Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

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* Report News


Windoc Update

08/31
The Windoc remains docked in the Welland Canal as plans are made for her future. Crews have removed much of the loose debris and twisted metal from what was the pilothouse that lay on her deck. A tarped structure is in place over the spot where her smokestack used to stand, no doubt to protect from water. An announcement is expected in the next few days regarding the ship's future.

Pictures by John Meyland
Docked in the Canal near Lock 7.
A shore side crane lifts the remains of the pilothouse.
Debris on shore.

Reported by: Jason Junge




Tall Ships on the St. Clair River

08/31
Eight tall ships will call the St. Clair River homeport this weekend as the ships work their way off the lakes. Five will dock in Port Huron and three in Algonac as they open to the public for tours.

The tall ships Pride of Baltimore II, Highlander Sea, Cape Rose, Larinda and Norfolk Rebel will be docked at Port Huron's Seaway Terminal today thought Monday. At least four of them will be open for free tours from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

A parade of the ships begin at 5:00 p.m. Thursday as the ships passed from lower Lake Huron to the Seaway Terminal.

Pierius Magnus, Road to the Isles and St. Paul were scheduled to arrive in Algonac Thursday. Through Monday the three vessels will be docked at the Riverfront Park pier. The three will also be open for tours but require a ticket to board, tickets are $6.00 each and can be purchased at the Algonac-Clay Historical Museum. The ships will depart on Tuesday.

Images as the parade starts downbound
Pride of Baltimore II passes above the Blue Water Bridges.
Larinda.
Cape Rose.
Highlander Sea.

Freighters in the River
Federal Rhine.
McKee Sons.
Alioth.
Federal Shimanto.

Reported by: Clayton Sharrard




H. Lee White at Bay Ship

08/31
The H. Lee White anchored off the mouth of Sturgeon Bay at Sherwood Point Thursday to await the winds on the bay to calm. Shortly after noon the winds calmed enough for the White to enter the Ship Canal and enter Bay Ship's Berth #15.

The Bay Ship crews were fast to get to work on a unloading system problem as soon as the ship arrived. The extent of repair required was unknown, although shipyard and crew members said it will be a short turn around for the repairs to be completed.

At anchor off Sherwood Point.
Bay Ship crew loading repair equipment onto White.
Close up of boom end.
Stern view from across yard.

Reported by: Vic De Larwelle




Cliffs chief predicts more trouble for taconite industry

08/31
Describing the state of the taconite industry as “chaotic,” Cleveland-Cliffs chief John Brinzo told a Minnesota audience Wednesday that his company will cut more jobs and make further changes to remain competitive.

"I deeply regret what this means to the employees and families who are affected,'' Brinzo said during a speech in Eveleth. "We will do all we reasonably can to assist them, but we have no alternative to making these difficult decisions. Our choice is to make the type of changes that will allow our mines to be competitive or risk losing them completely because they will not be able to meet the needs of the customers they serve.''

Brinzo, Cliffs’ chairman and chief executive officer, did not announce any cutbacks or layoffs for North America’s largest iron ore producer. He also said low pellet inventories likely will keep mines producing during the coming months.

However, Brinzo said Cliffs' mines need to look at every possible means of reducing the cost of producing and delivering taconite pellets at low cost to North American blast furnaces. He asked for support from employees, suppliers, vendors, government and local communities.

Cliffs plans to remain a leader in the iron ore business and may buy out some of its steel partners or purchase other mines, Brinzo said. Cliffs is talking to LTV Steel Corp. about acquiring LTV Steel Mining Co. and wants to acquire Bethlehem Steel's 70.3 percent share of Hibbing Taconite.

Brinzo also said Cliffs remains committed to Minnesota’s Iron Range.

"As far as the mines in Minnesota, we don't have all the answers, but we're looking at alternative ways to make them more viable,'' Brinzo said. "These mines are important to the community, but they are also important to Cleveland-Cliffs. We are looking at every possible way to reduce the cost of producing iron ore pellets for all the reasons I mentioned earlier, and we're determined to reach our objective.''

Cleveland-Cliffs is North America's largest supplier of iron ore. In Northeastern Minnesota, Cliffs manages and is part owner of Hibbing Taconite Co. It also owns and manages Northshore Mining Co. in Babbitt and Silver Bay. In Michigan, the company manages and holds interest in the Tilden and Empire mines. It also manages Wabush mines in Newfoundland.

Reported by: Al Miller




Saginaw River News

08/31
Thursday was a very busy day on the Saginaw River. The Wolverine finished lightering at the Bay City Wirt Dock at 3:15 a.m. that morning. She departed for the Saginaw Wirt Dock at Crow Island to finish. The Wolverine was outbound from the 6th Street Turning Basin around 100 p.m. after completing her unload at the Wirt Saginaw Dock.

The Canadian Transfer arrived in the Saginaw River early Thursday morning with a load of stone for the Buena Vista Dock. She decided to tie up at the Bay City Wirt Dock around 350 a.m. due to her draft of 21-feet and the river water level at -6 inches. South winds have lowered the water in the Saginaw so the Transfer will remain at dock until the water returns.

Late Thursday night the Canadian Transfer was still at the dock waiting for water levels to come back up. She has been checking the level with the Coast Guard every half hour. The water has risen from a low of -6 inches to the last reading which was at chart datum.

The Tug Mark Hannah & her tanker barge were inbound passing the pump out island at 830 a.m. headed to the Dow Chemical Dock in Bangor Township.

The St. Clair made a rare visit to the Saginaw River as well Thursday morning. She was inbound with a load of coal for the Consumers Energy Plant in Essexville. The St. Clair was passing Lights 1 & 2 of the Entrance Channel at 745 a.m.

The Buffalo, who had arrived in the river with a load of stone for the Saginaw Rock Products Dock late Wednesday night, finished unloading and was outbound passing Cass Ave. in Bay City at 1000 a.m. Thursday.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
St. Clair at upbound at the Saginaw River Front Range.
Docking at Consumers Energy.
St. Clair discharging coal.
Canadian Transfer at Bay City Wirt.
Another view.
Buffalo outbound at Bay Aggregates.
Approaching Liberty Bridge.
Passing the Canadian Transfer.
Wolverine downbound passing the Canadian Transfer.
Close up.
Stern View.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Detroit Traffic

08/31
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Thursday.

Coral Trader (Liberia) downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Alioth (Liberia) anchored at Ojibway.
Stern view.
Tall ship Highlander Sea upbound at Fighting Island North Light headed to Port Huron.
Stern view.
Mantadoc upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

08/31
The Cuyahoga and Algoway were both upbound the Maumee River Thursday afternoon. Both vessels were encountering delays at the various railroad bridges in town. The Cuyahoga was bound for one of the elevators to load grain while the Algoway was bound for the Kuhlman Dock to unload cargo.

The Algomarine was at the CSX Docks loading coal. The dredge Buxton II with her related equipment and their tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay by the CSX Coal Docks. The small hopper dredge Atchafalaya was dredging the ship channel around the Toledo Harbor Lighthouse area. The dredge Ellicott and related equipment with tug John Henry were tied up in the canal for the Edison Bayshore power plant just north of the Torco Docks.

The Adam E. Cornelius remains in lay-up at the CSX #1 Dock. The USCGC Neah Bay remains in drydock at the shipyard.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the McKee Sons, Canadian Century, American Republic, Kaye E. Barker, and John G. Munson all due in on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Middletown early this morning.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland News

08/31
The Mississagi was unloading stone at Ontario #4 Thursday morning. The Salty Isa arrived that morning and was berthed at the Ceres docks. The FedNav ship which arrived Wednesday night was the Lake Erie. She was unloading steel in front of the Science center Thursday morning.

Mississagi unloading.
Bow view.
Close up of forward cabins.
Lake Erie unloading.
Shore side crane reaches into the hold.
Cargo is off loaded.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




William A. Hoey, IV

08/31
William A. Hoey, IV. died on August 26, 2001, while on vacation in Florida. He was thirty-four.

He was born the second of three children on June 6, 1967, the son of William A. Hoey and Carolyn Brown Hoey.

He was educated in the Grosse Ile, Michigan, primary schools, and graduated in 1986 from Admiral Farragut Academy in Toms River, New Jersey where he served as Cadet Adjutant his senior year. He received his college education at the Maine Maritime Academy, graduating in 1990 with a degree in Marine Engineering and a Marine Engineer’s license for unlimited horsepower. While at Maine, he spent two summers as a cadet trainee on the 5,000 horse power Maritrans Corporation tug Independence.

Upon graduation, he joined the Gaelic Tugboat Company of Detroit, founded by his father, serving both on board the tugs and in the office. During that time, he qualified for a Great Lakes Master’s license. Upon his father’s retirement in January, 2000 he was named president of the company, becoming at the same time a principal shareholder.

As captain on Gaelic tugs, he won the International Freedom Festival tugboat race no less than seven times, apparently a record for a tug captain in that event.

Most recently, he served as dockmaster for the tall ships visiting Detroit as part of the “Detroit 300" celebration, determining berthing sites, and preparing docks with fendering, water supply, and other required services. His service earned a personal “thank you” from Edsel Ford II, chairman of Detroit 300.

He was a member of the International Shipmasters Association, Detroit Lodge number 7, and the Marine Historical Society of Detroit. He had an intense interest in and enjoyment of the maritime business. Family, friends, employees, shipmasters and the marine community will all remember his ambition and dedication.

A Memorial service will be held Friday, September 7, at 11:00 am at St. James Episcopal Church on East River Road, Grosse Ile, Michigan.

The family suggests donations in his memory to:
University of Michigan research program for Alcoholism.
In memory of Bill Hoey Jr.
University of Michigan Health System Office of Medical Development
301 East Liberty Suite 300
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Attention: Stephanie Peterson

Or

In memory of Bill Hoey Jr.
Dawn Farm Alcoholism Treatment
502 West Huron
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103

Reported by: William Hoey Sr.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 31

On August 31, 1977, the Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. (formerly Belle River) entered service, departing Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, for Superior.

In mid-August 1987 a peregrine falcon whom had disappeared from Regina, Saskatchewan two weeks earlier landed on the deck of a lake freighter on Lake Huron. The bird was captured and taken to a bird sanctuary in Vineland, Ontario. The vessel name is unknown.

In mid-August 1985, the Belgium saltie Federal Thames loaded 25,400 tons of low-concentrate chrome ore at Duluth's Hallett Dock and was bound for Sweden. This ore dates back to World War II when she was mined in Montana. Other shipments were to have been made later as well.

On 31 August 1906, CAVALIER (3-mast wooden schooner, 134'/268GT, built in 1867 at Quebec City as a bark) was carrying cedar lumber when she struck a reef off Chantry Island in Lake Huron and sank. Her crew was rescued by the Chantry Island Lightkeeper. She was bound from Tobermory for Sarnia, Ontario.

On 31 August 1869, the schooner W. G. Keith was launched at the Muir & Stewart yard in Port Huron, Michigan. She was named after her skipper/owner. Her dimensions were 126' x 26' x 8'6". She was built for the lake Michigan lumber trade.

On 31 August 1900, one hundred years ago, the efforts to free the newly launched steel steamer CAPTAIN THOMAS WILSON from the mud in the Black River at Port Huron, MI. Continued throughout the day. The launch had been watched by thousands the previous day and the vessel's stern stuck in the mud. On this date, the tugs BOYNTON and HAYNES tried to pull her free but were unable to do so. Finally 14 hydraulic jacks were used to lift the vessel and at 6:00 PM she was ready to be pulled by tugs. After a 15 inch hawser was broken in the first attempt, the tug PROTECTOR finally pulled the vessel free.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




c. Columbus arrives in Toronto

08/30
The magnificent cruise ship c. Columbus arrived in Toronto Wednesday morning at 10:00 a.m. via the Eastern Gap. She docked just east of Redpath Sugar where the Fraser is nearly finished unloading her cargo of raw sugar.

The Columbus then departed on a seven night cruise that will take passenger through the Great Lakes ending in Chicago on September 5.

Reported by: Bill Blair




Agawa Canyon Unloads

08/30
The Agawa Canyon arrived in Alpena during the early morning hours on Wednesday to deliver a load of salt at the Alpena Oil Co. dock. It left around 7:30 a.m.

Lafarge was also busy on Wednesday. The Paul H. Townsend came into port early to load for Saginaw followed by the Fred R. White Jr. with a load of coal for Lafarge. The Fred R. White was expected to load at Stoneport after leaving Alpena. The tug Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity arrived in the evening to load while the Alpena waited at anchor until the Integrity left. The J.A.W Iglehart was in Detroit on Wednesday.

Reported by: Ben and Chanda Bruski




Duluth - Superior News

08/30
Algoma ships were numerous in the harbor Wednesday. The Algosoo loaded at SMET, followed by the Algobay. The Algocape continued its cement unload at St. Lawrence Cement in Duluth. Later in the evening the Algowest arrived to unload salt at Cutler-Magner Duluth. In order to make the dock at Cutler successfully, the Algowest made a very unique approach angling into the piers directly from the east instead of the usual head-on approach from the northeast. The vessel proceeded very slowly through the piers and into the harbor, and the difficult approach was probably made worse for the ship's crew when dozens of sailboats began passing outbound from the harbor through the canal before the Algowest's bow even passed underneath the lift bridge.

The sailboats were headed for the weekly Wednesday evening regatta held out on Lake Superior. The Algowest successfully eased through the swarm of boats and docked at Cutler. A few hours later they were unloading directly into Cutler's main salt storage building, through an opening in the roof.

For much of the day all of Duluth's grain loading berths were full, with the Federal Fuji loading for Spain at AGP, the Ira loading for Italy at Cargill, and the Canadian Miner loading for a Quebec transshipment port at General Mills A. At 3:00 p.m. the Miner backed out of its slip and turned around to line up with the Duluth Canal piers and depart. Due to heavy southerly winds, the assistance of a G-tug was required. A few hours later G-tugs also helped the Ivi depart Cenex-Harvest States in Superior. The once again passed twin sister Ira at Cargill in Duluth, this time on her way out of the harbor headed for Algeria.

Reported by: Eric Holst




Detroit Traffic

08/30
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Wednesday evening.

Diamond Belle upbound in the Wyandotte Channel.
Capt Henry Tucker downbound at Grassy Island bound for the General Chemical Dock in Amherstburg.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

08/30
The Algomarine was at Anderson's "K" Elevator unloading a potash cargo, she departed late Wednesday morning and was bound for Ashtabula, Ohio to finish unloading. she will then return back to Toledo on Thursday afternoon to load a coal cargo at the CSX Docks. The Sam Laud finished loading her coal cargo at the CSX Docks and departed in the morning. She followed the Algomarine outbound Maumee Bay.

The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge was at the Sun Oil Dock loading cargo. The small hopper dredge Atchafalaya was dredging the ship channel near the Toledo Harbor Lighthouse. The dredge Buxton II with her equipment and their tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay by the CSX Docks. The dredge Ellicott and related equipment with the tug John Henry was tied up in the canal for the Bayshore road Edison power plant just north of the Torco Dock.

The CSL Laurentien arrived at the CSX Docks around 1:00 p.m. Wednesday afternoon to load coal. The Algosteel arrived at the CSX docks about 1:30 p.m. and will follow the Laurentien to load coal.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algomarine on Thursday afternoon. The Canadian Century, McKee Sons, and American Republic on Friday followed by the Kaye E. Barker and John G. Munson on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Middletown at 1:00 a.m. Friday morning.

The Adam E. Cornelius remains in lay-up at the CSX #1 Dock. The USCGC Neah Bay remains in drydock at the Shipyard.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Consumers Power in Erie Sand Fleet colors loading a coal cargo at the C&O #2 Dock.

Heron Bay getting ready to load a grain cargo at the Midstates Elevator.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Lorain Update

08/30
The Reserve departed the Lorain Pellet Terminal Wednesday morning about 9:00 a.m. The ship unloaded taconite pellets from Superior, WI. The American Republic has been working the shuttle run from Lorain to the LTV Steel mill on the Cuyahoga River. The Buckeye visited port on Tuesday with a load of pellets for the terminal.

Pictures by TZ
Reserve departs.
Close up passing the lighthouse.
Onto Lake Erie.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Cleveland Update

08/30
Wednesday evening the American Republic arrived at 6:00 p.m. A salty believed to be a Fednav ship arrived shortly after and tied up at the Lakefront Docks. At 9:30 p.m. the tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder were seen heading up the river.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - August 30

The CHARLES E. WILSON was christened August 30, 1973 at Bay Ship and completed her sea trials on September 6th.

On August 30, 1942, the A. H. Ferbert (2) ran aground in the St. Mary's River, just a day old. The vessel returned to the builder's yard in River Rouge, Michigan for repairs.

On August 30, 1988, the Willowglen made its first visit to Duluth-Superior under that name. She loaded grain at Harvest States in Superior, arriving early in the morning and departing in the early evening the same day. Her last visit to Duluth before this was in 1981 under the name Joseph X. Robert.

The H.G. DALTON entered service on August 30, 1903.

On August 30, 1985 the tug CAPTAIN IOANNIS S. departed Quebec city with MENIHEK LAKE and LEON FALK, JR. in tow, bound for Spain to be scrapped.

On 30 August 1873, CAMBRIDGE (3-mast, wooden schooner, 162'/445T, built in 1868 at Detroit, MI) was bound from Marquette, MI for Cleveland, OH with a load of iron ore. In rough seas, she was thrown onto the rocky shore near Marquette where she broke up. No lives were lost.

On 30 August 1900, one hundred years ago, thousands of people gathered at the Jenks Shipbuilding Company near the Grand Trunk Bridge on the Black River in Port Huron, MI to watch the launching of the large steel steamer CAPTAIN THOMAS WILSON. Superintendent Andrews gave the word and the blows were struck simultaneously at the bow and stern. Slowly the vessel started quivering slightly from deck to keel and then with a mighty rush, slid sideways into the river. Her stern stuck in the mud. Mrs. Thomas Wilson christened the ship.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Busy Day in Escanaba

08/29
It was a busy day in Escanaba Tuesday. The James R. Barker was loading taconite pellets at the ore facility and the Armco arrived a little later with a load of coal for C. Reiss Coal Co. The Mesabi Miner and Joseph H. Thompson were also scheduled for Tuesday.

Bow on shot of the Barker loading. Dick Lund
Looking back along the conveyor belt used to move the taconite pellets to the hopper that feeds the conveyor. Dick Lund
Business end of the conveyor. Dick Lund
One of the mountains of taconite pellets stored at the facility. Dick Lund
The Barker loading with the remains of the old ore dock in the foreground. Dick Lund
Close-up view of the Barker. Dick Lund
A view from across the bay. Dick Lund
A string of hopper cars at C. Reiss Coal Dock loaded with limestone ready for the next train out. Dick Lund
Armco arrives. Eric & Sandy Chapman
The Armco headed for the C. Reiss Coal Dock. Dick Lund
Passing the James R. Barker at the taconite loading facility. Dick Lund
The Armco at C. Reiss, wide view. Dick Lund
The Olive L. Moore in limbo at Escanaba taconite on conveyor in foreground. Dick Lund
Barker loading that evening. Eric & Sandy Chapman
Close up of loading rig. Eric & Sandy Chapman
A mink pops up to watch the action. Eric & Sandy Chapman
Work continues as the sun sets. Eric & Sandy Chapman

Reported by: Dick Lund and Eric & Sandy Chapman




Greek Sister-Vessels Meet In Port For First Time

08/29
Two world-traveling sisters, the Greek vessels Ivi and Ira, met Tuesday in the Port of Duluth-Superior for the first time in their 22 years of frequent (but separate) stops in the Lake Superior port.

The Ivi arrived around noon at Superior’s Cenex Harvest States grain facility for about 18,000 metric tons of corn destined for Algeria. The Ira arrived shortly after noon at Duluth’s Cargill facility for about 12,000 metric tons of spring wheat and 6,000 metric tons of durum wheat destined for Italy.

The two sister-vessels are owned by Commercial Trading & Discount Company, Ltd., Athens, Greece. The Ivi is operated by Castalia Shipping and Finance Corporation, and the Ira by Armonia Shipping and Finance Corporation, both of Monrovia, Liberia.

The 591-foot general cargo vessels were built in 1979 at the Hitachi Zosen-Osaka Works Shipyard, Sakai, Japan. Local agent for the vessels is Guthrie-Hubner, Inc.

The Ivi is commanded by Sarados N. Halaris, Monrovia, and the Ira is commanded by Antonios Tsonis, also of Monrovia. The Ivi’s crewmembers include 18 Filipinos, two Greeks and one Russian. The Ira’s crewmembers include18 Filipinos, two Greeks, one Estonian and one Russian.

The Ivi was scheduled to depart at about 6:00 p.m. today and the Ira is scheduled to leave the Port at approximately 5:00 a.m. on Friday.

Reported by: Lisa Marciniak - Duluth Seaway Port Authority




Outbound Cargo

08/29
Tuesday the tug Gregory J. Busch and barge were loading scrap metal in Holland at the Padnos dock. This is the first outbound cargo from Holland this year, and possibly for several years. The last time a vessel loaded in port may have been the Pere Marquette 41, from Padnos, in 1999.

Reported by: Bob Vande Vusse




Navy Ship

08/29
On Tuesday the Canadian navy frigate HMCS Kingston passed Brockville, Ont in the Seaway about 12:45 p.m.

Kingston passing.

Reported by: Peter Carter




Record Trip

08/29
Below are images of the Great Lakes Trader's record setting trip in to Holland, MI last week.

Great Lakes Trader before entering Channel.
Entering the channel.
Trader heading out onto Lake Macatawa.
Passing Kollen Park on Lake Macatawa.
Backed in to unload.
Ready to cast off lines.
Great Lakes Trader pulling away from Brewer's, one of the three record breaking pile to the left.

Reported by: Dale Rosema




Twin Ports Report

08/29
Arthur M. Anderson spent a long day loading taconite pellets under the gravity chutes at "east of six Missabe" on Tuesday. About 730 a.m. the boat was docked under the chutes with its bow pointing in toward the inner end of the slip. At 430 p.m., it was still under the chutes, but during the day it had turned around so its stern was pointing toward the inner end of the slip -- a maneuver that likely was done to aid in trimming the ship. Adding to the interesting line-up of ships, the John G. Munson steamed into port about 530 p.m., followed a short time later by the Joe Block. The Munson proceeded to the Reiss Inland dock to unload before moving to the DMIR ore dock. The Block went to the DMIR dock to take a partial load of pellets after starting at the DMIR dock in Two Harbors.

A number of ships were in port for grain Tuesday. Canadian Miner was at the General Mills S elevator in Superior, a terminal that's handled several Canadian vessels recently. Federal Shimanto was loading at Peavey, Ira was at Cargill, Federal Rhine was departing from AGP when it developed engine trouble and went to anchor, and Federal Fuji was expected to arrive late for AGP.

Elsewhere, Algocape was unloading at St. Lawrence Cement.

Reported by: Al Miller




Frantz in Holland

08/29
Below are images of the Joseph H. Frantz in Holland, Mi.

Frantz unloading at Brewer's in Holland.
Crew member climbs aboard.
A bike is load back aboard.
Harbor master and a crewmember in the engine room gang way door.

Reported by: Dale Rosema




Port Huron Traffic

08/29
Below are images of traffic passing on the St. Clair River at Port Huron, Mi.

Alaskan Rainbow downbound.
Coral Trader downbound below the Blue Water Bridges.
Joseph H. Frantz upbound.

Reported by: Clayton Sharrard




Detroit Traffic

08/29
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Tuesday evening.

Capt Henry Jackman downbound just above Fighting Island North Light after departing Zug Island.
Stern view.
Reserve downbound off the Rouge River.
Stern view.
Lee A Tregurtha at the Rouge Steel Slip in Dearborn.
Stern view.
Barge Marysville and tug Patricia Hoey tied up at the old Rouge Coal Dock in the turning basin waiting to fuel the Tregurtha with the Cason J Callaway unloading at the Levy Dock.
Tug Dorothy Ann against the Conrail Bridge unloading in the Rouge River.
Buckeye upbound off the ADM Dock.
Stern view.
Diamond Belle downbound in the Ecorse Channel.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




More Detroit Traffic

08/29
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Tuesday morning.

Capt Henry Jackman unloading at National Steel on Zug Island .
Algolake downbound at Belle Isle.
Sailing vessel Pathfinder downbound.
Pathfinder crew busy on the stern.
Southdown Challenger downbound for Detroit.
A friendly wave from passengers on the Southdown Challenger.
Southdown Challenger eases to the dock at silos marked Medusa Cement.
Mooring lines are hauled a shore.
Tug Doug McKeil and barge Ocean Hauler upbound at Detroit.
Doug McKeil stern view.
The Rouge shortcut bridge lowers quickly after Kaye E Barker passes outbound for the Detroit River.
Kaye E Barker, now out of the Rouge shortcut turns upbound in the river.
Barge and divers work just above the Rouge shortcut.

Reported by: Pat Pavlat & Frank Bachnak




Toledo Update

08/29
The Canadian Century finished loading coal at the CSX Docks and departed Tuesday afternoon. The American Mariner and Sam Laud were due in later that night to load coal. The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel and CSL Laurentien due in on Wednesday followed by the Algomarine on Thursday.

The USCGC Neah Bay remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing her survey/misc. repairs. The dredge Buxton II and related dredging equipment with their tug Muskegon are dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay between the Torco Docks and the CSX Docks. The small hopper dredge Atchalafaya was dredging the ship channel several miles north of the Torco dock.

The Adam E. Cornelius remains in lay-up at the CSX #1 Dock.

The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will now be the Middletown due in at 11:00 p.m. Thursday, followed by the Buckeye on Sunday morning.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
George M. Carl photographed from the Hi-Level Bridge while she was tied up at the City Dock waiting for a berth at one of the grain elevators to load grain.

USCGC Mackinaw in the white hull color scheme outbound Maumee Bay bound for her next port of call.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Sandusky Update

08/29
The Algowood arrived on Monday to take on a load of coal for Hamilton, Ontario. Last week the Wolverine visited to load coal for Holland.

Algowood in Sandusky.
Canada goose looks on.
Wolverine waits its turn at the NS No. 3 dock as a bass boat heads into the Shelby Street ramp.

Reported by: Don Lee




Today in Great Lakes History - August 29

On August 29, 1942, the A.H. Ferbert (2) entered service.

On her maiden voyage August 29, 1979 the INDIANA HARBOR sailed for Two Harbors, MN to load iron ore pellets for Indiana Harbor, IN. In August, 1982 INDIANA HARBOR became the first U.S. flag laker to receive satellite communication.

On August 29, 1972 the lightship HURON was placed in an earth embankment at Port Huron's Pine Grove Park along the St. Clair River and was opened to visitors on July 13, 1974.

Canada Steamship Lines' ATLANTIC SUPERIOR returned from Europe on August 29, 1985 with a cargo of gypsum for Picton, Ontario.

On 29 August 1871, GEORGE M. ABEL (2-mast wooden schooner) broke up on a reef near Port Burwell, Ontario.

On 29 August 1858, CANADA (3-mast wooden bark, 199', 758 t) was carrying a half million board feet of lumber to Chicago in bad weather when she settled just north of downtown Chicago. The next day during a salvage attempt, she blew southward, struck a bar off the old waterworks, broke her back, then broke up. She had been built in Canada in 1846 as a sidewheeler and was seized by the U.S. in 1849 and rebuilt as a bark in 1852.

August 29, 1998 - The BADGER was designated a spur route on the Lake Michigan Circle Tour.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Max Hanley, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Theodore Too Upbound

08/28
The tug Theodore Too spent Monday passing upbound in the Detroit and St. Clair Rivers. Early morning the tug entered the Detroit River and by 7:40 p.m. was passing Port Huron. Theodore paused off the Sydney Smith Dock in Sarnia for pictures. The tug let the Canadian Leader go past and then proceeded up into Lake Huron.

The tugs departed Cleveland and is sailing for Chicago where it will dock August 31 - Sept. 3. After Chicago it will visit the Soo Sept. 8 - 9; Windsor Sept. 15 - 16 and Sandusky Sept. 22 - 23.

For more details on the Theodore Too's schedule while on the lakes visit www.theodoretugboat.com

Please send images or reports of Theodore Too sightings to moderator@boatnerd.net

Pictures by Pat Pavlat & Frank Bachnak
Upbound in the Detroit River.
Passing Grassy Island.
Stern view.

Reported by: Jamie Kerwin, William Jenuwine, Pat Pavlat, Frank Bachnak




Lake Erie Update

08/28
The Algoway and CSL Laurentien were in Conneaut Monday morning, the Laurentien loading coal for Nanticoke and the Algoway unloading stone. The Algoway unloaded her limestone in quite and unusual place, at the ore dock across from the stone dock. The Laurentien departed at 10:00 am and the Algoway at 11:00 am. The Atlantic Erie was due at 5:00 p.m. to load. The Richard Reiss entered Erie around 5:30 pm for the Parade St. Dock.

Conneaut schedule
Friday-2330 Canadian Navigator-load coal
Saturday-2330 Algosoo-load coal

Algoway unloading.
Backing out of port.
Another view.
Close up.
Departing.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Wolverine Loads

08/28
On Saturday the Wolverine loaded 15,500 tons of stone at Port Inland, MI for Cleveland, Oh. The Load took about 11 hours. The Algowest loaded before the Wolverine and departed by noon, shortly her departure the Wolverine lifted anchor and docked.

Stern view at the dock.
Stone is loaded into the hold.
Deck view.
Looking down the boom.
Pilot house.
Chart table.
Anchor windlass.
Engine control room.
Engines.
Propellor shaft.
Generators.
Hydralic rams that move the rudder.
Co2 fire suppression tanks.
After the tour it is time for dinner.
Algowest loading.

Reported by: Scott Best




Mapleglen in Owen Sound

08/28
The Mapleglen arrived in Owen Sound Monday with a load of grain. She was at the Great Lakes Elevator unloading grain on the west side of the harbor.

Mapleglen unloading.
Another view.
Stack in CSL colors.
Smoke from the stack.

Reported by: Roger Cournoyer




Twin Ports Report

08/28
The DMIR ore docks are undergoing some interesting changes from the season's routine.

On Aug. 27, the Philip R. Clarke was observed making the rare move of unloading a partial cargo of stone directly onto the storage yard east of Dock 6 instead of unloading into the dock's hopper. The vessel was scheduled to load taconite pellets later in the day either in Duluth or Two Harbors.

Up in Two Harbors, several vessels are scheduled to make unusual calls at that dock. Oglebay Norton is due there Aug. 28; Joe Block - a common caller at the Duluth ore dock - is scheduled to load a partial cargo in Duluth and then complete loading in Two Harbors on Aug. 28; St. Clair is due Aug. 30; and Reserve is due Aug. 31. In recent seasons the Two Harbors dock has almost exclusively served vessels of USS Great Lakes Fleet, so this schedule change -- if it holds -- is a marked departure from the routine.

Duluth will see several GLF boats this week. Philip R. Clarke and Arthur M. Anderson were in town Aug. 27, and John G. Munson is scheduled to arrive Aug. 28 to unload at the Reiss Inland dock before moving to DMIR ore dock to load on the 29th.

Reported by: Al Miller




Detroit Traffic

08/28
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Monday evening.

Yacht My Marzy (Cayman Islands) downbound at Grassy Island.
Sten view.
Barge Hannah 5101 and tug James A Hannah upbound at Grassy Island headed for the Marathon Fordson Island Dock in the Rouge River.
Close up of tug.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




More Detroit Traffic

08/28
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Monday morning.

St. Clair downbound in the haze at Belle Isle.
Tramper & Claudia at Nicholson Terminal.

Reported by: Pat Pavlat & Frank Bachnak




Toledo Update

08/28
Monday the USCGC Neah Bay remains in drydock at the ship yard. The dredge Buxton II with her equipment and tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay between the CSX And Torco Docks. The small hopper dredge Atchalafaya was dredging the ship channel several miles north of the Torco Docks.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Canadian Century, American Mariner, Sam Laud, and Algosteel on Tuesday, followed by the Lee A. Tregurtha and CSL Laurentien on Wednesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Docks will be the Courtney Burton on Thursday evening, followed by the Buckeye on Sunday morning.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Buffalo News

08/28
Monday the Kinsman Independent was undergoing fit out and is expected to depart lay-up within a week or two.

The Gemini will be making the very rare trip all the way up the Buffalo River to the extreme limit of navigation late today. She is scheduled this evening for the Mobil Oil Elk St. Product Terminal.

The Herbert C. Jackson was due at ADM Standard elevator around 9:00 p.m. Monday. The English River is due to follow her in around 11:00 p.m. for Lafarge. Both are due to depart on Tuesday afternoon.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Today in Great Lakes History - August 28

EDWIN H. GOTT, 78, of Pittsburgh, died on August 28, 1986. The namesake of the 1,000 footer, he retired as Chief Executive Officer of U.S. Steel in 1973.

On August 28, 1962, the Edward L. Ryerson set a Great Lakes cargo record for iron ore. The Ryerson loaded 25,018 gross tons of iron ore in Superior, Wisconsin, breaking by 14 tons the record held by the Canadian bulk freighter Red Wing which was set in the 1961 season. The Ryerson held this record well into 1965.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 was repowered with two 2,850 ihp four cylinder Skinner Uniflow steeple compound steam engines, 19 1/2", 43" dia. x 26" stroke, built in 1953 by the Skinner Engine Co., Erie, PA and four coal-fired Foster-Wheeler water tube boilers with a total heating surface of 25,032 sq. ft. built in 1953. The repowering work was completed on August 28, 1954. Her 1954 tonnage was 3551 GRT, 1925 NRT, 2450 dwt. A new starboard tail shaft was installed at this time. Her service speed increased to 18 knots (20.7 mph).

The JOHN ANDERSON was outbound through the Duluth Ship Canal on August 28, 1928, the ANDERSON struck the north pier suffering $18,000 in damage.

The REGENT entered service on August 28, 1934. She was built for low clearances on the New York State Barge Canal and was equipped with five cargo tanks and one dry cargo hold.

The WILLIAM A. REISS (2) was laid up for the last time on August 28, 1981 at Toledo, OH and remained idle there until July 15, 1994 when she was towed to be scrapped.

On 28 August 1870, CHASKA (wooden scow-schooner, 72'/50T, built in 1869 at Duluth originally as a scow-brig) was wrecked in a northwesterly storm near Duluth. Reportedly she's the first vessel built at Duluth.

On 28 August 1763, BEAVER, an armed wooden British sloop built the previous year, was carrying provisions to Detroit to relieve the fort there which was under siege by the Indians led by Pontiac. however the vessel foundered in a storm at Cat Fish Creek, 14 miles from the site of Buffalo. 185 barrels of her cargo were salvaged and went on to Detroit on the schooner GLADWIN.

Data from: Joe Barr, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Al Miller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Saginaw Departs

08/27
The Saginaw departed from the Toledo Shipyard docks shortly before 8:00 a.m. Sunday morning. It was removed from the drydock at the on Saturday evening and was tied up at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock over night preparing to sail. The vessel entered the dry dock on August 8 for her 5-year survey and replacement of stern seals.

The hard working ship looks great with a fresh paint job.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




End of Lay-up

08/27
The American Mariner departed her lay-up berth at Toledo's Lakefront Docks about 2:45 p.m. Saturday afternoon. It is believed that she is going to Sandusky, Ohio to load a coal cargo for Essexville, Michigan.

Uncertainties over the future of U.S. steel makers put the American Mariner into temporary lay-up in mid May.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Duluth's July Tonnage Report

08/27
Another coal record helped bring year-to-date tonnage figures in the Port of Duluth-Superior ahead of last year, the Duluth Seaway Port Authority reported today.

All cargo through July totaled 16.9 million metric tons, five percent ahead of last year’s 16.1 million tons and two percent above the five-year average of 16.6 million tons.

Superior’s Midwest Energy Resources Co. set a Port record for coal loaded in a single month, two million metric tons, surpassing its previous record month, August 1999, by nearly 10 percent. Outbound coal handled through the facility has set annual Port records for seven consecutive years.

Strong Canadian coal shipments propelled total international trade to five million metric tons. This was a five percent increase from last year’s 4.8 million tons.

Total domestic trade of 11.9 million metric tons represented a five percent increase from 11.3 million tons last year. Domestic shipments of iron ore climbed from 4.8 million to 5.4 million tons, an increase partly attributable to this year’s higher lake levels and partly to the closure of an LTV Co. dock in Taconite Harbor, Minn.

Coal shipments through the Port continued as this season’s maritime commerce leader, equaling 44 percent of total waterborne commerce with 7.5 million tons through July.

Iron ore shipments of 6.7 million tons to U.S. and Canadian destinations ranked second with 39 percent of total commerce.

Shipments of bulk grain, the Port’s third leading cargo, contributed seven percent with 1.1 million tons. The Port’s three principal cargoes combined represented 90 percent of total commerce.

There were 467 vessels visiting the Port through July, a decrease of eight from last year. Making up 2001’s total were 294 U.S.-flag, 114 Canadian-flag and 59 overseas vessels.

Reported by: Duluth Seaway Port Authority




New Drummond Island ferry dedicated

08/27
The spacious new Drummond Islander IV, capable of handling 150 passengers and 32 vehicles, was dedicated by a host of state transportation officials, legislators and local residents in a ceremony last week in De Tour Village.

The new ferry boat is one of two which serves Drummond Island's 1,000 year-round residents, as well as the growing tourist population that visits the popular island on Michigan's Upper Peninsula's eastern tip.

"The 148-foot ferry boat will reduce waiting during busy times and is critical to residents of the island who must rely on the boats for transportation," said Phillip Kazmierski, deputy director, Urban and Public Transportation, Michigan Department of Transportation. "We are proud partners in this venture which combines a Federal Highway Administration Ferry Boat grant, MDOT funds, and a local match to construct the $2.8 million boat."

The number of passengers and vehicles traveling by ferry boat from De Tour Village to Drummond Island is steadily increasing. In 1997, 312,000 passenger rides were provided and 184,000 vehicles transported. In 2000, those numbers rose to 376,000 passenger rides and 217,000 vehicles. So far in 2001, 295,212 passengers and 175,835 vehicles have taken the ferry boats.

The vessel's design was by Tim Graul Marine in Sturgeon Bay, Wis. It was constructed by Basic Marine in Escanaba. Dock modifications to accommodate the Drummond Islander IV were funded by a combination of federal, state and local funds, for a total of $650,000. Dock design and engineering were done by Hitch, Inc. of Houghton, with construction by Ryba Marine Construction of Cheboygan.

The ferries are operated by the Eastern Upper Peninsula Transportation Authority which also provides service for Sugar and Neebish islands and bus transit service in Chippewa and Luce counties.

Reported by: Tom Hynes




St. Clair River

08/27
Below are images of ships on the St. Clair River Sunday evening

Munson at Shell Fuel.
Wide view with the Great Lakes Trader passing.
Oakglen upbound.
Close up of the bow.
Sun sets on the Griffon at the Government Dock.
LIMNOS at the Government Dock in Sarnia.

