Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

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* Report News


Goulet Tow

08/31
The tow of the Louis J. Goulet stopped in Montreal Thursday as crews prepare to make their last preparations on the barge for the ocean voyage. The tug Triton and Goulet were downriver of Quebec City Friday en route to the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

The Goulet was purchased by Bahamas Oil and is headed to Walker's Cay, Bahamas. The Goulet will be renamed Liberty Hunter.

Triton and Goulet docked in Montreal.

Reported by: Jerome A. Popiel




Windoc Tow

08/31
The hull of the Windoc is expected to be towed from Hamilton early Tuesday morning weather permitting. In preparation for the tow generators have been placed onboard and connected to the winches, a small construction shack is on deck for protection and storage from the elements.

The hull of the Windoc will be towed to Montreal by her new owners Groupe Ocean. Groupe Ocean is examining three possible uses for the hull. One would be conversion to a tug and barge combination with a notch at the stern, next would see use as a storage barge and finally they could sell the hull for scrap.

Groupe Ocean owns a dry dock in Quebec and a subsidiary of the company is McAllister Towing. With the range of services available to the company many believe the hull will be converted to a barge.

Last summer the Windoc was struck by a bridge in the Welland Canal. The damage from the accident and resulting fire effectively ended the vessel's career as a powered vessel. It has been dock in Hamilton since the accident.

Reported by: Wally Wallace




Buffalo Grain

08/31
Thursday the Herbert C. Jackson was expected into late Thursday night with a cargo of grain for ADM. Her arrival marks the first time ever that two self unloaders are discharging grain in Buffalo at the same time.

The Kinsman Independent reportedly has seven trips on the books for the fall grain rush. She has a tentative departure date of September 15. The Independent is the last operating U.S. Straight Deck bulk unloader. Rumors continue to circulate about her future due to the recent completion of the self-unloader hopper at General Mills. The lack of self unloading gear on the vessel may bring her long career to an end.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Fire onboard Saltie

08/31
The saltie Bremon caught fire while unloading steel in Hamilton. The fire is reported to have caused damage to the galley and accommodation areas. The ship will remain in Hamilton for about a week while repairs are made.

Reported by: Wally Wallace




Green Bay Traffic

08/31
Monday the Arthur M Anderson delivered a load of coal to the Reiss dock in Green Bay. Sunday morning the Great Lakes Trader visited the Reiss dock with coal. Monday evening the John G Munson also had a load of coal for the Reiss dock.

Anderson unloading at Reiss.
backing through the Mason St. Bridge.
backing through the Walnut St. Bridge.
backing through the Main St. Bridge.
turning in the East River turning basin.
Outbound past Western Lime.

Reported by: Scott Best




Toledo News

08/31
The Algolake was loading coal at the CSX Dock with the Reserve at the CSX #2 Dock ready to follow. The Federal Bergon was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo.

The small sailing vessel Red Witch, the brig Niagara, and the fire boat Edward M. Cotter are at the City Docks open for tours through the Labor Day weekend.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the John G. Munson and Charles M. Beeghly on Saturday followed by the Algosteel on Friday 6 Sept. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Adam E. Cornelius on Saturday, followed by the Buckeye on Monday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto Update

08/31
The salty Strange Attractor was turned by McKeil's harbor tug Atomic on Thursday to facilitate the unloading of her aft hatches. She departed this afternoon. McKeil's other harbor tug Lac Como was not in port this morning.

The tug Curly B. and barge BMI -105 arrived Thursday at Pier 52 to pick up a pair of blue shrink-wrapped generators which are bound for a U.S. port. This combo did the same job last summer.

The island airport ferry Maple City is still under the Atlas crane at Pier 35, but she is again in slings in the water. She has been in and out of the water for the past month.

The Toronto Drydock work crew are still busy removing old bunker oil and water from the the hull of the Queen City Yacht Club's breakwall Rapids Queen. This job has been on-going for about three weeks now.

A crew was busy on the Glenmont rebuilding project Friday morning. The window and door openings were cut in the new superstructure last week; it now appears that they are fitting windows and doors.

C & C Marine's tug Patricia D. finished laying the high speed and low speed marker buoys for this weekend's air show at the "Ex".

Reported by: Gerry O.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 31

On August 31, 1977, the Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. (formerly Belle River) entered service, departing Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, for Superior.

In mid-August 1987 a peregrine falcon that had disappeared from Regina, Saskatchewan two weeks earlier landed on the deck of a lake freighter on Lake Huron. The bird was captured and taken to a bird sanctuary in Vineland, Ontario. The vessel name is unknown.

In mid-August 1985, the Belgium saltie Federal Thames loaded 25,400 tons of low-concentrate chrome ore at Duluth's Hallett Dock and was bound for Sweden. This ore dates back to World War II when she was mined in Montana. Other shipments were to have been made later as well.

On 31 August 1906, CAVALIER (3-mast wooden schooner, 134'/268GT, built in 1867 at Quebec City as a bark) was carrying cedar lumber when she struck a reef off Chantry Island in Lake Huron and sank. Her crew was rescued by the Chantry Island Lightkeeper. She was bound from Tobermory for Sarnia, Ontario.

On 31 August 1869, the schooner W. G. Keith was launched at the Muir & Stewart yard in Port Huron, Michigan. She was named after her skipper/owner. Her dimensions were 126' x 26' x 8'6". She was built for the lake Michigan lumber trade.

On 31 August 1900 efforts to free the newly launched steel steamer CAPTAIN THOMAS WILSON from the mud in the Black River at Port Huron, MI. Continued throughout the day. The launch had been watched by thousands the previous day and the vessel's stern stuck in the mud. On this date, the tugs BOYNTON and HAYNES tried to pull her free but were unable to do so. Finally 14 hydraulic jacks were used to lift the vessel and at 6:00 PM she was ready to be pulled by tugs. After a 15 inch hawser was broken in the first attempt, the tug PROTECTOR finally pulled the vessel free.

In 1982 The Niagara, better known as the sandsucker, made its last trip through the I-75 bridge with a cargo of sand for the Chevrolet Saginaw Metal Castings plant.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Fraser Refloated

08/30 9:00 a.m. update
The saltie Fraser departed Duluth about 5:00 a.m. on Friday morning after undergoing inspection to ensure the ship wasn't damaged after being aground in the harbor for 24 hours.

The Fraser's agent told the Duluth News-Tribune that a diver and surveyor would examine the Fraser on Friday morning. After that, the vessel resumed its voyage to Antwerp, Belgium.

Coast Guard officials are continuing their investigation into the mishap that left the Fraser stuck in a foot of silt in about 25 feet of water. A Great Lakes pilot reportedly was aboard the ship when the grounding occurred.

The Fraser's agent estimated the ship lost about $1,000 an hour while aground. The situation could have been worse, however, if the vessel had been forced to lighter its cargo to get free.

The Fraser was formerly known as the Selkirk Settler and Federal St. Louis and is a frequent visitor to the Great Lakes.

Original report
The tugs Minnesota, North Dakota, Kentucky and Seneca working with the Fraser's main engine managed to free the saltie about 8:30 p.m. Thursday. The vessel then departed Duluth under the Aerial Lift Bridge and anchored off shore overnight awaiting inspection and Coast Guard approval to proceed.

Pictures by Al Miller
The Fraser aground near the Lafarge Cement terminal.
Close up.
Close up of the draft marks showing the vessel in 25 feet of water.
Two tugs from Great Lakes Towing were standing by Thursday morning waiting for word to begin salvage operations.

Pictures by Glenn Blaszkiewicz
Bow view.
Traffic passing.
Waiting to be refloated.

Reported by: Al Miller and Glenn Blaszkiewicz




First Trip, First use of Unloading Hopper

08/30
The Cuyahoga arrived on her first trip to Buffalo, NY Thursday. The vessel backed up the Buffalo Ship Canal and was unloading grain at 8 p.m. Thursday night. This cargo of grain is the first to be unloaded from a self unloader at the General Mills Frontier Elevator. Rounding out the "firsts" for this trip, this is the first time in many years that a Canadian flagged vessel has unloaded grain in Buffalo.

The General Mills Frontier Grain Elevator was serviced by the last U.S. straight deck grain carrier, the Kinsman Independent. Early this year the elevator was fitted with an unloading hopper. With the ability to accept grain from self unloading vessels, this could put the Independent out of work. The Kinsman Independent's fleet mate Kinsman Enterprise was sold early this year for scrapping.

Grain unloaded at the elevator is processed in the attached flour mill and used to make various General Mills cereals such as cheerios, lucky charms and Flour products such as Gold Medal Flour.

Cuyahoga unloading Thursday evening.
Close up.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




History in Motion

08/30
The Wisconsin Maritime Museum in Manitowoc announced to day that the former forward triple expansion steam engine from the Chief Wawatam was put into motion for the first time. The engine is powered by an electric motor and turns at 5 rpm. The drive shaft turns a 250 lb. replica of the Chief's 12-foot propeller.

Some work still needs to be done before the exhibit is ready for visitors. The more than $6 million museum expansion is scheduled to open in May, 2003. The Chief's engine will be the centerpiece of the project which has doubled the size of the museum.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Plans to Convert Idle Icebreaker into Research Ship

08/30
Canadian Coast Guard officials are expected to announce in early September that the idle icebreaker ex Sir John Franklin will be converted into a scientific research vessel with a mandate to study the sea and the environment.

The ex Franklin has been docked for the past year at the Anse-aux-Foulons portion of the Quebec Harbor (section 105) during that time, its name along with the traditional red maple leaf on its funnel had been concealed. Recently the red leaf is visible again but not its original name.

The Sir John Franklin (90.2m x 19.5m, two diesel electric engines, dev. 17,700 hp ) is a sister ship to the Henry Larsen, Pierre Radisson and Des Groseilliers. It was built in 1978 at Burrard Dry Dock of North Vancouver BC.

It appears that the Coast Guard will operate the converted ship but it is unknown at present time where it will be based and if it will retain its preview name of Sir John Franklin.

Sir John Franklin.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




Marquette News

08/30
The Charles Beeghly brought coal to Marquette on Wednesday and then took on a load of taconite pellets on Thursday. The dock area was being dredged while the Beeghly was loading. When the Beeghly was leaving she was kicking up mud with her bow thrusters, which emphasized the need for the dredging. She took on a big load of 436 cars, 28,119 tons.

The H. Lee White is due at the lower harbor on Friday, and will then shift to the ore dock on Saturday. Three boats, the Algosteel, John J. Boland, and Lee A. Tregurtha expected on Monday.

Beeghly loading.
View from across the harbor.
Dredging the harbor.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Detroit Traffic

08/30
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Thursday.

Fred R White Jr upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
tug Reliance and barge PML 9000 departing Mc Louth Steel in the Trenton Channel.
Stern view.
Tug Reliance .
Another view.
Corps of Engineers workboat RV GENERAL LEE off Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Algoway downbound off Nicholson's.
Stern view.
Grande Mariner downbound off Nicholson's bound for Bishop Park in Wyandotte.
Stern view. tug Manitou on Nicholson's Drydock.
Joseph H Thompson at Sterling Fuel.
Algoville downbound off Detroit.
Stern view.
St Marys Cement and Petite Forte downbound at Grassy Island.
Close up of tug.
Stern view.
Canadian Progress upbound at Grassy Island in ballast bound for Superior, WI for coal for Nanticoke.
Stern view.

Pictures from last week
Special passengers on the Diamond Jack last week. The Leader Dogs for the Blind brings dogs on the Diamond Jack as part of their training.
J A W Iglehart unloading at the Lafarge Terminal in Detroit.
Close up.
Stern view.
Middletown upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Halifax upbound in the Ballard's Reef Channel.
Stern view.
Neva Trader upbound in Ballard's Reef.
Stern view.
Maumee downbound below Grassy Island.
Stern view.
View of the Ambassador Bridge from Fighting Island North Light.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Port Inland News

08/30
The Stone dock at Port Inland remains busy, July and August were both very busy at Port Inland. Some of the regulars at Port Inland this season are, Wilfred Sykes, Buffalo, Sam Laud, Earl W Oglebay and the Joe Block.

The grocery hoist is known as "Brett's Elevator" on the Wolverine.
loading rig loading the Wolverine in August.
Capt Henry Jackman backing away from the dock at Port Inland.
Another view departing for Serpent Harbor.
passing the anchored Wolverine near the breakwall.
Wolverine backing in to the loading dock.

Reported by: Scott Best




Toledo Update

08/30
Thursday evening there were no active vessels in port. The Algolake was due in at the CSX Docks late Thursday evening to load coal.

On Thursday afternoon around 2 p.m. the small sailing vessel Red Witch followed by the brig Niagara was headed upbound the Maumee River under escort by the U.S. Coast and local law enforcement vessels followed by the Buffalo (New York) Fire Dept. tug Edward M. Cotter with all of her fire hoses spraying water then the Red Witch and Niagara followed by a flotilla of vessels representing the various yacht clubs in the area. The vessels proceeded to the City Docks across from downtown Toledo where they will be opened for tours from Friday through the Labor Day weekend.

The Joseph H. Frantz and the tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge remain in lay-up and there were no vessels at the Shipyard.

The next scheduled vessels due in at the CSX Docks will be the Reserve on Friday followed by the John G. Munson and Charles M. Beeghly on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Adam E. Cornelius on Saturday, followed by the Buckeye on Monday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Picture Catch-up

08/30
Below are recent images taken around the Great Lakes.

Duluth - Superior Views Glenn Blaszkiewicz
Herbert C. Jackson.
Courtney Burton on the inner harbor.
Docked.
Canadian Progress out bound.
J.A.W. Iglehart.
Stewart J. Cort.
Beeghly unloading coal in Superior.
Another view.

Canadian Miner Tow Alex Howard
Miner & tug arrive from Hamilton.
Stern view.
Tow underway.
Samuel Risley in the canal.
Stern view.
Pilot boat.
Dredge Atchafalaya.
Stern view.

Repairs in Escanaba. Dick Lund
Joseph H. Thompson & Joseph H. Thompson, Jr. at south side of dock with a crane ready to lift the winch aboard.
Stern view with empty conveyor in foreground and shiploader in the "rest" position.
Close-up of the tug.
Close-up of the barge.
Preparing to hoist the winch on board the tug.
Another view.
Wide view of the Thompson with the tug out of the notch.
Wide angle of the tug out of the notch.

More repairs by Lee Rowe
Side view.
Close up.
Stern view.

Marquette Traffic. Lee Rowe
Herbert C. Jackson brought a load of coal to Marquette's Presque Isle power plant on 8/24.
Close up.

Paul R. Tregurtha in Marquette. Eric & Sandy Chapman
Tregurtha backing in .
View from the north side of the dock - note the stack and radar tower over the top of the dock.
Unloading coal .
Coal delivered, on the other end of the conveyer system - across the road at the power plant.

Unusual summer visitors for Bay Shipbuilding Lee Grota
The Southdown Conquest & tug Susan W. Hannah.
State of Michigan .
Alpena in floating dry dock.
Another view.
Tall ship Dennis Sullivan was also in Sturgeon Bay on tour Docked in front of the Selvick Tugs.
New barge.


Kaye E. Barker in Escanaba Dick Lund
At the C. Reiss dock.
Close-up of her bow.
Meanwhile, the L. E. Block continues to waste away. Notice the "Mr. Mickey" & the huge pile of stone behind her.

Ashtabula, Conneaut & Fairport pictures Dave Merchant
Maumee.
Loading.
Algosoo unloading.
Another view.
Panoramic.

Agawa Canyon unloading in Parry Sound R. Walker
Unloading.


St. Clair River Traffic Stephen Hause
CSL Tadoussac, upbound past Algonac State Park, Monday afternoon.
Southdown Challenger, downbound Monday afternoon.
Southdown Challenger, passing the upbound Algosoo.
Mesabi Miner, upbound Monday evening.
Capt. Ralph Tucker, downbound Monday evening. Note the painted-over ACM logo and name.
American Mariner, downbound early Tuesday morning.
Oglebay Norton, upbound at St. Clair Tuesday afternoon.
John J. Boland follows the Oglebay Norton.
Courtney Burton, downbound early Wednesday morning.
CSL Laurentian, upbound Wednesday afternoon.
Middletown, upbound Wednesday afternoon.
James R. Barker, upbound Wednesday afternoon.
George A. Stinson, downbound Wednesday evening.
Roger Blough, downbound Wednesday evening.
Algomarine, downbound at dawn on Thursday.

Remains of the tug B.E.West (J. P. Manning) at Port Clinton, Ohio. Bob Densic
Wide view on the beach on Sandusky Bay, south of Port Clinton, Ohio.
Stern view.
Close up Port bow.
Starboard side view.
Close up.
Photo of the tug taken at the MCS yard in Chicago about 1967. Bill Hoey.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 30

The CHARLES E. WILSON was christened August 30, 1973 at Bay Ship and completed her sea trials on September 6th.

On August 30, 1942, the A. H. Ferbert (2) ran aground in the St. Mary's River, just a day old. The vessel returned to the builder's yard in River Rouge, Michigan for repairs.

On August 30, 1988, the Willowglen made its first visit to Duluth-Superior under that name. She loaded grain at Harvest States in Superior, arriving early in the morning and departing in the early evening the same day. Her last visit to Duluth before this was in 1981 under the name Joseph X. Robert.

The H.G. DALTON entered service on August 30, 1903.

On August 30, 1985 the tug CAPTAIN IOANNIS S. departed Quebec city with MENIHEK LAKE and LEON FALK, JR. in tow, bound for Spain to be scrapped.

On 30 August 1873, CAMBRIDGE (3-mast, wooden schooner, 162'/445T, built in 1868 at Detroit, MI) was bound from Marquette, MI for Cleveland, OH with a load of iron ore. In rough seas, she was thrown onto the rocky shore near Marquette where she broke up. No lives were lost.

On 30 August 1900 thousands of people gathered at the Jenks Shipbuilding Company near the Grand Trunk Bridge on the Black River in Port Huron, MI to watch the launching of the large steel steamer CAPTAIN THOMAS WILSON. Superintendent Andrews gave the word and the blows were struck simultaneously at the bow and stern. Slowly the vessel started quivering slightly from deck to keel and then with a mighty rush, slid sideways into the river. Her stern stuck in the mud. Mrs. Thomas Wilson christened the ship.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Fraser Grounds

08/29 9:40 p.m. update
Shortly after 8:30 p.m. Thursday night the saltie Fraser departed Duluth after being aground for one day. Several unsuccessful attempts were made Thursday to free the grounded Fraser using the ship's engine and tugs from Great Lakes Towing. About 6 p.m., four tugs began working on the vessel in another attempt to free it. That evening the vessel was pulled from the silt and haded for the lake. The vessel will undergo inspection Friday morning.

11:00 a.m. update
Vessel agents and tug operators this morning are devising a salvage plan for the saltie Fraser, which grounded Wednesday evening as it was departing Duluth. Once the plan is approved by the Coast Guard, efforts will resume to refloat the vessel. No work is expected to begin until at least this afternoon.

The Duluth Ship Canal remains open to commercial traffic although a Notice to Mariners has been issued to caution vessels using the entry.

The 730-foot Fraser grounded in about a foot of silt. Coast Guard inspectors reportedly have found no damage to the vessel.

Moving in dense fog, the vessel apparently missed the turn to line up on the ship canal. The vessel came to rest less than 200 feet from the concrete dock of the LaFarge Cement terminal in Duluth.

A slow-moving cold-air mass has shrouded Duluth harbor in heavy fog the past several days. The fog Wednesday evening was so thick that a local minor league baseball game was called because players and fans could no longer see the outfield.

Pictures by Al Miller
The Fraser aground near the Lafarge Cement terminal.
Close up.
Closeup of the draft marks showing the vessel in 25 feet of water.
Two tugs from Great Lakes Towing were standing by Thursday morning waiting for word to begin salvage operations.

Original Report
The Panamanian-flagged Fraser grounded at about 8 p.m. Wednesday evening as she attempted to depart the Duluth harbor in a heavy fog. Loaded with wheat and sailing in near-zero visibility, she apparently missed her turn around the traffic bouy and ran her bow into the mud just off of the Lafarge terminal. At one point her bow was reportedly only twenty feet off of the dock.

The G-tugs that had assisted her from her berth at Cenex-Harvest States in Superior were quickly on the scene. The Minnesota and North Dakota worked for about one and a half hour wriggling the Fraser back and forth to free her bow from the bottom. At 10 p.m. as the tugboats were beginning to make some progress and a third tug (the Kentucky) was ordered, the Coast Guard ordered all tugging operations halted.

It is unknown why the operations were stopped but at 12:30 a.m. Thursday the Fraser was still aground, her bow 100 feet off Lafarge and her stern near the Irvin L. Clymer pilothouse. By this time she also had a bow anchor dropped. The Coast Guard's 47' boat was patrolling alongside, and the G-tugs were rafted just off of the Fraser's bow at the end of the Lafarge pier waiting to resume their efforts to free the Fraser.

Reported by: Al Miller and Glenn Blaszkiewicz




Tow Continues

08/29
The Louis J. Goulet tow was proceeding through the lower St. Lawrence Wednesday. The tug Ocean Jupiter has taken up position as the lead tug with the Triton trailing the tow.

The Goulet was purchased by Bahamas Oil and is headed to Walker's Cay, Bahamas. The Goulet will be renamed Liberty Hunter.

Coming out of the narrows.
Another view.
Stern view.

Reported by: Peter Carter




PM 41 Loads

08/29
The tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 were loading scrap metal in Holland, Michigan Wednesday. The pair shifted after completing the unload of stone at Brewer's Wednesday morning.

Reported by: Bob Vande Vusse




Thunder Bay Marine Sanctuary Expedition Takes To The Water

08/29
Scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Michigan Department of History, Arts and Libraries (HAL) will continue a unique collaboration with Dr. Robert Ballard (discoverer of the Titanic, PT109) and his scientific team from the Institute for Exploration (IFE) in a mission to explore and document the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and Underwater Preserve off the coast of Alpena, Mich.

Using IFE’s Little Hercules, a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), the Thunder Bay Exploration 2002 expedition team will collect video and still images of known and newly discovered shipwrecks located in last year’s expedition. NOAA, HAL and IFE are focusing on Thunder Bay because of its high concentration of wrecks that span more than a century of maritime history.

“Preserved by the waters on which they served, these vessels offer a look back in time when steamers and schooners ruled the Great Lakes,” said Jeff Gray, Thunder Bay sanctuary manager. “Our work with IFE will not only provide information about our maritime past, but it will help us ensure that these sites are preserved for future generations.”

In June 2001, NOAA and IFE used sidescan sonar technology to search for the deepwater shipwrecks in the sanctuary. Of these targets, 11 are known shipwrecks and three are unidentified wrecks. The team hopes work this season will help identify these sites. It will also investigate limestone sinkholes that may reveal important artifacts and evidence of human habitation by Paleo-Indians during low lake levels 8,000 to 10,000 years ago.

Many Americans don’t even know that we have national marine sanctuaries,” said Dr. Ballard. “We are working with NOAA and the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation (NMSF) to change that. We are going to explore these sites, as we have so many other important sites around the world. Thunder Bay offers a unique set of possibilities and challenges and opportunities.”

The Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and Underwater Preserve was designated in October 2000 to protect a nationally significant collection of underwater cultural resources. Thunder Bay is the 13th national marine sanctuary and only the second sanctuary to focus solely on the protection of historic shipwrecks. Based on historical records, the sanctuary estimates that 116 shipwrecks lie within the 448-square-mile boundary, although thus far only 40 have been located. The sanctuary is co-managed by NOAA and the state of Michigan. For more information about the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and Underwater Preserve, visit www.glerl.noaa.gov/glsr/thunderbay.

Reported by: Ellen Brody




Medical Evacuations

08/29
The U.S. Coast Guard remained busy last week completing two medical evacuations.

On Friday a 53-year-old male suffering from a large laceration to his right thigh was evacuated from the Canadian Progress to the Alpena Hospital. After the flight surgeon approved the MEDEVAC, a rescue helicopter was launched and it hoisted the individual.

On Thursday the same crews from Air Station Traverse City lifted a crewmember from the James R. Barker on Lake Superior. The man was suffering from internal bleeding. The flight surgeon recommended that the patient be flown to the nearest hospital for treatment. The rescue helicopter hoisted the patient and transported to awaiting EMS at the K.I. Sawyer airport.

Reported by: Mike Ferris




Soo Traffic

08/29
Below are images of traffic at the Soo on Wednesday.
EPA vessel Lake Explorer makes a fuel stop in Soo Harbor on her way to Marquette and Duluth.
Atlantic Erie near Six Mile Point in the St. Mary's River Wednesday.
Algonova.
Algocen.
Oglebay Norton.
Soo's museum ship Valley Camp shows off a new Republic Steel red paint job on her smokestack.
McKee Sons unloads at Saginaw Tuesday evening.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




Detroit Traffic

08/29
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Wednesday.
Barge Ocean Hauler and tug Doug Mc Keil upbound at the Livingstone Crossing after departing the General Chemical Dock in Amherstburg.
Close up of tug.
Stern view.
Stokmarnes (Hong Kong) upbound at the Livingstone Crossing. She anchored at Ojibway for the evening.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo News

08/29
The Algosoo was at the Kuhlman Dock unloading cargo. The Capt. Henry Jackman was unloading stone at the Midwest Terminal Dock. The salt water vessels Greenwing and Stokmarnes were at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The Gemini was at the B-P Dock loading cargo. The Fred R. White Jr. followed by the Courtney Burton were unloading ore at the Torco Ore Dock.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algolake on Thursday. The Reserve on Friday, followed by the John G. Munson and Charles M. Beeghly on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Dock will now be the Adam E. Cornelius on Saturday, followed by the Buckeye on Sunday.

The sailing vessel the "Brig" Niagara, and the Red Witch are due to arrive in Toledo on Thursday and will tie up at the City Docks directly across from downtown Toledo, both vessels are scheduling tours from Friday right through the Labor Day weekend.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Welland Traffic

08/29
Below are images of traffic on the Welland Canal Wednesday.
Oakglen.
Stern view.
Bow view.
Stern view.
Yankcanuck at Port Colborne unloading gypsum.
Close up.
Scrap fleet at IMS.
Profile.
Jean Parisean was going into #2.
Barge St. Marys Cement II.
Port Weller Dry Docks.

