Barge Docks in Monroe

08/11:
The American Wind Symphony Orchestra will perform a free public concert today in the Port of Monroe, MI. turning basin. The one-of-a-kind orchestra sails around the world aboard the 195-foot-long Point Counterpoint II.

The Point Counterpoint II is a self propelled, 195-foot barge with bridge, performing stage and quarters, fore to aft. The barge, commissioned in 1976 for the country's bicentennial, is making its last world tour under conductor - and pilot - Robert Boudreau.

Point Counterpoint II, complete with the hydraulic bandshell and art gallery - full of pieces purchased in each of the many countries she's been to - is up for sale this year.

Performances began Thursday and continue today. Free rehearsals are open at 9:00 a.m. The vessel can be found at the Port of Monroe Turning Basin. East of I-75 on Front Street (exit 12 off I 75).

The Monroe Evening News reports that with its 40-foot band shell along the side, the boat is an unusual-looking vessel - a reworked barge designed by the famed architect Louis Kahn." The Point Counterpoint II's home port is Pittsburgh, Pa.

The barge at dock.
Close up of the stage.
Bow view.
Stern view.
Life ring on the barge.

Report and pictures by: Dean J. Frazer




Today in Great Lakes History - August 11

The H.M. GRIFFITH was the first self-unloader to unload grain at Robin Hood's new hopper unloading facility at Port Colborne, Ont on August 11, 1987.

On August 11, 1977 the THOMAS LAMONT was the first vessel to take on fuel at Shell's new fuel dock at Sarnia, Ont. The dock's fueling rate was 60 to 70,000 gallons per minute and was built to accommodate one-thousand footers.

Opening ceremonies for the METEOR (2) museum ship were held on August 11, 1973 with the President of Cleveland Tankers present whose company had donated the ship. This historically unique ship was enshrined into the National Maritime Hall of Fame.

The T.W. ROBINSON and US.265808 (former BENSON FORD (2) departed Quebec City on August 11, 1987 along with US.265808 (former BENSON FORD (2) in tow of the Polish tug JANTAR bound for Recife where they arrived on September 22, 1987. Scrapping began the next month in October.

On 11 August 1862, B.F. BRUCE (wooden propeller passenger steamer, 110'/169T, built in 1852 at Buffalo as a tug) was carrying staves when she caught fire a few miles off Port Stanley, Ontario in Lake Erie. She was run to the beach, where she burned to a total loss with no loss of life. Arson was suspected. She had been rebuilt from a tug to this small passenger steamer the winter before her loss.

On 11 August 1908, TITANIA (iron propeller packet/tug/yacht, 98', 73 gt, built in 1875 at Buffalo) was rammed and sunk by the Canadian sidewheeler KINGSTON near the harbor entrance at Charlotte, NY on Lake Ontario. All 26 on board were rescued.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




McKee Sons Update

08/10:
The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons remained at the Government Dock in Sarnia on Monday. The pair are expected to depart on their maiden voyage sometime today.
Please e-mail with updates or pictures.

Below are pictures of the pair taken in July by Matt Miner
McKee Sons at dock.
Tug Invincible from the McKee Sons.
Stern view of the pair.
Long view showing the Government Dock.

Reported by: Barry Hiscocks




Twin Ports Report

08/10:
Columbia Star arrived in Duluth about 7:20 a.m. Aug. 9 amid bright sun and lingering surface fog. The vessel was bound for Midwest Energy Terminal, where Reserve was just completing a load of coal for the LTV power plant in Taconite Harbor. The Reserve is an infrequent visitor at SMET, but it is the first vessel in a brief but interesting flurry of boats scheduled to load there. Charles M. Beeghly is due at SMET Aug. 10 to load for LTV, and Courtney Burton is due the 12th to load for LTV. Other unusual callers include St. Clair, due on the 10th for Nanticoke.

The Cenex Harvest States elevator in Superior remained busy Aug. 9, as it has been the past week. The latest vessel there was the saltie Malyowitza.

Reported by: Al Miller




GTS Katie Under Tow on St. Lawrence River

08/10:
The GTS Katie under tow passed the Quebec City pilot station Thursday evening en route to the Port of Becancour. With the tug Ocean Hercule leading, the Andre H at the stern and the Salvage Monarch at stand-by, the tow proceeded slowly up river to Quebec City through rain, strong winds and thick fog at times.

The passage between Quebec City and Trois-Rivieres will be accomplished with the flood tide in order to avoid the strong ebb tide currents west of Quebec City. The 225 million tons of military equipment on board the GTS Katie should reach their destination sometime today.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




Algorail in Midland

08/10:
The Algorail arrived in Midland at 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday morning. She tied up at the Unimin rock crushing plant and unloaded her cargo of silica for Badgeley Island. She had completed the unloading process and was outbound by the Gin Rocks by 16:00 the same day. She was heading back up to Badgeley Island to repeat the same trip.

Also, the tug Atlantic Hickory, pushing the barge Sarah Spencer was in port last week with a cargo of grain. The unloaded at the ADM mill.

Reported by: Rudy Smith




Algowood Update

08/10:
The Algowood continues to undergo repairs at Port Weller Dry Docks to damage suffered on June 2 while the vessel was loading stone at Bruce Mines, Ontario.

Pictures of the vessel in Port Weller Dry Docks taken in July.
In the dry dock.
Work continues.

Pictures by: Jack Reynolds




Today in Great Lakes History - August 10

On August 10, 1952, the Arthur M. Anderson entered service. Exactly fourteen years later, on August 10, 1966, the vessel's namesake, Arthur Marvin Anderson, passed away.

On August 10, 1969, the Edmund Fitzgerald set the last of many cargo records it set during the 1960s. The Fitzgerald loaded 27,402 gross tons of taconite pellets at Silver Bay on this date. This record was broken by the Fitzgerald's sister ship, the Arthur B. Homer, during the 1970 shipping season.

On 10 August 1937, B.H. BECKER (steel tug, 19T, built in 1932 at Marine City, MI) foundered in heavy seas, 9 miles north of Oscoda, MI.

On 10 August 1906, JOHN H. PAULEY (formerly THOMPSON KINSFORD, wooden propeller steam barge, 116', 185 gt, built in 1880 at Oswego, NY) caught fire at Marine City, Michigan. Her lines were burned through and she then drifted three miles down the St. Clair River before beaching near Port Lambton, Ontario and burning out.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Twin Ports Report

08/09:
The Twin Ports got a small dose of straight-deckers Aug. 7, with Alpena unloading first in Superior and then at the Duluth terminal, and Montrealais making one of its uncommon visits to load at the General Mills elevator. Other grain traffic included Moor Laker loading at Cargill B1 and Gunay A at Cenex Harvest States #1.

Arthur M. Anderson was scheduled to unload cargo in Lorain on Aug. 8, then load the same day in Toledo before proceeding to Escanaba, where it is an uncommon visitor.

Reported by: Al Miller




GTS Katie Under Tow on St. Lawrence River

08/09:
The American owned GTS Katie is now proceeding westward from Rimouski ,Quebec under tow for a 450 km trip to the port of Becancour (south shore of River &east of Montreal).The Maryland company ship under foreign flag was taken over and seized by the Canadian Armed Forces in the high seas off Newfoundland last Thursday following two weeks of sailing outside Canadian waters to avoid legal action while discussions took place between the ship’s broker, agent and ship’s company over an alleged commercial contract disagreement. The GTS Katie was under contract to bring back to Canada from the Kosovo conflict 580 army vehicles and 390 containers of army material.

14 crewman from the HMCS Athabascan along with RCMP officers took command of the ship and put it on course for the Port of Becancour in the St. Lawrence River to safely unload the cargo of ammunition on board then on to Montreal for the other remaining cargo.

While underway, Canadian Armed Forces authority decided to anchor the ship off the Port of Rimouski, Quebec because the fuel remaining on board was so low that it was feared that the ship could not safely sail the St. Lawrence River.

The Department of National Defence decided then to have the ship towed to Becancour and the towing company Groupe Ocean was selected for the task. Two of their tugs were assigned, the 4,200 HP Ocean Hercule and the 1,300HP Salvage Monarch along with a 2,400HP tug from the Port of Trois-Rivieres.