Reported by: T. Parker and J. Parker




Detroit Traffic and More

08/27
Below are images from a trip to Manitoulin Island Saturday
Rt Hon Paul J Martin loading at the Lafarge Dock in Meldrum Bay, ON on Mississagi Strait.
Agawa Canyon loading at the Ontario Trap Rock Dock in Bruce Mines, ON. This is the dock where the Algowood was damaged.
Trap Rock Dock.

tug Channel Bratt in Gore Bay, ON.
tug Bonnyville in Gore Bay, ON.

Museum Ship Norisle
Norisle at Manitowaning, ON.
Looking down the port side.
Car Deck.
Another view.
Norisle Engine.
Another view.
Looking down the engine.
From the other end.
Guages.
Chart of the route of the Norisle.
Observation Room.
Norisle Dining Room.
Vents.

Sault Ste. Marie
Katie Ann (former push boat Fort Yates) on the drydock at MCM Marine.
Research boat Cisco on the dock at MCM Marine.
Chicago Diver on the Dock at MCM Marine.

Detroit Traffic
Tramper (Netherlands) at Nicholson Terminal & Dock.
Stern view.
Claudia (Switzerland) at Nicholson's. This may be the first time this year that two salties have been at this dock at the same time.
Stern view.
Lake Champlain (Marshall Islands) at Morterm Dock in Windsor, ON.
Stern view.
CSL Tadoussac upbound at Fighting Island North Light.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

08/27
Sunday morning the John G. Munson was loading coal at the CSX Dock. The Armco was unloading ore at the Torco Dock. The Adam E. Cornelius remains in lay-up at the CSX #1 Dock. The dredge Buxton II with her related equipment and their tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay between the Torco and CSX Docks. The small hopper dredge Atchalafaya was dredging the ship channel several miles north of the Torco Docks.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the CSL Niagara and Armco later on today followed by the Canadian Century on Monday evening. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Courtney Burton on Thursday evening followed by the Buckeye on Sunday morning, Sept. 2.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Chicago Trader and Charles C. West in the C&O Docks frog pond area awaiting there fate.

Benson Ford (1) loading coal at the Lakefront #2 Coal dock.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto Report

08/27
Salty Fraser arrived at Redpath Sugar Sunday with McKeil tug assistance. The tall ship Concordia was in town for a few days but was gone early Sunday morning. Cape May Light made a return trip to Toronto last week.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Special Cruise to the Soo

08/27
On October 15, the M.S ChiCheemaun will make her maiden voyage to Sault Saint Marie, On, Canada. The journey's duration to Sault Saint Marie will complete 12 hours (based on good weather and no delays)The Trip from port back to Owen Sound will be 48 hours. (2 days)

On the morning of October 15 all passengers will board in Owen Sound at 5:30 a.m. where motor coaches will transport them to Tobermory to catch the 7:00 a.m. departure north bound to Sault Saint Marie. The approximate arrival time will be 7:00 p.m.

During the excursion breakfast, lunch and dinner will be provided, buffet style.

Once in Sault Saint Marie passengers will have the option of attending their guide to the Sault Saint Marie Charity Casino or retiring to their hotel room for the evening.

On the morning of October 16 a buffet breakfast will be provided for the guests by the hotel and free time granted to passengers until 1:00 p.m. This will allow the attendees to experience Sault Saint Marie individually to pursue their interests. The hotel is conveniently located in the heart of their downtown core, within walking distance of a museum, art gallery and shopping centers.

At 1:00 p.m. motor coaches will be departing the Holiday Inn Soo for Owen Sound, On, Canada.

The fare for the Fall Cruise is $350.00, (CDN) this includes passage, the 3 meals on the 15th, hotel accommodations based on double occupancy, guided tours and all meals provided on the 16th.

For more information call 800-265-3163 or e-mail northland@bmts.com

Image of the ChiCheemaun




Great Laker Mailing

08/27
Copies of the Premier issue of Great Laker continue to be mailed. We had a problem with our second mailing that should have been sent in early August. I corrected the problem and finished the second mailing last week. The first issue should start to arrive in the next 1-3 weeks depending on your post office, sorry for any delay.

My thanks to everyone who subscribed, of the 10,000 printed we only have 300 copies of the "Premier Issue" left. If you would like a copy please visit www.greatlaker.com

Our Fall issue is about to head to the printer featuring more of what you love about the Great Lakes. A preview will be available on the web site in early September.




Help Wanted

08/27
Grand River Navigation is now accepting applications for the Relief Positions of 2nd & 3rd Assistant Engineer for the M/V Maumee and Calumet. Qualified candidates should contact Mr. Sam Bomyea at 440-930-2024 (employment inquires only.)




E-mail

08/27
I started having problems accessing my e-mail late Thursday night. The service returned but I could not access the news server. All problems appear to be corrected, sorry for any delay.




Weekly Updates

08/27
The weekly updates have been loaded. Click here for the latest information.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 27

The AGAWA CANYON was launched in 1971 at Collingwood Shipyards Ltd.

The SAMUEL RISLEY arrived at Toronto, Ont. on August 27, 1985 on her way to Thunder Bay, Ont. where she replaced the retired CCGC ALEXANDER HENRY.

ELMGLEN (2) was launched August 27, 1952 as a) JOHN O. McKELLAR (2) for the Colonial Steamship Co. Ltd. (Scott Misener, mgr.), Port Colborne, Ont.

The WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) then renamed US.266029 departed her lay-up berth at the Rouge slip on August 20, 1986 in tow of Gaelic tugs and she was taken to Detroit Marine Terminals on the Rouge River, where her pilothouse was removed to be displayed at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Detroit's Belle Isle. The hull was moved to Nicholson's River Rouge dock on August 27th.

MERLE M. McCURDY was launched August 27, 1910 as a) WILLIAM B. DICKSON for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

The U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tender (WAGL-305) MESQUITE was commissioned on August 27, 1943 and served on the Pacific Ocean in the 7th Fleet in 1944 and 1945.

On August 27, 1940, the William A. Irvin set the Great Lakes record for the fastest unloading of an iron ore cargo using shore side equipment. The Irvin unloaded 13,856 gross tons of iron ore in 2 hours, 55 minutes (including the time to arrive and depart the dock!) in Conneaut, Ohio. This record still stands, and consequently the Irvin is one of the few Great Lakes vessels to be retired while still holding a Great Lakes cargo record.

On August 27, 1929, the Myron C. Taylor entered service.

On Aug. 25, 1923, the Duluth, Missabe & Northern ore dock in Duluth loaded 208,212 tons of ore into 23 ships.

On 27 August 1924, CITY QUEEN (wooden propeller steam tug, 71'/69GT, built in 1900 at Midland, Ontario) burned to a total loss ¼ mile east of the Manitou Dock in Georgian Bay.

The keel for the tug CRUSADER was laid on 27 August 1873 at the Leighton & Dunford yard in Port Huron. The tug's dimensions were 100' keel, 132' overall, and 23' beam. She was built for George E. Brockway.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Al Miller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Repairs Completed

08/26
The Sam Laud departed Bay Ship Sturgeon Bay Friday evening followed by the Mesabi Miner early Saturday evening in rain and fog. The ships departed through the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal into Lake Michigan for their next ports of call.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




Algoway Delivers Salt

08/26
The Algoway was in Alpena early Saturday morning unloading salt at the Alpena Oil Co. dock on the Thunder Bay River. This is the first of several loads of salt this year. The Algoway left before noon .

Reported by: Ben and Chanda Bruski




Thunder Bay Update

08/26
Algoma boats made up the vast majority of Vessels that visited the Port of Thunder Bay in the past few days. Making appearances were: Algocen, Algoville, Algowood, Algolake, Algomarine and Algonova. Algosteel is expected to visit sometime this week.

The Algocen finished up at Mission Terminal and departed late Friday night. After arriving late Thursday night and docking at Richardson Elevator, the Algoville moved over to United Grain Growers "A" house on Friday to finish her loading. By late night she had departed down the lake heading for Montreal.

The Algowood arrived early Friday morning and tied up at Thunder Bay Terminals to take on a load for Detroit. After loading more than 25,000 metric tons of coal, she headed out the South Entrance and down the lake. Next to arrive was the Algolake, arriving Friday evening and heading up the Mission River to Valley Camp where she unloaded her cargo. Saturday morning she moved over to Thunder Bay Terminals to load coal for Lambton. Around 8:30 p.m. she left downbound with more than 27,000 metric tons of cargo.

After the Algolake had departed, the Algomarine picked up her anchor which she dropped after arriving in Port Saturday morning. She proceeded into the vacated slip at Thunder Bay Terminals to load and was tied up at 9:30 p.m. The last Algoma boat to arrive Saturday was the Algonova, docking at Petro-Can in the Mission River late Afternoon.

Other boat traffic in the Harbor consisted of the Arizona Dream departing Mission Terminal at 2:00 p.m. on Friday. The Montrealais departing Cargill late Friday night. The Federal Yukon arrived early Friday Morning and went to anchor just outside the Main breakwall entrance. The tug Radium Yellowknife departed the port.

The tug Jane Ann IV and barge Sarah Spencer arrived for yet another visit to Thunder Bay. She pulled into Agricore Friday morning and later moved over to United Grain Growers "M" house in the afternoon. By late night Friday they were heading out onto the Lake.

The Sandra Mary remains docked at Keefer Terminals while her dredge John Holden continues to work on a dredging project near the Mission River.

Mapleglen at Sask 7 a.
Algoville at Richardson.
Arizona Dream at Richardson.
Cartierdoc Sask 7 a.
Doug McKeil General Chemicals.
Elm at Cargill.
Federal Agno at Sask 7 a.
Federal Yoshino at UGGm.
Algocen at Agricore.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Saginaw River News

08/26
The David Z. Norton entered the Saginaw River Saturday morning passing the Saginaw River Rear Range Light at 9:00 a.m. She stopped at the Bay City Wirt dock to lighter before proceeding upriver to Saginaw to finish. The Norton was outbound from Saginaw giving a security call downbound at 11:30 p.m.

The Sam Laud was also in the Saginaw on Saturday, passing the Saginaw River Rear Range Light at 1:00 p.m. the Laud stopped at Bay Aggregates in Bay City to lighter before departing a 4:40 p.m. for Saginaw Rock to finish.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Sam Laud approaching Independence Bridge Upbound.
Stern View.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Toledo Update

08/26
The Saginaw still remains in dry dock for her survey, painting and misc. repairs. The Algosoo was scheduled to load coal at the CSX Docks at 3:00 p.m. The Adam E. Cornelius remains in lay-up at the CSX#1 Dock. The dredge Buxton II with her equipment and tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay between the Torco and CSX Docks. The small hopper dredge Atchalafaya was dredging the ship channel several miles north of the Torco Dock.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the John G. Munson, CSL Niagara, and Armco on Sunday, followed by the Canadian Century on Monday evening. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco on Sunday morning, followed by the Courtney Burton on Thursday evening.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Hamilton News

08/26
Saturday evening the excursion vessel Enterprise 2000 was leisurely cruising Hamilton Harbour. She is one of two excursion vessels owned by Galactica 001 Enterprises Ltd. of Toronto.

The Canadian Leader was unloading iron ore pellets at Dofasco. The Hamilton Energy was alongside refueling her. Over at Stelco's iron ore dock the CSL Laurentien was unloading as well.

At 2010 hours the CSL Laurentien passed through the Burlington Ship Canal for Lake Ontario exchanging whistle salutes with the bridge operator. A small pleasure motorboat entered the canal from Lake Ontario as the Laurentien was entering from the Harbor side, apparently intending to pass on the laker's port side. When the pleasure craft saw the size of the stern wake following behind the Laurentien, the pleasure boater did a 180 degree turn about 300 feet in front of the Laurentien's bow and charged back out into Lake Ontario and away from the piers. Fortunately, the motor on the small craft did not stall.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Today in Great Lakes History - August 26

The Edgar B. Speer's sea trials were successfully completed on August 26, 1980.

The BEECHGLEN was towed out of Owen Sound by the McKeil tug KAY COLE on August 26, 1994 en route to Port Maitland, Ont. for scrapping.

The MICHIPICOTEN (2) was launched August 26, 1905 as a) HENRY C. FRICK.

EMORY L. FORD (b RAYMOND H. REISS) entered service on August 26, 1916 to load iron ore at Marquette, MI.

SILVERDALE was launched August 26, 1925 as the straight decker a) GLENEAGLES

The CHIEF WAWATAM was launched on August 26, 1911. She was built with three large propellers, two in the stern for propulsion and one in the bow for icebreaking.

The passenger-cargo ship FEDERAL PALM was christened August 26, 1961. She was built on the Great Lakes, but never served their ports.

On August 26, 1934, while on a Sunday sightseeing cruise, MIDLAND CITY damaged her bottom on a shoal near Present Island. She settled with her stern under water and her bow high in the air.

On 26 August 1875, COMET (propeller passenger/package freight, 181'/744T, built in 1857 at Cleveland, OH) was carrying ore and pig iron in Lake Superior on a foggy night. While trying to pass the Beatty Line steamer MANITOBA, 7 miles SE of Whitefish Point, signals were misunderstood and COMET veered into the path of MANITOBA. COMET was rammed amidships and sank in ten minutes. 11 of the 21 aboard lost their lives. This wasn't the first such accident for COMET. In October 1869, she suffered a similar mishap with the propeller HUNTER and that time both vessels sank.

The schooner MATTHEW McNAIR was launched at the Lee & Lamoree shipyard in Oswego on 26 August 1857. Her dimensions were 103' keel, 24'6" beam and 9'6" depth.

August 26, 1911 - The CHIEF WAWATAM was launched by the Toledo Shipbuilding Company.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Theodore Too makes a surprise stop in Cleveland

08/25
Cleveland's Nautica complex on the West bank of the Cuyahoga is hosting an interesting assortment of ships this weekend. The sailing ships Grand Nellie and Red Witch are in town for viewing and lake cruises.

Buffalo's venerable fireboat Edwin M. Cotter is giving tours at the dock. The Cotter is 101 years old and in beautiful condition. A nice reflection on the work of Captain Mike Higgins and crew.

Theodore Too made a surprise visit to Cleveland as well. This beautiful 65 foot tug is on a Great Lakes tour this summer after cruising the East coast as far south as Florida over the past 16 months. Captain Bill Stewart, his wife Fran and first mate Bob Henneberry have brought Theodore from Halifax and will continue as far as Chicago this month. Other cities to be visited include the Soo, Windsor and Sandusky before exiting the lakes and returning to the East coast. Original plans were for Theodore to travel from Chicago down the Mississippi but bridge clearances have canceled those plans. Long range trips will include the Gulf coast and then possible transport by cargo ship through the Panama canal to the pacific coast. Theodore is docked at the Nautica complex and is available for free tours on Sunday from 10am-noon and 2pm to 6pm.

After departing Cleveland the Theodore Too's next stop will be Chicago August 31 - Sept. 3; The Soo Sept. 8 - 9; Windsor Sept. 15 - 16 and Sandusky Sept. 22 - 23.

For more details on the Theodore Too's schedule while on the lakes visit www.theodoretugboat.com

Please send images or reports of Theodore Too sightings to moderator@boatnerd.net

Theodore Too at dock. Rex Cassidy
Close up of the moving eyes. Rex Cassidy
Another view. Rex Cassidy
Another view. Christine Rohn-Tielke
Stern view. Christine Rohn-Tielke
Stern view. Rex Cassidy
Another view. Rex Cassidy
Pilot house. Christine Rohn-Tielke
Another view. Rex Cassidy
Lounge area. Christine Rohn-Tielke
Edwin M. Cotter. Christine Rohn-Tielke
Another view. Rex Cassidy
Side view. Rex Cassidy
Cotter's pilot house. Rex Cassidy


Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Tall Ships in Waukegan

08/25
The tall ship "Bat'kivshchyna" called at Waukegan, IL harbor last week on her trip through the Great Lakes. The 90-foot topsail schooner sailed from her home port of Kiev, Ukrainia and is on a good will tour promoting Ukrainian independence. She departed Waukegan and sailed to Chicago where it was to dock at Navy Pier. After her stay in the Windy City, she will proceed down the Mississippi.

While the schooner lay at the city dock, the Sam Laud arrived with a load of gypsum for the National Gypsum Company.

Reported by: Lew Clarke




Water Quality Testing in Menominee River

08/25
The W.G. Jackson, a water research vessel from Grand Valley State University in Muskegon, Mich., was in Menominee, MI last weekend conducting water quality tests in the Menominee River. The visit to Menominee last Sunday, and other ports on the Great Lakes during the past week, was sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The river received a respectable rating slightly above a B-. The Jackson's next port of call was Escanaba, MI last Wednesday.

Jackson at the Menominee Marina.
Another view.
Sign aboard the Jackson.
Grand Valley State logo on board the Jackson.

Reported by: Dick Lund




Block Visits Sturgeon Bay

08/25
The Joseph L. Block made a trip into Sturgeon Bay last week to pick up equipment at the ship yard. She came in to Bayship at 10:30 a.m. and was gone by 9:30 p.m. the same evening.

Passing the Ryerson.
Close up of the Ryerson.
Through the highway bridge.
Bow view.
Crew members on the bow.
Sherwood Point Lighthouse.

Reported by: John C. Monefeldt




Shuttle Run

08/25
Below are images of the American Republic on her way out of the Cuyahoga at the Carter Road Bridge. The maneuverable freighter is returning from unloading at the LTV steel mill.

Republic passing.
Off-watch crewman walking laps on the deck of the ship.
Crewman at the starboard gangway door.
Go Tribe is the banner that hangs from the pilothouse.

Reported by: Mike Reindel




Alpena Update

08/25
The Paul H. Townsend arrived into port at Lafarge to load Friday evening. The Jacklyn M/ barge Integrity are expected Saturday morning. The Alpena left Superior on Friday. The J.A.W Iglehart went to Cleveland on Friday.

The Larinda a 1767 Boston replica schooner stopped in Alpena on Friday. It was on its way back from Muskegon. The David Z. Norton and Great Lakes Trader were loading at Stoneport on Friday.

Reported by: Ben and Chanda Bruski




Saginaw River News

08/25
The Canadian Transfer made her first visit of the season to the Saginaw River Friday morning. The Transfer gave a security call as she passed Lights 1 & 2 of the Entrance Channel at 3:30 a.m., headed to the GM Dock in Saginaw. She finished unloading and departed the GM Dock at 1:30pm, and was downbound through Bay City around 6:00 p.m. The Transfer is expected back to the Saginaw River on Tuesday or Wednesday.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
E.M. Ford at the Lafarge Terminal in Saginaw.
Canadian Transfer upbound passing the Ford.
Close up.
Canadian Transfer downbound at Wheeler's Landing in Bay City.
Stern View approaching Independence Bridge.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Lake Erie Update

08/26
The Canadian Navigator loaded coal in Conneaut Friday, departing west around 2:40 p.m. In other news, the J.S. St John departed Port Weller Dry Docks Thursday on her way back to Erie after a three-week stay. She started sucking sand again immediately. Navigator departs.
Close Up of her bow.
Stern view.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Toledo Tour

08/25
According to the Toledo Blade Newspaper the Port of Toledo will be conducting a tour of the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority Facility September 14. The tour begins at the Toledo Shipyard and Cargo Docks and is sponsored by the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority. No other details were available at this time.

Reported by: Vern Sondak




New Service

08/25
Tugz International L.L.C., an affiliate of the 101-year old The Great Lakes Towing Company, and a member of The Great Lakes Group, announced Tuesday that the Broward County (Florida) Board of County Commissioners, by a 6-3 vote, awarded Tugz a tugboat and towing service franchise for Port Everglades, Florida. This action put an end to the 43-year monopoly on tug service in the port previously held by Seabulk International, Inc., formerly known as Hvide Marine, Inc.

"We are really excited about the opportunity to serve this growing, dynamic port,” said Tugz President, Ronald C. Rasmus. "The Z-Drive tractor tugs we are providing for Port Everglades, totaling in the aggregate over 14,000 horsepower and 375,000 pounds of bollard pull, will include our new 5,000 horsepower proprietary TRI-Z Class, a revolutionary new design that takes harbor towing to the next level with three (3) Rolls Royce/Ulstein Z-drive units providing well over 105,000 lbs. of bollard pull in all directions,” Rasmus added.

The TRI-Z, to be patented and trademarked by Tugz, was collaboratively designed by Tugz Vice President, Engineering, Joseph P. Starck, Jr., and Jonathan G. Parrott, Director of Engineering, Jensen Maritime Consultants, Inc., Seattle, Washington, to meet specific operating requirements in Port Everglades and, at the same time, provide the excellent multi-mission capability of Tugz’ popular 4,000 horsepower Z-Class design.

Model tank testing was conducted by Ron Burchett, of Ron Burchett Models, Ladysmith, British Columbia, Canada, computer generated model testing was conducted by Glosten Associates, Seattle, Washington, and the final design review was performed by naval architect and marine engineer, Robert G. Allan, of Robert Allan, Ltd., Vancouver, B.C., Canada who stated “the TRI-Z tug concept will outperform all others presently operating in Port Everglades.”

Initial service in Port Everglades will be provided with two (2) tractor tugs to be followed thereafter with a 5,100 horsepower newly-constructed tractor tug. These tugs will be the most powerful combination of tractor tugs on the East Coast of the United States and will provide Port Everglades with the best tug fleet on the Coast.

With the introduction of tug services in Port Everglades, Tugz, an affiliate of The Great Lakes Group, plans to expand its tugboat, barge and repair operations to other ports and the Caribbean as a link to its Puerto Rico operation.

The Great Lakes Group, headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio, owns and operates over 50 tugboats, and is the largest U.S.-flag tugboat company engaged in towing on the Great Lakes. The Group operates across the United States in more than 40 U.S. ports, in all eight Great Lakes states, including Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and now Florida. What is not so widely known is that the Group’s tugboat operations extend from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands to Hawaii. The Group also charters tugboats to other companies worldwide.

Drawing of the tug.


Reported by: The Great Lakes Group




Today in Great Lakes History - August 25

On August 25, 1984 the hard luck ROGER M. KYES (b ADAM E. CORNELIUS) grounded off McLouth Steel and ended crosswise in the Detroit River's Trenton Channel.

The GEORGE M. STEINBRENNER (2) arrived at Port Colborne, Ont. on August 25, 1978 in tow of the tug WILFRED M. COHEN for scrapping.

On 25 August 1919, CABOTIA (formerly HIAWATHA, wooden propeller freighter, 235'/1299GT, built 1880 at Gibraltar, MI) went ashore on Main Duck Island in Lake Ontario and split her hull, becoming a constructive loss.

August 25, 1981 - The first of the famous "Love Boat" cruises was made. The BADGER carried 520 passengers, the largest number of passengers for a carferry up to that time. It was sponsored by the Ludington Area Ambassadors.

On 25 August 1873, JOURNEYMAN (wooden schooner, 129', 235 gt, built in 1873 at Wenona, Michigan) was put in service. Her first cargo was 225,770 feet of lumber. She was built for Whitehead & Webster of Bay City and lasted until 1896.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algoway Refloated

08/24
The Algoway was pulled free from the St. Clair River bottom about 11:15 a.m. Thursday morning. The ship became stuck on the sand and clay bottom close to Fawn Island Wednesday morning.

Four tugs and a barge were needed to free the Algoway. The Gaelic Tugboat Co. tugs Roger Stahl and Shannon departed their yard on the Rouge River in Detroit Wednesday night. Thursday a deck barge from Malcolm Marine was placed alongside the ship which was used to lighter the freighter. Some of the cargo was off loaded to the barge while the tugs Manitou and Shannon pulled on the bow and the Menasha and Roger Stahl worked on the stern. As the cargo was unloaded onto the barge the Algoway's engines ran full astern and the vessel began to move.

The tugs then assisted the ship for another hour to position it for unloading in the very tricky currents between Fawn Island and the mainland.

Thursday night the Algoway had finished unloading and was upbound in the St. Clair River. They planned to stop in Sarnia's North Slip for what was believed to be an inspection.

Reported by: Barry Hiscocks, Bill Jenuwine and Jamie Kerwin




Jackson Loads

08/24
The Herbert C. Jackson paid one of its occasional visits to the Twin Ports on Thursday when it arrived at the Peavey grain elevator in Superior to load. The self-unloader will take the cargo to Buffalo. Also loading grain were Federal Rhine at Cargill in Duluth and Titanas at Cenex Harvest States 1 in Superior.

Reported by: Al Miller




Trader Departs

08/24
Thursday morning the barge Great Lakes Trader and tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort cast off their lines after finishing the record setting trip to Holland, Mi. By 9:30 a.m. the pair were outbound past Kollen Park where a group of spectator had gathered to watch. By 11:00 a.m. a long salute was given as she approached the entrance to the channel to Lake Michigan. Forty-five minutes later the pier head had been cleared and the turn to the north had started. They are headed to Stoneport for their next cargo.

Reported by: Dale Rosema




Saginaw Scheduled to Depart

08/24
The Saginaw is expected to depart the Toledo Shiprepair dry dock some time in the next few days. The vessel entered the dry dock on August 8 for her 5-year survey and replacement of stern seals. A few crew members remained on board the Saginaw and were working on various projects inside the ship.

The Saginaw was also painted while in dry dock, this was the first chance the vessel's owners have had to complete a full paint job since buying the ship from American Steam Ship Company.

Saginaw in dry dock.
Stern view.
Looking down the side.
Close up of the new propeller.
Fresh paint is applied.

Reported by: T. Parker




Busy day for Bay Ship

08/24
The Mesabi Miner was sailing down the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal headed for Bay Ship on Thursday. The Sam Laud also arrived at the shipyard that morning. Both vessels were in for some type of repairs, the length of their stay was unknown.

Bay Ship recently launched the Liberty Island dredge for Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Co. It will be delivered in December. This hopper style dredge is 325 feet long and draws 14 feet empty and up to 25 feet loaded.

Mesabi Miner at Berth 15.
Close up of bow.
Sam Laud docked at the ship yard.
View from across the bay.
Close up of Miner.
Close up of Laud and the dredge Liberty Island.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




Reserve in Lorain

08/24
Thursday the Reserve backed into Lorain Harbor heading to the LTV Pellet Terminal to unload.

Pictures by TZ
Backing in from Lake Erie.
Close up of the bow.
Past the lighthouse.
Close up.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Ship test ballast equipment designed, eliminate exotic species

08/24
Michigan officials and members of the Coast Guard in Detroit on Wednesday got their first close look at the Federal Yukon, one of the first freighters to be fitted with a prototype system designed to test for, and eliminate, exotic species from ballast water.

The ship will test several technologies, including a copper ion system, before the end of the shipping season.

The Federal Yukon, a bulk carrier owned by the Montreal-based shipping company Fednav Limited, was launched in 2000. It transports grain from the Great Lakes to countries around the world and carries steel back to the Great Lakes.

John Stubbs, Fednav's manager of technical services, created the ship's system. He said the crew and Fednav, working with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, would experiment to determine the most efficient way to rid ballast of exotic species.

Michigan Lt. Gov. Dick Posthumus emphasized the importance of industry leaders, like Fednav, and government officials from the United States and Canada getting involved in protecting the waters.

"This isn't just an issue from Michigan. It's a regional issue. One state can't do it,'' he said.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service expects zebra mussels to cause $5 billion in damage by 2002.

Reported by: Carri Simmons




Thunder Bay Update

08/24
Traffic has picked up in the port of Thunder Bay over the last few days. The tug Sandra Mary remains at Keefer while her dredge John Holden continues work over near the Mission River. The saltie Arizona Dream continues to load at Mission Terminals.

The Mapleglen arrived early on Wednesday and docked at Saskatchewan Pool 7a to begin loading. By afternoon she was over at Richardson Elevator and then Cargill Elevator early evening. Thursday afternoon she had finished up loading at Cargill and departed through the south entrance and headed down the lake.

Thursday saw several arrivals, the first was the Algocen who tied up at United Grain Growers "A" house and later moving over to Agricore to continue loading. The second arrival saw the Montrealais arriving late morning and docking at Saskatchewan Pool 7a, before slipping over to Cargill in the evening. Rounding off the arrivals on Thursday was the Algoville. She passed the downbound Mapleglen between Thunder Cape and Isle Royale and rounded the Cape under sunny skies and no wind. At the time of this news report she was proceeding past the Welcome Islands and into port, headed for an unknown elevator.

The tug Jane Ann IV and barge Sarah Spencer were due into port late Thursday night or early Friday morning.

Reported by: Rob Farrow and Ron Konkol




Menominee Update

08/24
The saltie IVI arrived in Marinette Thursday morning to unload Pig Iron. The Mc Kee Sons and tug Invincible arrived to unload coal at Menominee Paper Co, its the tug and barge's first visit to the port since Grand River Navigation took over it's operation, it had finished unloading part of the cargo and departed by 1:30 p.m.

IVI off shore as the sun rises. Scott Best
Approaching the piers. Scott Best
Tug along side. Scott Best
Heading for the dock. Scott Best
Along side the Donner. Scott Best
Stern view. Scott Best
Docked. Scott Best
McKee Sons inbound. Scott Best
Passing through the piers. Scott Best
. Scott Best
. Scott Best
. Scott Best
McKee Sons and the IVI. Dick Lund
Stern view. Scott Best
McKee Sons unloading. Scott Best
Close up. Scott Best


Reported by: Scott Best




Sarnia News

08/24
The Paterson arrived late Monday night at the Cargill Elevators in Sarnia and appeared to be unloading. The Algolake arrived around 7:30 a.m. Tuesday at the south end of the North Slip. Her stern was immediately ballasted down and the bow raised to completely expose the bow thruster. A truck from Shelley Machine and Marine with cutting torch equipment was alongside. It is unknown what type of repairs were being made.

Reported by: Jamie Kerwin




Detroit Traffic

08/24
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Thursday evening.

Mighty Jake upbound from their work area off Zug Island to Nicholson's for the evening.
Stern view.
Sandviken (Bahamas) downbound at Fighting Island North Light.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

08/24
The Saginaw and USCGC Neah Bay are in both dry docks at Toledo Shipyard undergoing surveys and miscellaneous repairs. The Mantadoc was loading grain at Anderson's "E" Elevator. The tanker Gemini was at the B-P Dock.

The dredge Buxton II with her related equipment and tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay between the CSX and Torco Docks. The small hopper dredge Atchalafaya was dredging the ship channel several miles north of the Torco Dock.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the CSL Niagara early Friday morning followed by the Algosoo, and John G. Munson on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco on Sunday morning.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Help Wanted

08/24
Grand River Navigation is now accepting applications for the Relief Positions of 2nd & 3rd Assistant Engineer for the M/V Maumee and Calumet. Qualified candidates should contact Mr. Sam Bomyea at 440-930-2024 (employment inquires only.)




Today in Great Lakes History - August 24

LEON SIMARD was launched August 24, 1974.

On August 24, 1910 the THOMAS F. COLE ran aground on a shoal in the St. Marys River severely damaging her hull plates.

The C.H. McCULLOUGH, JR was launched on August 24, 1907 as a) WARD AMES .

On August 24, 1985, PAUL H. CARNAHAN arrived for her final lay up at Nicholson's in Ecorse, Michigan. Ironically, only a few hours later, her near sister LEON FALK, JR. departed the same slip on her final trip bound for Quebec City and overseas scrapping.

The BURLINGTON burned to the water's edge in Mississauga Strait near Manitoulin Island on August 24, 1895.

On 24 August 1885, IOSCO (wooden schooner-barge, 124'/230GT, built at Alabaster, MI in 1873) was heavily damaged by fire. She was rebuilt as an unrigged barge and lasted until 1912.

On 24 August 1882, the Port Huron Times reported that "the long looked for launch of the Stave Company's new river steamer MARY took place this afternoon between 4 and 5 o'clock and was witnessed by hundreds of spectators. The last support being knocked away, she slid very gracefully as far as the ways reached and then landed anything but gracefully in the mud where she now lies." She remained stuck in the mud until she was pulled free five days later.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




New Record for Holland

08/23
The barge Great Lakes Trader and tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort arrived in Holland, Mi about 7:00 p.m. Wednesday. She was in port to deliver the first portion of a three-product load of limestone from Calcite for the Brewer's dock. Her visit sets a new record for length of vessel and load tonnage (24,000) for the Lake Michigan port.

The previous records were held by the H. Lee White for length and the Wilfred Sykes for tonnage.

At the rate the barge was unloading it should depart early this morning.

The Trader arrived on the Great Lakes as a newly built barge last year. During that season she carried taconite pellets for the steel industry. With the down turn in the steel industry she has been carrying cargoes of stone to avoid lay-up.

Reported by: Bob Vande Vusse




Picket Line Delays Traffic

08/23
Traffic in Hamilton was delayed for more than six hours Wednesday as 30 pickets walked the length of the Burlington Canal Lift Bridge to keep it from being raised for ship traffic. The group picketing were protesting a lack of contracts between the Public Service Alliance of Canada and the government and the amount of their annual pay raise.

The Canadian Venture, Algocape and tug James A. Hannah with barge 5101 had already sailed into the Lake Ontario harbor before the bridge was lowered and the protest began, effectively locking them in. Wednesday evening, the saltie Scan Partner went to anchor in the lake waiting for the bridge to open. Nine small vessels, including sailboats and a Canadian Coast Guard boat, sat docked to the pier, unable to pass under the bridge.

The Hamilton police were called to the scene as labor relations negotiators tried to work out a deal with the union and restore bridge traffic. The Hamilton Spectator newspaper reports that the union planned to delay shipping traffic for 30 minutes. The situation appears to have escalated into the lengthily delay once police were on scene.

The bridge later returned to service restoring shipping traffic in the busy port.

Thursday evening the CSL Niagara departed the coal dock at Stelco and passed through the Burlington Ship Canal to Lake Ontario. No whistle salutes were exchanged between the Niagara and the bridge operator. It is customary for vessels to exchange whistle salutes with the bridge operator at the Burlington Ship Canal. The silence was notable as the vessel passed under the bridge.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Algoway Grounds

08/23
At approximately 6:00 a.m. Wednesday morning the Algoway was attempting to dock at Southwestern Sales at Sombra, Ont. with a full load of stone. This dock is located behind Fawn Island on the St. Clair River. The ship was caught by the strong currents between the island and the mainland and combined with a strong following breeze, became stuck in the sand and clay bottom close to the island.

Lines were secured from bow and stern to the mainland shore and with the use of her bow thruster and ships engines, attempted to free herself. These efforts were unsuccessful.

The tug Menasha arrived from Sarnia at about 11:00 a.m. to try and help free her. The tug Manitou arrived from Port Huron about 7:00 p.m. to assist. At 9:30 p.m. the Algoway remained stranded with the tugs working her bow and stern.

Reported by: Barry Hiscocks




Saginaw River News

08/23
The Agawa Canyon was inbound the Saginaw River passing Lights 1 & 2 of the Entrance Channel around 1:00 a.m. Wednesday morning, headed up to the Buena Vista Dock.

The Buffalo, who had unloaded in Saginaw earlier in the day Tuesday, was outbound and met the Agawa Canyon at the Bay City Wirt Dock. After the upbound Canyon had passed, the Buffalo continued outbound to the lake at 3:30 a.m.

The tug Donald C. Hannah and her tanker barge gave a security call passing the Pump Out Island at 7:00 a.m. They were headed to the Triple Clean Liquifuels Dock.

The Agawa Canyon completed unloading her cargo and was downbound passing Veteran's Park in Saginaw at 2:45 p.m. The Donald C. Hannah and her barge departed the Triple Clean Dock at 9:50 p.m. after discharging her cargo of #6 Fuel Oil.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
USSNCS Greyfox Downbound at Independence Bridge.
Agawa Canyon Downbound at Saginaw Vet's Park.
Close up.
Stern view.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Detroit Traffic

08/23
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Wednesday evening.

Paul R Tregurtha upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Algomarine upbound at Grassy Island. She was loaded with coal for Sault Ste. Marie, ON.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo News

08/23
The John J. Boland finished loading coal and departed Wednesday morning. The Algomarine then followed the Boland loading coal and she departed during the afternoon.

The Adam E. Cornelius and American Mariner remain in lay-up at their respective dock sites. The Saginaw and USCGC Neah Bay were in both dry docks at the Shipyard undergoing survey and repairs. The Saginaw is expected to depart on Friday. The dredge Buxton II and related dredging equipment with their tug Muskegon are now dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay between the CSX and Torco Docks. The small hopper dredge Atchalafaya is dredging the ship channel near the Toledo Harbor Lighthouse.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Coal Docks will be the CSL Niagara early Friday morning, followed by the Algosoo and John G. Munson on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco on Sunday morning. The next scheduled grain boat due in will be the Mantadoc within the next day or two.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Hamilton Update

08/23
Wednesday evening the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was unloading iron ore at Stelco. The Hamilton Energy was refueling the vessel. Over at Stelco's coal dock, the CSL Niagara was unloading. The Niagara departed about 6:30 p.m.

At Dofasco, the Canadian Century was unloading iron ore and at 6:15 p.m., the Canadian Miner pulled into the iron ore dock to unload.

The saltie, Tramper is still moored at Pier 8. The roll/on roll/off vessel Scan Partner was moored at Pier 14.

The fuel storage vessel Provmar Terminal is still moored to north side of Pier 14 and the LeVent is still in Heddle Marine's floating dry dock.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Help Wanted

08/23
Grand River Navigation is now accepting applications for the Relief Positions of 2nd & 3rd Assistant Engineer for the M/V Maumee and Calumet. Qualified candidates should contact Mr. Sam Bomyea at 440-930-2024 (employment inquires only.)




Today in Great Lakes History - August 23

The GEMINI sailed on her maiden voyage August 23, 1978 from the shipyard to load fuel oil at Baytown, TX, for delivery at Detroit, MI.

The wooden-hulled steamer AURORA was launched on August 23, 1887.

On August 23, 1979, KINSMAN ENTERPRISE was towed out of the Frog Pond, having escaped the scrapper's torch, and sold to the Port Huron Seaway Terminal to be used as a storage barge.

On 23 AUG 1887, CLARA (2-mast, wooden scow-schooner) was carrying a load of hardwood lumber bound from Manistee for Chicago when she was caught in a storm and capsized. Her hull later washed ashore upside-down near Miller's Station, IN.

August 23, 1901 - The PERE MARQUETTE 17 arrived Ludington on her maiden voyage with Captain Peter Kilty in command.

On 23 August 1875, PERSIAN (wooden propeller freighter, 1630 t, built in 1874 at Cleveland) caught fire off Long Point on Lake Erie. The Propeller EMPIRE STATE came alongside and tried to put out the fire with streams of water from her hose, but when this failed, she took PERSIAN in tow in an attempt to get her to shore. This too failed when the tow line burned through. PERSIAN burned to the waterline and sank 10 miles from land in about 30 fathoms of water. No lives were lost.

