Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

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Imbat Captain Arrested

8/31
The Captain of Imbat has been arrested by Canadian authorities for withholding information on paperwork about his crew, The Imbat made news last week when 6 crewmembers allegedly jumped from the moving vessel just below Trois Rivieres. The ship at that time had loaded steel in Sorel, Quebec, and was on its way to Italy.  All crewmembers that jumped from the vessel were located and are being held by Immigration authorities. If found guilty, the Captain could spend 2 years in jail. The Imbat is still in Quebec City, and there is no word on what will become of the ship.

From CTV News, reported by Kent Malo
 

 

Dennis Hale to be in the Soo

8/31
Dennis Hale, author of "Sole Survivor" will be in Sault Ste. Marie for a book signing on Friday, September 2, from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. He will be located in one of the shop directly across the street from the Locks. Stop in and say hello.

Dennis is the only crew member to survive the sinking of the Daniel J. Morrell on November 29, 1966 in Lake Huron.

 

Soo Weather Forecast Looking Good for Open House

8/31
The weather forecast for the Labor Day weekend and Closing Ceremonies of the Soo Locks 150th Anniversary Celebration looks good.
Friday-Partly Cloudy, Hi-69, 20% chance of rain; Saturday-Mostly Sunny, Hi-70, 20% chance; Sunday-Partly Cloudy, Hi-73, 20% chance.

Friday is the Locks Open House, and Saturday is the Boatnerd Freighter Chasing Cruise aboard the Chief Shingwauk.

 

William G. Mather Air Show Deck Party

8/31
The steamship William G. Mather is hosting an Air Show Deck Party September 3-4-5. The Cleveland National Air Show will be happening next door to the Mather at Burke Lakefront Airport, and the Mather's deck provides a terrific viewing platform. Tickets are now on sale at 216-574-9053, or contact p.lang@wgmather.org for more information.

 


Hollyhock goes in for a Checkup

8/31
The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Hollyhock is out of the water for eight weeks for a tune-up and modification. It also will be more visible when it returns to Port Huron in mid-October - at least on a computer screen.

The 225-foot buoy tender is in a Wisconsin dry dock at the Bay Shipbuilding Co., a partner of Marinette Marine, the company that originally built the $29 million ship.

While there it will receive a paint job on its hull and an overhaul on its onboard sewage system, said operations officer Lt. J.G. Tory Buerger.

The cutter also will get new equipment that will plot its exact location on a computer for vessel traffic centers, such as the one in Sarnia, which monitor the position of commercial traffic.

The transponder equipment, called the Automatic Identification System (AIS),  is required for all freighters that operate on the Great Lakes, but so far no Coast Guard cutters have been outfitted with the equipment.

"The Hollyhock is prototyping the system for all Great Lakes cutters," Buerger said.

Former Coast Guard Rear Adm. Ronald Silva ordered transponders to be put on all cutters after the 2003 collision between the Hollyhock and the 1,000-foot freighter Stewart J. Cort. Both ships sustained minor damage.

One of the reasons for the collision was the crew said they didn't have an exact location of the Cort, and the Vessel Traffic Service in Sault Ste. Marie didn't have an exact location of either ship.

While many of the Hollyhock's crew are in Wisconsin overseeing the maintenance work, others have remained in Port Huron to work on organizing the cutter's support building next to the Port Huron Coast Guard Station.

The $550,000-building provides a mix of office space and maintenance rooms the crew will use to order supplies, catch up on mail and do basic engineering tasks ashore.

Supplies were moved in this month, and the building should be fully operational by the time the Hollyhock returns.

Reported by: Chris Sebastian, Port Huron Times Herald

 

Region-bound iron ore held up in New Orleans

8/31
Jody Peacock, Indianapolis-based spokesman for the Ports of Indiana, said the port in Burns Harbor receives some shipments that originate on the Mississippi River in New Orleans that could be impacted by Hurricane Katrina.

Many of those shipments come from China and are loaded onto barges in New Orleans. From there, the shipments travel up the Mississippi River to the Illinois River, where they continue north to Lake Michigan and over to the port in Burns Harbor, Peacock said.

Clump iron ore used by steel plants along the Lake Michigan shores is currently in New Orleans awaiting shipment to Burns Harbor, Peacock said, and likely will be delayed at least four days.

"Any time you have a hurricane, there is a two-day shutdown period, and it takes two days to get going again," Peacock said.

"So, it's four days' minimum delay if there is no major damage. If there is major damage -- like a ship sinks and blocks the channel -- who knows how long it may be."

Being able to use the river systems is helpful to Indiana ports, Peacock said, because it allows for shipping year-round. The St. Lawrence Seaway closes annually from January to March for maintenance of the locks.

Peacock said the rain from Hurricane Katrina actually could help river shipments, particularly along the Ohio River. That river and some others are still reeling from the effects of the summer drought, and low water levels have hurt shipping imports and exports.

"In a strange way, it could be a blessing," Peacock said.

Reported by: Northwest Indiana Times

 

Ferry ridership Reported to be up

8/31
Average per-trip ridership on the high-speed ferry between Rochester and Toronto has more than doubled since its June 30 startup, with weekends typically drawing 700-plus passengers onboard the 785-seat ship, the ship's manager said.

But looking to offset rising gas prices, Bay Ferries has submitted a request to the ferry's board of directors to "scope out" possible schedule reductions and other adjustments. Ticket prices will not change.

With the first formal reporting of operations due next month, the news overall appears to bolster predictions that the Spirit of Ontario would shrug off its slow start.

"We continue to move in the right direction," said Don Cormier, vice president for operations and safety with manager Bay Ferries Great Lakes LLC. "We had a half-dozen sailings this past weekend that were basically sold out."

But what are ridership totals, and what does that mean for the ship's financial position? While Cormier knows, he isn't saying publicly. And it is unclear how much detail is being shared with the city.

Former operator Canadian American Transportation Systems ran the ferry last summer before abruptly shutting down after less than three months, citing more than $1.7 million in debt. The city then stepped in, creating the Rochester Ferry Co., and backing a loan to buy the $32 million ferry at a foreclosure auction plus cover startup expenses and initial shortfalls. Rochester Ferry then hired Bay Ferries as the manager.

"Some of the information, (Bay Ferries) feel it's proprietary, but it is information the board is entitled to," said Benjamin Douglas, president of the ferry board and a City Council member. "We are committed to put a full report together."

The ship's schedule already was to be scaled back beginning Sept. 6. Cormier declined to discuss what changes might be in the works, saying an official announcement is expected soon. Douglas said any change would require consensus of the ferry board's executive committee.

Reported by: Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

 

Stelco decides to go it alone on Lake Erie wind farm plans

8/31
Stelco Inc., which is at the centre of a $350-million lawsuit after backing out of a major wind development project, has decided to go it alone with plans for a 40-turbine wind farm around its Lake Erie steel plant in Nanticoke, the Toronto Star reports.

If completed, the project would produce enough electricity to power more than 12,000 homes in a region known for its coal-fired Nanticoke plant, the province's worst polluter.

"This facility would generate up to approximately 60 megawatts of electricity to be dispatched to the province of Ontario grid via an existing interconnection agreement with the Hydro One system," says an advertisement the company placed in a Haldimand County newspaper.

Haldimand Mayor Marie Trainer was notified in an Aug. 19 letter, obtained by the Star, that Canada's largest steel producer has commenced an environmental assessment of the planned wind farm location, as required by Ontario's Ministry of the Environment.

Dean Comand, who is leading the project for Stelco, said the company is committed to green energy and is trying to determine whether the wind farm will be economically viable.

He would not say whether the project is part of a longer-term strategy of luring a wind manufacturer to the area. "We're just doing all the detail engineering now," said Comand.

The wind industry is the second-largest buyer of steel, behind the automotive industry, in countries such as Germany -- good news in a sector suffering from overcapacity.

Stelco had a 20-year plan with consulting firm Georgian Windpower to install 2,200 megawatts of wind power in the area, beginning with an initial 80-megawatt wind farm at Stelco's Nanticoke Industrial Park.

But Stelco pulled out of the project on April 15, two days before Georgian Windpower was to secure $150 million in funding for the development. Georgian Windpower responded by filing a $350-million breach-of-contract lawsuit.

 


Port Reports - August 31

Duluth-Superior - Al Miller
Edwin H. Gott was back Tuesday morning in port undergoing some sort of repairs at the port terminal’s Garfield dock. The vessel was ballasted down by the stern so workers could access the bow.

Also Tuesday morning, CHS elevator in Superior was busy with Pineglen loading at the gallery and Montrealais loading in berth 2. It has been, by far, the busiest elevator in the Twin Ports for the past several seasons.

Oglebay Norton was loading coal at Midwest Energy Terminal. Indiana Harbor and Walter J. McCarthy Jr. also were due at the coal dock Tuesday. All are bound for St. Clair as their first stop.

Federal Manitou was expected to depart with a load of bentonite. It was loading Monday afternoon at Hallet dock under a big cloud of dust.

Marquette - Lee Rowe
The Herbert C. Jackson loaded ore at Marquette on Sunday. The Michipicoten arrived for a load on Monday. The Lee A. Tregurtha is also expected at the ore dock. The tug Joyce VanEnkevort and barge Great Lakes Trader is due at the Shiras dock Monday and will go to the ore dock for a load on Tuesday. The Michipicoten is expected to return on Tuesday along with fleetmate Saginaw.

Milwaukee - Paul Erspamer
Sunday afternoon the Algoway deposited a load of salt at dockside in Milwaukee's inner harbor. Although near the turning basin, Algoway then took the unusual approach of departing stern-first into the Milwaukee River and out onto Lake Michigan.

Monday morning the Russian oceangoing bulker Aleksandr Suvorov was assisted by two Great Lakes Towing tugs to a berth at Nidera Grain.

The tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort and barge Great Lakes Trader were inbound the Saginaw River Saturday morning stopping first at the Bay City Wirt dock to lighter.  The pair then continued upriver and finished unloading at the Wirt Stone dock in Saginaw.  There were outbound late Saturday night.

The research vessel Laurentian continued to work on the Saginaw Bay on Saturday.  She has been in port for a number of days now.

Buffalo by Brian W.
Coast Guard search and rescue teams found an oil slick and two aircraft seats floating on the lake Sunday. Vessels with side scan sonar are being sent to a location off Port Colborne Monday morning to check the bottom for the plane missing since Saturday night.

Saginaw River - Todd Shorkey
Sunday on the Saginaw River saw the tug Karen Andrie and her barge call on the Triple Clean Liquifuels dock in Essexville. She departed Monday morning, passing the inbound tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder who called on the Bay Aggregates dock in Bay City. Once finished unloading, the pair departed the slip heading for the lake allowing the tug Rebecca Lynn and her barge to take her place and unload at the Bit-Mat dock.

The Rebecca Lynn was outbound early Monday morning. Inbound on Monday was the Tug Gregory J. Busch. Her security call indicated she was headed for the BMT dock in Carrollton
 

 


The 150th Soo Locks Anniversary Closing Ceremonies

Friday, September 2, 2005 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Soo Locks open house.
A rare chance to cross over the locks and tour grounds and building usually closed to the public. Corp of Engineers boats will be present for tours. Get a close up view of the freighters!

Noon – 2 p.m. “Celebrate the Great Lakes” musical production.
This special presentation by well known musicians and performers from around the Great Lakes is filled with music, storytelling, dances and laughs as stories from 10,000 years ago through the late 1990’s are portrayed. Held under the tent between the MacArthur and Poe Locks.

3 p.m. Closing Ceremonies
Held by the main entrance to the Locks Park, political leaders gather to pay tribute to the Soo Locks, closing this year’s celebration and sharing their visions of the future. Those scheduled to speak include:
- Governor Jennifer Granholm
- U.S. Senator Carl Levin
- U.S. Representative Bart Stupak
- Sault Tribe Chairperson Aaron Payment
- Sault Ste. Marie Mayor Anthony Bosbous

4 p.m. Time Capsule Burial
Following the closing ceremonies, a special sesquicentennial time capsule will be buried in the park for the benefit of future anniversary celebrations.

4:15 Dodworth Saxhorn Band Concert – Lower Locks Park
This 17-piece ensemble will fill the park with 1800’s era music using period instruments. Bring your lawn chair, watch the ships go by, and listen to the music!

6 p.m. - Anniversary Ball – Kewadin Casino Ballroom (advance purchased midnight tickets required. For info call 906 632-2923).
A filet mignon/whitefish dinner followed by dancing to the music of the 17-piece Dodworth Saxhorn Band, playing antique instruments, and Hogans Goat, a contemporary band, all in celebration of the 150th Anniversary of the Soo Locks!

Freighter Chasing Cruise on Saturday, Sept. 3, at 6:00 p.m. This is a repeat of our annual trip aboard the Chief Shingwauk leaving from Roberta Bondar Pavilion in Soo, Ontario. Cruise will return at 9:00 p.m. Cost is C$30.00 Canadian or $25.00 US per person. Price includes dinner with a menu to be determined. Cash bar on board.

Make reservations today by calling (705) 253-9850, or 1-877-226-3665 with your credit card, or send your check to Locks Tours Canada Boat Cruises, P.O. Box 23002, Station Mall, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario P6A 6W6.

Details on other Boatnerd Gatherings are available at the Gathering page.

 

Glenn Nickerson

8/31
Glenn Nickerson, the always helpful representative for the Boatracs Satellite Communications system

Glenn Nickerson - 52, loving husband, a devoted father and grampie, of Melbourne, Yarmouth Co., died August 24, 2005, in Arcadia, Yarmouth Co. Born January 29, 1953, in Yarmouth, he was the son of the late Paul and Joyce (Dort) Nickerson. He was employed with Air IQ Boatracs. He was a musician, an avid fisherman and loved to canoe. He loved the outdoors. He is survived by his wife, the former Judith E. Fergus; daughter, Cheryl (Frank) Grant, Arcadia, Yarmouth Co.; grandchildren, Paxton and Andie. The body was resting in Sweeny's Funeral Home, Yarmouth, for visitation from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Saturday. Funeral service was 2 p.m. Sunday in Sweeny's Funeral Chapel, Rev. A.D. "Bill" Newell officiating. Burial will be in Cheggogin Cemetery. Donations in memory may be made to charity of choice. On-line condolences may be sent to: sweenys@ns.aliantzinc.ca  

Reported by: Eric Stapleton

 


Photo Gallery Updates - August
31

News Photo Gallery updated

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping
 

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August
31

On August 31, 1977, the BELLE RIVER entered service, departing Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, for Superior, Wisconsin. Renamed b.) WALTER J MC CARTHY JR in 1977.

In mid-August 1987, a peregrine falcon that had disappeared from Regina, Saskatchewan two weeks earlier landed on the deck of a lake freighter on Lake Huron. The bird was captured and taken to a bird sanctuary in Vineland, Ontario. The vessel name is unknown.

In mid-August 1985, the Belgium salty FEDERAL THAMES loaded 25,400 tons of low-concentrate chrome ore at Duluth's Hallett Dock and was bound for Sweden. This ore dates back to World War II when it was mined in Montana. Other shipments were to have been made later as well.

On 31 August 1906, CAVALIER (3-mast wooden schooner, 134 foot 268 gross tons, built in 1867, at Quebec City as a bark) was carrying cedar lumber when she struck a reef off Chantry Island in Lake Huron and sank. Her crew was rescued by the Chantry Island Lightkeeper. She was bound from Tobermory for Sarnia, Ontario.

On 31 August 1869, the schooner W G KEITH was launched at the Muir & Stewart yard in Port Huron, Michigan. She was named after her skipper/owner. Her dimensions were 126 foot x 26 foot x 8 foot 6 inches. She was built for the Lake Michigan lumber trade.

On 31 August 1900, efforts to free the newly launched steel steamer CAPTAIN THOMAS WILSON from the mud in the Black River at Port Huron, Michigan continued throughout the day. The launch had been watched by thousands the previous day and the vessel's stern stuck in the mud. On this date, the tugs BOYNTON and HAYNES tried to pull her free but were unable to do so. Finally 14 hydraulic jacks were used to lift the vessel and at 6:00 p.m. she was ready to be pulled by tugs. After a 15 inch hawser was broken in the first attempt, the tug PROTECTOR finally pulled the vessel free.

In 1982, The NIAGARA, better known as the sandsucker, made its last trip through the I-75 Bridge with a cargo of sand for the Chevrolet Saginaw Metal Castings plant.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Al Miller, James Neumiller, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 

Pole to test lake's wind power

8/30
Six, thin steel arms holding a variety of scientific equipment stretch out across Lake Erie this morning, waiting for a breeze. Those 10-foot arms and the measuring devices attached to them could help determine the future of wind power on the lake.

Technicians and volunteers finished building the tallest wind-monitoring tower on the Great Lakes Monday night just a few miles from downtown Cleveland.

It took a heavy-lift helicopter crane three attempts over three hours to position the upper half of the galvanized steel pole into place atop the Cleveland Water Department intake crib.

The wind tower rises 165 feet above the lake atop the orange water crib, which sits 3.5 miles north of Edgewater Park and is the major collection point for Greater Cleveland's drinking water. Instruments at 100 feet, 130 feet and 165 feet will record weather conditions and the wind's speed, frequency and direction.

Until now, scientists have not had hard data about Lake Erie's wind. Wind data has been theoretical based on math models and buoys on the lake. The 3-ton wind tower will collect data for two years. It will be used to determine whether it's feasible and economical to build large, electricity-generating wind turbines several miles offshore in Lake Erie.

"This is for study," Godwin said. "It's not a mandate for wind turbines on the lake." But the data is needed before any power company will invest money to build wind turbines, Godwin said.

Crews put the lower half of the tower into place on July 25. But fog-like haze prevented the project from getting finished that day.

High winds almost prevented the work from being finished Monday. This was the first time the helicopter company had built a tower over water, said Scott LeDuc, a member of the ground crew of Construction Helicopters Inc. of Detroit.

"On land, the winds stay down," he said. "Out here on Lake Erie, there is nothing to hold it down." Data will be available starting in about two weeks at the Web site, www.GreenEnergyOhio.org.

Reported by: Cleveland Plain Dealer

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August
30

On 30 August 1893, CENTURION (steel propeller freighter, 350 foot, 3401 gross tons) was launched by F. W. Wheeler (hull #100) at W. Bay City, Michigan. The name was a pun to celebrate the ship as Frank Wheeler’s 100th hull.

The CHARLES E WILSON was christened August 30, 1973, at Bay Shipbuilding Co., for the American Steamship Co., and completed her sea trials on September 6th. She was renamed b.) JOHN J BOLAND in 2000.

On August 30, 1942, the A H FERBERT ran aground in the St. Mary's River, just a day old. The vessel returned to the builder's yard in River Rouge, Michigan for repairs.

On August 30, 1988, the d.) WILLOWGLEN, a.) MESABI, made its first visit to Duluth-Superior under that name. She loaded grain at Harvest States in Superior, Wisconsin, arriving early in the morning and departing in the ,early evening the same day. Her last visit to Duluth before this was in 1981 under the name c.) JOSEPH X ROBERT.

The H G DALTON entered service on August 30, 1903, for Great Lakes & St. Lawrence Transportation Co. Later b.) COURSEULLES in 1916, c.) GLENDOCHART in 1922, d.) CHATSWORTH in 1927, e.) BAYLEAF in 1942 and f.) MANCOX in 1951.

On August 30, 1985, the tug CAPTAIN IOANNIS S departed Quebec City with MENIHEK LAKE and LEON FALK JR in tow, bound for Spain to be scrapped.

On 30 August 1873, CAMBRIDGE (3-mast, wooden schooner, 162 foot, 445 tons, built in 1868, at Detroit, Michigan) was bound from Marquette, Michigan for Cleveland, Ohio with a load of iron ore. In rough seas, she was thrown onto the rocky shore near Marquette where she broke up. No lives were lost.

On 30 August 1900, thousands of people gathered at the Jenks Shipbuilding Company near the Grand Trunk Bridge on the Black River in Port Huron, Michigan to watch the launching of the large steel steamer CAPTAIN THOMAS WILSON. Superintendent Andrews gave the word and the blows were struck simultaneously at the bow and stern. Slowly the vessel started quivering slightly from deck to keel and then with a mighty rush, slid sideways into the river. Her stern stuck in the mud. Mrs. Thomas Wilson christened the ship.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

Staten Island Ferry Downbound

8/29

The Staten Island Ferry, Spirit of America, passed through the Welland Canal on Sunday afternoon. The Spirit is on her delivery trip to New York from the builder's yard in Marinette, Wisconsin.

Reported by  David Bull, Bill Bird and Brian W.

Additional pictures in the News Photo Gallery.

 


Port Reports - August 29

Alpena by Ben & Chanda McClain
The cement silos at Lafarge were busy on Sunday with three vessels coming in to load. The Alpena arrived in port early Sunday morning, later followed by the Paul H. Townsend which tied up at the coal dock to wait. The Alpena was outbound in the lake by 7 a.m. heading for Green Bay,Wisconsin. The tug G.L Ostrander and barge Integrity was next in port, tying up around 8 a.m. to take on cargo for Saginaw. The Paul H. Townsend was the last vessel of the day and departed before 5 p.m. for Muskegon.

The Great Lakes Trader was loading at Stoneport on Sunday.

Saginaw by Todd Shorkey
The Walter J. McCarthy Jr. called on the Consumers Energy dock early Sunday morning to unload coal.  She completed her unload and was outbound for the lake around noon, backing out into the Saginaw Bay to turn around and head for the lake.

The tug G.L. Ostrander and barge Integrity were inbound Sunday night headed up to the LaFarge dock in Carrollton to unload cement.  They expected to be outbound late Monday.

The tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort and barge Great Lakes Trader were inbound the Saginaw River Saturday morning stopping first at the Bay City Wirt dock to lighter.  The pair then continued upriver and finished unloading at the Wirt Stone dock in Saginaw.  There were outbound late Saturday night.

The research vessel Laurentian continued to work on the Saginaw Bay on Saturday.  She has been in port for a number of days now.

Buffalo by Brian W.
The Maumee arrived at sunset Sunday evening for the Sand Supply Co. Wharf on the City Ship Canal. She arrived off the North Entrance at 6 p.m. and headed up without tug assistance. Line handlers went over the side and took her small motor launch to the unloading apron. Once on land they hauled her lines to the tie up stanchions and had the ship secured for unloading by 7:30 p.m.