The tow departed Rimouski around 9:00 a.m. Tuesday morning and is expected to reach the Quebec City pilot station late this afternoon or early evening after allowing for a high tide passage in the narrow channel off eastern tip of the Island of Orleans. The group should reach Becancour approximately 12 hours later.

The GTS Katie is a former 36,000 tons Russian cargo ship manned by a Russian Captain and a Russian,Croatian and Ukrainian crew. It is owned by Third Ocean Marine Navigation of Maryland and is flying a foreign flag.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




New Barge

08/09:
The Great Lakes Towing Company has recently acquired the deck barge Milwaukee. The Milwaukee is a 172' x 40' x 11'6" deck barge with a Great Lakes loadline. It has a cargo capacity of 1,095 tons, is outfitted with bin walls, and boasts a uniquely designed ship model bow for cargo protection and seakeeping. It is presently undergoing drydocking and survey by the American Bureau of Shipping for loadline renewal, and will soon receive its first coat of traditional "Great Lakes Towing Green." It will be outfitted for oversize, heavy lift, project, roll-on/roll-off, and specialty bulk cargoes such as scrap, logs and pig iron. The barge Milwaukee is one of very few Great Lakes loadlined U.S. flag deck barges and will be on the market available for charter, providing specialized service for customers throughout the Great Lakes system.

In addition to its role in Great Lakes harbor towing, The Great Lakes Towing Company is a full-service marine transportation company. Its tugboats tow every kind of barge and marine structure, from triple-decker roll-on/roll-off barges to floating drill rigs.

Reported by: Jerome A. Popiel




Passengers Rescued from Sinking Houseboat

08/09:
The Brockville Recorder & Times reported that eight Michigan residents on their way to Gananoque, Ontario were rescued from a sinking 48-foot houseboat Monday afternoon. The rental houseboat, from Clayton, NY. was heading across the St. Lawrence River from that village to Gananoque around 12:30 when it began taking on water. The initial emergency call came from a passing tour boat.

By the time firefighters got to the scene, some pleasure boats were already helping the sinking vessel. A Canadian Coast Guard ship also raced to the scene, as well as firefighters from Front of Leeds and Lansdowne and Parks Canada staff.

Two women and four children were taken aboard the Gananoque fire department's boat. The firefighters pumped the houseboat out and it was eventually guided to Gordon's Marine in Gananoque where it awaited its owners. The rescue operation took about an hour and no one was injured.

The vessel caught the attention of the U.S. Coast Guard as they received 28 automated SOS signals. The operator activated the SOS signal but was not broadcasting his position or nature of distress by voice.

Reported by: Rose Phillips




Coast Guard Search

08/09:
On Monday a pleasure craft came upon a jet ski disabled 1.3 nautical miles offshore near Hat Point in Saginaw Bay. The operator informed the pleasure craft that a female companion had left the jet ski four hours earlier to try to swim to shore. U.S. Coast Guard Stations Tawas, Harbor Beach, Saginaw River, Air Station Detroit and local rescue units launched a search for the swimmer. A shore unit from a local state park located the woman alive near the mouth of the Pinnebog River. She was transported by ambulance for treatment. She was treated for hypothermia and released.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 09

The keel was laid for the INDIANA HARBOR on August 9, 1978.

The HAMILDOC (3) was christened on August 9, 1963.

The G.A. TOMLINSON (1) entered service August 9, 1909.

The SHAUGHNESSY with the former CSL steamer ASHCROFT in tow of the Polish tug JANTAR arrived in Castellon, Spain for scrapping in 1969.

On August 9, 1989 the tug FAIRPLAY IX departed Sorel with the FORT CHAMBLY and NIPIGON BAY in tandem tow bound for Aliaga, Turkey for scrapping.

On the night of August 9, 1865, METEOR met her running mate, the propellor PEWABIC, off Thunder Bay on Lake Huron around 9:00 p.m. As the two approached, somehow METEOR sheered and struck her sister, sinking the PEWABIC within minutes in 180 feet of water. About one hundred twenty-five people went down with her, and 86 others were saved.

On 9 August 1850, CHAUTAUQUE (wooden sidewheel steamer, 124'/162T, built in 1839 at Buffalo, NY) caught fire in the St. Clair River and burned to a total loss. In previous years she had been driven ashore (1844) and sank twice - once in 1846 and again in 1848. In September 1846, she made the newspaper by purposely ramming a schooner which blocked her path while she was attempting to leave the harbor at Monroe, MI.

On 9 August 1856, BRUNSWICK (wooden propeller, 164', 512 t, built in 1853 at Buffalo) was carrying corn, scrap iron and lard from Chicago when she sprang a leak in a storm and was abandoned by the crew and passengers. One passenger drowned when one of the boats capsized, but the rest made it to shore near Sleeping Bear in the three other boats. BRUNSWICK went down in 50 fathoms of water, 6 miles south of South Manitou Island on Lake Michigan.

On 9 August 1875, the Port Huron Times reported that the schooner HERO, while attempting to enter the piers at Holland, Michigan, was driven two miles to leeward and went to pieces. Her crew took to the boats, but the boats capsized. Luckily all made it safely to shore.

August 9, 1938 - The Pere Marquette carferries 17 and 18 left Milwaukee for Grand Haven carrying 600 United States Army Troops, bound for Army war maneuvers near Allegan and at Camp Custer.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Cleveland update

08/08:
On Monday morning the cement boat English River paid a rare call to Cleveland. She was unloading at Lafarge cement and was expected to depart early morning today.

The cement barge St. Marys Cement II departed Blue Circle cement about 3:00 p.m. with the assistance of the tug Washington.

The American Republic completed unloading at LTV about 7:00 p.m. Due to debris from recent rainfall she did not use the upper turning basin and instead was seen heading downriver stern first. This is only slightly slower for her and made for a great show doing it backwards without a tow. They are scheduled for one more run on the Lorain to Cleveland shuttle before switching to a different run.

Saltie traffic was also busy Monday. The Oak arrived at 7:00 p.m. docking at 24 West. She is expected to depart some time today. The Elm was unloading 12,000 tons of coiled spring steel at 28 North and is expected to continue unloading until Wednesday. The Malta registered Lita departed about 5:30 p.m.

Pictures by TZ
The English River turns into port.
Entering the Cleveland Break Wall.
English River passes the American Republic.
St Marys Cement II rounds a turn.
Bow view.
Oak docking with assistance.
Elm at dock unloading.
Shore side cranes unloading the Elm.
Lita at dock before her departure.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Duden in Oshawa

08/08:
In Oshawa Monday the Turkish flagged Duden was in port to unload steel rods. There was no activity Monday, probably due to it being a Civic Holiday. The ship will likely be in port another two days before they finish unloading.

Bow view of the Duden
The Duden's super structure.

Reported by: Jim Gallacher




Milwaukee Clipper To Open For Tours

08/08:
On August 19, 2000 the S. S. Milwaukee Clipper will open its doors for public tours. An agreement has been reached between the City of Muskegon and S. S. Milwaukee Clipper Preservation, Inc., which will allow the group to open the National Historic Landmark steamer to the general public for the first time since the vessel arrived in Muskegon on December 2, 1997.

The agreement, which allows the vessel to be open for tours while restoration continues, will also allow the group to complete the safety repairs required by Muskegon's fire codes. Workers, volunteers, and contractors have been working feverishly to recondition the ship's fire suppression system to the point where it is operational in the areas where tour groups will be taken.

While not all parts of the vessel will be open to the public, the tours will cover the major parts of the ship that were generally used by passengers when she was in cross-lake service, including the passenger lounges, cafeteria, and cocktail lounge with its horse-shoe bar and polished dance floor.

Thus far restoration work on the vessel has been done by a dedicated group of volunteers and private donations. While the private donations has been enough to maintain the ship they have not been enough to allow the group to realize their dream of having a bed and breakfast, maritime museum, wedding receptions, and corporate parties. The tours will, it is believed, become the stepping stone to the accomplishment of this dream.