On 23 August 1900, one hundred years ago, ARGONAUT (wooden propeller freighter, 213', 1119 gt, built in 1873 at Detroit, MI) was raised by an expensive salvage operation at the Escanaba ore dock where she had previously sunk. She lasted another six years.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Hamilton Delays

08/22
Job action by the Public Service Alliance of Canada has disrupted the lift bridge over the Burlington Ship Canal by keeping the bridge in the down position since 3:00 p.m. Tuesday. That evening, up to a dozen small sailing craft were tied up to both the north and south sides of the canal waiting to enter Hamilton Harbor. Also waiting to enter the harbor was the Canadian Coast Guard vessel Shark tied to the north side of the canal. On the harbor side of the Ship Canal, the tug James A. Hannah and barge 5101 were moored to the north side of the canal waiting to enter Lake Ontario. The Hannah had arrived in Hamilton yesterday to unload carbon black oil. Patrolling the canal was a marine unit of the Hamilton Police Force.

About a kilometer or so from Burlington Piers, the roll on/roll off vessel Scan Partner of Scanscot Shipping Services was anchored in Lake Ontario.

The Canadian Venture was unloading iron ore at Dofasco and the Algocape was moored at the iron ore dock as well waiting to unload.

At Pier 8, the heavy lift vessel Tramper was moored, with no unloading activity seen.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Heavy Traffic in the Rouge

08/22
Early Tuesday morning saw a traffic jam on Detroit's Rouge River. The Canadian Century was departing the river shortly after midnight. The Herbert C. Jackson was downbound on the Detroit River running at a reduced speed waiting for the Century to clear. A few minutes after the Century cleared the Jackson entered heading upbound for Rouge Steel.

Following the Jackson was a rare visitor to the river, the tug Jane Ann IV and barge Sarah Spencer. The Spencer was loaded with taconite pellets from Sept-Iles, Quebec. The tug and barge followed the Jackson up river and docked behind the freighter to unload at Rouge Steel. Ending the parade of ships was the H. Lee White entering the Rouge to unload at the short cut coal dock near the entrance to the river.

The Jane Ann IV and barge Sarah Spencer finished unloading and departed upbound in ballast Tuesday afternoon heading for Thunder Bay.

Reported by: Wade Streeter




Ships compete with events around the lakes

08/22
Competing against freighters carrying millions of tons of materials each year, organizers of events that use the waters of the Great Lakes are finding their needs coming in second to those of business.

Vessel operators say can't take time to slow down for recreational events that might be in their way around the lakes. And these conflicts are expected to become more common as recreational boating continues to grow.

Freighters have the right of way on the Great Lakes and rivers. The authority that regulates freighter traffic on the St. Clair and Detroit rivers said stopping commerce is a big deal in the competitive marketplace.

"It's like having police stop traffic on I-94 [freeway] because someone wants to play on the road,'' Glen Wright of the Canadian coast guard's Marine Communications and Traffic Services told the Times Herald of Port Huron.

Event organizers aren't happy with some shipping companies. Earlier this month, a saltie cut short the second heat of the St. Clair River Classic Offshore Powerboat Races as 10,000 spectators looked on.

Race officials and fans were disappointed -- some even angry -- that the freighter chose to navigate the vessel through the race. Race officials fear fans will avoid the event if freighters get a reputation for interrupting.

Wright said the best thing organizers of races and other maritime events such as tall ship festivals can do is plan ahead. With enough notice, he said, fleets and pilots are more likely to slow down or speed up to give larger windows of time.

Glen Nekvasil of the Lake Carriers' Association said event coordinators should realize some freighters cost as much as $2,000 per hour to operate. Nekvasil said ships can schedule around events, but a ship running behind schedule isn't likely to stop.

Reported by: Craig Stephens




Steamship William G. Mather Museum Publishes Illustrated History and Photo Guide Book

08/22
In response to many visitors’ requests over the years, the Steamship William G. Mather Museum has put together an 80-page illustrated history and photo guidebook, published by Oxford Museum Press, Inc. of Oxford, Ohio. WILLIAM G. MATHER: Great Lakes Steamer and Museum Photo Guide recounts the Mather’s rich history, first as a freighter flagship hauling iron ore and coal, and more recently as a floating maritime museum permanently moored on Cleveland’s downtown lakefront. Sized for travel convenience and easy reference, the 8” x 5” Guide contains over seventy photographs and drawings, of which approximately one-third are reproduced in full color.

Tom Matowitz of Mentor -- Lakeland Community College instructor, licensed pilot and seasoned Mather tour guide -- wrote the 5,000-word text and along with Mather volunteer Al Zimmie, took several of the current photographs of the restored Mather in the book. Historic photographs of the Mather’s distinguished 55-year career as a Great Lakes freighter flagship were culled from the Museum’s archives housed in the Special Collections Department of Cleveland State University. A team of Mather volunteers, who have many years of Great Lakes freighter sailing experience collectively, performed much of the research and editing while contributing onboard expertise on the history and restoration of the historic Mather.

The book costs $10.95 ($15 with tax and shipping throughout the continental U.S.) and is available from the Museum’s “Ship Shop” (Phone: 216-574-9053 or Fax: 216-574-2536). Larger orders (11 or more copies) can be ordered directly from Oxford Museum Press Inc. (316 S. College St./Oxford, OH 45056 Phone: 513-756-9386).

Permanently docked at Cleveland’s North Coast Harbor, the Steamship William G. Mather Museum is open to the public May 4-October 28 in 2001. In May, September and October, the Mather is open Fridays (10 AM - 5 PM), Saturdays (10 AM - 5 PM), and Sundays (12 PM - 5 PM). In June, July and August, the Museum’s public hours are 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM, except for Sundays, when it opens at noon, and Wednesday, when it stays open until 9:00 PM. This will mark the second season of special Wednesday night programming on a variety of Great Lakes related topics, as well as the usual tours. Admission prices are $5.00/adult, $4.00/senior, and $3.00/student (age 5 - 18 years or with a full-time college I.D.) Due to its historic nature, the Museum has limited accessibility.

Click here for more information on the Mather.




Thunder Bay update

08/22
Thunder Bay boat traffic remains very slow with one arrival and a few vessels moving to other elevators Tuesday. The Sandra Mary is at Keefer while her dredge John Holden is still working on a dredging project near the Mouth on the Mission River. The Radium Yellowknife and her barges sit quietly at Northern Woods.

The saltie Elm finished up at Western Grain Elevator #10 and proceeded down the Kaministiqua River to the junction of the Mission River and then down the Mission River to Cargill Elevator where she tied up early Tuesday evening.

The Saltie Sandviken pulled up her anchor early Tuesday morning and docked at Thunder Bay Terminals to take on a load of Potash.

The only arrival of the day was the saltie Arizona Dream, who tied up at Richardson Elevator early Tuesday morning, to begin loading.

Long Term lay-ups in the Port remained quietly at their docks. The Quedoc and Vandoc at Paterson’s dock. The M.A.C. Gagne (former Saguenay) at Gagne Construction dock. The Wolf River at Thunder Bay Terminal slip and the Algontario at Pascol Engineering dock.

Reported by: Rob Farrow and Ron Konkol




Saginaw River News

08/22
The American Republic was outbound the Saginaw River early Tuesday morning, passing the Airport Turning Basin at 2:35 a.m. The Republic had unloaded earlier at the Burroughs Dock in Zilwaukee.

The David Z. Norton arrived at the Bay City Wirt Dock Tuesday morning to unload limestone. She was finished by early evening and was outbound for the lake around 8:00 p.m.

The Buffalo was unloading at the Saginaw Rock Products dock on Tuesday evening.

David Z. Norton unloading at Bay City Wirt.
Another view.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Detroit Traffic

08/22
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Tuesday evening.

Tug Sinbad off Zug Island. Sinbad went up the Rouge River.
Stern view.
Sarah Spencer and Jane Ann IV upbound after departing the Rouge River.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo News

08/22
The Wolverine was unloading stone at the Kuhlman dock and departed Tuesday morning. This was her first trip ever into this docksite. The Mckee Sons was at the CSX Dock loading coal and departed around noon.

The Saginaw remains in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing her 5 year survey and repairs. She is expected to depart on Friday. The dredge Buxton II with her related equipment and their tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay several miles north of the Torco Dock. The Adam E. Cornelius and American Mariner remain in lay-up.

The next scheduled coal boats due in athe CSX Docks will be the John J. Boland and Algomarine this morning. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco on Sunday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Quebec Pictures

08/22
Below are recent images taken around the Seaway in Quebec.

Algowest downbound above Cote St. Catherines lock after unloading at the Cote St. Catherines Wharf last week.
Cecilia Desgagnes loading for the Artic.
Algoriver at Section 56 Montreal Harbor. The River, Algosound, Algonorth, are all at Section 56, the dock there will be land filled next year for a container lot.
Algosound.
Algonorth at the dock.
Arcadia at Section 46 still under arrest.
Comeaudoc. shed 1 Montreal.
Looking forward on deck.
Looking into the cargo hold.
Inside wheelhouse.
Side view of stern.
Close up of her stack.
Canadian Ranger Elevator 5 Montreal Harbor.
Artic Viking now for sale.
Stern view.
Takis unloading molasses at Pipeline Molasses Montreal Harbor.
Canmar Fortune Loading Containers for Overseas.

Reported by: Kent Malo




Great Lakes Folksinger Lee Murdock Performs “On Deck”

08/22
Well-known Great Lakes folksinger and folklorist Lee Murdock will perform topside (weather-permitting) on the Steamship William G. Mather Museum’s Main Deck at 8:00 PM on Saturday, September 15, 2001. In the event of rain, the concert will be held onboard in the Museum’s Cargo Hold #1 Exhibit Hall. Tickets are $10 each ($8 for Mather Museum members) and can be purchased from the Mather Museum by calling (216) 574-9053. Part of the concert proceeds will go towards the Museum’s education and restoration programs.

Lee Murdock is a Chicago-based musician whose ten recordings of folk and maritime music have received national attention. Murdock’s music speaks to the people who live, work and play around the Great Lakes today. His songs create an unforgettable image of commerce and recreation as they coexist on the Lakes today, with huge cargo ships like the Mather traversing vital shipping lanes and sharing the waters along America’s fourth coast with pleasure craft of all types and sizes.

Lee Murdock began his career in the mid-1970s with a simple interest in finding folk songs from his own local history. From the beginning, the songs he discovered have filled a void, as audiences quickly embraced these songs and asked for more. With a deeper understanding of the folk music process, Murdock’s repertoire combines historical research and contemporary insights. Murdock’s “The Spirit of Long Point” and “Low Bridge, Everybody Down” capture the experience of sitting on an iron ore freighter’s deck, and his rendition of Gordon Lightfoot’s “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald“ is a perennial favorite with his audiences.

The Steamship William G. Mather exemplifies Northeast Ohio’s proud heritage as a major maritime industrial and Great Lakes shipping center. The Mather is nicknamed “The Ship That Built Cleveland” since it has had a presence on Cleveland’s waterfront for 76 years, first as a working ore freighter and now as a floating maritime museum. The 618-foot long Mather had an exemplary 55-year career as a Great Lakes freighter flagship, and is the site of at least three Great Lakes industrial firsts. Concertgoers are invited to tour the historic Mather before (7 - 8 PM) and after (9:30 PM - 10:00 PM) the concert.

Click here for more information on the William G. Mather.




Help Wanted

08/22
Grand River Navigation is now accepting applications for the position of 2nd Assistant Engineer on the M/V Maumee. Qualified candidates should contact Mr. Sam Bomyea at 440-930-2024 (employment inquires only.)




Today in Great Lakes History - August 22

The ALGOPORT left Collingwood August 22, 1979 on her maiden voyage for Calcite, MI to load limestone bound for Spragge, Ont.

ONTADOC was launched August 22, 1903 as a) R.L. IRELAND.

The ENDERS M. VOORHEES was towed out of Duluth on August 22, 1987 by the tugs AVENGER IV and CHIPPEWA, and was the first of the 'Supers' towed off the Lakes for scrap.

The a) ROGER M. KYES (b ADAM E. CORNELIUS) sailed on her maiden voyage on August 22,1973 from Toledo to load iron ore at Escanaba, MI. She was built under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. This program allowed U.S. shipping companies to construct new vessels or to modernize their existing fleet by government guaranteed financing and tax deferred benefits. The KYES was the second of ten ships launched for American Steamship but the first to enter service under this arrangement. The total cost of the ten ships was more than $250 million.

On 22 August 1863, WILLIAM S. BULL (wooden propeller steam tug, 16T, built in 1861 at Buffalo) waterlogged and went down in a storm 40 miles east of Erie, PA. She was in company of the tug G.W. GARDNER and the canal boat M.E. PAINE, who saved her crew.

On 22 August 1876, the Canadian schooner LAUREL sank off Big Sandy Creek on Lake Ontario. The crew made it to shore in the yawl. The LAUREL was bound from Kingston to Charlotte with iron ore.

On 22 August 1900, one hundred years ago, SPECULAR (wooden propeller freighter, 264', 1742 gt, built in 1882 at Cleveland) was carrying iron ore when she was a "hit & run" victim by the steamer DENVER at 2:00 AM and sank in 6 minutes in the Pelee Passage on Lake Erie. 15 of her crew abandoned in her yawl and were saved. The remaining 5 scrambled up into the rigging and clung there until they were rescued four hours later by the steamer MARITANA and brought to Detroit. Salvagers worked on the wreck continuously until they gave up on 28 September. Wreck lies 3.16 miles SE from Pelee Passage light. She was owned by Republic Iron Co. of Cleveland.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Final Load for Taconite Harbor

08/21
The Charles M. Beeghly is scheduled to arrive in Taconite Harbor about 7:00 a.m. today to take the last 6,000 tons of pellet chips from the dock. They will then head to Silver Bay to finish loading with pellets.

The taconite plant and mine were shutdown in February 2001. The company mined taconite ore in Hoyt Lakes, Minn., and shipped taconite pellets by freighter from Taconite Harbor. LTV Steel Mining Co. was Minnesota's second-oldest taconite operation. In its 43 years, workers there produced and shipped 328 million tons of taconite pellets.

The 225-megawatt power plant that serviced the facilities could reopen as soon as sometime next year. Inbound shipments of coal would resume at that time. It could be several years, if at all, before there are any more outbound cargos.

Reported by: Mike Cleary




One person missing after small boat loses power

08/21
Sunday night a 26-foot Bayliner with five passengers onboard became disabled in the Detroit River's Livingstone Channel. The Livingstone is a narrow channel used by downbound commercial ships, it is lined on both sides with large boulders and leaves very little room for a commercial ship to maneuver.

The Bayliner was at the southern end of the channel when it lost power just as the saltie Clipper Falcon was heading downbound. With no room to maneuver the Clipper was bearing down on the small boat and sounded the ships horn, a vessel will sound an emergency signal on the horn when ever danger is present.

Four of the occupants of the Bayliner panicked and jumped from the boat, with only two of them grabbing lifejackets. The Falcon passed closed to the boat and struck the port side near the stern, leaving only a small scrape.

The crew on the Clipper Falcon disengaged the engines so the propeller would not strike the persons in the water, and once clear of the channel they dropped anchor and launched a rescue boat. One of the swimmers managed to get back on the disabled boat and call the Coast Guard.

The Canadian Coast Guard ship SORA was soon on scene and picked up two of the victims from the water. The fifth swimmer could not be located. A large search effort was launched for the missing teen. Rescue agencies searched until 2:00 a.m. and then resumed at daylight Monday. The search was officially called off Monday afternoon. A Canadian dive team is expected this morning to begin a search and recovery operation for the body of the missing 17-year old.

Chart of the Livingstone Channel.

Reported by: Len Miller




Canadian steelmakers get mixed result from import ruling

08/21
Canadian steel producers won a mixed decision in last week’s ruling on a trade case that targeted 12 countries accused of import dumping.

In a ruling released Friday, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal said hot-rolled carbon and alloy steel sheet and strip manufactured by nine of the countries caused material injury to domestic steelmakers. Countries found guilty of dumping imports included Brazil, Bulgaria, China, Taiwan, India, South Africa, Ukraine, the former republic of Yugoslavia and the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia were found at fault.

Steel from three other countries - South Korea, New Zealand and Saudi Arabia - did not harm Canadian producers, the tribunal said.

Algoma Steel in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, filed the case and was supported by other Canadian steelmakers.

In the first quarter, steelmakers in Canada and the United States blamed high levels of imports for taking a higher portion of market share, reducing prices and plunging more than a dozen steelmakers, including Algoma, into bankruptcy.

Reported by: John Stark




Blount-Barker Signs Contract For Sea Wolf Marine Tug

08/21
On August 9th, Blount-Barker Shipbuilding signed a contract with Sea Wolf Marine of Bayonne, New Jersey to build a 2,400hp, 85’ double chine, all welded twin screw tug.

Bristol Harbor Group has been contracted to modify the Blount classic 85’ tug design to take advantage of CNC (computerized numeric controlled) cutting.

The tug will be powered by (2) CAT 3512 engines; 4:1 twin gears and two (2) 65kW generators will supply ship service power. The tug will be keel cooled and equipped with (2) 4-blade stainless steel propellers measuring 70-78” in diameter.

The tug will be used for marine towing along the inland and intracoastal waterways on the East Coast. Construction is scheduled to start immediately with the completion date set for April 2002.

Click here for more information on Blount/Barker Shipbuilding.




Big Slowdown In Iron Ore Trade In July

08/21
A 23 percent decrease in iron ore shipments dominated Great Lakes shipping in July. The ore slump completely offset record months for western coal and Canadian stone and pulled shipments of the three major dry-bulk commodities from U.S. and Canadian ports down by nearly 11 percent compared to the same period last year.

Iron ore loadings at U.S. Great Lakes ports actually fell by 27 percent in July. This largely reflects the closure of LTV Steel Mining Company in Minnesota and impending cessation of shipments from its Lake Superior port of Taconite Harbor. Loadings at Taconite Harbor have slowed to a trickle, but many ports registered decreases compared to last July. With domestic steel production down by more than 13 percent for the year, Great Lakes iron ore shipments must follow the curve, as there is no other major use for iron ore except steel production.

The Lakes western coal trade out of Superior, Wisconsin, registered its best month ever: 2,253,840 net tons tons. This development is certainly welcome, but it did result in part from more carrying capacity being available for coal because demand for iron ore is off by so much. Superior's record month offset another decline at Lake Erie ports and in total pushed the coal trade up by more than 5 percent.

A record month at Canadian stone docks could not overcome sluggish demand at American ports. The trade slipped 4.1 percent in July.

For the season, shipments of iron ore are down by nearly 15 percent. Coal loadings have slipped by 5.7 percent and the stone trade is off by 3.9 percent.

The U.S.-Flag Lakes fleet has felt the impacts of this reduced demand. Two vessels have never sailed this season, and 6 others have been withdrawn from service for varying periods of time. The latest addition to the lay-up list is USS Great Lakes Fleet's Roger Blough. The 854-foot-long vessel is one of the largest working the Lakes, but she was idled indefinitely on August 15.

Reported by: The Lake Carriers' Association




Twin Ports Report

08/21
Duluth and Superior got off to a busy start early Monday. At 7:30 a.m., Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal. Algosoo was fueling at the Murphy Oil dock while waiting its turn at the coal dock. Not far behind, Columbia Star entered port and tied up at the port terminal to wait for the McCarthy and Algosoo. By midday, Columbia Star was ballasted down by the stern while work apparently was being done on its bow. Canadian Enterprise and Jean Parisien were both due at the coal dock later in the day.

Around the harbor, Canadian Voyager was loading at Cenex Harvest States, Algocen was unloading at St. Lawrence Cement, Lynx was loading at the Peavey elevator, Ziemia Chelminska was loading at Cargill B1 and Orsula was loading at the AGP elevator. While Duluth Harbor was bathed in sunlight, the Superior Entry was fogbound. Burns Harbor was proceeding into the fog on its way into the BNSF ore dock.

Later in the day, Joe Block was loading at the DMIR ore dock while Philip R. Clarke was unloading limestone.

Walter J. McCarthy Jr. loading coal at Midwest Energy Terminal.
Columbia Star entering Duluth harbor.
Another view of Columbia Star.
Algosoo fuels at the Murphy Oil dock while waiting for the coal dock.
Algocen unloads at the St. Lawrence Cement terminal in Duluth.

Reported by: Al Miller




Thunder Bay News

08/21
Once again it was a very slow day in Port under sunny skies and a light breeze. Monday afternoon the Sandra Mary remains tied up at Keefer Terminal while her dredge John Holden continues working near the mouth of the Mission River. the Tug W. N. Twolan picked up the barge McAllister132 and headed for an unknown destination while the tug Radium Yellowknife remains docked at Northern Woods old Ore Dock with all her empty lumber barges.

The Saltie Elm was still over at Western Grain Elevator #10 and the Sandviken is still anchored off the outside of the break wall.

Lake Superior Shipwreck Pictures by Scott Hall and Rob Farrow
Wheel Stand of the Madeira sitting in 80' of water in what’s left of the Pilothouse.
Dinning Room of the America.
Galley Stove of the America deep inside the wreck.
Grey Oak Wheel. View looking towards the bow.
Grey Oak wheel looking towards the stern in about 80' of water.
Mast Hole in the deck of the Samuel P. Ely in about 15' of water.
Skylite over the America's Salon area.
2nd Engineer's Sink on the stern of the Emperor in about 120' of water.
Cumberland Paddle Wheels in 80' of water.
Dish Shelves in the Pantry of the Emperor in 125' of water. Ladder to Engine Room of the America. Propeller of the Henry Chisholm in about 145' of water.
Roman Numeral marking on the bow post of the wreck Samuel P. Ely.
American flag painted on the Starboard side of the Engine.
Rock of Ages Lighthouse at Isle Royale Michigan.

History of Wrecks
Grey Oak - Schooner/Scow scuttled early 1900's in 98' of water in Thunder Bay.
Cumberland - Was a 214' wooden Side-Wheeler Passenger boat. Hit Rock of Ages reef July 25, 1877. Lies in 30' to 80' of water at Isle Royale.
America - Was a 185' Passenger/Freight boat. Struck rock in Washington Harbor, Isle Royale and sank in 2' to 75' of water on June 7, 1928. One dog lost.
Emperor - 525' ore carrier struck Canoe Rocks Isle Royale on June 4, 1947 and sank in 30' to 165' of water. 12 lives lost.
Madeira - Steel 436' barge blown against Golden Bluff Clif near Beaver Bay Minnesota and sank November 28, 1905. Pieces in 5' to 125' of water. One life lost.
Henry Chisholm - 270' wood bulk carrier ran aground on Rock of Ages reef Isle Royale on October 20, 1898. Broke and sank in 30' to 155' of water. Some wreckage lays on top of Cumberland wreck.
Samuel P. Ely - 200' wood schooner being towed as a barge slammed the Two Harbors Minnesota break wall and sank on October 30, 1896 in around 40' of water and reaches to within about 12' of the surface.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Alpena Update

08/21
The J.A.W Iglehart arrived into port Monday morning. It loaded cement for Whitefish, ON. The tug Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity was also scheduled to load Monday evening. The Paul H. Townsend is heading for South Chicago. The Alpena is going to St. Joseph to unload. The tall ships Pride of Baltimore II and the H.M.S Tecumseth were in Alpena all weekend and drew lots of people for the festival. They were expected to depart sometime on Monday.

Reported by: Ben and Chanda Bruski




Saginaw River News

08/21
The tug Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity finished unloading cement overnight at the Lafarge Terminal in Saginaw. The pair were downbound the Saginaw River below the I-75 Bridge at 8:15 a.m. Monday.

The Joseph H. Frantz was inbound Monday morning, arriving at the Essexville Sand & Stone Dock around 10:00 a.m. She was unloading there when the downbound Integrity passed her at 11:20 a.m. Also in Bay City is the U.S. Navy Cadet training ship Greyfox. She is docked in Downtown Bay City at the Wenona Dock.

The Frantz finished lightering by early afternoon, then moved upriver to the Wirt Bay City Dock to finish. She finished unloading, then waited for the upbound American Republic to pass. Once the Republic was clear, the Frantz proceeded to the Wirt turning basin at 6:45 p.m., turned, and headed out to the lake.

The American Republic was inbound the Saginaw River Monday night giving a security call passing the Front Range at 6:00 p.m. The Republic indicated she was headed to the Burroughs Dock in Zilwaukee to unload her cargo of AA Dolomite.

Greyfox at Wenona Park.
Jacklyn M and Integrity downbound passing the Greyfox.
Jacklyn M and Integrity passing the Joseph H. Frantz at Essexville Sand & Stone.
Integrity Close Up.
Joseph H. Frantz unloading at Essexville Sand & Stone.
Another View.
Franz at Bay City Wirt Dock.
American Republic passing Joseph H. Frantz at Bay City Wirt.
Republic/Frantz Another View.
American Republic Upbound at Wheeler's Landing.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Detroit Traffic

08/21
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Monday evening.

Karen Andrie upbound the Detroit River after leaving their barge at the MMT Dock in the Rouge River. The Andrie was upbound for Sterling Fuel.
Karen Andrie stern view.
Algoeast upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Coral Trader (Liberia) upbound at Fighting Island South Light.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Report

08/21
The CSL Niagara finished loading coal and departed by early Monday afternoon. The Algosteel followed the Niagara to load coal, she had to wait for coal that was in transit to the dock site. The Saginaw was in drydock at the Shipyard undergoing her survey and repairs. The dredge Buxton II with her equipment and their tug Muskegon was dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay several miles north of the Torco Dock. The hopper dredge Atchalafaya was dredging the ship channel north of the dredge Buxton II.

The Adam E. Cornelius and American Mariner remain in long term lay-up at their respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the McKee Sons and John J. Boland on Tuesday. The Algomarine on Wednesday morning, followed by the CSL Niagara on Thursday afternoon. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Docks will be the Armco on Sunday morning followed by the Buckeye on Monday evening.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Cliffs Victory at the City Docks during spring fitout. Several days later she will be out sailing.

Oakglen (1) upbound the very muddy Maumee River from the Craig Bridge headed for one of the elevators to load a grain cargo.

Heron Bay departing Midstates Elevator after loading a grain cargo. She is bound for a Canadian port to unload the grain.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Ohio mulls Kelleys Island wreck preserve

08/21
Ohio officials are working out the details of a proposal that would establish the state’s first shipwreck preserve in the waters around Kelleys Island.

The plan for the Kelleys Island Underwater Preserve was prepared by state officials working with island residents and representatives of maritime organizations.

"I'm anticipating that if things continue to go well, we could file the rules during the winter months and dedicate a preserve by next spring,'' Michael Colvin, director of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources' Ohio Coastal Management Program, told the Columbus Dispatch.

State law prohibits divers from removing artifacts from wrecks without a permit, but the law is rarely enforced. The planned preserve would cover about 40 square miles of water.

State maps of the area list six confirmed wrecks: the Exchange, Relief, Keepsake, W.R. Hanna, Adventure and F.H. Prince. Unconfirmed wrecks are the Constitution, I.B. Crocker, Oak Valley, C.N. Plummer, John Mark, Uncle Sam, QA Gillmore, King Sisters and Florence.

Most are 19th-century commercial vessels that ran aground or were otherwise lost during storms, although a few were abandoned or burned at the dock.

Divers generally support the Kelleys Island plan, but are wary of a proliferation of state rules and restrictions, said Georgann and Michael Wachter of Avon Lake. The couple belongs to several dive clubs and have published a series of guide books for Lake Erie divers.

"The divers' concern would be if a permit requirement restricted access or if divers had to go through some registration process or if a fee was collected,'' Georgann Wachter said.

No such requirements are part of the plan distributed yesterday.

Reported by: Kevin Parks




Weekly Updates

08/21
Due to a busy few days at my real job, the regular weekly updates will be delayed until Wednesday night.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 21

The BUFFALO's sea trials were conducted from August 21 through August 24, 1978.

The GEORGE A. STINSON was christened at Detroit, MI on August 21, 1978.

The f) CEDARGLEN arrived under tow at Port Maitland, Ont. on August 21, 1994 where she was scrapped.

THE HARVESTER cleared Lorain August 21, 1911 on her maiden voyage loaded with coal for Duluth, MN.

IMPERIAL QUEBEC was launched August 21, 1957

The KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1) encountered steering problems downbound at the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River on August 21, 1973. She avoided hitting the stone embankments but ran aground after clearing the cut. The damage sustained in this grounding ended her career.

The VENUS was sold to Acme Metals Inc. and was towed to Ashtabula, OH on August 21, 1975 where she was broken up in 1976.

On August 21, 1971 the CHARLES DICK severed two underwater cables in the Maumee River, cutting off power to east Toledo and the Cherry Street Bridge. Massive traffic jams developed on Toledo's streets.

The graceful schooner HUNTER SAVIDGE was launched on August 21, 1879 by the Grand Haven Ship Building Company.

On 21 August 1856, CHARTER (wooden, propeller vessel, 132'/197T, built in 1849 at Huron, OH as a sidewheeler) was bound from Cleveland for Buffalo with flour, oats and rye. She swamped and sank in a storm 6 miles above Fairport, OH. By the end of August, she had been damaged beyond repair but her machinery was recovered as she lay in relatively shallow water.

On 21 August 1861, BANSHEE (wooden propeller freighter, 119', 166 t, built in 1852 at Portsmouth, Ontario, named HERO in 1860-61) was carrying wheat, flour and butter to Montreal when her engine failed (broken shaft) and she was helpless in a storm on Lake Ontario. She foundered near Timber Island on Lake Ontario. One passenger died, but the crew of 10 made it to Timber Island. She was owned by Howard & Rowe of Quebec.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Transfer Departs Lay-up

08/20
The Canadian Transfer departed the North Slip in Sarnia shortly after 7:00 p.m. Sunday, bound for a northern Ontario port. The Transfer entered lay-up in mid June as a downturn in ore, coal and stone shipments left little work for the vessel.

While straight deck Canadian freighters will often enter lay-up in the summer it is very rare for a self unloader to go to the wall.

Transfer at the lay-up dock last month. Mike Nicholls

Reported by: Jamie Kerwin




New Barge Scheduled to Arrive

08/20
McAsphalt Industries new barge Norman McLeod is expected to arrive on Tuesday in Montreal. The barge was built at the Jinling Shipyard in China and will carry of heavy oils and asphalt products on the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence River and East Coast.

The South Korean registered tug Headong Star No. 99 is towing the barge. In Montreal a McKeil Marine tug will take the barge in tow and continue on the tow on the Seaway.

Completion of the barge's outfitting will take place and it is expected to sail by fall 2001. The two-phase construction offered the owners both economic advantages with steel construction and coatings and Canadian expertise in equipment and fit out quality.

The ice strengthened OPA double-hulled barge is capable of carrying 11,300 cu. m. of asphalt or other black oils at 23-ft. draft. State of the art heating system, bow thruster, onboard pollution prevention equipment, and overall design will make it safe and efficient liquid product carrier to service the internal needs for McAsphalt Industries and other third party business.

The modern barge will be fitted to the tug Everlast, a specially designed 6,000 hp twin screw tug fitted with an Articouple system of hydraulic rams allowing ship like navigation efficiency and performance in both speed, maneuverability and safety even in rough weather conditions. The tug and barge are also fitted with full towing capabilities. The overall unit length will be just over 500 ft. with a 70 ft. beam.

McAsphalt will provide all marketing and traffic services while Upper Lakes Group Inc. will manage the pair's operations.

The tug Everlast arrived from the Caribbean last year and dock below Lock 1 at Port Weller. In December 2000 it was move to Hamilton as crews prepared the tug for the barge's arrival.

The tug was built in 1977 at the Hashimoto Zosen Shipyard in Japan as hull number 396 and entered service under the name Bilibino for the Far Eastern Shipping Corporation out of Russia. She sailed as such until a sale in December of 1996 saw her ownership change to Portolos Salvage and Towage of Greece. They applied the name Everlast that was retained after she was again sold to McAsphalt Marine Transportation in November of 1999.

Its dimensions are 143-feet in length, 44-feet in width, 21-feet in depth. It is registered at 1,361 Gross tons, 408 Net with a deadweight tonnage of 336. Her two Daihatsu engines produce a combined 6,000 horsepower and drive 2 propellers that can push the tug along at around 13.5 knots.

Drawing of tug and barge from Upper Lakes Group.
Tug Everlast in Hamilton this past spring
Another view

Reported by: David Bowie




Windoc's Fate

08/20
An official announcement on the fate of the Windoc is expected this week. Rumors continue to circulate ranging from the vessel being declared a total loss to rumors of repairs.

Check back for full coverage as soon as an announcement is made.




Block Visits Hancock

08/20
The Joseph L. Block made a rare trip into Hancock, Mi on Sunday passing through the little used Portage Canal about noon. The vessel arrived in the Upper Peninsula port to unload a cargo of crushed limestone at the Mattila dock.

Heading to the dock.
Starting to unload.
Stern view.
View from the dock.
Unloading.
Another view.

Reported by: Jim Noetzel, Jack Holland and George La Motte




The Manitowoc Company to Build Two 155,000-Barrel Petroleum Tug/Barge Units

08/20
The Manitowoc Company, Inc., the leading provider of marine services for the U.S. Great Lakes maritime industry, announced today that it has received a contract from Vessel Management Services, Inc. of Seattle, Washington, to construct two double-hull tank barges and ocean tugs, plus an option to purchase two additional tug/barge units. The resulting vessels will comply with the provisions of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA '90), which has created a growing market for double- hulled tank carriers. Terms of the contract were not disclosed.

``This contract and the potential follow-on work confirms our role as a leader in the expanding market for double-hulled, OPA '90-class carriers,'' explained Terry D. Growcock, Manitowoc's president and chief executive officer. ``The unmatched and specialized capabilities of our marine operations were key to winning the contract. These new vessels will be among the largest and most sophisticated of their type ever constructed in the United States.''

Tom Byrne, president of Manitowoc's Marine Group, added: ``We expect that these contracts will create a backlog of work that could extend over 30 months. The four shipyards comprising Manitowoc Marine Group possess an industry-leading breadth of skills, which will be employed to construct these vessels efficiently and to the high-quality standards for which our yards are well known. For example, we will rely on Marinette's outfitting skills for constructing the tugs, while Bay Shipbuilding's expertise in steel fabricating, large-scale construction, and systems installation is ideal for building the double-hull tank barges.''

The initial units under contract consist of two 155,000-barrel, double-hulled tank barges and two 9,280-horsepower, twin-screw ocean tugs. Manitowoc has built tank vessels since the 1920's. In the 1980's, the company began constructing petroleum barges, and in 1999, Manitowoc delivered one of the most sophisticated, double-hull petroleum tug/barges now in operation.

Web link: The Manitowoc Company




Duluth Superior News

08/20
Saturday was yet another busy day in the Twin Ports. The Dimitris Y dropped anchor off the Duluth piers early in the morning to wait for Cenex Harvest States, but eventually moved much farther out onto Lake Superior due to strong northeasterly winds. The Ziemia Chelminska, berthed at Cargill, the Canadian Voyager, berthed at Cenex Harvest States layby, and the Lynx, berthed at Peavey, continued waiting to load grain.

The Orsula finished her first day of loading wheat at AGP at about 7:00 p.m.

The Federal Kivalina completed her load of corn at Harvest States at about the same time. She was assisted out of her berth by the G-tugs Minnesota and North Dakota before heading on her way out of the harbor, bound for Casablanca, Morocco. The Kivalina's departure either frees up the gallery loading berth for the Canadian Voyager or the Dimitris Y.

Saltie traffic in the harbor wasn't limited to the grain trade; the Scan Parter finished her unload of an unassembled tunneling machine and left the harbor in the late afternoon. Earlier in the day, the Sandviken arrived at the Duluth piers and was assisted by the North Dakota and Kentucky up to Hallett #6, where it quickly began loading bentonite.

Many other lakers were also in port Saturday. The Stewart J. Cort loaded taconite pellets at BNSF #5, and the CSL Tadoussac did the same at DM&IR #6. The Courtney Burton unloaded limestone at Cutler-Magner Superior before loading coal for Ashland at Midwest Energy. While unloading, the Burton was making some sort of minor repairs at the stern, assisted by Fraser Shipyard's workboat Maxine Thompson. Repairs must not have been complete when the time came to shift to the coal dock, as the Burton used the tug Minnesota to tow it backward up the river into Midwest Energy. It appeared that the Burton didn't make the move under her own engine power, although her bow thruster was hard at work assisting in maneuvering through strong northeasterly winds. Repairs were finished by the time the coal loading was complete, and the Burton quickly steamed out of the Twin Ports during the early evening bound for Ashland.

As the evening progressed, the Algobay arrived, also bound for Midwest Energy. The Cason J. Callaway followed shortly after, being the second vessel of the day to bring limestone to the harbor. The Callaway made a quick stop for fuel at Murphy before heading up the river to DM&IR #6 to unload. After unloading, the Callaway will load taconite pellets at the same dock.

Reported by: Eric Holst and Al Miller




Thunder Bay Update

08/20
Traffic in the Port of Thunder Bay remains light as do the winds out in the Harbor which suits the mass of fishermen that showed up for the fishing festival held this weekend. Aside from a few tows for disabled fishing boats, things were relatively quiet over the weekend.

The saltie Elm continues to load at Western Grain Elevator #10 up the Kaministiqua River. The Radium Yellowknife sits idle at the Northern Woods dock while the Sandra Mary is tied up at Keefer Terminals. The dredge John Holden was working near the Mouth of the Mission River.

As of Sunday morning the tug W.N. Twolan was listed as out of the Pascol Drydock, while her barge McAllister sits at Great West Timber dock.

The Quebecois moved over to Saskatchewan Pool 7a early on Saturday and by early evening was finished loading and heading down the Lake.

The tug Doug McKeil and her barge Ocean Hauler arrived in Port Saturday afternoon and proceeded up the Kaministiqua River to General Chemicals. She departed with her barge early Sunday morning.

The saltie Sandviken arrived late Sunday night and went to anchor outside the South Entrance. She was coming from Duluth where she had loaded 8,000 metric tons of Bentonite.

Reported by: Rob Farrow and Ron Konkol




Toledo Report

08/20
The Algosteel was unloading stone at the CSX stone dock on Sunday afternoon. When finished she will shift over to the coal dock to load at 7:00 a.m. this morning. The Saginaw and USCGC Neah Bay remain in both dry docks at the Shipyard undergoing their surveys and repairs. The dredge Buxton II with her related equipment and tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay several miles north of the Torco Dock. The hopper dredge Atchalafaya is also dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay further north of the Buxton II.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the CSL Niagara on Monday, followed by the McKee Sons and John J. Boland on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Buckeye on Wednesday morning followed by the Armco on Sunday morning.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Passing Brockville

08/20
Friday afternoon the Canadian Progress and the saltie Federal Yukon passed each other just above McNair Island at Brockville, Ontario on the St. Lawrence Seaway. The Canadian Progress was downbound to Montreal while the Federal Yukon was heading into Lake Ontario.

Progress passing.
Federal Yukon.
Stern view.

Reported by: Keith Giles




Help Wanted

08/20
Grand River Navigation is now accepting applications for the position of 2nd Assistant Engineer on the M/V Maumee. Qualified candidates should contact Mr. Sam Bomyea at 440-930-2024 (employment inquires only.)