Search efforts were underway Sunday for a missing aircraft that disappeared over Lake Erie Saturday night.  A single engine Cherokee with three people on board dropped off the Buffalo radar scopes at 9:40 p.m. approximately eight miles north of Dunkirk Harbor. Buffalo International Airport controllers alerted the Niagara falls Air Force Base which then notified the Coast Guard. The Buffalo Coast Guard Base was coordinating the search that involved local marine units, helicopters from Detroit, USCG Biscane Bay, a Canadian Coast Guard Cutter, and a Canadian Coast Guard C-130 from Trenton, Ontario. Aircraft were calling in positions of the search operation all day long and nothing has been found as of 3PM.

Toronto by Charlie Gibbons
James Norris was in port Friday night unloading in the Turning Basin. Work on fitting out the long-idle Algobay began last week.

 


Webcam Fund Raising

8/29
The popularity of the Detroit River Livecam has literally worn out the present equipment and at this time we are starting a Fund Raising Drive to replace the camera. This new Web Cam Fund Raising Project includes the option of using PayPal.

Beginning in July 2003, the Great Lakes Maritime Institute and the Dossin Great Lakes Museum have provided a unique service to the maritime community. The 'Detroit River Watch' has brought the passing lake and ocean freighters, motor and sailboats, and even the rowing shells to the home and office monitors of the boat watching community.  

This popular feature has not come without a price. Since the start of the project over two years ago, the counter on the webpage has logged more than 600,000 visits. Numerous viewers have enjoyed the connection to our maritime heritage, and the over use of the current equipment now requires replacement equipment. Additionally the expense of our high speed wireless connection over the past two years has cost almost $8,000.00.  

The Dossin Great Lakes Museum is located on a main shipping channel, and the 'Detroit River Watch' camera is interactive and extremely popular. Control access is available to viewers to actually follow and zoom in on a passing vessel in real time.

The new equipment will offer the same user control, a stronger zoom and more robust hardware to accommodate the heavy usage the camera sees.

The group was ready to start a fund raising drive when the existing camera failed. All funds raised will go toward the purchase of the new camera, payment of the monthly connection charges and expansion of the camera network. Before the failure of this unit GLMI had planned to add a second river watch camera at a location below the Ambassador Bridge, giving live user controlled images of over half the Detroit River. This second camera is planned for but will depend on the fund raising.

Click here for More Information or to Donate

 


Photo Gallery Updates - August 29

News Photo Gallery updated

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping
 

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 29

It is not often that a schooner tows a tug, but on 29 August 1882, the tug J A CRAWFORD was towing the big schooner JAMES COUCH to Chicago when the wind picked up and the schooner passed the tug. Captain Gorman of the CRAWFORD cut the engine and allowed the COUCH to tow him until the got close to the harbor. Then the schooner shortened sail and the tug finished the job of towing her into port.

On August 29, 1942, the A H FERBERT entered service for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co..

On her maiden voyage August 29, 1979, the INDIANA HARBOR sailed for Two Harbors, Minnesota to load iron ore pellets for Indiana Harbor, Indiana. In August, 1982, INDIANA HARBOR became the first U.S. flag laker to receive satellite communication.

On August 29, 1972 the lightship HURON was placed in an earth embankment at Port Huron's Pine Grove Park along the St. Clair River and was opened to visitors on July 13, 1974. Canada Steamship Lines' ATLANTIC SUPERIOR returned from Europe on August 29, 1985, with a cargo of gypsum for Picton, Ontario.

On 29 August 1871, GEORGE M ABEL (2-mast wooden schooner) broke up on a reef near Port Burwell, Ontario.

On 29 August 1858, CANADA (3-mast wooden bark, 199 foot, 758 tons) was carrying a half million board feet of lumber to Chicago in bad weather when she settled just north of downtown Chicago. The next day during a salvage attempt, she blew southward, struck a bar off the old waterworks, broke her back, then broke up. She had been built in Canada in 1846, as a sidewheeler and was seized by the U.S. in 1849, and rebuilt as a bark in 1852.

August 29, 1998 - The BADGER was designated a spur route on the Lake Michigan Circle Tour.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Al Miller, James Neumiller, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 


Photo Gallery Updates - August 28

News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping
 

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 28

Capt. Frank R. West took his 8 year old son Robert and the boy’s friend 8 year old Edward Erickson aboard the new schooner LOUIS MEEKER as guests on a trip carrying 27,000 bushels of oats from Chicago to Buffalo. There was hardly any wind and it took them four days to creep north as far as Pentwater. On 28 August 1872, Captain West saw a storm coming and he had the sails taken in as a precaution. The winds came so suddenly and they hit the vessel so hard that the schooner was knocked over on her beam ends. Little Robert West, his dad and three sailors were lost when the vessel sank 15 minutes later near Big Sable Point. Peter Danielson dove and tried to cut away the lifeboat as the schooner was sinking and he almost drowned in that unsuccessful attempt. The mizzen gaff broke free and seven sailors plus little Edward Erickson clung to it until they were picked up by the schooner WILLIAM O BROWN six hours later.

Mr. Edwin H. Gott, 78, of Pittsburgh, died on August 28, 1986. The namesake of the 1,000 footer, he retired as Chief Executive Officer of U.S. Steel in 1973.

On August 28, 1962, the EDWARD L RYERSON set a Great Lakes cargo record for iron ore. The RYERSON loaded 25,018 gross tons of iron ore in Superior, Wisconsin, breaking by 14 tons the record held by the Canadian bulk freighter RED WING which was set in the 1961, season. The RYERSON held this record well into 1965.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 was repowered with two 2,850 ihp four cylinder Skinner Uniflow steeple compound steam engines, 19 1/2", 43" dia. x 26" stroke, built in 1953, by the Skinner Engine Co., Erie, Pennsylvania and four coal-fired Foster-Wheeler water tube boilers with a total heating surface of 25,032 sq. ft. built in 1953. The repowering work was completed on August 28, 1954. Her 1954, tonnage was 3551 gross tons, 1925 net tons, 2450 deadweight tons. A new starboard tail shaft was installed at this time. Her service speed increased to 18 knots (20.7 mph).

The JOHN ANDERSON, a.) LUZON of 1902, was outbound through the Duluth Ship Canal on August 28, 1928, the ANDERSON struck the north pier suffering $18,000 in damage. Renamed c.) G G POST in 1935. The POST was scrapped at Istanbul, Turkey in 1972.

Gulf Oil Corp., tanker REGENT entered service on August 28, 1934. She was built for low clearances on the New York State Barge Canal and was equipped with five cargo tanks and one dry cargo hold.

The WILLIAM A REISS a.) JOHN A TOPPING, was laid up for the last time on August 28, 1981, at Toledo, Ohio and remained idle there until July 15, 1994, when she was towed to be scrapped.

On 28 August 1870, CHASKA (wooden scow-schooner, 72 foot, 50 tons, built in 1869, at Duluth, Minnesota originally as a scow-brig) was wrecked in a northwesterly storm near Duluth. Reportedly she's the first vessel built at Duluth.

On 28 August 1763, BEAVER, an armed wooden British sloop built the previous year, was carrying provisions to Detroit to relieve the fort there which was under siege by the Indians led by Pontiac, however the vessel foundered in a storm at Cat Fish Creek, 14 miles from the site of Buffalo. 185 barrels of her cargo were salvaged and went on to Detroit on the schooner GLADWIN. 

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Al Miller, James Neumiller, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 27

The new Poe Lock at the Soo was first flooded on 27 August 1968.

On 27 August 1886, the Detroit Evening News reported that a fireman on the tug J H HACKLEY of 1874, was sent to watch for a leak in the boiler, which was being filled with cold water at a dock in Chicago. He fell asleep and the boiler overflowed, very nearly sinking the vessel before another tug could pump her dry.

The AGAWA CANYON (Hull#195) was launched in 1971, at Collingwood, Ontario by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd. for Algoma Central Railway Ltd.

The C.C.G.S. SAMUEL RISLEY arrived at Toronto, Ontario on August 27, 1985, on her way to Thunder Bay, Ontario where she replaced the retired C.C.G.C. ALEXANDER HENRY.

JOHN O MC KELLAR (Hull#12) was launched August 27, 1952, at St. Catharines, Ontario by Port Weller Drydocks Ltd.for the Colonial Steamship Co. Ltd. (Scott Misener, mgr.), Port Colborne, Ontario. Renamed b.) ELMGLEN in 1984.

The WILLIAM CLAY FORD then renamed b.) US266029 departed her lay-up berth at the Rouge slip on August 20, 1986, in tow of Gaelic tugs and she was taken to Detroit Marine Terminals on the Rouge River, where her pilothouse was removed to be displayed at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Detroit's Belle Isle. The hull was moved to Nicholson's River Rouge dock on August 27th.

The WILLIAM B DICKSON (Hull#75) was launched August 27, 1910, at Ecorse, Michigan by Great Lakes Engineering Works for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio. Renamed b.) MERLE M MC CURDY in 1969. She was scrapped at Port Colborne, Ontario in 1989.

The U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tender MESQUITE (WAGL-305) was commissioned on August 27, 1943, and served on the Pacific Ocean in the 7th Fleet in 1944 and 1945.

On August 27, 1940, the WILLIAM A IRVIN set the Great Lakes record for the fastest unloading of an iron ore cargo using shore side equipment. The IRVIN unloaded 13,856 gross tons of iron ore in 2 hours, 55 minutes (including the time to arrive and depart the dock) in Conneaut, Ohio. This record still stands, and consequently the IRVIN is one of the few Great Lakes vessels to be retired while still holding a Great Lakes cargo record.

On August 27, 1929, the MYRON C TAYLOR entered service. On 27 August 1924, CITY QUEEN (wooden propeller steam tug, 71 foot, 69 gross tons, built in 1900, at Midland, Ontario) burned to a total loss 1⁄4 mile east of the Manitou Dock in Georgian Bay.

The keel for the tug CRUSADER was laid on 27 August 1873, at the Leighton & Dunford yard in Port Huron, Michigan. The tug's dimensions were 100 foot keel, 132 foot overall, and 23 foot beam. She was built for George E. Brockway.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Al Miller, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series
This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 

Staten Island Ferry Departs

8/26


Passing Port Huron Friday afternoon. Frank Frisk

The new Staten Island Ferry, Spirit of America, departed the builders yard in Marinette on Thursday. The ferry continued  down bound over night. The ferry was making good time and passed Port Huron about 12:30 p.m. on Friday afternoon.

The Spirit was expected to continue down bound with out stopping until reaching the Welland Canal on Saturday morning. The ferry passed Belle Isle about 5 p.m. Friday afternoon.

This is the third and final ferry built by Marinette for service to Staten Island.

Check back for updates, please send pictures to news@boatnerd.net

Reported by  Brian Jackson

Additional pictures in the News Photo Gallery.

 


Vlieborg Update

8/26
The saltie Vlieborg apparently suffered a temporary steering failure that caused it strike the north pier of the Duluth Ship Canal, Coast Guard officials said.

Vlieborg was departing Duluth when it failed to complete its turn as it approached the canal’s entrance. The vessel struck the pier while a crowd of tourists watched and took pictures. No one was injured.

Damage to the Vlieborg was minor. Corps of Engineers officials said the ship punctured the pier’s sheet piling and toppled a light standard, causing about $200,000 in damage.

The Vlieborg remained anchored in Duluth harbor on Friday morning while the Coast Guard continued to investigate the incident.

The accident received extensive media coverage in the Twin Ports, mainly because it occurred during midday and many people were able to take digital photos of the ship as it struck. The piers have been struck many times since they were constructed. Damage has usually been relatively light; mainly damage to sheet piling or fractures in the concrete pier caps.  

Reported by  Al Miller

 


Port Reports - August 2
6

Sturgeon Bay by Wendell Wilke
Hollyhock arrived Bay Shipbuilding on Tuesday afternoon. She was in dry dock on Thursday.

At the fitout wall, awaiting her tug arrival for delivery, is the Hornbeck barge 11104. In the graving dock the Hornbeck barge 11105 is nearing completion and close to float-out.

At the dock wall the tug Norfolk is being refitted for future service with the new Lafarge Cement Barge under construction for Spring 2006 delivery.

Remaining idle at the yard are the Edward L. Ryerson and former Washington Island Ferry Voyageur, now owned by Shoreline Marine.

Saginaw by Todd Shorkey
The tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort and barge Great Lakes Trader were outbound the Saginaw River early Thursday morning after unloading overnight at the Saginaw Rock Products dock.

 
Inbound was the Calumet who unloaded at the Burroughs dock in Zilwaukee Thursday morning.  She finished her unload and was outbound late in the evening.  This was the second visit by the Calumet in the last few days.
 
The U of M Research Vessel Laurentian was also working the river and Saginaw Bay on Thursday.  The Capt. of the vessel stated they will be here for a few days.
 
The tug Donald C. Hannah was outbound for the lake late Thursday night after unloading at the Dow Chemical dock in Bay City.  The tug and barge arrived Wednesday night.

 


Photo Gallery Updates - August 2
6

News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping
 

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 2
6

On 26 August 1872, wooden propeller steamer LAKE BREEZE of 1868, was steaming from Saginaw to Mackinaw City with freight and about 40 passengers when fire broke out in the kitchen while off Au Sable Michigan. Captain M. S. Lathrop ordered the engines shut down and the steam pumps activated. The crew battled the blaze with fire hoses and put the flames out. When the LAKE BREEZE pulled into Mackinaw City that night, the partially burned vessel was still smoking.

The EDGAR B SPEER's sea trials were successfully completed on August 26, 1980.

The BEECHGLEN was towed out of Owen Sound by the McKeil tug KAY COLE on August 26, 1994, in route to Port Maitland, Ontario for scrapping.

The HENRY C FRICK (Hull#615) was launched August 26, 1905, at West Bay City, Michigan by West Bay City Ship Building Co. for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. Renamed b.) MICHIPICOTEN in 1964, she foundered off Anticosti Island on November 17, 1972 while being towed overseas for scrapping..

EMORY L FORD entered service on August 26, 1916, to load iron ore at Marquette, Michigan. Renamed b.) RAYMOND H REISS in 1965.

The GLENEAGLES (Hull#14) was launched August 26, 1925, at Midland, Ontario by Midland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd. for the Great Lakes Tramsportation Co. Ltd. (James Playfair, mgr.). Converted to a self-unloader in 1963. Renamed b.) SILVERDALE in 1978. She was scrapped at Windsor, Ontario in 1984.

The CHIEF WAWATAM (Hull#119) was launched on August 26, 1911, at Toledo, Ohio by Toledo Ship Building Co. for the Mackinaw Transportation Co.. She was built with three large propellers, two in the stern for propulsion and one in the bow for icebreaking. She was sold to Purvis Marine Ltd., of Sault Ste, Marie, Ontario in 1988, and cut down to a barge. The Port Weller Drydocks Ltd., built, passenger-cargo ship FEDERAL PALM (Hull#29) was christened August 26, 1961, for the West Indies Shipping Corp., Ltd. She was built on the Great Lakes, but never served their ports. Renamed b.) CENPAC ROUNDER in 1975, she was scrapped in 1979.

On August 26, 1934, while on a Sunday sightseeing cruise, MIDLAND CITY of 1871, a.) MAUD 153.2 foot, 521 gross tons, damaged her bottom on a shoal near Present Island in Georgian Bay. She settled with her stern under water and her bow high in the air.

On 26 August 1875, COMET (propeller passenger/package freight, 181 foot, 744 tons, built in 1857, at Cleveland, Ohio) was carrying ore and pig iron in Lake Superior on a foggy night. While trying to pass the Beatty Line steamer MANITOBA, 7 miles SE of Whitefish Point, signals were misunderstood and COMET veered into the path of MANITOBA. COMET was rammed amidships and sank in ten minutes. 11 of the 21 aboard lost their lives. This wasn't the first such accident for COMET. In October 1869, she suffered a similar mishap with the propeller HUNTER and that time both vessels sank.

The schooner MATTHEW MC NAIR was launched at the Lee & Lamoree shipyard in Oswego, New York on 26 August 1857. Her dimensions were 103 foot keel, 24 foot 6 inch beam and 9 foot 6 inch depth.  

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series
This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 


Saltie hits Duluth ship canal pier

8/25
The 433-foot saltie Vlieborg rubbed the north pier of the Duluth Ship Canal while attempting to leave port Wednesday afternoon. After the incident, the vessel returned to the harbor s anchorage area to undergo inspection by the U.S. Coast Guard.

Witnesses said the ship was lined up for a normal departure when it suddenly veered into the pier.

Damage to both the ship and the canal pier appeared to be limited to rub marks and scratches. A light standard on the canal pier also was topped by the vessel.

Reported by  Al Miller

 


Boblo boat makes an impact upon its return

8/25
One of the vintage excursion steamboats that ferried passengers to the defunct Boblo Island amusement park returned to the Detroit River waterfront with a bump on Wednesday.

On Wednesday evening, two tugboats maneuvered the Ste. Claire to a dock in River Rouge from Windsor, 4 1/2 miles down the Detroit River. This dock is about 10 miles north of Boblo Island.

The three-story, 197-foot vessel struck the dock, knocking out a 25-foot-long section of stainless steel railing, said Tony Laginess, a River Rouge city commissioner who was aboard at the time. There was no damage to the Ste. Claire, he said.

"The old girl came in at ramming speed. You just don't stop these things on a dime, you know?" laughed Laginess. His city will host the Ste. Claire for public tours and a Halloween-season haunted house dubbed Nautical Nightmare.

The Ste. Claire was built at Toledo in 1910, eight years after its sister ship, the 216-foot Columbia, was built at Detroit. The Ste. Claire and Columbia, with respective passenger capacities of 2,466 and 2,516, carried 600,000 passengers a season from Detroit to Boblo Island in their peak years.

The ships made their last runs in October 1991 and were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1992; the park closed in September 1993. The vessels were at the Great Lakes Steel facility in Ecorse from 1991 to 2001, when the Ste. Claire was bought by John and Diane Belko of Cleveland. They created a foundation to raise money for an estimated 10-year restoration effort.

Boblo Island opened as a recreation area in 1898. In its heyday in the mid-20th Century, the amusement park attracted a million visitors or more each year. Dozens of luxury homes and condominiums have been built on the 272-acre island since a Detroit-area developer purchased it in 1994.

The Columbia remains moored at Ecorse, Laginess said.

The Ste. Claire is docked at Belanger Park. Guided tours will be held Sept. 2-Oct. 31; the Nautical Nightmare will be held nightly Sept. 23-Oct. 31. For more information, go to www.bobloboat.com.

 


Canal boat set as floating exhibit
The Day Peckinpaugh was the first of its kind - and the last.

8/25
Buffalo - The first motorized Erie Canal freighter ever built is now the only survivor of about 100 such vessels that once hauled heavy loads along New York's canals. Gov. George E. Pataki announced Friday that the boat, undergoing repairs here, has been purchased by the New York State Museum and will be renovated into a floating exhibit and classroom.

Craig Williams, senior historian for the museum, said the vessel will be towed to Peebles Island State Park, north of Albany, next month for a complete overhaul. The craft, 259 feet long and 36 feet wide, is moored along the north wall of the canal between the Tri-Way and Stevens Street bridges. Williams said the museum paid $10,000 for the boat, while the Canal Society of New York State raised $35,000 to tow it from Erie, Pa., to Lockport. Williams said the boat's departure through Locks 34 and 35 will be worth seeing. "A vessel like that probably hasn't gone through the Lockport locks in 60 years," he said. The vessel went through Lockport on its maiden voyage in June 1921 and was greeted with "great fanfare," Williams said.


The museum bought the boat from Erie Navigation of Erie, Pa., a sister company of Erie Sand and Gravel Co., which had owned it since 1958 and used it until 1994, primarily to haul cement from Oswego to Rome. Williams said the vessel was designed for use on the Erie Barge Canal, the enlargement of the original Erie Canal that was finished in 1918. It was built in Duluth, Minn., for Interwaterways Lines of New York City.

Originally called the ILI 101, it was later renamed the Richard J. Barnes. The craft was taken over by the U.S. Merchant Marine during World War II and used to haul coal between East Coast ports before the government sold it to Erie Sand and Gravel. That company renamed it for Day Peckinpaugh, a freight shipper on the Great Lakes. He was the brother of Roger Peckinpaugh, a former player-manager for the New York Yankees.

Courtesy the Buffalo News

 

 


Lighthouse and Museum Trip

8/25
The Saginaw River Marine Historical Society is planning a bus trip to the Great Lakes Lore Museum, also the Old and New Presque Isle Lighthouses, on September 10. It will be about a 12 hour trip. The group will meet at Meijer’s on Wilder Road in Bay City and leave there at 8:00 am sharp.

The price is $24.00 per person which includes admission to the museum. The bus seats 31 people. To make  reservations please call Carol at 989-684-2816.

Reported by  Maureen Martin

 


Port Reports - August 25

Marquette by Lee Rowe
The Presque Isle was an unusual visitor to Marquette's ore dock Sunday. She had to load on both sides of the dock.

Wednesday saw the Dorothy Anne/Pathfinder bringing coal and the Lee A. Tregurtha loading ore.

Oshawa by Jim Gallacher
The bulker Iryda left Oshawa stern first at 5.00 p.m. Monday, assisted by the Ocean Tugs Jerry G and Escorte. Iryda was originally destined for Duluth but she was diverted to unload the stranded bulker Ziema Gornoslaska.

The two tugs after leaving the Iryda then assisted the bulker Aleksandre Surovov to dock at Oshawa stern first. Between the two movements the McNally Tug Sandra Mary returned to the McNally dock. Pictures in the News Photo Gallery.

Port Colborne
The saltie Menominee arrived at Wharf 16 (R&P Coal Dock) overnight and has tied up along the east wall next to a large collection of large wooden crates. Several cranes are in attendance and it appears she is to load this freight. Crates appear to be marked "Jacobs Engineering", not sure of source or destination.

Detroit-Windsor
The former Boblo Steamer Ste. Clair was moved from Windsor to Belanger Park down river from Detroit. Pictures in the News Photo Gallery.