Reported by: Dan Sweeley




Today in Great Lakes History - August 29

On August 29, 1942, the A.H. Ferbert (2) entered service.

On her maiden voyage August 29, 1979 the INDIANA HARBOR sailed for Two Harbors, MN to load iron ore pellets for Indiana Harbor, IN. In August, 1982 INDIANA HARBOR became the first U.S. flag laker to receive satellite communication.

On August 29, 1972 the lightship HURON was placed in an earth embankment at Port Huron's Pine Grove Park along the St. Clair River and was opened to visitors on July 13, 1974.

Canada Steamship Lines' ATLANTIC SUPERIOR returned from Europe on August 29, 1985 with a cargo of gypsum for Picton, Ontario.

On 29 August 1871, GEORGE M. ABEL (2-mast wooden schooner) broke up on a reef near Port Burwell, Ontario.

On 29 August 1858, CANADA (3-mast wooden bark, 199', 758 t) was carrying a half million board feet of lumber to Chicago in bad weather when she settled just north of downtown Chicago. The next day during a salvage attempt, she blew southward, struck a bar off the old waterworks, broke her back, then broke up. She had been built in Canada in 1846 as a sidewheeler and was seized by the U.S. in 1849 and rebuilt as a bark in 1852.

August 29, 1998 - The BADGER was designated a spur route on the Lake Michigan Circle Tour.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Max Hanley, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Elm Refloated

08/28
The saltie Elm was pulled free Tuesday evening and was anchored at Wilson Hill waiting for divers to inspect her hull. The tug Ocean Jupiter and St. Lawrence Seaway tug Robinson Bay were credited with freeing the vessel.

The vessel grounded three nautical miles below the Eisenhower Lock on the mud bottom. The Elm was floated and anchored nearby for divers to survey. The traffic system in the vicinity of American locks was closed for six hours with two commercial vessels delayed. Overall, there was minor economic impact.

The Ocean Jupiter was on her way up to meet with the tug Triton and Louis J Goulet tow when it was diverted to help pull the Elm free.

Reported by: Walt Statham and Kent Malo




Armco Departure

08/28
Armco appeared to be ready to depart Fraser Shipyards late Tuesday. The vessel had steam up and a GLT tug was standing by the stern about 4:30. The vessel had been in the yard about a day and a half for rudder repairs.

Reported by: Al Miller




Goulet Tow

08/28
The Louis J. Goulet tow was proceeding across eastern Lake Ontario last night. The tug Triton is expected to meet up with the tug Ocean Jupiter for the tow through the Seaway.

The Goulet was purchased by Bahamas Oil and is headed to Walker's Cay, Bahamas. The Goulet will be renamed Liberty Hunter.

Bahamas Oil plans to drill an exploratory well off Walker's Cay to test for the presence of commercial quantities of gas and oil. If found, the well will be converted to a production well with the Liberty Hunter serving as a materials storage, accommodation, logistics facility and well control vessel.

View of the Louis J. Goulet.
Triton approaches Wharf 19 to make up tow.
Triton backing drill barge out of the slip.
Approach lift bridge.
Triton and barge transiting lift bridge.

Reported by: Jerome A. Popiel




Greenwing damages Toledo Dock

08/28
The new saltie Greenwing last Friday struck a wharf in Toledo as it was docking, damaging the structure and tarnishing the ship's maiden voyage.

Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority hired a contractor to build a cofferdam around the damaged area to assess its extent.

The impact caused part of the wharf behind a bulkhead to collapse, leaving railroad rails hanging in the air. Workers filled the 20-foot-wide hole with gravel to keep river current from undermining the wharf.

No one on the wharf or aboard the Greenwing was injured in the crash, which occurred at 8:30 a.m. Friday. The Greenwing was making the dock when it struck the bulkhead with its bulbous bow.

Lt. Michael Block, a spokesman for the U.S. Coast Guard marine safety office in Toledo, said an investigation is continuing.

Fritz Tepper, the company’s local agent, told the Toledo Blade that the ship’s master believes he might have struck an underwater obstacle, perhaps a high spot in the river bottom, that kept the Greenwing from navigating its intended course as it approached the dock.

The Greenwing was launched in June at Wuhu Shipbuilding in China. The vessel sailed from the ship yard on August 5.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman and Dan Smart




Republic in Lorain

08/28
On Monday the American Republic arrived in Lorain to load for the ISG Mill in Cleveland. The Republic was built to server this shuttle run from Lorain to Cleveland.

Pictures by TZ
Inbound.
Passing the lighthouse.
Close up.
Backing to the pellet terminal.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Comeaudoc Tow

08/28
Below are images of the Comeaudoc tow.
Dave Wobser
Arriving at Wharf #2.
Lead tug Progress.
Steering and braking tugs Vac and Seahound.
Dalhousie Princess.
Diver enters the water.
Diver climbs back out of the water.
Pulling the loosened hawser back aboard Progress.
Headed for Lock #3.
Another view.
Tight fit.
Salty Irma passing Comeaudoc at Wharf #16,Sunday morning.
Comeaudoc at Wharf #16, Port Colborne.
Stern View.

Brian Harrison
In Lock 1.
Exiting Lock 1.
Stern tugs.
Tug Progress.
Close up of stack.
Approaching Lock 2.
Guided in.

Bill Bird
Bow View at dock.
Goulet tow.
Close up.
Algomarine passing.
Stern view.




Detroit Traffic

08/28
Below are images of recent traffic on the Detroit River.

Integrity & Jacklyn M upbound at Grassy Island. She stopped at the Detroit Lafarge Dock.
Stern view.
Close up.
Algocen upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
barge Ocean Hauler & Doug Mc Keil downbound at Fighting Island North light. She was bound for the General Chemical Dock in Amherstburg.
Stern view.
Close up.
Federal Ems (Cyprus) arriving at Nicholson's after spending the night at Ojibway Anchorage.
Stern view.
tug Curly B departing Warner Petroleum in the Rouge River after fueling.
yacht Kismet (Cayman Islands) downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
tug Manitou on Nicholson's Drydock.
barge BMI-105 at Nicholson's. This is the barge the Curly B is towing.
Cedarglen unloading at the ADM Dock in Windsor.
Stern view.
tug Allie B upbound at Grassy Island. She stopped in the Rouge River for fuel.
Stern view.
Jacklyn M & Integrity at the Lafarge Dock in Detroit.
Close up.
Stern view.
Close up.
yacht Kismet (Cayman Islands) at the head of Belle Isle. She tied up at the Detroit Boat Club.
Stern view.
Detroit Sunset.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Welland Canal Update

08/28
The Welland Canal was busy Sunday morning. At 6:30 a.m. the Comeaudoc was tied up at Wharf 16, with the Progress and Seahound in front of her. At 7 a.m. the tug Vac shifted across the Canal and moored next to the Seahound in preparation for the late morning move of the Algogulf. Also upbound below Lock 8 at 6:30 were the saltie Irma and the Algosoo. The freshly-repaired Algosoo was sailing upbound with a load of iron ore from Pointe Noire, Quebec to Ashtabula. Later that morning the Algocape and Federal Ems were upbound. Downbound were the saltie Arklow Bridge, with wheat, and the Everlast and Barge Norman McLeod. In the early afternoon, the Canadian Navigator was upbound at Lock 1, also loaded with iron ore for Ashtabula, and the Tug Allie-B, destined for Green Bay.

Comeaudoc tied up with tugs in front of her.
Stern View.
Irma slowly creeps by the Comeaudoc.
Another view.
Irma upbound below Lock 8.
Stern View.
Another view.
Algosoo upbound below Lock 8, destined for Ashtabula.
Stern View.
Enterprise tied up at IMS.
Algocape tied up above Lock 8.
Norman McLeod inbound Port Colborne.
Stern View.
Arklow Bridge downbound below Lock 8.
Norman McLeod downbound below Lock 8.
Stern View.
Federal Ems upbound below Lock 8.
Stern View.
CSL Tadoussac, upbound in the Welland by-pass.
Stern View.
Canadian Navigator upbound above Lock 1 destined for Ashtabula.
Stern View.
Allie-B above Lock 1, upbound for Green Bay.
Stern View.
Port Weller Dry Docks, Canadian Miner and Coast Guard Cutters.
Canadiana.
Old cabin from the tug James Battle.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Drought drops wheat harvest

08/28
Wheat production in western Canada will hit a 28-year low because of the worst drought to hit the region in recent memory.

Total wheat production this year will drop 25 per cent to 15.4 million tonnes -- the lowest level since 1974, Statistics Canada reported.

"Many producers believe that conditions were the driest ever experienced in the West," the government agency said.

The latest figures are also below other recent forecasts, which had estimated wheat output of between 17.1 million and 18.25 million tonnes.

Central and northern Saskatchewan and Alberta were both hit especially hard with a drought and grasshopper infestation, the agency said. Unseasonably cool temperatures in early August also suggested the potential for an early frost, according to the report.

A significant amount of the grain raised in western Canada is shipped through Thunder Bay to overseas customers.

Reported by: Brian Harrison




Toledo Update

08/28
The tug Jacklyn M and the barge Integrity were unloading cement at the Lafarge Dock Tuesday. The Gemini was at the B-P Dock loading cargo. The salt water vessels Stokmarnes and Greenwing were at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo.

The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge and the Joseph H. Frantz remain in layup. There are no vessels at the Shipyard at the present time.

The Buckeye was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore. The sailing vessel the "Brig" Niagara and the sailing vessel Red Witch are due in Toledo on Thursday and will tie up at the City Docks across from Downtown. They will be open for tours starting on Friday right through the Labor Day weekend.

The following tugs are currently in Toledo: Great Lakes Towing Company: Idaho, Illinois, Louisiana. Gaelic Towing Company: Susan Hoey, William Hoey. George Gradel Company: Mighty Jake, Mighty Jessie, Mighty Jimmy. Other tugs here are the Bessie B. and Pioneerland.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algolake on Thursday. The Reserve on Friday, followed by the John G. Munson and Charles M. Beeghly on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Fred R. White Jr. and Courtney Burton on Weds. The Reserve on Thursday. The Armco on Friday, followed by the Adam E. Cornelius on Saturday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Updates

08/28
I've fallen behind on the updates, I hope to be caught up soon. Please check back throughout the next few days.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 28

EDWIN H. GOTT, 78, of Pittsburgh, died on August 28, 1986. The namesake of the 1,000 footer, he retired as Chief Executive Officer of U.S. Steel in 1973.

On August 28, 1962, the Edward L. Ryerson set a Great Lakes cargo record for iron ore. The Ryerson loaded 25,018 gross tons of iron ore in Superior, Wisconsin, breaking by 14 tons the record held by the Canadian bulk freighter Red Wing which was set in the 1961 season. The Ryerson held this record well into 1965.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 was repowered with two 2,850 ihp four cylinder Skinner Uniflow steeple compound steam engines, 19 1/2", 43" dia. x 26" stroke, built in 1953 by the Skinner Engine Co., Erie, PA and four coal-fired Foster-Wheeler water tube boilers with a total heating surface of 25,032 sq. ft. built in 1953. The repowering work was completed on August 28, 1954. Her 1954 tonnage was 3551 GRT, 1925 NRT, 2450 dwt. A new starboard tail shaft was installed at this time. Her service speed increased to 18 knots (20.7 mph).

The JOHN ANDERSON was outbound through the Duluth Ship Canal on August 28, 1928, the ANDERSON struck the north pier suffering $18,000 in damage.

The REGENT entered service on August 28, 1934. She was built for low clearances on the New York State Barge Canal and was equipped with five cargo tanks and one dry cargo hold.

The WILLIAM A. REISS (2) was laid up for the last time on August 28, 1981 at Toledo, OH and remained idle there until July 15, 1994 when she was towed to be scrapped.

On 28 August 1870, CHASKA (wooden scow-schooner, 72'/50T, built in 1869 at Duluth originally as a scow-brig) was wrecked in a northwesterly storm near Duluth. Reportedly she's the first vessel built at Duluth.

On 28 August 1763, BEAVER, an armed wooden British sloop built the previous year, was carrying provisions to Detroit to relieve the fort there which was under siege by the Indians led by Pontiac. however the vessel foundered in a storm at Cat Fish Creek, 14 miles from the site of Buffalo. 185 barrels of her cargo were salvaged and went on to Detroit on the schooner GLADWIN.

Data from: Joe Barr, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Al Miller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Elm Grounds

08/27 6:00 p.m. Update
The saltie Elm grounded below the Eisenhower Lock Tuesday morning. The vessel is upbound carrying a cargo of steel. The tugs Robinson Bay and Ocean Jupiter were on scene Tuesday afternoon attempting to pull the vessel free. If the tugs are unsuccessful in freeing the vessel some of her cargo may need to be off loaded.

Traffic continues to pass the site of the grounding at a reduced speed.

Please e-mail with updates or pictures.

Reported by: Mike Jackson




Armco in for Repairs

08/27
The Armco pulled into Fraser Shipyards in Superior during the day on Aug. 26. By late afternoon, the vessel was docked with a large crawler crane alongside the stern.

The vessel appeared to have damage to its rudder. It was assisted by the tug North Dakota into Fraser Shipyards and welding was taking place that evening in the area of the rudder.

Reported by: Al Miller and Martin Steidle




Goulet Towed from Port Colborne

08/27
One of the last remaining canallers is on her way off the Great Lakes. The Louis J. Goulet was towed from her lay-up dock in Port Colborne Monday by the tugs Seahound and Triton.

The Goulet was purchased by Bahamas Oil and is headed to Walker's Cay, Bahamas. The Goulet will be renamed Liberty Hunter.

Bahamas Oil plans to drill an exploratory well off Walker's Cay to test for the presence of commercial quantities of gas and oil. If found, the well will be converted to a production well with the Liberty Hunter serving as a materials storage, accommodation, logistics facility and well control vessel.

Built for Hall Corporation as Coniscliffe Hall in 1957, the vessel was sold and converted to a non-propelled drill ship in 1974-75. Initially she was named Telesis but in 1994 she was sold again and in 1998 re-named Louis J. Goulet.

Goulet docked last summer Roger LeLievre
At Port Colborne in March Alex Howard

Reported by: Bill Bird and Jimmy Sprunt




Canadian Venture next to Go

08/27
In early October the Canadian Venture will be pulled from her berth in Toronto harbor and towed to International Marine Salvage in Port Colborne for scrapping. With the addition of the Venture to vessel waiting to be scrapped at the yard, the work of cutting the four ships will keep IMS busy for two or more years.

Reported by: Bill Bird and Jeff Thoreson




Great Lakes Fleet ships in Green Bay

08/27
The Arthur M. Anderson arrived in Green Bay early Monday morning and unloaded coal at C. Reiss Coal. The vessel departed at 10:30 a.m. The John G. Munson arrived in port at 8 p.m. Monday night and was on its way to unload coal at C. Reiss. This is the third delivery of coal for C. Reiss in two Days. The Great Lakes Trader was in port Sunday morning.

Reported by: Jason Leino




Alpena Report

08/27
The J.A.W Iglehart came into port shortly before 3 p.m. on Monday to load cement at Lafarge. Following the Iglehart was the Paul H. Townsend. It waited alongside at the coal dock for its turn to load. The Iglehart departed around 7:30 p.m. heading for South Chicago. The Townsend was expected to finish loading by midnight.

The Sam Laud delivered coal to Lafarge early Sunday morning.

The Alpena is due into port Tuesday afternoon. The Jacklyn M barge Integrity departed from Cleveland on Monday evening.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Toronto Update

08/27
Stephen B. Roman was unloading cement at the Essroc dock Monday morning. The salty Strange Attractor continued to unload raw sugar at the Redpath dock.

The C & C Marine barge Rock Prince returned to its dock Monday with the waste bunker oil recently removed from the Q.C.Y.C. barge/breakwater Rapids Queen. Later in the day, C & C Marine's tug Patricia D. began laying "Keep Out" buoys for the annual air show at the Toronto Exhibition. The air show runs this coming weekend.

The tug King Fish 1 and its consort "Party Barge" went to Hamilton Monday. This may be the end of the charter season for this combo.

Reported by: Gerry O. and Clive Reddin




Today in Great Lakes History - August 27

The AGAWA CANYON was launched in 1971 at Collingwood Shipyards Ltd.

The SAMUEL RISLEY arrived at Toronto, Ont. on August 27, 1985 on her way to Thunder Bay, Ont. where she replaced the retired CCGC ALEXANDER HENRY.

ELMGLEN (2) was launched August 27, 1952 as a) JOHN O. McKELLAR (2) for the Colonial Steamship Co. Ltd. (Scott Misener, mgr.), Port Colborne, Ont.

The WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) then renamed US.266029 departed her lay-up berth at the Rouge slip on August 20, 1986 in tow of Gaelic tugs and she was taken to Detroit Marine Terminals on the Rouge River, where her pilothouse was removed to be displayed at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Detroit's Belle Isle. The hull was moved to Nicholson's River Rouge dock on August 27th.

MERLE M. McCURDY was launched August 27, 1910 as a) WILLIAM B. DICKSON for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

The U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tender (WAGL-305) MESQUITE was commissioned on August 27, 1943 and served on the Pacific Ocean in the 7th Fleet in 1944 and 1945.

On August 27, 1940, the William A. Irvin set the Great Lakes record for the fastest unloading of an iron ore cargo using shore side equipment. The Irvin unloaded 13,856 gross tons of iron ore in 2 hours, 55 minutes (including the time to arrive and depart the dock) in Conneaut, Ohio. This record still stands, and consequently the Irvin is one of the few Great Lakes vessels to be retired while still holding a Great Lakes cargo record.

On August 27, 1929, the Myron C. Taylor entered service.

On Aug. 25, 1923, the Duluth, Missabe & Northern ore dock in Duluth loaded 208,212 tons of ore into 23 ships.

On 27 August 1924, CITY QUEEN (wooden propeller steam tug, 71'/69GT, built in 1900 at Midland, Ontario) burned to a total loss ¼ mile east of the Manitou Dock in Georgian Bay.

The keel for the tug CRUSADER was laid on 27 August 1873 at the Leighton & Dunford yard in Port Huron. The tug's dimensions were 100' keel, 132' overall, and 23' beam. She was built for George E. Brockway.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Al Miller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Comeadoc in Port Colborne

08/26
The Comeaudoc has reached the International Marine Salvage Dock in Port Colborne. To make room for Comeaudoc, the Algogulf was moved up alongside Kinsman Enterprise.

The tow experienced a delay while transiting the canal on Saturday. At 3:50 p.m. the tug Progress prepared to pull the Comeaudoc from Lock 2. However, the towline had become entangled with the rudder or propeller, and the tow did not exit the Lock. The securing lines were dropped from the Comeaudoc back to the lock bollards. A diver was called to the scene and the tow resumed later that day.

A spokesman for International Marine Salvage says Kinsman Enterprise will be scrapped first. Algogulf has a large amount of asbestos that must be carefully removed, it will likely be a few years before she has been scrapped.

Reported by: Bill Bird, Brian Harrison, Dave Wobser and Jeff Thoreson




Acushnet Update

08/26
The tug Acushnet will remain at MCM Marine in the Soo while the grounding repairs are made. The crew returned home until repairs are made. Approximately nine frames are bent and minor damage to the bulkheads. The hull remains intact and no leaks were reported.




Twin Ports Report

08/26
Herbert C. Jackson arrived in Duluth late Sunday afternoon to fuel before moving on to the Cenex Harvest States grain elevator in Superior to load. Clear skies are predicted here today, so the Jackson likely will make it's usual quick turnaround.

Elsewhere in port Sunday, Canadian Progress was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal with coal for Nanticoke. Courtney Burton was to finish unloading at CLM in Superior and then take on taconite pellets at DMIR in Duluth, and Paul R. Tregurtha was to load at DMIR. The saltie Fraser was at Cenex Harvest States.

Reported by: Al Miller




Green Bay Update

08/26
On Sunday the Joyce L Van Enkevort and barge Great Lakes Trader arrived late morning with coal for C. Reiss Coal. Early afternoon the Paul H. Townsend was outbound from Lafarge. Under sunny skies, with the yearly Art Fair Festival going on along the river in downtown, it gave quite a show.

Reported by: Wendell Wilke




Conneaut cameras to help boaters

08/26
Lake Erie boaters will soon be able to see weather and wave conditions before deciding whether to make a trip to Conneaut's lakefront.

The Conneaut Port Authority has mounted three cameras at the Port Conneaut Marine and Yacht Club. The cameras will soon begin providing streaming video of the waterfront, enabling boaters to eyeball conditions through the port authority's website at www.conneautportauthority.com.

The cameras also will be used for security and can be aimed at points of the harbor favored by thieves and vandals. Recording devices will keep images on file in case they're needed by investigators, members said.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Lake Erie Ports Update

08/26
Algosoo was unloading ore in Ashtabula all Sunday evening. Maumee loaded coal in Conneaut Sunday afternoon and evening, and departed eastbound at 2000. Yankcanuck had been waiting for Maumee to clear, then moved under the loader to take stone. No boats in Fairport all Sunday evening.

Reported by: Dave Merchant




Today in Great Lakes History - August 26

The Edgar B. Speer's sea trials were successfully completed on August 26, 1980.

The BEECHGLEN was towed out of Owen Sound by the McKeil tug KAY COLE on August 26, 1994 en route to Port Maitland, Ont. for scrapping.

The MICHIPICOTEN (2) was launched August 26, 1905 as a) HENRY C. FRICK.

EMORY L. FORD (b RAYMOND H. REISS) entered service on August 26, 1916 to load iron ore at Marquette, MI.

SILVERDALE was launched August 26, 1925 as the straight decker a) GLENEAGLES

The CHIEF WAWATAM was launched on August 26, 1911. She was built with three large propellers, two in the stern for propulsion and one in the bow for icebreaking.

The passenger-cargo ship FEDERAL PALM was christened August 26, 1961. She was built on the Great Lakes, but never served their ports.

On August 26, 1934, while on a Sunday sightseeing cruise, MIDLAND CITY damaged her bottom on a shoal near Present Island. She settled with her stern under water and her bow high in the air.

On 26 August 1875, COMET (propeller passenger/package freight, 181'/744T, built in 1857 at Cleveland, OH) was carrying ore and pig iron in Lake Superior on a foggy night. While trying to pass the Beatty Line steamer MANITOBA, 7 miles SE of Whitefish Point, signals were misunderstood and COMET veered into the path of MANITOBA. COMET was rammed amidships and sank in ten minutes. 11 of the 21 aboard lost their lives. This wasn't the first such accident for COMET. In October 1869, she suffered a similar mishap with the propeller HUNTER and that time both vessels sank.

The schooner MATTHEW McNAIR was launched at the Lee & Lamoree shipyard in Oswego on 26 August 1857. Her dimensions were 103' keel, 24'6" beam and 9'6" depth.

August 26, 1911 - The CHIEF WAWATAM was launched by the Toledo Shipbuilding Company.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history



 


Comeaudoc Makes Slow Canal Passage

08/25
 

 The retired Paterson bulker Comeaudoc continued to drag her feet on her final trip. The scrap tow, led by the tug Bonnie B III, arrived at the anchorage off Port Weller before 1000 Saturday. At this point, she was met by the three Nadro Marine tugs, Progress, Vac and Seahound. These are the same tugs that previously towed the Algogulf and Kinsman Enterprise to their final destination at International Marine Salvage in Port Colborne in May.

 

   The Bonnie B III headed for Hamilton to tow the burned out hull of the Windoc to back to Montreal. The tow is scheduled to begin Wednesday. The Comeaudoc arrived at Wharf #2, just inside the Port Weller piers, around 1030 hrs. She remained there while a discussion ensued concerning the number of Canadian union pilots required for the tow fleet. It was determined that each tug had an inland seas master and there were two more qualified masters aboard the Comeadoc, including Capt. Scott Bravener of Lower Lakes Towing.

 

   The break did allow several crewmembers to make a run for groceries and other essential items. While the tow was docked, the Dalhousie Princess brought a boatload of tourists into the canal entrance to see what was going on. Some 30 or more boatnerds and assorted other interested folks were gathered on the dock at Wharf #2 with cameras running.

 

   At 1340 hrs, after the salty Ziemia Zamojska passed downbound, the tow headed for Lock #1. It took nearly an hour to load the three tugs in the lock with the Comeaudoc, raise them and get headed for Lock #2.When the gates opened on Lock #2, at 1550 hrs, to let the tow proceed bout, the Progress reported a problem. It was discovered that the nylon tow line was wrapped around the propeller. A call went out to ASI Group Marine Services, one of two Seaway contracted diving firms. ASI arrived in less than an hour and a half. It took another hour to prepare the diver, and get all the safety lockouts installed on the lock control mechanisms. Within 20 minutes the diver had removed the tow line and the safety lockout procedure was reversed, putting the lock back in service.
 

    The tow finally headed toward Lock #3 at 1840 hours, passing a large group of spectators gathered to see what had the stopped the canal traffic. Another large crowd was on hand at Lock #3 when she arrived at 1930, and they locked through without incident. By 2000 hours the tow was headed toward the flight locks, and at 2200 hours they were in Lock #6.

 

           This morning the Comeaudoc will be temporarily parked at Wharf #16, and the Algogulf will be moved south next to the Kinsman Enterprise. The K.E .is docked against land as the old forebody of the Louis R. Desmarais has been completely dismantled. The Comeaudoc will then be moved to the Algogulf's former spot.

 

   Around October 1, the Canadian Venture will be brought from Montreal and  parked next to Comeaudoc to await her final destiny.

 

Reported by: Dave Wobser


 


Marquette Report

08/25
 

   The Herbert C. Jackson brought a load of coal to Marquette's Presque Isle power plant on Saturday. The H. Lee White is expected on Sunday to get a load of taconite. The next ship due at the ore dock is the Charles M. Beeghly due on Thursday morning.

 

Reported by: Lee Rowe


 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 25

On August 25, 1984 the hard luck ROGER M. KYES (b ADAM E. CORNELIUS) grounded off McLouth Steel and ended crosswise in the Detroit River's Trenton Channel.