Tours prices have been tentatively set at $5.00 for adults, $2.50 for children between 5 and 11, and children under 5 will be free.

In a related item, a 24 foot half model of the Milwaukee Clipper was recently donated to the vessel by the Pilgrim Center, United Church Camps, Inc., in Ripon, Wisconsin. While the actual history origin of the model is cloudy, for the past 15 years it has hung in the dining room at the Pilgrim Center.

This past weekend Chuck Truscott, Museum Curator; Duane Koomen, Director of Clipper Security; and James Moore, Museum Volunteer, traveled to Ripon and returned the model to Muskegon, where it will be put on display aboard the vessel.

The Milwaukee Clipper in Muskegon.
The 24 foot half model.

Reported by: Charles Truscott




John W. Brown in Toronto

08/08:
Under a sky of low clouds that threatened rain, the John W. Brown completed another great cruise Sunday. The last of her Great Lakes Cruises departed Toronto at 10:00 with her decks loaded. The ship was packed with passengers who enjoyed this re-creation of a World War II experience. Unfortunately the low ceiling prevented some of the flybys of WW II aircraft but a trio of Harvard trainers from Oshawa put on a good show.

When the ship got out onto Lake Ontario a good south west breeze was building up a slight chop that gave the ship a slight motion. With the gray rolling lake and fog obscuring the shore line some passengers commented, "It looks like the North Atlantic." Luckily there was no rain and passengers enjoyed the cruise on deck.

Most passengers were impressed with the Canadian content of the cruise. The navy band from HMCS York provided a good mix military and popular tunes. The gunners were all wearing Canadian WW II uniforms. Anyone aboard who had sailed aboard Liberties or the Canadian and British equivalents, the Parks, Forts and Oceans were invited back aft for a group photo. The memorial service recognized the contribution to the war effort by Canadian and American soldiers and sailors. It was an emotionally moving experience.

Food was plentiful and tasty. The crews of the Brown were very friendly and obviously proud of their ship.

Reported by: David Bull




Mackinaw Searches

08/08:
On Sunday afternoon possible cries for help were heard by a crewman on the Icebreaker Mackinaw as she was underway eight nautical miles northwest of Grand Haven, MI. The crewman thought he heard a child's voice yell. The Icebreaker began an expanding square search with all off-watch personnel on deck to aid in the search, visibility varied between a quarter mile and a half mile.

The Mackinaw report the incident to U.S. Coast Guard Group Grand Haven. A Station Grand Haven rescue boat was quickly launched to assist and conducted expanding square search of the area.

Another yell was heard, but a pleasure craft (one of several in the vicinity) was found approximately 1,000 yards in the direction of the yell. All personal water craft in the area had not seen and heard any signs of distress.




Search for Overdue Barge in Western Lake Erie

08/08:
Late Tuesday night, Aug. 1, Rescue Coordination Center Trenton, Canada reported a barge bound for Ashtabula had missed a scheduled check-in while transiting Lake Erie. Urgent Marine Information Broadcast's and call-outs were made with no response. A Canadian C-130 and Air Station Detroit HH-65A helicopter were launched. The HH-65A helicopter found the barge Wednesday morning in no distress north of Erie, PA. The name of the barge was not released.




Tall Ships at Sarnia

08/08:
August 18, 19 and 20 at the Government Dock in Sarnia, Ontario a marine heritage festival will be held with seven Tall Ships. A complete three-day program of entertainment, music, displays, demonstrations and games.

Public Boarding of the ships from 10am until 6pm each day.
Admission charge is $8.00 per person per day.
Admission for children 10 and under is $5.00. (Children 2 and under are free.)
www.tallshipssarnia.com

Reported by: Joe Barr




Power Outage

08/08:
The Oakland.edu portion of the Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping web site was down for a few hours Monday due to a major power outage. Systems have been restored and no other outages are expected.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 08

The JAMES R. BARKER became the longest vessel on the Great Lakes when it entered service on August 8, 1976. It held at least a tie for this honor until the Paul R. Tregurtha entered service on May 10, 1981. The BARKER's deckhouse had been built at AmShip's Chicago yard and was transported in sections to Lorain on the deck of the steamer GEORGE D. GOBLE.

The BUFFALO was christened August 8, 1978

The E.B. BARBER along with the motor vessel SAGINAW BAY arrived August 8, 1985 under tow in Vigo, Spain. Demolition began on August 9, 1985 by Miguel Martins Periera at Guixar-Vigo.

The Soo River Company was forced into receivership on August 8, 1982.

On 8 August 1887, CITY OF ASHLAND (wooden sidewheel tug, 90'/85GT, built in 1883 at Ashland, WI) was towing a log raft near Washburn, WI in Lake Superior. Fire broke out near the boilers and quickly cut off the crew from the lifeboat. They jumped overboard and all but 1 or 2 were picked up by local tugs. The burned hull sank soon afterward.

The wooden tug J.E. EAGLE was destroyed by fire at about 4:00 PM on 8 August 1869 while towing a raft of logs on Saginaw Bay to Bay City. Her loss was valued at $10,000, but she was insured for only $7,000.

August 8, 1981 - The Ann Arbor carferry VIKING took part in a ceremony christening a body of water between Manitowoc and Two Rivers as "Maritime Bay".

August 8, 1999 - The KAYE E. BARKER delivered the last shipment of limestone for Dow Chemical, Ludington. The plant later closed it's lime plant and began lime deliveries by rail.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Trip a Success

08/07:
The Elton Hoyt 2nd's first delivery of 428,000 bushels of grain last week was reported to be a success.

The Hoyt departed Buffalo and sailed to Conneaut, OH. to load coal for Marquette. After unloading in Marquette the Hoyt will load ore for Rouge Steel.

The Hoyt is expected back to Duluth for a return grain trip to Buffalo some time around August 19. The Hoyt could have as many as eight more loads of grain this season. The Herbert C. Jackson may be pressed into the grain service to assist the Hoyt.




Launch Scheduled

08/07:
On August 13 Marinette Marine will Launch the USCG SPAR. The United States Attorney General, Janet Reno will be on hand to Christen the ship and speak. The Spar is the first ship of Marinette Marines 3rd contract with the Coast Guard. The SPAR will be stationed in Kodiak Alaska with 6 officers and 34 enlisted. SPAR is an acronym for Semper Paratus the U.S. Coast Guard's motto meaning Always Ready.

Reported by: Scott Best




Buffalo Update

08/07:
The firetug Edward M. Cotter departed Sunday evening for Port Colborne where she will be open for tours during the annual Canal Days Today. Once into Lake Erie she ran into fog. She called the Canadian Transport for a radar fix while passing her in the shipping lane off Buffalo. The two vessels passed uneventfully around 5:00 p.m. at a distance of 1.4 miles.

Her trip to Port Colborne will be her first trip back to the area since fighting the large fire at the Maple Leaf Mills on Oct. 7, 1960.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Diamond Jack Tours

08/07:
Record crowds are lining up for a cruise on the Diamond Jack in Wyandotte. When the weather is good there is a lot of interest in the Detroit River tour from Wyandotte. Keith Steffke does a great narration on the trip bringing back thoughts about the rum running days in the lower river, and bygone industries including the Great lakes Engineering Works which built the North American, South American and Edmund Fitzgerald. Tied up at the old shipyard are the retired Bob-Lo steamers Columbia and Ste Claire.

Passengers board the Diamond Jack. Bill Hoey
The Jack in the Detroit River. N. Schultheiss
The former Bob-Lo boats. N. Schultheiss
Stern view of the boats. N. Schultheiss






Body Identified

08/07:
The body of a missing crewman from the John J. Boland has been recovered, and a coroner has determined he died from drowning, according to a report in the Aug. 6 Duluth News Tribune.

George Harrison, 56, of Ivy Day, West Virginia, was last seen aboard the Boland on July 27. He reportedly was showing symptoms of the flu. He was reported missing the next day when he didn't appear to stand his watch. The U.S. and Canadian coast guards and local law enforcement agencies launched an extensive search of northern Lake Huron and the St. Marys River.