 

 


Photo Gallery Updates - August 25

News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping
 

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 25

On 25 August 1892, H D COFFINBERRY (wooden propeller freighter, 191 foot, 649 gross tons, built in 1874, at East Saginaw, Michigan) was carrying iron ore from Escanaba to Ashtabula in a fierce NW gale when she grounded on the rocks near Port Hope on Lake Huron.  The crew was rescued by the San Beach Lifesaving crew and the tug ANAPING.  The COFFINBERRY was released five days later and put back in service.

On Aug. 25, 1923, the Duluth, Missabe & Northern Ore Dock in Duluth loaded 208,212 tons of ore into 23 ships.

On August 25, 1984, the hard luck ROGER M KYES grounded off Mc Louth Steel and ended crosswise in the Detroit River's Trenton Channel. It required lightering into the RICHARD REISS a.) ADIRONDACK and the assistance of nine tugs to refloat her.  Renamed b.) ADAM E CORNELIUS in 1989.

The GEORGE M STEINBRENNER a.) ARTHUR H HAWGOOD arrived at Port Colborne, Ontario on August 25, 1978, in tow of the tug WILFRED M COHEN for scrapping.

On 25 August 1919, CABOTIA (formerly HIAWATHA, wooden propeller freighter, 235 foot, 1299 gross tons, built 1880, at Gibraltar, Michigan) went ashore on Main Duck Island in Lake Ontario and split her hull, becoming a constructive loss.

August 25, 1981 - The first of the famous "Love Boat" cruises was made. The BADGER carried 520 passengers, the largest number of passengers for a carferry up to that time. It was sponsored by the Ludington Area Ambassadors.

On 25 August 1873, JOURNEYMAN (wooden schooner, 129 foot, 235 gross tons, built in 1873, at Wenona, Michigan) was put in service. Her first cargo was 225,770 feet of lumber. She was built for Whitehead & Webster of Bay City and lasted until 1896.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 


Port Reports - August 24

Alpena by Ben & Chandra McClain
The Paul H. Townsend arrived in port on Monday morning to load cement. Its next stop is Green Bay.WI.

The J.A.W Iglehart made its way to Lafarge around 1:30pm on Tuesday. Following behind the Iglehart was the Cuyahoga, which tied up at the Lafarge coal dock at 2:30pm. The Cuyahoga swung out its self unloader and carefully postitioned the boom into the storage hopper to unload its cargo. The Cuyahoga was outbound in the calm bay by 8:30 p.m. The J.A.W Iglehart departed around 9:00 p.m., heading for South Chicago.

The Steamer Alpena spent Tuesday evening waiting for both vessels to clear the channel so it could come into port to take on cement.

The G.L Ostrander/barge Integrity is expected to arrive at Lafarge sometime Wednesday morning, and the Joseph H. Thompson and the Calumet are also on the schedule for Wednesday.

The Herbert C. Jackson loaded at Stoneport on Tuesday morning, followed by the Great Lakes Trader.

Rogers City by Ben & Chandra McClain
On Friday, at the Rogers City Theatre, many people attended "The Survivors" program sponsored by the Great Lakes Lore Maritime Museum. Frank Mays, Dennis Hale, and Dave Erickson each told their stories of shipwreck survival to a captivated audience. Capt. Muth and Warren Toussaint from the Sundew told of their experience searching for survivors from the Carl D. Bradley and Peter Hahn shared his memories of rescuing saliors from the Cedarville.

Saginaw River by Gordy Garris
On Tuesday, the Saginaw River once again saw three vessels moving along the banks of the river. First was the James Norris who was outbound around 9:00 a.m. moving through the Bay City bridges headed outbound for the lake. On her outbound trip in Bay City she met the inbound Calumet.

The Calumet arrived in the Saginaw River around 9:00 a.m. Tuesday morning and continued upriver to lighter at the Buena Vista Stone dock before continuing upriver to complete unloading at Valley Asphalt dock. She departed from the Valley Asphalt dock around 2:30 p.m. and turned around off the end of the dock in the Sixth Street Turning Basin to head outbound for the lake. She stopped briefly at the Burroughs dock to wait for at least two hours for the inbound Agawa Canyon to pass. The Calumet was outbound clear of the Airport Turning basin by 6:45 p.m. headed outbound for the lake.

The Agawa Canyon was inbound the Saginaw River late Tuesday afternoon with a load of stone for the Buena Vista Stone dock which was just vacated by the Calumet earlier in the day. The Canyon was expected to be outbound the Saginaw River late Tuesday evening or early Wednesday morning.
 

 


Photo Gallery Updates - August 24

News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping, Regional, Lighthouse and Model
 

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 24

At 2:00 a.m. on 24 August 1892, the GEORGE N BRADY (wooden propeller tug, 102 foot, 165 gross tons, built in 1865, at Detroit or Marine City, Michigan) was engaged in pulling a raft of logs across Lake St. Clair along with the tug SUMNER. Fire was discovered around the BRADY’s smokestack and he flames quickly spread. The crew was taken off of the stricken vessel by the SUMNER and the BRADY was cut free of the raft. The blazing vessel drifted to the American shore where she sank about three miles north of Grosse Pointe, Michigan. No lives were lost.

LEON SIMARD (Hull#413) was launched August 24, 1974, at Sorel, Quebec by Marine Industries Ltd. for Branch Lines Ltd. Renamed b.) L'ORME NO 1 in 1982. Sold off the lakes in 1997, renamed c.) TRADEWIND OCEAN and d.) AMARA in 2001.

On August 24, 1910, the THOMAS F COLE ran aground on a shoal in the St. Marys River severely damaging her hull plates.

The WARD AMES (Hull#518) was launched on August 24, 1907, at West Superior, Wisconsin by Superior Ship Building Co. for the Acme Steamship Co. (Augustus B. Wolvin, mgr.). Renamed b.) C H MC CULLOUGH JR in 1916.

On August 24, 1985, PAUL H CARNAHAN arrived for her final lay up at Nicholson's in Ecorse, Michigan. Ironically, only a few hours later, her near sister LEON FALK JR departed the same slip on her final trip bound for Quebec City and overseas scrapping.

The steam barge BURLINGTON of 1857, 137 foot, 276 gross tons ex-package freighter, burned to the water's edge in the Straits of Mackinac on August 24, 1895.

On 24 August 1885, IOSCO (wooden schooner-barge, 124 foot, 230 gross tons, built at Alabaster, Michigan in 1873) was heavily damaged by fire. She was rebuilt as an unrigged barge and lasted until 1912.

On 24 August 1882, the Port Huron Times reported that "the long looked for launch of the Stave Company's new river steamer MARY took place this afternoon between 4 and 5 o'clock and was witnessed by hundreds of spectators. The last support being knocked away, she slid very gracefully as far as the ways reached and then landed anything but gracefully in the mud where she now lies." She remained stuck in the mud until she was pulled free five days later.

Data from: Father Dowling Collection, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
 

 


Boatnerd Outage

8/23
Boatnerd was down for a time Tuesday due to a cable that was cut, knocking out phone and data services to part of lower central Michigan. Service was returned about 6 p.m.
 

 


Port Reports - August 23

Port Colborne by Herb
After sailing down bound to Hamilton on Sunday afternoon, Michipicoten returned to Port Colborne where she is loading at Goderich elevator, the former National Harbours Board loading Ontario wheat. This is likely a first and the large vessel has squeezed into the short slip. Saginaw made a quick visit last week to load and then proceeded to back down the canal, it is unknown if she fueled but she sailed up bound the next day.

Saginaw River by Gordy Garris
On Monday, the Saginaw River saw three vessels moving along the banks of the river. The tug Joyce L. VanEnkevort and the barge Great Lakes Trader were first departing from the Saginaw Wirt dock just before 7am and heading upriver to turn around in the Sixth Street Turning Basin to head outbound for the lake. She was outbound clear of the I-75 bridge in Zilwaukee just before 8:00 a.m.

Around the same time, the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was arriving at the Consumers Power Plant in Essexville to unload coal. She departed from the Consumers Power Plant at 4:00 p.m. and began to back out to Light 12 in the Saginaw Bay to turn around to head outbound for the lake. The McCarthy was contacted by the inbound James Norris and the Norris was told to slow as she neared Light 12 to let the McCarty turn around, then pass her to continue inbound.

The James Norris reached the mouth of the Saginaw River by 6:00 p.m. and began her trip upriver to Saginaw where she would unload. Her security calls did not indicate where she was headed to unload in Saginaw. The Norris is rarely seen on the Saginaw River, but the peak of her visits in a season are in late August. The Norris was down bound from the Sixth Street Turning Basin by 6:00 a.m. Tuesday morning and was outbound at the Airport Turning Basin by 8:00 a.m. headed outbound for the lake.

Coal Trade on the Saginaw River will continue into next week as the Walter J. McCarty Jr. will return on Sunday with more coal for the Consumers Power Plant in Essexville along with the Indiana Harbor next Friday.

 

 

 

Second 2005 Soo Freighter Chasing Cruise is a GO!

8/23 - We have been advised that enough people have signed up for the Second Soo Freighter Chasing Cruise on Saturday, Sept. 3, at 6:00 p.m. This is a repeat of our annual trip aboard the Chief Shingwauk leaving from Roberta Bondar Pavilion in Soo, Ontario. Cruise will return at 9:00 p.m. Cost is C$30.00 Canadian or $25.00 US per person. Price includes dinner with a menu to be determined. Cash bar on board.

It is not too late to join your fellow Boatnerds
. Make reservations today by calling (705) 253-9850, or 1-877-226-3665 with your credit card, or send your check to Locks Tours Canada Boat Cruises, P.O. Box 23002, Station Mall, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario P6A 6W6. If we fail to get 50 reservations, your check will be returned and no credit cards will be charged.

Details on other Boatnerd Gatherings are available at the Gathering page.

 

 


Lee Murdoch to Perform at SS City of Milwaukee Annual Meeting

8/23
The S.S. City of Milwaukee annual meeting will be held on Sunday, September 11, 2005. The meeting will take place at 12:30 p.m., and a concert by Lee Murdoch will follow afterwards at 2:00 p.m. Cost for members and/or guests to attend is $10.00 per person to help cover the cost of food and the concert.
For more information please contact Linda Spencer at our office Wednesday-Sunday, or at lspencer@carferry.com

Further information on the Society for the Preservation of the SS City of Milwaukee can be found at http://www.carferry.com
 

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 23

On 23 August 1887, GESINE (wooden schooner, 99 gross tons, built in 1853, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin) was carrying lumber in a storm on Lake Michigan. She was shoved up against the breakwater at Michigan City, Indiana and pounded to pieces. The crew and Capt. C. Anderson jumped overboard and clung to the breakwater pilings until rescued.

The GEMINI sailed on her maiden voyage August 23, 1978, from the shipyard to load fuel oil at Baytown, Texas, for delivery at Detroit, Michigan. Sold Canadian and renamed b.) ALGOSAR in 2005.

The wooden-hulled steamer AURORA was launched on August 23, 1887, at Cleveland, Ohio by Murphy & Miller Shipyard for J.J. Corrigan of Cleveland, Ohio.

On August 23, 1979, KINSMAN ENTERPRISE a.) NORMAN B REAM was towed out of the Frog Pond in Toledo, Ohio, having escaped the scrapper's torch, and sold to the Port Huron Seaway Terminal to be used as a storage barge.

On 23 AUG 1887, CLARA (2-mast, wooden scow-schooner) was carrying a load of hardwood lumber bound from Manistee, Michigan for Chicago, Ilinois when she was caught in a storm and capsized. Her hull later washed ashore upside-down near Miller's Station, Indiana.

August 23, 1901 - The PERE MARQUETTE 17 arrived Ludington, Michigan on her maiden voyage with Captain Peter Kilty in command.

On 23 August 1875, PERSIAN (wooden propeller freighter, 1630 tons, built in 1874, at Cleveland, Ohio) caught fire off Long Point on Lake Erie. The propeller EMPIRE STATE came alongside and tried to put out the fire with streams of water from her hose, but when this failed, she took PERSIAN in tow in an attempt to get her to shore. This too failed when the tow line burned through. PERSIAN burned to the waterline and sank 10 miles from land in about 30 fathoms of water. No lives were lost.

On 23 August 1900, ARGONAUT (wooden propeller freighter, 213 foot, 1119 gross tons, built in 1873, at Detroit, Michigan) was raised by an expensive salvage operation at the Escanaba ore dock where she had previously sunk. She lasted another six years.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember seriesThis is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
 


 

 


Photo Gallery Updates - August 23

News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping, Regional, Lighthouse and Model
 

 


Shipwreck squabble draws French interest

8/22
While the state and a salvage group clash over a possible shipwreck in northern Lake Michigan, France is very interested in sending a team to determine if it is the 17th-century barque Le Griffon, a 326-year-old vessel linked to a famous French explorer. The disclosure by a U.S. State Department official was filed in federal court in Grand Rapids as part of a lawsuit over access to the site.

Some historians consider the Griffon to be the first European ship to sail lakes Erie, Huron and Michigan. It was built for French explorer Rene-Robert Cavelier Sieur de La Salle in 1679. "The French Ministry of Culture is prepared to send a team of three or four experts for eight to 10 days to assist with identification, although the issue of who pays ... remains a question to be resolved," wrote Robert Blumberg of the State Department's Office of Oceans Affairs.

Great Lakes Exploration Group believes it might have found the Griffon between Escanaba in the Upper Peninsula and the St. Martin Islands, which is in Wisconsin waters north of the Door County peninsula. Because of fears of looting, a precise spot in the lake has not been disclosed. In May, Great Lakes Exploration was ordered to share more details so state experts could check the site. Since then, however, both sides have been squabbling over how much to disclose. The state "must be given the precise location. ... Given the rapidly approaching seasonal change and the unpredictability of northern Michigan weather, the parties must move with expedited speed in order to accomplish this investigation," U.S. Chief District Judge Robert Holmes Bell said.

The state, which typically has control over abandoned ships at the bottom of the Great Lakes, has speculated a piece of wood is "barn timber." But if it is the Griffon, and France can prove the ship was sailing under the authority of King Louis XIV in 1679, the French could have rights to the wreck. Blumberg's e-mail expressing France's interest was filed by Great Lakes Exploration. There also is a memo from the French government describing the Griffon's history.

La Salle was one of the earliest French explorers of North America. In 1679, his expedition sailed Le Griffon on Lake Erie, Lake Huron and Lake Michigan. The ship went to Green Bay in the spring of 1679, loaded up with furs, and headed back for Buffalo on Sept. 18 with five crew members. Meanwhile, La Salle and a party of some 30 men went to the mouth of Michigan's St. Joseph River, over a portage to the Kankakee River, down the Kankakee to the Illinois River, then down the Illinois. In January 1680, he built Fort Crevecoeur near the site of Peoria, Ill. While there, he received word that Le Griffon had been lost. Robert de La Salle's trips "were not merely a personal initiative of an intrinsically private nature but required a king's decree," the memo states. The judge, however, said the documents are not relevant at this stage of the case.

La Salle's other ship, La Belle, was discovered in the mid-1990s in Matagorda Bay off the Texas coast. With approval from France, state archaeologists there recovered nearly 1 million artifacts, from human bones to muskets.

From the Muskegon Chronicle

 

 


American Spirit in Detroit for Repairs

8/22
The American Spirit was assisted by the G tugs Superior and Vermont into Nicholson's Slip Saturday for repairs to her unloading belt. Repairs are expected to be completed by Tuesday, the Spirit will then head upbound to Superior to load.

Reported by Mike Nicholls
 

 


Six Sailors Jump From Moving Ship

8/22
According to CTV News, Six Turkish sailors jumped from the moving Maltese-flagged Imbat at Champlain, Quebec. Two men made it to shore and a third was rescued by locals. Three others are still missing and the worse is feared. The waters are cold even when the air temperature is high.

Provincial Police detained the three men and were searching for the remaining three. Two more men were taken from Sorel, Quebec, to a doctor in Montreal and never returned to the ship. The ship had loaded steel at Sorel and was heading to Italy. Canada Customs had the ship stop in Quebec City to find who these people were that jumped from the moving vessel.

Transport Canada is suppose to board the ship and see if they can sail with a crew of only 12 men from the original 20. No explanation was given for the exodus of the Turkish sailors, who are seeking refuge status. Authorities say the problem lies within the ship it self.

Reported by K. Malo

 


Emergency Exercise at Soo Locks

8/22
On Friday, twenty different agencies worked together to practice responding to a radiological release at the Soo Locks last Friday. The Sea Cadet vessel, Pride of Michigan, participated with the Sea Cadets. Oglebay Norton locked through during the exercise and nearly took a Corps of Engineers cart in the hull, but it was saved just in time.

US Coast Guard Sector Sault Ste. Marie coordinated the exercise. Response teams from Chicago (Department of Energy), Augusta MI (Civil Support Team Michigan National Guard) and Lansing (Department of Environmental Quality Waste and Hazardous Materials Division) were on hand to provide expertise.
Reported by Erin Potter

 


Lake Express Ferry Rescues boater in water

8/22
Milwaukee's high-speed ferry sped to the rescue of a man whose boat had capsized Sunday 20 miles off Wisconsin's coastline in the chilly waters of Lake Michigan. On the Lake Express ferry's morning run from Milwaukee to Muskegon, Mich., the captain spotted a man clinging to debris from his capsized boat, authorities said. The crew plucked the man from the water, and a nurse started medical treatment as the ferry rushed him back to Milwaukee. "He was really lucky that we happened along at this time," Lake Express Capt. Rick Hopper said.

The Associated Press identified the boater as Thomas Drewek, 44. Two other sources also confirmed Drewek by his last name. His medical condition could not be confirmed Sunday.

Hopper said the Lake Express was heading east at its full speed of 34 knots (40 mph) about 6:35 a.m. Sunday when he noticed something a couple of miles away and picked up his binoculars. "I just had a feeling," Hopper said. "It didn't look right." Hopper changed course, put his crew on alert and notified the U.S. Coast Guard's Milwaukee station. As the ferry pulled up alongside the boater, crew members reached into the water and hauled the man aboard, Hopper said. The rescue was completed just 5 or 10 minutes after Hopper first noticed the boater, and then it took about 40 minutes to return to Milwaukee, he said.

Meanwhile, the cabin crew had explained the situation to passengers and asked whether anyone had medical training. They found a nurse, Teri Young of Rochester, Minn., ferry spokesman Jeff Fleming said. Crew members carried the boater to the crew mess, where Young started treating him for hypothermia, Hopper said. The man's body temperature had fallen to 92 degrees Fahrenheit, Hopper said. Although the water temperature was 63 degrees, it would feel like 48 degrees to a person in the water, Milwaukee Fire Department Battalion Chief Steven Gleisner said.

The boater first told the crew that he had been in the water for 48 hours, but he "wasn't real coherent" and it seemed unlikely he had survived that long, Hopper said. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Robert Napp said the man had been in the water for 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Other passengers donated clothing to the boater, Hopper said. And when Young learned the boater was diabetic, a fellow passenger hurried to his motorcycle and brought her his own diabetes testing kit so she could monitor the boater's blood sugar, Hopper said. By the time the ferry reached Milwaukee, "his temperature was up and he was feeling good," Gleisner said. "The hypothermia had abated."

However, the boater was not able to walk off the ferry, and the crew took him ashore in a wheelchair, Capt. Hopper said. The Fire Department then took him to St. Francis Hospital for treatment, Gleisner said. A St. Francis spokeswoman did not return calls seeking information about the boater. Capt. Hopper identified the boater's vessel as a 22-foot Sea Ray. Napp said the power boat had capsized after a wave washed over the stern. The boat had not been salvaged as of Sunday afternoon, and the Coast Guard was broadcasting warnings to other boaters to avoid running into it, Napp said.

Passengers remained calm during the incident and complimented the crew for its professional handling of the rescue, Hopper said. Because the rescue delayed the morning round trip, the ferry canceled its midday round trip, Fleming said.

Although this was the first time the Lake Express rescued anyone, it's the second time in a week that the ferry has changed course to come to the aid of other mariners, and the third time in a month that it has been involved in a rescue, Fleming said. On Tuesday, the ferry crew spotted waterspouts, somewhat similar to tornadoes on water, heading toward a group of kayakers who were paddling across the lake as part of an American Cancer Society fund-raiser. In that case, the ferry checked to make sure the kayakers were safe, but other boats had taken them aboard.

A few weeks ago, the ferry crew saw a flare and reported it to the Coast Guard's station in Grand Rapids, Mich., Fleming said. That turned out to be a distress signal that led to a Coast Guard rescue, he said. The Lake Express didn't encounter any similar incidents last year, its first season.

Reported by Paul Erspamer, from the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel
 

 


Toronto-Rochester
Ferry crashes into Toronto gangway


8/21
The fast ferry crashed into the gangway at the Port of Toronto Sunday evening, according to witnesses and a Bay Ferries official. Several windows were blown out, and a scratch is visible above the Cat logo, according to passengers who witnessed the event. No one was hurt.

Passengers reported the ship's walkway was inoperable and they loaded for the return trip to Rochester through the car ramp. The ship was on target to depart Toronto around 8:30 p.m., an hour and a half behind schedule.

Don Cormier, vice president of Bay Ferries, says a "master-in-training" was at the controls when the mishap occurred. he said his inexperience was "likely" a factor in the accident.

Courtesy WROC-TV

8/22 - Additional information from RNews.com
Rochester's fast ferry returned to service on time and on schedule this morning, after a mishap in Canada left the vessel with three broken windows Sunday.
As the ferry pulled into the Port of Toronto Sunday evening the ferry hit the gangway at the port. The collision broke three windows on the boat near the front part of the vessel. Due to the damage, the ferry's return trip to Rochester was delayed. "The Cat" pulled into the Port of Rochester just before 11:00 p.m. Sunday. The boat usually returns around 9:30 p.m. Monday morning, the ferry took off for Toronto at 8am, right on schedule. Crews spent the overnight working to replace the glass broken in the mishap. Sunday night, crews boarded up the windows, for the trip back to Rochester.
R News spoke with Dan Schiavone by phone after the accident. He was one of the passengers waiting to board the ferry. He said that the only damage he saw was the damage to the windows and some small scratches. He said that no one was hurt, but the crowd was a little anxious.
“The room is very loud and people are a bit anxious. They're disappointed there are some delays in their transportation. For the most part, people seem to be okay with it," said Schiavone. “I'm disappointed, I guess. I have a certain degree of sympathy for the fast ferry. They certainly had a lot of bad luck.”
Schiavone said that passengers were told windy weather may have caused the accident. Passengers also were told to either wait for the repairs or find an alternative way to get to Rochester. Bay Ferries, the ferry operator, will reimburse them.
This is now the third mishap for the Spirit of Ontario. In April last year, the ferry suffered a gash while pulling into a New York City pier. That's when the ferry first arrived to New York from Australia where the ship was built. The accident ended up delaying the launch of the ferry service.
In May, while in a dry dock in St. Catherines, Canada, the ferry slipped off some blocks while crews were getting ready to do some work on the ship to prepare it for its re-launch date. That mishap did not damage the boat.