The GEORGE M. STEINBRENNER (2) arrived at Port Colborne, Ont. on August 25, 1978 in tow of the tug WILFRED M. COHEN for scrapping.

On 25 August 1919, CABOTIA (formerly HIAWATHA, wooden propeller freighter, 235'/1299GT, built 1880 at Gibraltar, MI) went ashore on Main Duck Island in Lake Ontario and split her hull, becoming a constructive loss.

August 25, 1981 - The first of the famous "Love Boat" cruises was made. The BADGER carried 520 passengers, the largest number of passengers for a carferry up to that time. It was sponsored by the Ludington Area Ambassadors.

On 25 August 1873, JOURNEYMAN (wooden schooner, 129', 235 gt, built in 1873 at Wenona, Michigan) was put in service. Her first cargo was 225,770 feet of lumber. She was built for Whitehead & Webster of Bay City and lasted until 1896.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 


Comeaudoc Tow: 1:30 pm Saturday Update

08/24

Update: The Comeudoc tow, with the tug Progress in the lead, passed through Lock One around 1 p.m. today. No ETA for Lock 7 was given, but the passage is expected to be a slow one.

  Original report:

   The Comeaudoc tow received permission around 10 a.m. this morning to proceed from the Port Weller anchorage into the Welland Canal as far as the wharf below Lock 1, where the tow will await a canal pilot. The pilot is expected at around 12:30 p.m. today. The tugs Progress, Vac and Seahound are handling the tow through the Canal. The tugs Bonnie B III and Lac Vancouver, which towed the Comeaudoc from her six-year layup berth at Montreal, were released and dispatched to Hamilton to pick up the fire-damaged Windoc and tow it to an undisclosed port on the eastern end of the St. Lawrence Seaway, possibly Montreal. Both the Comeaudoc and Windoc were once owned by N. M. Paterson and Sons, which ended its shipping operations this spring.

 

Reported by: Dave Wobser and Paul Wallace


 

 

Comeaudoc expected at Welland Canal Today

08/24
 

   As of 9:08 p.m. Friday, the Comeaudoc tow was just west of the Sodus Point call-in-point on Lake Ontario. The new ETA for the Welland Canal Lock 1 is 9:46 a.m. Saturday. For updates by phone, call the Welland Canal recording, (905) 688-6462, and reference" ETA for Lake Ontario entrance" prompt for the tug Bonnie B, which is the lead tug for the tow. The Comeaudoc is bound for the scrapyard at Port Colborne on the western end of the Welland Canal.
 

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson and Peter Jobe


 


Quiet Day Friday on the Welland Canal

08/24
 

  The Welland Canal was rather quiet Friday, with the  tug Sea Eagle II and barge St. Mary's Cement II upbound in Lock 7.  Downbound, the saltie Marinette was locking through Lock 2 bound for  for Three Rivers. At 3:30 p.m. the saltie Stokmarnes appeared at Port Weller from Hamilton to begin her upbound transit of the canal. Returning to Hamilton, the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was unloading coal at Stelco, while over at Dofasco, the Algocen was unloading iron ore. The saltie Olympic Merit was being escorted into Pier 23 at 5 pm by two McKeil tugs.
 

Reported by: Patricia Burgon


 


Twin Ports Report

08/24

   Twin Ports boatwatchers Friday were treated to the unusual sight of the Philip R. Clarke lying at anchor off Duluth. The handsome vessel was waiting for the Frontenac to clear the DMIR ore dock before entering port to unload limestone.

 

   Elsewhere around the ports, James R. Barker was loading at Midwest Energy  Terminal and Calliroe Patronicola was loading at the Cargill elevator in Duluth. Superior's BNSF ore dock was busy with CSL Niagara, Burns Harbor and Stewart J. Cort all scheduled to load.

 

Reported by: Al Miller

 

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 24

LEON SIMARD was launched August 24, 1974.

On August 24, 1910 the THOMAS F. COLE ran aground on a shoal in the St. Marys River severely damaging her hull plates.

The C.H. McCULLOUGH, JR was launched on August 24, 1907 as a) WARD AMES .

On August 24, 1985, PAUL H. CARNAHAN arrived for her final lay up at Nicholson's in Ecorse, Michigan. Ironically, only a few hours later, her near sister LEON FALK, JR. departed the same slip on her final trip bound for Quebec City and overseas scrapping.

The BURLINGTON burned to the water's edge in Mississauga Strait near Manitoulin Island on August 24, 1895.

On 24 August 1885, IOSCO (wooden schooner-barge, 124'/230GT, built at Alabaster, MI in 1873) was heavily damaged by fire. She was rebuilt as an unrigged barge and lasted until 1912.

On 24 August 1882, the Port Huron Times reported that "the long looked for launch of the Stave Company's new river steamer MARY took place this afternoon between 4 and 5 o'clock and was witnessed by hundreds of spectators. The last support being knocked away, she slid very gracefully as far as the ways reached and then landed anything but gracefully in the mud where she now lies." She remained stuck in the mud until she was pulled free five days later.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 


Comeaudoc Tow Due Today at Welland Canal

08/23
 

   The Comeaudoc scrap tow continues its slow progress toward the Welland Canal and, eventually, the scrap yard at Port Colborne. Tentative ETA for Lock One at Port Weller is 1:36 p.m. today. If all goes well, the tow could reach Port Colborne just before midnight.

 

Reported by Peter Jobe and Kent Malo


 


Paul R. Conducts Drills at Marquette

08/23
 

   While the Paul R. Tregurtha was unloading coal at Marquette's Presque Isle power plant on Thursday, they conducted a lifeboat drill. The next ship due in Marquette is the H. Lee White on Sunday and the Charles M. Beeghly on  Thursday the 29th
 

Reported by: Lee Rowe


 


Plenty of Traffic at Fairport

08/23
 

   Thursday was busy in Fairport harbor. The Calumet was unloading stone at Union Sand dock. Saginaw picked up a load of sand at Osborne's. The Sam Laud unloaded stone late in the day, backing down the river under threatening skies, then turning on a dime between the pierhead and the breakwall entrance. The tug Prairieland was transporting dredgings from the upriver marina areas.
 

Reported by: Dave Merchant and Greg Stephens


 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 23

The GEMINI sailed on her maiden voyage August 23, 1978 from the shipyard to load fuel oil at Baytown, TX, for delivery at Detroit, MI.

The wooden-hulled steamer AURORA was launched on August 23, 1887.

On August 23, 1979, KINSMAN ENTERPRISE (1) was towed out of the Frog Pond, having escaped the scrapper's torch, and sold to the Port Huron Seaway Terminal to be used as a storage barge.

On 23 AUG 1887, CLARA (2-mast, wooden scow-schooner) was carrying a load of hardwood lumber bound from Manistee for Chicago when she was caught in a storm and capsized. Her hull later washed ashore upside-down near Miller's Station, IN.

August 23, 1901 - The PERE MARQUETTE 17 arrived Ludington on her maiden voyage with Captain Peter Kilty in command.

On 23 August 1875, PERSIAN (wooden propeller freighter, 1630 t, built in 1874 at Cleveland) caught fire off Long Point on Lake Erie. The Propeller EMPIRE STATE came alongside and tried to put out the fire with streams of water from her hose, but when this failed, she took PERSIAN in tow in an attempt to get her to shore. This too failed when the tow line burned through. PERSIAN burned to the waterline and sank 10 miles from land in about 30 fathoms of water. No lives were lost.

On 23 August 1900, one hundred years ago, ARGONAUT (wooden propeller freighter, 213', 1119 gt, built in 1873 at Detroit, MI) was raised by an expensive salvage operation at the Escanaba ore dock where she had previously sunk. She lasted another six years.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history



 


Comeaudoc Scrap Tow Update

08/22
 

The Comeaudoc's scrap tow from Montreal to Port Colborne continues to make its slow way west. The tow's latest tentative ETA for Port Weller at the eastern end of the Welland Canal  is now early Friday morning.

After a full 6 years of lay-up, the Comeaudoc departed Montreal shortly after 10:30 p.m. Monday. The tug Bonnie B III is leading the tow from Montreal with the tugs Progress and Lac Vancouver on the stern.

Comeaudoc is headed to the International Marine Salvage yard at Port Colborne, where she'll join the retired lakers Algogulf and Kinsman Enterprise in awaiting an eventual date with the cutting torch..


Reported by: Peter Jobe

 


Kaye E. Barker Calls on Wet Marquette

08/22
 

   Kaye Barker loaded in rainy weather in Marquette on Wednesday.  The rest of the week in Marquette will be quite slow, with the Lee A. Tregurtha due on Thursday morning, the H. Lee White due on Sunday, and the Charles Beeghly due the following Thursday.  It
may be one of the slowest weeks of the shipping season.

 

Reported by: Lee Rowe


 


Vessel Arrivals End Grand Haven Dry Spell

08/22
 

    The arrival of two vessels into Grand Haven today broke a long lull in vessel traffic into the port.  The Southdown Challenger arrived in the hours of darkness with a split load of cement for Cemex.  The Algomarine paid a rare visit this morning to the Meekhof's upper dock with a load of stone. She experienced almost a 24-hour delay in arriving dockside due to delays in both Muskegon and in Grand Haven. Because the Cemex dock abuts Meekhof's, the Algomarine needed to wait for the Challenger to finish unloading before getting her berth.

 

Reported by David Swain


 


Salties, Tugs Dominate Toronto Traffic

08/22
 

   The salty Strange Attractor arrived Wednesday afternoon assisted by McKeil's harbor tugs. It went to anchor awaiting the departure of the salty Dorothea, which left Redpath Sugar dock around 1700 hrs. and went to anchor in the inner harbor.
 
    The tug Kenteau towed a 500 foot section of pipe from the Outer Harbor to Ashbridge's Bay today as part of an on-going sewage plant upgrade project.
 
   The tug Tony Mackay, which departed solo Tuesday under a smoke screen, has not returned from Hamilton. Its consort cement barge Metis continues unloading at the Essroc plant.
 
   Canada's largest dredge, Canadian Argosy, owned by McNally Construction of Hamilton, was towed into Toronto from Hamilton, and moored next to McNally dredge John Holden. McNally has the contract for a multi-million-dollar deep water cooling project and these vessels will be a part of that project.

 

Reported by Gerry O.


 


Saginaw River Passages

08/22
 

   The Tug Dorothy Ann/Barge Pathfinder were inbound the Saginaw River Wednesday evening.  The pair gave a security call passing Light 1 of the entrance channel, stating they were heading to the Saginaw Rock Dock in  Saginaw. They should be outbound during the early morning hours today.
 
Reported by Todd Shorkey


 


Alpena Update

08/22
 

   The Earl W. Oglebay arrived at Lafarge around 2 p.m. Wednesday to unload coal. It was scheduled to leave before 10 p.m. The J.A.W Iglehart is  expected in port early this morning to load. The Alpena and Paul H. Townsend are due in late tonight. The Jacklyn M and barge Integrity is in St. Joseph.

 

Reported by Chandra Bruski


 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 22

The ALGOPORT left Collingwood August 22, 1979 on her maiden voyage for Calcite, MI to load limestone bound for Spragge, Ont.

ONTADOC was launched August 22, 1903 as a) R.L. IRELAND.

The ENDERS M. VOORHEES was towed out of Duluth on August 22, 1987 by the tugs AVENGER IV and CHIPPEWA, and was the first of the 'Supers' towed off the Lakes for scrap.

The a) ROGER M. KYES (b ADAM E. CORNELIUS) sailed on her maiden voyage on August 22,1973 from Toledo to load iron ore at Escanaba, MI. She was built under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. This program allowed U.S. shipping companies to construct new vessels or to modernize their existing fleet by government guaranteed financing and tax deferred benefits. The KYES was the second of ten ships launched for American Steamship but the first to enter service under this arrangement. The total cost of the ten ships was more than $250 million.

On 22 August 1863, WILLIAM S. BULL (wooden propeller steam tug, 16T, built in 1861 at Buffalo) waterlogged and went down in a storm 40 miles east of Erie, PA. She was in company of the tug G.W. GARDNER and the canal boat M.E. PAINE, who saved her crew.

On 22 August 1876, the Canadian schooner LAUREL sank off Big Sandy Creek on Lake Ontario. The crew made it to shore in the yawl. The LAUREL was bound from Kingston to Charlotte with iron ore.

On 22 August 1900, one hundred years ago, SPECULAR (wooden propeller freighter, 264', 1742 gt, built in 1882 at Cleveland) was carrying iron ore when she was a "hit & run" victim by the steamer DENVER at 2:00 AM and sank in 6 minutes in the Pelee Passage on Lake Erie. 15 of her crew abandoned in her yawl and were saved. The remaining 5 scrambled up into the rigging and clung there until they were rescued four hours later by the steamer MARITANA and brought to Detroit. Salvagers worked on the wreck continuously until they gave up on 28 September. Wreck lies 3.16 miles SE from Pelee Passage light. She was owned by Republic Iron Co. of Cleveland.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

 


Comeaudoc Scrap Tow Update

08/21
 

As of 11 p.m. Tuesday night, the Comeaudoc scrap tow was at Cote St. Catherine, departing shortly before mid night. The tow is was scheduled to arrive at Iroquois about 2:41 p.m. She is bound for the International Marine Salvage scrapyard at Port Colborne.


Reported by: Peter Jobe and Kent Malo



Toledo Report

08/21
 

   The Canadian Progress was loading coal at the CSX Docks Tuesday. The salt water vessels Arion and Lake Superior were at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge, and the Joseph H. Frantz are in layup at  the Hocking Valley Dock.

 

   The Saturn has departed from layup at the Lakefront docks and is now out sailing. The Gemini is now in layup at the Lakefront Docks in the same position where the Saturn was at earlier (behind the passenger vessel Ste. Claire). There is nothing in at the shipyard at the present time.

 

   The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel today after she finishes unloading a stone cargo at the Midwest Terminal Dock. The H. Lee White and Arthur M. Anderson are due on Thursday, followed by a return visit of the Arthur M. Anderson and Algomarine on Friday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Buckeye today, followed by a return visit of the Buckeye, then the Courtney Burton next Tuesday.

 

   The USCG Cutter Acacia was docked at International park in Toledo, just in front of the museum ship Willis B. Boyer, on Tuesday. The crew is participating in fire fighting drills with the Toledo Fire Department at the TFD training site near Toledo Express Airport.

 

   The Geo. Gradel Co. clamshell dredge was doing channel maintenance near the stern of the Boyer, assisted by the tug Mighty Jake.

Reported by Jim Hoffman and Dave Wobser


 


Sturgeon Bay hosts unusual callers

08/21
 

   The past week has seen some unusual visitors in Sturgeon Bay. The Southdown Conquest arrived with its tug, Susan B. Hannah on Saturday. The new Great Lakes Maritime Academy training vessel State of Michigan research vessel has been docked for about a week. The steamer Alpena in the floating dry dock. The Milwaukee-based tall ship Dennis Sullivan is also in Sturgeon Bay on tour, docked in front of the Selvick tugs. 

 

Reported by Lee Grota


 


Canadian Miner at Port Weller Dry Docks

08/21

   At 6 a.m. Tuesday the Canadian Miner departed Hamilton for a visit to Port Weller Drydocks for her five- year inspection. With the tugs Miseford at the bow and Vac at the stern, she made her way into Port Weller harbor eight hours later. There the tow was joined by the tug Seahound to help assist at the Wharf 2 tie-up wall. After securing the ship, seaway officials boarded her before giving the go-ahead to proceed to Lock 1. The Miner made the trip with captain, mates and engineers all on board, and running on emergency generator. Ahead of the Canadian Miner, the Samuel Risley returned  to the canal, blowing a salute as she passed the drydocks, with fleetmates Griffon and George R. Pearkes still in the deepdock.Also in the canal was  the dredge Atchafalaya below Lock 7.

 

Reported by Alex Howard and Jimmy Sprunt


 


Green Bay Update 

08/21

   The David Z. Norton is scheduled for Western Lime Co. today at noon, departing at 8 p.m. The Paul H. Townsend is due to arrive at LaFarge at 2 a.m. today, departing at 7 p.m.

 

Reported by: Jason Leino


 


Full Moon in Marquette

08/21

   Oglebay Norton's Armco visited Marquette for a second straight trip on Tuesday.  She arrived in the late afternoon under crystal clear blue skies and loaded into the night under a full moon.
 

Reported by Rod Burdick

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 21

The BUFFALO's sea trials were conducted from August 21 through August 24, 1978.

The GEORGE A. STINSON was christened at Detroit, MI on August 21, 1978.

The f) CEDARGLEN arrived under tow at Port Maitland, Ont. on August 21, 1994 where she was scrapped.

THE HARVESTER cleared Lorain August 21, 1911 on her maiden voyage loaded with coal for Duluth, MN.

IMPERIAL QUEBEC was launched August 21, 1957

The KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1) encountered steering problems downbound at the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River on August 21, 1973. She avoided hitting the stone embankments but ran aground after clearing the cut. The damage sustained in this grounding ended her career.

The VENUS was sold to Acme Metals Inc. and was towed to Ashtabula, OH on August 21, 1975 where she was broken up in 1976.

On August 21, 1971 the CHARLES DICK severed two underwater cables in the Maumee River, cutting off power to east Toledo and the Cherry Street Bridge. Massive traffic jams developed on Toledo's streets.

The graceful schooner HUNTER SAVIDGE was launched on August 21, 1879 by the Grand Haven Ship Building Company.

On 21 August 1856, CHARTER (wooden, propeller vessel, 132'/197T, built in 1849 at Huron, OH as a sidewheeler) was bound from Cleveland for Buffalo with flour, oats and rye. She swamped and sank in a storm 6 miles above Fairport, OH. By the end of August, she had been damaged beyond repair but her machinery was recovered as she lay in relatively shallow water.

On 21 August 1861, BANSHEE (wooden propeller freighter, 119', 166 t, built in 1852 at Portsmouth, Ontario, named HERO in 1860-61) was carrying wheat, flour and butter to Montreal when her engine failed (broken shaft) and she was helpless in a storm on Lake Ontario. She foundered near Timber Island on Lake Ontario. One passenger died, but the crew of 10 made it to Timber Island. She was owned by Howard & Rowe of Quebec.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series



 


Mississagi Returns to Service

08/20
Less than three weeks after entering lay-up the Mississagi has returned to service. Monday afternoon the shutters had been removed, power was up and crews were preparing the Mississagi to depart her lay up berth in Sarnia's North Slip. By early afternoon the vessel had back from the slip and was seen heading upbound onto Lake Huron.

Activity was also seen on the Canadian Transfer which has also been in the North Slip, indicating that she may soon be out sailing again.

Reported by: Barry Hiscocks




Comeaudoc Tow Departs

08/20
The scrap tow of the Comeaudoc was delayed until late Monday as crews worked out details for pilots to work the tugs. After a full 6 years of lay-up in the Old-Port of Montreal, the Comeaudoc departed shortly after 10:30 p.m. Monday. The tug Bonnie B III will lead the tow from Montreal with the tugs Progress and Lac Vancouver on the stern.

The Comeaudoc is headed to International Marine Salvage in Port Colborne for scrapping. The tow is expected to take five days according to the towing crew.

Reported by: Kent Malo and Laurent Côté




Tug Acushnet Grounds

08/20
Early Monday morning found the tug Acushnet aground on Crab Island Shoal at the lower end of DeTour Passage in the St. Marys River. Soo Traffic was informing upbound traffic that "a 64-foot pleasure craft was aground" and later radio traffic identified the vessel. She may have been assisted by a local salvage tug and at about 7:15 passed Gaffney Point upbound with flags flying and apparently undamaged.

Reported by: Marc & Jill Vander Meulen




Temperature defeats Lake Superior swimmer

08/20
August is the best (and possibly only) month for swimming in Lake Superior, but the big lake's waters were still cold enough to defeat Jim Dreyer in his quest to swim across the lake.

The endurance swimmer quit about three hours into his attempt to swim the 62 miles from Grand Portage, Minn., to Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula. Cold water was "paralyzing his body," and he was pulled into a support boat, according to his web site. Last year, Dreyer was blown off course and was fighting waves too big to continue when he called off the swim 45 miles short of his goal. Dreyer has swam across the other four Great Lakes. He uses his swimming to raise awareness and money for the Big Brothers Big Sisters programs.

Reported by: Al Miller




Sub Move in Buffalo

08/20
The Buffalo Industrial Diving Co. coordinated the move of the USS Croaker from the Gateway Terminal on the Lackawanna Ship Canal back to the Erie Basin in Buffalo at 9 a.m. on the morning of the 8th. The tugs Washington, New Jersey and Jacklyn brought her out into the South Entrance, turned her around and took her through the Outer Harbor under Coast Guard Cutter and Fire Boat escort. They passed another WWII vet, the Marine Star at the Cargil Pier at about 10 a.m.

The tow arrived at the North Entrance as the Calumet was departing the Black Rock Canal around 10:30 a.m. The tugs docked the Croaker just downstream from the new Naval Park Basin for temporary mooring at the Visiting Ship's Dock.

Croaker Tow.
Close up.
The Sullivans floating free about 100 feet back from her old berth, the Little Rock and the Neah Bay.

Reported by:




Marquette Traffic - Soo Pictures

08/20
The Middletown loaded taconite at Marquette Monday. The Great Lakes Trader arrived Monday about 10:30 p.m. The Armco is expected on Tuesday, and the Kaye E. Barker on Wednesday.

Monday was a busy day at the Soo with many ships going through, including the Quebecois, the John G. Munson, Reserve, Oglebay Norton, Algonova (stopping in the Soo Harbor), Indiana Harbor, and Paul Tregurtha.

Quebecois downbound.
Close up.
Paul R. Tregurtha upbound at Mission Point.
Stern view.
Oglebay Norton downbound.
Algonove passing the Oglebay Norton.
Algonova close up.
Indiana Harbor upbound.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Toledo News

08/20
The American Mariner was loading coal at the CSX Docks. There was a salt water vessel at the T.W.I. Docks unloading cargo.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will now be the Canadian Progress on Tuesday. The Algosteel on Wednesday after unloading a stone cargo at the Midwest Terminal Dock, followed by the Arthur M. Anderson and H. Lee White on Thursday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Buckeye on Wednesday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Erie Report

08/20
The Lee A. Tregurtha made her second visit of 2002 to Erie on Monday, arriving at 8:00 pm with stone for the Mounfort Terminal. The vessel gave a half hour security call at 7:15 and was inbound about forty five minutes later. The Tregurtha pulled in and docked at the Mounfort Terminal bow first.

This is the Tregurtha's second visit of 2002, the first coming on March 31, when she opened Erie's season with stone from Stoneport. For Interlake Steamship, the Pathfinder has also made a visit with stone from Stoneport.

Tregurtha inbound.
Stern View.
Toward the Dock.
Docking.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Hamilton Update, Norris Returns to Service

08/20
The Federal Schelde is moored at Pier 11. The James Norris has left its lay-up berth at Pier 11 and returned to service. The Tecam Sea was moored at Pier 12 with no activity seen. On the north face of Pier 12, the Agawa Canyon was unloading a bulk cargo.

Over at Dofasco, the Canadian Leader was unloading iron ore. Seen from the Burlington Piers, a tanker was moored at the Bronte Piers.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Appropriations Act adds money for port security

08/20
President Bush last week signed a supplemental appropriations act that provides money to the Coast Guard to increase port security.

The Coast Guard received $6 million for port vulnerability assessments and $38.1 million to acquire, repair, renovate, or improve vessels, small boats, and related equipment. The bill also includes $22,929,000 to upgrade the port surveillance and vessel tracking capability in the high-value ports of New York, Houston-Galveston, and Port Arthur.

Also receiving funds is the Transportation Security Administration, which received $105 million for additional port security grants; $20 million for developing and conducting port incident training and exercises; $4 million for grants and contracts for radiation system test and evaluation; and $10 million for grants and contracts for security research, development, and pilot projects.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - August 20

The INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORT arrived at Toronto, Ont. August 20, 1969 on her maiden voyage with fuel oil.

The R. BRUCE ANGUS in tandem tow with the ULS steamer GORDON C. LEITCH behind the tug IRVING CEDAR arrived at Setúbal, Portugal August 20, 1985 where they were broken up.

August 20, 1920 the WILLIS L. KING, upbound light in Whitefish Bay, was in collision with and sank the downbound Steel Trust steamer SUPERIOR CITY. The SUPERIOR CITY was struck nearly amidships and when the cold water reached her engine room, her boilers exploded. She sank immediately with 29 of her 33 crew members aboard.

The US.266029 (a.WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) departed her lay-up berth at the Rouge slip on August 20, 1986 in tow of Gaelic tugs and she was taken to Detroit Marine Terminals on the Rouge River, where her pilothouse was removed to be displayed at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Detroit's Belle Isle.

The TEXACO WARRIOR (1) punctured her tank in a grounding accident in the Welland Canal near Bridge 10 on August 20, 1964.

On 20 August 1899, HUNTER SAVIDGE (2-mast, wooden schooner, 117'/152GT, built in 1879 at Grand Haven, MI) capsized in a squall or tornado in Lake Huron. 5 survivors, including Capt. Fred Sharpstein, were rescued from the overturned schooner by the steamer ALEX McVITTIE. However, 5 lost their lives, including the captain's wife and their son, the ship's owner's wife and daughter, and the Mate. Capt. Sharpstein patrolled the beaches looking for the bodies of his wife and son for months but they were never found. The wreck was found in 1987 near Grindstone City, MI.

On 20 August 1852, ATLANTIC (wooden sidewheeler, 267', 1155 t, built in 1849 at Detroit) was loaded with immigrants when she collided with the propeller freighter OGDENSBURG and quickly sank south of Long Point on Lake Erie at about 2:30 AM. Of the 600 on board, estimates of death range from 150 to 250. Numerous salvage attempts have been made through the years up through 1989 since there were supposed to be valuables on board when she went down.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Randy Johnson, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algoriver Towed from Montreal

08/19
The Algoriver was towed from sec 56 in Montreal Harbor at 1 p.m. Sunday. The Panamanian tug Suhaili is on the bow and the Ocean Hercules on the stern. The Algoriver was launched as the John A. France for Misener Transportation in 1960 and after 42 years finally departed undertow to a final destination of Turkey for scrapping.