Harrison's body was recovered Aug. 3 from the Neebish Channel in the St. Marys River. A coroner's report released Aug. 5 indicated the cause of death was drowning and that no foul play was suspected.

Reported by: Al Miller




July Loadings At SMET Hold Even

08/07:
July shipments of low-sulfur coal from Superior Midwest Energy Terminal totaled 1.7 million tons, essentially the same as a year ago. A slight but noticeable increase in water levels did allow the dock to load several cargoes of nearly 64,000 tons each. That is a significant improvement compared to the beginning of this shipping season, but still represents a significant decrease when compared to pre-plunge navigation seasons.

For the season, shipments from SMET stand at 7.3 million net tons, a decrease of 4.6 percent compared to the same point in the 1999 navigation season.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




The Winner Is

08/07:
The winners in the ISMA Lodge #4 Boat Trip Raffle (drawing held August 3), were:

1st Prize: - Trip for 4 aboard the Kaye E. Barker - Margaret Rabatsky, Westlake, OH.
2nd Prize: - $100 - Doug Green, Frankfort, MI.
3rd Prize: - $50 - Gloria Dirtzu, Inver Grove, MN.
4th Prize: - $50 - David Morrison, Marine City, MI.

Cleveland Lodge #4 would like to thank everyone for supporting the raffle.

The winner of the trip on the S.S. Cuyahoga to benefit the Port Colborne Historical and Marine Museum was won by Wesley Fleming of Kingsville, Ontario.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 07

The JAMES R. BARKER was christened August 7, 1976 she was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flag ship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.). She was built at a cost of more than $43 million under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. She was the third thousand footer to sail on the Lakes and the first built entirely on the Lakes.

On 7 August 1844, DANIEL WHITNEY, a wooden schooner, was found floating upside-down, with her crew of 4 missing and presumed dead.. She was six miles off mouth of the Kalamazoo River in Lake Michigan.

August 7, 1948 - Edward L. Ryerson, chairman of Inland Steel Company has announced that the new ore boat under construction for Inland will be named the WILFRED SYKES in honor of the president of the company. Mr. Sykes has been associated with Inland since 1923, when he was employed to take charge of engineering and construction work. From 1927 to 1930 he served as assistant general superintendent and from 1930 to 1941 as assistant to the president in charge of operations. He became president of Inland in May, 1941. He has been a director of the company since 1935. The new ship will be the largest and fastest on the Great Lakes, having a carrying capacity in intermediate depth of 20,000 gross tons. The ship will be 678 ft. long, 70 ft. wide and 37 ft. deep, and will run at 16 miles per hour when loaded.

While lying at the dock at the C & L.H. RR Yard in Port Huron on 7 August 1879, the scow MORNING LARK sank after the scow MAGRUDER ran into her at 4:00 AM. MORNING LARK was raised and repaired at the Wolverine dry dock and was back in service on 20 September 1879.

Data from: Dave Wobster, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Desgagnes Delayed

08/06:
Saturday morning as the Catherine Desgagnes departed Marinette Fuel and Dock they encountered some type of delay. They were in port to unload a cargo of Pig Iron. The vessel attempted to turn around in the river near the dock instead of going up river to the turning Basin or backing out.

They began turning and came to a stop, whether the vessel was on the bottom or could not make the turn is unclear. The Desgagnes remained in the position or at least a half hour, after some maneuvering the vessel was turned and were on their way with no tugs assisting. As she departed her bow was drawing 11-feet 14-feet midship and almost 18-feet at the stern.

On other trips the Desgagnes has back out and turned around in the bay.

Desgagnes blocking the river. Dick Lund

Reported by: Scott Best and Dick Lund




New Coast Guard Vessel

08/06:
Coast Guard Station Duluth next week will begin using a new 47-foot motor lifeboat. The $1 million boat, loaded with the latest electronic equipment, was built in New Orleans and replaces a 44-footer built in 1967. The vessel currently is undergoing final assembly at Barkers Island Marina in Superior and is due to report to the station on Park Point on Thursday. Coast Guard officials said the boat will enable them to reach vessels in distress in half the time needed by the old lifeboat, and it can handle 30-foot seas, 50-knot winds and 20-foot breaking waves. If capsized, the boat can right itself in 4 to 6 seconds.

In addition, the Duluth station was scheduled to receive on Saturday a new 49-foot boat that will assist in maintaining Aids to Navigation. A third boat -- a 28-footer -- is expected to arrive this summer. The biggest replacement - that of the World War II era Cutter Sundew - is scheduled to take place in 2004.

Reported by: Al Miller




Detroit Update

08/06:
Saturday was busy day on the Detroit River, the pictures below show some of the day's activity.

The day started with the Cuyahoga unloading blue salt. Pat Pavlat & Frank Bachnak
The Halifax, an uncommon visitor to the area, passed upbound Saturday morning. Pat Pavlat
Fleet mate Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was also upbound. Pat Pavlat

After unloading the Cuyahoga turned and headed down river. N. Schultheiss
A closer view of the bow. N. Schultheiss
She made a quick stop for fuel at Sterling Fuel in Windsor. After fueling she moved a short distance down river to load at Ojibway salt in Windsor. N. Schultheiss

Also in the river was the tour boat Diamond Jack taking a load of passengers on their popular river tour from Wyandotte. N. Schultheiss

The former Bob-Lo boats remain in lay-up at the Nicholson Terminal - Ecorse Dock. The Diamond Jack can be seen in the back ground turning into the dock. N. Schultheiss
Stern view of the boats. N. Schultheiss

The David Z. Norton in the lower Detroit River loaded heading downbound. Picture from the deck of the Diamond Jack. Bill Hoey
Following closely behind the Norton. N. Schultheiss
Bow view as the Norton sails down the Detroit River's Livingston Channel. N. Schultheiss

Saltie Kavo Yerakas was sailing downbound. She is loaded with grain from Duluth. N. Schultheiss
Kapitonas Kaminskas was upbound in the river's Amherstburg Channel. She was sailing from Cleveland for Windsor. N. Schultheiss
A closer view of her bow. The shape of the bow aids in ice breaking. N. Schultheiss





Buffalo Update

08/06:
The barque Picton Castle arrived in the port of Buffalo Friday morning. She docked behind the firetug Edward M. Cotter at the Erie Basin Visiting Ship's Dock on the Buffalo River.

Both ships and the schooner Locus will be open for free tours today. The Cotter will depart for Port Colborne at 5:00 p.m. and will be open for tours during the annual Canal Days celebration on Monday. This will be her first trip back to the area since fighting the large fire at the Maple Leaf Mills on Oct. 7, 1960.

The Buffalo Coast Guard Base will also be open to the public today. There will be helicopters on display from the Detroit Coast Guard Air Station, the New York State Troopers, and also Mercy Flight Medevac.

Displays will also include water rescue craft from local law enforcement and fire fighting agencies. The 1833 Buffalo Main Light may be open as well.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Today in Great Lakes History - August 06

WALTER J. McCARTHY JR.'s bottom was damaged at the fit-out dock and required dry docking on August 6, 1977 for repairs prior to her maiden voyage.

The IMPERIAL BEDFORD was delivered to Imperial Oil Co. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. on August 6,1969.

The fourth Welland Canal was officially opened with much ceremony on August 6, 1932 when the steamer LEMOYNE, then the largest bulk carrier on the Lakes, locked down the Flight Locks.

On August 6, 1982 the Pierson fleet was placed in receivership and eventually the entire fleet was purchased by Parrish & Heimbecker Ltd. (P&H Shipping Ltd.,), Mississauga, Ont.

WILLIAM CLAY loaded her first cargo of iron ore on August 6, 1953 to be delivered to her home port at the Ford Rouge Plant south of Detroit, MI.

On August 6, 1965 the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON, upbound in the Trenton Channel of the Detroit River after having unloaded taconite ore at McLouth Steel, lost steering control and struck a stationary section of the Grosse Ile toll bridge. This caused the bridge section and two cars to drop into the river. Fortunately no one was seriously hurt, but the bridge was closed for several months. The HUTCHINSON sailed to AmShip's South Chicago yard for repairs.