 

 


Port Reports - August 22

Escanaba/Marquette by Scott Best
Sunday was a cool day in the UP with temperatures that felt more like late fall than late summer. Around 11:00 a.m. the Arthur M. Anderson arrived at Escanaba with a load of coal for the C. Reiss Dock. In Marquette under grey skies the Presque Isle was taking on a rare load or ore for delivery to Nanticoke, ON. The Presque Isle is the first 1000 footer to load in Marquette in a very long time.

Toronto by Charlie Gibbons
CSL Niagara departed with coal this afternoon. The James Norris went back into service on the 19th. There was lots of black smoke coming from her on the 18th. Canadian Ranger was down bound in the canal Sunday night and expected in Toronto with raw sugar for Redpath on Sept. 7th.

Saginaw River by Stephen Hause
Invincible-McKee Sons delivered material to three docks along the Saginaw River on Sunday. The tug-barge arrived early in the morning at the Wirt Stone Dock in Bay City. After lightering there, the vessel continued up the river to the Burroughs dock near the I-75 bridge. The Invincible's third stop was the Buena Vista Dock a short distance further up the river. Invincible-McKees Sons was outbound early Sunday evening.

Paul H. Townsend, which arrived Saturday at the LaFarge cement terminal in Saginaw, was outbound late Sunday afternoon.

Joyce L. VanEnkevort-Great Lakes Trader arrived early Sunday evening at the Wirt Stone Dock in Bay City.

Oshawa by Jim Gallacher
Petite Forte and the Barge St Marys Cement docked at the Port of Oshawa on August 18 and departed the following day. It appears that the Petite Forte had docked to avoid bad weather conditions.

The bulker Iryda called at Oshawa on Sunday, unloading steel products after arriving from Sorrel Quebec. She will be leaving Oshawa on Monday afternoon heading for Duluth.

Milwaukee by Paul Erspamer
Milwaukee's inner harbor turning basin was a busy place Monday morning. The Middletown unloaded coal at the Greenfield Avenue We Energies site. The Alpena offloaded at the LaFarge silo while the tug G.L.Ostrander and barge Integrity had to wait in line. They were moored to the wall in brisk winds.

 

 


Photo Gallery Updates - August 22

News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping, Regional, Lighthouse and Model
 

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 22

On 22 August 1898, the schooner FANNY CAMPBELL (wooden schooner, 404 tons, built in 1868, at St. Catherines, Ontario) ran ashore near Johnston’s harbor in Georgian Bay.  She was sailing light on her way for a load of cordwood.

The ALGOPORT left Collingwood Ontario, August 22, 1979, on her maiden voyage for Calcite, Michigan to load limestone bound for Spragge, Ontario.

The R. L. IRELAND (Hull#62) was launched August 22, 1903, at Chicago, Illinois by Chicago Ship Building Co. for the Gilchrist Transportation Co. Renamed  b.) SIRIUS in 1913, and c.) ONTADOC in 1926.

The ENDERS M VOORHEES was towed out of Duluth, Minnesota on August 22, 1987, by the tugs AVENGER IV and CHIPPEWA, and was the first of the 'Supers' towed off the Lakes for scrap.

The ROGER M. KYES sailed on her maiden voyage on August 22,1973, from Toledo, Ohio to load iron ore at Escanaba, Michigan. She was built under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. This program allowed U.S. shipping companies to construct new vessels or to modernize their existing fleet by government guaranteed financing and tax deferred benefits. The KYES was the second of ten ships launched for American Steamship but the first to enter service under this arrangement. The total cost of the ten ships was more than $250 million.  Renamed b.) ADAM E CORNELIUS in 1989.

On 22 August 1863, WILLIAM S BULL (wooden propeller steam tug, 16 tons, built in 1861, at Buffalo, New York) waterlogged and went down in a storm 40 miles east of Erie, Pennsylvania. She was in company of the tug G W GARDNER and the canal boat M E PAINE, who saved her crew.

On 22 August 1876, the Canadian schooner LAUREL sank off Big Sandy Creek on Lake Ontario. The crew made it to shore in the yawl. The LAUREL was bound from Kingston, Ontario to Charlotte, New York with iron ore.

On 22 August 1900, SPECULAR (wooden propeller freighter, 264 foot, 1742 gross tons, built in 1882, at Cleveland, Ohio) was carrying iron ore when she was a "hit & run" victim by the steamer DENVER at 2:00 a.m. and sank in 6 minutes in the Pelee Passage on Lake Erie. Fifteen of her crew abandoned in her yawl and were saved. The remaining five scrambled up into the rigging and clung there until they were rescued four hours later by the steamer MARITANA and brought to Detroit. Salvagers worked on the wreck continuously until they gave up on 28 September. Wreck lies 3.16 miles SE from Pelee Passage light. She was owned by Republic Iron Co. of Cleveland.

 Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

 


Third-quarter U.S. steel profits flame out
The steel industry trims its output as demand grows sluggish after record earnings a year ago.

8/21
U.S. steel mills have trimmed production, but continue to slog through a quarter that many companies say will be the low point of the year and a dramatic drop from the third quarter of 2004, when the market hit what many now see as an artificial high. Six weeks into the third quarter, steelmakers are struggling to balance lower prices and still-sluggish demand for their products with the soaring costs of scrap and natural gas.

"The horse race at this time will be keeping selling prices ahead of the cost of operations," says Harry Page, president of West Virginia's Wheeling Pittsburgh Steel Corp. Key industry players, including Netherlands-based Mittal Steel Co., Pittsburgh-based U.S. Steel and North Carolina's Nucor Corp., have all warned investors to expect a drop in third-quarter results, and analyst Charles Bradford says some companies could report profits 30 percent to 100 percent below the same period last year.

"Last year's third quarter was the best the industry ever had. There were companies who made as much in a year in their prior histories as they made that quarter," says Bradford, of New York's Bradford Research-Soleil Securities Corp. "This is going to be a terrible third quarter."

But Mark Parr, a steel analyst with KeyBanc Capital Markets in Cleveland, says producers could see a fourth-quarter rebound if prices rise as expected in September, if demand climbs as projected and if domestic producers "maintain supply discipline" rather than quickly ramping up production.

Steel prices skyrocketed last summer, driving up the cost of everything from cars and tractors to home appliances. But those record prices and the rampant buying turned out to be a bubble, with steel users building up inventory in hopes of waiting out further price increases, then holding back on new orders. Nor did consumers see any short-term benefit when the prices began to drop.

"When you're talking about cars or washing machines or whatever, those people are buying steel a year forward or more," says Robert Crandall, steel industry expert and senior fellow at The Brookings Institution, a research group in Washington, D.C. At best, price fluctuations might appear a year or two later, he said. But other market factors help keep prices high, including the rising costs of oil and energy. "You're going to have a tough time picking up effects in month-to-month or even year-to-year movement of steel prices," Crandall says.

With full warehouses of their own and few new orders coming, steelmakers responded to the inventory buildup by curtailing production. Page, at Wheeling-Pitt, said 32 blast furnaces were operating in the United States in June 2004; one year later, only 23 were still firing. That's the fewest since a nationwide steel strike in 1959, when only 19 furnaces were in operation. "So the degree to which integrated producers cut back is really unprecedented," he said. Though China had purchased massive amounts of U.S.-made steel in 2003, that buying didn't continue in 2004. Instead, the Chinese looked to Europe and other producers with lower costs as they supplemented their own rapidly growing industry.

Reported in the Detroit News

 

 

Today is the Last Day to Make Reservations
August 21 the last day
to sign up for the
Second 2005 Soo Locks Open House and Freighter Chasing Cruise

8/20
Saturday - Sept. 3 - 6:00 p.m. - Annual Boatnerd Freighter Chasing Cruise-Part II. This is a repeat of our annual trip aboard the Chief Shingwauk leaving from Roberta Bondar Pavilion in Soo, Ontario. Cruise will return at 9:00 p.m. Cost is C$30.00 Canadian or $25.00 US per person. Price includes dinner with a menu to be determined. Cash bar on board.

We must have a minimum of fifty (50) paid reservations by August 21 in order to have this cruise. Make reservations by calling (705) 253-9850, or 1-877-226-3665 with your credit card, or send your check to Locks Tours Canada Boat Cruises, P.O. Box 23002, Station Mall, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario P6A 6W6. If we fail to get 50 reservations, your check will be returned and no credit cards will be charged.

Details on other Boatnerd Gatherings are available at the Gathering page.

 

 

 

Port Reports - August 21

8/21 - Toronto by Charlie Gibbons
The Toronto Port Authority held its annual general meeting Tuesday and announced that they will buy a new $5 million ferry in an attempt to attract new carriers to the City Centre Airport which they operate at a $2.7 million loss annually. The new ferry is due to be delivered next August and will carry 100 passengers on the enclosed upper deck, the same number as the existing ferry, which dates to the 1940's.

On Wednesday, Ziemia Gnieznienska departed Redpath early for the canal and Stephen B. Roman departed as well. Fair Jeanne departed around 20:00 for Buffalo.

On Thursday, Federal Matane arrived at Pier 52.

Saturday the yacht Sea Kids Six went on Toronto Drydock. CSL Niagara is back in port loading more coal from the defunct Lakeview Generating Station. Stephen B. Roman came in around 11 p.m.
 

8/21 - Saginaw River by Todd Shorkey
The Paul H. Townsend was inbound the Saginaw River Saturday evening headed up the river for the LaFarge Dock in Carrollton to unload cement. She is expected outbound late Sunday.

8/21 - Alpena by Ben & Chandra McClain
The Paul H. Townsend arrived in port to load early Saturday morning. The Townsend was outbound in the bay by 7 a.m. heading for Saginaw. The Steamer Alpena was at Lafarge on Friday night and is expected to be in Milwaukee on Sunday. The J.A.W. Iglehart came in on Thursday to take on cargo, and will be making one of its infrequent trips to Superior, WI and Heron Bay, ON.

The G. L. Ostrander/barge Integrity was in port on Wednesday morning and has since made stops in Waukegan and South Chicago.
The Great Lakes Trader was loading at Stoneport Saturday night. The Joseph H. Thompson was on the schedule for Sunday.
 

 


Photo Gallery Updates - August 21

News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping and Other/Off Topic
 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 21

At 7:10 p.m. on 21 August 1901, the whaleback steamer ALEXANDER Mc DOUGALL (steel propeller modified whaleback freighter, 413 foot, 3686 gross tons, built in 1898, at W. Superior, Wisconsin) ran into and cut in two the tug GEORGE STAUBER (wooden propeller tug, 55 foot, 43 gross tons, built in 1883, at Buffalo, New York) in the rapids at the mouth of the St. Clair River. The STAUBER sank immediately in about 60 feet of water. No lives were lost. The steam barge IDA assisted in retrieving people in the water. The MC Dougall did not stop.

The BUFFALO's sea trials were conducted from August 21 through August 24, 1978.The GEORGE A STINSON was christened at Detroit, Michigan on August 21, 1978.

The CEDARGLEN a.) WILLIAM C ATWATER arrived under tow at Port Maitland, Ontario on August 21, 1994, where she was scrapped.

THE HARVESTER cleared Lorain, Ohio, August 21, 1911, on her maiden voyage loaded with coal for Duluth, Minnesota.

IMPERIAL QUEBEC (Hull#161) was launched August 21, 1957, at Collingwood, Ontario by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd. for Imperial Oil Ltd.

The KINSMAN INDEPENDENT a.) WILLIAM B KERR, encountered steering problems downbound at the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River on August 21, 1973. She avoided hitting the stone embankments but ran aground after clearing the cut. The damage sustained in this grounding ended her career.

The VENUS was sold to Acme Metals Inc. and was towed to Ashtabula, Ohio on August 21, 1975, where she was broken up in 1976.

On August 21, 1971, the CHARLES DICK severed two underwater cables in the Maumee River, cutting off power to east Toledo and the Cherry Street Bridge. Massive traffic jams developed on Toledo's streets.

The graceful schooner HUNTER SAVIDGE was launched on August 21, 1879, by the Grand Haven Ship Building Company.

On 21 August 1856, CHARTER (wooden, propeller vessel, 132 foot, 197 tons, built in 1849, at Huron, Ohio as a sidewheeler), was bound from Cleveland for Buffalo with flour, oats and rye. She swamped and sank in a storm 6 miles above Fairport, Ohio. By the end of August, she had been damaged beyond repair but her machinery was recovered as she lay in relatively shallow water.

On 21 August 1861, BANSHEE (wooden propeller freighter, 119 foot, 166 tons, built in 1852, at Portsmouth, Ontario, named HERO in 1860-61) was carrying wheat, flour and butter to Montreal when her engine failed (broken shaft) and she was helpless in a storm on Lake Ontario. She foundered near Timber Island on Lake Ontario. One passenger died, but the crew of 10 made it to Timber Island. She was owned by Howard & Rowe of Quebec.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

 


Algonorth Suffers Engine Room Fire

Shortly after 5:00 a.m. Friday morning the Algonorth contacted Thunder Bay Coast Guard Radio to report that they had an engine room blackout caused by a fire affecting three electrical panels. They are powerless and drifting awaiting tug assistance. The fire was put out with extinguishers and there was no other damage or injuries to any of the 22 crew members on board.

The ship was forced to drop anchor around 6:45 a.m. as she was drifting toward Pie Island. The tug Robert John, owned by Gravel & Lake Services Ltd., arrived about an hour later and took the vessel in tow to Keefer Terminal where repairs will be made.

Reported by Tom Stewart

 

 

Port Reports - August 20

8/18 - Marquette by Lee Rowe
Thursday was a very busy day in Marquette. The Wolverine brought stone to the lower harbor Shiras dock while the James R. Barker brought coal to the upper harbor WE power plant. The Canadian Leader left with her load and the Canadian Miner took her place at the dock. The Miner dropped a bow anchor before reaching the dock and pulled it back up after getting tied up.

The Lee A. Tregurtha arrived and had to wait for the Barker before she could go to her side of the dock, so pulled in behind the Miner until the Barker pulled out into the harbor while the coal pile was moved. The Lee A. then moved to the south side and began loading, while the Barker anchored.


8/19 - Marquette by Rod Burdick
Canadian Miner loaded ore on a gloomy Friday morning. It was her second Marquette visit of 2005. Miner departed around noon.

Anchored off the Upper Harbor was Herbert C. Jackson waiting for James R. Barker to complete unloading coal. Barker's unload was suspended Thursday evening to allow Lee A. Tregurtha to load ore.

8/19 - Buffalo - by Brian Wroblewski
The English River was unloading at the LaFarge dock this afternoon and the Courtney Burton is currently on her way across the lake for Buffalo at 5:00 p.m. The Tall Ship Fair Jeanne was sitting in the Outer Harbor off the North Entrance Channel at 3:00 p.m.
 

 

 


Photo Gallery Updates - August 20

News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping and Other/Off Topic
 

 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 20

On 20 August 1881, MICHIGAN (Hull#48), (iron propeller passenger-package freight steamer, 215 foot, 1183 tons) was launched by the Detroit Dry Dock Company at Wyandotte, Michigan for the Goodrich Transportation Company. She was then taken to Milwaukee for fitting out and completion. She cost $159,212. She was designed by Frank E. Kirby especially for cross-lake winter service.

The INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORT arrived at Toronto, Ontario, August 20, 1969, on her maiden voyage with fuel oil.

The R BRUCE ANGUS in tandem tow with the ULS steamer GORDON C LEITCH behind the tug IRVING CEDAR arrived at Setúbal, Portugal August 20, 1985, where they were broken up. The a.) IRVING CEDAR is now Purvis Marine’s c.) RELIANCE.

August 20, 1920, the WILLIS L KING, up bound light in Whitefish Bay, was in collision with and sank the down bound Steel Trust steamer SUPERIOR CITY. The SUPERIOR CITY was struck nearly amidships and when the cold water reached her engine room, her boilers exploded. She sank immediately with 29 of her 33 crew members aboard. 

The US266029, a.) WILLIAM CLAY FORD departed her lay-up berth at the Rouge slip on August 20, 1986, in tow of Gaelic tugs and she was taken to Detroit Marine Terminals on the Rouge River, where her pilothouse was removed to be displayed at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Detroit's Belle Isle. 

The TEXACO WARRIOR of 1930, punctured her tank in a grounding accident in the Welland Canal near Bridge 10 on August 20, 1964.

On 20 August 1899, the HUNTER SAVIDGE (2-mast, wooden schooner, 117 foot, 152 gross tons, built in 1879, at Grand Haven, Michigan) capsized in a squall or tornado in Lake Huron. 5 survivors, including Capt. Fred Sharpstein, were rescued from the overturned schooner by the steamer ALEX MC VITTIE. However, 5 lost their lives, including the captain's wife and their son, the ship's owner's wife and daughter, and the Mate. Capt. Sharpstein patrolled the beaches looking for the bodies of his wife and son for months but they were never found. The wreck was found in 1987, near Grindstone City, Michigan.

On 20 August 1852, ATLANTIC (wooden sidewheeler, 267 foot, 1155 tons, built in 1849, at Detroit, Michigan) was loaded with immigrants when she collided with the propeller freighter OGDENSBURG and quickly sank south of Long Point on Lake Erie at about 2:30 a.m. Of the 600 on board, estimates of death range from 150 to 250. Numerous salvage attempts have been made through the years up through 1989, since there were supposed to be valuables on board when she went down.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Randy Johnson, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample. The books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
 

 

 


Photo Gallery Updates - August 18

News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping and Other/Off Topic
 

 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 19

On 19 August 1902, OMAR D CONGER (wooden propeller ferry, 92 foot, 200 gross tons, built in 1887, at Port Huron, Michigan) burned at Port Huron, Michigan. The entire upper works burned and the lower deck was also badly burned. She had burned on 20 June 1901, and had been rebuilt over the winter. She was again rebuilt and lasted until 1922.

The JOHN E F MISENER of 1951, grounded near Hard Island on the St. Lawrence River August 19, 1966, suffering bow damage. The ROBERT S PIERSON was sold to P & H. Shipping Ltd. on August 19, 1982, and renamed e) SPRUCEGLEN.

The package freighter ARIZONA was launched on August 19, 1868, at Cleveland, Ohio by Quayle & Martin for E.T. & J.C. Evans of Buffalo, New York.

On August 19, 1915, the HENRY PEDWELL burned at Wiarton, Ontario. CARDINAL, a.) WINDSOLITE, was towed to the Strathearne Terminal in Hamilton, Ontario on August 19, 1974, for scrapping.

On 19 August 1909, CITY OF GREEN BAY (wooden propeller passenger/package freight, 134 foot, 257 gross tons, built in 1880, at Fort Howard, Wisconsin as the sidewheeler M C HAWLEY) caught fire while crossing Saginaw Bay, burned to the waterline and sank.. This wasn't her first experience with this type of accident since on 17 November 1887, she had burned to a "total loss" in Lake Michigan.

August 19, 1930 - The ANN ARBOR NO 7 towed the disabled tug FRED C GREILING from Frankfort, Michigan to Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co..The propeller QUEBEC was launched at the Chisholm & Simpson yard at Chatham, Ontario on 19 August 1874. She was built for the Beatty Line and designed to run between Sarnia and Duluth.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample. The books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
 

 

 

Port Reports - August 18

Marquette by Lee Rowe
The Canadian Leader had a day's wait at the ore dock before loading on Wednesday.

The Canadian Miner was expected at the dock, on Thursday, along with the James R. Barker with coal, and the possibility of the Lee A. Tregurtha as well.

Saginaw River by Todd Shorkey
After a few quiet days on the Saginaw River, two vessels called on the lower river Wednesday. First in was the tug Rebecca Lynn and her barge bound for the Bit-Mat dock in Bay City. Not far behind was the Adam E. Cornelius headed for the Bay Aggregates dock in Bay City. With both the above docks sharing the same slip, the Rebecca Lynn tied up across the river at the Essroc dock and allowed the Cornelius, with the much shorter unload time, to take the Bay Aggregates slip first. The Adam E. Cornelius finished her unload Wednesday afternoon and backed out of the slip, turned and headed for the lake. The Rebecca Lynn then pulled in and began her unload. She would be expected outbound later on Thursday.

 

 


Photo Gallery Updates - August 18

News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping, Lighthouse and Transportation/Trains Albums
 

 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 18

On 18 August 1871, GEN WINFIELD SCOTT (wooden schooner, 114 foot, 213 tons, built in 1852, at Black River, Ohio) was carrying lumber from Menominee to Chicago when she sprang a leak during a gale and capsized off Spider Island near Death’s Door on Lake Michigan. The crew clung to her for 13 hours until rescued by the passing schooner ETHAN ALLEN.

CANADIAN ENTERPRISE (Hull#65) was float launched on August 18, 1979, at St. Catharines, Ontario by Port Weller Drydocks Ltd. for Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd.

On August 18, 1972, $50,000 in bottom damage occurred when the CHAMPLAIN, of 1943, hit an obstruction in the Trenton Channel, on the lower Detroit River.

The NORMAN B REAM (Hull#70) was launched August 18, 1906, at Chicago, Illinois by the Chicago Ship Building Co.for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio. Renamed b.) KINSMAN ENTERPRISE in 1965.

On 18 August 1907, KATE WHITE (wooden propeller steam tug, 62 foot, 28 gross tons, built at Erie, Pennyslvania in 1885, as a yacht) sank near the harbor entrance at Fairport, Ohio.