Cruise the Seaway this fall- two for one

08/20
Looking for an unusual cruise? Jim Barker’s got just the ticket. Barker, through his new venture, Coastal Expeditions, is offering a 12-day cruise from Warren, R.I., up the Hudson River, through the Erie Canal and down the St. Lawrence Seaway, ending up in Quebec City aboard the American Canadian Caribbean Line’s M/V Grande Caribe. Passenger may also choose to take certain parts of the cruise, 4 or 8 days visiting selected ports.

The Grand Caribe was completed in 1997 by Blount Shipbuilding and is 182 feet long. It is registered in the U.S. and has a U.S. crew.

The cruise, which begins from Providence, R.I., is from September 3-15. Passengers may elect to complete the entire 12-day trip, or choose one leg of the cruise. The first four days of the trip includes passage on the Hudson River past New York City and the Erie Canal, with visits to West Point and Cooperstown (home of the Baseball Hall of Fame). After stopping at Oswego, N.Y. on Lake Ontario, the second leg includes a stop at the Wooden Boat Museum in Clayton, N.Y. and the beautiful scenery of the 1,000 Islands area. Winery visits and golf outings are also on the itinerary, with the trip winding up at Quebec City.

Costal Expeditions is now offering a Two for the Price of one promotion to viewers of this web site and subscribers to Great Laker Magazine. Booking for this trip is limited to 98 passengers.

Click here for more information. or call 800-556-7450




Cruise to Explore Shipwreck

08/20
The Great Lakes Cruise Company of Ann Arbor, Michigan and the Great Lakes Shipwreck Historical Society of Whitefish Point, Michigan have teamed up to organize the first ever live dive of a 1892 shipwreck, the wooden steamer Vienna, from the luxurious French cruise ship Le Levant. "Passengers aboard Le Levant are in for a remarkable experience," states Christopher Conlin, President of the Great Lakes Cruise Company, a division of Conlin Travel.

On September 14, 2001 the 90-passenger Le Levant will position itself over the Vienna. The Great Lakes Shipwreck Historical Society will position its research vessel next to Le Levant and hook up audio and video feeds into Le Levant's television system. Two divers with underwater cameras along with the Society's Phantom S4 Remotely Operated Underwater Vehicle, equipped with hi-tech cameras and lights, will dive to and explore the well-preserved ship. "Passengers will be able to hear a live narration from the dive team, as we explore the shipwreck," Farnquist states.

According to Tom Farnquist, Executive Director of the Great Lakes Shipwreck Historical Society, in 1892 the 191 ft., 1006 ton Vienna rounded Whitefish Point and was smashed into by another steamer and sank in 147 feet of water. "The Vienna sits upright, her decks, dory, lifeboat and other features are extremely accessible. Her painted watermarks -- white Roman numerals on an hourglass stern -- are still visible. Like most of Lake Superior's deeper wrecks, she is remarkably preserved from decay due to the near freezing water temperature," states Farnquist.

Click here for more information. or call 888-891-0203.




New Cruises in 2002

08/20
Delta Queen Coastal Voyages, a subsidiary of American Classic Voyages Co. will operate a total of 32 cruises on the Great Lakes in the summer of 2002 with its 224-passenger twin coastal cruisers Cape May Light and Cape Cod Light. The centerpiece of the schedule will be a series of 15 three-, four- and seven-night voyages from Chicago, IL operated by the Cape May Light. The ship also will sail several seven-night voyages from Buffalo, NY; Windsor, ONT and Duluth, MN. In its inaugural summer cruise season Cape Cod Light, currently under construction, will sail a series of eight seven-night cruises on the eastern Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway between Buffalo and Quebec City, PQ. Both ships will offer additional Great Lakes cruises as they move between different homeports.

``Great Lakes cruising is one of today's hottest vacations and we are delighted that with an expanded fleet of two ships, Delta Queen Coastal Voyages will be at the forefront with a series of truly unique cruises in the summer of 2002,'' said Scott McGinnis, Delta Queen Coastal Voyages' vice president of marketing. ``By virtue of our U.S. flag, we can take travelers to destinations that allow them to experience the rich heritage and culture of ports that are off-limits to larger, foreign-flag ships. We can explore what, to the foreign-flag cruise industry, has been the 'forgotten coastline' of the Great Lakes.''

A century ago, the Great Lakes were crisscrossed with U.S.-flag overnight passenger ships offering skillfully prepared regional cuisine amid plush surroundings that reflected the times. The Cape May Light and the Cape Cod Light are the first ships in decades specifically designed to revive the true spirit of classic Great Lakes travel. Both ships feature hearty and refreshing all-American cuisine and entertainment set within period Federal- style decor. Unlike their predecessors on the Great Lakes, however, Delta Queen Coastal Voyages' ships bow to the demands of the modern traveler and feature amenities like telephones, air-conditioning, televisions and VCRs in every stateroom.

After spending the spring sailing along the eastern seaboard of the United States, the Cape May Light will sail the Great Lakes from mid-May until mid- October, 2002. Cruises include
Halifax, NS to Buffalo - 14 nights - May 18, 2002.
Buffalo to Chicago - seven nights - June 1, 2002.
Chicago roundtrip - three nights - June 8, 29 and July 27, 2002.
Chicago roundtrip - four nights - June 11 and July 2 and 30, 2002.
Chicago roundtrip - seven nights - June 15, 22; August 3, 31; September 7 and 14, 2002.
Chicago to Duluth - seven nights - July 6 and August 10, 2002.
Duluth to Windsor - seven nights - July 13 and August 17, 2002.
Windsor to Chicago - seven nights - July 20 and August 24, 2002.
Chicago to Buffalo - seven nights - September 21, 2002.
Buffalo to Halifax - 14 nights - September 28, 2002.

The Cape Cod Light is scheduled to enter service on April 20, 2002 and spends both the spring and fall sailing an extensive program of seven- and 14- night cruises along the eastern seaboard of the United States.

The Cape Cod Light will sail the Great Lakes and picturesque St. Lawrence Seaway from mid-June until mid-September, 2002.
Cruises include * Halifax to Buffalo - 14 nights - June 22, 2002.
* Buffalo to Quebec City - seven nights - July 6, July 20, August 3 and August 17, 2002.
* Quebec City to Buffalo - seven nights - July 13, July 27, August 10 and August 24, 2002.
* Buffalo to Halifax - 14 nights - August 31, 2002.

By booking their cruise at least six months in advance, passengers can save up to $1,600 per couple. Incorporating the 6-month Early Booking Bonus, cruise-only fares for both ships, including port charges, begin as low as $995 per person double occupancy for three-night cruises, $1,395 for four-night cruises, $2,295 for seven-night cruises and $4,195 for 14-night cruises. For more information, consumers should contact their travel agent.

The ships will visit more than 35 cities and towns, offering a unique perspective on the heritage and charm of the Great Lakes region. Unlike most cruises today, many Delta Queen Coastal Voyages shore excursions are included in the fare. Passengers will be able to experience the Victorian heritage of Manistee, MI; relive the era of 19th century fur traders at Old Fort William in Thunder Bay, ONT; hike the Tiger Dunlop Heritage Trail in Goderich, ONT; witness an authentic Ojibwe Pow-Wow in Little Current, ONT; tour fabled Door County, WI and tap their toes at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Museum in Cleveland, OH. Optional excursions include carriage rides on Michigan's car- free Mackinac Island and the thrill of riding a ``dune buggy'' in Saugatuck, MI.

Click here for more information.

Reported by: Kevin Griffin and Nathan Boyle




Today in Great Lakes History - August 20

The INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORT arrived at Toronto, Ont. August 20, 1969 on her maiden voyage with fuel oil.

The R. BRUCE ANGUS in tandem tow with the ULS steamer GORDON C. LEITCH behind the tug IRVING CEDAR arrived at Setúbal, Portugal August 20, 1985 where they were broken up.

August 20, 1920 the WILLIS L. KING, upbound light in Whitefish Bay, was in collision with and sank the downbound Steel Trust steamer SUPERIOR CITY. The SUPERIOR CITY was struck nearly amidships and when the cold water reached her engine room, her boilers exploded. She sank immediately with 29 of her 33 crew members aboard.

The US.266029 (a.WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) departed her lay-up berth at the Rouge slip on August 20, 1986 in tow of Gaelic tugs and she was taken to Detroit Marine Terminals on the Rouge River, where her pilothouse was removed to be displayed at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Detroit's Belle Isle.

The TEXACO WARRIOR (1) punctured her tank in a grounding accident in the Welland Canal near Bridge 10 on August 20, 1964.

On 20 August 1899, HUNTER SAVIDGE (2-mast, wooden schooner, 117'/152GT, built in 1879 at Grand Haven, MI) capsized in a squall or tornado in Lake Huron. 5 survivors, including Capt. Fred Sharpstein, were rescued from the overturned schooner by the steamer ALEX McVITTIE. However, 5 lost their lives, including the captain's wife and their son, the ship's owner's wife and daughter, and the Mate. Capt. Sharpstein patrolled the beaches looking for the bodies of his wife and son for months but they were never found. The wreck was found in 1987 near Grindstone City, MI.

On 20 August 1852, ATLANTIC (wooden sidewheeler, 267', 1155 t, built in 1849 at Detroit) was loaded with immigrants when she collided with the propeller freighter OGDENSBURG and quickly sank south of Long Point on Lake Erie at about 2:30 AM. Of the 600 on board, estimates of death range from 150 to 250. Numerous salvage attempts have been made through the years up through 1989 since there were supposed to be valuables on board when she went down.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Randy Johnson, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Heavy-lift cargo unloaded at Duluth

08/19
Workers at the Duluth port terminal Saturday unloaded a 438-ton tunnel-boring machine from the heavy-lift vessel Scan Partner.

Using the port terminal's twin 90-ton gantry cranes, employees of Lake Superior Warehousing Co. began promptly at 8 a.m. and 30 minutes later had the first of 13 components loaded onto waiting trucks. The first component off the ship appeared to be one of the 95-ton mouths of the boring machine. It was loaded onto side-by-side lowboy trailers pulled by semi-tractor trucks. The remaining components were unloaded as the day progressed.

The so-called mechanical worm, manufactured by Herrenknecht AG in Germany, will be used to burrow twin 7,300-foot light-rail tunnels that will link the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport passenger terminal to the Mall of America and the Nicollet Mall in downtown Minneapolis.

Although the Scan Partner is equipped with 100-ton-capacity cranes, the dock workers chose to use the port terminal's gantry cranes to unload the cargo. These cranes were built in Duluth for the port terminal a short time before the St. Lawrence Seaway opened.

The machine pieces will be transported to the Twin Cities by Kirscher Trucking of Virginia, Minn., with the two largest units moving down Interstate 35 on side-by-side trucks with parallel trailers. These two pieces will be moved at night, with the first scheduled to leave the port terminal at 10 p.m. Monday with the other to follow at 10 p.m. Tuesday.

The tunneling machine was brought to Duluth aboard the Antigua-flag Scan Partner, a 331-foot roll-on/roll-off general cargo vessel owned and operated by Harren & Partner Schiffahrts GmbH & Co., of Emden, Germany. Local agent for the vessel is Duluth's Guthrie-Hubner Inc. Logistical planning of the project took several months, according to Peter Schweizer of Schenker Inc. in New York. The diameter of more than 18 feet on some pieces of the machine presented a challenge both in Germany and in the United States. "We chose Duluth as a port because we wanted to bring the mechanical boring machine as close as possible to the job site by ocean freight. The port choice was also influenced by this Port's capability to handle the cargo," Schweizer said.

Duluth has handled a number of heavy-lift cargoes over the past 20 years. Shippers like to use the port because ships can carry cargoes deep into the Midwest and because the port terminal has easy access to highways and railroads with sufficient clearance to carry outsized loads.

"Lake Superior Warehousing has established an excellent reputation for handling heavy-lift cargoes," said Gary Nicholson, president of Lake Superior Warehousing. "Last year alone we handled several enormous pieces of equipment built in Japan and destined for Canada's Athabasca Oil Sands Project via record-setting rail shipments; turbine generator equipment from Sweden destined for Chaska, Minn.; large pieces of ductwork from Bremen, Germany, destined for Trimont, Minn.; an apron conveyor system manufactured in Bremen for a crane in Alberta; and a stone crusher manufactured in Pennsylvania and destined for northern Alberta for another oil sands recovery project."

Pictures by Al Miller
Heavy-lift vessel Scan Partner at the Duluth port terminal.
Scan Partner docked alongside the port terminal's two 90-ton gantry cranes.
Dock workers attach a lifting cable to the hook on one of the port terminal's 90-ton gantry cranes.
Scan Partner, bow shot.
Scan Partner and cranes.
Dock worker signals to a crane operator just before the first lift.
Cranes begin lowering the first piece of the boring machine onto two side-by-side lowboy trailers.
Cranes lowering machinery.
Cranes lower part of the boring machine to waiting trucks.
Closeup of equipment being lowered onto trucks.
Stern view of Scan Partner, a heavy-lift and ro-ro vessel. The vertical structures at the stern are the exhaust stacks.
Close up of the first piece of the boring machine being secured to the trucks.

Web links to the Port of Duluth: Duluth Seaway Port Authority
Duluth Shipping News


Reported by: Al Miller




Anderson Delivers Coal

08/19
The Arthur M. Anderson arrived in Gladstone Saturday night to deliver coal. The Anderson drew a large crowd to watch as it unloaded.

Anderson arrives.
Boom is swung out.
Unloading.

Reported by: Eric and Sandy Chapman




Arizona Dream Passage

08/19
The saltie Arizona Dream passed through the Welland Canal Saturday heading upbound. The ship is the former Mina Cebi registered in Malta. It is travelling from unloading in Toronto and Hamilton.

Arizona Dream passing Port Colborne. The pilot boat J.W. Cooper is seen off her stern and in the distance on the east side of the canal is the Tarantau.

Reported by: Bonney Heatherington




Escanaba Update

08/19
On Friday the Wilfred Sykes arrived in Escanaba with a cargo of Limestone from Port Inland for the South Reiss dock. It then shifted to load ore. Next Saturday the Kaye E Barker, Mesabi Miner and Joseph H Thompson are expected to load in Escanaba. This will be the Thompson's first trip since it entered lay-up in July.

Wilfred Sykes arrives.
Thompson in lay-up.
Stern view.

Reported by: Scott Best




Detroit Traffic

08/19
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Saturday.

CGB 12002 & Mobile Bay downbound at Grassy Island.
Close up of Mobile Bay.
Stern view.
Titanas (Malta) at DMT2.
Stern view.
George A Stinson unloading at Zug Island.
Stern view.
J A W Iglehart upbound at Fighting Island North Light.
Stern view.
Southdown Challenger upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
U.S.E.C. Veler & tug Forney.
Close up.
Stern view.
Diamond Belle downbound entering the Ecorse Channel.
Stern view.
Paul H Townsend upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Algonova downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
American Republic upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
John G Munson upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Sam Laud upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Polydefkis P (Greece) upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Saturn Blimp.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

08/19
The Reserve was at the Torco Dock unloading ore on Saturday. The H. Lee White was due in at the CSX Docks to load coal around 7:00 p.m. Saturday night. The tug Donald C. Hannah with her barge was at the Hocking Valley Dock across the slip was her fleet mate James A. Hannah with her barge at the Sun Oil Dock loading cargo. The Paul H. Townsend was at the Lafarge Dock unloading cement.

The Saginaw and the USCGC Neah Bay remain in both dry docks at the Shipyard undergoing their surveys and repairs. The dredge Buxton II and related equipment with their tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay several miles north of the Torco Dock. The hopper dredge Atchalafaya was dredging the ship channel further north of the Buxton II.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel late Sunday night followed by the CSL Niagara early Monday morning. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Buckeye on Wednesday morning, followed by the Armco on Sunday morning.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
J.F. Schoelkopf Jr. (Erie Sand-green hull) getting ready to back into the C&O Coal Docks to load a coal cargo.

Lawrendoc heading downbound the Maumee River from the Cherry Street Bridge. She has just finished loading a grain cargo at one of the Elevators upriver.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - August 19

The JOHN E.F. MISENER (2) grounded near Hard Island on the St. Lawrence River August 19, 1966 suffering bow damage.

The ROBERT S. PIERSON was sold to P & H. Shipping Ltd. on August 19, 1982 and renamed e) SPRUCEGLEN.

The ARIZONA was launched on August 19, 1868.

On August 19, 1915, the HENRY PEDWELL burned at Wiarton.

CARDINAL (3) was towed to the Strathearne Terminal in Hamilton, Ont. on August 19, 1974 for scrapping.

On 19 August 1909, CITY OF GREENBAY (wooden propeller passenger/package freight, 134'/257GT, built in 1880 at Fort Howard, WI as the sidewheeler M. C. HAWLEY) caught fire while crossing Saginaw Bay, burned to the waterline and sank.. This wasn't her first experience with this type of accident since on 17 November 1887, she had burned to a "total loss" in Lake Michigan.

August 19, 1930 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 7 towed the disabled tug GREILING from Frankfort to the Manitowoc shipyards.

The propeller QUEBEC was launched at the Chisholm & Simpson yard at Chatham, Ontario on 19 August 1874. She was built for the Beatty Line and designed to run between Sarnia and Duluth.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Windoc Update

08/18
The damaged Windoc remains docked in the Welland canal awaiting its fate. Salvage crews were able to repair the eight hull fractures that caused the vessel to take on water. The leaking water has been pumped from the ballast tanks and the Windoc now sits at a draft acceptable for towing. It is expected to remain in the Welland Canal over the weekend and could be towed as early as next week.

No official announcement has been by the ships owners, N.M. Paterson and Sons Ltd. but they are rumored to have declared the hull a constructive total loss. If the rumors are true the vessel will be in the hands of the insurance company. The vessel would be towed and have her cargo of grain unloaded, likely ports for the unloading would be Hamilton, Prescott or Windsor.

With repair of the damaged stern section estimated to cost $5 million to $10 million, her future career is likely to be as a barge. Once permanent repairs are made to the hull damage her stern section could be cut away and notched for a tug to push.

Pictures by Dave Wobser
Windoc on Wednesday morning.
Close up of water being pumped from the vessel.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Scan Partner Arrives

08/18
The vessel carrying the mechanical boring machine built in Germany and bound for the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport as part of a light-rail project arrive at the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge Friday evening.

The Scan Partner proceeded to Duluth’s Clure Public Marine Terminal where Lake Superior Warehousing Co., Inc., will begin unloading the equipment about 8:00 a.m. this morning.

The largest component of the shipment is scheduled to depart the Clure Public Marine Terminal via the tandem trucks at approximately 10:00 p.m. Monday. A second large component of the shipment is scheduled to depart the Terminal via the tandem trucks at approximately 10:00 p.m. Tuesday.

Reported by: Duluth Seaway Port Authority




Repairs in Sarnia

08/18
The Holland flagged Turid Knutsen was at Sarnia's Government Dock on Friday for what appeared to be repairs to her propeller. The vessel was ballasted down at the bow with the stern raised while repairs were made. The Knutsen was built in 1993 in Spain and is 533-feet long by 75-feet wide. She made her first appearance on the lakes in April 1993. Last season she made three visits to the lakes in May, July and November.

In other Sarnia news, the Canadian Transfer remains in lay-up in the North Slip.

Reported by: Dan Sweeley




Frantz in Holland

08/18
The Joseph H. Frantz arrived in Holland on Friday clearing the piers inbound about noon. She docked at Brewer Coal and Dock and unloaded two grades of limestone.

The Frantz was heard saluting the campers along the channel as she passed outbound around 9:45 p.m. By 10:30 p.m. they had cleared the channel and were heading north. Their next destination was reported to be Port Inland.

Reported by: Dale Rosema and Bob Vande Vusse




Swimmer ends quest on Superior

08/18
Heavy weather Thursday night forced Jim Dreyer to give up his quest to swim 62 miles across Lake Superior.

Dreyer's support crew pulled him out of the water about 9 p.m. Thursday. He still had 45 miles to go to reach his goal on the Keweenaw Peninsula.

At times Wednesday and Thursday, Dreyer struggled with cold water, strong currents, waves up to eight feet, numb hands and feet and weather conditions that prevented his crew from getting him food

Reported by: Al Miller




Twin Ports Report

08/18
Duluth-Superior was busy again Aug. 16. Alpena departed about mid-morning from Lafarge’s Duluth terminal; Ziemia Chelminska was docked at the port terminal to unload steel coils; Isolda was loading at the AGP elevator; Federal Kivalina was loading at Cenex-Harvest States.

Across the harbor, Clipper Falcon was loading at Peavey elevator while James R. Barker was loading taconite pellets at BNSF.

Paul R. Tregurtha was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal while Oglebay Norton waited at the port terminal for its turn at the loading dock. Atlantic Erie was due in later in the day to load behind the Oglebay Norton.

Saltie Orsula remained anchored on the lake waiting for a grain berth.

The DMIR's Two Harbors ore dock is scheduled to load three vessels on Friday Edwin H. Gott, Presque Isle and Armco. St. Clair, a periodic visitor to Two Harbors, is set for Saturday. Oglebay Norton is back on the dock's schedule for Aug. 21.

As evening approached the Isolda finished loading and departed AGP, bound for Belgium with wheat. She waited momentarily for the Canadian Voyager to arrive under the Aerial Bridge and the two freighters then passed just inside the Duluth piers. The Voyager continued up the river and docked at the Cenex Harvest States layby berth, just ahead of the Federal Kivalina.

The outbound Isolda passed the inbound Scan Partner on Lake Superior as a storm loomed over the Duluth hills. The Scan Partner arrived through the Duluth piers and the Orsula weighed anchor and followed.

Waiting just inside the piers were three G-tugs side-by-side. The Kentucky broke formation first to assist the Scan Partner into the Port Terminal. The Minnesota and North Dakota waited to assist the Orsula into AGP. The two salties slid into their berths simultaneously on Rice's point as heavy rain moved across the harbor.

Other traffic on Friday included the research vessel Lake Guardian making an evening departure from the DECC, the Mesabi Miner and Stewart J. Cort loading at Burlington Northern Santa Fe. Saturday promises to be busy as well, with arrivals including Courtney Burton, CSL Tadoussac, Dimitris Y, Sandviken, Algobay, and Cason J. Callaway.

Reported by: Al Miller and Eric Holst




Thunder Bay News

08/18
Traffic in the port of Thunder Bay remains light after several vessels departed during the past week. The tanker Jade Star departed Wednesday from Petro-Canada. The Federal Yoshino, Cartierdoc and the Canadian Enterprise all departed on Thursday. The Enterprise had arrived at Thunder Bay Terminals late night on Wednesday.

The local tug Robert W. moved over to Keefer Terminal after picking up the barge F. R. McQueen and by Thursday morning the pair had departed for an unknown destination. The W. N. Twolan remains in the Pascol Drydock while her barge sits empty the at Great West Timber dock. The Sandra Mary remains docked at Keefer Terminal while her dredge John Holden continues to work at an unknown location in the Harbor.

The tug Radium Yellowknife returned to port Friday morning towing empty lumber barges. She had departed on the Monday with out the barges for Superior Wisconsin. The tug is docked at the Northern Woods Old Ore Dock with the empty barges.

One other arrival Friday saw the saltie Elm making her first trip of the season to Thunder Bay. She arrived late afternoon in ballast and proceeded up the Kaministiqua River where she tied up at the Western #10 elevator to begin loading.

The Quebecois is scheduled to arrive sometime today.

Reported by: Rob Farrow and Ron Konkol




Detroit Traffic

08/18
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Friday evening.

Yacht Helene downbound off Nicholson's.
Stern view.
Volonga (Cyprus) loading at the ADM Elevator in Windsor.
Stern view.
Algocen upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view (note blimp over head).
Paul H. Townsend downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Mc Kee Sons & tug Invincible upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Reserve downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Capt. Larry Leveille

08/18
Capt. Larry Leveille passed away at Welland County Hospital, Welland, ON on August 9, 2001. He retired from P. & H. in 1992 and previously sailed for Soo River.




Help Wanted

08/18
Grand River Navigation is now accepting applications for the position of 2nd Assistant Engineer on the M/V Maumee. Qualified candidates should contact Mr. Sam Bomyea at 440-930-2024 (employment inquires Only.)




Today in Great Lakes History - August 18

CANADIAN ENTERPRISE was float launched on August 18, 1979.

On August 18, 1972, $50,000 in bottom damage occurred when the CHAMPLAIN (3) hit an obstruction in the Trenton Channel, on the lower Detroit River.

The KINSMAN ENTERPRISE (1) was launched August 18, 1906 as a) NORMAN B. REAM for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

On 18 August 1907, KATE WHITE (wooden propeller steam tug, 62'/28GT, built at Erie, PA in 1885 as a yacht) sank near the harbor entrance at Fairport, OH.

On 18 August 1878, JAVA (iron twin propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 232', 1525 gt, built in 1873 at Buffalo) was sailing from Bay City for Chicago and Milwaukee with mixed merchandise, including 300 tons of fine household goods, parlor stoves, salt, etc. She was a twin-screw and the main theory of her loss in good weather was that her starboard shaft coupling came loose and the shaft slid out the stern, allowing water to flood through the sleeve. nevertheless, she sank quickly, 15 miles off Big Sable Pointe on Lake Michigan in over 300 feet of water. The crew escaped in lifeboats and were picked up by passing steamers.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Crewmen narrowly escape in bridge accident

08/17
Concerned his vessel might drift out of control, the Windoc’s wheelsman remained at his post even as the Allenburg Bridge tore the pilothouse apart last Saturday night on the Welland Canal.

Captain Ken Strong, the Windoc’s master, ordered wheelsman Alan Hiscock to leave the pilothouse, but a union official said Hiscock remained at the wheel because he was worried the vessel would drift into the canal embankment.

``At the last minute, he just jumped to the floor,'' Bill Ross, vice president of the Seafarers' International Union of Canada, told the Torstar News Service. ``All the metal just crunched above him. Some of the metal bits came toward him, but nothing touched him. He was lucky he wasn't hurt.'' The pilothouse was sheered from the vessel leaving about 2-feet over the spot where Hiscock lay on the floor.

Hiscock reportedly abandoned the pilothouse only after it had passed under the bridge. He ran down an interior stairway before the vessel caught fire. As Hiscock made his way to the main deck the vessel caught fire, he sounded the fire alarm before exiting.

Not realizing Hiscock remained at the wheel, the Windoc's Captain and 3rd Mate left the pilothouse moments before the impact and made their way down the external ladder that runs from the bridge wing to the deck. All crew members were accounted for and began fighting the fire with onboard equipment.

Ross’ description of events came from interviews crew members had with Canada’s federal transportation safety board about the accident.

Early estimates place the damage to the Windoc more than $5 million damage to the Windoc. About $1 million in damage may have been caused to the lift bridge.

The bridge may be out of service until next year. The St. Lawrence Seaway Corp. has indicated it should know within a week how long repairs will take.

Seaway spokeswoman Sylvie Moncion has said the lift bridge caused the collision but added the corporation does not know whether it resulted from mechanical failure or human error.

Images before the accident.
Picture of the Windoc.
Stern view.

Reported by: Greg Jackson




Theodore Too in Erie

08/17
The tug Theodore Too arrived in Erie, PA Thursday evening at about 7:15 p.m. The tug will be in port through Monday at the Erie Maritime Museum and will be open for tours Friday through Sunday. Theodore is docked behind the Blasco Library next to the Brig Niagara.

After departing Erie the Theodore Too's next stop is unknown. The tug's web site lists the next stop as Windsor, Ont. on September 15.

For more details on the Theodore Too's schedule while on the lakes visit www.theodoretugboat.com

Please send images or reports of Theodore Too sightings to moderator@boatnerd.net

Theodore Too at dock.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Toledo Update

08/17
Thursday the Jean Parisien was loading coal at the CSX Docks and expected to depart later that morning. The Algomarine was waiting to follow with the CSL Niagara and Arthur M. Anderson due in at the CSX Docks later Thursday evening to follow Algomarine respectively. The USCGC Bramble was at the City Docks. The USCGC Neah Bay and the Saginaw are in both dry docks at the Shipyard undergoing their surveys and misc. repairs.

The Nanticoke was at the T.W.I. Dock loading coke she was expected to depart later in the evening. Canadian Olympic was at Anderson's "K" Elevator loading a grain cargo. The dredge Buxton II with her dredging equipment and tug Muskegon are dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay several miles north of the Torco Dock. Also the hopper dredge Actchalafaya is dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay north of the dredge Buxton II.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the H. Lee White, Algosteel, and CSL Niagara on Sunday, followed by the H. Lee White, McKee Sons, and Algomarine on Monday. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Buckeye on Wednesday morning Aug. 22.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Silverdale backing away from the C&O Coal Docks bound for her next port of call.

Consumers Power in Boland-Cornelius colors upbound from the Cherry Street Bridge with a load of salt bound for the City Docks. The S.T. Crapo is in the background at the Huron Cement Docks.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland News

08/17
The Cuyahoga was at the West 3rd Street Dock unloading stone on Thursday. She departed the dock site around 3:00 p.m. with the tug Delaware assisting her downriver out to the lake. The tug Sea Eagle II with her barge St. Marys Cement II was unloading cement at the Blue Circle Cement Dock she was expected Friday morning sometime. The tug James Palladino with her barge Kellstone One was at their dock unloading stone. The American Republic finished unloading ore at the LTV Steel and departed around 12:30 p.m. heading downriver for the lake. No other vessels were in port at the time of this report.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Hamilton Report

08/17
The fuel storage vessel Provmar Terminal is no longer in Heddle Marine's floating drydock, but moored on the north face of Pier 14. The barge LeVent is now in the floating drydock being painted below the water line.

The Arizona Dream, formerly the Mina Cebi has been at Pier 12 for the last two days unloading steel products. There was no unloading activity seen Thursday evening, the vessel looks to be in ballast.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Clarkson Update

08/17
The Algocen was loaded and departed St. Lawrence Cement early Thursday afternoon with cement clinker aboard. Showers moved into the area late that afternoon. By evening heavier rain and mist made it difficult to identify a laker unloading limestone into the St. Lawrence Cement hopper, the vessel was about half unloaded Thursday. The James Norris stood offshore waiting her turn to come in and use the hopper. The boom lights and lighting on the Upper Lakes insignia on the Norris' funnel stood out through the rain and mist.

Reported by: Bryan Ridley




Today in Great Lakes History - August 17

On August 17, 1987, CADILLAC was towed by the tugs GLENADA and ELMORE M. MISNER, from Toledo's Frog Pond on the first leg of her journey to be scrapped.

At 4:00 PM on 17 August 1869, the schooner CARLINGFORD was launched at the Fitzgerald and Leighton yard in Port Huron, Michigan with plenty of spectators on hand. Robert Montgomery of Buffalo, the owner, built the vessel for the grain trade. her capacity was 30,000 bushels of grain. After launching, she still had to have her masts (96', 98' and 94') and rigging installed. At the time, she was the largest sailing vessel built in Port Huron. her dimensions were 155' keel, 165' overall, 31'6" beam and 12'8" depth. 50 men worked on her and she cost $35,000.

Data from: Joe Barr, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Blough Arrives

08/16
As expected, Roger Blough arrived at Fraser Shipyards on Wednesday afternoon to begin lay-up, the length of which is not known at this time.

Reported by: Al Miller




Mariner Set to Sail

08/16
As crews prepare the Blough for lay-up, crews in Toledo will soon begin fit out of the American Mariner. Uncertainties over the future of U.S. steel makers sent the Mariner into temporary lay-up in May.

She is expected to depart lay-up on August 25 and load coal in Sandusky for Consumers Power in Essexville, Mi. This will leave the Adam E. Cornelius as the only remaining American Steamship Company vessel in lay-up.

Reported by: M. Harris




Windoc Update

08/16
Traffic continued to crawl past the damaged Windoc on Wednesday. On board, salvage crews were working to control flooding so the vessel can be moved.

Investigators from the Seaway and Transportation Safety Board of Canada continue to investigate the accident that took place on Saturday leaving the Allenburg Bridge damaged and the Windoc out of commission. The cause of the accident has not been established, but investigators report the bridge was in motion when the collision took place.

Talk of the incident has turned to lawsuits and repairs. The St. Catharines Standard Newspaper reported that estimates for the repair of the damaged sections of Windoc could run from $5 million to $10 million, according to industry experts. The price rises considerably if a new stern section was to be built, that type of repair is estimated at $25 million to $30 million.

In a statement issued on Tuesday by N.M. Paterson and Sons Ltd., the owners of the Windoc, company officials said that until the full extent of the damage is known the company won't be making any decisions on repairs or replacement of the vessel.

Port Weller Dry Docks, located at the entrance to the canal, is working on a repair estimate. Port Weller is the closest dry dock to the damaged vessel.

Windoc on Wednesday morning.
Close up of water being pumped from the vessel.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Theodore Too in Port Colborne

08/16
The tug Theodore Too passed through the Welland Canal Wednesday as it heads for Erie, PA. where it will be open for tours this weekend. Wednesday evening the tug was stopped in Port Colborne at the Lake Erie entrance to the canal.

Theodore Too is a specially built representation of the popular children’s TV show tug. The real Theodore is only a 20" model. The big Theodore Too is 16 months old and has traveled over 12,000 miles along the east coast of Canada and the US. This is her first venture in to the Great Lakes.

For more details on the Theodore Too's schedule while on the lakes visit www.theodoretugboat.com

Please send images or reports of Theodore Too sightings to moderator@boatnerd.net

Docked in Port Colborne.
Close up.

Reported by: Bonney Heatherington




Back to Work

08/16
Laid off workers at the Tilden Mine are returning to the job at least two weeks earlier than expected. Repairs on a damaged kiln have been completed ahead of schedule, full operations will resume Sunday.

About 250 employees of the mine were laid off late last month because of a 20 foot crack in on of the mine's two pelletizing kilns. The kilns are used to turn iron ore into pellets at temperatures of about 2,400 degrees. The mine was shut down in 1998 for about six weeks for a similar problem.

Reported by: Jim Grill




Cleveland Harbor Tonnage Report

08/16
The July 2001 Cleveland Harbor report shows a large decline from the same period last year. The port saw only 10 iron ore cargoes for the month compared to 36 in July 2000. This July ore total is the worst since the Depression of the 1930's.
Click here to view the report




Canadian Strike Could Close Seaway in Busy Season

08/16
A strike could close the St. Lawrence Seaway at the beginning of its busiest season if contract talks between workers and management of the waterway's Canadian-owned locks continue to stall, according to an article in the Watertown Times. Nine months of negotiations between union members and the Canadian management of the binationally controlled waterway have failed to uncover common ground in safety standards or pay scales.

"We have made no progress," said David W. Lee, a negotiator for Canadian Auto Workers, which represents 500 Seaway workers at locks from Montreal to Niagara Falls.

A spokeswoman for the St. Lawrence Management Corp. was less willing to write off the talks. "The negotiations are ongoing, Sylvie Moncion said from the corporation’s Cornwall headquarters, "They do have the right to strike after September 30. But I don't think a strike is likely ."

Safety of linesmen, who oversee ship's secure passage through locks, tops the workers list of contested issues. The union insists that three linesmen is the minimum number to safely moor a ship two football fields long to lock walls with heavy cables. While one person spots the vessel and the other workers securing the lines.

Management wants to reduce the number of linesmen per lock transit to two. "That is a strike issue," Mr. Lee said. Also contested are pay scale changes and raises.

Mr. Lee said he is pessimistic about reaching a resolution before the waterway's busy fall season, when Midwest grain harvests are shipped to Atlantic ports. "There is so much animosity between the employees and the company, it is hard to swallow anything they say," he said." Trust is very low." After accepting staff cutbacks that erased 400 positions over the last eight years, it's hard to face more, he said.

Ms. Moncion is more optimistic. "We are still talking," she said.

Wednesday began a three-day meeting ---the two parties last before a professional conciliator mediates 14 days of eleventh-hour talks spaced over six weeks. After that, we'll see them on the picket line," Mr. Lee said.

Canada owns four locks in the Montreal area, one at Iroquois Dam and eight in the Welland canal, which bypasses Niagara Falls. The only American-owned locks are Eisenhower and Snell, near Massena. The Seaway is managed by separate American and Canadian agencies that coordinate development and customer service. Unlike the U.S. federal St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp., the Canadian agency was privatized in 1998. Now a nonprofit corporation, its directors are members of the carrier, grain, iron ore, and other Seaway-user industries, and a few government representatives.

The 160 Seaway workers at the Massena locks, who do not have legal rights to strike, have seen their own yearlong contract negotiations progress little. Among their issues are many of the same safety concerns faced by their Canadian counterparts, said Bryan F. Woods, president of American Federation of Government Employees Local 1968. "We fully support their efforts," he said of the Canadian workers.

Though the Canadian and American unions negotiate separately and with separate management agencies, Mr. Lee warned against dismissing their collective leverage. "Don't ever bet on what we can't do," he said. "The unions have never been closer--Canadian, American, the pilots union, everybody. we talk constantly now. Just watch us."

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Twin Ports Report

08/16
For the first time in many weeks, Duluth's three grain-loading berths were full on the morning of Aug. 15. Keizerborg was at General Mills, Milo at Cargill B1 and Isolda at AGP. The situation wasn't expected to last long, however, with Keizerborg expected to depart later in the day. Across the harbor, NST Challenge was loading at Peavey in Superior.

An apparent scheduling change has taken Oglebay Norton off the loading line-up for DMIR in Two Harbors. However, Armco is still scheduled for Aug. 17 -- a rare call for that vessel. Fleetmate Courtney Burton is still scheduled to load coal in Superior on Aug. 18 for a rare call in Ashland, Wis.

Reported by: Al Miller




Alpena Update

08/16
The Paul H. Townsend is expected into port Thursday morning. The Earl W. Oglebay arrived at the Lafarge coal dock Wednesday morning to unload. The J.A.W Iglehart returning from Bath, ON. The Alpena is in Superior, WI. The tug Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity is headed for Milwaukee. The tall ships H.M.S. Tecumseth and the Pride of Baltimore II are scheduled to stop in Alpena for the weekend.

Reported by: Ben and Chanda Bruski




Saginaw River News

08/16
The David Z. Norton entered the river early Wednesday morning. After lightering at the Wirt dock in Bay City, she proceeded up to the Wirt dock at Saginaw.

The Algoway was inbound at about 10:00 a.m. Wednesday and went to the Buena Vista salt dock. She arrived at the dock about 3:00 p.m.

The Mississagi was inbound at about 3:00 p.m. Wednesday, going to the GM dock at Saginaw.

The Gemini was inbound shortly after 4:00 p.m. Wednesday, going to the Marathon-Ashland dock.

Just before 7:00 p.m., the Algoway, Mississagi and David Z. Norton were all within the short stretch of river above the I-75 Bridge. The Algoway was docked at the Buena Vista. The Mississagi was just arriving at the GM dock about a mile further up the river, and the Norton had completed her turn at the Sixth Street turning basin and was outbound, checking down to give the Mississagi time to secure at the dock.