On hand to see the vessel off was a small group of boatwatchers including a wheelsman who spent 21 years on the John A France and Algoriver.

Algoriver Tow pictures
The name Algoriver was added very crudely just before she left the Port of Montreal on Sunday Aug. 18.
The ocean going tug Suhaili loaded down with 650 tons of fuel for the trip to Turkey , takes the lead.
The Ocean Hercule takes the stern for the trip to Les Escoumins where she weill part with the tow and return to Sorel Quebec where she is based.
The shipkeeper aboard the Algonorth spent 21 years aboard the Algoriver and John A France as wheelsman, Josip saying good bye to an old friend.
The final departure for what use to be a classic vessel on the great lakes proud and undaunted, Godspeed old girl.

Below are pictures from the scrap tow of the Canadian Voyager.
Tug Ocean Hercule.
Captain Maurice Harvey of the Tug Ocean Hercules.
Tom the seaman preparing to shove off in the rain .
Tow underway at 1800 hrs Thursday the 15th of Aug.
Canadian Voyager preparing to go under the Quebec City Bridges for the final time .
Pilot change at Quebec City, Pilot Paul Bherer comes aboard with the white shirt and Bernard in the blue jacket prepares to leave.
CCGS Marth Black under the famous Chateau Frontenac.
Farewell old Friend.
Seaman Tom at the controls note the 2 black levers at the full speed down position. No steering wheel here, the wheel is a small round knob under the radar screen on the left hand side, and the use of the twin VP prop controls also help in steering the tug.
Meeting the Algoville down bound just east of Montreal at Contrecoeur Sat AM Aug 17th.
On arrival at Montreal Aug 17th, the tug Suhaili has connected to the anchorless chains in preparation for the tow of another great vessel.
I would like to thank the good people at Groupe Ocean: Kevin Nichol, Claude Moisan the 2 Captains on board "Ocean Hercule" Capt.Maurice Harvey and Capt Noel Lavoie and the crew for a most enjoyable 2 days.

Reported by: Kent Malo




Comeaudoc Tow

08/19
The Comeaudoc is scheduled to leave Montreal today and should arrive at Port Weller by Wednesday. Once in Port Colborne the engine will be removed for possible use in the Saginaw and the hull then scrapped at IMS.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




FIR Launched

08/19
Sunday morning the USCG FIR was side launched into the Menominee River at Marinette Marine Co. The launch was originally scheduled for Saturday morning, but winds gusting over 50 mph caused the launch to be delayed until Sunday morning.

The Tugs Erika Kobasic, Escort, and Krystal assisted docking the FIR after its launch. The Basic Marine tugs departed for Escanaba about 12:30 Sunday afternoon.

USCG FIR ready to be launched at Marinette Marine.
USCG FIR splashes into the Menominee River.
FIR just after launching.
Basic Marine tugs moving the FIR to the dock after launch.
Escort and Krystal dock the FIR in front of the tug Ocean Reliance.
Ready for the launch.
Launch from the dock.
Hitting the water.
leveling off.

Reported by: Scott Best & Lee Rowe




Frontenac Aids in Rescue

08/19
Sunday night a 33-foot power boat was speeding across northern Lake St. Clair when it ran aground south of Seaway Island. This area is just off the shipping channel and is lined by a stone dike at the waterline. The small boat hit the line of stone at high speed and all four occupants of the boat were thrown into the water. The 33-foot boat split in half, sinking just off the shipping channel.

The Frontenac was passing the area and spotted the four people on the rocks waving for help. The Frontenac called the Coast Guard.

A work boat from the dredging project a short distance away responded to the scene and pick up the boaters who had made it through the incident with no injuries.

Early Monday morning the Coast Guard was investigating the incident and trying to determine where the other half of the 33-foot Baja went. There was a concern that it may have sunk in the channel and could pose a hazard to navigation.

Reported by: Glen Kingsford




Goderich Report

08/19
The Capt. Henry Jackman visited the Goderich salt mine twice last week. Wednesday she was seen loading in the morning and departed that afternoon, bound for Buffalo, NY. She was back on Saturday, loading salt for Fisher Harbor, Ontario.

The Canadian Navigator docked at the salt mine around 7am on Thursday, loaded all day, and left at 6:30pm heading south down Lake Huron. The Oakglen was spotted Saturday morning, unloading grain at the terminals, and was still there in the evening.

Reported by: Lisa Stuparyk




Detroit Traffic

08/19

Philip R Clarke downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Clarke passing the Reserve below Grassy Island.
Reserve upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
John G Munson upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Fraser (Panama) anchored at Ojibway.
Stern view.

Barge North Cliffehall in Windsor.
Close up.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Maumee Bay Cruise

08/19
Below are images of a cruise on Maumee Bay aboard the Sandpiper.

Atlantic Erie loading.
Another view.
Mighty Jessie and barge.
Susan & William Hoey pass.
Turtle Island Lighthouse.
Close up.
New building.
New and the old.

Reported by: Gregory Hornyak




Munson & Martin in Sandusky, Wolverine at Marblehead

08/19
Saturday was a busy day at the Sandusky Coal Dock. The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was loading while the Maumee waited at anchor about three miles east of the Cedar Point pier head light. About 4:30 p.m. the Martin headed out and the Maumee moved into Sandusky Bay to load. The John G. Munson was moored at the coal dock behind the Martin. On Sunday the Wolverine was at the Lafarge gravel dock in Marblehead loading limestone.

Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin loading.
Wolverine loading.

Reported by: Bob Smalling




Fairport update

08/19
Saginaw was loading salt Sunday afternoon, completed and departed at 9:00 p.m. The vessel is heading for Toronto and plans to return in about four days or less. The Atchafalaya was dredging upriver Sunday night.

Saginaw loading.
Another view.

Reported by: Dave Merchant




Scrap Tow Tribute

08/19
Below are images of ships recently sent to scrap.

Black Bay in drydock at Fraser Shipyards in Superior, October 1, 1989.
Black Bay's stern floodlit in the drydock, October 1, 1989.
Canadian Voyager upbound in the Welland Canal below Lock 2, August 26, 1999.
Stern shot of Canadian Voyager below Lock 2, August 26, 1999.
Ice-covered John A France in the Misener blue scheme unloading at St. Lawrence Cement in Duluth, December 19, 1991.
John A France in the Misener/Great Lakes Bulk Carriers black scheme loading grain at Cargill B1 in Duluth, April 6, 1993.
Algoriver laid up in Montreal, June 28, 2001.
Manitoulin with black hull entering Duluth, July 5, 1991.
Manitoulin freshly painted with red hull, March 1, 1997.
Manitoulin laid up in Sorel, June 28, 2001.
Comeaudoc loading grain in Thunder Bay, May 15, 1992.


Reported by: Richard Jenkins




August Moving Sale

08/19
Don’t forget the Boatnerd and Great Laker items are on special directly on Force 5 -trading.com web site. If you have not seen the Great Laker logo up close it features a ship and lighthouse design embroidered on the items. Force 5 sets up specials directly on the site for your convenience. they have $4.00 Boatnerd.com caps available but they are going fast.
Click here to view




Weekly Updates

08/19
The weekly updates have been uploaded. Click here to view




Today in Great Lakes History - August 19

The JOHN E.F. MISENER (2) grounded near Hard Island on the St. Lawrence River August 19, 1966 suffering bow damage.

The ROBERT S. PIERSON was sold to P & H. Shipping Ltd. on August 19, 1982 and renamed e) SPRUCEGLEN.

The ARIZONA was launched on August 19, 1868.

On August 19, 1915, the HENRY PEDWELL burned at Wiarton.

CARDINAL (3) was towed to the Strathearne Terminal in Hamilton, Ont. on August 19, 1974 for scrapping.

On 19 August 1909, CITY OF GREENBAY (wooden propeller passenger/package freight, 134'/257GT, built in 1880 at Fort Howard, WI as the sidewheeler M. C. HAWLEY) caught fire while crossing Saginaw Bay, burned to the waterline and sank.. This wasn't her first experience with this type of accident since on 17 November 1887, she had burned to a "total loss" in Lake Michigan.

August 19, 1930 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 7 towed the disabled tug GREILING from Frankfort to the Manitowoc shipyards.

The propeller QUEBEC was launched at the Chisholm & Simpson yard at Chatham, Ontario on 19 August 1874. She was built for the Beatty Line and designed to run between Sarnia and Duluth.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Farewell Canadian Voyager, Algoriver May Go Today

08/18
At 7:00 p.m. Friday the tug Ocean Hercule let her line on the stern of Canadian Voyager at cap Aux Oies (Goose Cape) a few miles east of Baie St. Paul, at the same time the up bound Canadian Leader was making her way west with a load of iron ore for Hamilton.

The Ocean Hercule was expected to stay with the tow as far as Les Escoumins, it was decided that the tug Akhtiar could continue the tow to Les Escoumins to drop off the two pilots on board the tug. As the Ocean Hercule dropped off to the right, Akhtiar along with the Canadian Voyager sailed for the Atlantic on the finial trip of the Canadian Voyager's career. The Ocean Hercule returned to Montreal arriving about 1 p.m. Saturday.

The tug Suhaili has connected to the anchor less chains of the Algoriver in preparation for the coming tow. By Sunday morning the crew of the tug should have the tow ready to begin.

Reported by: Kent Malo




Wind Delays Launch, Donner away from Dock

08/18
High winds Saturday morning are to blame for a delay in the launching of the USCG FIR at Marinette Marine. About 8:30 Saturday morning it was decided the strong winds would make it dangerous to launch and try to dock the USCG FIR. The FIR will now be launched on Sunday morning at 10 a.m.

The same strong winds Saturday morning broke two mooring lines on the William H Donner which is docked at Marinette Fuel and Dock. The Donner's stern drifted about 35 feet from the dock while the bow was about 10 feet from the dock. By early afternoon crews from K&K Warehouse were able to use a front end loader to return the Donner to the dock. Crews then carefully tied up the Donner and added a few extra lines.

In other port news, Tuesday morning the saltie Marinette arrived in Menominee to unload a cargo of lumber and wood pulp at the K&K Warehouse West dock. The Marinette spent the day unloading and departed Tuesday evening about 10 p.m. heading for Marathon to load pulp products. Tuesday afternoon the Catherine Desgagnes arrived to unload a cargo of pig iron at Marinette Fuel and Dock. The USCG Hickory spent Tuesday undergoing trials on Green Bay.

The Wagenborg salty Voorneborg may be the next vessel due into Menominee sometime in the next week or two.

Donner away from Dock and gangway in the river.
Stern view.
Close up.
Crews use an end loader and fork lift to bring the Donner back where it belongs.

Sunset on the Menominee River Victoriaborg at right unloading at K&K dock.
Bow view of Ira departing with tug Jacklyn Nicole.
Jacklyn Nicole working on Ira's bow (Jacklyn Nicole is the former tug Ethel E.).
Victoriaborg turning of K&K dock to turn around in the river before departing.
Victoriaborg outbound in the Menominee River.
Marinette and Tug at the lighthouse inbound Tuesday morning.
USCG Hickory passing the Marinette in the Menominee River heading to the Bay for Trials.
Catherine Desgagnes at the outer buoys Tuesday afternoon.
Research Vessel Perca enters the Menominee River heading to the old Ansul dock in Marinette.

Reported by: Scott Best




Tall Ship H.M.S. Detroit Launch

08/18
The first phase of the H.M.S. Detroit's construction is complete. The replica tall ship that served as Canada's flag ship was launched Saturday at the Hike Metal Ship Yard in Wheatley, Ont.

H.M.S. Detroit, named in honor of the capture of Fort Detroit in the War of 1812 played a significant role in the development of Canada and the United States.

As the largest Tall Ship on the Great Lakes she will serve as an "Ambassador of Friendship," an educational forum and tourist attraction.

In Celebration of this event, the tall ship Niagara will moor in Amherstburg, home port of H.M.S. Detroit, August 24 & 25 open for public dockside tours 10a.m. - 5p.m.

Wide view after the launch.
Close up.
Close up from the dock.
Another view.
Tug Linda Jane under going survey.

Reported by: T. Parker




Marquette Update

08/18
Severe weather may delay the H. Lee White which is due in Marquette on Sunday morning. The Middletown and Great Lakes Trader are due in on Monday, with the Armco expected on Wednesday.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Rare Visit for Wolverine

08/18
Thursday the Wolverine paid a rare visit to the Drummond Island stone dock. The Wolverine loaded a cargo of stone for Erie PA. The Wolverine arrived at 6 p.m. and was due to depart about 1 a.m. Friday morning. Last week the Wolverine loaded stone at Cedarville for Erie.

Wide view across the St. Marys River.
Side view at the loading dock.
Stern view loading.
Bow view loading at Drummond Island.

Reported by: Scott Best




Stone Port News

08/18
The Kaye E. Barker loaded at Stoneport on Friday. It tied up to the dock early Friday morning after the Wilfred Sykes departed and left before 7 p.m. The Great Lakes Trader was waiting at anchor and came in after the Barker left.

Due Saturday was the Dorothy Ann/ Pathfinder and the Sykes making a return trip.

Kaye E. loading.
Great Lakes Trader waiting at anchor.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Saginaw News

08/18
The Wilfred Sykes entered the Saginaw River Friday afternoon, stopping at the Essexville Sand & Stone Dock to lighter before proceeding upriver to the Wirt Dock in Saginaw. The Sykes was passing Wheeler's Landing around 6 p.m. on her way up to Saginaw. She is expected to be downbound during the early morning hours on Saturday.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Wilfred Sykes upbound at Wheeler's Landing.
Close up.
Stern view at Liberty Bridge.
Elias Brothers Big Boy and Comfort Inn flags flying from the pilot house.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Toledo News

08/18
An unusual site on Saturday was the Atlantic Erie loading taconite at the CSX Dock. This dock is used almost exclusively for loading coal, it is rare to see the dock load an ore cargo.

The John G. Munson departed the Shipyard very early Saturday morning and is now out sailing. The John J. Boland was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore the Middletown was due in at the Torco Ore Dock late Saturday afternoon and will follow the Boland unloading ore. The Catherine Desgagnes was at the ADM/Countrymark Elevator loading grain.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will now be the American Mariner on Monday, followed by the Canadian Progress and John J. Boland on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Buckeye on Wednesday. The Joseph H. Frantz and Saturn remain in layup at their respective dock sites.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toledo Traffic

08/18
Below are images of traffic in Toledo.
Toledo Saturday
Sandpiper upbound on the Maumee River.
William Hoey upbound on the Maumee.
Another view.
Finish loading hatch #3, loader pulling away.
Completing the load in hatch #5.
Mate checking the draft marks while the last hold is loaded.
Closing hatch number 2.
Closing.
Another view.
Closed.
Catherine Desgagnes after departing the ADM Dock and just above the I 280 Bridge.
Caisson for the high level bridge which will take I 280 over the Maumee River.
Another view.
Joseph H Frantz laid up at the Hocking Valley Dock.
workboat Marilyn H at the Toledo Shipyard.
barge Hannah 5101 and James A Hannah at the old Interlake Steel Dock. It appeared the barge was having her tanks cleaned.
Close up.
Atlantic Erie loading ore at C&O #4.
Middletown unloading at the Torco Dock.
Mighty Jessie tied up at Brenner Marine.
tug Illinois at Hans Hansens.
tug Louisiana at Hans Hansens.
workboat Weldcraft IV at Hans Hansens.

Detroit Saturday
Reserve downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Stephen B Roman upbound at Grassy Island bound for the JMT Dock in the old Rouge River.
Stern view.

Toledo Traffic Friday
Catharine Desgagnes assisted by William and Susan Hoey approaching the N&S South Bridge in Toledo in route to the ADM Daymark Elevator. .
Ready to load.
A picture of the top of the engine of the William Hoey.
William Hoey.
tug Susan Hoey downbound the Maumee River.
Another view.
Cuyahoga loading at the Anderson's "K' Dock.
tug Mighty Jake with barge Crow dredging across from downtown Toledo.
Another view.
workboat Mona Lisa II at the I-280 bridge worksite.
Another view.
Mighty Jimmy & barge downbound the Maumee River.
Mighty Jessie & barge.
Close up.
Ocean Bird (Denmark) at Toledo World Terminal.
Stern view.
William Hoey assisting Algosteel into C & O Number 4.
barge Moby Dick and tug Pioneerland upbound the Maumee River.
Stern view.
Pioneerland.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Fairport, Ohio News

08/18
Friday afternoon the Saginaw finished loading salt and departed about 3:30 p.m. The tugs Prairieland and Mighty John III were hauling loads from the marina dredging, while Atchafalaya was dredging the main channel above the turning basin.

Saginaw departing.
Passing the lighthouse.
Dredge Atchafalaya.
Tug Mighty John.

Reported by: Dave Merchant




Erie Update

08/18
The Wolverine made her second visit of 2002 to Erie on Saturday, arriving at 3:00 pm to unload stone at the Mounfort Terminal. The vessel had loaded the cargo late Wednesday night at Drummond Island. After departing the Wolverine is then scheduled to head to Marblehead to load for Cleveland.

Oglebay Norton has had six vessel visits in 2002. The David Z. Norton leads with three, followed by the Wolverine with two and the Earl W. Oglebay with one. This is different from 2001, when Erie Sand's own Richard Reiss carried the vast majority of stone to Erie, however, this year the leading visitor to Erie is the Adam E. Cornelius with only five visits.

Wolverine inbound.
Stern View.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Toronto Report

08/18
The cruise ship Le Levant was in port Saturday. The saltie Aegean Sea departed late Friday night. The Dorothea is unloading at Redpath Sugar. The Maple City is back on the dock under the Atlas crane, removed from the water for some type of repairs.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Farewell Canadian Voyager - Algoriver

08/18
The Canadian Voyager was built by Collingwood Shipyards and launched as the Black Bay on September 20, 1962.

Black Bay Downbound Toledo, she just finished loading grain and is heading for a St. Lawrence River Port to unload.
Inbound Maumee Bay.
Upbound from the Cherry Street Bridge bound for one of the elevators to load grain.
Upbound from the High Level Bridge.
At Andersons "K" Elevator loading grain. She is on her maiden voyage under her new name.
Canadian Voyager (ex Black Bay) upbound from the Martin Luther King Bridge. She departed Port Weller Dry docks the day before and is on her maiden voyage. Toledo was her first port of call under her new name. She is bound for Andersons "K" Elevator to load grain.
Inbound Maumee Bay bound for one of the elevators to load grain.
Upbound from the High Level Bridge.
Click here for a detailed look at the vessel's history.

As crews prepare the Algoriver for tow over seas we take a look at her career. The straight-decker was built by Canadian Vickers Ltd., Montreal, PQ and was christened Aug. 26, 1960 as the John A. France for Misener Shipping. Algoma Central acquired the John A. France in 1994 renaming her Algoriver. The Algoriver's activities continued to be focused in the grain products and iron ore trades. As such, her sailings were subject to long periods of lay-ups due to the seasonal fluctuations of the grain industry.

John A. France upbound at the Soo with a blue hull.
John A. France upbound from the Hi level Bridge at Toledo bound for one of the elevators to load grain.
John A. France departing ADM/Countrymark Elevator after loading grain and will be headed downbound the Maumee river for Lake Erie.
John A. France outbound Maumee Bay at Toledo. She just finished loading a grain cargo upriver and is now bound for a St. Lawrence River Port.
Algoriver (ex John A. France) upbound the Maumee River headed for one of the Elevators to load grain.
A close up view of the Algoriver as she works her way upriver bound for one of the elevators to load grain.
Loading grain at the Cargill Elevator (now known as Andersons "E" Elevator).
Outbound Maumee Bay after loading grain bound for a St Lawrence River Port.
Click here for a detailed look at the vessel's history.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - August 18

CANADIAN ENTERPRISE was float launched on August 18, 1979.

On August 18, 1972, $50,000 in bottom damage occurred when the CHAMPLAIN (3) hit an obstruction in the Trenton Channel, on the lower Detroit River.

The KINSMAN ENTERPRISE (1) was launched August 18, 1906 as a) NORMAN B. REAM for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

On 18 August 1907, KATE WHITE (wooden propeller steam tug, 62'/28GT, built at Erie, PA in 1885 as a yacht) sank near the harbor entrance at Fairport, OH.

On 18 August 1878, JAVA (iron twin propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 232', 1525 gt, built in 1873 at Buffalo) was sailing from Bay City for Chicago and Milwaukee with mixed merchandise, including 300 tons of fine household goods, parlor stoves, salt, etc. She was a twin-screw and the main theory of her loss in good weather was that her starboard shaft coupling came loose and the shaft slid out the stern, allowing water to flood through the sleeve. nevertheless, she sank quickly, 15 miles off Big Sable Pointe on Lake Michigan in over 300 feet of water. The crew escaped in lifeboats and were picked up by passing steamers.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Voyager and Algoriver Tow

08/17
Friday the Canadian Voyager scrap tow continued down the Seaway heading for the Atlantic Ocean. The tow was expected to reach Les Escoumins at 2 a.m. Saturday morning. Once at Les Escoumins, the trailing tug Ocean Hercule will be release and the tug Akhtiar will continue on solo to Turkey.

The Panamanian tug Suhaili arrived in Montreal on Thursday and will prepare to tow the Algoriver. The tug is docked at Section 56. The current schedule calls for the tow to depart on August 22 but it could begin as soon as Sunday, August 18.

Reported by: Kent Malo and Laurent Côté




Comeaudoc Tow

08/17
The Comeaudoc is scheduled to leave Montreal at daybreak Monday, August 19 and should arrive at Port Weller on Wednesday. Once in Port Colborne the engine will be removed for possible use in the Saginaw and the hull then scrapped.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Maumee returns to Tonawanda

08/17
The Maumee arrived in Tonawanda, NY to unload coal at the power station. She arrive Friday at 12:30 p.m. and departed at 5 p.m. On her last three trips she has met the Karen Andrie at the Black Rock locks or in the Niagara River. Friday was now exception as they met just off the power station. With high winds blowing they passed without incident. The Karen Andrie had just departed the Marathon docks behind the old Wickwire Spencer Steel Co. in Tonawanda.

Reported by: Tom Miller




Cutter Launch Today

08/17
Marinette Marine will launch the USCG FIR today at 10 a.m. The launch is open to the public. The tugs Erika, Krystal and Escort arrived Friday night and docked at K&K West. The tugs will assist in the launch and docking of the FIR.

The 225-foot Seagoing Buoy Tender will be delivered in the fall of this year to the 13th Coast Guard District based in Oregon. It will replace the USCGC Cowslip (WLB 277).

Reported by: Scott Best




Lakes Iron Ore Trade Registers 10 Percent Increase In July

08/17
Shipments of iron ore from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports destine for the region's steelmakers totaled 6.3 million gross tons in July, an increase of 10 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. A major factor in the upturn was a 75 percent increase in loadings at the Burlington Northern Santa Fe dock in Superior, Wisconsin. The dock's total of 1.6 million gross tons represents the third-best month in its history. The significant decrease in shipments from Escanaba reflects that a major customer took more pellets from a Lake Superior source in July.

For the season, the Lakes iron ore trade stands at 23.5 million gross tons, a decrease of 5.7 percent. For the year, shipments total 24.9 million gross tons, a decrease of 4.8 percent.

Vessel shipments of iron ore to other North American locations totaled only 48,731 tons in July, a decrease of 83 percent. For the year, this segment of the trade stands at 1.6 million gross tons, an increase of 26 percent.

The all-rail movement of iron ore totaled 718,135 gross tons in July, a decrease of 18 percent. For the year, all-rail deliveries stand at 5.9 million gross tons, a decrease of 6.6 percent.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Assocation




Sam Laud in Holland

08/17
The Sam Laud was moving up Lake Macatawa at 9 a.m. Friday morning heading for Verplank's Coal and Dock. By early morning she was docked and discharging her load on the far northeast corner. By late afternoon the she had turned and headed out the channel. At 5 p.m. she was on the horizon 10 miles north of Holland heading down Lake Michigan.

Reported by: Dale Rosema




Toledo Update

08/17
The Cuyahoga was loading grain at one of the Anderson elevator complexes and was expected to depart Friday evening. The John G. Munson was at the Shipyard undergoing repairs. There was a saltwater vessel at the T.W.I. Dock. The Joseph H. Frantz and Saturn remain in layup at their respective docksites. The Algosteel was loading coal at the CSX Docks.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Atlantic Erie and John J. Boland on Saturday. The American Mariner on Monday, followed by the Canadian Progress on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the John J. Boland, and Middletown on Saturday, followed by the Buckeye on Tuesday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




More Updates

08/17
Check back tomorrow for more updates including pictures. (I ran out of time tonight, the pictures can take from 1-2 hours to process for the news). Sorry for the delay.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 17

On August 17, 1987, CADILLAC was towed by the tugs GLENADA and ELMORE M. MISNER, from Toledo's Frog Pond on the first leg of her journey to be scrapped.

At 4:00 PM on 17 August 1869, the schooner CARLINGFORD was launched at the Fitzgerald and Leighton yard in Port Huron, Michigan with plenty of spectators on hand. Robert Montgomery of Buffalo, the owner, built the vessel for the grain trade. her capacity was 30,000 bushels of grain. After launching, she still had to have her masts (96', 98' and 94') and rigging installed. At the time, she was the largest sailing vessel built in Port Huron. her dimensions were 155' keel, 165' overall, 31'6" beam and 12'8" depth. 50 men worked on her and she cost $35,000.

Data from: Joe Barr, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algosoo Heading for Repairs

08/16
Sunday morning the Algosoo suffered damage while docking in Clarkson, Ont. The vessel reportedly suffered a bow thruster failure and dropped its starboard anchor to help maneuver. The vessel than ran over the anchor, holeing the No.1 starboard ballast tank and breaking off the anchor flukes.

The vessel was cleared to continue on for repairs. It made a quick stop in Hamilton to pick up a new anchor and then proceeded up the Seaway for the ship yard in Les Mechins, Quebec. She is expected to arrive there on Saturday.

Reported by: Al Jackman




Voyager Towed for the Breakers

08/16
Thursday evening the Canadian Voyager was towed from her berth in Montreal, beginning her final voyage to the scrap yard. The tug Akhtiar will tow the vessel to Turkey.