On 18 August 1878, JAVA (iron twin propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 232 foot, 1525 gross tons, built in 1873, at Buffalo, New York) was sailing from Bay City, Michigan for Chicago and Milwaukee with mixed merchandise, including 300 tons of fine household goods, parlor stoves, salt, etc. She was a twin-screw and the main theory of her loss in good weather was that her starboard shaft coupling came loose and the shaft slid out the stern, allowing water to flood through the sleeve. nevertheless, she sank quickly, 15 miles off Big Sable Point on Lake Michigan in over 300 feet of water. The crew escaped in lifeboats and were picked up by passing steamers.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 

Sarnia's Imperial Oil pays record fine

8/17
SARNIA - Imperial Oil was convicted Tuesday for its 2004 Super Bowl Sunday chemical spill that forced water plants to stop their intakes and sparked a government crackdown on the petrochemical industry. Judge J. L. Menzies imposed a fine of $300,000 (Canadian) after the company pleaded guilty to the Feb. 1, 2004, release of solvents into the St. Clair River. The fine was one of the largest ever imposed for an environmental offense in Ontario and the maximum allowed for a summary offense under the Fisheries Act.

In an emotional victim-impact statement, former Walpole Island Chief Donna Day said the spill caused widespread anxiety and heartache among First Nation residents. Drinking-water intakes were closed on both sides of the river, but Walpole refused to reopen its taps for several days until chemical levels in the ice-filled river returned to zero.

About 42,000 gallons of methyl ethyl ketone and methyl isobutyl ketone - enough to fill three tanker trucks - escaped into the river from a leaky heat exchanger. The ensuing outcry from downriver residents brought national media attention and did what Sarnia Mayor Mike Bradley called "sickening damage" to the city's reputation. In response, former Environment Minister Leona Dombrowsky ordered Ontario's environmental "swat team" to Sarnia for a yearlong inspection sweep of Imperial and 33 other petrochemical companies.

Sarnia refinery manager Barry Robinson pleaded guilty on behalf of the company and expressed "disappointment and regret" for the incident. "During the past two decades we have reduced the number of spills by 90%," he said. "However, our goal has been and remains zero spills." The company is reducing its use of "once-through" cooling water to fulfill a recommendation of the Industrial Pollution Action Team, he said.

The $300,000 fine was the largest Imperial Oil has had to pay for an offense in Ontario

From the Port Huron Times-Herald, Reported by Freighter Frank Frisk
 

 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 17

On August 17, 1987, Cadillac was towed by the tugs Glenada and Elmore M Misner, from Toledo's Frog Pond on the first leg of her journey to be scrapped.

At 4:00 PM on 17 August 1869, the schooner Carlingford was launched at the Fitzgerald and Leighton yard in Port Huron, Michigan with plenty of spectators on hand. Robert Montgomery of Buffalo, the owner, built the vessel for the grain trade. Her capacity was 30,000 bushels of grain. After launching, she still had to have her masts (96 foot, 98 foot and 94 foot) and rigging installed. At the time, she was the largest sailing vessel built in Port Huron. her dimensions were 155 foot keel, 165 foot overall, 31 foot 6 inch beam and 12 foot 8 inch depth. 50 men worked on her and she cost $35,000.

Data from: Joe Barr, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample. The books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 

Teakglen's new owner is scrapper Wayne Elliott

8/16
The motor vessel Teakglen, which has most recently been used as a grain storage hull at Goderich, Ont., has been purchased by Wayne Elliott, who also owns International Marine Salvage Co. at Port Colborne, Ont.

Elliott, in confirming the purchase earlier this week, said he is "as yet undecided what will happen with her."

Possible options include scrapping the vessel, reselling it for scrapping overseas, or returning it to service in some capacity. Teakglen, which is presently moored at Sarnia, Ont., was recently towed out of Goderich with another storage hull, the Willowglen, which is bound overseas for eventual scrapping.

The Teakglen was among vessels purchased in 2002 by Canada Steamship Lines from N. M. Paterson & Sons, for which she had sailed as Mantadoc. She made only one trip under her present name for CSL and was eventually sold to Goderich Elevators for grain storage. The 607-foot vessel entered service in 1967.

International Marine Salvage also presently owns the Joseph H. Frantz. Scrapping has not yet started on the Frantz.

 

 

Port Reports

8/16
Buffalo by Brian Wroblewski
As part of the Buffalo Waterfront Sailabration, there will be a boat parade escorting the Tall Ship Fair Jeanne into the Buffalo inner harbor on Friday, August 19, 2005 at 5:00 PM. The procession will be led by the Coast Guard, the fireboat Cotter, Buffalo Harbor Sailing Club, Seven Seas Sailing School, and an amazing spectacle of Buffalo’s floating waterfront community. Boaters wishing to participate should meet at the North Gap at 4:45 PM. For further information, log on to www.celebratethewaterfront.com.

Duluth/Superior by Al Miller
The Twin Ports were busy Tuesday morning, with the saltie Jana loading at AGP elevator in Duluth, Pineglen under the spouts at CHS gallery, and Courtney Burton at General Mills in Superior. Canadian Enterprise was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal. James R. Barker entered port about 7:30 a.m., also bound for the coal dock. Kasteelborg was anchored on the lake waiting for a turn at CHS gallery. Philip R. Clarke was unloading stone at DMIR ore dock, and was later expected to shift down the harbor to load at BNSF ore dock.

Marquette by Rod Burdick
After a month lull, another Canadian bulker visited Marquette on August 16. After being anchored off the Upper Harbor until early afternoon, Canadian Leader took the north side of the ore dock after Michipicoten departed. Charles M. Beeghly was on the south side of the ore dock. The Leader last loaded ore in Marquette in the late 1980's. Both the Beeghly and Leader expected delays in loading.
 

 

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 16


On 16 August, 1890, the Annie Watt (wooden propeller, passenger and package freight "packet", 75 foot, 62 gross ton, built in 1884, at Lion's Head, Ontario) collided with the ship Alderson and sank off of Gunn Point, Ontario. Just the previous year (8 November 1889), Annie Watt had burned and been declared total loss, but she was rebuilt.

The captain of the 2 year old, 125 foot wooden schooner-barge John F Ritchie brought his wife, two other women and several small children as guests on a voyage from Bay City, Michigan to Buffalo, New York. The Ritchie was one of a string of four barges loaded with lumber in tow of the tug Zouave. As the tow entered Lake Erie, they were struck by a terrifying storm. The Ritchie broke her tow line and was cast adrift. The deck load of lumber broke loose and everyone was in danger. The women and children were brought out of the cabin since it was considered to be a death trap and they were lashed on deck for safety. Soon the vessel was waterlogged and the cabin was actually washed away. On 17 August, a passing steamer took everyone aboard and towed the Ritchie in to Cleveland, Ohio where she was repaired. Amazingly, no lives were lost.

August 16, 1902 - The Pere Marquette 18 (Hull#412) was launched at Cleveland, Ohio by American Ship Building Co. for the Pere Marquette Railway.

Data from: Joe Barr, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.
 

 


Photo Gallery Updates

8/16
News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping, Lighthouse and Transportation/Trains Albums
 

 

 

Port Reports

8/15
Saginaw River by Stephen Hause

Wilfred Sykes paid its fourth visit within six days to the Saginaw River on Sunday, delivering a split load to the Wirt Stone Docks in Bay City and Saginaw. The vessel arrived during the early morning hours in Bay City, then continued up the river to Saginaw after 6 a.m. The Sykes was outbound from Saginaw at about 3:30 p.m.  During the outbound passage, the Sykes was contacted by the excursion boat Princess Wenonah, which was cruising the river with a group of passengers hoping to see a Great Lakes freighter up close. The tourists were rewarded later in the afternoon as the Sykes passed the excursion boat in Bay City. 

Alpena by Ben and Chandra
The G.L Ostrander barge Integrity arrived at Lafarge around noon on Sunday, and is headed for Detroit next.

The J.A.W Iglehart is expected to return on Monday morning to load after delivering on the lower lakes. The Steamer Alpena will also be in on Monday afternoon to take on cargo. The Paul H. Townsend was unloading in Muskegon on Sunday.

The Sam Laud brought coal to Lafarge last Monday the (8th).

The Wilfred Sykes loaded at Stoneport three times last week. The Joseph H. Thompson took on stone early Sunday morning, and the Sam Laud is expected for Monday.

Marquette by Lee Rowe
Sunday saw the Great Lakes Trader/Joyce VanEnkevort unloading stone at Marquette's lower harbor Shiras dock while the Michipicoten took on ore at the upper harbor.

Soo Locks Weekend by Gordy Garris
Traffic at the Soo Locks in the late morning hours on Friday started with the tug Avenger IV and her barge who were downbound in the Soo Harbor area around 10am Friday morning with a cargo of fuel. The pair met the upbound Herbert C. Jackson past Mission Point while just behind the pair who was also downbound was the saltie Kwintebank. The Herbert C. Jackson was upbound the Soo Locks around 11:00 a.m. with a load of coal for the Soo Harbor. She received supplies from the supply boat Ojibway near the Carbide dock before continuing upbound. The Algoisle was downbound from the Macarthur Lock shortly afterwards with a load of wheat from Thunder Bay, ON. The sailing ship Windy II departed from her mooring at the Carbide dock at 2pm giving the public rides. The downbound American Spirit departed from the Poe Lock around 2:30 p.m. and met the Windy II in the Soo harbor before continuing downbound. The Edgar B. Speer cleared the Poe lock headed downbound around 3:50 p.m. and received supplies from the supply boat Ojibway after exiting the locks. The St. Clair arrived at the Soo Locks at West Pier ready to lock through the Poe Lock around 5:30 p.m.. She was carrying a load of taconite from Two Harbors, MN heading downbound. She was clear of Mission point just before 7pm.

At 7:00 p.m. the parade of boats began to line up in the Soo Harbor in celebration of the Locks 150 anniversary with the Soo Locks Tour boats, the Schooner Madeline, the Tall Ship Windy II, the Coast Guard Vessel Buckthorn, an army vessel, the GLGS boat David Boyd, the GLGS boat Grayling, the tugs Ivan Purvis, Avery Bay, Deschenes, Reagan, Owen M. Frederick, and the Wilfred M. Cohen all participating. The parade started in the Soo Harbor and went through the Poe and Macarthur locks and went past West Pier each of them blowing their horn there and then the parade turned around and headed back through the locks to the Soo Harbor to dock. While the Tall Ship Windy II broke off from the parade past west Pier and went around to lock through the Canadian Lock to get to the Soo Harbor. Once the St. Mary's River was clear of the parade, several freighters began to approach to the locks to lock through Friday night. First was the Oglebay Norton arriving at the Poe Lock around 10:00 p.m. and departed from the locks about 45 minutes later. The upbound Canadian Progress was told to pull over at the entrance to the locks to let the Oglebay Norton to depart the Poe Lock so that she could be able to make either lock. Also upbound was the Pinglen who proceeded to lock through just after the Progress.

Traffic at the Soo Locks on Saturday began with the Mesabi Miner locking through the Poe lock downbound around 9:30am. At 10:30 a.m. the CSL Niagara approached the Poe lock to lock upbound. Around 11:30 a.m. the barge Sarah Spencer and the tug Jane Ann IV were preparing to move into the Poe Lock to head downbound. Once the pair were clear of the Poe Lock they passed the upbound Arthur M. Anderson who continued to the Poe lock. The downbound Canadian Ranger was on the approach to the Macarthur Lock around 2:00 p.m. and then when they were ready to depart she slowed to let the downbound Roger Blough to make the Poe Lock before the Ranger continued to depart the Macarthur Lock headed downbound. The Blough cleared the lock about 30 minutes later headed downbound. The Edwin H. Gott was upbound at Detour Village passing the downbound barge Sarah Spencer and the tug Jane Ann IV headed for Two Harbors, MN and would later reach the Soo Locks later Saturday evening.

 

 


Photo Gallery Updates

8/15
News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping, Lighthouse and Transportation/Trains Albums
 

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 15

 

The whaleback barge 107 (steel whaleback barge, 276 foot, 1295 gross tons) was launched by the American Steel Barge Co. at W. Superior, Wisconsin.  She only lasted eight years.  In 1898, she broke free from the tug Alva B in rough weather and stranded near Cleveland, Ohio and was wrecked.

The Joseph L Block sailed light on her maiden voyage from the Bay Ship Building Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin to load 32,600 long tons of taconite ore pellets at Escanaba, Michigan for delivery to Indiana Harbor, Indiana on August 15, 1976.

The Ottercliffe Hall, the last "straight deck" Great Lakes bulk freighter built with a pilot house forward was bare boat chartered to Misener Transportation Ltd. on August 15, 1983, renamed b.) Royalton.  

Under threat of a strike on August 15, 1978, the uncompleted George A Stinson was towed out of Lorain, Ohio by six tugs to River Rouge’s  Nicholson's Terminal & Dock Co. to finish her fit-out.  

The Leon Falk Jr was laid up for the last time August 15, 1980, at the Great Lakes Engineering Work's old slip at River Rouge, Michigan. 

On August 15, 1985, the Menihek Lake sailed under her own power to Quebec City (from there by tug), the first leg of her journey to the cutter torch in Spain.

J P Morgan Jr arrived in tow of Hannah Marine's tug Daryl C Hannah at Buffalo, New York on August 15th where she was delayed until she could obtain clearance to transit the Welland Canal. Permission to pass down the Canal was refused because of the Morgan Jr's improper condition.  By September 5, 1980, the situation was rectified and she was towed down the Welland Canal by the tugs Barbara Ann Starmont and Argue Martin bound for Quebec City.

On 15 August 1856, the Welland (sidewheel steamer, wood, passenger & package freight, 145 foot, 300 ton, built 1853, at St. Catharine's, Ontario) burned to a total loss at her dock at Port Dalhousie, Ontario. She was owned by Port Dalhousie and Thorold Railroad Co. 

On 15 August 1873, Thomas Dunford and Frank Leighton announced a co-partnership in the shipbuilding business in Port Huron, Michigan. Their plans included operating from Dunford's yard. When they made their announcement, they already had an order for a large tug from Mr. George E. Brockway. This tug was the Crusader with the dimensions of 132 feet overall, 100 foot keel, and 23 foot beam.

In 1914, the Panama Canal was officially opened to maritime traffic.  

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze,Father Dowling Collection, Jim Olsson, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 
 

 

 

Monday is the last day to sign up for the
Second 2005 Soo Locks Open House and Freighter Chasing Cruise

8/14
Saturday - Sept. 3 - 6:00 p.m. - Annual Boatnerd Freighter Chasing Cruise-Part II. This is a repeat of our annual trip aboard the Chief Shingwauk leaving from Roberta Bondar Pavilion in Soo, Ontario. Cruise will return at 9:00 p.m. Cost is C$30.00 Canadian or $25.00 US per person. Price includes dinner with a menu to be determined. Cash bar on board.

We must have a minimum of fifty (50) paid reservations by August 15 in order to have this cruise. Make reservations by calling (705) 253-9850, or 1-877-226-3665 with your credit card, or send your check to Locks Tours Canada Boat Cruises, P.O. Box 23002, Station Mall, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario P6A 6W6. If we fail to get 50 reservations, your check will be returned and no credit cards will be charged.

Details on other Boatnerd Gatherings are available at the Gathering page.

 

 

 

Port Reports

8/14
Saginaw River by Todd Shorkey

The CSL Tadoussac was inbound early Saturday morning calling on the Essroc dock in Essexville. She unloaded clinker during the day before departing and heading outbound for the lake.
Inbound late Saturday was the American Republic. Her security call indicated she was headed for the Bay Aggregates dock in Bay City to unload. She should be out bound early Sunday morning.

Buffalo by Brian Wroblewski
The Atlantic Huron was down bound at CIP 16 around 7:00 p.m. on Saturday and bound for the Welland Canal

Marquette by Lee Rowe
The Lee A. Tregurtha loaded ore in Marquette on Friday.

Oshawa by Jim Gallacher
The Tug John Spence and the barge McAsphalt 401 arrived at the Port of Oshawa, Ontario with a full load of asphalt on Wednesday. The Tug James A Hannah & Hannah Barge 5101 were also in Oshawa on Wednesday.

Sandusky Area by Kevin Davis
On Friday, the Canadian Transport was under the NS Coal pan at 11:00 a.m., as the Steamer Calumet was ariving in the Sandusly Bay upper channel. She made her way down to the turning basin and backed down to the Old Erie Sand & Gravel dock, which is now the Geo. Gradel Co. tug and salt dock, to unload 12,000 tons of salt. At around 5:35 p.m she made her way over to the Lafarge dock in Marblehead to load about 12,000 of limestone for a dock in Lorain. On Saturday, the Calumet departed Marblehead at around 6:50 a.m and made her way to Lorain. She arrived Lorain at around 10:45 am.

 

 


Photo Gallery Updates

8/14
News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping, Lighthouse and Transportation/Trains Albums
 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 14

At 11:00 p.m., 14 August 1882, the steam barge Chicago, 206 foot, 935 gross tons of 1855, was carrying coal on Lake Michigan while towing the barge Manitowoc, 210.5 feet, 569 gross tons of 1868.  In mid-lake, near Fox Island, Chicago was discovered to be on fire.  Within 15 minutes, she was ablaze.  Her crew escaped to her barge-consort Manitowoc.  The Chicago burned to the water’s edge and sank the following day.  

Sea trials for the Henry Ford II took place on August 14, 1924, and shortly after she left on her maiden voyage with coal from Toledo, Ohio to Duluth, Minnesota and returned with iron ore to the Ford Rouge Plant at Dearborn. 

Having been sold for scrap, the Governor Miller was towed down the Soo Locks on August 14, 1980, for Milwaukee, Wisconsin to load scrap.  

On 14 August 1873, Chester B. Jones (3-mast, wooden schooner, 167 foot, 493 gross tons) was launched at East Saginaw, Michigan. She was built by Chesley Wheeler. The spars and top hamper ordered for her were broken in a log jam, so the 3-master received her spars at Buffalo, New York on her first trip.  

The 149 foot bark Mary E. Perew was found floating west of the Manitou Islands by the propeller Montgomery on 14 August 1871. The Perew had been sailing to Milwaukee with a load of coal when a storm came upon her so quickly on 8 August (nearly a week before Mongomery found her) that the crew did not have time to trim the sails. All three masts were snapped and the mizzen mast fell on the yawl, smashing it. So the crew was stuck on the ship, unable to navigate. The Montgomery towed her to Milwaukee where she was rebuilt and she lasted until 1905. 

On 14 August 1900, the tug William D of the Great Lakes Towing Company got under the bow of the steamer Wawatam at Ashtabula, Ohio and was rolled over and sank. One drowned.  

August 14, 1899 - W. L. Mercereau, known as the "Father of the Fleet", became Superintendent of Steamships for the Pere Marquette Railway.  

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history  

 

 

Port Reports

8/13
Saginaw River by Todd Shorkey

Friday saw the Wilfred Sykes back on the Saginaw river for her third trip in a row and third trip since Tuesday. She lightered at the Essexville Sand & Stone dock in Essexville then finished her unload at the Bay City Wirt dock. The Sykes then turned in the basin at the end of the dock and departed for the lake late in the evening. Also outbound on Friday was the tug Donald C. Hannah and her barge. The pair was outbound from the Dow Chemical dock in Bay City.
 

Buffalo
The John R. Emery will be towed off the lakes via Buffalo and the Erie Canal some time next week. She was built in Buffalo in 1905 and will be leaving the lakes from Buffalo in 2005. If anyone is able to get pictures, please send them to the Boatnerd News.

 

 

Dredge worker dies in fall from tug at Huron, Ohio

8/12
As reported today in the Sandusky Register:
A Michigan man is dead following a accident on a tug in Lake Erie near the Huron River, according to the Erie County Sheriff's Office. Charles Franklin Grout II, 32, Lansing, Mich., was pronounced dead at the scene after he fell overboard, said Capt. Paul Sigsworth of the Erie County Sheriff's Office.

The Huron Fire Department and United States Coast Guard responded to a report from a tugboat of a man overboard about two miles north of the mouth of the Huron River. Both agencies dispatched rescue crews. A nearby tugboat also heard the call, and responded to the scene, pulling Grout out of the water and beginning first aid. Huron fire Chief Paul Berlin said his men responded to the call a little before 1 p.m. Berlin said the man suffered from a head injury, and after contacting the emergency room and the Erie County coroner, EMS stopped resuscitation attempts.

Sigsworth said an initial investigation by the coroner revealed Grout was climbing from the barge to the tugboat which was pushing it when he fell into the river. Sometime between falling overboard and hitting the water, Grout sustained the injury to the top of his head, Sigsworth said. Grout was working for a Michigan-based company dredging the Huron River when the accident occurred. Sigsworth said waves were about 3- to 4-feet high at the time of the accident.

Huron City Manager Mike Tann said the company has been working on the dredging project for less than a month, but he was unsure when the project began since it is done through the Army Crops of Engineers. The Huron River is usually dredged every year, Tann said.

Grout's body was transported to the Lucas County Coroner's Office for an autopsy. Erie County Coroner Brian Baxter responded to the scene and will make the final ruling on the cause of death. The Coast Guard, Huron police and fire departments, and an investigator from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Watercraft assisted in the investigation.
 

 

John R. Emery heading to Panama
 

8/12
Welders are preparing the 100 year old sandsucker John R. Emery, built in 1905, for her journey from Fairport to Panama. It appears that she is to be operated there.

The wheelhouse and masts are being removed and placed in the hold for clearance on her trip down the Erie Canal. They will be reattached when she gets to Troy, NY. The inclined sand chute and forward control cab were removed a couple weeks ago. It's unknown whether they are going along.

Although she had not been used in several years, the workers say she's in good shape, and that both engines started right up. The guess was that she will depart in about a week, giving a chance for Buffalo and Erie Canal watchers to get a look.

Reported by Dave Merchant

 

 

 

Port Reports

8/12
Saginaw River by Todd Shorkey

Wilfred Sykes completed her unload overnight Wednesday at the Wirt dock in Bay City and then turned from the dock in the Bay City Wirt turning basin. She took her time as morning "Bridge Hours" were in effect closing the Independence Bridge to downbound traffic from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. Once clear of the bridge, she was delayed for the second time in as many days by upbound traffic. This time it was the tug Rebecca Lynn and her barge bound for the Bit-Mat dock in Bay City. The Sykes again stopped across the river in Essexville until the Rebecca Lynn made her dock then she continued on her way for the lake. The Rebecca Lynn was expected outbound early Friday morning.