Once past the other two vessels, the Norton was outbound during the evening. The Algoway was preparing to depart the Buena Vista Dock at about 9:15 p.m.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Detroit Traffic

08/16
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Wednesday evening.

World War II vintage B-17 bomber which seems to fly up the Detroit River on Wednesday evenings.
Canadian Navigator downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Lee A. Tregurtha downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Moor Laker (Hong Kong) downbound at Fighting Island North Light.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

08/16
The Catherine Desgagnes finished loading coal at the CSX Docks and departed early Wednesday morning. The Algobay followed her to load coal. The Canadian Century was at the #2 Dock waiting to follow and the Jean Parisien was due in around 6:30 p.m. and she will follow the Century. The Armco was at the Torco Dock unloading ore, she departed in the morning. The Nanticoke arrived at the T.W.I. Dock that afternoon to load a coke breeze cargo (fine granulated coal that is like sand).

The USCGC Bramble was at the City Docks. The Saginaw and USCGC Neah Bay are in both dry docks at the shipyard undergoing survey and misc. repairs. The Adam E. Cornelius and American Mariner remain in lay-up at their respective dock sites. The dredge Buxton II and related dredging equipment with their tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay several miles north of the Torco Dock. Also the dredge Atchalafaya was dredging the ship channel further out from the dredge Buxton. She is a self-propelled hopper style dredge.

The next coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algomarine, CSL Niagara, and Arthur M. Anderson due in on Thursday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Reserve on Friday evening.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Calgadoc heading downriver after loading a grain cargo at one of the grain elevators in Toledo.

George D. Goble going through spring fitout at the C&O Docks Frog Pond area. Several days later she will be out sailing.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Erie Update

08/16
The Richard Reiss was unloading at the Parade St. Dock on Monday. Recently there has been much activity on the former car ferry Viking I. The Viking I will have to be moved now that Specialty Restaurant Chain signed a 25 year lease with the Erie Western Pennsylvania Port Authority to dock the Lansdowne where the Viking I is docked at the Sassafras St. Dock.

After work on the Lansdowne is complete the Viking will have to be moved to another dock or out of town. Erie already has two floating restaurants, the Victorian Princess and Empress.

Viking I at dock.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Clarkson Report

08/16
Wednesday the Algocen arrived from Hamilton. At mid afternoon she was in the early stages of loading cement clinker at St. Lawrence Cement. The Kapitan Tokaev, that was in port on Tuesday, had departed in ballast eastbound in the Seaway for Montreal.

Reported by: Bryan Ridley




The Case For Steel

08/16
Wednesday's Washington Times featured an interesting Editorial on the crisis in the steel industry by Rep. Phil English who is chairman of the Congressional Steel Caucus.
Click here to read the story




Today in Great Lakes History - August 16

On 16 August, 1890, ANNIE WATT (wooden propeller, passenger and package freight "packet", 75'/62GC, built in 1884 at Lion's Head, Ontario) collided with the ship ALDERSON and sank. off of Gunn Point, Ontario. Just the previous year (8 November 1889), ANNIE WATT had burned and been declared total loss, but she was rebuilt.

The captain of the 2 year old, 125' wooden schooner-barge JOHN F. RITCHIE brought his wife, two other women and several small children as guests on a voyage from Bay City to Buffalo. The RITCHIE was one of a string of four barges loaded with lumber in tow of the tug ZOUAVE. As the tow entered Lake Erie, they were struck by a terrifying storm. The RITCHIE broke her tow line and was cast adrift. The deck load of lumber broke loose and everyone was in danger. The women and children were brought out of the cabin since it was considered to be a death trap and they were lashed on deck for safety. Soon the vessel was waterlogged and the cabin was actually washed away. On 17 August, a passing steamer took everyone aboard and towed the RITCHIE in to Cleveland where she was repaired. Amazingly, no lives were lost.

August 16, 1902 - The PERE MARQUETTE 18 (I) launched at Cleveland, Ohio.

Data from: Joe Barr, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Windoc Update

08/15
Traffic has been heavy in the Welland Canal since reopening Monday night. A steady stream of ships have been passing the damaged Windoc.

Two pumps were running all day Tuesday on the bow of Windoc. She appears to be regaining a more even keel but still shows a list. Divers were working under her starboard bow off and on all day, while the pumping proceeds. The first vessel to pass her Tuesday morning caused three ropes of the many that hold her to the dock to part from their mooring. The passing salt water vessel was proceeding very slow but the normal suction that develops when ships pass in a narrow channel moved her away from the dock. All vessels are asked to proceed at 'dead slow' when passing.

No plans have been made to move the Windoc until the flooding is controlled and it is decided where her cargo will be unloaded. There are eight fractures in the hull, one being described as major. On Tuesday water was leaking into in the number 1 starboard tank and seepage was reported in the number 2 tank. Divers use rubber membranes placed against the fractures to patch the leaks, passing vessel can make this a difficult operation.

In the fire the Windoc's cabins were burned to the top of the engine room, gutting the accommodations. Crew Accommodations, the deck below the main deck was still intact. Investigators continue their work and though no formal assessment has been made, repairs could cost millions.

The upbound Canadian Leader was the first boat passed Windoc Monday night. Since then traffic has consisted of Federal Kivalina up, Catherine Desgagnes up, tug Carrol C I (had helped tow Windoc) up, Sea Eagle II up, CSL Tadoussac up, Algobay up, Anglican Lady and barge up, Paterson up, Titanas up, Canadian Voyager up, Lynx up, Elm up, Diamond Star up, Nanticoke up, Turid Knutsen up, Quebecois up, Atlantic Huron down, Cape May Light down, Canadian Olympic down, Kapitonas Stulpinas down, Almak down, Algowest down, J. A. W. Iglehart down, and Canadian Miner down.

Cape May Light had all her passengers onboard. During their unexpected stay in Port Colborne, the passengers were offered free bus tours to Toronto either day. This was in lieu of the scheduled stop in Toronto. The ship will now bypass the Toronto stop on her way back to Montreal where it is due on Thursday.

Pictures of traffic in the canal by Alex Howard and Jeff Thoreson
Lynx passing the Algowest. Alex Howard
Stern of the Titanas. Alex Howard
Algowest.
Stern view. Alex Howard
Canadian Voyager. Alex Howard

Images of traffic waiting for the canal to open
Salvage tugs heading for the Windoc Sunday. Alex Howard
Federal Kivalina waiting below Lock 7. Alex Howard
Bow view. Jeff Thoreson
Catherine Desgagnes waiting for the canal to open. Alex Howard
Bow view. Jeff Thoreson
Canadian Leader waiting above Lock 7. Alex Howard
Bow view. Jeff Thoreson
Desgagnes and Leader. Jeff Thoreson
Tug Anglian Lady and barge docked in front of the Paterson. Jeff Thoreson
Paterson. Jeff Thoreson
Close up of the Paterson’s bow. Jeff Thoreson
Canadian Transport at Port Weller Dry Docks. Jeff Thoreson
Atlantic Huron. Jeff Thoreson
Stern view. Jeff Thoreson
CSL Tadoussac. Jeff Thoreson
Barge St. Marys Cement II and tug Sea Eagle II. Jeff Thoreson
Cape May Light. Jeff Thoreson
Stern view. Jeff Thoreson
Canadian Olympic at Port Colborne. Jeff Thoreson
J.S. St. John in Port Weller Dry Docks. Jeff Thoreson
Aerial view of the Windoc under tow Monday. Image from the Thunder Bay Chronicle-Journal

Reported by: Dave Wobser and Al Hart




Theodore Too stops in Port Dalhousie

08/15
Because of the heavy traffic in the Welland Canal, the tug Theodore Too paid an unexpected visit to Port Dalhousie. Port Dalhousie is about two miles west of Port Weller, the entrance to the Welland Canal.

From 1829 to 1932 Port Dalhousie was the Lake Ontario terminus of the Welland Canal but is now used only for pleasure boats. Theodore Too arrived in Port Dalhousie about 1:00 pm on Tuesday.

The tug wasn't open for tours but the crew were very friendly to kids of all ages. To the delight of onlookers, he frequently sounded his whistle and moved his eyes. The crew was planning a daylight passage of the canal for Wednesday on the way to the next port, Erie, Pennsylvania. They are expected to depart about 8:00 a.m. today

Theodore Too is a specially built representation of the popular children’s TV show tug. The real Theodore is only a 20" model. The big Theodore Too is 16 months old and has traveled over 12,000 miles along the east coast of Canada and the US. This is her first venture in to the Great Lakes.

Tuesday Seaway Welland called her on the radio to see when she was coming to the canal, it seems the Seaway has been getting a number of inquiring telephone calls. Theodore is the official spokes boat on boating safety for the US and Canadian Coast Guards, The US National Safe Boating Council and the Canadian Red Cross.

Pictures by David Bull
Theodore Too at Port Dalhousie.
Stern view.

Please e-mail with updates or pictures.

Reported by: David Bull and Dave Wobser




Lay up for the Blough

08/15
The Roger Blough is expected to enter lay-up in the Twin Ports today. She is due in Superior, WI at Fraser's Shipyards at 6:30 p.m. The Blough will be the latest vessel to enter a rare mid season lay-up. It is unknown how long she will be out of service.

The Blough will join the American Mariner and Adam E. Cornelius in lay-up as the effects from the steel industry continue to be felt by Great Lakes shippers.

Reported by: David French and Al Miller




Tall Ships Muskegon

08/15
The Parade of Sail from Muskegon started Monday with 15 of the Tall Ships departing their docks at Heritage Landing and putting up their sails. Led by the Pride of Baltimore II, they sailed in a line through Muskegon Lake and out the Muskegon channel that was lined with over 20,000 spectators.

The tugs Fischer Hayden and Duluth along with two small Coast Guard vessels and the Cutter Katmai Bay also participated in the parade. Due to bad weather, 11 of the 15 vessels returned to Muskegon, two with injured or sick crew members, and the Highlander Sea that required assistance because they were taking on water 25 miles West of Whitehall. All vessels returned safely and the majority planned to depart under calmer conditions Tuesday.

The cause of the flooding on the Highlander Sea was unknown but the vessel had taken on between 1,000 and 1,500 gallons in the forward part of the vessel. The ship's pump could not keep up with the flooding. An Air Facility Muskegon helicopter dropped a pump to the vessel and the vessel crew repaired their pump while another tall ship and several good Samaritans stood by. U.S. Coast Guard Station Muskegon and Cutter Katmai Bay escorted the tall ship back into port.

Reported by: Scott Golin




Paterson Release

08/15
The latest news from the owner of the Windoc was released Tuesday in Thunder Bay by Mr. Donald Paterson, Vice Chairman of N.M. Paterson and Sons Ltd. The 26,000mt of wheat onboard the Windoc appears to be undamaged. Paterson said that until the full extent of Windoc's damage is known the company won't be making any decisions on repairs or replacement of the vessel.

Paterson said that they've lost 25% of their ability to meet demand and that this percentage of load will have to be shifted to the other vessels in the fleet. Deadlines and deliveries have to be made and they will make them. He commented on the Vandoc and Quedoc saying that both hulls are good and that they were still good boats, but the company has no immediate plans for those boats.

Paterson credits the crew's emergency response training for the admirable job they did in handling the situation. He says the crew even fought the fire while waiting for help. None of the 22 crew members were seriously injured in the collision.

The corporate emergency response plan was also very effective as company officials from Thunder Bay were on scene within hours of the incident to supervise the salvage of the vessel.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Another heavy-lift cargo for Duluth

08/15
The heavy-lift vessel Scan Partner is scheduled to arrive in Duluth today or early Thursday carrying a 438-ton highway tunneling machine - the port’s latest cargo that’s unusually large or heavy.

The tunneling machine, built by the German company Herrenknecht, is a “shield-type tunnel boring machine” that will be used to simultaneously dig and pave twin 7,300-foot tunnels under the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. The tunnels eventually will carry light rail traffic from downtown Minneapolis to the Mall of America.

Lake Superior Warehousing, which operates the warehouses at the Duluth port terminal, will transfer the disassembled machine from the ship to two trucks, which will haul it side-by-side to the Twin Cities.

The Duluth port terminal has developed a reputation for handling heavy-lift cargoes because of its western location on the Seaway and the wide clearances on roads and railways out of the terminal and out of the city. In recent years, roads leading to the terminal have been improved and widened to make it easier for trucks carry to oversized cargo out of the terminal.

Recent heavy cargoes have included refinery equipment bound for the Athabasca Oil Sands Project in northern Alberta and “digesters” installed at the Potlatch pulp and paper mill in Cloquet, Minn.

For more information visit the Port of Duluth's home page

Reported by: Al Miller




New Tanker

08/15
Visiting the port of Quebec is a new Canadian tanker owned by Desgagnes. The Vega Desgagnes is the former Bacalan, former Acila built in 1982. The tanker is 462-feet in length, it is unknown where the vessel will be trading.

Reported by: David Bowie




Duluth port terminal adding warehouse space

08/15
The Duluth Seaway Port Authority is expanding its east warehouse in a $3.85 million project that will add more storage space for cargo in time for the 2002 navigation season.

Lakehead Constructors Inc. of Superior was awarded a contract to expand the warehouse. A 106,000-square-foot annex will be added to the existing 65,000-square-foot structure.

A grant from the Minnesota Department of Transportation grant is funding 80 percent of the total project cost. Remaining expenses will be funded by the port authority.

Port officials have said that in recent years the terminal’s warehouses, under the management of Lake Superior Warehousing, have been full. Adding warehouse space will enable the terminal to do more business.

Reported by: Mark Sanford




Thunder Bay Update

08/15
The McNally Construction Inc. Tug Sandra Mary is tied up a Keefer and her dredge John Holden is docked at an unknown location in the harbor. The Algontario, Vandoc, Quedoc and Wolf River all remain in long term lay-up in port. The W.N. Twolan remains in the Pascol Engineering Drydock while her barge McAllister132 remains at the Great West Timber dock and is not presently being loaded.

The saltie Marinus Green finished unloading Via Rail Cars at Keefer and moved over to Richardson Elevator early Tuesday morning. There she took on 8,000 metric tons of Flax Seed that is bound for Belgium. By around 5:00 p.m. she was finished and headed out the North Entrance helped by the tugs Glenada and Point Valour.

The saltie Federal Agno finished up at Saskatchewan Pool 7a and departed for Montreal with Flax Seed on Tuesday at 9:30 p.m., while the other Federal boat the Federal Yoshino, continues to load at United Grain Growers "M" house.

Two arrivals Tuesday saw the Cartierdoc docking at Cargill Elevator in the early evening and the tanker Jade Star arriving shortly after and proceeding up the Mission river to Petro-Can to unload Fuel.

Reported by: Rob Farrow




Detroit Traffic

08/15
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Tuesday night.

Canadian Progress downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Canadian Leader upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Barge A 377 & Karen Andrie upbound at Grassy Island headed for the Marathon Dock at Fordson Island in the Rouge River.
Stern view.
Close up of the Karen Andrie.
Federal Kivalina (Hong Kong) upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Algosoo at Ojibway Salt Dock.
Stern view.
CSL Niagara downbound off Nicholson's.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

08/15
The tanker Gemini was at the B-P Dock loading cargo. The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Bramble was at the City Dock. The Saginaw and U.S.C.G.C. Neah Bay were in both dry docks undergoing their surveys and misc. repair work.

The Catherine Desgagnes was scheduled to arrive late Tuesday evening at the CSX Coal Docks to load. The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algobay, Jean Parisien and Canadian Century today followed by the Algomarine and CSL Niagara on Thursday.

The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco this morning followed by the Reserve on Friday evening.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Steelcliffe Hall upbound from the Cherry Street Bridge headed to one of the grain elevators to load grain. She now sails as the Windoc.

Charles C. West at the C&O Coal Docks getting ready for spring fitout.

St. Lawrence Navigator at the Midstates Elevator loading grain. She was a salt water vessel that was purchased by the Upper Lakes Shipping Company in 1975. She was lengthened nearly 83 feet and renamed Canadian Navigator in 1980. She was converted to a self unloader in 1997 and is presently sailing.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




U.S.-Flag Carriage Dips Again In July

08/15
The steel industry's struggle to survive under the weight of unfair trade again plagued U.S.-Flag Great Lakes shipping in July. Cargo movement in U.S. bottoms totaled 11.5 million net tons, a decrease of 13 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. A major drop-off in iron ore for steelmakers accounted for most of the decrease. The July ore float slipped below 5 million tons, a decrease of nearly 30 percent compared to last July. While direct shipments were down significantly, an 80 percent reduction in the Lorain/Cleveland shuttle also severely impacted the trade's total. Since the opening of the iron trade in March, U.S-Flag shipments stand at 23.7 million tons, a decrease of 16.4 percent.

There has been no improvement in domestic steel production. Through August 4, production stood at 59.8 million tons, a decrease of 13.2 percent from the 68.9 million tons poured through the same point in 2000. For the year, the industry is operating at 79.2 percent of capacity; at this point in 2000, the rate was 89.3 percent.

With demand for iron ore at the lowest level since the mid-1980s, some vessel capacity has been diverted to the western coal trade. U.S.-Flag lakers hauled 1.9 million tons of western coal in July, an increase of 50.5 percent compared to last July. Loadings of eastern coal are holding even, so for the year, the U.S.-Flag coal trade stands at 9.7 million tons, an increase of 8.6 percent.

U.S.-Flag stone cargos totaled 3.2 million tons, in July, a decrease of 7.8 percent. The trade is highly dependent on movements of fluxstone for steel production, so it is little surprise that the season-to-date total is down by 5.6 percent.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Accident on the Orsula - Correction

08/15
The incident reported last Friday aboard the Orsula (former Federal Calumet) was incorrectly reported as an accident. Emergency crews were on scene to conduct training.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 15

The JOSEPH L. BLOCK sailed light on her maiden voyage from the Bay Ship Building Co., Sturgeon Bay, WI to load 32,600 long tons of taconite ore pellets at Escanaba, MI for delivery to Indiana Harbor, IN on August 15, 1976.

The OTTERCLIFFE HALL, the last "straight deck" Great Lakes bulk freighter built with a pilot house forward was bare boat chartered to Misener Transportation Ltd. on August 15, 1983.

Under threat of a strike on August 15, 1978, the GEORGE A. STINSON was towed out of Lorain before her completion by six tugs and was taken to Detroit's Nicholson's Terminal & Dock to finish her fit-out.

The LEON FALK, JR. was laid up for the last time August 15, 1980 at the Great Lakes Engineering Work's old slip at River Rouge, MI.

On August 15, 1985 the MENIHEK LAKE sailed under her own power to Quebec City (from there by tug), the first leg of her journey to the cutter torch in Spain.

J.P. MORGAN, JR. arrived in tow of Hannah Marine's tug DARYL C. HANNAH at Buffalo, NY on August 15th where she was delayed until she could obtain clearance to transit the Welland Canal. Permission to pass down the Canal was refused because of the MORGAN, JR.'s improper condition after a collision with the 480 foot Interlake steamer CRETE on June 23, 1948 in dense fog off Devils Island, in the Apostle Islands, on Lake Superior.

On 15 August 1856, WELLAND (sidewheel steamer, wood, passenger & package freight, 145'/300T, built 1853 at St. Catharine's, Ontario) burned to a total loss at her dock. at Port Dalhousie, Ontario. She was owned by Port Dalhousie and Thorold Railroad Co.

On 15 August 1873, Thomas Dunford and Frank Leighton announced a co-partnership in the shipbuilding business in Port Huron, Michigan. Their plans included operating from Dunford's yard. When they made their announcement, they already had an order for a large tug from Mr. George E. Brockway. This tug was the CRUSADER with the dimensions of 132' overall, 100' keel, and 23' beam.

In 1914 the Panama Canal was officially opened to maritime traffic.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Jim Olsson, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Windoc Moved, Canal Open

08/14
After being closed for two days the Welland Canal opened to traffic Monday night.

The Allenburg Bridge was raised about 8:30 p.m., to a round of applause from the gathered 100 or more spectators. After a test lowering and raising, it was left in the up position. The bridge is expected to remain in the open position for the balance of the shipping season and repairs will be made during the winter. Additional weights were standing by to be loaded atop the counterweights.

Canal traffic began moving around 10:30 p.m. Canadian Leader was the first up bound vessel to pass the Windoc. Windoc has been towed closer to Lock 7 and is tied to the west bank of the canal. Plans call to move the vessel to the Thorold Industrial Docks after the traffic slows on Tuesday, there she will be lightered.

Several boats in the canal were taking advantage of the down time to do repairs. Atlantic Huron, tied at the Ramey's Bend stone dock, has several pickup trucks parked nearby and welding cables running on board. She also was freshly painted on the bow and had fresh primer on the stern cabins.

CSL Tadoussac had rubber-tired crane along side.

Shortly after midnight 28 vessels were reported to be waiting at anchor to transit the canal. In the canal the Canadian Leader, Catherine Desgagnes, Federal Kivalina and the barge St. Marys Cement II and the tug Sea Eagle II were leading the traffic upbound. Downbound will be the CSL Tadoussac, Algobay, Atlantic Huron, Cruise ship Cape May Light and the Canadian Olympic.

Seaway crews spent most of the day Monday clearing loose debris from the damaged area of bridge that could fall into the canal. Crews also remove debris left by the Windoc at the bottom of the canal. The ship's exhaust boiler was submerged in the center of the channel, the 15-foot by 8-foot piece of equipment was knocked off the vessel during the collision.

About 1:00 p.m. Monday the Windoc was secured at the Guard Gate above Lock 7 near the paper mill in Thorold. An army of inspectors from the Seaway and the Transportation Safety Board of Canada continued investigating the incident.

Early Monday morning McKeil Marine tugs were on scene working to move the Windoc. McKeil Marine is handling the salvage operation. Crew’s pumped compressed air into the compartment that was damaged by the dropped anchor, this allowed the Windoc to float for the move to the Guard Gate. Additional repairs will be necessary to move the hull once a salvage plan is completed.

That morning a generator was lowered on to the Windoc restoring some power. The barge Henry T. with a crane on deck was on scene and used to lift the Windoc's anchor. Because the Windoc is fully loaded, four tugs were need for the move. Carrol C 1, Paul E No. 1, Lac Vancouver, and Progress were all involved. The Progress arrived from Lake Erie on Monday. The bridge was raised to 25 feet that morning and the Progress folded her mast to clear.

Of the three ships bought by HALCO to become Cartiercliffe Hall (Algontario), Montcliffe Hall (Cartierdoc), and Steelcliffe Hall (Windoc 2, damaged in the incident), all three have been severely damaged by fire. Also, in 1938, WINDOC (1) had a lift bridge drop onto it and cause damage.

Pictures taken Monday by Jeff Thoreson
Salvage operation Monday morning.
Crane on the Henry T. goes after the anchor.
Pulled from the water.
Close up of the operator.
Tug Lac Vancouver on the stern of the barge.
Tug Paul E. No 1 along side.
Stern view.
Another view.
Cabins.
Close up.
Another view.
Stack rests on the stern deck.

Pictures taken Sunday
The Windoc blocks the canal. Alex Howard
Wide view. Shaun Vary
Another view. Jimmy Sprunt
Close up of the damage Alex Howard
Damage to cabins. Shaun Vary
Another view. Jimmy Sprunt
Profile of the damage. Jimmy Sprunt
Close up looking from the bow. Jimmy Sprunt
Looking from the Stern. Jimmy Sprunt
Close up of what was the pilot house. David Bull
Close up of her stern. Shaun Vary
View about 2:00 p.m. David Bull
Another view. Alex Howard
Life raft that was deployed at the bow. Alex Howard
Another view. Shaun Vary
Containment boom. Alex Howard
Allenburg Bridge. David Bull
Close up of the damage. David Bull
Surveying the bridge. David Bull

Pictures taken Saturday night by Bonney Heatherington From David Bull
The stack rests on the stern deck as fire crews battle the blaze.
Close up.
Wide view.

Images before the accident.
Picture of the Windoc.
Stern view.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt, Dave Wobser, Wally Wallace and Ron Beaupre




Tall Ship taking on water

08/14
The tall ship Highlander Sea departed Muskegon Monday along with most of the other tall ships in a full sail parade out of Muskegon Lake, through the channel, and into Lake Michigan. Last night the ship reported that it was taking on water 25 miles West of White Lake. A 47-foot Coast Guard vessel, along with a helicopter and two other vessels were working to help the ship back to Muskegon. The cutter Katmai Bay was standing by in case the situation worsens.

Reported by: Scott Golin




McKee Sons Moved

08/14
With repairs completed, the McKee Sons was moved from the Bay Ship Building graving dock late Monday afternoon with the assistance of tugs from Selvick Marine. Once out of the dock she was taken to Berth #15 and placed their bow in. This will allow the barge to be ballasted down to accept the tug Invincible. The tug reconnected to the McKee Sons departed early this morning.

Out of dock.
Tug Bay Ship tailing bow out of dock.
Out of dock heading to Berth #15.
Heading into berth.

Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




First for Westcott Co.

08/14
August 7 saw the first all female crew working on the U.S. Mail Boat, J.W. Westcott II. For more than 100 years the Westcott Company has been delivering mail and freight to passing ships in the Detroit River. The Westcott operates 24 hours a day during the shipping season, with crews working three eight-hour shifts.

On the 7th Captain Mary Taylor and deck hand Cathy Nasiatka worked together as the first all female boat crew. Their watch was routine but ended with the pair leaving flowered curtains and bows inside the cockpit of the Westcott II, a joke for the incoming male crew.




Barkers Island eyed for more development

08/14
Superior officials are looking at development options for Barkers Island, action that likely will affect the end housing the world’s only remaining whaleback steamer.

Barkers Island was created decades ago from dredge spoils. Starting in the 1970s, city officials began developing the island, eventually making it home to a marina, a motel, and a development of upscale townhouses. Among the island’s earliest developments was addition of the whaleback Meteor, which has operated as a museum for about 30 years. The steam-powered dipper dredge D.D. Gaillard was added to the island several years ago but never opened to the public.

City officials are now pondering ways to revitalize the north end of the island, home to the Meteor and a collection of small shops known as “whaleback wharf.” Visitation to the Meteor has declined in recent years.

According to the Duluth News Tribune, the city will have the Gaillard removed from the island this fall. Once the dredge is gone, the city may improve a band shell already on the site or create a “festival park.” City officials also say they haven’t ruled out the possibility of adding a restaurant or other commercial development to the site.

Funding for the improvements would come from selling land on the island’s south end for construction of additional townhouses.

Reported by: Chris Porter




Twin Ports Report

08/14
Several vessels are currently in the Twin Ports that could be affected by any delays to traffic in the Welland Canal. On Monday morning, Moor Laker was loading at Peavey in Superior, Keizerborg was backed into the berth at General Mills S in Superior, Yarmouth was at AGP in Duluth, and Isolda was anchored out waiting for AGP. Salties Milo and NST Challenge were due Monday.

Several vessels are scheduled to make unusual calls this week. Courtney Burton is scheduled to load Friday at Midwest Energy Terminal with coal bound for the Xcel Energy plant in Ashland, Wis. If the schedule holds, this will be a rare visit for the Burton.

Other unusual calls include Armco due at the DMIR ore dock in Two Harbors on Aug. 17 and Oglebay Norton on Aug. 21. The DMIR ore dock in Duluth has Presque Isle scheduled to unload stone on Aug. 15.

In other DMIR traffic, St. Clair is scheduled to make another trip to Two Harbors on Aug. 18. In Duluth, the lineup includes Halifax, Aug. 13; Buckeye, Aug. 14; CSL Tadoussac, Aug. 16; Arthur M. Anderson, unloading stone and then loading ore, Aug. 18; and Joe Block, unloading stone and then loading ore, Aug. 19.

Reported by: Al Miller




Thunder Bay Update

08/14
Another sunny day in port saw another Federal boat arriving Monday. The Federal Yoshino, making only her second trip to this port this season, arrived in ballast from Toronto. Her first trip into port this season was her maiden voyage. She pulled into United Grain Growers "M" house at 8:00 p.m. Monday.

The Federal Agno is still in Port and made a move over to Saskatchewan Pool 7a around noon Monday to continue loading. The Marinus Green is still unloading Via rail cars over at Keefer Terminal and the Sandra Mary is tied up at Keefer while there is no sign of her Dredge John Holden. The Holden is apparently doing some dredging somewhere in the Harbor.

The W.N. Twolan left her barge McAllister132 at the Great West Timber dock and proceeded into Pascol Drydock Monday morning. It is unknown if it is a routine trip or to fix a problem. The Radium Yellowknife headed out of the port early Monday evening. She is without barges and is heading to Superior Wisconsin to presumably to pick up three empty lumber barges. A 19% tariff was levied this week by the United States to any Canadian lumber brought into the Country. This is apparently to give the American Lumber industry a level playing field when it comes to lumber sales. Superior Wisconsin may very well be seeing it's last Radium Yellowknife trip this year.

The saltie Lake Carling departed early Monday morning from Thunder Bay Terminals. As She backed away from the terminal, the tugs Peninsula and George Carleton pushed her around 90 degrees to Port so that she was lined up with the Kam River entrance. She then proceeded out down the lake with Potash for Augusta, Italy. She is scheduled to make one more stop on her way to the Atlantic Ocean.

The Oakglen also departed Monday, leaving United Grain Growers "A" house around 6:00 p.m. and heading out the North Entrance and down the Lake.

Oakglen at UGG"a" Monday morning.
Mantadoc loading at Cargill.
Atlantic Huron prepares to depart UGG"m".
Grampa Woo 3 at Beaver Bay, MN.
Old Frontenac (1) Pilothouse at Two Harbors, MN.
F.A. Johnson at the Gravel and Lake Services Dock in Thunder Bay.


Reported by: Rob Farrow




Alpena News

08/14
The Alpena arrived into port Monday morning to load cement for Superior,WI. The tug Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity is expected early this morning. The Paul H. Townsend is going to Green Bay. The J.A.W Iglehart is heading for the Welland Canal up to a Lake Ontario port. The John G. Munson made an unusual stop to load at Stoneport on Monday.

Reported by: Ben and Chanda Bruski




Detroit Traffic

08/14
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Monday night.

Great Lakes Trader & Joyce L Van Enkevort with a long (30 hour) unload into the Zug Island hopper.
Tug Mighty Jake with a load of divers returning from the barge Merganser after a days work off Zug Island.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo Update

08/14
The Canadian Miner was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. The Saginaw and USCGC Neah Bay were in both dry docks at the Shipyard. The tanker Gemini was loading cargo at the B-P Dock. There was an unidentified tug/barge unit at the T.W.I. Dock.

The Philip R. Clarke is scheduled in at the CSX Docks to load coal at 9:00 p.m. The Adam E. Cornelius and American Mariner remain in long term lay-up at their respective dock sites. The dredge Buxton II and related dredging equipment with the tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay several miles north of the Torco Dock.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will today with the Canadian Century, Jean Parisien, Catherine Desgagnes, and Algobay all due to arrive during the evening hours. The Algomarine and CSL Niagara are due in on Thursday, followed by the H. Lee White on Friday.

The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Armco very early Wednesday morning. The Reserve late Friday evening, followed by the Buckeye on Wednesday morning, August 22.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Frank Armstrong unloading ore at the Interlake Iron Company Dock (Toledo Furnace). In 1976 she was renamed Samuel Mather (6). She was sold for scrap in Sept. 1987 and arrived at Aliaga, Turkey on June 20th 1988 where scrapping was completed on her by Oct. 1988.

Rogers City at the C&O #3 Coal Dock. She has just finished loading a coal cargo and is getting ready to back away from the dock and will be outbound for her next port of call.

Sparrows Point as a bulk carrier for the Bethlehem Steel Fleet headed upbound the Maumee River. Picture taken from the Cherry Street Bridge bound for the City Docks for winter lay-up. She now sails as a self unloader named "Buckeye" for the Oglebay Norton Fleet.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto Report

08/14
The ferry Sam McBride was on charter this Monday morning to the Disney Corp. for the shooting of scenes for "Tru Confessions". Shooting continues at 5:00 a.m. today. The Federal Rhine came in with McKeil tug assistance to Redpath sugar dock and English River returned to town with another cargo of cement.

McKeil's tugs Atomic and Lac Como went out Sunday afternoon to assist a vessel at Clarkson and they returned before midnight.

The classic 1926 Robertson & Burnside wooden schooner Anitra of Oakville was in port on Sunday. The schooner Kajama had mechanical difficulties again and her charter was transferred to the paddle steamer Trillium.

Tug Theodore Too on its recent visit to Toronto.
Another view.
Close up.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Clarkson Update

08/14
Monday afternoon was a busy one in the Lake Ontario port. The piers at Petro Canada and St. Lawrence Cement were busy. At Petro Canada the Kapitan Korotaev which arrived Sunday from Montreal appeared to be about halfway through unloading a cargo of hydro cracker bottoms. Over at St. Lawrence Cement the James Norris which had arrived Monday morning from Colborne with a cargo of limestone was also about half unloaded.

Reported by: Bryan Ridley




Michigan man plans to swim Superior

08/14
Marathon swimmer Jim Dreyer, who has swam four of the five Great Lakes since 1998, plans to attempt to swim across Lake Superior later this week.

Dreyer is in Grand Portage, Minn., preparing to depart Wednesday or Thursday, depending on weather. His taget is F.J. McLain State Park, about 63 miles away on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

Dreyer, from Byron Center, Mich., told the Saint Paul Pioneer Press that he learned to swim five years ago so he could take part in triathlons, a sport where participants, run, bike and swim.

He's swum four of the five lakes since 1998: Michigan, Huron, Erie and Ontario. He's heading to Grand Portage on Minnesota's North Shore today, getting ready to become the only person in history to make direct crossings of all five Great Lakes. On Wednesday or Thursday, depending on the weather, he plans to begin stroking from Grand Portage to the beach at F.J. McLain State Park in Michigan's Upper Peninsula.

"Once I learned to control the fear and got a little technique, I found I could swim a long way without getting tired,'' Dreyer told the newspaper. "A really long way.''

Dreyer first cross Lake Michigan in 1998, swimming the 43 miles between Two Rivers, Wis., and Big Sable Light just north of Ludington, Mich. The crossing took 41 hours, as he endured leaking goggles that made his eyes swell shut, swallowing too much lake water and falling asleep.

He crossed Lake Huron on the third attempt in 1999. Dreyer decided to swim lakes Erie and Ontario last summer as part of a world triathlon record. After swimming Erie, he got out of the water and ran 26.2 miles to Port Rowan, Ontario, and was going to bike to Lake Ontario and swim across that, but collapsed after the marathon.

A month later, he ran the marathon, biked 112 miles, then crossed Lake Ontario and was swimming back across it when the weather stopped him at 204 miles, a world record.

Dreyer is well aware that Lake Superior’s temperature hovers around 60 degrees, and he expects to suffer from hypothermia to some extent during an anticipated 55-hour crossing.

Reported by: Steve Jackson




Today in Great Lakes History - August 14

Sea trials for the HENRY FORD II took place on August 14, 1924 and shortly after she left on her maiden voyage with coal from Toledo, OH to Duluth, MN and returned with iron ore to the Ford Rouge Plant at Dearborn.

Having been sold for scrap, the GOVERNOR MILLER was towed down the Soo Locks on August 14, 1980 for Milwaukee, WI to load scrap.

On 14 August 1873, CHESTER B. JONES (3-mast, wooden schooner, 167'/493GT) was launched at E. Saginaw, MI. She was built by Chesley Wheeler. The spars and top hamper ordered for her were broken in a log jam, so the 3-master received her spars at Buffalo, NY on her first trip.

The 149' bark MARY E. PEREW was found floating west of the Manitou Islands by the propeller MONTGOMERY on 14 August 1871. The PEREW had been sailing to Milwaukee with a load of coal when a storm came upon her so quickly on 8 August (nearly a week before MONGOMERY found her) that the crew did not have time to trim the sails. All three masts were snapped and the mizzen mast fell on the yawl, smashing it. So the crew was stuck on the ship, unable to navigate. The MONTGOMERY towed her to Milwaukee where she was rebuilt and she lasted until 1905.

The schooner CHESTER B. JONES was launched at Saginaw on 14 August 1873. She was a three-and-aft rig.

On 14 August 1900 the tug WILLIAM D. of the Great Lakes Towing Company got under the bow of the steamer WAWATAM at Ashtabula, Ohio and was rolled over and sank. One drowned.

August 14, 1899 - W.L. Mercereau, known as the "Father of the Fleet", became superintendent of steamships (Pere Marquette Railway)

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Windoc Update

08/13 11:00 p.m. update
The Allenburg Bridge was raised about 9:30 p.m. tonight. Waiting vessels were told to warm their engines at 10:00 p.m., traffic had resume by 11:00 p.m.

Canadian Leader, Catherine Desgagnes, Federal Kivalina and the barge St. Marys Cement II and the tug Sea Eagle II will lead the traffic upbound. Downbound will be the CSL Tadoussac, Algobay, Atlantic Huron, Cruise ship Cape May Light and the Canadian Olympic.

Seaway crews spent most of the day Monday clearing loose debris from the bridge. An army of inspectors from the Seaway and the Transportation Safety Board of Canada spent Monday investigating the incident.

Please e-mail with updates or pictures.

About 1:00 p.m. Monday the Windoc was secured at the Guard Gate above Lock 7 near the paper mill in Thorold. It will remain at this spot until a salvage plan is made.

Early Monday morning tugs were on scene working to move the Windoc. A generator was lowered on to the Windoc restoring some power. The barge Henry T. with a crane on deck was on scene and used to lift the Windoc's anchor. Because the Windoc is fully loaded, four tugs were need for the move. Carrol C 1, Paul E No. 1, Lac Vancouver, and Progress were all involved. The damaged bridge was opened about 20-feet to allow the tug Progress to reach the scene.

Seaway crews continued to work on the damaged Allenburg Bridge and hoped to have it in a raised position by Monday evening. Crews were removing loose debris from the damaged area of bridge that could fall into the canal. Crews will also remove debris from the Windoc at the bottom of the canal. The ship's exhaust boiler is resting in the center of the channel, is 15-foot by 8 foot piece of equipment was knocked off the vessel during the collision.

Seaway authorities hope to restore shipping traffic tonight around 11:00 p.m.

Updates and corrections
To correct media reports that were inaccurate: No crew members jumped over board as first reported.
The Allenburg Bridge is controlled by an operator on the bridge, not remotely.

Original report
Monday morning the Windoc remained blocking the Welland Canal above Lock 7 and the canal was closed to traffic. The Windoc was struck by the Allenburg Bridge Saturday night and caught fire (see original story from Sunday).

Sunday afternoon work crews from the Seaway began planning the salvage of the Windoc and repair of the bridge. The McKeil tug Carrol C1 with salvage equipment is in the canal waiting for the bridge to open, it is expected to be joined by another tug from Hamilton to assist in moving the Windoc. Salvage efforts will be difficult; the vessel suffered flooding in her forward end as it was holed after running over its anchor that was dropped to stop the vessel. Her cargo of wheat must be at least partially off loaded and the vessel stabilized before it can be towed.

Traffic in the canal is expected to resume some time Monday after the bridge is moved into an open position and the Windoc is towed. It is unknown how long the bridge will be out of service for automobile traffic.