The KINGDOC (2) was launched August 6, 1963 for N.M. Paterson & Sons Ltd.

The POINTE NOIRE was released on August 6, 1977 after running aground two days prior in the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River blocking the channel.

On 6 August 1890, MICHIGAN (Steel sidewheel carferry, 296'/1730GT) was launched at W. Bay City, MI. She was built by F. W. Wheeler (hull # 76) for the Canadian pacific Railway for use on the Detroit River and had a capacity of 16 railroad cars. She was retired in 1916 and converted to an unrigged pulpwood barge.

On 6 August 1871, the 3-mast wooden schooner GOLDEN FLEECE was down bound on Lake Huron laden with iron ore. The crew mistook the light at Port Austin for the light at Pointe Aux barques and steered directly for the Port Austin Reef where the vessel grounded. After 200 tons of ore were removed, GOLDEN FLEECE was pulled off the reef then towed to Detroit by the tug McCLLELLAN and repaired.

On 6 August 1900, one hundred years ago, the McMorran Wrecking Company secured the contract for raising the 203-foot 3-mast wooden schooner H. W. SAGE which sank at Harsen's Island on 29 July 1900. The SAGE had been rammed by the steel steamer CHICAGO. Two lives had been lost; they were crushed in her forecastle.

August 6, 1929 - The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 was launched. She was christened by Miss Ann Bur Townsend, daughter of the mayor of Saginaw.

Data from: Max Hanley, Jody L. Aho , Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Elton Hoyt 2nd Departs

08/05:
The Elton Hoyt 2nd departed Buffalo at 12:30 p.m. Friday after spending 16 hours unloading grain at the ADM Standard Elevator.

The Hoyt had an uneventful trip out, especially at the Ohio St. bend. The tug Sand Pebble was contacted by the tug New Jersey and asked to wait in the outer harbor with her barges. The Hoyt then cleared the harbor breakwall at 2:00 p.m. and began heading up the lake.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Saginaw Visits Duluth

08/05:
Saginaw steamed into Duluth about noon Aug. 4 en route to the DMIR ore dock. The vessel has made several trips to the ore dock this season.

Saginaw enters Duluth harbor with downtown Duluth in the background.
The vessel proceeds through Duluth's inner harbor.
Close up of the bow.
Saginaw turns into the mouth of St. Louis Bay heading toward DMIR.
A deckhand at work on deck.
Stern view proceeding up St. Louis Bay to the ore dock
Video clip of the Saginaw.

Report and pictures by: Al Miller




Rare visitor in Rogers City

08/05:
The BBC America, a heavy lift ship, unloaded a cargo of electrical generating equipment at Rogers City on Friday. The ship was built in 1999. The cargo is going to the Wolverine Power Co. in Gaylord, MI. Her hailing port is St. John's and her flag Antigua & Barbuda.

Reported by: Jim Bearman and Andy LaBorde




Twin Ports Report

08/05:
John G. Munson is scheduled to make one of its periodic calls to Ontonagon, Mich., on Aug. 5 to deliver coal.

Midwest Energy Terminal's traffic schedule looks like a 'who's who' of 1,000-footers for the next couple weeks. Walter J. McCarthy Jr., Columbia Star, Paul R. Tregurtha, Oglebay Norton, Indiana Harbor and Mesabi Miner are all scheduled to load there through mid-August. American Mariner is due to load there Aug. 6 with coal for Marquette and Joe Thompson is due the same day to load for the power plant at Taconite Harbor. St. Clair will put in one of its occasional visits Aug. 9 to load coal for Nanticoke.

A number of salties have called in Duluth this season to load bentonite at the Hallett Dock. The next scheduled vessel is the 419-foot Sabina, due Aug. 6.

Duluth's AGP grain elevator is suddenly busy again. Federal Agno was there Aug. 5 loading soybeans. Lake Carlin and Federal McKenzie are both due there next week.

Reported by: Al Miller




Ludington Update

08/05:
On Friday the barge Pere Marquette 41 and tug Undaunted delivered a load of stone for Laman's Asphalt.

Bow view of the barge unloading.
The view from the bow of the tug

Report and pictures by: Max Hanley




Saltie in Cleveland

08/05:
The Malta registered Lita arrive in Cleveland Friday. She is in port to unload.

The Lita arrives off Cleveland. TZ
A close up of her bow with the Cleveland sky line in the back ground. TZ




Body Recovered

08/05:
Thursday afternoon the U.S. Coast Guard recovered the body of a male between Neebish and Sugar Islands after someone spotted it floating earlier in the Middle Neebish Channel.

The Coast Guard could not confirm whether it was the body of the sailor which went missing from John J. Boland last Friday. The Sault Star quoted Coast Guard Petty Officer Dan Spisso as saying. "The body was found in the general location that was suspected that the crew member was missing in."

Reported by: Randy Johnson




Today in Great Lakes History - August 05

The Richard M. Marshall (later Joseph S. Wood, John Dykstra, Benson Ford, and, finally, 265808) entered service on August 5, 1953. From 1966 until it was retired at the end of 1984, this vessel and the William Clay Ford (1) were fleetmates. There is only one other instance of two boats being owned by the same company at some point in their careers with as close or closer age difference. The Charles M. Beeghly (originally Shenango II) and the Herbert C. Jackson, fleetmates since 1967, both entered service on May 14, 1959.

The aft section of the WALTER J. McCARTHY JR. was float launched August 5, 1976. She was American Steamship's first thousand-footer and the first thousand-footer built at Bay Ship.

The G.A. TOMLINSON (2). was sold outright to Columbia Transportation Co. (an Oglebay Norton Co.), on August 5, 1971 along with the last two Tomlinson vessels, the SYLVANIA and the JAMES DAVIDSON.

On 5 August 1850, ST. CLAIR (sidewheel steamer, passenger & package freight, 140'/210T, built in 1843 at Detroit, MI) was reported as lost with no details given whatsoever. The report of her loss was published 3 days BEFORE she was enrolled at Detroit by J. Watkin.

The motor vessel Beaver Islander completed her maiden voyage to Charlevoix in 1962. At the time, she was the largest, fastest, and most advanced ship built for the run. She served as the flagship for 37 years, a record, until the Emerald Isle II arrived in 1997.

August 5, 1907 - A female passenger dived off the deck of the PERE MARQUETTE 18 (I) on a dare. Two of the 18's officers leapt over to rescue her. One of the officers nearly drowned and was rescued by the passenger.

On 5 August 1866, AUTOCRAT (2-mast, wooden schooner, 345 t, built in 1854 at Caltaraugus, NY) was carrying 15,000 bushels of corn and was lying off Chicago, waiting for a storm to die down. Just before dawn, the schooner J.S. HEWHOUSE was also seeking shelter when she ran into AUTOCRAT, sinking her in 7 fathoms of water. The crew was rescued by the tug UNION.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Jody L. Aho , Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Elton Hoyt 2nd Arrives

08/04:
The Elton Hoyt 2nd arrived in Buffalo Thursday evening carrying her first load of grain. The Hoyt was towed up the river by the tugs Mississippi and New Jersey to the above Ohio St.

The tow went smoothly until she reached the Ohio St. Bridge at 7:45 p.m. A faulty north traffic gate on the bridge brought the Hoyt to a dead stop in the turn below the bridge. She waited in the channel for a half hour until the problem was resolved.

Then while passing through the lift span at very slow speed, rock throwing vandals added to the crew's stress during tight maneuvering.

The Hoyt made her dock at the ADM Standard elevator at 8:30 p.m. Positioning the ship for unloading took another half hour and the tugs were released at 9:00 p.m. The Hoyt was expected to spend the night and early morning unloading before departing around noon today with one tug.

In other Buffalo news, the Fleet Waterfest will begin today with free ship tours. The Firetug Edward M. Cotter, barque Picton Castle and the schooner Lotus will be docked at the Erie Basin Visiting Ship's Dock on the Buffalo River. The Festival runs through Sunday but the Cotter will only be open for tours on Friday.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




John W. Brown Update

08/04:
The Liberty Ship John W. Brown departed Buffalo Thursday at 3:00 p.m. under Coast Guard Cutter escort. She entered the Welland Canal a few hours later and had an e.t.a. of 2:49 a.m. for Lock 1 in the canal. She is sailing for Toronto.