Video clip by Bill Bird of the Voyager upbound at Port Huron last summer.

Reported by: Kent Malo




First Trip up for the Vega Desgagnes

08/16
The Vega Desgagnes arrived at the Shell Dock in Sarnia Thursday evening. This is the first time the tanker has sailed this far up into the Great Lakes. It is expected to depart early Thursday morning.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt




Tall Ships Arrive

08/16
The Brig Niagara docked in the Thunder Bay River in Alpena around 2 p.m. on Thursday. The Madeline came in next followed by the H.M.S Bee. The Bee had to make a second try at tying up at the dock, so it turned around and came back down the river and tied up safely in front of the Madeline. All vessels were docked by 4:30 p.m., preparing for the Tall Ship Celebration Friday through Sunday.

H.M.S Bee.
Niagara.
Madeline.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




U.S.-Flag Great Lakes Carriage Posts First Real Gain of the Season in July

08/16/
U.S.-Flag lakers moved 11.6 million net tons of dry-bulk cargo on the Great Lakes in July, the first time this season the float really exceeded the corresponding period last year. (One U.S.-Flag laker moved a few, sporadic cargos of iron ore in February of this year, but that is not typical of the industry.)

Iron ore cargos moved in U.S. bottoms totaled 5.4 million tons in July, an increase of 10 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. The increase reflects in part the gradual start-up of ISG's mills in Cleveland and Indiana Harbor. However, on a season-to-date basis, iron ore loadings still trail last year by nearly 13 percent.

Coal cargos carried by U.S.-Flag lakers totaled 2.5 million tons in July, a decrease of 7.7 percent. It must be noted, however, that July 2001 loadings of western coal set a record for the U.S.-Flag fleet, so the decrease is not as significant as it appears at first glance. For the season, the U.S.-Flag coal float stands at 9.4 million tons, a decrease of 3 percent.

Stone shipments in U.S.-Flag lakers decreased 2.6 percent in July to 3,155,649 tons. Sluggish demand for aggregate has plagued the trade all season and through July, U.S.-Flag loadings have fallen 3.1 percent to 11,853,595 tons.

As July began, the U.S.-Flag Lakes fleet had 57 of its 66 vessels in service. On July 8, the mid-sized self-unloader AMERICAN REPUBLIC (American Steamship Company) began its season . Four lakers remain idle this season: ELTON HOYT 2ND (Interlake Steamship); EDWARD L. RYERSON (Central Marine Logistics); RICHARD REISS (Erie Sand); and JOSEPH H. FRANTZ (Oglebay Norton Marine Services Company).

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Assocation




Twin Ports Report

08/16
Star of the day Thursday in the Twin Ports was the barge Joseph H. Thompson, which spent the rainy day unloading salt at the Cutler Magner dock. The vessel was docked a couple blocks from the interstate, offering nice views to passersby. The vessel was due later to load at the BNSF ore dock, where the 'Little Joe' often called as a steamer.

The influx of saltie traffic continued, with Lady Hamilton at Peavey, Ira at Cargill B1, Federal Rhine at AGP, Goldeneye at Cenex Harvest States and Federal Shimanto anchored on the lake.

In the lake trades, St. Clair arrived late in the afternoon for DMIR ore dock. Burns Harbor was due late in the day for BNSF and Paul R. Tregurtha was due later at Midwest Energy Terminal.

Reported by: Al Miller




Saginaw News

08/16
The tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort and Barge Great Lakes Trader was outbound for the lake Thursday morning about 11:30 a.m. Thursday. The pair had entered the Saginaw River on Wednesday to unload at the Burroughs Dock. They turned at the 6th Street Turning Basin for the out bound trip.

The Algorail was inbound early Thursday morning passing the Front Range around 2 a.m. She was headed upriver to unload at the GM Dock in Saginaw. After unloading, Algorail turned and was downbound passing Cass Ave shortly before 3 p.m.

The CSL Tadoussac was inbound passing the Front Range around 6:30 p.m.. She arrived at the Essroc Terminal in Essexville and was expected to unload overnight, departing during the morning hours on Friday.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Great Lakes Trader downbound at Veteran's Memorial Bridge.
Stern view.
Turning on the power.
Algorail downbound approaching Veteran's Memorial Bridge.
Nosing through.
Stern view.
CSL Tadoussac passing the Front Range.
Close up.
Stern view at Consumers Energy.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Detroit Traffic

08/16
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Thursday.
Federal Rideau (Hong Kong) downbound at Grassy Island.
Close up.
Stern view.
Algobay downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Barge Hannah 3601 & tug Mary E Hannah upbound at Grassy Island.
Close up.
Stern view.
Le Levant downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo News

08/16
The John G. Munson was at the Shipyard undergoing what looks like to be bow thruster repairs. The Mary E. Hannah with her barge was at the old Interlake Company Dock. There was a salt water vessel at the T.W.I. Dock. The Cuyahoga was at one of the Anderson elevators loading grain. The Joseph H. Frantz and Saturn remain in lay-up at their respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel on Friday. The Atlantic Erie and John J. Boland on Saturday, followed by the John B. Aird on Sunday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the John J. Boland and Middletown on Saturday, followed by the Buckeye on Tuesday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Fairport, Ohio Update

08/16
The Algosteel arrived in Fairport about 5 p.m. Thursday to unload stone at Sidley's Dock, next to the Coast Guard Station. She delivered a partial load and had departed by 8:40 p.m. The Saginaw arrived late Thursday night and began to load salt.

The tugs Mighty John III and Prairieland were towing dump scows from a hydraulic excavator dredging the marinas upriver. The suction dredge Atchafalya is still working on the main channel.

Algosteel unloading.
Another view.
Close up of the bow.
Stern view.
Mighty John III.
Prairieland.

Reported by: Dave Merchant




Farewell Algoriver

08/16
As crews prepare the Algoriver for tow over seas we take a look at her career. The straight-decker was built by Canadian Vickers Ltd., Montreal, PQ and was christened Aug. 26, 1960 as the John A. France for Misener Shipping. Algoma Central acquired the John A. France in 1994 renaming her Algoriver. The Algoriver's activities continued to be focused in the grain products and iron ore trades. As such, her sailings were subject to long periods of lay-ups due to the seasonal fluctuations of the grain industry.

John A. France upbound at the Soo with a blue hull.
John A. France upbound from the Hi level Bridge at Toledo bound for one of the elevators to load grain.
John A. France departing ADM/Countrymark Elevator after loading grain and will be headed downbound the Maumee river for Lake Erie.
John A. France outbound Maumee Bay at Toledo. She just finished loading a grain cargo upriver and is now bound for a St. Lawrence River Port.
Algoriver (ex John A. France) upbound the Maumee River headed for one of the Elevators to load grain.
A close up view of the Algoriver as she works her way upriver bound for one of the elevators to load grain.
Loading grain at the Cargill Elevator (now known as Andersons "E" Elevator).
Outbound Maumee Bay after loading grain bound for a St Lawrence River Port.
Click here for a detailed look at the vessel's history.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - August 16

On 16 August, 1890, ANNIE WATT (wooden propeller, passenger and package freight "packet", 75'/62GC, built in 1884 at Lion's Head, Ontario) collided with the ship ALDERSON and sank. off of Gunn Point, Ontario. Just the previous year (8 November 1889), ANNIE WATT had burned and been declared total loss, but she was rebuilt.

The captain of the 2 year old, 125' wooden schooner-barge JOHN F. RITCHIE brought his wife, two other women and several small children as guests on a voyage from Bay City to Buffalo. The RITCHIE was one of a string of four barges loaded with lumber in tow of the tug ZOUAVE. As the tow entered Lake Erie, they were struck by a terrifying storm. The RITCHIE broke her tow line and was cast adrift. The deck load of lumber broke loose and everyone was in danger. The women and children were brought out of the cabin since it was considered to be a death trap and they were lashed on deck for safety. Soon the vessel was waterlogged and the cabin was actually washed away. On 17 August, a passing steamer took everyone aboard and towed the RITCHIE in to Cleveland where she was repaired. Amazingly, no lives were lost.

August 16, 1902 - The PERE MARQUETTE 18 (I) launched at Cleveland, Ohio.

Data from: Joe Barr, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Canadian Voyager Scrap Tow Ready to Depart

08/15
Thursday evening tugs are expected to tow the Canadian Voyager from her berth in Montreal, beginning her final voyage to the scrap yard.

The tug Akhtiar along with the Group Ocean's tug Ocean Hercule will move the Canadian Voyager down to les Escoumins were the Ocean Hercule will break off and return to Montreal. The Akhtiar will continue on the tow solo to Turkey.

The Panamanian tug Suhaili is expected to arrive on Thursday and prepare to tow out the Algoriver.

Algoriver with her name painted out and anchorless.
Stern view
Algonorth shifting
Ocean Jupiter getting a line on the Algoriver and towing her to elevator.
Canadian Voyager and Algosound.
Pulling the Algoriver backwards past the can. Voyager to elevator 4.
Algoriver secured at elevator 4. As the Algoriver and John A France the vessel delivered many a cargo of grain for over forty years, it is only fitting that she spend a few hours there before going to her final demise.
The tug Akhtiar

Reported by: Kent Malo




Unusual cargo coming to Owen Sound

08/15
Six wind turbines, each capable of supplying power to 600 homes, will be delivered by ship the last week of September according to an article in the Owen Sound Sun Times.

Five of the units are destined to Huron Wind Co. of Tiverton, Ont. near the Bruce Energy Centre and one for Sky Generation Inc. of Ferndale, north of Wiarton, Ont.

The shipments will require 35 trucks to move the cargo to its destinations. Some components will be dimensional loads requiring special police escort. Each tower will stand 394-feel tall and generate 1.8 megawatts of power per year.

Reported by: Peter Bowers




Duluth foghorn lives to bellow another day

08/15
Duluth city councilors voted Monday to allow the city's old diaphone foghorn to continue operating as a navigation aid rather than a tourist attraction.

People from one Duluth neighborhood had asked councilors to silence the foghorn except for occasional blasts to amuse tourists. They said the horn's distinctive "bee-yoh" bellow was disturbing their sleep.

After hearing from many city residents who favored keeping the horn, most councilors agreed the foghorn is an important part of the Northland's history and should continue its current hours of operation.

Councilor Greg Gilbert withdrew a proposal to take the historic diaphone foghorn off navigational status and use it only occasionally as a tourist attraction. "'We've heard from the community, and it is overwhelmingly in favor of the foghorn," he said.

Councilors originally considered a resolution to trim the foghorn's hours of operation, but Councilor Russ Stewart amended the plan to continue the same hours of use -- 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. during the shipping season.

The U.S. Coast Guard in Duluth controls the foghorn, which is located in the lighthouse building on the Duluth ship canal's south pier. With its 10-mile range, the horn is loudest in the city's hillside neighborhoods north and east of Canal Park.

The foghorn is not a necessary navigational aid, but the U.S. Coast Guard will use it as long as the city desires, said Chief Scott McAloon, who is in charge of Lake Superior's navigational warnings. A group of foghorn enthusiasts salvaged and restored the horn in the '80s. It began regular operation in 1995. After 11 p.m., the Coast Guard's modern -- and quieter -- electronic foghorn serves as a guide to boaters.

Reported by: Al Miller




White Loads, Burton Unloads

08/15
Wednesday the Fred R. White Jr. was in loading for ISG in Cleveland. The Courtney Burton came in later that day to unload at the Pellet Terminal.

Pictures by TZ
Burton arrives.
Close up.
Backing past the lighthouse.
Bow view.
Backing to the terminal while the White loads.
Burton unloading.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Holland Report

08/15
The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder arrived Wednesday morning from Toledo to deliver a load of eastern coal to the James DeYoung power plant. This is thought to be the first visit to Holland for the pair. Also in port, the tug Duluth and two dump scows were tied up at Brewer's waiting to load stone for delivered to South Haven.

Reported by: Bob Vande Vusse




Alpena Update

08/15
The J.A.W Iglehart came into port Wednesday morning to load cement at Lafarge. It left after 2 p.m. heading for Superior, WI. As soon as the Iglehart left the steamer Alpena headed in for its turn at the loading dock. It departed late Wednesday evening.

The Paul H. Townsend was heading to Milwaukee and the tug Jacklyn M and barge Integrity is in Waukegan.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Toledo News

08/15
The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was loading coal at the CSX Docks Wednesday. The Cuyahoga was inbound Maumee Bay late that afternoon and was headed upbound for one of the grain elevators to load. The John G. Munson was also inbound, heading for the Shipyard for some type of repairs.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel on Friday. The Atlantic Erie and John J. Boland on Saturday followed by the American Mariner on Monday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Middletown on Saturday. The American Mariner on Sunday, followed by the Buckeye on Tuesday. The Joseph H. Frantz and Saturn remain in layup at their respective dock sites.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Report

08/15
The Fred R. White Jr. arrived at dusk Tuesday and proceeded upriver to unload ore at ISG upper dock. The David Z. Norton could be seen on the lake as the White passed by. After waiting for the Norfolk and Southern bridge to open the David Norton entered the river very slowly. She inched through the span to unload stone at Ontario #1 next to the bridge. When docking in this position the bow of the vessel is only 50 feet from the Shooters Restaurant deck. Many patrons gathered on the deck to watch this difficult maneuver.

Fred R. White Jr. inbound Tuesday.
Close up.
David Z. Norton arrives.
Close up.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - August 15

The JOSEPH L. BLOCK sailed light on her maiden voyage from the Bay Ship Building Co., Sturgeon Bay, WI to load 32,600 long tons of taconite ore pellets at Escanaba, MI for delivery to Indiana Harbor, IN on August 15, 1976.

The OTTERCLIFFE HALL, the last "straight deck" Great Lakes bulk freighter built with a pilot house forward was bare boat chartered to Misener Transportation Ltd. on August 15, 1983.

Under threat of a strike on August 15, 1978, the GEORGE A. STINSON was towed out of Lorain before her completion by six tugs and was taken to Detroit's Nicholson's Terminal & Dock to finish her fit-out.

The LEON FALK, JR. was laid up for the last time August 15, 1980 at the Great Lakes Engineering Work's old slip at River Rouge, MI.

On August 15, 1985 the MENIHEK LAKE sailed under her own power to Quebec City (from there by tug), the first leg of her journey to the cutter torch in Spain.

J.P. MORGAN, JR. arrived in tow of Hannah Marine's tug DARYL C. HANNAH at Buffalo, NY on August 15th where she was delayed until she could obtain clearance to transit the Welland Canal. Permission to pass down the Canal was refused because of the MORGAN, JR.'s improper condition after a collision with the 480 foot Interlake steamer CRETE on June 23, 1948 in dense fog off Devils Island, in the Apostle Islands, on Lake Superior.

On 15 August 1856, WELLAND (sidewheel steamer, wood, passenger & package freight, 145'/300T, built 1853 at St. Catharine's, Ontario) burned to a total loss at her dock. at Port Dalhousie, Ontario. She was owned by Port Dalhousie and Thorold Railroad Co.

On 15 August 1873, Thomas Dunford and Frank Leighton announced a co-partnership in the shipbuilding business in Port Huron, Michigan. Their plans included operating from Dunford's yard. When they made their announcement, they already had an order for a large tug from Mr. George E. Brockway. This tug was the CRUSADER with the dimensions of 132' overall, 100' keel, and 23' beam.

In 1914 the Panama Canal was officially opened to maritime traffic.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Jim Olsson, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Tugs Prepare For Scrap Tow

08/14
Tuesday the tugs Ocean Jupiter and Ocean Intrepide shifted the Algoriver and Algonorth in Montreal as they prepare for the coming tow to Turkey. The Algoriver is on the outside of Section 56 with the bow heading downstream and the Algonorth in on the inside bow facing upstream.

The tug Akhtiar will depart Montreal with either the Algoriver or Canadian Voyager on Thursday or Friday. The tug Ocean Hercules will assist as far as les Escoumins.

It is unknown which vessel will depart first but early signs point to the Algoriver. On Tuesday the Algoriver's name had been painted out and the anchors were removed, the tug Akhtiar rigs a bridle with the two anchor chains. The Canadian Voyager still has its anchors and name.

The Panamanian tug Suhaili is expected to arrive on Thursday and prepare to tow out the remaining vessel. Each vessel will be towed to Izmir or Antalya Turkey for scrapping.

Reported by: Kent Malo




State of Michigan Arrives

08/14
The Great Lakes Maritime Academy's new training ship, “State of Michigan" completed its two-week journey Tuesday with a guest cruise from Northport to Traverse City. It passed by the Maritime Academy at about 5:00, and finally docked at the Tall Ship's dock to unload passengers and offer tours.

On August 15th, the ship will be officially christened the State of Michigan at the Great Lakes Maritime Academy.

Visit www.nmc.edu/glma/news/state-of-michigan.html for more information.




Cresswell Visits Marquette

08/14
Algoma's Peter R. Cresswell loaded taconite in Marquette for two straight trips on Aug 12 and 14. Algoma normally uses Algomarine and Algosteel on the short run to Algoma Steel at the Soo.

As the Cresswell arrived late in the afternoon of August 13, Marquette's venerable ore dock was being recharged after loading four vessels in 36 hours (Cresswell, Kaye E. Barker, H. Lee White and Charles M. Beeghly).Cresswell was not scheduled to load until early Wednesday morning. The Beeghly spent over 24 hours in port before departing at sunset on August 13.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Coast Guard Cutters in the Soo

08/14
It was a rare treat Tuesday for boatwatchers as the Mackinaw and the Sundew passed upbound through the St. Marys River. Both ships locked through upbound in late afternoon heading for Duluth. They were both built in 1944 serving the U S Coast Guard in the Great Lakes, working in the Lake Superior region. The ageing icebreakers have done a superior service during the winter months through out their careers and are now due for replacement.

Reported by: Jerry Masson




Port Weller Update

08/14
The Canadian Coast Guard vessel Samuel Risley has been moved from the deep drydock to the outer wall at Port Weller Dry Docks. She appears ready to sail. Two other Coast Guard ships, the Griffon and the George R. Pearkes, are sitting on the blocks for a four to five week stay for maintenance and new paint jobs. The name has been scraped off one side of the Pearkes bow. The shallow dock is being prepared for the arrival of the Canadian Miner, as workers were moving the blocks into position, for her 5 year survey. It is expected to arrive next week.

Griffon and George R. Pearkes in the deep dry dock.
Another view.
Stern view.
Close up of propellers and rudder.
Samuel Risley at the fit out dock.
Tug James E. McGrath.
Another view.
George R. Pearkes.
Close up of bow.
Crews prepare the shallow dry dock.

Port Weller Dry Docks home page

Reported by: Alex Howard




Ispat Inland resume production after fire

08/14
Ispat Inland Mining Co. near Virginia, Minn., resumed production of taconite pellets Sunday following a fire that damaged three conveyor belts used in loading pellets into railcars.

No one was hurt in the fire, but the damage it caused is expected to cost several hundred thousand dollars to repair.

Until the damage is repaired this fall, taconite pellets are being moved by front-end loaders to a loading pocket, which then fills railcars. A temporary conveyor system may be erected to load cars.

Company officials said the fire won't affect plans to produce about 2.9 million tons of taconite pellets this year. It also won't affect a two-week plant shutdown scheduled to start Sept. 4.

The fire broke out Saturday when a thunderstorm interrupted electrical power and workers attempted to re-start portions of the plant. A valve that directs water onto red-hot pellets coming out of the furnace failed to open, allowing red-hot pellets to fall onto the conveyor belts and set them aflame.

Ispat Inland ships its pellets through the DMIR ore docks in Duluth and Two Harbors.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo News

08/14
The Algomarine was loading coal at the CSX Docks Tuesday. The Armco was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore. There are no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Wednesday. The Algosteel on Friday, followed by the Atlantic Erie, John J. Boland, and John B. Aird on Saturday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Middletown on Saturday, followed by the American Mariner on Sunday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto Update

08/14
English River brought in a load of cement Tuesday morning. That afternoon the saltie Aegean Sea arrived and was assisted into berth at Pier 52 by McKeil's harbor tugs.

The tug Kenteau was spotted on the lake just east of Toronto with a spud barge in tow for Toronto.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Kingston Report

08/14
The Kingston area cement fleet has increased by one vessel. The tug Tony McKay is pushing the barge Metis carrying cement from Picton. Monday afternoon she departed Toronto for Picton . At 4:30 p.m. she departed Picton for Oswego, with an eta of mid night. The Metis is an old canal size vessel which has been converted into a barge.

The Stephen B. Roman is coming from Oswego and expected to arrive early Wednesday morning in Picton. This is the first time in many years that going the opposite way between Picton and Oswego, at the same time. The CSL Laurentian was also in to Picton on Sunday.

The Canadian Empress had a day lay-over last Thursday and then left Friday for a ten day trip to Quebec City and Return.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Scientists ponder closing Seaway to keep out invading species

08/14
A small number of scientists in Canada and the United States say barring oceangoing ships from the St. Lawrence Seaway is the best way to keep destructive aquatic invaders out of the Great Lakes, according to a story in the Hamilton Spectator.

The controversial proposal to sever commercial traffic between the lakes and the Atlantic Ocean comes as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is asking Canada and the United States to study expanding the Seaway to accommodate larger ships.

Ralph Smith, biology professor at the University of Waterloo, says rules requiring saltwater ships to exchange ballast water before entering Canadian territory haven't worked.

"It may sound extreme, but an idea that's growing is to stop saltwater ships from coming up further than Quebec City or Montreal."

Smith told the newspaper. He's slated to become head of the International Association for Great Lakes Research next year.

Gary Fahnenstiel, chief scientist at a Lake Michigan research station run by the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, also is convinced the answer is to stop salties, if not in the lower St. Lawrence, then at least in Lake Ontario.

Fahnenstiel called the Seaway expansion idea "absolutely crazy" and argues it would be better to study the value of letting ships travel from the ocean to Thunder Bay or Duluth.

"We're talking about 200 to 500 trips per year by maybe 80 foreign-owned, foreign-crewed boats," he said. "There are not really that many trips. If you're truly interested in protecting the Great Lakes, you would isolate them. Close the Welland Canal or build a huge Jiffy Lube facility on the St. Lawrence to scour out and disinfect the ships."

George Robichon, vice president and general counsel of Montreal-based Fednav Ltd., which operates Canada's largest fleet of oceangoing dry-bulk carriers -- whose cargoes include iron ore coming up the St. Lawrence to Hamilton's Dofasco -- calls the notion of a shipping ban "just absurd."

"That's really not an answer, because of the significance of shipping and the amount of cargo moving in and out of the lakes," he said. "Transferring how many hundreds of millions of tons of cargo to road and rail would be an environmental disaster in the Great Lakes region."

Reported by: Larry Morris




Today in Great Lakes History - August 14

Sea trials for the HENRY FORD II took place on August 14, 1924 and shortly after she left on her maiden voyage with coal from Toledo, OH to Duluth, MN and returned with iron ore to the Ford Rouge Plant at Dearborn.

Having been sold for scrap, the GOVERNOR MILLER was towed down the Soo Locks on August 14, 1980 for Milwaukee, WI to load scrap.

On 14 August 1873, CHESTER B. JONES (3-mast, wooden schooner, 167'/493GT) was launched at E. Saginaw, MI. She was built by Chesley Wheeler. The spars and top hamper ordered for her were broken in a log jam, so the 3-master received her spars at Buffalo, NY on her first trip.

The 149' bark MARY E. PEREW was found floating west of the Manitou Islands by the propeller MONTGOMERY on 14 August 1871. The PEREW had been sailing to Milwaukee with a load of coal when a storm came upon her so quickly on 8 August (nearly a week before MONGOMERY found her) that the crew did not have time to trim the sails. All three masts were snapped and the mizzen mast fell on the yawl, smashing it. So the crew was stuck on the ship, unable to navigate. The MONTGOMERY towed her to Milwaukee where she was rebuilt and she lasted until 1905.

The schooner CHESTER B. JONES was launched at Saginaw on 14 August 1873. She was a three-and-aft rig.

On 14 August 1900 the tug WILLIAM D. of the Great Lakes Towing Company got under the bow of the steamer WAWATAM at Ashtabula, Ohio and was rolled over and sank. One drowned.

August 14, 1899 - W.L. Mercereau, known as the "Father of the Fleet", became superintendent of steamships (Pere Marquette Railway)

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Trader Unloads

08/13
The tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort and barge Great Lakes Trader was outbound from the Saginaw River Monday morning passing through Downtown Bay City around 7 a.m. The pair unloaded overnight at the Saginaw Rock Dock. A few hours later the Wolverine was outbound after unloading overnight at the Buena Vista Dock.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Joyce L. Van Enkevort/Great Lakes Trader downbound at the Liberty Bridge.
Close up.
Tug view.
Stern view at Wheeler's Landing.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Niagara Locks Through

08/13
The brig Niagara locked downbound at the Soo Locks Monday. The vessel is sailing from Marquette, Mi to Alpena, Mi. The Niagara will spend the weekend open for tours in Alpena and depart early next week for Amherstburg, Ont. on the Detroit River.

Niagara downbound. Soo Locks Live Cam

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Grand Mariner at the Soo

08/13
The small cruise ship Grande Mariner arrived in the Soo Harbor late Monday night and will be docked at the Carbide Dock overnight. After an early morning departure, the 182-foot ship will lock through upbound into Whitefish Bay for a short tour and return downbound through the St Marys River.

Reported by: Jerry Masson




Fred White in Green Bay

08/13
On Thursday the Fred R White Jr. paid a visit to Green Bay. The White unloaded coal from Sandusky Ohio at the Georgia Pacific plant on the Fox River. The White spent over 10 hours unloading the coal and departed Thursday evening for Port Inland Mi to load stone for Cleveland. This was the White's second visit of the year to Green Bay, the other visit was in late May.

Monday evening the Alpena is due into Green Bay for Lafarge cement.

Unloading at Georgia Pacific.
Close up of deckhouse.
Close up of coal being unloading onto the large pile at GP.

Reported by: Scott Best




Goderich Update

08/13
The salt trade continues to be steady, with several ships per week coming and going. The Agawa Canyon arrived early on August 7 and was seen loading salt at 6 a.m. She left later that day for Chicago, Illinois. The Algorail was spotted at the mine mid-afternoon on Saturday; destination unknown.