Also inbound Thursday was the most frequent visitor to the Saginaw River, the tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort and barge Great Lakes Trader. The pair lightered at the Sargent dock in Essexville before continuing upriver to finish unloading at the Saginaw Rock Products dock in Saginaw. They were expected to be outbound Friday morning. The tug Donald C. Hannah and her tank barge were also inbound late Thursday with a cargo for the Dow Chemical dock in Bay City. Their expected departure is during the day Friday.

8/12 - Buffalo by Brian Wroblewski
Courtney Burton was unloading at General Mills on Thursday evening.

8/11 - Sault Ste Marie by Capt. John Chomniak
A major lightening strike set fire to a caisson holding a log boom across the entrance to the Sault Edison power canal Tuesday. A small structure atop the crib provided a colorful show in the Soo Locks live camera for a short period of time.
8/12 - Update
The structure that burned atop the caisson was a wooden housing for the winch mounted on the crib. The winch holds the cables that control the log boom across the power canal.

8/12 - Duluth/Superior by Al Miller
Twin Ports boatwatchers were treated to a pair of Great Lakes Fleet vessels Friday. Roger Blough departed the DMIR ore docks about 7:00 a.m. well laden with taconite pellets. John G. Munson was due in late Friday or early Saturday to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal for the Pinney dock in Ashtabula.

Midwest Energy Terminal remains the busiest dock in port. Most of the coal is bound for St. Clair, Mich., and Nanticoke, Ont., but several vessels scheduled for August have unusual destinations: H. Lee White is scheduled to load Aug. 18 for the WE Energies plant in Milwaukee; Oglebay Norton is scheduled to load Aug. 23 for Muskegon; St. Clair is scheduled to load Aug. 23 for the CLM Dock in Superior – about a mile from the coal terminal; and Atlantic Superior is due Aug. 25 to load for Sydney, Nova Scotia.
 

 

Photo Gallery Updates

8/12
News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping, Lighthouse and Transportation/Trains Albums
 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 12

The C&O carferry Spartan, in a heavy fog while inbound from Kewaunee on the morning of August 12, 1976, struck rocks at the entrance to the Ludington harbor. She suffered severe damage to about 120 feet of her bottom plating. She was taken to Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay on August 18th for repairs. There were no injuries as a result of this incident.

The Tom M. Girdler was christened August 12, 1951, she was the first of the C-4 conversions.

The b.) Maunaloa II (Hull#37) was launched August 12, 1899 at Chicago, Illinois by Chicago Shipbuilding Co. for Minnesota Steamship Co. as a.) MAUNALOA.

The William E. Corey sailed from Chicago on her maiden voyage August 12, 1905, bound for Duluth, Minnesota to load iron ore.  She later became b.) Ridgetown in 1963.  Used as a breakwater in Port Credit, Ontario in 1974.

On 12 August 1882, Florida (3-mast wooden schooner, 352 tons, built in 1875 at Batiscan, Ontario) was carrying 662 tons of coal from Black River to Toronto when she sprang a leak and sank 12 miles from Port Maitland, Ontario. She hailed from Quebec and was constructed mostly of pine and tamarack.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

  

 

 

Port Reports

8/11
Saginaw River by Todd Shorkey

The Wilfred Sykes was back for its second visit in two days Wednesday, calling on the Wirt Stone Dock in Bay City. She arrived late in the afternoon and as of 10:30 p.m. was still unloading there.

Buffalo by Brian Wroblewski
The Karen Andrie showed up Wednesday around 5:00 p.m.. She came in the North Entrance with her barge A-397 on a wire behind her. The tug came inside the breakwall and switched out of pulling gear and into push mode before heading down the Black Rock Canal for the Marathon Dock in Tonawanda.

Sault Ste Marie by Capt. John Chomniak
A major lightening strike set fire to a caisson holding a log boom across the entrance to the Sault Edison power canal Tuesday. A small structure atop the crib provided a colorful show in the Soo Locks live camera for a short period of time.

 

 

Photo Gallery Updates

8/11
News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping, Lighthouse and Transportation/Trains Albums
 

 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 11  

On 11 August 1899, the Simon Langell (wooden propeller freighter, 195 foot, 845 gross tons, built in 1886, at St. Clair, Michigan) was towing the wooden schooner W. K. Moore off Lakeport, Michigan on Lake Huron when they were struck by a squall.  The schooner was thrown over on her beam ends and filled with water.  The local Life Saving crew went to the rescue and took off two women passengers from the stricken vessel.  The Moore was the towed to Port Huron, Michigan by the tug HAYNES and placed in dry dock for inspection and repairs.  

The night of August 11, 2001, the Windoc was damaged and caught fire when the Allenburg Bridge was lowered onto the vessel. the accident stopped traffic in the canal until August 13. the Windoc was later towed to Hamilton, Ontario to await her fate.  

The H. M. Griffith was the first self-unloader to unload grain at Robin Hood's new hopper unloading facility at Port Colborne, Ontario on August 11, 1987.  

On August 11, 1977, the Thomas W. Lamont was the first vessel to take on fuel at Shell's new fuel dock at Corunna, Ontario The dock's fueling rate was 60 to 70,000 gallons per hour and was built to accommodate one-thousand footers.  

Opening ceremonies for the whaleback tanker Meteor a.) Frank Rockefeller, museum ship were held on August 11, 1973, with the President of Cleveland Tankers present whose company had donated the ship. This historically unique ship was enshrined into the National Maritime Hall of Fame.  

The T. W. Robinson departed Quebec City on August 11, 1987, along with US265808 (former Benson Ford in tow of the Polish tug Jantar bound for Recife, Brazil where they arrived on September 22, 1987. Scrapping began the next month.  

On 11 August 1862, B. F. Bruce (wooden propeller passenger steamer, 110 foot, 169 tons, built in 1852, at Buffalo, New York as a tug) was carrying staves when she caught fire a few miles off Port Stanley, Ontario in Lake Erie. She was run to the beach, where she burned to a total loss with no loss of life. Arson was suspected. She had been rebuilt from a tug to this small passenger steamer the winter before her loss.  

On 11 August 1908, Titania (iron propeller packet/tug/yacht, 98 foot, 73 gross tons, built in 1875, at Buffalo, New York) was rammed and sunk by the Canadian sidewheeler Kingston near the harbor entrance at Charlotte, New York on Lake Ontario. All 26 on board were rescued.  

The wooden scow-schooner Scottish Chief had been battling a storm on Lake Michigan since Tuesday, 8 August 1871. By late afternoon of Friday, 11 August 1871, she was waterlogged. The galley was flooded and the food ruined. The crew stayed with the vessel until that night when they left in the lifeboat. They arrived in Chicago on Sunday morning, 13 August.  

Data from: Father Dowling Collection, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 

 

Maritime Days This Weekend at Soo
 

8/10
Fireworks, tall ships, boat tours, and parade this weekend at the Soo as part of the Soo Locks 150th Anniversary celebration. This weekend's events are titled Maritime Days.

Flashes of color will illuminate the skies and the water on Saturday evening, as a fireworks display and recreational boat parade light up Soo Harbor as part of the Soo Locks 150th Anniversary Celebration. Fireworks will begin around 10 p.m. over the lower St. Marys River, according to a news release. Prior to the pyrotechnics, a recreational boat parade promises color and light on Soo Harbor. Area boaters are invited to decorate their vessels prior to joining the parade. A Soo Locks Boat Tour boat will leave dock two at 9 p.m. and lead the parade.

Meanwhile, Soo Harbor will welcome two tall ship sailing vessels this weekend as part of the Soo Locks 150th Celebration's Maritime Days. They will be joined by a number of other vessels, all open for public touring. Beginning Friday, the public is invited to tour the "Tall Ship Madeline" and enjoy sailing excursions aboard the "Tall Ship Windy II." Both will be docked at Alford Park. The Windy II is owned by Captain Bob Marthai and is docked throughout the summer at Navy Pier in Chicago. Sailing aficionados will want to know that the Windy II is a convertible four masted gaff rigged barquentine/schooner. It has a sparred length of 150 feet and can accommodate 150 people during day sails and 49 people on overnight excursions. Windy II was launched in 2000.

Tall Ship Madeline, a gaff topsail schooner, calls Traverse City home. It was launched in 1990 and modeled after the original Madeline, which served many uses in the mid-1800s, including that of private school. The modern Madeline was built over a period of five years by volunteers using traditional methods and materials. Deck tours of the Madeline will include historical interpretation. Deck tours of the Madeline are schedule for 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday. A donation will be accepted for tours of the Madeline.

In addition to Tall Ships, several other ships will be on hand this weekend for free public tours. U.S. Coast Guard vessels Mackinaw, Biscayne Bay, and Buckthorn will be docked at Carbide Dock for public tours. In addition, U.S.
Geologic Survey vessel "Grayling" will be docked at the Valley Camp dock for public tours and the Great Lakes Shipwreck Society dive and research vessel "David Boyd" will be docked at Kemp Marina for tours.

Most ships will participate in a parade of ships on Friday evening at 7 p.m. Re-enacting a parade of ships from earlier anniversary celebrations, the fleet will motor around the harbor and through the Soo Locks.

More information regarding ship tours or other anniversary activities is available by calling the celebration hotline at 906-632-6361 or at the 150th Celebration web site
 

 

 

Port Reports

8/10
Saginaw River

Reported by Gordy Garris & Todd Shorkey
The Saginaw River remained busy on Tuesday with three vessels transiting the river, two of them on a return visit.The Wilfred Sykes was the first inbound. She stopped at the Essexville Sand & Stone dock to lighter, then continued upriver to finish unloading at the Bay City Wirt dock. While unloading there, the tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort and barge Great Lakes Trader also called on the Bay City Wirt dock and took up position just in front of the Sykes. Once the Trader had finished lightering, she departed for the Wirt dock in Saginaw to finish unloading. This cleared the turning basin for the Sykes, who turned and was outbound for the lake Tuesday morning. The tug Joyce L & Great Lakes Trader were outbound late Tuesday evening.

The American Republic also returned the Saginaw River Tuesday morning calling on the Bay Aggrates dock in Essexville to unload. Her arrival delayed the outbound Sykes who had to lay over back at the Essexville Sand and Stone dock until the Republic backed into the Bay Aggregates slip. The Republic was outbound the Saginaw River backing out of the Bay Aggrates slip, turned and was heading outbound for the lake late Tuesday afternoon.

The Paul H. Townsend was outbound the Saginaw River at the I-75 bridge in Zilwaukee around 1:00 p.m. headed outbound for the lake after she had unloaded overnight and during the morning hours on Tuesday at the Carrollton Lafarge Terminal.

Toronto
Reported by Charlie Gibbons
CSL Niagara departed Toronto Tuesday evening with a load of coal which had been trucked in from the now mothballed Lakeview Generating Station.

Prescott
Reported by Dave Maville
Algomarine came alongside at the Prescott, Ont elevator docks too unload salt. Dave Maville

Buffalo
The Iglehart took the LaFarge dock from the English River at about 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, unloaded overnight, and departed with one tug at the stern at 8:00 a.m. this morning

 

 

 

"The Cedarville Conspiracy"

8/10
The Straits of Mackinac Shipwreck Preserve Association will present maritime attorney, former naval officer, and author of "The Cedarville Conspiracy", L. Stephen Cox, who will discuss the heroism, villany, courage and confusions surrounding the tragedy of the freighter Cedarville, which sank in the Straits on May 7, 1965, with the loss of 10 lives. The presentation will take place at the Quality Inn, 913 West US-2, St. Ignace, on Saturday, August 13. The talk begins at 8:00 p.m. and will be preceded by an Ice Cream Social at 7:00 p.m. The talk is open to divers and non-divers at no charge.

 

 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 10

On 10 August 1890, Two Fannies (3-mast wooden bark, 152 foot, 492 gross tons, built in 1862, at Peshtigo, Wisconsin) was carrying 800 tons of iron ore on Lake Erie when a seam opened in rough weather.  The crew kept at the pumps but to no avail.  They all made it off of the vessel into the yawl just as the bark sank north of Bay Village Ohio.  The City Of Detroit tried to rescue the crew but the weather made the rescue attempt too dangerous and only two men were able to get to the steamer.  The tug James Amadeus came out and got the rest of the crew, including the ship’s cat which was with them in the yawl.  

On August 10, 1952, the Arthur M. Anderson entered service for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. Exactly fourteen years later, on August 10, 1966, the vessel's namesake, Arthur Marvin Anderson, passed away. 

In 1969, the Edmund Fitzgerald set the last of many cargo records it set during the 1960's. The Fitzgerald loaded 27,402 gross tons of taconite pellets at Silver Bay on this date. This record was broken by the Fitzgerald's sister ship, the ARTHUR B HOMER, during the 1970, shipping season.  

On 10 August 1937, B. H. Becker (steel tug, 19 tons, built in 1932, at Marine City, Michigan) foundered in heavy seas, 9 miles north of Oscoda, Michigan.

In 1906, John H. Pauley (formerly Thompson Kinsford, wooden propeller steam barge, 116 foot, 185 gross tons, built in 1880, at Oswego, New York) caught fire at Marine City, Michigan. Her lines were burned through and she then drifted three miles down the St. Clair River before beaching near Port Lambton, Ontario and burning out.

On 10 August 1922, Annie Laura (wooden propeller sandsucker, 133 foot, 244 gross tons, built in 1871, at Marine City, Michigan) beached near Algonac, Michigan, caught fire and burned to the waterline.

 Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 

Photo Gallery Updates

8/10
News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping, Lighthouse and Transportation/Trains Albums
 

 

 

Wind Power Boosts Business for Minnesota Port
 

8/09 - Duluth
As of this spring, the Duluth Seaway Port Authority expected five ships to deliver wind turbine components this year for destinations in Minnesota and Manitoba, and by mid-July all five had arrived. These contracts also serve to underline the expanding potential business that manufacturing, transportation and other aspects that wind power and other renewable energy industries can bring to the U.S. at a time of downward job pressures.

The port authority worked with Lake Superior Warehousing Company, Inc. (LSW) to market the port to wind power companies. LSW President Gary Nicholson, Port Trade Development Director Ron Johnson and others invested time and energy in numerous trade missions and sales calls on wind turbine manufacturers and users since the mid-1990s in attempts to stimulate the trade. Their efforts have paid off.

The first, the Bavaria's, delivered 21 wind turbine blades earlier this spring. Manufactured in Denmark and the United Kingdom, the blades measured 132 feet long and weighed 16,000 pounds each. The shipment included other components for eventual truck delivery to Manitoba. The fifth of the ships, the Scan Arctic, arrived last month to deliver wind turbine towers. The other three ships carried wind turbine hubs and nacelles as well as another 24 wind turbine blades. Through the recent passage of a federal energy bill, the wind power industry has now secured their tax credit for the next two and a half years and that is a major reason for the increased business.

"With the extension of the Federal Production Tax Credit, work has begun on a significant number of wind farm development projects," said Johnson. "Most of the turbine components come from Europe, and we expect to handle a number of inbound ships through Duluth that will move by special trucks to two large wind farm developments in the upper Midwest. We have already begun to quote handling rates on 2006 wind farm developments." 

Reported by: Renewable Energy Access.

 

 

Rochester's Fast Ferry Business Up

8/09 - Rochester, NY
For the first time since its relaunch, Rochester's fast ferry had a sell-out last weekend and major league baseball was mainly responsible. A weekend series between the Yankees and Blue Jays brought a steady stream of New Yorkers to Toronto and many of them made the trip on the ferry called, "The Cat." A lot of baseball fans made the return trip to Rochester Sunday afternoon. The ferry holds up to 774 passengers, and its weekend trips were at capacity.

"I think it was much more pleasant than we thought it would be," said Pete Palermo of Geneseo, a first-time ferry passenger. "It's faster and very comfortable." "It was very smooth going and coming," said Bob Martell of Wayland. "Hardly any lines. They moved very quickly. Going through customs was a breeze."

Those are the kind of reviews the ship's operator, Bay Ferries, wants to hear. The crush of passengers was welcomed by businesses at the ferry's Port of Rochester terminal. "At this point, it's helping," said Kiran Patel, who owns a sandwich shop at the terminal. Definitely, the summer's good. Hopefully, we'll see at least this kind of traffic all throughout the year."

The ferry's operator says overall ridership is up 30 percent since the service resumed this summer. They declined to provide specific numbers, but say they are on target and encouraged.

 

 

Agencies to Conduct Exercise on William G. Mather

8/09 - Cleveland
The U.S. Coast Guard, Ohio National Guard WMD Civil Support Team, and the Cleveland Fire Department will hold a joint training exercise on Wednesday in Cleveland from 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. The purpose of this exercise is to enhance the ability of agencies to work together to respond to the threat of a weapons of mass destruction (WMD) attack in the Cleveland area.

The exercise will be held at the East 9th Street pier aboard the Steamship William G. Mather museum ship. Using the museum ship as a platform to represent a foreign merchant ship, responders will work together to respond to a simulated release of a potentially hazardous chemical on board the vessel.

Participating in the field exercise will be the Coast Guard Atlantic Strike Team from Fort Dix, NJ; the Ohio National Guard 52nd WMD Civil Support Team from Columbus, OH; U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Cleveland; and the Cleveland Fire Department HAZMAT Team. Personnel from these agencies will be using state-of-the-art communications and response equipment to conduct joint entries to the S.S. William G. Mather as part of this training exercise.

Reported by the U. S. Coast Guard
 

 

 

Slower Stone Trade in July

8/09
Shipments of limestone on the Great Lakes totaled 4.5 million net tons in July, a decease of 13 percent compared to a year ago, and a drop of 5 percent against July's 5-year average. A slowdown in steel production and some sluggishness in the construction industry account for the decrease in shipments. As a result of the July total, the Great Lakes limestone trade is now slightly behind last year's pace. Shipments for the fist seven months stand at 18.9 million net tons, a decrease of 2.5 percent compared to the same point in 2004. However, the trade remains well ahead of its 5-year average for the January-July time frame.

The reports covers shipments from the following Great Lakes ports: United States - Calcite, MI; Cedarville, MI; Drummond Island, MI; Kelley's Island, OH; Marblehead, OH; Port Inland, MI. Canada - Bruce Mines, Manitoulin Island, Port Colborne and Smelter Bay, Ontario.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association

 

 

Port Reports

8/9
Saginaw River

Reported by Gordy Garris
The Wolverine was outbound the Saginaw River early Monday morning after unloading overnight at the Bay Aggregates dock in Essexville.

The Canadian Transfer was inbound the Saginaw River early Monday morning and continued upriver to lighter at the Buena Vista Stone dock before continuing a short distance upriver to complete unloading at the GM Dock in Saginaw. She departed from the GM Dock and headed upriver to turn around in the Sixth Street Turning Basin around 1 p.m. She was clear of the Sixth Street Turning Basin around 3 p.m. headed outbound for the lake.

The Transfer briefly stopped at the Burroughs dock in Zilwaukee to let the inbound Paul H. Townsend pass before continuing outbound for the lake. The Paul H. Townsend was inbound the Saginaw River early Monday afternoon with a load of cement for the Carrollton Lafarge Terminal. She was expected to be outbound the Saginaw River Tuesday afternoon. Pictures in the News Photo Gallery

The American Republic was outbound in the Saginaw Bay clear of the Gravely Shoal Light near Charity Island around 5 p.m. Sunday after unloading in the Saginaw River earlier during the day Sunday.

Marquette
Reported by Lee Rowe
Monday the Paul R. Tregurtha brought coal to Marquette's WE power plant. There has been a parade of footers to the coal unloader lately. the Herbert C. Jackson loaded ore.
Pictures in the News Photo Gallery

Buffalo
Reported by Brian Wroblewski
The English River was unloading at the LaFarge dock Tuesday morning. The JAW Iglehart was sitting on the hook out by the traffic buoy at 9 a.m. There was no sign of anyone at the tug dock so it would appear that the English River will probably be departing late this morning or early this afternoon and the Iglehart is waiting to take the dock from her.
 

 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 09

On 09 August 1910, the Eastland Navigation Company placed a half page advertisement in both the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Cleveland Leader offering $5,000 to anyone who could substantiate rumors that the excursion steamer Eastland was unsafe.  No one claimed the reward.

The keel was laid for the Indiana Harbor (Hull#719) on August 9, 1978, at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin by Bay Shipbuilding Co. for Connecticut Bank & Trust Co. (American Steamship Co., mgr.).

The Hamildoc (Hull#642) was christened on August 9, 1963.

The G A Tomlinson (Hull#370) entered service August 9, 1909.  Renamed b.) Henry R. Platt, Jr. in 1959.  Hull used as a breakwall at Burlington Bay, Ontario in 1971.

The Sis Thomas Shaughnessy with the former CSL steamer Ashcroft in tow of the Polish tug Jantar arrived in Castellon, Spain for scrapping in 1969.

On August 9, 1989, the tug Fairplay IX departed Sorel with the Fort Chambly and Nipigon Bay in tandem tow bound for Aliaga, Turkey for scrapping.

On the night of August 9, 1865, Meteor met her running mate, the propeller Pewabic, off Thunder Bay on Lake Huron around 9:00 p.m. As the two approached, some how Meteor sheered and struck her sister, sinking the Pewabic within minutes in 180 feet of water. About one hundred twenty-five people went down with her, and 86 others were saved.

On 9 August 1850, Chautauque (wooden sidewheel steamer, 124 foot 162 tons, built in 1839, at Buffalo, New York) caught fire in the St. Clair River and burned to a total loss. In previous years she had been driven ashore 1844, and sank twice - once in 1846, and again in 1848. In September 1846, she made the newspaper by purposely ramming a schooner which blocked her path while she was attempting to leave the harbor at Monroe, Michigan.

On 9 August 1856, Brunswick (wooden propeller, 164 foot, 512 tons, built in 1853, at Buffalo, New York) was carrying corn, scrap iron and lard from Chicago when she sprang a leak in a storm and was abandoned by the crew and passengers. One passenger drowned when one of the boats capsized, but the rest made it to shore near Sleeping Bear in the three other boats. Brunswick went down in 50 fathoms of water, 6 miles south of South Manitou Island on Lake Michigan.