Pictures taken Monday by Jeff Thoreson
Salvage operation Monday morning.
Crane on the Henry T. goes after the anchor.
Pulled from the water.
Close up of the operator.
Tug Lac Vancouver on the stern of the barge.
Tug Paul E. No 1 along side.
Stern view.
Another view.
Cabins.
Close up.
Another view.
Stack rests on the stern deck.

Pictures taken Sunday
The Windoc blocks the canal. Alex Howard
Wide view. Shaun Vary
Another view. Jimmy Sprunt
Close up of the damage Alex Howard
Damage to cabins. Shaun Vary
Another view. Jimmy Sprunt
Profile of the damage. Jimmy Sprunt
Close up looking from the bow. Jimmy Sprunt
Looking from the Stern. Jimmy Sprunt
Close up of what was the pilot house. David Bull
Close up of her stern. Shaun Vary
View about 2:00 p.m. David Bull
Another view. Alex Howard
Life raft that was deployed at the bow. Alex Howard
Another view. Shaun Vary
Containment boom. Alex Howard
Allenburg Bridge. David Bull
Close up of the damage. David Bull
Surveying the bridge. David Bull

Pictures taken Saturday night by Bonney Heatherington From David Bull
The stack rests on the stern deck as fire crews battle the blaze.
Close up.
Wide view.

Images before the accident.
Picture of the Windoc.
Stern view.

Media coverage:
Pictures and video from CBC News (updated)
Story from the Toronto Star

Reported by: Dave Wobser, Jimmy Sprunt, Wally Wallace, Peter Bowers, David Bull, Stephen D. James, Roger Cournoyer, Don Detloff, Shaun Vary, Alex Howard, David McLeod, Ralph Martens and Ron Walsh




Halifax in Sarnia

08/13
The Halifax arrived early Saturday morning in Sarnia's North Slip (South Dock) to receive a new portable generator. The Cat generator was visible on the stern deck.

Reported by: Jamie Kerwin




Diamond Belle to Wallaceburg

08/13
The Diamond Belle made its annual trip to the Antique Car, Boat and Truck show in Wallaceburg Canada on Saturday. With 136 passengers on board, great weather, and lots of ships, a great time was had by all. Here is a selection of photos from the trip.

Algowest passing.
Stern view.
Passing the Atlantic Erie.
Charles M. Beeghly.
Stern view of the Beeghly.
Canadian Century passes.
Barge Chief Wawatam.
Edgar B. Speer.
Jade Star.
Stern view.
Saltie Scan Partner passing.
Diamond Belle in Wallaceburg. Alan Mann
Another view. Alan Mann

Reported by: Bill Hoey Sr.




Great Lakes Transportation LLC Creates Business Units

08/13
Monroeville, PA -- Great Lakes Transportation LLC (GLT) announced Aug. 10 that it has organized its four transportation and bulk-handling companies into two geographically based business units.

The Eastern Business Unit, consisting of GLT's Bessemer and Lake Erie Railroad Company and The Pittsburgh & Conneaut Dock Company, will be headquartered in Monroeville, PA. The Northern Business Unit, comprised of GLT's Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway Company (DM&IR) and the USS Great Lakes Fleet, Inc. (USS-GLF), will be based in Duluth, MN.

“The companies in the two units are complementary, and each of the resulting business units has a different set of opportunities and challenges. These organizational changes will allow the respective teams to focus on everything that relates to customers, revenues, and expenses. In addition, we are taking steps to enhance our people programs because they are a key part of our strategy,” said John E. Giles, president and CEO of GLT.

In line with the launch of business units, Giles announced the following management changes:

  • Peter D. Stephenson has been appointed to head the Northern Business Unit. Stephenson, a company veteran, was previously vice president of both the DM&IR and USS-GLF.
  • Jerry E. Vest has been named to lead the Eastern Business Unit. Vest recently joined GLT from the Kingsley Group, a consulting firm.
  • Elliott M. Hughes III has been appointed vice president and assistant to the president. In addition to his responsibility for commercial activities on the Northern Business Unit, Hughes - another company veteran - will tackle high-impact special projects.
  • David L. Novak, GLT's vice president strategy, planning, and performance improvement, will add responsibility for People Programs, including human resources.

    Monroeville, PA-based Great Lakes Transportation LLC owns businesses principally engaged in the transportation and handling of bulk commodities. Its units, which operate in four states and on four of the Great Lakes, include the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway Company; the Bessemer and Lake Erie Railroad Company; the USS Great Lakes Fleet, Inc.; and The Pittsburgh & Conneaut Dock Company.

    Reported by: Al Miller




  • Apostle Island lights to get help

    08/13
    Two historic lighthouses nestled in Lake Superior’s Apostle Islands will soon get help to save them from erosion.

    The 2001 federal budget includes $1.36 million to shore up Raspberry Island Light and $600,000 for work on Outer Island Light. Another $200,000 was included for a wilderness study of Apostle Islands National Lakeshore.

    Both lights are threatened by wave action that is eroding the bluffs upon which they stand. Also, rainfall has washed away soil from the top of the bluffs.

    A National Park Service official said work on shoring up Raspberry Island Light is expected to begin next spring. Workers will try to stabilize the bluff by adding fill to modify the slope. On top, they will add drainage and trenching to stabilize the soil against heavy rains.

    Outer Island Light, which already has suffered structural damage, will undergo work starting in 2004.

    National Park Service officials in the Apostles say they also would like to restore the six lighthouses located in Apostle Islands National Lakeshore. Although most are presentable on the outside, their interiors and accompanying structures such as keepers’ homes have received little attention.

    "We don't have a single lighthouse yet that's been restored on the inside," Apostle Islands National Lakeshore management assistant Jim Nepstad told the Ashland Daily Press.

    Sen. Russ Feingold, who recently spent two days on Devil’s Island as a volunteer lighthouse keeper, said he’s interested in seeing restoration work done on the lights. He’s asked the Park Service for more information about what’s needed for historical reconstruction and landscaping for the 100-year-old Devil’s Island Light.

    "It would be a very worthwhile investment to get these to look like what they used to be," Feingold said.

    Reported by: Steve Block




    Thunder Bay Update

    08/13
    Traffic in the Port of Thunder Bay was slow last week. The Algonova broke the silence, arriving in port on the Friday and began unloading fuel at Petro-Can on the Mission river. She departed later the same day.

    The Mantadoc, Radium Yellowknife, saltie Marinus Green and the tug W.N. Twolan with barge McAllister132 all arrived on Saturday. The Mantadoc took on cargo at Richardson and Cargill elevators before departing early Sunday evening. Both the Yellowknife and the Twolan returned from trips to Superior Wisconsin to unload lumber.

    The saltie Marinus Green arrived at Keefer Terminals to unload yet another load of Via rail cars for Bombardier. This contract is now in jeopardy due to an appeal by the Council of Canadians with Disabilities (CCD). They are asking the Canadian Transport Agency to stop the conversion work because they believe that the cars cannot be made Handicap Accessible.

    The Oakglen made another trip in to port, arriving early Sunday morning. She docked at P & H elevator to begin loading and then later in the afternoon moved over to Mission Terminals.

    Two more salties arrived in port, one arriving in the early evening hours Sunday and the other around 11:00 p.m. The first to arrive was the Lake Carling who tied up at Thunder Bay Terminals to take on a load of Potash bound for Augusta, Italy. She was followed by the Federal Agno who docked at United Grain Growers "M" house.

    The tug Sandra Mary and Dredge John Holden are docked at the Keefer Terminal.

    Reported by: Rob Farrow




    Detroit Traffic

    08/13
    Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Saturday and Sunday.

    U.S.C.G.C. Bramble downbound at Fighting Island South Light on Sunday.
    Charles M Beeghly upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Greek salty Milo upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    tug Mighty Jake upbound pushing a spud barge to work during the next 3 weeks 300 feet off Zug Island.
    Stern view.
    Gradel barge in position off Zug Island, notice one spud down.
    the old Great Lakes Engineering Works slip with the submerged carferry Huron and the Great Lakes Towing Dock.
    Scan Partner (Antigua) at DMT 2.
    Stern view.
    Gaelic Tugboat Company Dock in the Rouge River. The tugs, left to right are: Acushnet, Patricia Hoey, Carolyn Hoey, Roger Stahl and Shannon.
    Jadestar upbound at Grassy Island. She is flying a Desgagnes houseflag.
    Close up of flag.
    Stern view.
    tug Mighty Jake tied up for the evening in Nicholson's Slip.
    tug Avenger IV tied up at Morterm after bringing Chief Wawatam down from the Soo with steel coils.
    Stern view.
    Barge Chief Wawatam tied up on the knuckle at Morterm being unloaded.
    The hot metal train from Zug Island passes over the Shortcut Bridge headed for Great Lakes Steel lower works.
    Twenty minutes later the train is at the south works waiting to unload and continue the steel making process.

    Reported by: Mike Nicholls




    Special Cruise in Bay City

    08/13
    The Bay City Lodge No. 5 of the International Shipmasters' Association will be holding a fundraising dinner cruise and silent auction on Friday Sept. 14, 2001. The event will be held aboard Bay City Boat Line's cruise vessel "Princess Wenonah". Live entertainment will be provided by the celtic/maritime group "Hoolie" who will be touring and playing across Europe during the month of August. Casual dinner will be provided for the cruise with a cash bar available. There will be a silent auction during the cruise with door prizes and an eclectic selection of items, including some marine related items. Boarding will be at 6:30 p.m. with a prompt sailing at 7:00 p.m. The boat will return to the dock at 10:00 p.m. Ticket cost is $25.00 per ticket and are available by calling 313 894-9233 or 989 894-0617. Cruise space is limited to 220 persons, so order soon to ensure your place aboard. Hope to see you there.

    Reported by: Wade Streeter and Stephen Hause




    Cruise the Seaway this fall- Special Offer

    08/13
    Looking for an unusual cruise? Jim Barker’s got just the ticket. Barker, through his new venture, Coastal Expeditions, is offering a 12-day cruise from Warren, R.I., up the Hudson River, through the Erie Canal and down the St. Lawrence Seaway, ending up in Quebec City aboard the American Canadian Caribbean Line’s M/V Grande Caribe. Passenger may also choose to take certain parts of the cruise, 4 or 8 days visiting selected ports.

    The Grand Caribe was completed in 1997 by Blount Shipbuilding and is 182 feet long. It is registered in the U.S. and has a U.S. crew.

    The cruise, which begins from Providence, R.I., is from September 3-15. Passengers may elect to complete the entire 12-day trip, or choose one leg of the cruise. The first four days of the trip includes passage on the Hudson River past New York City and the Erie Canal, with visits to West Point and Cooperstown (home of the Baseball Hall of Fame). After stopping at Oswego, N.Y. on Lake Ontario, the second leg includes a stop at the Wooden Boat Museum in Clayton, N.Y. and the beautiful scenery of the 1,000 Islands area. Winery visits and golf outings are also on the itinerary, with the trip winding up at Quebec City.

    Costal Expeditions is now offering a Two for the Price of one promotion to viewers of this web site and subscribers to Great Laker Magazine. Booking for this trip is limited to 98 passengers.

    Click here for more information. or call 800-556-7450




    Today in Great Lakes History - August 13

    Operated by a crew of retired Hanna captains, chief engineers and executives, the GEORGE M. HUMPHREY departed Great Lakes Engineering Works under her own power on August 13, 1986 for Lauzon, Que. The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY cleared Lauzon September 3rd with the former Hanna steamer PAUL H. CARNAHAN in tow of the Dutch tug SMIT LLOYD 109. The tow locked through the Panama Canal, September 27th through 30th, and arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan December 10, 1986 completing a trip of over 14,000 miles. The HUMPHREY was scrapped in 1987 by Shiong Yek Steel Corp.

    On 13 August 1899, H. G. CLEVELAND (wooden schooner, 137'/264T, built in 1867 at Black River, OH) sank with a full load of limestone, 7 miles from the Cleveland harbor entrance.

    August 13, 1980 - The ARTHUR K. ATKINSON returned to service after repairing a broken crankshaft suffered in 1973. She brought 18 railcars from Manitowoc to Frankfort.

    The 272'/1740 gross ton, wooden propeller freighter SITKA was launched by F. W. Wheeler (hull # 32) at W. Bay City, Michigan on 13 August 1887.

    Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Windoc hit by bridge, catches fire, Canal closed

    08/12 7:00 p.m. update
    The Windoc was struck by the Allenburg Bridge Saturday night as it passed underneath. CBC News reports that the lift bridge, spanning the Welland Canal south of Lock 7, appeared to suddenly drop striking the passing Windoc, which then caught fire. The collision ripped the large smoke stack off of the vessel sending it crashing on to the stern deck. The wheelhouse was torn off to a point just below the wheelhouse windows and folded back.

    Some of the vessel's crew members jump into the water after the collision, according to witnesses that saw the accident. Miraculously there were only minor injuries reported to two of her crew members. The captain and the chief engineer remained on scene through out the incident and the rest of the crew were given accommodations at a near by Community Center.

    Witnesses report that the ship drifted approximately 1 kilometer from the bridge after the collision. In addition to damage from the bridge and fire, the Windoc suffered flooding in her forward end from running over an anchor that was dropped.

    The Windoc came to a stop with its stern about 30 feet off the side of the canal with the bow about mid channel blocking the canal. The Windoc is dead ship with no propulsion or generator power.

    The upbound side of the bridge (bridge is lowered) has a large "V" shaped notch in it. The rest of the bridge except for a small bit of the decking adjacent to the impact area seems intact, but unable to close all the way.

    Sunday afternoon work crews from the Seaway were planning the salvage of the Windoc and repair of the bridge. The McKeil tug Carrol C1 was in the canal waiting for the bridge to open, it is expected to be joined by another tug from Hamilton to assist in moving the Windoc. Traffic in the canal is expected to resume late Monday night after the bridge is moved into an open position and the Windoc is towed. It is unknown how long the bridge will be out of service for automobile traffic.

    Vessels delayed in the canal Sunday morning included: Canadian Leader and Catherine Desgagnes above Lock 6, Federal Kivalina at the Lock 5, barge St. Marys Cement II and the tug Sea Eagle II above Lock 3 wall, CSL Tadoussac Below Lock 3, Algobay below Lock 2, Atlantic Huron at the Stone Dock, Cruise ship Cape May Light at Lock 8 and the Canadian Olympic at the Port Colborne Fuel Dock.

    The Windoc was sailing downbound with a cargo of grain from Thunder Bay.

    Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt, Wally Wallace, Peter Bowers, Bill Bird, Stephen D. James, Roger Cournoyer, Don Detloff, Shaun Vary, Alex Howard, David McLeod and Ron Walsh




    Paterson Press Release

    08/12
    N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited vessel the MV Windoc was involved in a collision with a bridge in the Welland Canal on Saturday, August 11, 2001. N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited is please to report that all crewmembers are safe and well. N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited is cooperating fully with Canadian Transportation Safety Board investigators to determine the cause of this event. N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited is a Canadian grain and shipping company which has operated a fleet of dry bulk vessels safely on the Great Lakes for more than eighty years.

    The MV Windoc was converted to a modern Great Lakes dry bulk vessel in 1978. The vessel dimensions are 222 metres in length, with a gross registered tonnage of 18, 500. The vessel was loaded with wheat bound for the St. Lawrence River from Thunder Bay, Ontario.




    Erie News

    08/12
    Two former fleetmates were in Erie together Saturday as the American Republic and Richard Reiss unloaded gravel. The Republic came in at 9:00 a.m. and turned in the bay and begun unloading at the Mounfort Terminal around 10:30 a.m. Around 10:30 the Richard Reiss entered the Erie Channel, passing the Old Ore Dock so she could turn and back into that dock. Both vessels were unloading gravel. The Reiss departed after the Republic on Saturday afternoon, ending Erie's two-boat day.

    Republic at dock.
    Reiss inbound.
    Crewmen on deck of the Reiss.
    Stern View.
    Passing the Republic.
    Reiss outbound.

    Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




    Twin Ports Report

    08/12
    Cason J. Callaway was undergoing repairs in Duluth on Aug. 11. It was due to depart later in the day for Two Harbors.

    Roger Blough apparently will lay up in Duluth. After unloading in Gary on Aug. 12, it's due in Duluth on the 15th. Meanwhile, the Gott and Speer remain in their usual runs. The Gott is due in Gary on the 13th and Two Harbors again on the 16th. The Speer in due in Two Harbors on the 13th to load for Conneaut. Presque Isle is handling some stone; it's due in Cedarville on the 13th.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Toledo Update

    08/12
    Saturday the Canadian Miner was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. The tanker Gemini was in temporary lay-up at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock. The Saginaw and USCGC Neah Bay are in both dry docks at the Shipyard undergoing their surveys and misc. repairs. The Adam E. Cornelius and American Mariner remain in temporary lay-up at their respective dock sites.

    The Buckeye was at the Torco Dock unloading ore. The Algosteel was loading coal at the CSX Docks. The dredge Buxton II and related dredging equipment with their tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay several miles North of the Torco Docks.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Catherine Desgagnes due in late Sunday night with a 7am start to load coal on Monday morning. The Algobay, Arthur M. Anderson, and Canadian Century are due in on Monday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Docks will be the Armco late Tuesday evening.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Today in Great Lakes History - August 12

    The C&O carferry S.S. Spartan, in a heavy fog while inbound from Kewanee on the morning of August 12, 1976, struck rocks at the entrance to the Ludington harbor. She suffered severe damage to about 120 feet of her bottom plating. She was taken to Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay on August 18th for repairs. There were no injuries as a result of this incident.

    The TOM M. GIRDLER was christened August 12, 1951, she was the first of the C4 conversions.

    The MAUNALOA II was launched August 12, 1899

    The RIDGETOWN (a WILLIAM E. COREY) sailed from Chicago on her maiden voyage August 12, 1905 bound for Duluth, MN to load iron ore.

    On 12 August 1882, FLORIDA (3-mast wooden schooner, 352 t, built in 1875 at Batiscan, Ontario) was carrying 662 tons of coal from Black River to Toronto when she sprang a leak and sank 12 miles from Port Maitland. She hailed from Quebec and was constructed mostly of pine and tamarack.

    Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Lay up for the Blough

    08/11
    As the Great Lakes shipping industry continues to suffer from the crisis in the steel industry, the Roger Blough is expected to be the latest vessel to enter a rare mid season lay-up. She is expected to enter lay-up in Duluth some time next week for an unknown length of time.

    The Blough will join the American Mariner and Adam E. Cornelius in lay-up as the effects from the steel industry continue to be felt by Great Lakes shippers.

    Reported by: Steve Fisher




    Algolake Stops in Sarnia

    08/11
    The Algolake arrived at the Sarnia Elevators for some type of repair about noon Thursday. Ballast water was pumped out and the ship was sitting extremely high out of the water. By noon Friday the vessel was ballasted down heavily at the bow and workers where busy working on what appeared to be the shaft seal. The Algolake departed early Friday evening in ballast for Goderich.

    The Canadian Coast Guard Ship Griffin was in at the Government Docks Friday with the contents of her storage hold emptied on the dock. Workers doing some type of repair in the storage hold.

    Work on the Algolake.
    Algoville passes downbound.
    American Republic follows.
    Stern view.
    Richard Reiss enters the St. Clair River.

    Reported by: Jamie Kerwin




    Mail Boat in For Service

    08/11
    The U.S. Mail Boat J.W. Westcott II was out of service for three hours Friday for a scheduled stern tube packing replacement. The Westcott II was hoisted out of the water at the Gregory Boat Yard behind Belle Isle. While the Westcott was serviced the back up mail boat Joseph J. Hogan delivered mail and freight to vessels passing the station in the Detroit River.

    Reported by: Sam Buchanan




    Minnesota firm to import lumber via lakes

    08/11
    A Minnesota distributor has begun importing European lumber through Great Lakes ports.

    Lakes States Lumber in Aitkin is the first Midwest company to distribute the EuroWoods brand of spruce and pine dimensional lumber from Germany and the Scandinavian countries. The company said it’s buying lumber overseas because the quality of Canadian lumber has declined.

    The wholesaler's first shipment arrived Aug. 6 at Menominee, Mich., equaling 400 truckloads. A cargo of approximately half that size is expected during October in Duluth-Superior, sale manager Jerry Lipovetz told the Duluth News-Tribune.

    "Our plan is to have one delivery every month during the shipping season. In the winter, we'll ship to Quebec, then transfer to rail,'' he said.

    Reported by: Greg Roberts




    08/11
    Thursday the Niagara Prince of the American Canadian Caribbean Line Inc. slipped into Sturgeon Bay for a short stop over at the dock at Stone Harbor. The ship departed early afternoon for Milwaukee and then on to Chicago.

    In the bay.
    Through the Michigan Street bridge to Stone Harbor Dock.

    Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




    Twin Ports Pictures

    08/11
    Below are images from Duluth taken last week.

    The barge McAllister 132, a barge that has been hauling lumber down from Thunder Bay and off loading at the former Incan Superior dock ( Now Hallett 8 ) is Superior WI.
    Frontenac departing DMIR Dock #6 with a load of pellets.

    Reported by: Kent Rengo




    Saginaw River News

    08/11
    The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder departed the Sargent dock near the I-75 bridge during the night and was outbound passing through Bay City shortly before 7:00 a.m. Friday.

    The Tug Donald C. Hannah and her tanker barge arrived at the Triple Clean Liquifuels Dock in Essexville at 1:30 p.m. She discharged her 2 gallons barrel cargo of fuel oil and gave a security call stating she would depart at approximately 11:15 p.m. headed for the lake.

    The Donald C. Hannah & her barge. Todd Shorkey
    Close up of tug. Todd Shorkey
    Another View. Todd Shorkey
    Tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort and barge Great Lakes Trader Thursday morning. Stephen Hause
    Stern view. Stephen Hause

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Port Huron Pictures

    08/11
    Below are images from Port Huron taken last week.

    Atlantic Erie upbound under the Blue Water Bridges.
    Alaska Rainbow downbound.

    Reported by: Clayton Sharrard




    Detroit Traffic

    08/11
    Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Thursday and Friday.

    Traffic on Thursday by Mike Nicholls
    Halifax upbound at Fighting Island North Light. She was bound for the Blue Circle Cement Dock in the Rouge and arrived there stern first with the assistance of tugs Pennsylvania and Wyoming.
    Stern view.
    Fred R. White Jr. upbound at Grassy Island loaded with coal for Alpena.
    Stern view.
    Maumee upbound at Grassy Island loaded with salt for Green Bay.
    Stern view.

    Traffic on Friday by Pat & Jan Pavlat & Frank Bachnak

    Algomarine departs Ojibway salt headed for Milwaukee.
    Diamond Jack returns to Stroh dock after a cruise out of Wyandotte.
    Atlantic Huron unloading with the Algomarine in the background.
    Scan Partner at DMT.
    Indiana Harbor at National Steel Zug Island.




    Busy day on the Welland Canal

    08/11
    Below are images taken on Friday.

    Tarantau at Port Colborne scrapyard.
    Lake Carling upbound at Port Colborne (note pilot boat along side).
    Carling Stern.
    Pilot Boat J.W. Cooper.
    Federal Agno upbound above Lock 7.
    Stern View.
    Stern View-Stephen B. Roman above Lock 3.
    Algowood passing Roman above Lock 3.
    Bow View.
    Stern View.
    Algowest.
    Looking on Algowest's deck.
    Canadian Transport at Port Weller Dry Dock.
    Jade Star above Lock 1.
    Desgagnes container on deck. She was also flying the Desgagnes houseflag.
    "No Smoking-Dangerous Cargo".
    Stern View.
    Stephen B. Roman and Jade Star below Lock 2.
    Close up of the Roman.
    Cape May Light above Lock 1.

    Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




    Toronto Update

    08/11
    Thursday saw the departure of Theodore Too tugboat for Hamilton, Ontario. The tug will be open for tours in Hamilton Saturday & Sunday at the Royal Hamilton Yacht Club

    The Cuyahoga was in and out in mid-afternoon Thursday. The cruise ship Cape May Light was at the Queen Elizabeth Terminal and Federal Yoshimo was unloading sugar at Redpath dock.

    For more details on the Theodore Too's schedule while on the lakes visit www.theodoretugboat.com

    Please send images or reports of Theodore Too sightings to moderator@boatnerd.net

    Theodore Too docked in Toronto.

    Reported by: Gerry O.




    Brockville Traffic

    08/11
    Thursday was a busy afternoon at the Brockville waterfront. The saltie Federal Agno passed westbound around 2:40 p.m. She was in ballast and was heading for Thunder Bay. The Algowood also westbound followed it about fifteen minutes later. The Montrealais passed the Algowood at Brockville heading eastbound to Montreal. At 3:20 p.m., the saltie Milo passed Brockville heading westbound into Lake Ontario. Finally, the American Cruise Ship, the Grande Mariner passed westbound at 3:45 p.m.

    Pictures by Keith Giles and Peter Carter
    Federal Agno.
    Algowood.
    Close up of cabins.
    Montrealais.
    Milo passing.
    Close up of bow.
    Grand Mariner passing.
    Another view.

    Reported by: Peter Carter and Keith Giles




    Quebec Pictures

    08/11
    Below are images taken August 7 around the Seaway in Quebec.

    Mapleglen at the upper wall St Lambert waiting for harbor pilot to go to Elevator 4 in Montreal.
    Oakglen upbound light St. Lambert Lock.
    Close up.
    Manitoulin in lay-up at Sorel.
    Bow.
    Another view.
    Stern.
    Alcor being dismantled. Dismantling has stopped due to complaints from locals.
    Close up.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Kent Malo




    Today in Great Lakes History - August 11

    The H.M. GRIFFITH was the first self-unloader to unload grain at Robin Hood's new hopper unloading facility at Port Colborne, Ont on August 11, 1987.

    On August 11, 1977 the THOMAS LAMONT was the first vessel to take on fuel at Shell's new fuel dock at Sarnia, Ont. The dock's fueling rate was 60 to 70,000 gallons per minute and was built to accommodate one-thousand footers.

    Opening ceremonies for the METEOR (2) museum ship were held on August 11, 1973 with the President of Cleveland Tankers present whose company had donated the ship. This historically unique ship was enshrined into the National Maritime Hall of Fame.

    The T.W. ROBINSON and US.265808 (former BENSON FORD (2) departed Quebec City on August 11, 1987 along with US.265808 (former BENSON FORD (2) in tow of the Polish tug JANTAR bound for Recife where they arrived on September 22, 1987. Scrapping began the next month in October.

    On 11 August 1862, B.F. BRUCE (wooden propeller passenger steamer, 110'/169T, built in 1852 at Buffalo as a tug) was carrying staves when she caught fire a few miles off Port Stanley, Ontario in Lake Erie. She was run to the beach, where she burned to a total loss with no loss of life. Arson was suspected. She had been rebuilt from a tug to this small passenger steamer the winter before her loss.

    On 11 August 1908, TITANIA (iron propeller packet/tug/yacht, 98', 73 gt, built in 1875 at Buffalo) was rammed and sunk by the Canadian sidewheeler KINGSTON near the harbor entrance at Charlotte, NY on Lake Ontario. All 26 on board were rescued.

    The wooden scow-schooner SCOTTISH CHIEF had been battling a storm on Lake Michigan since Tuesday, 8 August 1871. By late afternoon of Friday, 11 August 1871, she was waterlogged. The galley was flooded and the food ruined. The crew stayed with the vessel until that night when they left in the lifeboat. They arrived in Chicago on Sunday morning, 13 August.

    Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    New Wreck Found

    08/10
    Reports in the Kingston Whig-Standard indicate a new shipwreck has been discovered in the vicinity of Main Duck Island. It is reported to be an as yet unidentified schooner that is relatively intact. Work is proceeding on the identity of the vessel.

    Reported by: Ron Walsh




    Marinette Marine Wins Staten Island Ferry Contract

    08/10
    The Marinette/Menominee Eagle Herald reported that Marinette Marine Corp. has been awarded a contract to for three new ferryboats that will service Staten Island, NY. Only two ship builders submitted bids, and MMC won the contract for a little over $119, which was over $60-million less than the other bidder from Jacksonville, FL.

    This is reported to be the world's largest passenger-ferry contract that has ever been awarded. Each vessel is designed to carry 4,500 passengers, but only 30 vehicles, which is an increased capacity of 1000 passengers per ferry but 10 vehicles less than the current ferries. Once the contract is in place, MMC will have 600 days to complete the first vessel, with the other two due 120 days and 240 days after the first respectively.

    The new vessels will replace three older Kennedy-Class boats that have been in service since about 1965. Marinette Marine Corp. has been occupied almost exclusively for the past several years with contracts for United States Coast Guard ships.

    Reported by: Dick Lund




    Analysts favor USX's splitting of steel, oil

    08/10
    USX Corp.'s decision to split its energy and steel divisions is looking ever wiser as the steel industry struggles through some of its toughest times ever, analysts said.

    The separation, announced in April, would eliminate about 40 percent of its U.S. Steel division's debt and position the steelmaker to be a stronger competitor. USX Marathon Group, an energy producer and distributor, would continue on alone.

    "I think being a financially independent company will really encourage some changes in management,'' Michael Gambardella, steel analyst with J.P. Morgan, told the Associated Press. He added that U.S. Steel should become more aggressive.

    John Duray, a spokesman for the United Steelworkers of America, said the deal should shore up domestic steel.

    "It looks to be as well-capitalized a steel business as we've got in the U.S.,'' Duray told the AP, "which is basically what we need.''

    Handing $900 million in debt to Marathon is designed to put U.S. Steel "in a position to survive,'' said USX spokesman William Keslar.

    U.S. Steel owns and operates the Minntac mine near Mountain Iron. It ships much of its taconite pellets through the DMIR ore dock in Two Harbors aboard vessels of USS Great Lakes Fleet.

    U.S. Steel bought Marathon in 1982, at a time when the steel company had a history of accumulated tax losses, and changed its name to USX in 1986. Marathon was profitable and the arrangement allowed USX to write off some of Marathon's profits against U.S. Steel's losses.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Lake Erie Coal Slump Continues In July

    08/10
    Coal loadings at Lake Erie ports fell to 1,935,312 net tons in July, a decrease of 17 percent compared to a year ago. For the season, the trade stands at 8,663,459 net tons, a decrease of 21.6 percent compared to the same point in the 2000 navigation season. Coal availability problems continue to account for the lion's share of the decrease.

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




    Record Month For Canadian Stone Docks

    08/10
    For the first time since starting our monthly survey in 1993, stone shipments from Canadian ports have topped 1 million tons. July loadings at Smelter Bay, Manitoulin Island, Port Colbourne and Bruce Mines totaled 1,044,932 net tons. U.S. stone ports did not share in the bounty; shipments totaled 3,467,865 net tons, a decrease of 11.2 percent from the corresponding period last year.

    Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




    Toledo Update

    08/10
    The Canadian Miner was loading grain at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. The Reserve was unloading ore at the Torco Dock with the Armco was in later Thursday evening. The Saginaw and USCGC Neah Bay were in both dry docks at the Shipyard undergoing their surveys and misc. repairs. The tanker Gemini was at the B-P Dock. The Adam E. Cornelius and American Mariner remain in long term lay-up at their respective dock sites.

    The dredge Buxton II with related dredging equipment and their tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay several miles north of the Torco Dock.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algomarine on Friday evening followed by the Algosteel on Saturday morning. The next scheduled ore boat due in at the Torco Dock will be the Buckeye on Saturday morning.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Lighthouse Festival this weekend

    08/10
    August 9th-12th is the 3rd Annual North American Lighthouse Festival in Mackinaw City, Michigan. Festivities include Lighthouse Festival Cruises. The cruises depart Shepler’s Mackinac Island Ferry Dock and head west under the Mackinac Bridge. This four hour tour takes you to historic lights including, White Shoal Light, Gray’s Reef Light, Waugoshance Light and St. Helena Island Lighthouse. For those who would prefer to admire lighthouses from land there is a trip on The Lighthouse Trolley Tour. This ride takes you to the beautiful shores of Lake Superior and The Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum at Whitefish Point.

    A Vendor Tent will be open at the festival site at Conkling Heritage Park throughout the weekend. There will be products available from Lefton, Lighthouse Digest, Harbour Lights and The Lighthouse Depot, just to name a few.

    Reported by: Chris West




    Today in Great Lakes History - August 10

    On August 10, 1952, the Arthur M. Anderson entered service. Exactly fourteen years later, on August 10, 1966, the vessel's namesake, Arthur Marvin Anderson, passed away.

    In 1969 the Edmund Fitzgerald set the last of many cargo records it set during the 1960s. The Fitzgerald loaded 27,402 gross tons of taconite pellets at Silver Bay on this date. This record was broken by the Fitzgerald's sister ship, the Arthur B. Homer, during the 1970 shipping season.

    On 10 August 1937, B.H. BECKER (steel tug, 19T, built in 1932 at Marine City, MI) foundered in heavy seas, 9 miles north of Oscoda, MI.

    In 1906, JOHN H. PAULEY (formerly THOMPSON KINSFORD, wooden propeller steam barge, 116', 185 gt, built in 1880 at Oswego, NY) caught fire at Marine City, Michigan. Her lines were burned through and she then drifted three miles down the St. Clair River before beaching near Port Lambton, Ontario and burning out.

    On 10 August 1922, ANNIE LAURA (wooden propeller sandsucker, 133', 244 gt, built in 1871 at Marine City, MI) beached near Algonac, Michigan, caught fire and burned to the waterline.

    Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Busy day in Nanticoke

    08/09
    Nanticoke was busy Wednesday. Algoma had five boats in port, the Algolake unloaded early in the morning and departed. The Algocatalyst was at the fuel dock. At 4:30 p.m., the Algoeast, loaded with 9500 tons of bunker fuel, departed Nanticoke and went to anchor in the Long Point Bay anchorage. It was reported she would be there 12 hours while a piston was changed on the engine. Also anchored waiting to unload were the Canadian Olympic, Canadian Enterprise and Algosoo.

    Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




    Saginaw in Dry Dock

    08/09
    Wednesday crews at the Toledo Shipyard were hard at work on the Saginaw. The vessel is in dry dock for her 5-year survey and replacement of stern seals. A few crew members remain on board the Saginaw and are working on various projects inside the ship.

    The Saginaw entered the dry dock on Wednesday, blocks are placed in the dock according to the vessel blue prints, these block keep the vessel from resting on the bottom of the dry dock and give crews access to the bottom of the vessel.

    Pictures by N. Schultheiss
    Saginaw in dry dock.
    Another view.
    The hull appears massive from the bottom of the dock Note the man standing beneath the bow thruster on the left.
    Anchors are down for inspection.
    Bow thruster.
    Close up of the bow.
    Crews working on the propeller and shaft.
    Looking down the rudder.
    Inside looking down at the Saginaw's engine.
    Builder's plate on the engine turbine.
    Engine controls.
    Looking forward on the deck.
    Name on the forward cabins.
    Pilot house.
    Hot day in Ohio, thermometer outside the pilot house shows the temperature in the shade.
    Looking down the bow stem to the bottom of the dry dock.
    180 degree view of the dry dock.
    Panoramic in the dry dock.

    Reported by: Neil Schultheiss




    Buffalo Passes Detroit

    08/09
    Wednesday evening the Buffalo was upbound passing Detroit on the way to Indiana Harbor. The Buffalo is loaded with a cargo of mill scale from Cleveland, mill scale is surface scale produced while making steel. The scale is gathered at the steel mill and then shipped to another mill where it is reduced in a blast furnace.

    While passing Detroit the Buffalo took on mail and freight from the mail boat J.W. Westcott II. The Westcott also took a crewman out to the boat for a crew change.

    Buffalo upbound.
    Crew man comes off through the engine gang way door.
    Man on.
    Freight comes off.
    Wide angle view passing under the Ambassador Bridge.
    Heading upbound.

    Reported by: Neil Schultheiss




    Twin Ports Report

    08/09
    A rare visitor to the Twin Ports on Aug. 8 was Canadian Century. The vessel with the ungainly but adorable forward cabins loaded coal at Midwest Energy Terminal for shipment to Ontario Power Generating in Nanticoke.

    Although the dock remains busy, it currently has no vessels scheduled for either Saturday or Sunday -- a rarity for a terminal that often has vessels waiting in line to load. Scheduled for the next several days are

    Columbia Star - Aug. 9 to the Cobb plant in Muskegon
    James R. Barker - Aug. 10 - for St. Clair
    Oglebay Norton - Aug. 10 - for St. Clair
    Indiana Harbor - Aug. 13 - for Silver Bay
    Canadian Navigator - Aug. 13 for Nanticoke
    Algolake - Aug. 13 for Nanticoke
    Canadian Enterprise - Aug. 13 for Nanticoke
    Walter J. McCarthy Jr. - Aug. 13 for ST. Clair

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Thunder Bay Update

    08/09
    It was a busy Wednesday in port with a number of departures. Only two vessels arrived and both were finished and out on the lake before the days end.

    The Atlantic Huron finished loading at Mission Terminal early Wednesday morning and headed down Lake Superior. The tug W.N. Twolan and barge McAllister132 departed early Wednesday morning loaded with lumber. The tug Radium Yellowknife has been very busy making quick turn arounds from Superior, Wisconsin. She arrived Wednesday morning and by late afternoon was heading back out onto the lake again, also loaded with lumber.

    The Windoc finished loading wheat at Richardson Elevator Wednesday evening and backed out of the slip and headed down the lake for Montreal with 26,000 metric tons of cargo. She was preceded by the John B. Aird who had loaded at Thunder Bay Terminals, arriving there after midnight Wednesday. She is bound for Hamilton.

    The Algoville also joined the list of departures on Wednesday. She left Agricore elevator around 5:00 p.m. bound for Port Cartier, Quebec with 27,300 metric tons of wheat.

    With all of Wednesday's departures, the port of Thunder Bay is once again left with the normal long term lay-ups and the tug Sandra Mary docked at Keefer Terminals.

    Reported by: Rob Farrow




    Saginaw River News

    08/09
    The American Republic entered the Saginaw River early Wednesday on her second visit this week. The vessel arrived shortly before noon at the Saginaw Rock Products dock. She finished unloading in Saginaw and was outbound the Saginaw River passing the Front Range at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday night.

    The Jacklyn M/Integrity departed the Lafarge terminal early Wednesday afternoon, shortly after the American Republic arrived.

    Because the Republic was moored some distance off the bank while unloading, the Jacklyn M backed downriver to turn below the I-75 bridge, rather than try to slip by the Republic to reach the Sixth Street turning basin. The Jacklyn M/Integrity was outbound from the I-75 bridge at 1:40 p.m.

    Deliveries by ship to the Lafarge terminal in Saginaw are running far ahead of last season, with 16 shiploads so far this year, compared to 18 loads for the entire 2000 shipping season.

    The tug Karen Andrie and her tank barge were in contact with the outbound Republic as they were inbound at Light 12. The Karen Andrie waited for the Republic to pass and proceeded inbound with a destination of Triple Clean Liquifuels in Essexville. The Andrie gave a security call approaching Light 12 around 7:15 p.m.