Sunday night brought a fairly rare visit by the Canadian Olympic, and apparently she was sporting a new paint job, as the fumes were potent along the mine dock. Unfortunately, she left sometime during the night or early morning, and few people were able to get a good look at her.

Reported by: Lisa




Erie Update

08/13
The Earl W. Oglebay made her first visit of the 2002 season to Erie on Monday, arriving at the piers at 11:20 a.m. with stone from Marblehead for the Old Ore Dock. The Oglebay departed at 6:15 p.m.

So far, American Steamship leads all fleets with 12 visits to Erie, but Oglebay Norton is gaining fast. Four of the last five stone boats to Erie have been from Oglebay Norton and American Steamship has not had a vessel here since The Adam E. Cornelius on July 16.

Earl W. Oglebay inbound.
Stern View.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Toronto Report

08/13
The tug Tony Mackay and cement barge Metis departed Monday afternoon. McKeil's Atomic and Lac Como were back in port that morning. The Charlie E. has departed Toronto.

Reported by: Gerry O.




News from Quebec Harbor

08/13
Ships in port on Sunday in the St. Charles River: The tanker Trogir ( Malta) was unloading jet fuel from El Palito Venezuela. The Bulk carrier Kamenitza (Bulgaria) was loading grain for Greece. The small cruise ship Nantucket Clipper (USA) departed for Montreal.

Two ships were expected on Monday: The bulker North Defiance (Panama) with chemicals from Mobile, Ala. and the tanker Venice (Malta) loading oil for Dalhousie NB.

Pictures taken earlier this summer
Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Pierre Radisson departing Coast Guard Base for Arctic duty.
Another view.
First visit of Celebrity cruise ship Galaxy (Liberia).
Galaxy with Chateau Frontenac in background.
Algocen unloading grain for Bunge elevators. Notice Quebec flag flying by courtesy.
CSL Pineglen heading for the Lakes after unloading grain in harbour.

Reported by: Frederick Frechette




Today in Great Lakes History - August 13

Operated by a crew of retired Hanna captains, chief engineers and executives, the GEORGE M. HUMPHREY departed Great Lakes Engineering Works under her own power on August 13, 1986 for Lauzon, Que. The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY cleared Lauzon September 3rd with the former Hanna steamer PAUL H. CARNAHAN in tow of the Dutch tug SMIT LLOYD 109. The tow locked through the Panama Canal, September 27th through 30th, and arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan December 10, 1986 completing a trip of over 14,000 miles. The HUMPHREY was scrapped in 1987 by Shiong Yek Steel Corp.

On 13 August 1899, H. G. CLEVELAND (wooden schooner, 137'/264T, built in 1867 at Black River, OH) sank with a full load of limestone, 7 miles from the Cleveland harbor entrance.

August 13, 1980 - The ARTHUR K. ATKINSON returned to service after repairing a broken crankshaft suffered in 1973. She brought 18 railcars from Manitowoc to Frankfort.

The 272'/1740 gross ton, wooden propeller freighter SITKA was launched by F. W. Wheeler (hull # 32) at W. Bay City, Michigan on 13 August 1887.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




More Scrap Tows

08/12
Turkish Buyers have finalized the deal for the purchase of the Algoriver and Canadian Voyager. Tugs are expected to arrive in Montreal this week to tow the ships for scrapping. The departure date was unknown but each vessel will be towed individually to Izmir or Antalya Turkey for scrapping.

The tugs Akhtiar and Suhaili will complete the scrap tows, the Akhtiar is return from the successful tow of the former laker Manitoulin to Turkey.

The Comeaudoc is expected to be towed from Montreal to Port Colborne around August 18. Once in Port Colborne the engine will be removed for possible use in the Saginaw and the hull then scrapped.

Reported by: Brian R. Mccaughrin




Assistance for Southdown Conquest

08/12
The tug Susan Hanna and barge Southdown Conquest used the services of the Great Lakes Towing Co. on Friday. The Conquest's bow thruster was not in operation. The crew of the G-tug Virginia assisted the Conquest both in and out of port. The tug and barge combination were headed to Sturgeon Bay for repairs and a short lay up after departing Milwaukee.

The tug Virginia approaches the Southdown Conquest.
The tug captains discuss strategy before departing.
The view from the pilot house of the Susan Hanna looking forward.
The notch of the Southdown Conquest.
The tug Virginia alongside the Susan Hanna.
The tug Virginia's "A-team", wearing their distinctive headgear, tie off the bow line.
The Virginia holds up the bow of the Conquest through the RR bridge.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Victoriaborg Unloads

08/12
The Victoriaborg arrived at K&K Warehouse Thursday morning with a load of wood pulp. She moved all the way up to the West Dick, past K&K's new barge acquisition, Manitowoc, plus another smaller barge and two rafted Selvick tugs. This is the Vicroriaborg's second visit to port this year.

At K&K Warehouse West Dock.
Her hatch crane and a stack of hatches.
More hatch covers toward the bow and a load coming out of the hold.
(L to R) - Victoriaborg, Selvick tug behind her, barge Manitowoc behind her, USCG Hickory, IRA (saltie unloading pig iron at Marinette Fuel & Dock.
Victoriaborg, Carla Anne Selvick, Manitowoc and IRA.

Reported by: Dick Lund




Twin Ports Report

08/12
July was a slow month for Twin Ports grain elevators, with almost all traffic concentrated on Cenex Harvest States with only a few other vessels using the General Mills elevator. That has suddenly changed, with a parade of salties and lakers arriving for elevator berths in recent days.

On Sunday, Herbert C. Jackson arrived at the Peavey elevator and Victoriaborg was loading at Cenex Harvest States. With four spouts loading the small saltie, it was finished by late afternoon and fueling at the Murphy Oil dock before departing. In Duluth, Algocape was at the AGP elevator. In the early and mid-80s, lakers from the Kinsman fleet were a common sight at AGP (or Cap 6, as it was then known). But in recent years, lakers -- especially straightdeckers -- have been rare sights at the elevator.

Also Sunday, the Federal Rhine was anchored on the lake waiting for AGP, and Federal Shimanto and Cedar were anchored out waiting for Cenex Harvest States. Several more salties are due in port in the coming week.

At other docks, Atlantic Erie was anchored out on the lake early Sunday but later came into Superior Entry to load at BNSF ore dock, and Canadian Transport arrived to load at Midwest Energy Terminal.

Reported by: Al Miller




Indiana Harbor in Muskegon

08/12
Saturday the Indiana Harbor was unloading coal in Muskegon, MI. The 1000-footer departed outbound passing the pier heads of Muskegon Harbor onto Lake Michigan at 6 p.m. local time.

Indiana Harbor departs.

Reported by: Mark Kelley




Saginaw Update

08/12
The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons made a grim discovery on the Saginaw River late Sunday afternoon as the vessel was outbound from the Sixth Street turning basin in Saginaw.

Shortly before 5:00 p.m., the vessel called a sheriff patrol boat on the river to report a body in the water near the E.M. Ford, just downstream from the turning basin. Local news later reported the body had also been sighted and reported by two young boat watchers who had arrived to watch the McKee Sons pass. The two young men called 911 and pulled the man from the river, but rescue personnel were unable to revive him. According to reports, the victim was a local elderly man who had apparently fallen into the river while fishing.

The tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort and barge Great Lakes Trader were inbound on the river at about 4 p.m. The pair tied up at the Essroc dock in Essexville before continuing up the Saginaw Rock Products in the evening after the Invincible/McKee Sons passed outbound.

The Wolverine was also upbound on the river late Sunday evening, going to the Buena Vista Dock near the I-75 Bridge.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Detroit Traffic

08/12
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Sunday.
Rega (Bahamas) anchored at Ojibway.
Stern view.
Adam E Cornelius downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
John G Munson backing out of the Rouge River after unloading at Detroit Lime.
George A Stinson unloading at Zug Island.
Stern view.
Corps of Engineers Slip in Detroit. Demolen, Paj & Forney.
Joseph H Thompson loading salt at DMT 2.
Salt on dock.
Stern view.
Toro (Greece) almost anchored in the Belle Isle Anchorage with engine trouble.
Stern view.
Diamond Queen and Diamond Belle tied up at Stroh River Place.
J A W Iglehart at the Lafarge Dock in Detroit.
John G Munson upbound off the Rencen.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo News

08/12
The Cuyahoga was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator and was expected to depart Sunday evening for Port Colborne, Ontario. The tug/barge combo Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder was loading coal at the CSX Docks. The Reserve was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore. The Gemini was at the B-P Dock unloading cargo. There were no other active boats in port at the time of this report. The Joseph H. Frantz and Saturn remain in layup at their respective dock sites.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algomarine on Monday. The Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Weds., followed by the Algosteel on Friday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the St. Clair on Monday, followed by the Armco on Tuesday.

Classic views of Toledo Shipping
Goderich at the Andersons layby slip waiting to load a grain cargo. She was later sold to the Soo River Company and was renamed Soo River Trader when the Soo River Fleet went bankrupt she was sold to the Parrish Heimbecker Fleet and sailed for a brief time as Pineglen during 1982, she then went to Toronto, Ontario for layup she was sold for scrap and was towed to Port Maitland, Ontario in 1984 where she met her fate.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Busy Weekend at Marblehead

08/12
Saturday Morning the Earl W. Oglebay was loading at the Lafarge Gravel dock at Marblehead, Ohio while the Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder waited at anchor at the western end of Kelley's Island. The Saginaw waited her turn at the eastern end of Kelley's. The Saginaw was at the dock waiting to load Sunday morning. Pathfinder loading.
Saginaw at anchor.

Reported by: Bob Smalling




Cleveland Report

08/12
Sunday the Sam Laud was outbound the Cuyahoga River after delivering to ISG. They are doing one more shuttle on Monday.

Laud departs.
H. Lee White unloading.
Southdown Challenger.
Armco unloading.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Toronto Update

08/12
The Stephen B. Roman came in Friday and unloaded, departing early Saturday morning. Following on her heels was the tug Tony Mackay and cement barge Metis, which began unloading at Essroc.

The International marine Salvage tug Charlie E. came into port at dusk Saturday and moored at Pier 35. She was out for an afternoon run but returned to Pier 35 for the evening.

C & C Marine's tug Patricia D. and the barge Rock Prince have been out of town for several days working in Oshawa. McKeil's tug Atomic and Lac Como have also been at Oshawa, where they assisted the salty Doxa A.

The Port Authority tug William Rest and crane barge T.H.C. 50 have been dredging just outside the East Gap. The Port Authority's island airport ferry Maple City is still under the Atlas crane, but she is now back in the water sitting in slings.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Detroit to Wallaceburg on the Diamond Belle

08/12
Below are images of a trip from Detroit to Wallaceburg on Diamond Belle Saturday.
CSL Niagara downbound at LightX32.
Stern view.
Str. Smokey at Wallaceburg. A plate on the hull said she was built at Great Lakes Engineering Works.
Diamond Belle at Wallaceburg.
Le Taureau and Bagotville on Chanel Ecarte.
Charles M Beeghly upbound above the Lake St. Clair Crib Light.
Stern view.
Southdown Challenger upbound below the Lake St. Clair Crib Light.
Stern view.
Canadian Progress upbound above Belle Isle Coast Guard Station.
Painting the sign on the boom.
Stern view.
Aurora Borealis upbound at Hiram Walker.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Today in Great Lakes History - August 12

The C&O carferry S.S. Spartan, in a heavy fog while inbound from Kewanee on the morning of August 12, 1976, struck rocks at the entrance to the Ludington harbor. She suffered severe damage to about 120 feet of her bottom plating. She was taken to Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay on August 18th for repairs. There were no injuries as a result of this incident.

The TOM M. GIRDLER was christened August 12, 1951, she was the first of the C4 conversions.

The MAUNALOA II was launched August 12, 1899

The RIDGETOWN (a WILLIAM E. COREY) sailed from Chicago on her maiden voyage August 12, 1905 bound for Duluth, MN to load iron ore.

On 12 August 1882, FLORIDA (3-mast wooden schooner, 352 t, built in 1875 at Batiscan, Ontario) was carrying 662 tons of coal from Black River to Toronto when she sprang a leak and sank 12 miles from Port Maitland. She hailed from Quebec and was constructed mostly of pine and tamarack.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Today in Great Lakes History - August 11

The night of August 11, 2001 the Windoc was damaged and caught fire when the Allenburg Bridge was lowered onto the vessel. The accident stopped traffic in the canal until August 13. The Windoc was later towed to Hamilton, Ont. yto wait out its fate.

The H.M. GRIFFITH was the first self-unloader to unload grain at Robin Hood's new hopper unloading facility at Port Colborne, Ont on August 11, 1987.

On August 11, 1977 the THOMAS LAMONT was the first vessel to take on fuel at Shell's new fuel dock at Sarnia, Ont. The dock's fueling rate was 60 to 70,000 gallons per hour and was built to accommodate one-thousand footers.

Opening ceremonies for the METEOR (2) museum ship were held on August 11, 1973 with the President of Cleveland Tankers present whose company had donated the ship. This historically unique ship was enshrined into the National Maritime Hall of Fame.

The T.W. ROBINSON and US.265808 (former BENSON FORD (2) departed Quebec City on August 11, 1987 along with US.265808 (former BENSON FORD (2) in tow of the Polish tug JANTAR bound for Recife where they arrived on September 22, 1987. Scrapping began the next month in October.

On 11 August 1862, B.F. BRUCE (wooden propeller passenger steamer, 110'/169T, built in 1852 at Buffalo as a tug) was carrying staves when she caught fire a few miles off Port Stanley, Ontario in Lake Erie. She was run to the beach, where she burned to a total loss with no loss of life. Arson was suspected. She had been rebuilt from a tug to this small passenger steamer the winter before her loss.

On 11 August 1908, TITANIA (iron propeller packet/tug/yacht, 98', 73 gt, built in 1875 at Buffalo) was rammed and sunk by the Canadian sidewheeler KINGSTON near the harbor entrance at Charlotte, NY on Lake Ontario. All 26 on board were rescued.

The wooden scow-schooner SCOTTISH CHIEF had been battling a storm on Lake Michigan since Tuesday, 8 August 1871. By late afternoon of Friday, 11 August 1871, she was waterlogged. The galley was flooded and the food ruined. The crew stayed with the vessel until that night when they left in the lifeboat. They arrived in Chicago on Sunday morning, 13 August.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algobay visits Grand Haven

08/10
The Algobay made perhaps its first visit ever to Grand Haven/Ferrysburg Friday. She arrived at the pier heads that afternoon and eased past Le Levant, which is berthed at Escanaba Park.

Algobay then proceeded upriver to the Verplanks dock to unload her cargo of stone.

Pictures by: Mark Kelley
Algobay unloading.
Close up.
Le Levant.

Reported by: Dave Swain and Mark Kelley




Group hopes to muzzle historic foghorn

08/10
A group of Duluth residents hopes to silence the old diaphone foghorn that's bellowed its distinctive warning from the Duluth ship canal since being restored in the 1980s.

Duluth's old foghorn -- with its load "bee-yohh" tone -- was removed in the 1960s and replaced with a modern, high-pitched electronic tone. A local group named TOOT -- for reTurn Our Old Tone -- later salvaged an old foghorn in Wisconsin, raised more than $100,000 to restore it and persuaded Duluth officials and the U.S. Coast Guard to allow the old horn to replace the modern horn and operate as an official aid to navigation.

The trouble is, according to the anti-foghorn group, is that the old horn is too loud and disruptive for people living in some of the city's neighborhoods. The group is asking Duluth city councilors to silence the horn except for occasional daytime blasts for tourists.

On Monday, city councilors will consider two proposals to limit the horn's operation. One resolution would end use of the foghorn as a navigational aid, setting it off occasionally as a tourist attraction.

Another councilor, who has said he enjoys the foghorn, is seeking the middle ground. He wants to trim the horn's hours of operation from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. to 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

The foghorn is on the south pier of the Duluth Ship Canal and is aimed to the northeast, making it loudest in the hillside neighborhoods and farther east. Under the right conditions, it can be heard as far up the shore as Knife River, Minn., about 15 miles away.

The U.S. Coast Guard in Duluth, which controls the foghorn, gets at least three calls a day from people who love or hate the horn, said Chief Scott McAloon. The Coast Guard will use its electrical whistle that already serves as a backup if the city takes the historic foghorn off navigational status, he said.

Reported by: Al Miller




Twin Ports Report

08/10
The DMIR ore dock in Duluth has been seeing a parade of boats in the past few days, and a steady stream is expected into next week. On Thursday, the Cason J. Callaway was at Dock 6 to unload limestone while the Joe Block anchored out on the lake. By late morning the Callaway was gone and the Block was at the dock to unload stone while Hon. Paul J. Martin waited at the port terminal for its turn to load at the ore dock. The Martin was due at the dock on Aug. 9 to be followed the same day by American Mariner. Armco is due to load pellet on Aug. 10. Roger Blough is scheduled to arrive Aug. 12 with another stone cargo from Port Dolomite. Frontenac is due in Aug. 13 to load.

The Two Harbors ore dock also is busy handling boats from Great Lakes Fleet, including the Presque Isle, Callaway and Philip R. Clarke on Thursday. Other boats loading over the next few days include the Joe Block and Oglebay Norton.

Reported by: Al Miller




Alpena Report

08/10
The Paul H. Townsend came into port Friday morning to load cement. This was its first trip back since leaving lay-up in Muskegon. The Townsend departed around 1pm, heading for St. Joseph. The Jacklyn M barge Integrity is expected to be in port on Saturday morning.

The Alpena is in Duluth and will be back sometime on Sunday. The J.A.W Iglehart is going to Cleveland.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Detroit Traffic

08/10
Below are images of traffic on the Detroit River Friday.
Lady Hamilton (Hong Kong) unloading at DMT 2.
Stern view.
Salt Pile at DMT 2. The last time a pile of salt was built at DMT 2 the Joseph H Thompson loaded it using the rig on the left of the picture. The salt comes from the Detroit Salt Mine.
Stern view.
Barge Mc Allister 132 and tug W N Twolan at the Motor City Intermodal Dock in Detroit.
Stern view.
Barge Lac St Jean & tug Stormont on their ferry service between Windsor and Detroit.
Stormont.
Middletown upbound off Nicholson's.
Stern view.
H Lee White upbound at Grassy Island. She gave her destination as Thunder Bay, ON.
Stern view.
Lake Ontario (Marshall Islands) upbound at Grassy Island with a yacht on her deck.
Yacht on deck.
Stern view.
Isa (Cyprus) downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Barge Salty Dog No 1 & Evans Mc Keil downbound at Fighting Island North Light.
Close up Evans McKeil.
Stern view.
Arklow Bridge (Ireland) unloading at Nicholson Terminal & Dock in Ecorse.
Stern view.
Goldeneye (Greece) unloading clay at the Morterm Dock in Windsor.
Algosoo downbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.
Atlantic Huron upbound at Grassy Island.
Stern view.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Toledo News

08/10
The Buckeye was unloading ore at the Torco Ore Dock and departed late Friday morning. The tug Everlast and barge Norman McLeod arrived at the Sun Dock on Thursday evening and departed mid Friday morning. The Gemini was inbound Maumee Bay headed for the B-P Dock. There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

The Joseph H. Frantz and Saturn remain in layup at their respective docksites. There was an unidentified tug at the Shipyard.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel on Saturday. The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder on Sunday. The Algomarine on Monday, followed by the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boats now due in at the Torco Ore Dock will be the Reserve on Sunday. The St. Clair on Monday, followed by the Armco on Tuesday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - August 10

On August 10, 1952, the Arthur M. Anderson entered service. Exactly fourteen years later, on August 10, 1966, the vessel's namesake, Arthur Marvin Anderson, passed away.

In 1969 the Edmund Fitzgerald set the last of many cargo records it set during the 1960s. The Fitzgerald loaded 27,402 gross tons of taconite pellets at Silver Bay on this date. This record was broken by the Fitzgerald's sister ship, the Arthur B. Homer, during the 1970 shipping season.

On 10 August 1937, B.H. BECKER (steel tug, 19T, built in 1932 at Marine City, MI) foundered in heavy seas, 9 miles north of Oscoda, MI.

In 1906, JOHN H. PAULEY (formerly THOMPSON KINSFORD, wooden propeller steam barge, 116', 185 gt, built in 1880 at Oswego, NY) caught fire at Marine City, Michigan. Her lines were burned through and she then drifted three miles down the St. Clair River before beaching near Port Lambton, Ontario and burning out.

On 10 August 1922, ANNIE LAURA (wooden propeller sandsucker, 133', 244 gt, built in 1871 at Marine City, MI) beached near Algonac, Michigan, caught fire and burned to the waterline.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Mississagi Enters Lay-up

08/09
Mississagi entered into short term lay-up Thursday due to a mid season lull in cargo. The vessel is tied up in Sarnia's North Slip behind the Canadian Transfer.

Mississagi in lay-up.
Another view.

Reported by: T. Parker




Coal Trade Reaches Highest Level This Season

08/09
Thanks to a record-setting month at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wisconsin, coal shipments on the Great Lakes in July rose to 4.8 million tons, the highest monthly total recorded so far this season, and an increase of 2.5 percent compared to the corresponding period last year.

The hot spell that began toward the end of June and stretched throughout July increased demand for steam coal from the power generating industry. Shipments of low-sulfur steam coal from Superior Midwest Energy Terminal soared to 2,548,173 net tons, the most coal to be shipped by an individual dock in one month in the entire history of Great Lakes shipping. The previous record dated all the way back to October 1946 when the Chesapeake & Ohio dock in Toledo loaded 2,468,619 net tons.

Total shipments from Lake Erie ports declined by 7.5 percent to 1.8 million tons, but this segment of the trade was impacted by the miners' vacation period at eastern coal mines that idled the industry for last week of June and the first two weeks of July.

For the season, the Lakes coal trade stands at 19 million tons, an increase of 1.9 percent compared to the same point in the 2001 navigation season.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Assocation




Traffic Picks up in Marquette

08/09
The Algomarine loaded at Marquette's ore dock on Wednesday. The Paul Tregurtha unloaded coal at the Presque Isle power plant while the John J. Boland loaded taconite on Thursday. The American Mariner delivered a load of coal to the Shiras Steam Plant in the lower harbor.

The Brig Niagara arrived in Marquette for a two-day stay on Thursday evening to a large crowd, and gave a salute which resulted in a round of applause. Because of wind conditions she could not come in under sail power.

The Algomarine is due back in Marquette on Friday, with the Lee A. Tregurtha expected on Saturday. The H. Lee White is expected at the lower harbor on Sunday.

Algomarine loading on Wednesday.
Paul Tregurtha unloading.
Boland loading.
Bow view.
American Mariner unloading.
Wide view.
Niagara arrives.
Niagara saluting.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Saginaw News

08/09
The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons arrived on the Saginaw River Thursday afternoon. The pair were headed up to Saginaw to unload and expected to be outbound during the evening hours.

On Wednesday, the Wilfred Sykes entered the Saginaw River early in the day, unloading at the Bay City and Saginaw Wirt Docks. She was outbound during the early morning hours on Thursday.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Invincible/McKee Sons upbound at Wheeler's Landing.
Close up.
Stern View.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Toledo News

08/09
The Melissa Desgagnes was at the T.W.I. Dock Thursday unloading cargo. There was a Andrie tug and barge at the B-P Dock and an unidentified tug at the Shipyard.

There were no other active vessels in port at the time of this report.

The tugs Mighty Jake, Mighty Jimmy, Pioneerland, and Prairieland are still working on the Maumee River channel dredging project, and the I-280 Bridge replacement project. The Joseph H. Frantz, and Saturn remain in layup at their respective dock sites. Crews are still working on the restoration of the former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the Algosteel on Saturday. The tug/barge combo Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder on Sunday. The Algomarine on Monday, followed by the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Tuesday. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Buckeye on Friday. The Reserve on Sunday. The American Mariner on Monday, followed by the Armco on Tuesday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Fairport, Ohio

08/09
On Thursday evening the Cuyahoga was loading salt in Fairport. The suction dredge Athcafalaya remains in port.

Cuyahoga loading.
Wide view.
Close up of the after cabins.

Reported by: Dave Merchant




Yankcanuck in Erie

08/09
The Yankcanuck paid an extremely rare visit to Erie Thursday, arriving at 7:30 pm. The vessel proceeded past the Mounfort Terminal, turned into the bay and turned around to dock at the Mounfort Terminal.

The Yankcanuck has a cargo of stone from Algoma Steel in Sault Ste. Marie. This is the second such load Erie has received this year, the first coming when the Pere Marquette 41 docked in Erie on July 27. The Yankcanuck has spent most of the season shuttling gypsum between Conneaut and Port Colborne, so this is a rare trip for her to make.

The last time the Yankcanuck visited Erie was December 30, 1994, while being towed by the tug Anglian Lady. At that time she delivered a cargo of logs for the since closed International Paper Mill.

Yankcanuck inbound.
Another View.
Side View.
Stern View.
At dock.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Quebec Report

08/09
Cunard's flagship, Queen Elizabeth II, arrived Wednesday afternoon. The mighty cruise ship was berthing in the Old Port (sections 21-22), at the foot of world renowned Chateau Frontenac. The vessel departed port at 4:30 p.m. Thursday.

Other vessels in port Thursday included Quebecois, unloading grain at Bunge (section 18), the saltie Kamenitza, also at Bunge but loading at section 28, and liquid bulker Sunshine, unloading gasoline at Ultramar' section 87.

Ship repairing activities are getting on at Davie shipyard, with two Groupe Desgagnes carriers (Petrolia Desgagnés, Vega Desgagnés) at the fitting wall, and Canada Maritime's Canmar Courage, a St. Lawrence very familiar 2100 TEU double hulled containership heading for the deep drydock for the very first time.

Reported by: Jeff Boutin




WAMBO this Saturday

08/09
On Saturday the 14th annual WAMBO (Wallaceburg (Ont.) Antique Motor & Boat Outing will be held in Wallaceburg. Once a busy commercial port known as Canada's Inland Deep Water Port, approximately 90 antique cruisers and runabouts, over 250 antique cars and trucks, 35 antique fire rigs, 50 antique motor cycles, agricultural equipment of the past and a vintage airplane fly past mark the event which attracts 15,000 people from both side of the border. No admission is charged.