The Brown will be open for tours in Toronto from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.. Be sure to stop by, for a $5.00 donation you can tour a piece of history that will never again be seen on the lakes.

There are still a few tickets available for the Toronto Cruise that takes place on August 6. This cruise will be the final one on the lakes, it is well worth a trip to Toronto. You will be treated to a entertaining day on this historic steamer.

Click here for a preview of the cruise.

For additional details, call 410 558-0164 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski and John Stark




Horns Returned to Lift Bridge

08/04:
Duluth's Aerial Lift Bridge regained its sonorous old voice Aug. 2 when city workers replaced the locomotive air horns that had been removed during last winter's bridge repairs.

The locomotive horns had been replaced with smaller, quieter truck air horns to appease neighbors and workers who had complained over the years that the old horns scared tourists, disrupted work at nearby businesses and bothered nearby residents.

The new horns had a relatively quiet, high-pitched tone similar to the modern fog signals in use at many lighthouses. Needless to say, a group was promptly organized to protest the new horns, complaining that they bothered nearby residents, weren't "majestic" enough, and couldn't be heard aboard vessels that were more than a mile away.

To appease the new organization, the city agreed to return the old locomotive horns to their post. The work was promised to be done by June but actually was completed in time to sound for several vessels on Aug. 2. In an effort to avoid blasting the tourists in Canal Park, the horns were moved from the north end of the bridge to the center of the span. (Ironically, the horns had originally been in the center of the span, but were moved to the end about 15 years ago to take some of the weight off the old structure's center.)

Reported by: Al Miller




Lake Erie Hovercraft Service Delay

08/04:
The planned hovercraft service between Kingsville Ont. and Cedar Point, OH. will be delayed until next spring. The Windsor Star reported Thursday that the hovercraft was seriously damaged in a loading accident. While being loaded onto a ship on the Gaspe coast of Quebec, the craft slipped from its sling and sustained damage to the port side skirt. Repairs are estimated to be around one million dollars.

Tuesday's Windsor Star reported that a Ohio based hovercraft would begin a service from Kingsville, Ontario to Cedar Point, Ohio.

Reported by: Norm Barton




Twin Ports Report

08/04:
Cenex Harvest States in Superior had another full house Aug. 3 with two new vessels in the loading berths. Kavo Yerakas and Maria Green departed late Wednesday, to be quickly replaced by Stefania 1 and Algoville.

Nearly all the ore docks on western Lake Superior were busy Aug. 3. Burns Harbor called at BNSF in Superior; Reserve and St. Clair were due at Silver Bay; James R. Barker was scheduled to arrive in Taconite Harbor; and Presque Isle was due at Two Harbors. DMIR in Duluth will be busy Aug. 4 loading Saginaw and taking stone from Arthur M. Anderson.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

08/04:
On Thursday the saltie Sabina was at the T.W.I. Docks unloading cargo. She appears to be on her maiden voyage as the paint on her hull is new. The vessel is similar in design to the Wagenborg vessels.

The Armco was at the Torco Dock discharging ore pellets. The Alpena was at the Lafarge Dock unloading Cement.

The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge was loading at the B-P Oil Dock. At the Seneca Oil Dock was the tug Karen Andrie with her barge unloading cargo. The tanker Gemini remains in temporary lay-up at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock.

In the small drydock at the Toledo Shiprepair was the "G" tug Ohio with a barge under going some type of work.

The next scheduled coal boat is the Buffalo due in at 4:00 a.m. this morning. The next ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Reserve with an e.t.a. of 12:30 a.m. on Sunday 6 Aug.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Erie Update

08/04:
The port of Erie, Pennsylvania remained busy with the John J. Boland arriving on Thursday. The Boland has been a frequent caller to the port this season. She unloaded gravel at the Old Ore Dock.

The Boland Unloading.
The Boland and the John R. Emery.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Today in Great Lakes History - August 04

Two favorites of many boatwatchers, entered service on August 4. The William Clay Ford (1) entered service on August 4, 1953, and the Edward L. Ryerson entered service on August 4, 1960.

The MELISSA DESGAGNES sailed to Holland under her 'a' name ONTADOC (2) with a load of Bentonite from Chicago on August 4, 1979.

The E.J. BLOCK was laid up for the last time at Indiana Harbor, IN on August 4 1984, the E.J. BLOCK was sold for scrap in late May, 1987.

The D.M. CLEMSON (2) left Superior on August 4, 1980 in tow of Malcolm Marine's tug MALCOLM for Thunder Bay where she was dismantled.

The HOCHELAGA (2) was launched August 4, 1949 at the Collingwood Shipyards Ltd., Collingwood, Ont. for Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., Montreal, Que

On a foggy August 4, 1977 the POINTE NOIRE went hard aground near the entrance to the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River and blocked the channel. After her grain cargo was lightered by Columbia Transportation's crane steamer BUCKEYE, the POINTE NOIRE was released on August 6th. She was reloaded in Hay Lake and continued her downbound trip. Repairs to her bottom damage were completed at Thunder Bay. Ont.

On 4 August 1902, CITY OF VENICE (wooden propeller freighter, 301'/2108GT, built in 1892 at W. Bay City, MI). was sailing in perfect weather in Lake Erie abreast of Rondeau, Ontario with a load of iron ore. The steamer SEGUIN collided with the CITY OF VENICE, sinking her. U.S. marshals later impounded the SEGUIN for damages.

August 4, 1935 - The only time the ANN ARBOR NO. 7 had the full limit of passengers when she ran an excursion from Frankfort around the Manitou Isle and back with 375 passengers on board.

LYCOMING (wooden propeller, 251', 1610 gt) was launched on 4 August 1880 at W. Bay City, Michigan by F. W. Wheeler (hull #7) as a 2-deck package freighter. She was rebuilt as a single deck bulk freighter after she burned in 1905. She was one of the few bulk freighters that still carried her arched hog-braces visible above deck.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Elton Hoyt 2nd Scheduled to Arrive

08/03: 10:30 a.m. update
The Elton Hoyt 2nd is expected to arrived in Buffalo, NY. tonight about 7:00 p.m. She is carrying her first load of grain that was loaded in Superior, Wisconsin on Monday at the General Mills Elevator S. The grain will be unloaded at the ADM Standard Elevator above Ohio St.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski and Al Miller




John W. Brown Update

08/03:
The Liberty Ship John W. Brown is expected to depart Buffalo today at 2:45 p.m. for the Welland Canal and then Toronto. She is scheduled to be open for tours in Buffalo at 10:00 a.m. today. Be sure to stop by, for a $5.00 donation you can tour a piece of history that will never again be seen on the lakes.

There are still a few tickets available for the Toronto Cruise that takes place this Saturday, August 6. This cruise will be the final one on the lakes, it is well worth a trip to Toronto. You will be treated to a entertaining day on this historic steamer.

Click here for a preview of the cruise.

For additional details, call 410 558-0164 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com




Record Lows Unlikely

08/03
Frequent rains and cooler weather this summer means water levels in the upper Great Lakes aren't expected to reach record lows this year as feared just months ago, according to a story distributed by the Associated Press (AP).

Adam Fox of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Detroit told the AP "It's pretty much guaranteed we're not going to hit a (record low) on any of the Great Lakes, which we couldn't say back in April," citing benefits of rain and cooler, evaporation-slowing temperatures in recent months.

But Fox said levels of the already low lakes are into their seasonal retreat, meaning dropoffs perhaps ranging from 4- to 22- inches through December, depending on the lake and any rainfall. "It appears the Great Lakes have pretty much peaked, and we're beginning a slow, steady decline" for the rest of this year, Fox said.

With the exception of Lake Ontario, the Great Lakes and Lake St. Clair are below normal, though a bit better off than when observers four months ago were predicting them to hit their lowest levels on record. Lakes Michigan, Huron and Erie have receded more than 3 feet since April 1997, as has Lake St. Clair, which is not among the Great Lakes but links lakes Huron and Erie. Lakes Superior and Ontario are down 1 1/2 feet, even though their outflows are regulated by locks and gates.