    Integrity departs. Stephen Hause
    American Republic downbound at the Saginaw River Rear Range Light. Todd Shorkey
    Republic passing the Consumers Energy Plant. Todd Shorkey
    Stern View. Note the water displaced by her hull rushing back in after passing. Todd Shorkey
    Another View. Todd Shorkey

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Detroit Traffic

    08/09
    Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Wednesday.

    Mantadoc upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Capt Ralph Tucker downbound at Mama Juda bound for the General Chemical Dock in Amherstburg.
    Stern view.
    Former Norfolk & Western rail barge Detroit in Nicholson's South Slip.
    Tugs Wyoming and Pennsylvania at their dock in River Rouge.
    The recently arrived tug Pennsylvania.
    Canadian Navigator loading salt at Ojibway. Note the blimp in the distance under the unloading boom.
    Stern view.
    Goodyear Blimp upbound above Fighting Island North Light.

    Reported by: Mike Nicholls




    Toledo Update

    08/09
    The Canadian Miner under tow of the Gaelic tugs Susan Hoey (bow) and William Hoey (stern) was upbound the Maumee River headed for the ADM/Countrymark Elevator to load grain. She arrived at the dock late Tuesday morning. The J.A.W. Iglehart was unloading cement at the Lafarge Dock and departed around noon. The Saginaw and USCGC Neah Bay were in both dry docks at the Shipyard for survey and misc. repairs.

    The Adam E. Cornelius and American Mariner remain in long term lay-up at their respective dock sites.

    The dredge Buxton II and related dredging equipment with their tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay several miles north of the Torco Dock.

    The John G. Munson was due in at the CSX Docks to load coal around 11:30 p.m. Wednesday night. The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algomarine late Friday evening followed by the Algosteel on Saturday afternoon. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Reserve (afternoon) and Armco (evening) followed by the Buckeye on Friday afternoon.

    Classic views of Toledo Shipping
    The bumboat Deweys headed upbound the Maumee River for the vessels moored at the grain elevators.
    Hennepin, followed by the H. Lee White inbound Maumee Bay. Both vessels are headed for the Lakefront and C&O Coal Docks respectively. The Henry Ford II is seen outbound Maumee Bay she just finished loading a coal cargo at the C&O Coal Docks.
    Thomas Wilson at the Hans Hansen Dock. The Columbia Fleet had just purchased her from The Kinsman Marine Transit Company Fleet and they are beginning to paint the vessel in their color scheme.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Toledo Pictures

    08/09
    Images by Jerry Mihlbauer
    Iglehart headed for Lake Erie.
    Neah Bay in dry dock.
    Saginaw in dry dock.

    Below are images of the Miner's trip to the ADM/Countrymark Elevator. Neil Schultheiss
    Canadian Miner inbound.
    Close up of the bow.
    Cargo holds are ready for cargo.
    Close up of the Susan Hoey.
    William Hoey trailing the tow.
    Tugs begin to turn the Miner off the dock.
    Susan Hoey holds the bow in place.
    Turning.
    Susan Hoey brings the bow around.
    Turned and heading for the dock.
    Crew member is lowered to the dock.
    Second man landed.
    Susan Hoey turns on the power.
    Tug crew releases the line.
    Lines are put out to the dock and loading can begin.




    Today in Great Lakes History - August 09

    The keel was laid for the INDIANA HARBOR on August 9, 1978.

    The HAMILDOC (3) was christened on August 9, 1963.

    The G.A. TOMLINSON (1) entered service August 9, 1909.

    The SHAUGHNESSY with the former CSL steamer ASHCROFT in tow of the Polish tug JANTAR arrived in Castellon, Spain for scrapping in 1969.

    On August 9, 1989 the tug FAIRPLAY IX departed Sorel with the FORT CHAMBLY and NIPIGON BAY in tandem tow bound for Aliaga, Turkey for scrapping.

    On the night of August 9, 1865, METEOR met her running mate, the propeller PEWABIC, off Thunder Bay on Lake Huron around 9:00 p.m. As the two approached, somehow METEOR sheered and struck her sister, sinking the PEWABIC within minutes in 180 feet of water. About one hundred twenty-five people went down with her, and 86 others were saved.

    On 9 August 1850, CHAUTAUQUE (wooden sidewheel steamer, 124'/162T, built in 1839 at Buffalo, NY) caught fire in the St. Clair River and burned to a total loss. In previous years she had been driven ashore (1844) and sank twice - once in 1846 and again in 1848. In September 1846, she made the newspaper by purposely ramming a schooner which blocked her path while she was attempting to leave the harbor at Monroe, MI.

    On 9 August 1856, BRUNSWICK (wooden propeller, 164', 512 t, built in 1853 at Buffalo) was carrying corn, scrap iron and lard from Chicago when she sprang a leak in a storm and was abandoned by the crew and passengers. One passenger drowned when one of the boats capsized, but the rest made it to shore near Sleeping Bear in the three other boats. BRUNSWICK went down in 50 fathoms of water, 6 miles south of South Manitou Island on Lake Michigan.

    On 9 August 1875, the Port Huron Times reported that the schooner HERO, while attempting to enter the piers at Holland, Michigan, was driven two miles to leeward and went to pieces. Her crew took to the boats, but the boats capsized. Luckily all made it safely to shore.

    August 9, 1938 - The Pere Marquette carferries 17 and 18 left Milwaukee for Grand Haven carrying 600 United States Army Troops, bound for Army war maneuvers near Allegan and at Camp Custer.

    On 9 August 1870, ONTONAGON (wooden propeller bulk freight, 176', 377 t, built in 1856 at Buffalo) sank after striking a rock near the Soo. She was initially abandoned but later that same year she was recovered, repaired and put back in service. In 1880, she stranded near Fairborn, Ohio and then three years later she finally met her demise when she was run ashore on Stag island in the Detroit River and succumbed to fire.

    The 204' wooden side-wheeler CUMBERLAND was launched at Melancthon Simpson's yard in Port Robinson, Ontario on 9 August 1871. She cost $101,000. Too large for the Welland Canal, she was towed up the Welland River to Chippawa and then up the Niagara River to Lake Erie. She operated on the Upper Lakes and carried soldiers to put down the Red River Rebellion. She survived being frozen in for the winter near Sault Ste. Marie in 1872, grounding in 1873, sinking in 1874, and another grounding in 1876. But she finally sank near Isle Royale on Lake Superior in 1877.

    Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes,Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Saginaw in Dry Dock

    08/08
    Tuesday the Saginaw was moved in to the Toledo Ship Repair dry dock and prepared for her 5-year survey. Survey and repairs should be completed about August 20.

    Pictures by Jerry Mihlbauer
    Saginaw's bow is moved to the dry dock entrance.
    Lining up for the dry dock.
    Entering.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman and Jerry Mihlbauer




    Bay Ship Update

    08/08
    The Wilfred Sykes departed Bay Ship Building in Sturgeon Bay early Tuesday morning after completing minor repairs to the vessel.

    Remaining in dry dock at Bay Ship is the barge McKee Sons. The vessel was originally reported as under going her 5 year survey, recent reports have the vessel in for bottom repairs. The vessel was departing Stoneport on August 3 when it ran aground. The barge off loaded part of the cargo into the H. Lee White and floated free. From Stoneport is sailed to Sturgeon Bay.

    Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle and Sharon Ann




    Busy day in Lorain

    08/08
    Menominee unloading lumber Monday at the K&K Dock in Menominee. Several more loads of lumber are expected to be brought in by ship this season for K&K. The Lumber was off loaded by the Menominee’s cranes then put on truck by a forklift and transported the short distance to the warehouse where it will be stored and eventually shipped out.

    Docked and unloading.
    Lumber is unloaded using the onboard crane.
    Lifted from the hold.
    Moved on the dock.
    Deck view.
    The pilot house.
    Close up of her stack.
    Name board.
    A large pin slides into a hole to prevent the deck crane from shifting while underway.
    Tug Carla Anne Selvick docked near by.

    Reported by: Scott Best




    Michigan ballast water law seeks to protect Great Lakes

    08/08
    A Michigan bill designed to protect the Great Lakes from foreign species such as the zebra mussel was signed into law Monday in Lansing.

    "The Great Lakes define Michigan, and one of the most critical risks facing them is an invasion of foreign species," said Lt. Gov. Dick Posthumus, who signed the bill in the absence of Gov. John Engler, who is attending the National Governors Association meeting in Rhode Island.

    The new law requires vessel operators to submit their ballast water management and treatment practices to the state Department of Environmental Quality, which will list companies that comply with state ballast water standards. Such standards are to be determined by the DEQ by March 1, 2002.

    Any business using a shipper not on the DEQ compliance list won't be eligible for loans, grants or awards administered through the DEQ.

    Reported by: Chris Williams




    Thunder Bay News

    08/08
    The heat wave continues to roll across the Great Lakes and so do the boats. The port of Thunder Bay saw several departures on Sunday. The Radium Yellowknife and lumber barges left for Superior, Wisconsin and the Montrealais left downbound Sunday evening after finishing loading at Richardson Elevator. The Captain Henry Jackman made her first trip into port on Sunday, docking at Thunder Bay Terminals and completing loading by late night. She departed downbound for the Soo.

    The tug/barge combo of W.N. Twolan and McAllister132 arrived back in Port Monday around 2:00 p.m. to load lumber for another trip on the lake and the tug Sandra Mary was tied up at Keefer Terminals Tuesday.

    The Atlantic Huron arrived in port and tied up at United Grain Growers "A" house early Monday morning and moved over to "M" house later in the afternoon. She then moved over to Mission Terminal late afternoon on Tuesday to finish loading.

    The Windoc and the Algoville arrived early on Tuesday morning. The Windoc docked at Cargill and moved over to Saskatchewan Pool 7a by 10:00 p.m. Tuesday. Algoville made a couple of moves on Tuesday, leaving Saskatchewan Pool 7a and arriving first at Richardson's and then moving again, this time over to United Grain Growers "A" house around 9:00 p.m. Tuesday night.

    Recent Thunder Bay and Duluth pictures
    Catherine Desgagnes at United Grain Growers "A" house .
    CSL Tadoussac loading DMIR in Duluth .
    Federal Welland being helped into Richardson Elevator by Glenada and Point Valour .
    Lake Charles loading in Superior .
    Arthur M Anderson departing Duluth.
    CSL Tadoussac departing Duluth.
    Stern view.
    James R Barker arriving Duluth.
    Reserve arriving back in Duluth after unsuccessful trip to Silver Bay to unload coal.
    Algocape arriving Duluth early morning.
    Dredges working in the Steep Rock Mine near Atikokan in 1959 .
    Another view.

    Reported by: Rob Farrow




    Alpena Update

    08/08
    The Paul H. Townsend arrived into port early afternoon on Tuesday to load cement at Lafarge. The J.A.W Iglehart was in Detroit. The tug Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity were in Saginaw on Tuesday and will head back to Alpena to load. The Alpena was expected back early Thursday morning coming from Superior.

    The American Republic was loading at Stoneport on Tuesday. Also expected was the John J. Boland and Great Lakes Trader.

    Reported by: Bryan Ridley




    Detroit Traffic

    08/08
    Tuesday was a slow night on the Detroit River.

    Montrealais downbound.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Mike Nicholls




    Toledo Report

    08/08
    The Courtney Burton was expected in at the CSX Docks Tuesday afternoon to load coal. The tug Donald C. Hannah with her barge was at the Hocking Valley Dock awaiting orders. The Adam E. Cornelius and American Mariner remain in long term lay-up at their respective dock sites. The dredge Buxton II with her related dredging equipment and their tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay several miles north of the Torco Dock.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the John G. Munson on Wednesdays evening followed by the Algomarine on Friday morning. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Reserve (morning) and Armco (afternoon) on Thursday, followed by the Buckeye on Friday afternoon.

    Winter views of Toledo shipping
    Buckeye unloading ore at the Torco Dock on a cold, windy, snowy day.
    Fred R. White Jr. with the tug Illinois approaching the Torco dock for winter lay-up.
    Middletown approaching the Lakefront Docks for lay-up.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Busy day in Lorain

    08/08
    The St. Clair was inbound at 2:00 p.m. Tuesday heading for the steel mill. She was followed by the Joseph H. Frantz going up river for an unknown dock. The Wolverine was inbound at 5:00 p.m. for the Pellet Terminal, to load for Cleveland.

    Pictures by TZ
    St. Clair inbound.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Rex Cassidy




    Clarkson News

    08/08
    By 5:30 Tuesday morning the James Norris had returned with another cargo of limestone for St. Lawrence Cement. To the east at Petro Canada, the Jade Star was in again to unload hydro cracker bottoms from Bronte.

    Reported by: Bryan Ridley




    Today in Great Lakes History - August 08

    The JAMES R. BARKER became the longest vessel on the Great Lakes when it entered service on August 8, 1976. It held at least a tie for this honor until the Paul R. Tregurtha entered service on May 10, 1981. The BARKER's deckhouse had been built at AmShip's Chicago yard and was transported in sections to Lorain on the deck of the steamer GEORGE D. GOBLE.

    The BUFFALO was christened August 8, 1978

    The E.B. BARBER along with the motor vessel SAGINAW BAY arrived August 8, 1985 under tow in Vigo, Spain. Demolition began on August 9, 1985 by Miguel Martins Periera at Guixar-Vigo.

    The Soo River Company was forced into receivership on August 8, 1982.

    On 8 August 1887, CITY OF ASHLAND (wooden sidewheel tug, 90'/85GT, built in 1883 at Ashland, WI) was towing a log raft near Washburn, WI in Lake Superior. Fire broke out near the boilers and quickly cut off the crew from the lifeboat. They jumped overboard and all but 1 or 2 were picked up by local tugs. The burned hull sank soon afterward.

    The wooden tug J.E. EAGLE was destroyed by fire at about 4:00 PM on 8 August 1869 while towing a raft of logs on Saginaw Bay to Bay City. Her loss was valued at $10,000, but she was insured for only $7,000.

    August 8, 1981 - The Ann Arbor carferry VIKING took part in a ceremony christening a body of water between Manitowoc and Two Rivers as "Maritime Bay".

    August 8, 1999 - The KAYE E. BARKER delivered the last shipment of limestone for Dow Chemical, Ludington. The plant later closed it's lime plant and began lime deliveries by rail.

    On 8 August 1813, the U. S. Navy schooner HAMILTON (wooden 10-gun schooner, 112', 76t, built in 1809 at Oswego as DIANA) was lying at anchor off the mouth of the Niagara River on Lake Ontario with her armed fleet-mate SCOURGE awaiting dawn when they planned to attack the British fleet. However, a quick rising storm swamped and sank both vessels. Since they were both built as commercial vessels, it has been suggested that their cannons may have made them top-heavy. The HAMILTON was found by sonar in 1975, sitting upright almost completely intact at the bottom of Lake Ontario. The Cousteau organization has dived to her and she was the subject of a live television dive by Robert Ballard in 1990.

    Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Sykes enters Bay Ship

    08/07
    The Wilfred Sykes entered Sturgeon Bay though the ship canal heading to Bay Ship Monday. They are visiting the ship yard for repairs to some type of ballasting problem. The Sykes went to Berth #15 at Bay Ship and was expected to be at the ship yard for a very short period of time.

    In the ship canal.
    Half way through.
    View down side of Edward L. Ryerson.
    Passing through the Michigan Street Bridge.

    Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




    Long Load for Badger

    08/07
    Sunday night the Lake Michigan Carferry Badger carried a long load from Ludington, Mi to Manitowoc, Wi. The cargo was a 220-foot long by 12-foot wide piece from a cement plant in Alma, Mi. The piece, weighing 300,000 lbs, arrived on Friday and is being shipped to Texas.

    In addition to passengers and automobiles the Badger is used by commercial trucking companies as a convenient short cut across Lake Michigan. Her large car deck allows her to carry over-dimensional loads with almost unlimited weight and length restrictions.

    Cargo is prepared for loading.
    Backed onto the Badger.

    Reported by: Max Hanley




    United States Gypsum Operation For Sale

    08/07
    The lakefront operations of the United States Gypsum Company in Alabaster, Michigan are officially for sale. This follows the failure last year of the tram system that carried gypsum several hundred feet out to a loading crib in Lake Huron. The cost to repair the decades-old system was deemed too excessive to justify. It appears gypsum is still being trucked out of the plant as unconfirmed reports state that gypsum will continue to be mined at the company's inland locations. The sale of USG's operation marks the end to an historic era that dates back to the 1920s.

    Reported by: Ross Ruehle




    Twin Ports Report

    08/07
    Twin Ports grain elevators were busy Monday morning. In Superior, Canadian Prospector was tucked into the berth at General Mills S -- a rare call for that vessel. Nearby, Lake Charles was loading at Cenex Harvest States 1. Over in Duluth, tugs were assisting Goviken into the AGP berth while Algocape was tied up at the General Mills layby dock. Back over in Superior, Alpena was back already, tied up alongside JB Ford to unload cargo, while down the front channel, Burns Harbor was loading at BNSF ore dock.

    Indiana Harbor is scheduled to call at BNSF on Tuesday. The vessel has been hauling mostly coal this season. It's due back in the coal trade on Aug. 12 when it's scheduled to load at Midwest Energy Terminal with coal for Silver Bay.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Saginaw River News

    08/07
    The American Republic paid one of her infrequent visits to the Saginaw River on Monday to deliver a load of coal to the Saginaw Asphalt/International Materials dock in Carrollton Township.

    The vessel entered the river at about 1:00 a.m. and unloaded during the morning. She was outbound from the Sixth Street turning basin at 11:35 a.m.

    The Republic normally works the Cuyahoga River shuttling iron ore to steel mills near Cleveland. She is seen on the Saginaw River only three or four times each season.

    The Sam Laud was outbound from the Saginaw Rock Products dock in Saginaw on Sunday afternoon. The vessel had unloaded during the morning, but tied up at the old Anderson dock near the I-75 Bridge around noon to await re-opening of the river later in the afternoon. The Laud was delayed by personal watercraft races that took place on Saturday & Sunday between Veteran & Wenona Parks in Downtown Bay City. These races were associated with the "Pig Gig" BBQ Rib Festival held in Bay City's Veterans Park.

    American Republic outbound. Stephen Hause
    Another view. Stephen Hause
    American Republic approaching Veteran's Bridge. Todd Shorkey
    Entering the Span. Todd Shorkey
    Stern View passing Downtown Bay City. Todd Shorkey
    American Republic downbound passing Essexville Sand & Stone. Todd Shorkey
    Republic passing the Essroc Dock in Essexville. Todd Shorkey
    Close up of "Go Tribe" banner in honor of the Cleveland Indians baseball team. Todd Shorkey

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Detroit and Port Huron Traffic

    08/07
    Algosoo downbound at the Bluewater Bridge.
    Algosteel upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Mike Nicholls




    Toledo Report

    08/07
    The CSL Niagara finished loading coal at the CSX docks and departed mid morning Monday. The Algosteel shifted over to the loading dock to load coal, she finished loading by mid afternoon and departed.

    The Saginaw was at the old Interlake Iron company dock just north of the shipyard preparing to enter drydock this morning. She has ordered two Great Lakes Towing Company tugs for 8:00 a.m. to assist placing her in drydock.

    The Donald C. Hannah with her barge was at the Hocking Valley Dock for several days awaiting orders. The Adam E. Cornelius and American Mariner remain in long term lay-up at their respective dock sites. The dredge Buxton II and her related equipment with their tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay several miles north of the Torco Docks. There were no grain or ore vessels in port at the time of this report.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Courtney Burton on Tuesday afternoon. The John G. Munson late Wednesday evening followed by the Algomarine on Friday morning. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Reserve (morning) and Armco (afternoon) on Thursday followed by the Buckeye on Friday afternoon.

    Classic views of Toledo shipping
    Detroit Edison at the Amship yard undergoing repairs.
    Lehigh with the bumboat "Deweys" alongside loading a grain cargo at the Midstates Elevator. The grain cargo will be going out the Seaway and she will return back to the Lakes with a load of high grade ore loaded at a Seaway port.
    Red Wing getting ready to load coal at the C&O #4 Dock.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Today in Great Lakes History - August 07

    The JAMES R. BARKER was christened August 7, 1976 she was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flag ship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.). She was built at a cost of more than $43 million under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. She was the third thousand footer to sail on the Lakes and the first built entirely on the Lakes.

    On 7 August 1844, DANIEL WHITNEY, a wooden schooner, was found floating upside-down, with her crew of 4 missing and presumed dead.. She was six miles off mouth of the Kalamazoo River in Lake Michigan.

    August 7, 1948 - Edward L. Ryerson, chairman of Inland Steel Company announced that the new ore boat under construction for Inland will be named the WILFRED SYKES in honor of the president of the company. Mr. Sykes had been associated with Inland since 1923, when he was employed to take charge of engineering and construction work. From 1927 to 1930 he served as assistant general superintendent and from 1930 to 1941 as assistant to the president in charge of operations. He became president of Inland in May, 1941. He had been a director of the company since 1935. The new ship was to be the largest and fastest on the Great Lakes, having a carrying capacity in intermediate depth of 20,000 gross tons. The ship will be 678 ft. long, 70 ft. wide and 37 ft. deep, and will run at 16 miles per hour when loaded.

    While lying at the dock at the C & L.H. RR Yard in Port Huron on 7 August 1879, the scow MORNING LARK sank after the scow MAGRUDER ran into her at 4:00 AM. MORNING LARK was raised and repaired at the Wolverine dry dock and was back in service on 20 September 1879.

    Data from: Dave Wobster, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Michigan governor signs bill to fund new lock at the Soo

    08/06
    A supplemental appropriations bill signed by Michigan Gov. John Engler provides $4.7 million toward building a new lock at Sault Ste. Marie.

    The planned $225 million lock linking Lake Superior with the lower lakes would be the second that is large enough to handle 1,000-foot vessels. It would reduce delays for larger vessels transiting the locks and reduce the risk that a shutdown of the Poe Lock would close the vital waterway to all larger vessels.

    "Michigan is leading the way in building a new Soo lock that will ensure that Michigan is open to global shipping well into the next century and will assure jobs and commerce for the Upper Peninsula," Engler said in a press release.

    The cost of the project will be shared with other Great Lakes states: Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Each state will contribute funding based on its percentage of the origin and destination tonnage shipped through the Soo Locks in 1995.

    Michigan's share is $14.1 million. The initial deposit of $4.7 million will be placed into a fund and the interest earned will cover the state's annual costs related to the construction of the new lock.

    Reported by: Eric and Sandy Chapman




    McKee Sons in for 5-Year

    08/06
    Sunday morning the barge Mc Kee Sons and tug Invincible were waiting for sun rise to enter Sturgeon Bay. At sun rise the barge raised anchor and headed down the Bay for Bay Ship.

    Once at Bay Ship the 1000-foot Graving dock and Selvick Marine Tugs were waiting to receive her. At the entrance to the dock the tug Invincible was uncoupled from the barge and the Mc Kee Sons was placed into the dock, for her 5-year survey. The tug docked at the end of Berth #9 to await the completion of the survey.

    Inbound.
    Tug Escort II heads out to lead the tow.
    Escort II receives the tow line.
    Escort II lining up on dock, Jimmy L. and William C. holding.
    All tugs holding while the Invincible detaches from the barge.
    Escort II leading into dock.
    Entering the dry dock as the Invincible heads to Berth 9.

    Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




    Reserve Still in Superior

    08/06
    Sunday the Reserve remained at the east side of the CLM dock in Superior delivering a cargo of coal. The vessel arrived at the dock Aug. 1 and has had difficulty unloading the sticky cargo.

    Last week a crane was along side the vessel and by Sunday workers were using hand tools to help the cargo into the unloading system. It is unknown why this load of coal is causing the long unloading process. A self unloading freighter will discharge a normal load in 4-10 hours.

    At the dock.
    Stern view.
    Onboard looking forward.
    Looking into a cargo hold. Note hand tools on right

    Reported by: Kent Rengo




    Middletown Loads

    08/06
    Sunday the Middletown was loading taconite in Escanaba. It will carry the load to LTV Steel at Indiana Harbor where it is expected to arrive today about 3:00 p.m. The tug and barge Joseph H. Thompson remain in lay-up near the ore dock.

    Pictures by Eric and Sandy Chapman and Scott Best
    Middletown loading.
    Close up.
    Bow view of the barge Joseph H. Thompson in lay-up. Scott Best
    Tug Joseph H. Thompson Jr. and tug Olive L. Moore. Scott Best
    Bow of the barge. Scott Best
    New crane on the Thompson. Eric and Sandy Chapman

    Reported by: Eric and Sandy Chapman




    "Tin Stackers" enters second printing

    08/06
    Wayne State University Press recently completed a second printing of "Tin Stackers: The History of the Pittsburgh Steamship Company" by Boatnerd.com contributor Al Miller. The second printing ensures the book will remain available in hardcover.

    "Tin Stackers" draws on company documents and interviews with former employees as it chronicles the 100-year history of the fleet that today is known as USS Great Lakes Fleet. It includes 50 photos shot by such well-known photographers as Wes Harkins and the late Howard Weis, as well as rare photos from the National Archives and the Pittsburgh Steamship Company archives. Also included are appendices that chronicle which fleets and boats were pulled together to form the company along with a short history of each vessel that has been part of the fleet. The book is highly regarded by boat watchers and historians and considered a "must have".

    Click here to read a sample chapter or to order




    Detroit Traffic

    08/06
    Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Sunday.

    Orsula (Croatia) at DMT 2.
    Stern view.
    Metacom at the Corps of Engineers Dock. She looks untouched, just moved to the other side of the slip.
    Canadian Century and Mississagi unloading at Zug Island.
    Stern view.
    Canadian Century.
    Stern view.
    Mississagi.
    Stern view.
    Calumet unloading at the Conrail Bridge.
    David Z Norton upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Algoville upbound at Grassy Island in route to Thunder Bay.
    Stern view.
    Walter J Mc McCarthy Jr. upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Arctic Blue ex Toronto tug (J G Langdon) now a personal yacht. Upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Calumet downbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Earl W Oglebay upbound at Grassy Island with coal for Port Washington.
    Stern view.
    Algosteel downbound at Grassy Island for Toledo.
    Stern view.
    Mesabi Miner downbound off Belanger Park.
    Stern view.
    Algocatalyst downbound off Belanger Park.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Mike Nicholls




    Toledo Report

    08/06
    The CSL Niagara was due in at the CSX Docks Sunday afternoon for an 11:00 p.m. starting time to load coal. The Algosteel was due in later that evening and will follow the Niagara loading coal on Monday morning. The Saginaw is at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock being readied for her entrance into the drydock at the Shipyard on Tuesday morning. The dredge Buxton II with her related dredging equipment and their tug Muskegon were dredging the ship channel in Maumee Bay. The Lake Michigan Contractors large crane barge no. 55, a large bulk barge, and their tug Capt. Barnaby were docked at the Lakefront Docks Frog Pond area.

    The Adam E. Cornelius and American Mariner remain in long term lay-up at their respective dock sites.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX docks will be the Courtney Burton on Tuesday afternoon. The John G. Munson on Wednesday afternoon followed by the Algomarine on Friday morning. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Reserve (morning) and Armco (afternoon) on Thursday, followed by the Buckeye on Friday evening.

    Classic views of Toledo shipping
    Agawa Canyon unloading salt at the Nicholson Dock. Notice the color scheme was different.
    Passenger boat Arawanna Belle sailing upbound the Maumee River. She operated in Toledo for several years before being sold and leaving Toledo.
    J. Burton Ayers (in Columbia colors) approaching the C&O Coal Docks to load a coal cargo at the No. 4 machine.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Hamilton and Welland Canal Update

    08/06
    Below are images taken Sunday at Hamilton and the Welland Canal.

    Algogulf in long term lay-up at Hamilton.
    Lake Guardian upbound below Lock 7 Saturday afternoon.
    Oakglen downbound at Lock 7 Saturday afternoon.
    Mapleglen fuels at Port Colborne Sunday morning.
    Louis J. Goulet (ex. Coniscliffe Hall and Telesis) at Port Maitland Sunday. She is owned by Pembina Gas Exploration Co. and is currently laid up.
    Unidentified pilothouse beside Rte 3. just outside Port Maitland. Please Please e-mail if you can identify.

    Reported by: Roger LeLievre




    Oshawa Update

    08/06
    Sunday the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Advent was docked in Oshawa, the Lake Ontario Port is included in her coverage area. It departed that afternoon for her home base. The tug Carrol C. I and the Barge OC 181 will be unloading machinery for General Motors this morning and will then sail for Hamilton shortly after.

    CCGS Advent at dock.
    Stern view.
    Advent's Captain C. Slade.
    Away from the dock.
    On to the lake.
    Tug Carrol C. I and the Barge OC 181.
    Bow view.
    Close up.

    Reported by: Jim Gallacher




    Clarkson News

    08/06
    Sunday evening the James Norris was carrying a load of limestone up Lake Ontario for the St. Lawrence Cement plant in Clarkson. About 8:20 p.m. the vessel was about a mile out. The sun had set and her boom lights and masthead lights punctuated the vessel's classic lines. By 9:00 she was secure and unloading was underway.

    At Petro Canada's pier just to the east; the Jade Star was alongside unloading. She started up the Seaway from Montreal early Saturday. The tanker arrived in port early Sunday with a cargo of hydro cracker bottoms.

    Reported by: Bryan Ridley




    Aerial Views

    08/06:
    Pilot and photographer Don Coles was flying over the Lake St. Clair and the St. Clair River Saturday and sent in the pictures below. All photographs are available for purchase. Don's company, Great Lakes Aerial Photos, is available for hire for any aerial photography need.

    Walter J. McCarthy Jr. downbound St. Clair Cut Off.
    Stern view.
    Pathfinder and Dorothy Ann.
    Stern view.
    Barge A 390 and tug.
    Captain Ralph Tucker on Lake St. Clair.




    Cruise the Seaway this fall- Special Offer

    08/06
    Looking for an unusual cruise? Jim Barker’s got just the ticket. Barker, through his new venture, Coastal Expeditions, is offering a 12-day cruise from Warren, R.I., up the Hudson River, through the Erie Canal and down the St. Lawrence Seaway, ending up in Quebec City aboard the American Canadian Caribbean Line’s M/V Grande Caribe. Passenger may also choose to take certain parts of the cruise, 4 or 8 days visiting selected ports.

    The Grand Caribe was completed in 1997 by Blount Shipbuilding and is 182 feet long. It is registered in the U.S. and has a U.S. crew.

    The cruise, which begins from Providence, R.I., is from September 3-15. Passengers may elect to complete the entire 12-day trip, or choose one leg of the cruise. The first four days of the trip includes passage on the Hudson River past New York City and the Erie Canal, with visits to West Point and Cooperstown (home of the Baseball Hall of Fame). After stopping at Oswego, N.Y. on Lake Ontario, the second leg includes a stop at the Wooden Boat Museum in Clayton, N.Y. and the beautiful scenery of the 1,000 Islands area. Winery visits and golf outings are also on the itinerary, with the trip winding up at Quebec City.

    Costal Expeditions is now offering a Two for the Price of one promotion to viewers of this web site and subscribers to Great Laker Magazine. Booking for this trip is limited to 98 passengers.

    Click here for more information. or call 800-556-7450




    Weekly Updates

    08/06
    The weekly updates have been loaded. Click here for the latest information.




    Today in Great Lakes History - August 06

    WALTER J. McCARTHY JR.'s bottom was damaged at the fit-out dock and required dry docking on August 6, 1977 for repairs prior to her maiden voyage.

    The IMPERIAL BEDFORD was delivered to Imperial Oil Co. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. on August 6,1969.

    The fourth Welland Canal was officially opened with much ceremony on August 6, 1932 when the steamer LEMOYNE, then the largest bulk carrier on the Lakes, locked down the Flight Locks.

    On August 6, 1982 the Pierson fleet was placed in receivership and eventually the entire fleet was purchased by Parrish & Heimbecker Ltd. (P&H Shipping Ltd.,), Mississauga, Ont.

    WILLIAM CLAY loaded her first cargo of iron ore on August 6, 1953 to be delivered to her home port at the Ford Rouge Plant south of Detroit, MI.

    On August 6, 1965 the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON, upbound in the Trenton Channel of the Detroit River after having unloaded taconite ore at McLouth Steel, lost steering control and struck a stationary section of the Grosse Ile toll bridge. This caused the bridge section and two cars to drop into the river. Fortunately no one was seriously hurt, but the bridge was closed for several months. The HUTCHINSON sailed to AmShip's South Chicago yard for repairs.

    The KINGDOC (2) was launched August 6, 1963 for N.M. Paterson & Sons Ltd.

    The POINTE NOIRE was released on August 6, 1977 after running aground two days prior in the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River blocking the channel.

    On 6 August 1890, MICHIGAN (Steel sidewheel carferry, 296'/1730GT) was launched at W. Bay City, MI. She was built by F. W. Wheeler (hull # 76) for the Canadian pacific Railway for use on the Detroit River and had a capacity of 16 railroad cars. She was retired in 1916 and converted to an unrigged pulpwood barge.

    On 6 August 1871, the 3-mast wooden schooner GOLDEN FLEECE was down bound on Lake Huron laden with iron ore. The crew mistook the light at Port Austin for the light at Pointe Aux barques and steered directly for the Port Austin Reef where the vessel grounded. After 200 tons of ore were removed, GOLDEN FLEECE was pulled off the reef then towed to Detroit by the tug McCLLELLAN and repaired.

    On 6 August 1900 the McMorran Wrecking Company secured the contract for raising the 203-foot 3-mast wooden schooner H. W. SAGE which sank at Harsen's Island on 29 July 1900. The SAGE had been rammed by the steel steamer CHICAGO. Two lives had been lost; they were crushed in her forecastle.

    August 6, 1929 - The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 was launched. She was christened by Miss Ann Bur Townsend, daughter of the mayor of Saginaw.

    On 6 August 1870, the wooden propeller tug TORNADO had her boiler explode without warning four miles northwest of Oswego, New York. The tug sank quickly in deep water. Three of the six onboard lost their lives. Apparently the tug had a new boiler and it had been allowed to run almost dry. When cold water was let in to replenish the supply, the boiler exploded.

    Data from: Max Hanley, Jody L. Aho , Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Saginaw in for 5-year

    08/05
    Saturday the Saginaw arrived in Toledo and began preparing for dry docking at the Toledo Ship Yard. The vessel will undergo her required 5-year survey and replacement of stern seals, both front and back.

    Crews at the ship yard were laying the blocks in the dry dock and the Saginaw is expected to enter the dock on Tuesday. Survey and repairs should be completed about August 20.

    Reported by: Jim Siddall and Jim Hoffman




    Burns Harbor Departs

    08/05
    The Burns Harbor cleared Berth #15 at Bay Ship Building, Sturgeon Bay Saturday morning. The Harbor was in Bay Ship for repairs to a generator.

    Clear of Berth #15 in channel.
    Outbound Sturgeon Bay.
    Bow clearing harbor buoy and Sherwood Point.
    Entering the Bay of Green Bay.

    Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




    First Tall Ship in Muskegon

    08/05
    A week before the public portion of the Muskegon Stop of the 2001 Tall Ships Challenge begins, the first ship arrived Friday. The HMS Tecumseth a replica of a war of 1812 British naval ship arrived at 3:00 p.m. Friday afternoon.

    The Tecumseth will take up a temporary berth at Great Lakes Marina. By next Thursday at all 20 ships are expected to be docked at the newly improved Heritage Landing facility in downtown Muskegon. This site has a maritime heritage as it was once home to one of Charles Hackley's lumber mills. Facilities included the wharfs where lumber schooners tied up.

    The Tall Ships have now completed their 4th race from Tawas Point Light to the Straits of Mackinac. When they gather for the Muskegon it will be the largest gathering of Tall Ships on the Great Lakes with 20 ships expected. Time can be saved by purchasing tickets in advance on line at www.sailmuskegon.com/tickets

    HMS Tecumseth arrives.

    Reported by: Ike Stephenson




    Busy day in Menominee and Marinette

    08/05
    Saturday was another busy day for vessels in Menominee and Marinette. That morning the Millenium Falcon arrived in Marinette with approximately twenty thousand tons of pig iron for Marinette Fuel and Dock. Saturday afternoon the pulp boat Menominee arrived from Marathon Canada. This is the second time this week that two vessels have been in port at the same time, the Capt Henry Jackman and Catherine Desgagnes were both in port on Tuesday.

    Pictures by Scott Best and Dick Lund
    Millenium Falcon is assisted to the dock.
    Docking at the William H. Donner.
    Unloading.
    Pig iron is dropped to the dock by magnetic crane.

    Menominee arrives with the Selvick tug Jimmy L leading and the Carla Anne Selvick trailing.
    A crowd at the North Pier Lighthouse looks on.
    Making the turn in the Menominee/Marinette Harbor, as there was a bit of a cross-wind.
    Menominee towed past the Millenium Falcon.
    Another view.

    Reported by: Scott Best, Dick Lund and Chad Michaels




    Cruise ship Queen Elizabeth 2 docks in Quebec City

    08/05
    The QE2 arrived early Friday morning in Quebec City from New York on a bright and beautiful summer day and docked at pier 22 with the Citadel and Château Frontenac as background. The QE2 was carrying 1780 passengers. This will be the ship’s only stop this season. The passenger ship was expected to depart Quebec Saturday evening sailing for Sydney NS , her next port of call. The peak of the cruise ship season will occur in September and October when 54 ship stopovers are expected including the newly launched 80,000 tons Norwegian Sun with a capacity of 2,000 passengers.

    Reported by: Frederick Frechette




    Integrity unloads

    08/05
    Saturday the tug Jacklyn M. and barge Integrity were in St. Joseph, MI. The pair were visiting the Lake Michigan port to unload a cargo of cement.

    Unloading.

    Reported by: Rick Pasley




    Detroit Traffic

    08/05
    Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Saturday afternoon.

    Canadian Navigator downbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Barge Hannah 5101 & tug James A Hannah upbound at Grassy Island.
    Close up of tug.
    Stern view.
    Indiana Harbor upbound at Grassy Island. Algolake downbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Rubin Lark (Panama) downbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Pilot Capt. Alan Gindroz comes out to wave.

    Reported by: Mike Nicholls




    Toledo Update

    08/05
    The Algocen finished loading her grain cargo at Anderson's "E" Elevator and departed Friday evening. The Cuyahoga arrived at Anderson's "K" Elevator that evening. She finished loading grain Saturday and departed in the late afternoon. She has a load of corn onboard bound for Port Colborne, Ontario.

    Fleetmate Saginaw was docked at the old Interlake Iron Company Dock. She was removing ballast water from her hull and was sitting quite high out of the water as she prepares for dry docking.

    The Algobay was loading coal at the CSX Dock and departed late morning Saturday, the Algomarine and American Republic were waiting to follow to load coal respectively. The Armco was at the Torco Dock unloading ore. The dredge Buxton II with her dredging equipment and tug Muskegon resumed dredging operations on Maumee Bay ship channel north of the Torco Docks.