A highlight of the event is the 1:00 p.m. arrival of the Detroit excursion boat Diamond Belle, operated by Diamond Jack's River Tours. Capt. Wm. Hoey and his vessel first arrived in Wallaceburg in the fall of 1994, reviving a once brisk historic route between Detroit and Wallaceburg when excursion ships such as Thousand Islander, Olcott, Rapids King, Ossifrage were on scheduled service. In August of 1951 the Ashley-Dustin steamer Put-in-Bay arrived in Wallaceburg for a special afternoon-moonlight charter, ending steam boat excursion service locally.

The Diamond Belle trip offers a unique and picturesque inland route to Wallaceburg via the narrow and twisting Chenal Ecarte(Snye) and Sydenham Rivers. Aug.10, 2002 will mark the 8th appearance of a Diamond Jack's River Tours vessel in Wallaceburg, the 1 pm to 3 pm stopover a highlight for WAMBO.

For further information call 519-627-4733; 519-627=3296 or visit the WAMBO web site www.kent.net/wambo

Reported by: Alan Mann




Today in Great Lakes History - August 09

The keel was laid for the INDIANA HARBOR on August 9, 1978.

The HAMILDOC (3) was christened on August 9, 1963.

The G.A. TOMLINSON (1) entered service August 9, 1909.

The SHAUGHNESSY with the former CSL steamer ASHCROFT in tow of the Polish tug JANTAR arrived in Castellon, Spain for scrapping in 1969.

On August 9, 1989 the tug FAIRPLAY IX departed Sorel with the FORT CHAMBLY and NIPIGON BAY in tandem tow bound for Aliaga, Turkey for scrapping.

On the night of August 9, 1865, METEOR met her running mate, the propeller PEWABIC, off Thunder Bay on Lake Huron around 9:00 p.m. As the two approached, somehow METEOR sheered and struck her sister, sinking the PEWABIC within minutes in 180 feet of water. About one hundred twenty-five people went down with her, and 86 others were saved.

On 9 August 1850, CHAUTAUQUE (wooden sidewheel steamer, 124'/162T, built in 1839 at Buffalo, NY) caught fire in the St. Clair River and burned to a total loss. In previous years she had been driven ashore (1844) and sank twice - once in 1846 and again in 1848. In September 1846, she made the newspaper by purposely ramming a schooner which blocked her path while she was attempting to leave the harbor at Monroe, MI.

On 9 August 1856, BRUNSWICK (wooden propeller, 164', 512 t, built in 1853 at Buffalo) was carrying corn, scrap iron and lard from Chicago when she sprang a leak in a storm and was abandoned by the crew and passengers. One passenger drowned when one of the boats capsized, but the rest made it to shore near Sleeping Bear in the three other boats. BRUNSWICK went down in 50 fathoms of water, 6 miles south of South Manitou Island on Lake Michigan.

On 9 August 1875, the Port Huron Times reported that the schooner HERO, while attempting to enter the piers at Holland, Michigan, was driven two miles to leeward and went to pieces. Her crew took to the boats, but the boats capsized. Luckily all made it safely to shore.

August 9, 1938 - The Pere Marquette carferries 17 and 18 left Milwaukee for Grand Haven carrying 600 United States Army Troops, bound for Army war maneuvers near Allegan and at Camp Custer.

On 9 August 1870, ONTONAGON (wooden propeller bulk freight, 176', 377 t, built in 1856 at Buffalo) sank after striking a rock near the Soo. She was initially abandoned but later that same year she was recovered, repaired and put back in service. In 1880, she stranded near Fairborn, Ohio and then three years later she finally met her demise when she was run ashore on Stag island in the Detroit River and succumbed to fire.

The 204' wooden side-wheeler CUMBERLAND was launched at Melancthon Simpson's yard in Port Robinson, Ontario on 9 August 1871. She cost $101,000. Too large for the Welland Canal, she was towed up the Welland River to Chippawa and then up the Niagara River to Lake Erie. She operated on the Upper Lakes and carried soldiers to put down the Red River Rebellion. She survived being frozen in for the winter near Sault Ste. Marie in 1872, grounding in 1873, sinking in 1874, and another grounding in 1876. But she finally sank near Isle Royale on Lake Superior in 1877.

In 1942 the sea-going tug Point Sur was launched at Globe Shipbuilding Co. in Superior, and the Walter Butler Shipbuilders, in Superior, launched the coastal freighter William Bursley.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes,Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Stone Trade Holds Even In July

08/08
Shipments of limestone on the Great Lakes totaled 4,459,380 net tons in July, virtually the same as the corresponding period last year. Since the resumption of the stone trade in late March, loadings stand at 16,444,358 net tons, a decrease of 2 percent from the same point in the 2001 navigation season. Decreased demand for aggregate from the construction industry continues to negatively impact the trade.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Assocation




First Visit For Arklow Bridge

08/08
Wednesday afternoon the Irish vessel Arklow Bridge made her first visit to the Great Lakes. The 328-foot saltie was transiting upbound above Lock 7.

Also heading up to the upper lakes were the Bulgarian registered Malyovitza, along with the Russian flagged .

Arklow Bridge upbound.
Stern view.
Malyovitza.
Stern view.
Khudozhnik Kraynev.
Stern view.

Reported by: Alex Howard




Welland Canal Documentary

08/08
“Bypass” is the name of a new documentary film to be made on the Welland Canal. The documentary was announced on Tuesday at the Welland Canal Centre, Lock 3, St. Catharines, in ceremonies sponsored by the Welland Canals Foundation.

Scheduled for its inaugural presentation in June 2004, commemorating the 175th anniversary of the historic 25-mile waterway, the two-hour film will be produced by the prominent TV production company, Norflicks Productions Ltd., Toronto.

Development funding for “Bypass”, will include funding from the Ontario Trillium Foundation and these details will be outlined by Consumer and Business Services Minister Tim Hudak and Jim Bradley, MPP and Peter Kormos, MPP. The overall budget for the film will be approximately $ 1 million.

August 6, is a historic day for the Welland Canal, for on that date, 70 years ago, in 1932, the 4th present canal, was officially opened by Canada’s Governor Lord Bessborough and British Commonwealth statesmen, including Stanley Baldwin, Prime Minister of Britain.

Representatives of Niagara’s business and marine organization, tourism, education, and heritage will join with the general public as plans are unveiled to produce 'Bypass', the exciting story of the Welland Canal which shaped North America's heartland.

A volunteer organization, representative of the canal zone from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario, the Welland Canals Foundation, was established in 1980 following the 1979 highly successful Welland Canal 150th anniversary celebration.




State of Michigan Continues up the Seaway

08/08
Wednesday morning the Great Lakes Maritime Academy's new ship, “State of Michigan was heading down the St. Lawrence Seaway. The vessel passed through the Iroquois Lock eight hours ahead of schedule. By 9 p.m. Wednesday night they were expected to pass Cape Vincent.

Pictures by Peter Carter
State of Michigan passing Brockville.
Another view.

Chart the voyage on the NMC website at www.nmc.edu/glma/news/state-of-michigan.html




Marquette Report

08/08
The Lee A. Tregurtha and the H. Lee White loaded ore in Marquette on Tuesday while the Algosteel waited for the White to finish. The Algomarine was due in on Wednesday, loading about noon.

The Charles M. Beeghly is expected early Thursday and will load immediately. The Paul R. Tregurtha can come in to unload coal. Also expected on Thursday is the John J. Boland.

Lee A. Tregurtha loading.
Algosteel waits at anchor, view from the deck of the Lee A.
Dusty loading on the H. Lee White.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Stone Port

08/08
The Buffalo arrived at Stoneport, Mi. early Wednesday morning. It has not been a common visitor this year to the Lake Huron port. It loaded stone for Detroit.

Waiting at anchor was the tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons. The pair came in at 5 p.m. after the departure of the Buffalo. The McKee Sons loaded for Bay City and Saginaw.

Buffalo loading.
Departing.
McKee Sons loads.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Goderich Update

08/08
Saturday was a busy day at the salt mine. The Canadian Navigator loaded that afternoon, followed by the Algorail in the evening. She loaded overnight and departed on Sunday morning.

Reported by: L. Stuparyk




Erie News

08/08
The Wolverine made her first visit to Erie in the 2002 season on Wednesday, arriving shortly after midnight with stone for the Mounfort Terminal. The vessel finished unloading at 8 a.m. and departed the Mounfort Terminal, turning around in the bay just off of the Terminal. She departed at 8:30 for Conneaut, where she was scheduled to load 15,000 tons of coal for Charlevoix. The Wolverine is the second Oglebay Norton vessel to visit Erie since July 28.

At the same time the Wolverine was leaving, the 72-foot tall ship St. Lawrence II was inbound. The crew maneuvered the vessel into a bay that was relatively calm compared to Lake Erie. The David Z. Norton is due in Calcite at 3 a.m. Thursday to load for Erie. When the Norton visits Erie it will be the fourth Oglebay Norton vessel to visit Erie in 2002. When she arrives, likely on Saturday, she will have made three visits, and the Wolverine one. Four visits represent the most by Oglebay Norton to Erie since 1998, when Oglebay made at least one visit a week along with American Steamship Vessels.

St. Lawrence II inbound.
Stern view.
Wolverine outbound
Stern view.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Hamilton Report

08/08
Wednesday evening the saltie Hea was moored at Pier 12. Although no unloading activity was observed, it looked as though steel products had been unloaded earlier in the day. The James Norris remains in lay-up at Pier 11.

Fed Nav's Lake Ontario is moored at Pier 14 unloading steel coils, while over at Pier 23 the Federal Rideau was unloading steel billets.

Observed from Pier 27, the Algocen was seen backing from Dofasco's iron ore dock at 7:40 pm where she had just finished unloading. At 8:15 pm, the Algocen transited the Burlington Ship Canal and was headed towards the Welland Canal.

At 8:30 pm the tug RCL Tug 11 and barge Derrick #1 (McNally Construction) were seen headed towards the Burlington Ship Canal from the Burlington side of Lake Ontario. At 9:50 the tug and barge transited the canal into Hamilton Harbor.

Reported by: Patricia Burgon




Toronto Update

08/08
The tug Tony McKay arrived in port Wednesday afternoon and took the cement barge Metis away for its second trip of the season. Commercial traffic has been very slow in Toronto in recent weeks.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 08

The JAMES R. BARKER became the longest vessel on the Great Lakes when it entered service on August 8, 1976. It held at least a tie for this honor until the Paul R. Tregurtha entered service on May 10, 1981. The BARKER's deckhouse had been built at AmShip's Chicago yard and was transported in sections to Lorain on the deck of the steamer GEORGE D. GOBLE.

The BUFFALO was christened August 8, 1978

The E.B. BARBER along with the motor vessel SAGINAW BAY arrived August 8, 1985 under tow in Vigo, Spain. Demolition began on August 9, 1985 by Miguel Martins Periera at Guixar-Vigo.

The Soo River Company was forced into receivership on August 8, 1982.

On 8 August 1887, CITY OF ASHLAND (wooden sidewheel tug, 90'/85GT, built in 1883 at Ashland, WI) was towing a log raft near Washburn, WI in Lake Superior. Fire broke out near the boilers and quickly cut off the crew from the lifeboat. They jumped overboard and all but 1 or 2 were picked up by local tugs. The burned hull sank soon afterward.

The wooden tug J.E. EAGLE was destroyed by fire at about 4:00 PM on 8 August 1869 while towing a raft of logs on Saginaw Bay to Bay City. Her loss was valued at $10,000, but she was insured for only $7,000.

August 8, 1981 - The Ann Arbor carferry VIKING took part in a ceremony christening a body of water between Manitowoc and Two Rivers as "Maritime Bay".

August 8, 1999 - The KAYE E. BARKER delivered the last shipment of limestone for Dow Chemical, Ludington. The plant later closed it's lime plant and began lime deliveries by rail.

On 8 August 1813, the U. S. Navy schooner HAMILTON (wooden 10-gun schooner, 112', 76t, built in 1809 at Oswego as DIANA) was lying at anchor off the mouth of the Niagara River on Lake Ontario with her armed fleet-mate SCOURGE awaiting dawn when they planned to attack the British fleet. However, a quick rising storm swamped and sank both vessels. Since they were both built as commercial vessels, it has been suggested that their cannons may have made them top-heavy. The HAMILTON was found by sonar in 1975, sitting upright almost completely intact at the bottom of Lake Ontario. The Cousteau organization has dived to her and she was the subject of a live television dive by Robert Ballard in 1990.

August 8, 1882 - an August snowstorm was reported by a ship on Lake Michigan, dumping 6 inches of snow and slush on the deck. Snow showers were reported at shore points that day.

In 1942 the seven shipyards at Duluth-Superior were in full production and announced three launchings in two days. The submarine chaser SC-671 was launched on August 8 at Inland Waterways, Inc. on Park Point.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, Brian Bernard , Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl in the Welland

08/07
Tuesday the Gaelic tug Roger Stahl was downbound above Lock 7, on its way to Port Weller to pick up a barge for delivery to Detroit.

The barge Faust 31 has been at Port Weller Dry Docks since being repaired last fall. The barge began taking on water during a pre canal transit heading to Detroit.

Also downbound Tuesday were the salties Virginiaborg at Lock 7, Lake Michigan (formerly Federal Maas) approaching Lock 2.Upbound exiting Lock 2 was the tug Petite Forte and barge St. Marys Cement II.

Pictures by Alex Howard
Roger Stahl heading for Lock 7.
Stern view.
Virginiaborg at Lock 7.
Lake Michigan.
Stern view.
Petite Forte and barge St. Marys Cement II.
Close up of tug.
Stern view.

Reported by: Alex Howard and Jimmy Sprunt




Ira Enters

08/07
Early Tuesday morning the Ira picked up anchor and waited for the Selvick tugs Ethel E. and Carla Anne Selvick to assist them in the river and docking along the William H Donner.

A strong Northeast wind was blowing as the Ira entered port. As the Ira was about half way through the piers, the wind pushed her to the Marinette side of the channel and the Ethel E brought the bow back to the middle of the channel, the stern came close to the breakwall but the quick action of the pilot and tug Carla Anne Selvick kept the Ira out of danger.

The tow proceeded to dock with out further incident. The Ira entered port with a draft of about 23 feet.

Ira in the channel at sunrise.
Ethel E. works to bring the Ira's bow back into the channel.
Ira using full engine to keep stern away from Marinette pier wall.
Another view of Ira's stern in the channel.
Stern view after completing turn headed for the dock.
Tugs working to bring Ira along the Donner on a windy morning.

Reported by: Scott Best




St. Lawrence Seaway & River news

08/07
Entering the Seaway Tuesday was the research vessel/training ship State of Michigan on her delivery trip to Traverse City, MI. The vessel is the former Persistent which was a US Coast Guard vessel but was operated by the US Navy until 1998.

Still laid up in Montreal is the Algoriver. Her name and port of registry has been painted out everywhere including the lifeboats. The Algoma bear logo on the stack has been painted out also.

Because there is not enough business for two bunkering tankers in the Port of Montreal, the Imperial Lachine has remained docked at section 102 this season. The larger Horizon Montreal has been active.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Twin Ports Report

08/07
Montrealais was back in Duluth on Tuesday to unload at St. Lawrence Cement. American Mariner was due at the Northland Constructors dock during the evening to unload stone. From there it was scheduled to shift to Midwest Energy Terminal on Wednesday to load coal for the Shiras power plant in Marquette.

In Superior, James R. Barker was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal, to be followed by Indiana Harbor on Wednesday. Saltie Doxa D was finishing its load at Cenex Harvest States terminal. It is to be followed by the Toro and then Kapitonas Marcinkus, both of which have been anchored on the lake for several days.

Reported by: Al Miller




Saginaw Update

08/07
The Adam E. Cornelius was inbound the Saginaw River passing the Front Range around 5pm. She proceeded upriver to the Bay Aggregates Dock to unload during the evening hours on Tuesday.

Pictures by Todd Shorkey
Adam E. Cornelius upbound at Essroc.
Head on.
Turning.
Backing into the Bay Aggregates Dock.

Reported by: Stephen Hause, Lon Morgan and Todd Shorkey




Conneaut and Ashtabula Update

08/07
Conneaut and Ashtabula have been busy over the past few days. The Calumet loaded coal in Conneaut Monday, departing for Buffalo at around 3:30 p.m. In Ashtabula, the Algowood was loading coal while the Halifax remained at anchor off port waiting for her to clear. The Great Lakes Trader was unloading ore from Marquette at the Pinney Dock and departed at 2:45 p.m. A Fednav saltie, possibly the Federal Shimanto, was in port unloading titanium slag.

The taconite trade in Ashtabula, dominated by Oglebay Norton in the past, has fallen to American Steamship due to the pooling arrangement between the companies. On Saturday the H Lee White and Adam E. Cornelius docked back to back to unload taconite, the White's cargo coming from Marquette and the Cornelius' from Silver Bay .

Calumet loads in Conneaut.
Great Lakes Trader unloads.
Backing from Dock.
Stern View.
Close Up of the Tug.
Backing Away from Dock.
Turning.
Backing Out of the Harbor.
Algowood loads.
Kozoil and Palmetto.
Kozoil.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Today in Great Lakes History - August 07

The JAMES R. BARKER was christened August 7, 1976 she was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flag ship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.). She was built at a cost of more than $43 million under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. She was the third thousand footer to sail on the Lakes and the first built entirely on the Lakes.

On 7 August 1844, DANIEL WHITNEY, a wooden schooner, was found floating upside-down, with her crew of 4 missing and presumed dead.. She was six miles off mouth of the Kalamazoo River in Lake Michigan.

August 7, 1948 - Edward L. Ryerson, chairman of Inland Steel Company announced that the new ore boat under construction for Inland will be named the WILFRED SYKES in honor of the president of the company. Mr. Sykes had been associated with Inland since 1923, when he was employed to take charge of engineering and construction work. From 1927 to 1930 he served as assistant general superintendent and from 1930 to 1941 as assistant to the president in charge of operations. He became president of Inland in May, 1941. He had been a director of the company since 1935. The new ship was to be the largest and fastest on the Great Lakes, having a carrying capacity in intermediate depth of 20,000 gross tons. The ship will be 678 ft. long, 70 ft. wide and 37 ft. deep, and will run at 16 miles per hour when loaded.

While lying at the dock at the C & L.H. RR Yard in Port Huron on 7 August 1879, the scow MORNING LARK sank after the scow MAGRUDER ran into her at 4:00 AM. MORNING LARK was raised and repaired at the Wolverine dry dock and was back in service on 20 September 1879.

Data from: Dave Wobster, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Tug Roger Stahl continues to next tow

08/06
Gaelic Tugboat's big twin screw tug Roger Stahl returned to her Detroit dock about 2:30 p.m. Monday. The Stahl stopped at the Waterfront Petroleum on the Rouge and took on 8,000 gallons of fuel, then at the Gaelic yard was resupplied with groceries, and potable water.

By 5 p.m. Captain Wellington ordered the lines slipped, and the tug departed for Port Weller to pick up a scow for Detroit.

The tug Roger Stahl inbound the Rouge River at the Fort Street bridge about 2:30 p.m.
The big tug shifting the barge Marysville so the tug can be fueled at Waterfront Petroleum.
Captain John Wellington ordering the lines off for departure.
The tug on her way back outbound the Rouge at 5 p.m., bound for Port Weller.

Reported by: Bill Hoey




Marinette - Menominee Update

08/06
This week looks to be a busy one for the ports of Menominee and Marinette. Sunday evening the Melissa Desgagnes arrived in Marinette to unload pig iron. Monday morning the salty Ira arrived off Menominee and went to anchor until Tuesday morning when the Melissa Desgagnes departs. The Victoriaborg is due into the K&K dock on Thursday with wood pulp. On Saturday the Marinette is due into Menominee to unload a cargo of lumber from Germany.

Pictures by Scott Best
Melissa Desgagnes unloading Monday evening .
Ira at anchor off Menominee breakwall on a windy evening.

Pictures by Dick Lund
Desgagnes unloading.
Another view.
Close up.

Reported by: Scott Best and Dick Lund




Maumee Returns

08/06
The Maumee returned Monday with another load of coal for the power station in Tonawanda, NY. This is her third trip into the Lake Erie port since Friday. She waited at the Black rock Locks for the Karen Andrie and barge to get to the wall. She then passed into the Niagara River with a Buffalo Bills flag flying from the pilot house.

Each trip she has delivered coal loaded in Conneaut, Ohio.

As she passed through the Buffalo harbor Sunday she added to the delight of the early arrivals to Buffalo's annual Waterfest . Open to the public for tours on Saturday and Sunday were the USCG icebreaker Neah Bay, Great Lakes research vessel Aquarius and the historic fireboat Edward M. cotter.

Reported by: Tom Miller and Brian Wroblewski




Marquette Update

08/06
The Herbert C. Jackson loaded at Marquette on Monday. Due in on Tuesday are the Lee A Tregurtha, H. Lee White, Algosteel, and the Algomarine. The Algomarine will probably not load until Wednesday, when the Beeghly will also arrive in the afternoon.

The Paul R. Tregurtha is expected Wednesday to unload coal. A busy few days at the upper harbor.

Recent pictures from Marquette
Charles M. Beeghly loading.
Bow view.
Great Lakes Trader arrives.
Bow view.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Burton Visits Stone Port

08/06
The Courtney Burton arrived at Stoneport, Mi. Friday morning. This was her first visit of the year to Stoneport. It loaded stone bound for Superior,WI and departed that evening. She was followed by the tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder.

Courtney Burton loading.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




H. Lee White Cheered

08/06
On Sunday the upbound H. Lee White became very popular with the spectators of the St. Clair Power Boat Races when it elected to check back and not interrupt one of the races. The crowd cheered for the vessel when it finally moved past St. Clair, Mi.

The St. Clair River is closed to pleasure boats during the race, but commercial vessels have the right of way and can delay the races.

Reported by: Bob Arnold




Alpena Update

08/06
The Wolverine came into port around noon on Sunday. It made an unusual stop in the Thunder Bay River at the Alpena Oil Dock to deliver a load of sand from Calcite. Normally the Wolverine brings coal into Lafarge off and on. It left around 3:30 p.m. heading for Cedarville.

The Alpena is in South Chicago. The Jacklyn M barge Integrity is at Green Bay and the J.A.W Iglehart is going to Detroit. The Paul H. Townsend is expected to leave lay-up in Muskegon on Wednesday.

Wolverine unloads.

Reported by: Ben & Chanda McClain




Marblehead Loading

08/06
The Calumet backed into the Lafarge gravel dock at Marblehead, Ohio about 10:30 p.m. Saturday night. At noon on Sunday the Fred R. White Jr. waited just north of the dock while the Calumet departed, heading east.

Reported by: Bob Smalling




Ashtabula Update

08/06
A rare visitor to the Norfolk Southern coal dock Monday afternoon was the Paul R Tregurtha. Interlake boats, once very common to Ashtabula, are now a rare sight. The John J. Boland was also in port, unloading ore at the A&B Dock.

For the last two weeks, US Army Corps of Engineers tug Kozoil has been working a crane barge doing repair work on the east breakwall.

Reported by: Jeff Miller




State of Michigan on St. Lawrence River

08/06
The Great Lakes Maritime Academy's new ship, “State of Michigan”, was traveling down the St. Lawrence River Monday and expected to arrive in Quebec City by 4 p.m. They are cruising at 10 mph and enjoying good weather as they are accompanied by whales.

Chart the voyage on the NMC website at www.nmc.edu/glma/news/state-of-michigan.html




Trip down the River

08/06
Below are images aboard the saltie Lake Michigan as she passed down bound from Port Huron to Detroit Monday. The vessel is loaded with 25,699 MT of Flax Seed from Thunder Bay.

Onboard the Lake Michigan heading for the St. Clair River off Port Huron.
Tug Roger Stahl races by.
Passing under the Blue Water Bridges.
Meeting the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin in the St. Clair Cut Off Channel.
Stern view.
George A. Stinson upbound on Lake St. Clair.
Close up.
Stern view.
Reserve upbound.
Close up.
Stern view.
Approaching the Ambassador Bridge off Detroit.
Detroit pilot boat Huron Maid heads out to the Lake Michigan.
Disembarking via the pilot ladder to the deck of the Huron Maid.
Lake Michigan continues downbound for the Seaway.

Other traffic in Detroit
Buffalo on the Rouge River.
Buffalo unloading.
Charles M. Beeghly waiting to enter the Rouge at Zug Island.

Reported by: Wade Streeter




Weekly Updates

08/06
The weekly updates have been uploaded. Click here to view




Today in Great Lakes History - August 06

WALTER J. McCARTHY JR.'s bottom was damaged at the fit-out dock and required dry docking on August 6, 1977 for repairs prior to her maiden voyage.

The IMPERIAL BEDFORD was delivered to Imperial Oil Co. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. on August 6,1969.

The fourth Welland Canal was officially opened with much ceremony on August 6, 1932 when the steamer LEMOYNE, then the largest bulk carrier on the Lakes, locked down the Flight Locks.

On August 6, 1982 the Pierson fleet was placed in receivership and eventually the entire fleet was purchased by Parrish & Heimbecker Ltd. (P&H Shipping Ltd.,), Mississauga, Ont.

WILLIAM CLAY loaded her first cargo of iron ore on August 6, 1953 to be delivered to her home port at the Ford Rouge Plant south of Detroit, MI.

On August 6, 1965 the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON, upbound in the Trenton Channel of the Detroit River after having unloaded taconite ore at McLouth Steel, lost steering control and struck a stationary section of the Grosse Ile toll bridge. This caused the bridge section and two cars to drop into the river. Fortunately no one was seriously hurt, but the bridge was closed for several months. The HUTCHINSON sailed to AmShip's South Chicago yard for repairs.

The KINGDOC (2) was launched August 6, 1963 for N.M. Paterson & Sons Ltd.

The POINTE NOIRE was released on August 6, 1977 after running aground two days prior in the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River blocking the channel.