At least in the past several weeks, heavy rains have helped replenish some of the lakes, at least enough to let commercial shippers beef up loads, says Glen Nekvasil of the Lake Carriers Association. On some lakes, Nekvasil said, "we've seen some increases of 3 to 4 inches of water," not lost on shippers that in some cases can add 270 tons of cargo for each additional inch.

"Every little bit helps, and certainly we're not turning it down," Nekvasil said. "But we're certainly not going to tell you the drought is over.

"Understand, this has been a four-year cycle. Compare what they're carrying today to the summer of 1997; vessels are still losing 6,000 to 7,000 tons of cargo per trip."

Reported by: Al Miller




Griffon in Drydock

08/03:
The Canadian Coast Guard Ship Griffon, from the Canadian Coast Guard Center and Artic region fleet, entered the Davieship graving dock in Lauzon Québec on July 17. The underwater hull and topsides are being sandblasted, the underwater portion of the hull will be coated with epoxy paint. The port and starboard tailshaft were drawn and the propeller send for refurbishing. She is expected to depart on August 11.




Twin Ports Report

08/03
Cenex Harvest States had a full house Aug. 2 with the aptly named, green-hulled Maria Green loading wheat for Italy in No. 2 berth and Kavo Yerakas loading grain in the No. 1 berth.

Saginaw and Joe Block are becoming semi-regulars this season at DMIR in Duluth. Saginaw is due again Aug. 4 and Joe Block is scheduled for the 5th.

Reported by: Al Miller




Erie Update

08/03:
On a usual rainy day in A major summer storm hit Erie, Pennsylvania Wednesday as the Richard Reiss entered her homeport at around 1:30 p.m. The Reiss was followed by the Erie Sand and steamship sandsucker J.S. St. John. The visibility was off and on and the Reiss waited with her bow against the dock before tying up to unload their cargo. While the Reiss held at the dock the St. John, with her deck awash, waited behind.

Bow View of Reiss.
Stern Shot.
J.S. St. John.
Algosteel arriving on Tuesday.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Today in Great Lakes History - August 03

Under tow, the AVONDALE (2) in tandem with former fleetmate FERNDALE (2) arrived at Castellon, Spain for scrapping in 1979.

The CANADOC (2) left the St. Lawrence River on August 3, 1991 in tow bound for Mamonal, Colombia for scrapping.

On 3 August 1915, ALEXANDRIA (wooden sidewheel passenger/package freight, 174'/863GT, built in 1866 at Hull, Quebec, formerly CONSORT) was carrying food stuff in Lake Ontario when she was blown on a bar in a storm and fog. She broke up by wave action under the Scarborough Bluffs, east of Toronto. Lifesavers worked for hours and rescued the entire crew.

August 3, 1946 - The third officer of the ANN ARBOR NO. 6 drowned while painting her draft marks. He had apparently leaned too far and fell out of the rowboat.

On 3 August 1900, one hundred years ago, FONTANA (wooden 2-mast schooner-barge, 231', 1164 gt, built in 1888 at St Clair, MI as a 4-mast schooner-barge) was carrying iron ore in tow of the steamer KALIYUGA. The FONTANA sheared off and collided with the big schooner-barge SANTIAGO and settled in the mouth of St. Clair River in the St. Clair Flats, one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world. After salvage was given up months later, she was dynamited several times to flatten and reduce her wreckage. Although officially no loss of life was reported, local newspaper reported that one crewman was drowned. The FONTANA was owned by Cleveland Cliffs Iron Co.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




McKee Sons Update

08/02:
At the Government Dock in Sarnia work continues on the tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons. The pair are expected to depart on their maiden voyage together by August 10.
Below are pictures of the pair taken in July.

McKee Sons at dock.
Tug Invincible from the McKee Sons.
Stern view of the pair.
Long view showing the Government Dock.

Report and pictures by: Matt Miner




John W. Brown Update

08/02:
The Liberty Ship John W. Brown arrived in Buffalo at 8:00 a.m. Tuesday. The fire tug Edward M. Cotter escorted the Brown and the tug Mississippi was alongside to help her make the dock at the Erie Basin on the Buffalo River.

She is scheduled to be open for tours from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday before departing for the Welland Canal on Friday. Be sure to stop by, for a $5.00 donation you can tour a piece of history that will never again be seen on the lakes.

There are still a few tickets available for the Toronto Cruise that takes place this Saturday, August 6. The cruise is well worth a trip to Toronto, you will be treated to a entertaining day on a historic steamer as she makes her way out off the lakes.

Click here for a preview of the cruise.

For additional details, call 410 558-0164 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com




Funding for Mackinaw Replacement

08/02
Coast Guard Commandant Adm. James Loy told a crowd in Superior, WI. on Saturday that the Great Lakes icebreaker Mackinaw will be replaced by 2006. The $110 million needed to build a new heavy icebreaker for lakes was added by Wisconsin Rep. David Obey to an emergency supplemental appropriations bill that passed the House Appropriations Committee on June 29.

Speaking to people aboard the Mackinaw during a visit to Superior, Obey said he decided to move the replacement project ahead one year because the Coast Guard is doing a deep-water replacement program next year that will take up much of its budget.

Loy said the Coast Guard has not determined what will happen to the Mackinaw once it is replaced, but added that he would by pleased if a city offered to make the ship a museum.

Reported by: Al Miller




Burton Visits Ashtabula

08/02
The Courtney Burton arrived in Ashtabula, Ohio Tuesday morning to unload at the Pinney dock. Also arriving was the Manitoulin heading for the coal dock.

The Burton arrives, Manitoulin can be seen in the back ground. TZ
Close up of her bow. TZ
Stern view as the Burton docks. TZ




Cruise Ship Makes Second Visit

08/02
The 174-foot Niagara Prince arrived in Sturgeon Bay Tuesday morning for the second of what could be a total of six visits. Before she could dock her captain asked the captain of a small pond type towboat, the Bay Prudent Towing, if he could move down the dock. This accomplished, the Niagara Prince docked and discharged her passengers for visiting in the heart of the historic downtown. Others boarded a bus for a tour of Door County.

The Prudent, out of Menominee, MI, was called to the area to attempt a recovery of a 19-foot Aquasport fishing boat that capsized on Lake Michigan beyond the Sturgeon Bay Shipping Canal. On Monday morning, a crew from the U.S. Coast Guard Canal Station had rescued two boaters in the incident. The Prudent searched the area for nearly six hours but found no sign of the boat. If it is still floating the large number of private and charter fishing boats out on the lake may sight it. Many of these fishing boats are competing in the Kewaunee County/Door County Salmon Fishing Tournament, a two week event.

Reported by: Paul Graf and Chad Michaels




Lake Erie Hovercraft Service

08/02:
Tuesday's Windsor Star reported that an Ohio based hovercraft will begin a service from Kingsville, Ontario to Cedar Point, Ohio on August 11. The cost will be $107 dollars (ca) which will include admission into the park. In September the hovercraft is expected to start service from Kingsville to Pelee Island.

Reported by: Norm Barton




Toledo Update

08/02:
On Tuesday the Cuyahoga was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator she was expected to depart later that night.

The tanker Saturn was at the Sun Oil Company Dock. The tanker Gemini was at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock in temporary lay-up.

The Buckeye was at the Torco Dock unloading ore pellets. The next scheduled coal boat will be the Courtney Burton with an e.t.a. of 4:00 a.m. this morning. The next ore boat will be the Armco with an e.t.a. of 4:00 a.m. on Thursday morning.

The Swiss registered Sabina is expected to arrive at Toledo sometime later this week.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Erie Update

08/02:
On a usual rainy day in Erie, Pennsylvania the Algosteel came in for what is believed to be the first time in 5 years. Carrying a load for the Mounfort Terminal, she gave a security call at 2:30 p.m. and said that they would be at the outer buoys in 30 minutes. With visibility decreasing and increasing off and on, the vessel took its time coming in to Erie during a thunderstorm that lasted only a short while.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




August 1 Vessel Survey

08/02:
63 U.S.-Flag lakers were in service on August 1, a decrease of one hull compared to a year ago. During the month of August, a cement carrier will enter temporary lay-up. Also, the grain carrier Kinsman Independent remains idled.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




New Books

08/02:
A trio of new books have been published of interest to fans of lake boats and lighthouses.