On 9 August 1875, the Port Huron Times reported that the schooner Hero, while attempting to enter the piers at Holland, Michigan, was driven two miles to leeward and went to pieces. Her crew took to the boats, but the boats capsized. Luckily all made it safely to shore.

August 9, 1938 - The Pere Marquette carferries 17 and 18 left Milwaukee for Grand Haven carrying 600 United States Army Troops, bound for Army war maneuvers near Allegan and at Camp Custer.

On 9 August 1870, Ontonagon (wooden propeller bulk freight, 176 foot, 377 tons, built in 1856, at Buffalo, New York by Bidwell & Banta) sank after striking a rock near the Soo. She was initially abandoned but later that same year she was recovered, repaired and put back in service. In 1880, she stranded near Fairborn, Ohio and then three years later she finally met her demise when she was run ashore on Stag Island in the St. Clair River and succumbed to fire.

The 204 foot wooden side-wheeler Cumberland was launched at Melancthon Simpson's yard in Port Robinson, Ontario on 9 August 1871. She cost $101,000. Too large for the Welland Canal, she was towed up the Welland River to Chippewa and then up the Niagara River to Lake Erie. She operated on the Upper Lakes and carried soldiers to put down the Red River Rebellion. She survived being frozen in for the winter near Sault Ste. Marie in 1872, grounding in 1873, sinking in 1874, and another grounding in 1876. But she finally sank near Isle Royale on Lake Superior in 1877.

In 1942, the sea-going tug Point Sur was launched at Globe Shipbuilding Co. in Superior, Wisconsin and the Walter Butler Shipbuilders, in Superior, launched the coastal freighter William Bursley.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Jody L. Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 


Port Reports

8/8
Cleveland

Reported by Brian McSweeney
Two rare visitors that were in Cleveland on Friday. The M/V Edwin H. Gott was here unloading at the Bulk Terminal. This was the first time that I know of that the Gott was here in Cleveland. The cement carrier Paul H. Townsend was unloading at the Lafarge dock in the old River bed. It has been awhile since he was here.

8/07
Port Colborne
Reported by Charlie Gibbons
It has been reported that the tug Seven Sisters had been purchased by Three Rivers Elevators (Distribution Grand Lacs/St. Laurent Ltee.) The tug is to be renamed Doc Morin after a relative of Three Rivers Elevator president Gilles Morin. The company has also purchased four more grain barges similar to those acquired last year for use shuttling grain between Prescott and Trois Rivieres. These barges were in Port Colborne, one of them being placed on the drydock at Ramey's Bend after the Seven Sisters came off.

Marquette
Reported by Lee Rowe
The H. Lee White arrived late Friday night for ore. The Lee A. Tregurtha and Michipicoten came to Marquette for ore on a beautiful Saturday. The Michipicoten is expected to return Sunday night. the Paul R. Tregurtha is due with coal for the WE power plant on Monday, and the Herbert C. Jackson is expected in for ore. Pictures in the News Photo Gallery

Buffalo
Reported by Brian Wroblewski
The Summer Slump is officially over. The Karen Aandrie-A-397 arrived on the Saturday night for the Marathon Dock in Tonawanda. She was unloading there on the Friday morning. The Halifax came in for the Gateway Terminal in Lackawanna on Saturday night. She departed the Bethlehem Slip at 8AM on the Sunday morning and passed the inbound Courtney Burton. The Burton headed straight in the North Entrance and went up to the General Mills Frontier Elevator at 9:00 a.m.. She will probably depart on Monday morning.The Karen Andrie and her barge A-397 departed Buffalo for the Marathon dock on the Rouge River in Detroit at 4PM on Sunday. Pictures in the News Photo Gallery

Lake Ontario
Reported by Ron Walsh
The tug Bagotville along with a barge and tug Canadian are westbound in Lake Ontario. A communication with Seaway Sodus revealed the cargo was sand blocks and the destination was Hamilton. It is a slow tow with etas of 2:50 a.m. for Sodus Point and 11:45 a.m. for Midlake were given

Saginaw River
Reported by Gordy Garris, Todd Shorkey & Stephen Hause
The Manistee returned to the Saginaw River on Saturday once again bringing a load for the Saginaw Wirt dock. She unloaded until around 5:30pm then she departed for the Sixth Street Turning Basin to turn around to head outbound for the lake. The Saginaw County Sheriff helped the Manistee, while she was turning in the Sixth Street Basin, to make sure that recreational boaters would not get too close to the vessel during her turn around. The Manistee cleared the Sixth Street Turning Basin and was outbound the Saginaw River at the I-75 bridge in Zilwaukee around 7pm Saturday.  Pictures in the News Photo Gallery

The tug Joyce L. VanEnkevort and the barge Great Lakes Trader were inbound the Saginaw River early Saturday afternoon lightering at the Sargent dock in Essexville before continuing upriver to complete unloading at the Saginaw Rock Products dock. The outbound Manistee had arranged to pass the pair while they unloaded at the Sargent dock in Essexville. After the Manistee passed the pair the pair continued upriver to complete her unload at the Saginaw Rock Products dock. The pair were expected to be outbound the Saginaw River Sunday morning.

Early Sunday morning saw the American Republic on the Saginaw River with a split load. She stopped at the Bay Aggregates dock in Bay City to lighter before continuing upriver to finish at the Saginaw Asphalt dock. The Republic was outbound Sunday afternoon. Inbound late Sunday night was the Wolverine making her first appearance on the Saginaw River this season. She called on the Bay Aggregates dock in Bay City to unload a cargo loaded in Calcite. Wolverine was expected to be outbound early on Monday. Canadian Transfer was inbound on the Saginaw River at 2 a.m. Monday. The vessel was vessel carried a split load for the Buena Vista and GM docks in Saginaw.

Goderich
Reported by
Both the Saginaw and the Nantucket Clipper arrived at Goderich between 7:00 and 8:00 a.m.. The Saginaw was first in to dock with the help of the Mac Donald Marine Tugs and about a half hour later, the Nantucket Clipper arrived. The Saginaw is unloading grain, while the Nantucket Clipper is in Goderich for the day to allow her passengers to visit Goderich and the local area. The Nantucket Clipper is scheduled to leave at 20:00(L) this evening, then she will be North bound for Tobermory. The training vessel "Pathfinder" arrived in Goderich on Sunday afternoon at 13:50 (L). They will be in town for a few days until they sail again north bound up to Killarney in Georgian Bay.  Pictures in the News Photo Gallery

 

 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 08

On 08 August 1878, the Buffalo (wooden propeller package freighter, 258 foot, 1762 gross tons) was launched at the yard of Thomas Quayle & Sons in Cleveland, Ohio for the Western Transportation Company.  Her engine was a double Berry & Laig compound engine constructed by the Globe Iron Works in Buffalo, New York.  She lasted until 1911, when she was abandoned at Marine City, Michigan.

The James R. Barker became the longest vessel on the Great Lakes when it entered service on August 8, 1976. It held at least a tie for this honor until the William J. Delancey entered service on May 10, 1981. The Barker's deckhouse had been built at AmShip's Chicago yard and was transported in sections to Lorain on the deck of the steamer George D. Goble.

The Buffalo was christened August 8, 1978, for the Connecticut Bank & Trust Co. (American Steamship Co., mgr.)

The E. B. Barber along with the motor vessel Saginaw Bay, a.) Frank H. Goodyear of 1917, arrived August 8, 1985, under tow in Vigo, Spain. Demolition began on August 9, 1985, by Miguel Martins Periera at Guixar-Vigo.

The Soo River Company was forced into receivership on August 8, 1982.

On 8 August 1887, City Of Ashland (wooden sidewheel tug, 90 fot 85 gross tons, built in 1883, at Ashland, Wisconsin) was towing a log raft near Washburn, Wisconsin in Lake Superior. Fire broke out near the boilers and quickly cut off the crew from the lifeboat. They jumped overboard and all but 1 or 2 were picked up by local tugs. The burned hull sank soon afterward.

The wooden tug J. E. Eagle was destroyed by fire at about 4:00 p.m. on 8 August 1869, while towing a raft of logs on Saginaw Bay to Bay City. Her loss was valued at $10,000, but she was insured for only $7,000.

August 8, 1981 - The Ann Arbor carferry Viking took part in a ceremony christening a body of water between Manitowoc and Two Rivers as "Maritime Bay".

August 8, 1999 - The Kaye E. Barker delivered the last shipment of limestone for Dow Chemical, Ludington. The plant later closed it's lime plant and began lime deliveries by rail.

On 8 August 1813, the U. S. Navy schooner Hamilton (wooden 10-gun schooner, 112 foot, 76 tons, built in 1809, at Oswego, New York as a.) DIANA, was lying at anchor off the mouth of the Niagara River on Lake Ontario with her armed fleet-mate Scourge awaiting dawn when they planned to attack the British fleet. However, a quick rising storm swamped and sank both vessels. Since they were both built as commercial vessels, it has been suggested that their cannons may have made them top-heavy. The Hamilton was found by sonar in 1975, sitting upright almost completely intact at the bottom of Lake Ontario. The Cousteau organization has dived to her and she was the subject of a live television dive by Robert Ballard in 1990.

August 8, 1882 - an August snowstorm was reported by a ship on Lake Michigan, dumping 6 inches of snow and slush on the deck. Snow showers were reported at shore points that day.

In 1942, the seven shipyards at Duluth-Superior were in full production and announced three launchings in two days. The submarine chaser SC-671 was launched on August 8, at Inland Waterways, Inc. on Park Point.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Jody L. Aho, Brian Bernard , Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 

One week remaining to sign up for the
Second Soo Locks Open House and Freighter Chasing Cruise

8/7
September 2-3, 2005 - Soo Gathering 2005-Part 2 - Soo Locks 150th Anniversary Closing Ceremonies. Here we go again. An encore visit to the Soo Locks for the Closing Ceremonies and open house. It may be another 50 years before we see two Open Houses in the same year. Don't miss this one. Additional Soo Locks 150th Celebration details are available.

Friday, Sept. 2 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m..- The Corps of Engineers will open the area between the MacArthur and Poe Locks, the Administration Building and the Davis Building to visitors. This is a once-a-year (twice in 2005) chance to see inside the Corps operation, and see the passing freighters from a different angle.

Saturday - Sept. 3 - 6:00 p.m. - Annual Boatnerd Freighter Chasing Cruise-Part II. This is a repeat of our annual trip aboard the Chief Shingwauk leaving from Roberta Bondar Pavilion in Soo, Ontario. Cruise will return at 9:00 p.m. Cost is C$30.00 Canadian or $25.00 US per person. Price includes dinner with a menu to be determined. Cash bar on board.

We must have a minimum of fifty (50) paid reservations by August 15 in order to have this cruise. Make reservations by calling (705) 253-9850, or 1-877-226-3665 with your credit card, or send your check to Locks Tours Canada Boat Cruises, P.O. Box 23002, Station Mall, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario P6A 6W6. If we fail to get 50 reservations, your check will be returned and no credit cards will be charged.

Details on other Boatnerd Gatherings are available at the Gathering page.

 

 


Photo Gallery Updates

8/07
News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping, Lighthouse and Transportation/Trains Albums

 


Trip Auction Ends Tonight

8/07
On our trips page, a Trip Auction for a cruise aboard the Saginaw. Auction ends August 7, this is likely going to be one of the last auctions for some time.

Boat trips are rare, auctions are even rarer. Most trips are made available to the public only through raffles. This is a rare chance to book a cruise on a working freighter. Click here for more information

 


Today in Great Lakes History - August 07

 On 07 August 1890, the schooner CHARGER (wooden schooner, 136 foot, 277 gross tons, built in 1868, at Sodus, New York) was struck by the CITY OF CLEVELAND (wooden propeller freighter, 255 foot, 1528 gross tons, built in 1882, at Cleveland, Ohio) near Bar Point near the mouth of the Detroit River on Lake Erie.  The schooner sank, but her crew was saved.

The JAMES R BARKER was christened August 7, 1976.  She was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flag ship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.). She was built at a cost of more than $43 million under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. She was the third thousand footer to sail on the Lakes and the first built entirely on the Lakes.

 On 7 August 1844, DANIEL WHITNEY, a wooden schooner, was found floating upside-down, with her crew of 4 missing and presumed dead.. She was six miles off mouth of the Kalamazoo River in Lake Michigan.

 August 7, 1948 - Edward L. Ryerson, chairman of Inland Steel Company announced that the new ore boat under construction for Inland will be named the WILFRED SYKES in honor of the president of the company. Mr. Sykes had been associated with Inland since 1923, when he was employed to take charge of engineering and construction work. From 1927 to 1930, he served as assistant general superintendent and from 1930 to 1941, as assistant to the president in charge of operations. He became president of Inland in May, 1941. He had been a director of the company since 1935. The new ship was to be the largest and fastest on the Great Lakes, having a carrying capacity in intermediate depth of 20,000 gross tons. The ship will be 678 ft. long, 70 ft. wide and 37 ft. deep, and will run at 16 miles per hour when loaded.

 While lying at the dock at the C & L.H. Railroad Yard in Port Huron on 7 August 1879, the scow MORNING LARK sank after the scow MAGRUDER ran into her at 4:00 a.m., MORNING LARK was raised and repaired at the Wolverine dry dock and was back in service on 20 September 1879.

 Data from: Dave Wobser, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

 This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 


 Today in Great Lakes History - August 06

 Early in the morning of 06 August 1899, the WILLIAM B MORLEY (steel propeller freighter, 277 foot, 1846 gross tons, built in 1888, at Marine City, Michigan) and the LANSDOWNE (iron side-wheel carferry, 294 foot, 1571 gross tons, built in 1884, at Wyandotte, Michigan) collided head on in the Detroit River.  Both vessels sank.  The LANSDOWNE settled on the bottom in her slip at Windsor, Ontario and was raised four days later and repaired.  The MORLEY was also repaired and lasted until 1918, when she stranded on Lake Superior.

The BELLE RIVER’s bottom was damaged at the fit-out dock and required dry docking on August 6, 1977, for repairs prior to her maiden voyage.  Renamed b.) WALTER J MC CARTHY JR in 1990.

On 6 August 1871, the 3-mast wooden schooner GOLDEN FLEECE was down bound on Lake Huron laden with iron ore. The crew mistook the light at Port Austin for the light at Pointe Aux barques and steered directly for the Port Austin Reef where the vessel grounded. After 200 tons of ore were removed, GOLDEN FLEECE was pulled off the reef then towed to Detroit by the tug GEORGE B MC CLELLAN and repaired.

On 6 August 1900, the Mc Morran Wrecking Company secured the contract for raising the 203-foot 3-mast wooden schooner H W SAGE which sank at Harsen's Island on 29 July 1900. The SAGE had been rammed by the steel steamer CHICAGO. Two lives had been lost; they were crushed in her forecastle.

August 6, 1929 - The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 (Hull#246) was launched at Manitowoc, Wisconsin by Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co. for the Pere Marquette Railway.  She was christened by Miss Ann Bur Townsend, daughter of the mayor of Saginaw.  

On 6 August 1870, the wooden propeller tug TORNADO had her boiler explode without warning four miles northwest of Oswego, New York. The tug sank quickly in deep water. Three of the six onboard lost their lives. Apparently the tug had a new boiler and it had been allowed to run almost dry. When cold water was let in to replenish the supply, the boiler exploded.  

Data from: Max Hanley, Jody L. Aho , Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

 This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

 


Communication Error Sends Federal Agents to Board Saltie

8/05
Federal agents will board the saltie Jana on the Detroit River Friday morning after the ship reportedly skipped what is being described by local media is a "security checkpoint".

The ship was traveling upbound in the Detroit River with a U.S. Pilot aboard, reports are sketchy but is appears a call in point or security call was missed. The missed call and lack of information raised suspicions causing a great deal of commotion by the Coast Guards.

The Jana was heading to unload in Detroit, after off loading part of her cargo in Cleveland. The vessel stopped in the Ojibway Anchorage last night.

Vessels waiting for a dock in Detroit will typically anchor in the Ojibway Anchorage, which is in Canadian waters. This is the only anchorage for waiting vessels on the lower Detroit River.

The Jana was docked at the Detroit Marine Terminals Friday morning and the Coast Guard was expected to board the vessel to investigate the incident.

Reported by Rob Kennedy

 

 


Brigantine to visit Buffalo

8/05
The Sail Training Vessel Fair Jeanne will be arriving at the Buffalo Harbor on Friday, August 20. The Fair Jeanne is a sail training vessel who's home port is Ottawa, Canada. The brig belongs to the Bytown Brigantine Foundation and serves as a sail training venue for young up and coming sailors.

Reported by Brian Wroblewski

 

Port Reports

8/05
Buffalo
Reported by Brian Wroblewski
The American Mariner was Eastbound on the lake and passing Long Point for Buffalo at 11AM this morning.

The old Exxon-Mobil Terminal (now owned by Buckeye Partners LTD), on Elk Street, has a brand new high level chain link fence with barb wire all the way around the property. The West part of the site where the refinery once stood has been cleared of all the old rubble and there are marker flags sticking up from the ground. It looks like they were getting ready to either clean something up, build something new, or possibly both.

The rebuilding operations at the South Park Avenue Lift Bridge continue. Construction equipment was everywhere and they had the bridge deck torn back down to the original steel mesh roadway. The approaches were completely ripped up, right down to the underlying stone so it looks like it will be a total rebuild of the street surface on either side of the bridge along with the repairs being made to the lift span itself.

Marquette
Reported by Lee Rowe
The Charles M. Beeghly took a load of ore out of Marquette on a steamy Tuesday. The tug BeeJay and barge assisted dock workers doing some repairs. The Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder arrived Tuesday night, the Lee A. Tregurtha is expected on Friday.

Saginaw
Reported by Gordy Garris
The Manistee was inbound the Saginaw River late Thursday morning with a load for the Saginaw Wirt dock. This was the Manistee's first load for the Saginaw Wirt dock under her new name and new paint job which was giving to her during the beginning of the 2005 shipping season from her current owners. The Manistee departed the Saginaw Wirt dock around 7pm and headed upriver to turn around in the Sixth Street Turning Basin to head outbound for the lake. The Manistee was outbound the Saginaw River just clear of the Sixth Street Turning Basin headed outbound for the lake at 8:45pm Thursday.

Pictures in the News Photo Gallery
 

 


Photo Gallery Updates

8/05
News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping, Lighthouse and Transportation/Trains Albums

 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 5

On 05 August 1958, the tug GARY D. (steel propeller tug, 18 tons) was destroyed by an explosion and fire near Strawberry Island Light on Lake Huron.

The RICHARD M MARSHALL, later b.) JOSEPH S WOOD, c.) JOHN DYKSTRA, d.) BENSON FORD, and finally e.) 265808, entered service on August 5, 1953. From 1966, until it was retired at the end of 1984, this vessel and the WILLIAM CLAY FORD were fleet mates. There is only one other instance of two boats being owned by the same company at some point in their careers with as close or closer age difference. The CHARLES M BEEGHLY (originally SHENANGO II) and the HERBERT C JACKSON.

The aft section of the BELLE RIVER (Hull#716), was float launched August 5, 1976. She was American Steamship's first thousand-footer and the first thousand-footer built at Bay Shipbuilding Co. She was renamed b.) WALTER J MC CARTHY in 1990.

The G A TOMLINSON, a.) D O MILLS of 1907,. was sold outright to Columbia Transportation Div. (Oglebay Norton Co.), on August 5, 1971 along with the last two Tomlinson vessels, the SYLVANIA and the JAMES DAVIDSON.

On 5 August 1850, ST CLAIR (sidewheel steamer, passenger & package freight, 140 foot 210 tons, built in 1843, at Detroit, Michigan) was reported as lost with no details given whatsoever. The report of her loss was published 3 days BEFORE she was enrolled at Detroit by J. Watkin.

The motor vessel BEAVER ISLANDER completed her maiden voyage to Charlevoix in 1962. At the time, she was the largest, fastest, and most advanced ship built for the run. She served as the flagship for 37 years, a record, until the EMERALD ISLE arrived in 1997.

August 5, 1907 - A female passenger dived off the deck of the PERE MARQUETTE 18 of 1902, on a dare. Two of the 18's officers leapt over to rescue her. One of the officers nearly drowned and was rescued by the passenger.

On 5 August 1866, AUTOCRAT (2-mast, wooden schooner, 345 tons, built in 1854 at Caltaraugus, New York) was carrying 15,000 bushels of corn and was lying off Chicago, waiting for a storm to die down. Just before dawn, the schooner J S NEWHOUSE was also seeking shelter when she ran into AUTOCRAT, sinking her in 7 fathoms of water. The crew was rescued by the tug UNION.

On 5 August 1869, LAURA E CALVIN (3-mast wooden schooner, 130 foot, 216 tons, built in 1863, at Garden Island, Ontario as a bark) sprang a leak during a storm and foundered 10 miles off Braddock's Point on Lake Ontario. No lives were lost.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. Marine Historical Society of Detroit. This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history tailed history

 


Willowglen and Teakglen Heading for Scrapping

8/04
The recent move of the Willowglen and Teakglen has raised many questions to the fate of the vessels. Both vessels have been reported to be sold for overseas scrapping.

Willowglen will be prepared for tow at Hamilton and then moved Sorel, Quebec. The Teakglen will be prepared in Sarnia and then moved to Sorel. Each vessel will then be towed one at a time to Quebec City. After each has reached Quebec City they will be towed in tandem for overseas scrapping.

The Group Ocean tugs Jerry C and Omni-Richelieu are docked at Pier 9 in Hamilton and could be awaiting the tow.

Reported by Kent Malo

 

 


Lee A. Tregurtha will get new engines this winter

8/04
The steamer Lee A. Tregurtha will be repowered during the coming winter layup period, Interlake Steamship Co. treasurer and vice president Mark Barker announced recently.

The work will be done at Bay Shipbuilding at Sturgeon Bay, Wis., during the ship's five-year inspection. Her steam plant will be replaced with two heavy fuel, medium speed Bergen diesel engines with a controllable pitch propeller.

The Lee A. was built in 1942 for saltwater service. She previously sailed the lakes as Walter A. Sterling and William Clay Ford (ii).