On 6 August 1890, MICHIGAN (Steel sidewheel carferry, 296'/1730GT) was launched at W. Bay City, MI. She was built by F. W. Wheeler (hull # 76) for the Canadian pacific Railway for use on the Detroit River and had a capacity of 16 railroad cars. She was retired in 1916 and converted to an unrigged pulpwood barge.

On 6 August 1871, the 3-mast wooden schooner GOLDEN FLEECE was down bound on Lake Huron laden with iron ore. The crew mistook the light at Port Austin for the light at Pointe Aux barques and steered directly for the Port Austin Reef where the vessel grounded. After 200 tons of ore were removed, GOLDEN FLEECE was pulled off the reef then towed to Detroit by the tug McCLLELLAN and repaired.

On 6 August 1900 the McMorran Wrecking Company secured the contract for raising the 203-foot 3-mast wooden schooner H. W. SAGE which sank at Harsen's Island on 29 July 1900. The SAGE had been rammed by the steel steamer CHICAGO. Two lives had been lost; they were crushed in her forecastle.

August 6, 1929 - The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 was launched. She was christened by Miss Ann Bur Townsend, daughter of the mayor of Saginaw.

On 6 August 1870, the wooden propeller tug TORNADO had her boiler explode without warning four miles northwest of Oswego, New York. The tug sank quickly in deep water. Three of the six onboard lost their lives. Apparently the tug had a new boiler and it had been allowed to run almost dry. When cold water was let in to replenish the supply, the boiler exploded.

Data from: Max Hanley, Jody L. Aho , Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Superior Ore Dock Has Third-Best Month Ever

08/05
The Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway's iron ore loading facility in Superior Wisconsin, recorded its third-best month ever in July. The dock loaded 1,591,825 gross tons (1,782,844 net tons) of iron ore pellets into Great Lakes freighters.

That total came within a boatload or so of setting a new record for the dock. On only two occasions has the dock loaded more iron ore in a single month. In September 1991, BNSF shipped 1,646,608 gross tons (1,844,201 net tons). In June 1989, the dock loaded 1,641,608 gross tons (1,838,601 net tons).

Included among the regular callers at the dock are both of Bethlehem Steel's 1,000-footers and the George A. Stinson that delivers pellets to National Steel's Detroit mill. This year the dock is also shipping pellets to ISG Steel's Indiana Harbor and Lorain, Ohio facilities.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Assocation




Today in Great Lakes History - August 05

The Richard M. Marshall (later Joseph S. Wood, John Dykstra, Benson Ford, and, finally, 265808) entered service on August 5, 1953. From 1966 until it was retired at the end of 1984, this vessel and the William Clay Ford (1) were fleet mates. There is only one other instance of two boats being owned by the same company at some point in their careers with as close or closer age difference. The Charles M. Beeghly (originally Shenango II) and the Herbert C. Jackson, fleetmates since 1967, both entered service on May 14, 1959.

The aft section of the WALTER J. McCARTHY JR. was float launched August 5, 1976. She was American Steamship's first thousand-footer and the first thousand-footer built at Bay Ship.

The G.A. TOMLINSON (2). was sold outright to Columbia Transportation Co. (an Oglebay Norton Co.), on August 5, 1971 along with the last two Tomlinson vessels, the SYLVANIA and the JAMES DAVIDSON.

On 5 August 1850, ST. CLAIR (sidewheel steamer, passenger & package freight, 140'/210T, built in 1843 at Detroit, MI) was reported as lost with no details given whatsoever. The report of her loss was published 3 days BEFORE she was enrolled at Detroit by J. Watkin.

The motor vessel Beaver Islander completed her maiden voyage to Charlevoix in 1962. At the time, she was the largest, fastest, and most advanced ship built for the run. She served as the flagship for 37 years, a record, until the Emerald Isle II arrived in 1997.

August 5, 1907 - A female passenger dived off the deck of the PERE MARQUETTE 18 (I) on a dare. Two of the 18's officers leapt over to rescue her. One of the officers nearly drowned and was rescued by the passenger.

On 5 August 1866, AUTOCRAT (2-mast, wooden schooner, 345 t, built in 1854 at Caltaraugus, NY) was carrying 15,000 bushels of corn and was lying off Chicago, waiting for a storm to die down. Just before dawn, the schooner J.S. HEWHOUSE was also seeking shelter when she ran into AUTOCRAT, sinking her in 7 fathoms of water. The crew was rescued by the tug UNION.

On 5 August 1869, LAURA E. CALVIN (3-mast wooden schooner, 130', 216 t, built in 1863 at Garden Island, Ontario as a bark) sprang a leak during a storm and foundered 10 miles off Braddock's Point on Lake Ontario. No lives were lost.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Jody L. Aho , Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Tug Roger Stahl and barge Manitowoc Arrive

08/04
The big tug Roger Stahl and barge Manitowoc arrived in Menominee at 10 p.m. Saturday evening. The tow arrived in the middle of the City of Menominee's annual Water Front Festival fireworks.

The Roger Stahl was followed inbound in the channel by the Erika Kobasic pushing a barge for the fireworks display.

The barge Manitowoc was docked at the K&K east dock. By 11 p.m. the Roger Stahl departed the Menominee River heading back to Detroit.

Roger Stahl arrives at K&K east dock.
Barge Manitowoc docked.
Roger Stahl turning in the river to depart.

Reported by: Scott Best




U.S.-Flag Fleet Holding Even With Last Year

08/04
The major U.S.-Flag Lakes lines had 58 vessels in service on August 1, the same total as a year earlier. Returning to service during July was American Steamship's American Republic. However, still idle are the Elton Hoyt 2ND (Interlake Steamship); Edward L. Ryerson (Central Marine Logistics); Joseph H. Frantz (Oglebay Norton Marine Services Company); and Richard Reiss (Erie Sand Steamship). Also, the straight-decker Kinsman Independent has been removed from service to due lack of grain cargos.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Assocation




Twin Ports Report

08/04
Shipments of Canadian lumber continue to arrive in the Twin Ports from Thunder Bay. A large tug towing three barges of lumber and assisted by a local tug arrived at the Duluth ship canal about 8 a.m. Saturday. The large tug quickly dropped the barge at Hallett Dock 8 in Superior and by 11 a.m. was bound for Thunder Bay with empty barges. There was talk that this sort of traffic would end after the imposition of duties earlier this year on imported Canadian lumber.

As the tug-barge train was headed into Duluth, the Stewart J. Cort was running on a parallel course several miles away bound for Superior Entry and the BNSF ore dock.

Other Twin Ports traffic on Saturday included Arthur M. Anderson, arriving at DMIR with stone; the heavy-lift saltie Fairload unloading at the Duluth port terminal; and Walter J. McCarthy Jr. loading at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal.

The brig Niagara drew a large crowd to the bay front on Saturday for tours.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - August 04

Two favorites of many boatwatchers, entered service on August 4. The William Clay Ford (1) entered service on August 4, 1953, and the Edward L. Ryerson entered service on August 4, 1960.

The MELISSA DESGAGNES sailed to Holland under her 'a' name ONTADOC (2) with a load of Bentonite from Chicago on August 4, 1979.

The E.J. BLOCK was laid up for the last time at Indiana Harbor, IN on August 4 1984, the E.J. BLOCK was sold for scrap in late May, 1987.

The D.M. CLEMSON (2) left Superior on August 4, 1980 in tow of Malcolm Marine's tug MALCOLM for Thunder Bay where she was dismantled.

The HOCHELAGA (2) was launched August 4, 1949 at the Collingwood Shipyards Ltd., Collingwood, Ont. for Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., Montreal, Que

On a foggy August 4, 1977 the POINTE NOIRE went hard aground near the entrance to the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River and blocked the channel. After her grain cargo was lightered by Columbia Transportation's crane steamer BUCKEYE, the POINTE NOIRE was released on August 6th. She was reloaded in Hay Lake and continued her downbound trip. Repairs to her bottom damage were completed at Thunder Bay. Ont.

On 4 August 1902, CITY OF VENICE (wooden propeller freighter, 301'/2108GT, built in 1892 at W. Bay City, MI). was sailing in perfect weather in Lake Erie abreast of Rondeau, Ontario with a load of iron ore. The steamer SEGUIN collided with the CITY OF VENICE, sinking her. U.S. marshals later impounded the SEGUIN for damages.

August 4, 1935 - The only time the ANN ARBOR NO. 7 had the full limit of passengers when she ran an excursion from Frankfort around the Manitou Isle and back with 375 passengers on board.

LYCOMING (wooden propeller, 251', 1610 gt) was launched on 4 August 1880 at W. Bay City, Michigan by F. W. Wheeler (hull #7) as a 2-deck package freighter. She was rebuilt as a single deck bulk freighter after she burned in 1905. She was one of the few bulk freighters that still carried her arched hog-braces visible above deck.

HIRAM W. SIBLEY (wooden propeller freighter, 221', 1419 gt) was launched at E. Saginaw, Michigan on 4 August 1890. She only lasted eight years. While carrying 70,000 bushels of corn from Chicago for Detroit, she stranded on the northwest corner of South Manitou Island in Lake Michigan during blizzard on 26 November 1898. The tugs PROTECTOR and SWEEPSTAKES were dispatched for assistance but the SIBLEY re-floated herself during high water the following night, then was stranded on the southwest side of North Fox Island to prevent sinking. She broke in half; then completely broke up during a gale on 7 December 1898.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Jody L. Aho, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Tug Roger Stahl and barge Manitowoc progress

08/03
Captain John Wellington, master of the big Gaelic tug Roger Stahl reports that the tow is doing well, and the tug is performing in its usual excellent manor.

In the push mode from Toledo to the South end of Lake Huron the tow was making about 10 mph. Due to the tornado warnings and forecast thunderstorms for Lake Huron Capt. Wellington put the big barge on the tug's heavy tow wire and let out the winch, dropping the barge to about 1,000 feet behind the tug, this reduced the speed of the tow to about 8 mph.

If the tow continues in the towing mode it is expected that the tug and barge will reach its destination of Menomonee Michigan about midnight on Saturday.

Reported by: Bill Hoey




SMET Sets All-Time Coal Record

08/03
Superior Midwest Energy Terminal (SMET) in Superior, Wisconsin, loaded 2,548,173 net tons of coal in July, a new record for the most coal to be shipped by a single dock in one month in the entire history of Great Lakes shipping. The previous peak was 2,468,619 net tons loaded at the Chesapeake & Ohio dock in Toledo in October 1946. Before that, the record was held by Sandusky - 2,200,737 net tons in October 1944.

For the season, coal loadings at SMET stand at 8,208,187 net tons, essentially the same level as a year ago.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Assocation




Twin Ports Report

08/03
Saltie traffic in the Twin Ports picked up a bit toward the end of the week. On Friday, Hope 1 was unloading steel coils at the Duluth port terminal while Doxa D was anchored on the lake waiting for the Cenex Harvest States berth occupied by Canadian Prospector.

Elsewhere, Silver Bay was busy with Reserve departing and John J. Boland arriving.

Reported by: Al Miller




Busy Day in Manistee

08/03
Thursday was a busy day for Manistee. Already in port were the Evans McKeil/Salty Dog No. 1 at General Chemical and the tug Gregory Busch with a barge tied up at Seng's dock for repairs to the barge.

The Busch has a load of stone for pier repairs at Portage Lake ten miles to the north. The Capt. Ralph Tucker came in to load calcium chloride at General Chemical and tied up alongside Salty Dog.

The Fred R. White Jr. arrived with a load of coal for Packaging Corporation of America at Filer City. The small cruise vessel Grande Mariner will return again Sunday to tie up at the City Dock in the Victorian Port City.

Reported by: Steve Harold




Kingsville Harbor

08/03
The tug Annie M Dean and the barge Jubilee are currently busy hauling the summer wheat harvest from Pelee Island to Kingsville for delivery to Sarnia via trucks loaded on the island and driven on the barge at West Dock and unloaded at the ferry terminal in Kingsville. The trips take an average of 4 to 5 hours one way as weather permits, it is not known how many trips will be required to complete the job.

Reported by: Dave James




Updates

08/03
Check back tomorrow for more updates including pictures.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 03

Under tow, the AVONDALE (2) in tandem with former fleet mate FERNDALE (2) arrived at Castellon, Spain for scrapping in 1979.

The CANADOC (2) left the St. Lawrence River on August 3, 1991 in tow bound for Mamonal, Colombia for scrapping.

On 3 August 1915, ALEXANDRIA (wooden sidewheel passenger/package freight, 174'/863GT, built in 1866 at Hull, Quebec, formerly CONSORT) was carrying food stuff in Lake Ontario when she was blown on a bar in a storm and fog. She broke up by wave action under the Scarborough Bluffs, east of Toronto. Lifesavers worked for hours and rescued the entire crew.

August 3, 1946 - The third officer of the ANN ARBOR NO. 6 drowned while painting her draft marks. He had apparently leaned too far and fell out of the rowboat.

On 3 August 1900 FONTANA (wooden 2-mast schooner-barge, 231', 1164 gt, built in 1888 at St Clair, MI as a 4-mast schooner-barge) was carrying iron ore in tow of the steamer KALIYUGA. The FONTANA sheared off and collided with the big schooner-barge SANTIAGO and settled in the mouth of St. Clair River in the St. Clair Flats, one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world. After salvage was given up months later, she was dynamited several times to flatten and reduce her wreckage. Although officially no loss of life was reported, local newspaper reported that one crewman was drowned. The FONTANA was owned by Cleveland Cliffs Iron Co.

On 3 Aug 1857, R. H. RAE (3-mast wooden bark, 136', 344 t, built in 1857 at St. Catharine's, Ontario) capsized and sank in a "white squall" off Duck's Creek on Lake Ontario. She went down slowly enough for her people to abandon in her small boat. They were later picked up by the propeller COLONIST. There was a big effort to salvage her the next summer, but to no avail. She was a total loss of $20,000. She was reportedly built for the trans-Atlantic trade and looked more like a seagoing schooner. Some sources give the date of the loss as 4 August 1857. The wreck is in very good condition. The Cousteau organization lost a diver on her in 1980.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Clive Reddin, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Another Big Tow for Gaelic

08/02
Gaelic Tugboat Company's big tug Roger Stahl departed Toledo about 4:30 a.m. Thursday morning with the old Detroit River train ferry barge Manitowoc. The 365-foot ferry has been bought by a dock company in Menominee, Michigan for use as a dock and to lighter salties visiting the Lake Michigan port.

The Roger Stahl and Manitowoc should arrive in Menominee on Sunday.

Bow view of Manitowoc and tug Roger Stahl passing Detroit Marine Terminals.
Quarter view of the Tug Roger Stahl and Manitowoc.
Stern View with General Motors Building at Detroit.
Headed under the Ambassador Bridge.
J.W.Westcott headed for the tow with supplies.
Fleet Engineer Jim Storen and Crewman Mike Nichols.
Non Smoker Capt John Wellington (right) smiles as Fleet Engineer Jim Storen discusses cigarette costs with tug namesake Capt. Roger Stahl.
Captain John Wellington on the bridge of the tug Roger Stahl.

Reported by: Bill Hoey




Ship Under Arrest

08/02
The saltie Delight will remain anchored off Port Weller on Lake Ontario as its owners work to get the vessel released. The vessel was put under arrest over a dispute about damaged steel coils the vessel had unloaded. The Delight will not be allowed to depart the Seaway until its owners come to an agreement with the owner of the coils.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt




Goderich News

08/02
The Canadian Navigator was loading salt at the mine on Monday morning. She was followed by the Agawa Canyon who came in overnight and departed by mid-morning Tuesday.

The Agawa Canyon was headed to Saginaw. The Capt. Henry Jackman was due to arrive late Wednesday to load salt for Quebec City. Last night, the Algoway was loading at the salt mine.

Reported by: Lisa Stuparyk




Toledo Update

08/02
The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge were at the Sun Dock loading cargo. The Courtney Burton was at the Torco Ore Dock unloading ore. The ex Norfolk-Southern Railroad carfloat Manitowoc departed from the CSX Docks "Frog Pond" area early Thursday morning under tow of the Gaelic Tugboat Company tug Roger Stahl.

Work crews continue the restoration project on the former Boblo passenger vessel Ste. Claire tied up at the Lakefront Docks.

The Joseph H. Frantz and Saturn remain in lay-up. The tugs Mighty Jake, Mighty Jimmy, Pioneerland, and Prairieland with there related barges are still working on the Maumee River channel dredging project, and the I-280 bridge replacement project.

The next scheduled coal boats due in at the CSX Docks will be the American Republic very late Thursday evening. The Algomarine on Friday, followed by the H. Lee White on Sunday. The Algomarine is due in at the Midwest Stone Dock located at the CSX Docks to unload stone early Friday morning, once finished unloading stone she will the proceed to the coal dock to load coal. The next scheduled ore boats due in at the Torco Ore Docks will be the Buckeye on Saturday, followed by the Reserve on Sunday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Updates

08/02
Check back tomorrow for more updates and pictures.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 02

The AMERICAN MARINER was launched on August 2, 1979 for the Connecticut Bank & Trust Co., (American Steamship Co., Buffalo, NY, mgr.). She was to be named CHICAGO (3), but that name was removed before launch.

The U.S. Coast Guard's report on the sinking of the EDMUND FITZGERALD was released on August 2, 1977. It cited faulty hatch covers, lack of water tight cargo hold bulkheads and damage caused from an undetermined source as the cause of her loss.

The BENSON FORD's maiden voyage was on August 2, 1924 with coal from Toledo, OH to Duluth, MN and returned with iron ore to the Ford Rouge Plant at Dearborn.

On August 2, 1990 the Lightship HURON was dedicated as a National Historic Landmark. LIGHTSHIP 103 had been almost completely restored and was opened to the public for tours and remains so at this time.

August 2, 1862 - John C. Ackerman was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin. At the time of his death in 1916 he was commodore of the Pere Marquette carferry fleet based in Ludington.

On 2 August 1877, GRACE A. CHANNON (wooden schooner, 141'/266GT, built in 1873 at E. Saginaw, MI) was bound from Chicago for Buffalo when she collided with the propeller tug FAVORITE and sank 12 miles south of Milwaukee, WI. The young son of the owner of the CHANNON lost his life in this accident.

In 1858, the wooden side-wheeler TELEGRAPH collided with the schooner MARQUETTE and sank 40 miles north of Cleveland.

On 2 August 1877, GRACE A. CHANNON (wooden schooner, 141', 266 gt, built in 1873 at E. Saginaw, MI) collided with the propeller FAVORITE and sank 12 miles south of Milwaukee. One life was lost: the young son of the ship's owner.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Maritime Academy Ship Sails Home

08/01
The “State of Michigan” is the new 225-foot training vessel that has just been assigned to the Great Lakes Maritime Academy at Northwestern Michigan College by the federal Maritime Administration (MARAD). During the first two weeks in August, Academy staff and graduates will be sailing the ship from New York City to Traverse City, Mi.

On Tuesday, July 30 the crew departed New York City and started the voyage through the St. Lawrence Seaway. They plan to arrive in Traverse City on August 13.

The State of Michigan left Massachusetts Maritime Academy in Buzzards Bay at 9 a.m. Wednesday morning. They expect to be in Cap Cod Bay around 10.

The crew consists of Academy staff and graduates, they are having a great time and are extremely proud. The ship is running smoothly and everything is in working order. Ship shape, in fact.

Boatwatchers are invited to participate in this historic occasion in several ways: Chart the voyage on the NMC website at www.nmc.edu/glma/news/state-of-michigan.html
See the ship arrive on Tuesday, August 13 at 5 p.m. in West Bay. (or Wednesday, August 14, if delays occur). The public is invited to attend the Christening on Thursday, August 15, at 10 a.m. at the Academy Dock. For more information, call the NMC College Relations Office at 231 995-1019.

Reported by: Mike Dell




Algoma Builds New Tankers

08/01
Algoma Central Corporation has signed an agreement with Jiangnan Shipyard in Shanghai, China for the construction of a double hulled OPA 90 compliant 18,000 DWT product/chemical tanker. This vessel, which will cost approximately Cdn. $47,000,000, is expected to be delivered from the shipyard in June 2004.

This transaction is a continuation of the Corporation’s on-going program to replace its single hull tankers with double hulled vessels. Coincident with the delivery of this vessel to Canada in July/August 2004, the Corporation expects to retire the single hulled tanker, the M.T. Algofax, from active petroleum product service.

This new tanker will become the primary vessel serving the needs of the Corporation’s customers in Atlantic Canada, although it is capable of trading in the Great Lakes system as well as having full ocean trading capabilities.

Algoma Central Corporation owns and operates the largest Canadian fleet on the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Seaway and Eastern Seaboard of Canada. The Algoma fleet includes 14 self-unloaders, seven bulk carriers, five Canadian flag tankers and two US flag tankers on long-term charter.

Click here for a drawing of the new tanker

Reported by: Algoma Central Corp.




Cleveland Salt Shuttle

08/01
The Maumee arrived on Tuesday evening about 6 p.m. and loaded salt at the Cargill mine on the old river. She transferred her cargo about 500 yards up the old river and unloaded on the North side of the river bed which seems to still be the Cargill property. The same process was repeated on Wednesday with a second cargo loaded and unloaded into a storage pile. The Maumee appears to only be involved in a cargo transfer to different points in the same facility as opposed to moving salt to a dock not under Cargill control.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Algoma Steel Reports a Profit

08/01
Algoma Steel has moved into the black, reporting its first quarterly profit in two years. The company has posted a second-quarter profit of $21.6 million. That compares to a net loss of $47.8 million for the same quarter last year.

The improvement in second-quarter cash flow allowed Algoma Steel to pay down $22.1 million of its $76.6 million in bank loans.

Ben Duster, Algoma’s Chairman, said "Based on current market conditions, we expect this positive performance to continue in the third quarter. "

"Market conditions for the fourth quarter are less certain, particularly in light of the adverse finding on hot rolled sheet in the safeguard investigation," Duster said. The company attributed the improved results to higher steel prices, increased shipments, lower operating costs and the benefits arising from the company's restructuring.

Reported by: Ed Schipper




Great Lakes Trader Unloads

08/01
The barge Great Lakes Trader and tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort arrived in Ferrysburg's Meekoff dock Wednesday. The pair came in from Stoneport with a light load, drawing only 20' 6" that deepest the Grand River will allow. She unloaded 4,000 tons of railroad grade aggregate on the west side of Meekoff's property.

The tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort then came out the notch and shifted the Great Lakes Trader as far east toward the railroad bridge as she could in order to unload the remaining 22,000 tons of cement aggregate on the east side of the property.

Shortly after 7:15 p.m. the unloading was finished and tug maneuvering to get the pair back together.

By 7:30 they were pushing away from the dock and started heading out through the evening pleasure boat traffic on their way back out to Lake Michigan. The pair were on their way to Port Inland for their next load.

Reported by: Dale Rosema




Buffalo in Green Bay

08/01
The Buffalo was in Green Bay Wednesday with another load of coal for Georgia Pacific.

Stern view from across the Fox River.
Wide view.
Wider angle showing the Georgia Pacific facility.
Bow view.

Reported by: Dick Lund




Marquette Report

08/01
The H. Lee White was expected in Marquette at 9 p.m. on Wednesday. The Kaye E. Barker is expected on Thursday morning. Other ships expected in the next few days are the Lee A. Tregurtha, the Charles M. Beeghly and the Great Lakes Trader.

The Paul Tregurtha unloaded coal at Marquette's Presque Isle power plant Tuesday. They seemed to have a little problem with the unloading belts. The Charles Beeghly came in and began loading taconite on Tuesday, with many boat watchers out in spite of the 90 degree heat.

Paul Tregurtha unloading.
Stern view.
Beeghly loading.
Close up of bow.

Reported by: Lee Rowe




Port Huron Traffic

08/01
Below are images of traffic passing Port Huron Wednesday.

John G. Munson downbound.
Courtney Burton.
Tug and barge Joseph H. Thompson.

Reported by: Stephen Wilder




Sykes Unloading in Detroit

08/01
The Wilfred Sykes unloaded at Rouge Steel in Detroit on Tuesday. Below are images of the vessel departing the mill.

Backing from the dock.
Mate calls out distances on the stern.
In the turning basin.
Outbound on the Rouge River.

Reported by: Wade P. Streeter




Welland Canal Update

08/01
The Canadian Coast Guard Ship George R. Pearkes was at fitout wall of Port Weller Dry Docks Wednesday. The vessel was reported to have arrived early Monday morning.

Departing anchorage Wednesday afternoon and heading upbound was the Kapitonas Marcinkus. She had been at anchor since July 3. Saltie traffic normally slows in the summer but is off more than usual this year. The Marcinkus now sports the same blue stack colors of fleet mate the Kapitonas Andzejauskas. The two vessels may no longer a part of the Lithuanian fleet.

In the canal Wednesday night was the small excursion steamer Pumper which usually operates on the lower Niagara River. The wood fired steamer was on its way to Port Colborne for Canal Days.

Expected to transit the canal over night was the new U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Cypress on her trip off the lakes.

Upbound Tuesday was the heavy lift ship Fairload, sailing for Duluth.

Reported by: Jimmy Sprunt




Today in Great Lakes History - August 01

On August 1, 1982, the Canadian tanker Hubert Gaucher entered service

August 1957 - The Pere Marquette 18 (II) was sold to Luria Brothers, Chicago scrap merchants, along with the PM 14.

On 1 August 1849, CHICAGO (wooden propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 951/151T, built in 1842 at Oswego, NY) burned to a total loss in Buffalo harbor. No lives were lost.

On 1 August 1871, the construction of the canal through the St. Clair Flats was finished at a cost of $365,000. It was the first real channel built to help ships through the shallow waters where the St. Clair River empties into Lake St. Clair and where there are seven mouths or passes. It took the Canadian contractor John Brown three years to dig the channel that measures 300 feet wide and 8,421 feet long. The water was 18 feet deep. It was protected on most of its sides by piers and dikes. The new channel was considered too small even as it was being dug. At only 300 feet wide, tows of log rafts were encouraged to sue the old shallower channels. Within 20 years, plans were made to deepen the channel to 20 feet.

On 1 August 1849, CHICAGO (wooden passenger/package freight vessel, 95', 151 t, built in 1842 at Oswego, NY) burned in Buffalo harbor. No lives were lost.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




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