“Graveyards of the Great Lakes” is the latest volume by Mark L. Thompson, author of “A Sailor’s Logbook” and “Queen of the Lakes.” “Graveyards” examines specific Great Lakes shipwrecks, from the 1679 loss of the Griffon to the explosion of the tanker Jupiter in 1990, with an eye to the economic, political and psychological factors involved. He includes factual accounts of more than 100 wrecks, and suggests that most of the accidents and deaths on the lakes have been the result of human error, ranging from simple mistakes to gross incompetence. Further, Thompson, a seasoned Great Lakes sailor, concludes that rather than learn from those errors, shipowners, captains and crews throughout Great Lakes history have been slow to accept change that would result in greater safety.

Shipwreck historian Frederick Stonehouse’s latest is “Keepers & Cutters,’’ the stories of 14 famous and heroic lighthouse keepers ranging from coast to coast, and the new, Great Lakes-built U.S. Coast Guard cutters (George Cobb, Ida Lewis, Frank Drew, etc.) named after them. The book covers the life and times of the keepers, how they did their jobs, their daily routines and the lamps and lenses that kept the lights burning. Finally, it is about the ships themselves, how the Coast Guard will use them and the vessels they are replacing.

Finally, Wes Oleszewski, author of several books on Great Lakes shipwrecks, has written “Keepers of Valor (Lakes of Vengeance),’’ a collection of true stories involving Great Lakes lighthouse keepers, lifesavers and lake mariners. Includes is “The Gale That Stole Christmas,” a chapter devoted to the Christmas 1979 sinking of the E.M. Ford in Milwaukee harbor.

All three titles are available from Marine Publishing Co.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 02

The AMERICAN MARINER was launched on August 2, 1979 for the Connecticut Bank & Trust Co., (American Steamship Co., Buffalo, NY, mgr.). She was to be named CHICAGO (3), but that name was removed before launch.

The U.S. Coast Guard's report on the sinking of the EDMUND FITZGERALD was released on August 2, 1977. It cited faulty hatch covers, lack of water tight cargo hold bulkheads and damage caused from an undetermined source as the cause of her loss.

The BENSON FORD's maiden voyage was on August 2, 1924 with coal from Toledo, OH to Duluth, MN and returned with iron ore to the Ford Rouge Plant at Dearborn.

On August 2, 1990 the Lightship HURON was dedicated as a National Historic Landmark. LIGHTSHIP 103 had been almost completely restored and was opened to the public for tours and remains so at this time.

August 2, 1862 - John C. Ackerman was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin. At the time of his death in 1916 he was commodore of the Pere Marquette carferry fleet based in Ludington.

On 2 August 1877, GRACE A. CHANNON (wooden schooner, 141'/266GT, built in 1873 at E. Saginaw, MI) was bound from Chicago for Buffalo when she collided with the propeller tug FAVORITE and sank 12 miles south of Milwaukee, WI. The young son of the owner of the CHANNON lost his life in this accident.

On 2 August 1858, the wooden side-wheeler TELEGRAPH collided with the schooner MARQUETTE and sank 40 miles north of Cleveland.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Hoyt Loads Grain

08/01
Elton Hoyt 2nd arrived in the Twin Ports on July 30 and proceed to General Mills Elevator S in Superior. The vessel is shown in the images below waiting to load on Monday morning. In the past several seasons, this elevator's most frequent caller has been the Kinsman Independent, along with occasional salties and Canadian lakers. The Hoyt departed about 7:00 p.m. CDT.

Pictures of the Hoyt loading.
The Hoyt waiting to load.
A closer view.

Report and pictures by: Al Miller




Investigation Continues

08/01
The U.S. Coast Guard continues to investigate the disappearance of George Harrison, the crewman who last Friday was reported missing from the freighter John J. Boland in northern Lake Huron, according to an article in the July 31 Duluth News Tribune.

Friday's search for Harrison involved two helicopters, a Canadian Coast Guard C-130, cutters and small boats from the U.S. Coast Guard, Canadian Coast Guard, Chippewa County Sheriff's Department in Michigan and Sault Ontario Rescue. Searchers found two matching shoes about a mile apart near St. Joseph Island in the St. Marys River. The Michigan State Police also conducted a door-to-door search on Neebish Island.

Harrison worked in the Boland's galley. He was last seen Thursday evening as the vessel was in northern Lake Huron. The crew noticed he was missing at 6:00 a.m. just after passing through the Sault Locks sailing for Marquette.

Report and pictures by: Al Miller




Possible Sale

08/01
Rumors have persisted for sometime that USS Great Lakes Fleet was planning to sell some of the older vessels in the fleet. Unconfirmed reports say that the Calcite II, Myron C. Taylor and George A. Sloan are to be sold to the Canadian shipping company, Lower Lakes Towing (LLT).

Talks were reported to be in progress and a sale could take place as soon as this week. If the vessels are sold, USS will continue to operate them until the end of the year. Officials at USS and LLT were not available for comment on Monday.




Crewman Evacuated from the CSL Niagara

08/01
Sunday night the Canadian Rescue Coordination Center Trenton requested assistance from the U.S. Coast Guard for a 33-year-old male crewman suspected of suffering a heart attack on the CSL Niagara. The Niagara was traveling just south of Detour Passage in Northern Lake Huron. A U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Traverse City helicopter was diverted from a search operation and transported the crewman to the hospital in Sault Ste Marie, Ontario, Canada.




Twin Ports Report

08/01
Canadian Transfer arrived in Duluth early on July 31. As of 7:30 a.m. it was proceeding down the front channel toward the BNSF ore dock, where it was scheduled to load. George A. Stinson was scheduled to arrive at BNSF in the evening.

Another interesting vessel due in the Twin Ports on Monday was CSL Niagara, which was scheduled to make another call at Midwest Energy Terminal late at night to load coal for Ontario Power Generating Co. in Nanticoke.

Reported by: Al Miller




Kingsville Update

08/01
The Algoway was in Kingsville, Ontario Monday unloading a cargo of stone. She finished unloading and prepared to depart into Lake Erie during a heavy rain storm.

Finished unloading and ready to depart in heavy rain.

Reported by: Norm Barton




John W. Brown Update

08/01:
The Liberty Ship John W. Brown is scheduled to arrive in Buffalo some time today. The Liberty Ship will be open for tours while in Buffalo. Be sure to stop by, for a $5.00 donation you can tour a piece of history that will never again be seen on the lakes.

There are still a few tickets available for the Toronto Cruise that takes place this Saturday, August 6. The cruise is well worth a trip to Toronto, you will be treated to a entertaining day on a historic steamer as she makes her way out of the lakes.

Click here for a preview of the cruise.

For additional details, call 410 558-0164 Visa/MC accepted. Visit the Brown's web site at www.liberty-ship.com




Today in Great Lakes History - August 01

On August 1, 1982, the Canadian tanker Hubert Gaucher entered service

August 1957 - The Pere Marquette 18 (II) was sold to Luria Brothers, Chicago scrap merchants, along with the PM 14.

On 1 August 1849, CHICAGO (wooden propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 951/151T, built in 1842 at Oswego, NY) burned to a total loss in Buffalo harbor. No lives were lost.

On 1 August 1871, the construction of the canal through the St. Clair Flats was finished at a cost of $365,000. It was the first real channel built to help ships through the shallow waters where the St. Clair River empties into Lake St. Clair and where there are seven mouths or passes. It took the Canadian contractor John Brown three years to dig the channel that measures 300 feet wide and 8,421 feet long. The water was 18 feet deep. It was protected on most of its sides by piers and dikes. The new channel was considered too small even as it was being dug. At only 300 feet wide, tows of log rafts were encouraged to sue the old shallower channels. Within 20 years, plans were made to deepen the channel to 20 feet.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




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