Reported by The Interlake Log

 

 


Old Ship Learns New Trick in NJ Harbor

8/04
The Valgocen, the former Algocen a retired 730 foot Great Lakes bulk carrier ship, docked Wednesday at Bayshore Recycling in Keasbey, N.J., where it will launch unique projects to clean material dredged from Newark Bay and process it as beneficial use construction materials. The tow from Montreal took eight days.

The Valgocen will be an important step in federally and state sponsored two-year demonstration projects to clean or decontaminate sediments from the bay and identify a market to sell the material for construction use. The carrier ship will be used to screen the sediment for large debris, press it to remove water, and store it before processing.

This is the first time a retired ship has been used as part of a process to clean contaminated dredged materials from the harbors of New York and New Jersey.

Each year, between four and six million cubic yards of sediment must be dredged from the bay to keep its depth at least 40 feet to permit safe navigation and commerce. An estimated 2.3 million cubic yards per year of the dredged sediment is not suitable for ocean placement because of concentrations of heavy metals, organic compounds, and other chemical constituents.

"Dredging the sediments occurs much faster than technologies can clean the contaminants for beneficial uses," said David Carabetta, President of Norlite Corp. of Cohoes, NY, which is a partner with Bayshore Recycling in one of the demonstration projects. "The Valgocen allows storage of the sediment in an area close to the dredging in the bay and the decontamination processing at Bayshore Recycling."

The Valgocen was purchased by Bayshore Recycling and will be moored at its waterfront recycling facility. The six holds of the ship are capable of storing more than the 35,000 cubic yards of dredged material to be tested in these projects. When it operated along the Great Lakes, the holds typically were used to transport grain and iron ore.

"The arrival of the ship is a major milestone in demonstrating different technologies that can decontaminate dredged materials to produce environmentally acceptable and beneficial use products at an affordable cost," said Valerie Montecalvo, President of Bayshore Recycling. The company processes construction debris for resale as material for new roads as well as other commercial uses.

"Dredging is not only an issue for shipping lanes. Small marinas and recreational boating channels often are unable to dredge due to lack of disposal sites," Montecalvo said. "By cleaning the sediment in a relatively low cost way and identifying a market for its sale, we hope to encourage more dredging without risk to the air, land or water."

Reported by Bayshore Recycling

 


Ore dock concept outlined

8/04
A former Marquette resident is hoping to get the community familiar with his plans to reuse the abandoned ore dock in Marquette's Lower Harbor.

Milwaukee resident Gary Kropp presented his plans for the massive, 75-year-old structure to the Marquette Planning Commission Tuesday.

"We hope that someday, the phrase 'Let's go around the ore dock' will be as popular in Marquette as the phrase 'Let's go around the island,'" Kropp said. "This will be a destination."

Kropp, in conjunction with the Wisconsin firms Genesis Architecture and Legacy Development Corporation, has proposed three levels of about 45 condominiums, a first-level parking garage, a 11-foot-wide promenade along the perimeter of the dock and a public amphitheater at the east end, facing Lake Superior.

About 10 percent of the dock's interior will be preserved for public space, the usage of which will be left to the city. Several parallel boat slips would be positioned around the dock.

Reported by The Mining Journal

 

 

Port Reports

8/04
Marquette
Reported by Lee Rowe
The Herbert C. Jackson loaded ore on a hot and sultry Monday.  The  high humidity made the ship appear as though she were in fog. The Charles M. Beeghly and the Saginaw were expected Tuesday.

The Mesabi Miner brought coal to Marquette's WE power plant Sunday and continued her unloading on Monday. The Herbert C. Jackson, Charles M. Beeghly, and Saginaw are all expected at the ore dock.

Sturgeon Bay
Reported by Wendell Wilke
The tug Barney Turecamo (owned by Moran) arrived at Bay Shipbuilding about 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. The tug is in port to mate up with the barge Georgia which was build at the yard for Moran. The tug and barge will head off lakes on the delivery trip.

Milwaukee
Reported by Bill Bedell
The Algoway unloaded 8,500 tons of salt Sunday morning. They expected to return with another load of salt around the Monday the 8th.

Goderich
Reported by D.B. MacAdam
The CSL Tadoussac arrived in the Port of Goderich about 6:30 a.m. Monday to load salt. The passenger ship Nantuckett Clipper arrived that morning about 8:00 a.m.

Alpena
Reported by Ben & Chanda McClain
On Sunday afternoon the tug G. L Ostrander and barge Integrity were in port. Monday saw the Steamer Alpena arrive at 5 p.m. The Alpena unloaded cargo throughout the evening and then took on cement under the silos. The Alpena departed before noon on Tuesday bound for Superior. The J.A.W Iglehart waited for the Alpena to clear on Tuesday and tied up at the dock to also unload cargo. The Iglehart left port in the early morning hours on Wednesday to head for Milwaukee.  The Paul H. Townsend is expected to be in Toledo on Thursday. 

The Armco made a stop in Alpena on Tuesday night. Arriving about 10 p.m., the Armco carefully made its way into the Thunder Bay River with many spectators watching on the breakwall. The Armco proceeded to unload coal from Sandusky for the DPI Plant. The Armco was outbound in the bay before 6 a.m. on Wednesday, heading into the fog & haze.

The Kaye E. Barker was loading at Stoneport on Wednesday.

Saginaw
Reported by Todd Shorkey
After a brief lull in river traffic, things started to pick up on Tuesday.  The tug Rebecca Lynn and her tank barge called on the Bit-Mat dock in Bay City to unload liquid asphalt.  They were outbound late Tuesday.  Also outbound on Tuesday was the Tug Gregory J. Busch and her deck barge, departing from her home port.  The pair were headed for Rogers City.

Inbound on Wednesday was the Walter J. McCarthy Jr. calling on the Consumers Energy dock in Essexville to unload coal.  She was expected to be outbound early Thursday morning.

The tug Joe Thompson Jr and barge Joseph H. Thompson called on the Sargent dock in Essexville early Saturday morning to unload.  When finished, they backed to the Bay Aggregates slip, turned and were outbound for the lake early Saturday afternoon.

Erie, Pennsylvania
Reported by Roman Kloeckerby
On Sunday the tug Presque Isle returned from dry docking at Port Weller Dry Docks to mate up with the barge. The pair departed about 8 p.m.

 

 


Trip Auctions

8/04
On our trips page, a Trip Auction for a cruise aboard the Saginaw. Auction ends August 7, this is likely going to be one of the last auctions for some time.

Boat trips are rare, auctions are even rarer. Most trips are made available to the public only through raffles. This is a rare chance to book a cruise on a working freighter. Click here for more information

 


Photo Gallery Updates

8/04
News Photo Gallery updated
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping and Lighthouse Albums

 


News Updates

8/04
News stories have been updated below through August 1.

 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 4

On the clear, almost perfect night of 4 August 1902, the SEGUIN (steel propeller freighter, 207 foot, 818 gross tons, built in 1890, at Owen Sound, Ontario) collided with the CITY OF VENICE (wooden propeller freighter, 301 foot, 2108 gross tons, built in 1892, at W. Bay City, Michigan) abreast of Rondeau, Ontario on Lake Erie. The CITY OF VENICE, which was loaded with iron ore, sank and three of her crew were drowned. The U. S. Marshall impounded the SEGUIN for damages

Two favorites of many boatwatchers, entered service on August 4. The WILLIAM CLAY FORD entered service on August 4, 1953, and the EDWARD L RYERSON entered service on August 4, 1960.

The MELISSA DESGAGNES sailed to Holland under her 'a' name ONTADOC with a load of bentonite from Chicago on August 4, 1979.

The E J BLOCK was laid up for the last time at Indiana Harbor, Indiana on August 4 1984, the E J BLOCK was sold for scrap in late May, 1987.

The D M CLEMSON left Superior on August 4, 1980 in tow of Malcolm Marine's TUG MALCOLM for Thunder Bay, Ontario where she was dismantled.

The HOCHELAGA (Hull#144) was launched August 4, 1949, at Collingwood, Ontario by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd., for Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., Montreal, Quebec.

On a foggy August 4, 1977, the POINTE NOIRE went hard aground near the entrance to the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River and blocked the channel. After her grain cargo was lightered by Columbia Transportation's crane steamer BUCKEYE, the POINTE NOIRE was released on August 6th. She was reloaded in Hay Lake and continued her downbound trip. Repairs to her bottom damage were completed at Thunder Bay. Ontario..

August 4, 1935 - The only time the ANN ARBOR NO 7 had the full limit of passengers when she ran an excursion from Frankfort, Michigan around the Manitou Island and back with 375 passengers on board. LYCOMING (wooden propeller, 251 foot, 1610 gross tons) was launched on 4 August 1880, at West Bay City, Michigan by F. W. Wheeler (Hull #7) as a 2-deck package freighter. She was rebuilt as a single deck bulk freighter after she burned in 1905. She was one of the few bulk freighters that still carried her arched hog-braces visible above deck.

HIRAM W SIBLEY (wooden propeller freighter, 221 foot, 1419 gross tons) was launched at East Saginaw, Michigan on 4 August 1890. She only lasted eight years. While carrying 70,000 bushels of corn from Chicago for Detroit, she stranded on the northwest corner of South Manitou Island in Lake Michigan during blizzard on 26 November 1898. The tugs PROTECTOR and SWEEPSTAKES were dispatched for assistance but the SIBLEY re-floated herself during high water the following night, then was stranded on the southwest side of North Fox Island to prevent sinking. She broke in half; then completely broke up during a gale on 7 December 1898.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. Marine Historical Society of Detroit. This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history tailed history

 


Willowglen Tow Passes through the Welland

8/03
The Willowglen tow continued yesterday through the Welland Canal. The tug Evans McKeil was the lead tug while the tug Progress took up position on the stern for the tow through the Canal.

The tow was heading for Hamilton, Ontario where it will reportedly be prepared for tow to an overseas scrap yard. The Teakglen, now docked in Sarnia, is also reported to be heading for overseas scrapping.

It is unknown why the vessels were towed to different locations to be prepared, their ultimate destination is said to be India.

The Group Ocean tugs Jerry C and Omni-Richelieu are docked at Pier 9 in Hamilton and could be awaiting the tow.

In the fall of 2004, both the Teakglen and Willowglen were listed as for sale as scrap or barge conversion candidates.

Reported by Bill Bird

 


Photo Gallery Updates

8/03
News Photo Gallery updated (Note two new galleries today, click the "Next Gallery" link to view the second page)
Note: Please be advised that due to the large volume of photos being submitted for inclusion in this gallery and the time constraints involved in handling each submission, only selected photos relating to news stories will be used. Please visit the Public Gallery to upload and share you own trip photos (link below).

Public Photo Gallery
New albums in the Shipping Album

 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 3

Under tow, the AVONDALE, a.) ADAM E CORNELIUS of 1908, in tandem with former fleet mate FERNDALE. a.) LOUIS R DAVIDSON of 1912, arrived at Castellon, Spain for scrapping in 1979.

The CANADOC left the St. Lawrence River on August 3, 1991, in tow bound for Mamonal, Colombia for scrapping.

On 3 August 1915, ALEXANDRIA (wooden sidewheel passenger/package freight, 174 foot 863 gross tons, built in 1866, at Hull, Quebec, formerly a.) CONSORT, was carrying food stuffs in Lake Ontario when she was blown on a bar in a storm and fog. She broke up by wave action under the Scarborough Bluffs, east of Toronto. Lifesavers worked for hours and rescued the entire crew.

August 3, 1946 - The third officer of the ANN ARBOR NO 6, drowned while painting her draft marks. He had apparently leaned too far and fell out of the rowboat.

On 3 August 1900, FONTANA (wooden 2-mast schooner-barge, 231 foot, 1164 gross tons, built in 1888, at St Clair, Michigan as a 4-mast schooner-barge) was carrying iron ore in tow of the steamer KALIYUGA. The FONTANA sheared off and collided with the big schooner-barge SANTIAGO and settled in the mouth of St. Clair River in the St. Clair Flats, one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world. After salvage was given up months later, she was dynamited several times to flatten and reduce her wreckage. Although officially no loss of life was reported, local newspaper reported that one crewman was drowned. The FONTANA was owned by Cleveland Cliffs Iron Co.

On 3 Aug 1857, R H RAE (3-mast wooden bark, 136 foot, 344 tons, built in 1857, at St. Catharines, Ontario) capsized and sank in a "white squall" off Duck's Creek on Lake Ontario. She went down slowly enough for her people to abandon in her small boat. They were later picked up by the propeller COLONIST. There was a big effort to salvage her the next summer, but to no avail. She was a total loss of $20,000. She was reportedly built for the trans-Atlantic trade and looked more like a seagoing schooner. Some sources give the date of the loss as 4 August 1857. The wreck is in very good condition. The Cousteau organization lost a diver on her in 1980.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. Marine Historical Society of Detroit. This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history tailed history

 


$6 million grant to help Lake Erie ferry plan

8/02
A $6 million federal boost could help the Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Port Authority meet its goal of launching a ferry service to Canada next year. The money - part of the $286 billion U.S. transportation bill - will help pay for construction of a terminal near Cleveland's North Coast Harbor. The proposed Lake Erie passenger and cargo ferry would travel between Cleveland and Port Stanley, Ontario.

Restarting a trans-Erie ferry service has been on the port authority's to-do list for years. Its latest effort, which began 2½ years ago, has gone further than the rest. The authority has invested more than $1 million, mostly in federal money, to study whether the ferry could turn a profit and to find a private operator. Negotiations are under way with the top choice-a Dutch company called Royal Wagenborg.

Tentative plans call for a 30,000-square-foot terminal on Dock 28, behind the Great Lakes Science Center and Cleveland Browns Stadium.

The $6 million federal grant would cover most of the construction, including design and engineering. The building would include space for U.S. Customs and other federal agencies, the terminal manager, ferry operator, a public lounge and restrooms.

The port, which originally estimated the cost of a terminal at $10 million, would cover the balance and recoup its investment by leasing the terminal to the ferry operator.

In February, the port authority's board approved an $18,500 contract with Desman Associates. The company will help decide the best location and most efficient layout for a terminal.

Remaining hurdles for the ferry depend on Canadian solutions.

For example, a Canadian trade act limits some foreign businesses to one-year licenses, but a Royal Wagenborg representative has said his company wouldn't make a multimillion-dollar investment in the ferry service without a long-term license.

Initial feedback from the Canadian government shows that the act wouldn't apply to the ferry, according to the port authority. But the port still is waiting for a legal opinion.

Ownership of the harbor at Port Stanley is another major roadblock. The Canadian government is liquidating port facilities across the country, including Port Stanley. That means the port has not had a solid negotiating partner.

In addition to money for the terminal, the six-year federal transportation bill passed Friday includes $85 million for an Inner Belt Bridge over the Cuyahoga River Valley, engineering work for a Towpath bike and hiking trail extension to Lake Erie, a pedestrian bridge linking the Great Lakes Science Center and Voinovich Park, and a number of other area projects.

The bill also includes $2.5 million for the port authority to build a road to its Cleveland Bulk Terminal on Whiskey Island as part of the city's Flats Transportation Plan.

Reported by Cleveland Plain Dealer

 


Tug Islay Going Home to the Twin Ports

8/02
The 1892-vintage tugboat Islay has been sold to the Northeastern Maritime Historical Foundation, based in Superior, WI. The Foundation closed a deal in June, with owner Greg Stamatelakys of Milwaukee, who had salvaged the abandoned vessel more than twenty years ago. Throughout the 1980s and 90s, the vessel underwent extensive restoration including the reinstallation of a B-3 Kahlenberg oil engine, taken from the fish tug Eric of Bayfield, WI.

The Islay was built by whaleback pioneer Alexander McDougall as his personal yard tug. The historic vessel slid down the ways in the first triple launch in the history of the Great Lakes, along with the whaleback steamers Washburn and Pillsbury.

Islay has been moved to a boatyard up river in Milwaukee where preparation for a tow to Lake Superior is underway. The vessel will be moved to a Duluth boatyard later this year for continued preservation and eventual public display.

The vessel's history and a photographic tour can be found on the Foundation's website: Northeastern Maritime Historical Foundation - Islay

 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 2

On the morning of 02 August 1869, Deputy U. S. Marshall Insley sold at auction the scow AGNES HEAD to pay for debts incurred when she was repaired that Spring by Mr. Muir and Mr. Stewart. Bidding started at $500 and ran very lively. Mr. John Stewart of Detroit purchased the vessel for $1,050.

The AMERICAN MARINER (Hull#723) was launched on August 2, 1979, at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin by Bay Shipbuilding Co. for the Connecticut Bank & Trust Co., (American Steamship Co., Buffalo, New York, mgr.). She was to be named CHICAGO, but that name was removed before launch.

The U.S. Coast Guard's report on the sinking of the EDMUND FITZGERALD was released on August 2, 1977. It cited faulty hatch covers, lack of water tight cargo hold bulkheads and damage caused from an undetermined source as the cause of her loss.

The BENSON FORD's maiden voyage was on August 2, 1924, with coal from Toledo, Ohio to Duluth, Minnesota and returned with iron ore to the Ford Rouge Plant at Dearborn.

On August 2, 1990, the Lightship HURON was dedicated as a National Historic Landmark. LIGHTSHIP 103 had been almost completely restored and was opened to the public for tours and remains so at this time.

August 2, 1862 - John C. Ackerman was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin. At the time of his death in 1916, he was commodore of the Pere Marquette carferry fleet based in Ludington.

On 2 August 1877, GRACE A CHANNON (wooden schooner, 141 foot, 266 gross tons, built in 1873 at East Saginaw, Michigan) was bound from Chicago for Buffalo when she collided with the propeller tug FAVORITE and sank 12 miles south of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The young son of the owner of the CHANNON lost his life in this accident.

In 1858, the wooden side-wheeler TELEGRAPH collided with the schooner MARQUETTE and sank 40 miles north of Cleveland.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. Marine Historical Society of Detroit. This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history tailed history

 


Rochester ferry ridership picks up

8/01
The Spirit of Ontario has been less than half-full during its first four weeks in service but its ridership is picking up, the operator reported this week.

"Over the last week, we were operating at about half-capacity'' — an improvement over the first three weeks — and crossings during the first weekend of August look likely to be sold out, said spokesman Glenn Gardner of Bay Ferries Ltd.

The Spirit of Ontario, which is nicknamed "The Cat," makes two daily round-trip voyages between Rochester and Toronto except on Tuesdays when only one round-trip is scheduled. Bay Ferries won't reveal how many one-way tickets have been sold since the vessel was re-launched June 30. If the 774-passenger vessel were full every time, that number would be close to 80,000.

"There's certainly a steady increase in the number of travelers and we're seeing that on a weekly and daily basis," Gardner said. ``There's quite a bit to be encouraged about.''

The ferry zooms across the lake in two hours and 30 minutes. A car trip around the lake usually takes three to four hours — and far longer when there are traffic tie-ups at the border. Walk-on fares during peak sailings through Sept. 5 are $32 (U.S.), and $35 for most cars. The five-story-tall ship — almost a football field in length — can carry 220 cars, or a smaller number of cars and as many as 10 trucks and buses.

The maiden run in spring 2004 was postponed for six weeks after the Australian-built ship sideswiped a pier in New York near the end of a round-the-world voyage and underwent $1 million in engine repairs. It then sailed for just 80 days — Canadian American Transportation Systems shut down last September with $1.7 million in debt.

The private company blamed mainly regulatory hurdles — chiefly the failure to get approval from U.S. Customs to carry commercial vehicles, which could have injected up to $18,000 in daily revenues. That issue has now been largely resolved — trucks are allowed on board under certain restrictions.

The city of Rochester bought the ferry for $32 million at an auction in February, and hired Bay Ferries to run it. The Canadian company also manages a 55-mph ferry that has hustled between Bar Harbor, Maine, and Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, since 1998.

Bay Ferries expects to offer daily round-trip crossings to Toronto for 10 months each year, with a winter break in January and February. It is hoping up to 25 per cent of passengers will be regular business travelers.

"We're probably going to hit a peak in the August time frame,'' Gardner said. "This weekend probably will max out because we've got the Yankees-Toronto baseball series going on.''

Reported by The Toronto Star

 


Rower Reaches Whitefish Bay

8/01
After fifteen days of rowing, kayaker Ian Harvey reached his destination of Whitefish Bay, covering over 400 miles that took him through the Apostle Islands, Keweenaw Waterway and more than a dozen ports along the South Shore.

Harvey is said to be the first ever to row the length of Lake Superior. Harvey continued into the night on Friday, completing 51 miles in one stretch. The following day, winds picked up and seas increased in the final five miles to Whitefish. Some dramatic footage was shot by the BBC filmcrew on board the tugboat SENECA, as part of an upcoming documentary, expected to be completed later this year.

Additional information, daily reports, and photos of the Lake Superior Charity Row can be found on their website: http://world-marathon-charity-row.co.uk/

 

 

Today in Great Lakes History - August 1

On 01 August 1862, UNION (wooden propeller passenger-package freight steamer, 163 foot, 434 ton, built in 1861 at Manitowoc, Wisconsin) was sold by the Goodrich Line to James H. Mead and J. F. Kirkland for $28,000. This was $9,000 more than Goodrich had paid to have the vessel built just the previous year.

On August 1, 1982, the Canadian tanker HUBERT GAUCHER entered service

August 1957 - The PERE MARQUETTE 18 of 1911, was sold to Luria Brothers, Chicago scrap merchants, along with the PERE MARQUETTE 14.

On 1 August 1871, the construction of the canal through the St. Clair Flats was finished at a cost of $365,000. It was the first real channel built to help ships through the shallow waters where the St. Clair River empties into Lake St. Clair and where there are seven mouths or passes. It took the Canadian contractor John Brown three years to dig the channel that measures 300 feet wide and 8,421 feet long. The water was 18 feet deep. It was protected on most of its sides by piers and dikes. The new channel was considered too small even as it was being dug. At only 300 feet wide, tows of log rafts were encouraged to sue the old shallower channels. Within 20 years, plans were made to deepen the channel to 20 feet.

On 1 August 1849, CHICAGO (wooden passenger/package freight vessel, 95 foot, 151 tons, built in 1842, at Oswego, New York) burned in Buffalo harbor. No lives were lost.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. Marine Historical Society of Detroit. This is a small sample, the books includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history tailed history



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