    Lake Michigan Contractors large crane barge no.55, plus a large bulk barge. and their tug Capt. Barnaby were tied up at the Lakefront Docks Frog Pond area. The Adam E. Cornelius, and American Mariner still remain in long term lay-up at their respective dock sites.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the CSL Niagara and Algosteel on Sunday evening followed by the Courtney Burton on Tuesday afternoon. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Docks will be the Reserve on Wednesday morning. The Armco on Thursday evening, followed by the Buckeye late Friday evening.

    Classic views of Toledo Shipping

    Canadoc with the old tug Patricia Hoey upbound the Maumee River headed for one of the Elevators to load grain.
    J.L. Mauthe loading coal at the C&O Coal Docks. She was converted to a barge several years ago and renamed Pathfinder. The tug Dorothy Ann now operates with this barge.
    Adam E. Cornelius and Sharon at the City docks getting ready for Spring fitout.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Clarkson Report

    08/05
    The James Norris was in early Saturday afternoon. She was discharging a cargo of limestone at St. Lawrence Cement.

    Reported by: Bryan Ridley




    Today in Great Lakes History - August 05

    The Richard M. Marshall (later Joseph S. Wood, John Dykstra, Benson Ford, and, finally, 265808) entered service on August 5, 1953. From 1966 until it was retired at the end of 1984, this vessel and the William Clay Ford (1) were fleet mates. There is only one other instance of two boats being owned by the same company at some point in their careers with as close or closer age difference. The Charles M. Beeghly (originally Shenango II) and the Herbert C. Jackson, fleetmates since 1967, both entered service on May 14, 1959.

    The aft section of the WALTER J. McCARTHY JR. was float launched August 5, 1976. She was American Steamship's first thousand-footer and the first thousand-footer built at Bay Ship.

    The G.A. TOMLINSON (2). was sold outright to Columbia Transportation Co. (an Oglebay Norton Co.), on August 5, 1971 along with the last two Tomlinson vessels, the SYLVANIA and the JAMES DAVIDSON.

    On 5 August 1850, ST. CLAIR (sidewheel steamer, passenger & package freight, 140'/210T, built in 1843 at Detroit, MI) was reported as lost with no details given whatsoever. The report of her loss was published 3 days BEFORE she was enrolled at Detroit by J. Watkin.

    The motor vessel Beaver Islander completed her maiden voyage to Charlevoix in 1962. At the time, she was the largest, fastest, and most advanced ship built for the run. She served as the flagship for 37 years, a record, until the Emerald Isle II arrived in 1997.

    August 5, 1907 - A female passenger dived off the deck of the PERE MARQUETTE 18 (I) on a dare. Two of the 18's officers leapt over to rescue her. One of the officers nearly drowned and was rescued by the passenger.

    On 5 August 1866, AUTOCRAT (2-mast, wooden schooner, 345 t, built in 1854 at Caltaraugus, NY) was carrying 15,000 bushels of corn and was lying off Chicago, waiting for a storm to die down. Just before dawn, the schooner J.S. HEWHOUSE was also seeking shelter when she ran into AUTOCRAT, sinking her in 7 fathoms of water. The crew was rescued by the tug UNION.

    On 5 August 1869, LAURA E. CALVIN (3-mast wooden schooner, 130', 216 t, built in 1863 at Garden Island, Ontario as a bark) sprang a leak during a storm and foundered 10 miles off Braddock's Point on Lake Ontario. No lives were lost.

    Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Jody L. Aho , Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Steel slump erasing shipping gains

    08/04
    Port officials in Ohio say economic growth experienced by Great Lakes shipping over the past decade is being erased by the current decline of the U.S. steel industry.

    A report by the U.S. Department of Transportation released earlier this week indicated that economic growth in Great Lakes ports along the St. Lawrence Seaway has outpaced inflation. The study said shipping-related revenues in the Seaway were $3.4 billion in 2000, nearly double the amount reported in 1991.

    But Ohio shippers and port operators say mill closings, mine shutdowns and company bankruptcies experienced by the steel industry over the past 18 months has eliminated much of the growth.

    "We're seeing our (cargo) numbers down across the board, " Brian Schwartz, spokesman for the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority, told the Associated Press.

    The port' s steel-related shipping is down 81.5 percent from last year, Schwartz added.

    "In the boom economy we had in the '90s, Great Lakes shipping did rebound, " Glen Nekvasil, spokesman for the Lake Carriers’ Association, told the AP. "But ever since we have had the steel dumping and the slowdown in other segments (of the economy) we are seeing a general sluggishness."

    As of June, cargo shipments on the lakes were down 7.8 percent from last year, largely the result declining iron ore shipments, Nekvasil said.

    The administrator for the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. said the DOT study was intended to measure the Seaway's impact on the regional economy, not to suggest the Seaway can cure larger economic woes.

    "The Seaway system really reflects the rest of the economy and for that matter the rest of the world economy," Administrator Albert Jaquez said.

    Reported by: Glen Thompson




    Theodore Tugboat

    08/04
    The tug Theodore Too is in Toronto this weekend as part of a 50 City Tour that will take the tug all the way to Chicago this summer. Theodore Too is a working tug based on the tug boat character from the popular children’s program "Theodore Tugboat". Theodore Too departs Monday heading for Hamilton, Ontario.

    For more details on the tug's schedule while on the lakes visit www.theodoretugboat.com

    Tuesday the tug as passing through the Iroquois Lock in the St. Lawrence Seaway .
    Theodore Too downbound on the Seaway.
    Approching the lock.
    Entering the lock.

    Please send images or reports of Theodore Too sightings to moderator@boatnerd.net

    Reported by: Jamie Kerwin




    Annual QE2 visit in Quebec City

    08/04
    Cunard's flagship, the Queen Elizabeth II, arrived Friday morning in Quebec City on her annual visit. The 70,000 grt / 961-foot vessel made her arrival at Berth 22 around 9:30 a.m. with the help of two Groupe Océan's tugs, docking in front of the worlwide renowed Château Frontenac and Old City. The Queen is scheduled to depart on Saturday on her way back via the Saguenay fjord to New-York City.

    Also in port Friday were the now familar cruiseship Cape May Light and tanker Alioth, who finished loading jet fuel for a delivery to Hamilton.

    Reported by: J. F. Boutin




    Thunder Bay News

    08/04
    Another warm day greeted the Catherine Desgagnes as she arrived in port early Friday Morning. She tied up at Cargill Elevator to begin loading. The Saltie Federal Welland made it's first trip this season to port Friday afternoon. She entered the North Entrance where she was helped by the tugs, Glenada and Point Valour, into the slip at Richardson Elevator around 2:00 p.m.

    She arrived in ballast and began pumping ballast water out as she approached the breakwall. As the Federal Welland was being tied up the Catherine Desgagnes was also lining up for the North Entrance after leaving Cargill. As she entered through the breakwall she dropped her starboard anchor to aid her in steering and skillfully docked at United Grain Growers "A" house at 3:00 p.m. By 6:30 p.m. she had moved over to Agricore Elevator near the South Breakwall Entrance to finish her loading. She will be most likely leaving sometime Friday night.

    The Montrealais is expected in port sometime Saturday afternoon.

    The construction tug Sandra Mary is docked at Keefer Terminals while the Algontario still continues her long term lay-up waiting for a decision on her fate. Other long term layups in port include Quedoc and Vandoc at the Paterson dock in the Kaministiqua River, the M.A.C. Gagne former Saguenay at the Gagne dock and the Wolf River at a slip beside Thunder Bay Coal Terminals at the mouth of the Kaministiqua River.

    Reported by: Rob Farrow and Ron Konkol




    Cleveland update

    08/04
    The G tug Ohio has returned to Cleveland and is again berthed forward of the tug Triton on the river. The Calumet was unloading stone Friday evening at the Ontario stone dock next to the Conrail bridge. She had to twist around the bend partway through her unload to make a second pile. The American Republic is still running the LTV shuttle and was expected to depart the upper LTV dock at 8:00 p.m. Friday evening.

    Reported by: Rex Cassidy




    Today in Great Lakes History - August 04

    Two favorites of many boatwatchers, entered service on August 4. The William Clay Ford (1) entered service on August 4, 1953, and the Edward L. Ryerson entered service on August 4, 1960.

    The MELISSA DESGAGNES sailed to Holland under her 'a' name ONTADOC (2) with a load of Bentonite from Chicago on August 4, 1979.

    The E.J. BLOCK was laid up for the last time at Indiana Harbor, IN on August 4 1984, the E.J. BLOCK was sold for scrap in late May, 1987.

    The D.M. CLEMSON (2) left Superior on August 4, 1980 in tow of Malcolm Marine's tug MALCOLM for Thunder Bay where she was dismantled.

    The HOCHELAGA (2) was launched August 4, 1949 at the Collingwood Shipyards Ltd., Collingwood, Ont. for Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., Montreal, Que

    On a foggy August 4, 1977 the POINTE NOIRE went hard aground near the entrance to the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River and blocked the channel. After her grain cargo was lightered by Columbia Transportation's crane steamer BUCKEYE, the POINTE NOIRE was released on August 6th. She was reloaded in Hay Lake and continued her downbound trip. Repairs to her bottom damage were completed at Thunder Bay. Ont.

    On 4 August 1902, CITY OF VENICE (wooden propeller freighter, 301'/2108GT, built in 1892 at W. Bay City, MI). was sailing in perfect weather in Lake Erie abreast of Rondeau, Ontario with a load of iron ore. The steamer SEGUIN collided with the CITY OF VENICE, sinking her. U.S. marshals later impounded the SEGUIN for damages.

    August 4, 1935 - The only time the ANN ARBOR NO. 7 had the full limit of passengers when she ran an excursion from Frankfort around the Manitou Isle and back with 375 passengers on board.

    LYCOMING (wooden propeller, 251', 1610 gt) was launched on 4 August 1880 at W. Bay City, Michigan by F. W. Wheeler (hull #7) as a 2-deck package freighter. She was rebuilt as a single deck bulk freighter after she burned in 1905. She was one of the few bulk freighters that still carried her arched hog-braces visible above deck.

    HIRAM W. SIBLEY (wooden propeller freighter, 221', 1419 gt) was launched at E. Saginaw, Michigan on 4 August 1890. She only lasted eight years. While carrying 70,000 bushels of corn from Chicago for Detroit, she stranded on the northwest corner of South Manitou Island in Lake Michigan during blizzard on 26 November 1898. The tugs PROTECTOR and SWEEPSTAKES were dispatched for assistance but the SIBLEY re-floated herself during high water the following night, then was stranded on the southwest side of North Fox Island to prevent sinking. She broke in half; then completely broke up during a gale on 7 December 1898.

    Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Jody L. Aho, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Reserve in Superior

    08/03
    The steamer Reserve made the unusual move of spending two days at the seldom-used east side of the CLM dock in Superior delivering a cargo of coal. The vessel arrived at the dock Aug. 1 and appeared to be finishing its discharge of cargo in early afternoon on Aug. 2. The CLM dock receives occasional shipments of coal on the east side. It's more frequently used west side handles stone. The Reiss Inland dock in Duluth also occasionally receives coal cargoes from vessels. After finishing in Superior, the Reserve was expected to proceed up the shore to Silver Bay to load taconite pellets.

    Other Twin Ports docks were also busy Aug. 2. Canadian Olympic was back in the saddle again, loading coal at Midwest Energy Terminal. It was scheduled to be followed late in the day by Paul R. Tregurtha. Canadian Prospector, a familiar sight in Duluth, was unloading cement at St. Lawrence Cement. Joe Block was here for a long day of unloading stone at the DMIR ore dock and then loading pellets there. Grant Carrier, another familiar caller, was loading grain at the Cenex Harvest States elevator while Rubin Lark was finishing its load at the Peavey elevator.

    Reserve unloads coal at the CLM dock in Superior. The white-and-red boom crane seen at left was performing some sort of task on the Reserve's deck just aft of the pilothouse.
    Another view of the Reserve.
    Closeup of the unloading boom and coal pile.

    Reported by: Al Miller




    Rare visitors in the Canal

    08/03
    The Welland Canal had a rare visitor Thursday when the J.S. St. John entered the system en route to Port Weller Dry Docks for possible repairs or survey. The sand sucker is based in Erie, Pennsylvania and normally works close to that port.

    The Empire Sandy was upbound heading for Port Colborne to take part in this weekend's Canal Days Festival. The festival celebrates the Welland Canal with citywide events over the long, Canadian holiday weekend.

    J.S. St. John approaches Lock 7.
    Close up of her pilot house and stack.
    Stern view entering the lock.
    Empire Sandy upbound above Lock 7.
    Crowd onboard enjoys the passage .
    Empire Sandy sails for Port Colborne.

    Reported by: Alex Howard




    Theodore Tugboat

    08/03
    The tug Theodore Too arrived in Toronto Thursday as part of a 50 City Tour that will take the tug all the way to Chicago this summer. Theodore Too is a working tug based on the tug boat character from the popular children’s program "Theodore Tugboat".

    The tug will be open for tours today and Saturday at Harbour Square Park (21 Queens Quay West, next to the Toronto Island Ferry Terminals. The tug then shifts to Ontario Place on Sunday where it will again be open for tours. Theodore Too departs Monday heading for Hamilton, Ontario.

    For more details on the tug's schedule while on the lakes visit www.theodoretugboat.com

    Reported by: Gerry O. and Jamie Kerwin




    Hot Weather Pushes SMET To New Level

    08/03
    July's hot weather, and the resultant need for more electricity, pushed coal loadings at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal to 2,253,840 net tons that month, a new record for the Lakes' largest coal loading dock. SMET's previous peak month was August of 1999 when the dock loaded 2,023,055 net tons.

    For the season, loadings at SMET stand at 8.2 million tons, an increase of 12 percent. While low water levels continue affect SMET - 64,000 tons is a top load right now - reduced demand for iron ore has allowed the 1,000-footers to increase their participation in the western coal trade.

    Reported by: the Lake Carriers' Association




    Bush in Marinette

    08/03
    Thursday the tug Gregory J Bush and a barge arrived in Marinette, Wi to load a pile of soil that was piled behind the crane ship William H. Donner. This is the Bush's first trip to Marinette in several years. The tug and barge departed about 7:00 p.m., as they left they had to blow a series of danger signals on the whistle as a small fishing boat was blocking the channel.

    The next vessel expected in port is the Millenium Falcon due today with Pig Iron. A lumber ship or barge is due on Sunday to K&K and the Menominee is expected sometime next week.

    Loading Thursday afternoon.
    Departing that evening.
    Close up of tug.
    Heading for Lake Michigan.

    Reported by: Scott Best




    Another Cruise Ship for Sturgeon Bay

    08/03
    The cruise ship Niagara Prince entered the Sturgeon Bay through the ship canal Thursday for a short stop at the Stone Harbor and Conference Center Dock. The ships is on a six night cruise visiting Chicago, Holland Mi., Manistee Mi., Mackinac Island, Sturgeon Bay, Milwaukee and returning to Chicago. She was scheduled to sail from Sturgeon Bay to Milwaukee late yesterday afternoon.

    The schedule lists Sturgeon Bay as one of the largest shipbuilding ports on the Great Lakes, 3000 acres of beautiful cherry orchards in harvest, and touts the Door County Maritime and historical museums. :As the Sun begins to set , you will cruise out of the harbor and reflect on the remarkable beauty of this bayside city".

    Sailing for the conference center dock.
    Close up of her bow.
    Docking.
    Looking past the conference center to the dock.

    Reported by: Vic De Larwelle




    Thunder Bay Update

    08/03
    Four departures in the past two days have left the Port of Thunder Bay empty. Thursday Another hot day in Port and with no boats to watch and few scheduled to arrive until early next week, the month of August is off to a slow start.

    The BBC Japan slipped out of Port on Wednesday sometime after finishing unloading Windmill Parts at Keefer Terminal. The Jane Ann IV and her barge Sarah Spencer backed out of United Grain Growers "A" house around 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday and headed down the lake for Midland. The Oakglen also left Port on Wednesday around 10:00 p.m. bound for Montreal with a load of Grain.

    On Thursday morning the tug Radium Yellowknife left with three more full lumber barges for Superior, Wisconsin. With her departure the only other vessel in port, aside from the normal boats based in port, was the tug Sandra Mary and her dredge John Holden docked at Keefer Terminals.

    The port of Thunder Bay has seen a slight increase in both traffic and cargo shipped out this season. Up to this point in the Season there has been 4.5 million tons of cargo shipped out as compared to around 4 million tons last year this time. The big increase in cargo shipment has been coal. Ship traffic is up 10% compared to this time last year with 245 visits to Port this season so far. This total includes repeat visits.

    Reported by: Rob Farrow and Ron Konkol




    Detroit Traffic

    08/03
    Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Thursday morning.

    Maumee upbound off Nicholson's.
    Stern view.
    Fred R. White Jr. downbound off Nicholson's.
    Stern view.
    Algowest loading at Ojibway Salt Dock.

    Reported by: Mike Nicholls




    Kingston Update

    08/03
    Thursday was a busy day in the Kingston area. There were many ships in the Seaway and the harbor was busy.

    The Algoport, Patterson and Canadian Voyager were eastbound while the Gemini was westbound. The tug John Spence and McAsphalt 401 were eastbound from Oshawa and the Stephen B. Roman was westbound along the south shore from Oswego to Rochester. CCGS Limnos was in Lake Ontario and the Orsula was westbound.

    The Algoville, Algocatalyst, Canadian Century, Federal Yoshima, and the tug Salvor and Pennsylvania barge were all westbound in the seaway. The Algowood, and English River were eastbound as is the tall ship Bluenose II. The Paul H. Townsend had departed Bath and was westbound for the canal.

    The CCGS Caribou Isle left Kingston Thursday for Prescott while the Canadian Empress arrived from Quebec City. The local tour boats Island Belle, Island Queen and Island Star are all busy with the start of the long weekend.

    Pictures by Barrett Smith
    Bluenose II in the Welland Canal.
    Another view.

    Reported by: Ron Walsh




    Quebec Images

    08/03
    Below are images of vessel traffic taken last week.

    Atlantic Huron entering St. Lambert Lock upbound.
    Crew members enjoy the warm afternoon.
    Stern view.
    Canadian Provider, upbound above Cote St, Catherine Lock.
    Stern view.
    Canadian Provider Entering Lock 3 at Beauharnois.
    Close up of her pilothouse.
    Artic Viking at Bickerdike Basin (Elevator 5).
    Stern view.
    Stern view of former carferry Nindawayma at the Bickerdike Basin.
    Close up of pilothouse.
    Deck view.

    Reported by: Kent Malo




    Today in Great Lakes History - August 03

    Under tow, the AVONDALE (2) in tandem with former fleetmate FERNDALE (2) arrived at Castellon, Spain for scrapping in 1979.

    The CANADOC (2) left the St. Lawrence River on August 3, 1991 in tow bound for Mamonal, Colombia for scrapping.

    On 3 August 1915, ALEXANDRIA (wooden sidewheel passenger/package freight, 174'/863GT, built in 1866 at Hull, Quebec, formerly CONSORT) was carrying food stuff in Lake Ontario when she was blown on a bar in a storm and fog. She broke up by wave action under the Scarborough Bluffs, east of Toronto. Lifesavers worked for hours and rescued the entire crew.

    August 3, 1946 - The third officer of the ANN ARBOR NO. 6 drowned while painting her draft marks. He had apparently leaned too far and fell out of the rowboat.

    On 3 August 1900 FONTANA (wooden 2-mast schooner-barge, 231', 1164 gt, built in 1888 at St Clair, MI as a 4-mast schooner-barge) was carrying iron ore in tow of the steamer KALIYUGA. The FONTANA sheared off and collided with the big schooner-barge SANTIAGO and settled in the mouth of St. Clair River in the St. Clair Flats, one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world. After salvage was given up months later, she was dynamited several times to flatten and reduce her wreckage. Although officially no loss of life was reported, local newspaper reported that one crewman was drowned. The FONTANA was owned by Cleveland Cliffs Iron Co.

    On 3 Aug 1857, R. H. RAE (3-mast wooden bark, 136', 344 t, built in 1857 at St. Catharine's, Ontario) capsized and sank in a "white squall" off Duck's Creek on Lake Ontario. She went down slowly enough for her people to abandon in her small boat. They were later picked up by the propeller COLONIST. There was a big effort to salvage her the next summer, but to no avail. She was a total loss of $20,000. She was reportedly built for the trans-Atlantic trade and looked more like a seagoing schooner. Some sources give the date of the loss as 4 August 1857. The wreck is in very good condition. The Cousteau organization lost a diver on her in 1980.

    Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Coast Guard Festival

    08/02
    The Coast Guard Festival in Grand Haven, Mi is underway. The celebration features events and entertainment include ship tours in the Lake Michigan port. Vessels visiting Grand Haven this year include the Biscayne Bay, Katmai Bay, Bramble, and the Mackinaw. Ship tours began Monday night and run throughout the week.

    Visitors wait to board the Mackinaw.
    Mackinaw from the Bramble.
    View from the Mackinaw's aft deck looking forward.
    Mackinaw's wheel and compasses.
    Brass levers in the Mackinaw's pilothouse.
    Young visitor to the Mackinaw looks through a porthole on the bridge and dreams of a future in the U.S. Coast Guard.
    Biscayne Bay at dock in Grand Haven.
    U.S.C.G. cutter Bramble open to the public at the Coast Guard Festival.
    Bramble and Biscayne Bay docked in Grand Haven.
    Bramble's wheel station.
    Officer's lounge on board the USCG Bramble.
    Mess hall for enlisted men on the USCG Bramble.

    Click here for more information on the event.

    Reported by: Roger LeLievre




    James Norris Back in Clarkson

    08/02
    Just before 3:00 p.m. Wednesday afternoon, The James Norris arrived in the Lake Ontario port shortly before 3:00 p.m. She is back on her limestone runs from Colborne, Ontario to the St. Lawrence Cement plant after completing survey work at Port Weller Dry Docks. She entered Port Weller Dry Docks almost four weeks ago for her five-year survey. The vessels looks terrific in her fresh paintwork. By 8:30 p.m. she was about 3/4 unloaded. She will likely clear Clarkson just before midnight.

    Reported by: Bryan Ridley




    Busy day for Marinette

    08/02
    Marinette, Wi was a busy port on Tuesday with two vessels visiting. The day started with the Capt. Henry Jackman arriving that morning with a load of salt. The Catherine Desgagnes arrived next delivering a load of pig iron to Marinette Fuel & Dock Tuesday night.

    The next arrival is expected to be the Millenium Falcon with pig iron then shifting to load pulp products.

    Desgagnes unloading. Dick Lund

    Reported by: Scott Best and Dick Lund




    Diamond Belle Trip to Wallaceburg

    08/02
    The annual trip of the Diamond Belle to the Wallaceburg Ontario antique car, boat and fire truck show is set for Saturday, August 11. The mini-ship will depart Detroit's River Place dock at 8:00 a.m., then crossing Lake St. Clair and through the St. Clair Flats in the Delta of the St. Clair River, then twelve miles through a pristine marshland in Canada to Wallaceburg. There will be two hours at the Wallaceburg show, and the Diamond Belle will return to Detroit about 9:30 PM. Tickets are $70 each including three light meals on board, and are available by reservation only by calling 313-843-9376.

    Photo of the Diamond Belle by Mike Nicholls.

    Reported by: Diamond Jack River Tours




    Twin Ports Report

    08/02
    Despite humidity that felt more appropriate for New Orleans than Duluth, vessels and crews were busy in the Twin Ports on Wednesday morning. Reserve was in an unusual spot, unloading on the seldom-used east side of the CLM dock in Superior; Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was loading coal; Alaska Rainbow was at the Cenex Harvest States elevator; and Black Swan was at the Peavey elevator. Visible through the mist out on Lake Superior were Algolake, waiting to load at Midwest Energy Terminal and a saltie believed to be Grant Carrier, waiting for Harvest States. Due later in the day were Canadian Navigator for coal, and Canadian Olympic, scheduled to load coal on its first trip back to the Twin Ports since mid-July when it shutdown Duluth entry for a day after its stern anchor fouled the propeller.

    A welcome site at midday was the steamer Alpena, arriving to unload cement at the Lafarge terminals in Superior and Duluth. Alpena pulled into the Duluth port terminal, apparently to wait for Reserve to clear the CLM dock, where it was unloading coal right around the corner from the Alpena's usual berth alongside the JB Ford.

    The pace kept steady and Wednesday evening in the span of one hour the Grant carrier entered the Duluth Piers and passed an outbound saltie near Cargill. It proceeded on to Harvest States in Superior with the help of two G tugs. A short time later the Canadian Olympic entered the Duluth piers and went to Murphy fuel dock where she took on bunkers and groceries. The Alpena finished her unload at Lafarge and steamed out under the Aerial Bridge giving the long salute - 3 long 2 short.

    The Algolake was loading coal at SMET, saltie Rubin Lark was loading grain at Peavey Superior, and Canadian Prospector was unloading Cement at Lawrence. Just off Superior piers Reserve was apparently awaiting reentry to finish her stone unloading and another saltie was at anchor off Duluth piers.

    Reported by: Al Miller and Andrew Tubesing




    Saginaw River News

    08/02
    The Mississagi departed the Buena Vista Dock at Saginaw shortly after midnight Wednesday. At about the same time, the David Z. Norton was departing the Wirt Stone Dock in Bay City, upbound to the Wirt dock at Saginaw to finish unloading

    After turning, the Mississagi tied up at the Sargent dock near the I-75 bridge to permit the upbound Norton to pass, then proceeded outbound. The vessel cleared the river at about 7:00 a.m.

    The Norton completed unloading at Saginaw later in the morning and was outbound at about noon on Wednesday.

    Pictures by Todd Shorkey
    David Z. Norton downbound at Cass Ave.
    Close up.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Detroit Traffic

    08/02
    Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Wednesday evening.

    CSL Tadoussac upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Quebecois downbound at Fighting Island North Light.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Mike Nicholls




    Hamilton Update

    08/02
    Wednesday the tug James A. Hannah and its barge 5101 were finishing unloading carbon black at Pier 23. At Dofasco, the Algocape was unloading iron ore.

    About 8:00 p.m. the tug James A. Hannah was preparing to depart. The tug backed astern of the barge and then pulled forward into the notch. The deck crew then secured the tug and barge together with wire cables with departure imminent.

    Reported by: Patricia Burgon




    Today in Great Lakes History - August 02

    The AMERICAN MARINER was launched on August 2, 1979 for the Connecticut Bank & Trust Co., (American Steamship Co., Buffalo, NY, mgr.). She was to be named CHICAGO (3), but that name was removed before launch.

    The U.S. Coast Guard's report on the sinking of the EDMUND FITZGERALD was released on August 2, 1977. It cited faulty hatch covers, lack of water tight cargo hold bulkheads and damage caused from an undetermined source as the cause of her loss.

    The BENSON FORD's maiden voyage was on August 2, 1924 with coal from Toledo, OH to Duluth, MN and returned with iron ore to the Ford Rouge Plant at Dearborn.

    On August 2, 1990 the Lightship HURON was dedicated as a National Historic Landmark. LIGHTSHIP 103 had been almost completely restored and was opened to the public for tours and remains so at this time.

    August 2, 1862 - John C. Ackerman was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin. At the time of his death in 1916 he was commodore of the Pere Marquette carferry fleet based in Ludington.

    On 2 August 1877, GRACE A. CHANNON (wooden schooner, 141'/266GT, built in 1873 at E. Saginaw, MI) was bound from Chicago for Buffalo when she collided with the propeller tug FAVORITE and sank 12 miles south of Milwaukee, WI. The young son of the owner of the CHANNON lost his life in this accident.

    In 1858, the wooden side-wheeler TELEGRAPH collided with the schooner MARQUETTE and sank 40 miles north of Cleveland.

    On 2 August 1877, GRACE A. CHANNON (wooden schooner, 141', 266 gt, built in 1873 at E. Saginaw, MI) collided with the propeller FAVORITE and sank 12 miles south of Milwaukee. One life was lost: the young son of the ship's owner.

    Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




    Burns Harbor in for Repairs

    08/01
    The Burns Harbor entered Sturgeon Bay Tuesday heading for repairs at Bay Ship Building. The Burns Harbor turned and then backed from the Sherwood Point Lighthouse to Berth 15 at Bay Shipbuilding, a distance of about 5 Miles. With the water levels low, the ship came into the yard stern first with out the assistance of tugs. The Burns Harbor is reported to be in the yard for generator repairs. The duration of her stay is unknown but is expected to be short.

    In the morning haze off Sherwood Light .
    Backing into berth #15 .
    Backing past the old tug on top of the dock wall (nick-name the wall weight) .
    Burns Harbor all of the way into berth #15.

    Reported by: Vic DeLarwelle




    Republic on Shuttle

    08/01
    The American Republic was on the Lorain to Cleveland shuttle run Tuesday. The shuttle run was suspended last month in an effort to reduce inventory as LTV Steel tries to control costs after declaring bankruptcy. The pellets are shipped from the upper lakes to Lorain by 1000-footer and then smaller boats shuttle the pellets up the twisting Cuyahoga River to the LTV steel mill.

    LTV Steel has reached an agreement with the steel workers union and its creditors. If approved by the union's membership, the agreement would save LTV 1 billion dollars per year. The workers would give a concession in wage at this time but would receive two fifty-cent raises in the future. The mill on the west bank of the Cuyahoga River would remain on "hot idle" until October 31while studies are conducted of possible future reuse of the facility. LTV plans to reduce the permanent workforce by 1,300 people.

    Future ship traffic to Lorain includes the Reserve arriving with a load of taconite on August 9 and the Charles Beeghly on August 10.

    Pictures by TZ
    Republic backing to the pellet terminal.
    Close up as the boom is raised for loading.
    Another view.
    The Richard Reiss was also in Lorain Tuesday.

    Reported by: Ned Gang




    Salt for Menominee

    08/01
    The Capt. Henry Jackman delivered a load of salt to Marinette Fuel & Dock Co. Tuesday. It is the second load of salt in as many weeks for the dock, as the Algoway unloaded salt last Wednesday. The Jackman backed into the Menominee River Tuesday morning, and was gone by mid-afternoon.

    Unloading.
    Stern view.
    Close up.
    From the dock.
    Almost unloaded.
    Close up of stack and flag.

    Reported by: Dick Lund




    Foggy day in Manistee

    08/01
    On Monday, fog held up two Oglebay Norton boats from entering the harbor. The Wolverine arrived off of the Manistee Piers at 11:00 a.m. Visibility at that time was about 500 ft. The Joseph H. Frantz arrived at about noon and went to anchor 2 miles NW of the Manistee piers. At around 1:00 p.m. the Wolverine hauled up the anchor and made an attempt at entering the harbor.

    The vessel could not be seen until she was 1/4 of a mile to the break wall. Negotiations were made that the Frantz would wait to start up the river once the Wolverine got to the Maple Street Bridge. The Frantz entered the piers at 2:00 p.m. on her way to Seng's with 12,500 tons of 3 grades of aggregate she loaded at Port Inland. The Wolverine was on her way to the Tondu plant with coal from Conneaut.

    This was a great event for the tourists as they only had to wait 45 minutes to see two ships. The Frantz departed at 10:30 p.m. bound for Calcite and the Wolverine departed at 1:00 a.m. on Tuesday bound for Port Inland.

    Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




    Jackson Visits Milwaukee

    08/01
    The Herbert C. Jackson was in Milwaukee Tuesday unloading a cargo of coal.

    Jackson unloading.
    Madeline Island car ferry Madeline. The ferry from Bayfield, WI to Madeline Island.
    Island Princess, a tour boat out of Bayfield that works the Apostle Islands area.

    Reported by: Jim Zeirke




    WestKap in Seaway

    08/01
    The saltie Westkap passed Brockville, downbound on the Seaway, for its next port of call, Montreal. It is loaded with bentonite clay and wheat that it picked up at Duluth, Mn.

    Westkap passing.

    Reported by: Keith Giles




    Thunder Bay Update

    08/01
    Amidst very dark skies and thunderstorms the Oakglen arrived in port Tuesday morning along with the tug Jane Ann IV and barge Sarah Spencer. The Spencer is on her return trip after unloading barley in Duluth. She backed into United Grain Growers "A" house while the Oakglen tied up at Saskatchewan Pool 7a. Later the Oakglen moved over to Mission Terminals in the afternoon.

    The Algonova departed Petro-Can early Tuesday and headed back down the lake. The BBC Japan continues to unload Windmill Parts at Keefer Terminals while the tug Sandra Mary remains tied up just down the dock from her. At the old ore dock at Northern Woods, the Tug Radium Yellowknife is docked with three lumber barges getting ready for another trip to Superior.

    Pictures from this past week
    Quebecois at Agricore.
    Canadian Olympic leaving Thunder Bay Terminals.
    Canadian Olympic leaving Thunder Bay Harbor.
    Canadian Voyager United Grain Growers "A" house.
    Federal Oshima Agricore.
    Federal Fuji Agricore.
    BBC Japan backing into Keefer Terminals.
    Oakglen in CSL Colors at Richardson Elevator.
    Mapleglen in CSL colors at United Grain Growers.
    Jane Ann IV / Sarah Spencer at United Grain Growers.
    Canadian Enterprise entering Pascol Drydock.

    Reported by: Rob Farrow and Ron Konkol




    Alpena Update

    08/01
    The Fred R. White Jr. was due at the Lafarge coal dock to unload around 3:30 a.m. Tuesday morning. The tug Jacklyn M and barge Integrity is due into port early this morning coming from Waukegan, IL. The J.A.W Iglehart was in Cleveland early Tuesday morning. The Paul H. Townsend was heading for Detroit and the Alpena was due in Superior around 2:00 a.m. this morning. The Cason J. Callaway was loading at Stoneport on Monday.

    Reported by: Chanda and Ben McClain




    Saginaw River News

    08/01
    The Buffalo and Sam Laud were both outbound the Saginaw River during the early morning hours on Tuesday after unloading on Monday evening.

    The Mississagi was inbound Tuesday afternoon passing the Front Range at 4:20 p.m. Her security call indicated she was headed to the Saginaw Asphalt Buena Vista Dock. The David Z. Norton arrived in the Saginaw River passing the Front Range at 9:30 p.m. The Norton was carrying a split load, lightering at the Bay City Wirt Dock before going up to Saginaw Wirt to finish.

    Pictures by Todd Shorkey
    Mississagi upbound at Essroc.
    Another view.
    Port side view.
    Stern view passing Smith Park.

    Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




    Detroit Traffic

    08/01
    Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Tuesday evening.

    Algosoo upbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.
    Tug Patricia Hoey and mud barge downbound at Grassy Island.
    Close up.
    Stern view.
    Tug Wisconsin in the old Great Lakes Engineering Works Slip that is now the Great Lakes Towing Dock. This is the slip that the Edmund Fitzgerald was launched into. The tug Ohio is upbound with the tug Pennsylvania, due at Detroit River Light at 11:00 p.m. The Ohio will be taking the Washington to Buffalo.
    Tug Washington.
    The lonely vigil kept by a great blue heron over the remains of the carferry Huron.
    Cason J Callaway downbound at Grassy Island.
    Stern view.

    Traffic on Monday evening.
    Barge Pathfinder and tug Dorothy Ann downbound off Zug Island. A series of pictures below showing how she held the American side, turned on the red buoy at the mouth of the Rouge River and backed into the Rouge without tug assistance.
    approaching the buoy.
    turns to port, away from the buoy.
    straightens out across the river still above the red buoy.
    drops down below buoy.
    backs into the Rouge River.
    Capt Ralph Tucker unloading at the General Chemical Dock in Amherstburg.
    Stern view.
    Federal Welland (Hong Kong) upbound at the Amherstburg Channel "Hole In The Wall". She went to anchor at Ojibway for the night.
    Stern view.

    Reported by: Mike Nicholls




    Toledo Report

    08/01
    The Lake Superior was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator on Tuesday. The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was loading grain at Anderson's "K" Elevator. The USCGC Neah Bay was in drydock at Toledo Shipyard. The Lake Michigan Contractors tug Capt. Barnaby was docked at the old Interlake Iron Company dock with their large crane barge no. 55 and another bulk barge. The tug Donald C. Hannah with her barge was loading cargo at the B-P Dock.

    The John J. Boland was loading coal at the CSX Dock. The tug Muskegon is tied up at the CSX Stone Dock. The dredge Buxton II remains docked up at the Toledo Edison power canal north of the Torco Docks.

    The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Arthur M. Anderson early Wednesday morning, followed by the Algobay and CSL Niagara early Friday morning. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Dock will be the Middletown on Wednesday morning followed by the Reserve and Armco on Saturday morning.

    The American Mariner and Adam E. Cornelius remain in lay-up at there respective dock sites.

    Reported by: Jim Hoffman




    Conneaut News

    08/01
    The Lee A Tregurtha was in Conneaut Tuesday to load 19,500 tons of coal for Milwaukee. She docked at the stone dock to wait for the CSL Niagara to finish loading. Both hoppers were being used to load the CSL Niagara, not an unusual move if vessels are waiting to load.

    The Conneaut Schedule follows:
    Wednesday: Algobay-coal dock
    Thursday: Halifax-coal dock
    Friday-Philip R Clarke-stone dock, Halifax-coal dock
    Saturday-Earl W. Oglebay-coal dock

    Lee A. Tregurtha and CSL Niagara.
    Lee A. Tregurtha.
    Close up of her bow.
    Close up of her battle stripes.
    Stern view.
    CSL Niagara loading.
    Another View.

    Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




    Toronto Update

    08/01
    Cape May Light was in late Sunday night and departed Monday afternoon. Empire Sandy was in service Monday for another movie filming. She was to depart Tuesday for Port Weller for a charter work and will be upbound for Port Colborne on Thursday to participate in the Canal Days activities. The tall ship Kajama returned to service Monday after repairs to her shaft. Actor Maury Chaykin ("Whale Music") was seen on the Toronto Islands ferry Sam McBride returning from a day on the island.

    Reported by: Gerry O.




    Today in Great Lakes History - August 01

    On August 1, 1982, the Canadian tanker Hubert Gaucher entered service

    August 1957 - The Pere Marquette 18 (II) was sold to Luria Brothers, Chicago scrap merchants, along with the PM 14.

    On 1 August 1849, CHICAGO (wooden propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 951/151T, built in 1842 at Oswego, NY) burned to a total loss in Buffalo harbor. No lives were lost.

    On 1 August 1871, the construction of the canal through the St. Clair Flats was finished at a cost of $365,000. It was the first real channel built to help ships through the shallow waters where the St. Clair River empties into Lake St. Clair and where there are seven mouths or passes. It took the Canadian contractor John Brown three years to dig the channel that measures 300 feet wide and 8,421 feet long. The water was 18 feet deep. It was protected on most of its sides by piers and dikes. The new channel was considered too small even as it was being dug. At only 300 feet wide, tows of log rafts were encouraged to sue the old shallower channels. Within 20 years, plans were made to deepen the channel to 20 feet.

    On 1 August 1849, CHICAGO (wooden passenger/package freight vessel, 95', 151 t, built in 1842 at Oswego, NY) burned in Buffalo harbor. No lives were lost.

    Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

    This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




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