Great Lakes NEWS & RUMOR Archive

* Report News


Today in Great Lakes History - August 31

On August 31, 1977, the Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. (formerly Belle River) entered service, departing Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, for Superior.

In mid-August 1987 a paregrine falcon whom had disappeared from Regina, Saskatchewan two weeks earlier landed on the deck of a lake freighter on Lake Huron. The bird was captured and taken to a bird sanctuary in Vineland, Ontario. The vessel name is unknown.

In mid-August 1985, the Belgium saltie Federal Thames loaded 25,400 tons of low-concentrate chrome ore at Duluth's Hallett Dock and was bound for Sweden. This ore dates back to World War II when she was mined in Montana. Other shipments were to have been made later as well.

On 31 August 1906, CAVALIER (3-mast wooden schooner, 134'/268GT, built in 1867 at Quebec City as a bark) was carrying cedar lumber when she struck a reef off Chantry Island in Lake Huron and sank. Her crew was rescued by the Chantry Island Lightkeeper. She was bound from Tobermory for Sarnia, Ontario.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - August 30

The CHARLES E. WILSON was christened August 30, 1973 at Bay Ship and completed her sea trials on September 6th.

On August 30, 1942, the A. H. Ferbert (2) ran aground in the St. Mary's River, just a day old. The vessel returned to the builder's yard in River Rouge, Michigan for repairs.

On August 30, 1988, the Willowglen made its first visit to Duluth-Superior under that name. She loaded grain at Harvest States in Superior, arriving early in the morning and departing in the early evening the same day. Her last visit to Duluth before this was in 1981 under the name Joseph X. Robert.

The H.G. DALTON entered service on August 30, 1903.

On August 30, 1985 the tug CAPTAIN IOANNIS S. departed Quebec city with MENIHEK LAKE and LEON FALK, JR. in tow, bound for Spain to be scrapped.

On 30 August 1873, CAMBRIDGE (3-mast, wooden schooner, 162'/445T, built in 1868 at Detroit, MI) was bound from Marquette, MI for Cleveland, OH with a load of iron ore. In rough seas, she was thrown onto the rocky shore near Marquette where she broke up. No lives were lost.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - August 29

On August 29, 1942, the A.H. Ferbert (2) entered service.

On her maiden voyage August 29, 1979 the INDIANA HARBOR sailed for Two Harbors, MN to load iron ore pellets for Indiana Harbor, IN. In August, 1982 INDIANA HARBOR became the first U.S. flag laker to receive satellite communication.

On August 29, 1972 the lightship HURON was placed in an earth embankment at Port Huron's Pine Grove Park along the St. Clair River and was opened to visitors on July 13, 1974.

Canada Steamship Lines' ATLANTIC SUPERIOR returned from Europe on August 29, 1985 with a cargo of gypsum for Picton, Ontario.

On 29 August 1871, GEORGE M. ABEL (2-mast wooden schooner) broke up on a reef near Port Burwell, Ontario.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News from the Seaway

08/28:
For the second time this year, a ship was renamed in Montreal. Yesterday, August 26, The Indian-flag bulker LT ODYSSEY was renamed MILLENIUM OSPREY at section M-3 in Mtl. and reflagged to the flag of convenience of the Cayman Islands. Her last port of call before docking in Mtl. was Detroit. She was a regular visitor to Great Lakes ports since she was built in 1984. I was told by Fednav, her agent in Mtl. she will be seen again in the Lakes with her new name later on this year or next year. Owned by Larsen Toubro Ltd. of Bombay, she has several other fleetmates plying the Seaway regularly. All of them have been sold also to the same owners and will be renamed in due time. They are LT Argosy, Holck-Larsen, Mangal Desai and Soren Toubro.The other vessel renamed in Montreal was the Malaysian-flag container ship Brandenburg taking the new name of Montreal Senator on May 7.

Fednav took delivery lately of a new ship christened Federal Sumida. Last weekend, she was at Trois-Rivières but did not go beyond that port. Fednav ordered from a shipyard in Japan at least five ships several months ago. They will be phased in into service starting in the Spring of 1999. Federal Sumida will never go in the Lakes. She is too beamy. Another company Stolt Tankers, took delivery of a new ship lately. Arriving on her maiden trip in Mtl. today August 27 was the Isle of Man registered STOLT KENT. She is expected to leave Mtl. for Great Lakes ports this coming weekend.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Steven Reinauer and barge George Morris in Toledo

08/28:
The tug "Steven Reinauer" and it's barge are laying in Toledo OH waiting to get another load. The unit arrived Thursday the 27 of August and was assisted into the Phillips 66 dock by the tug Tennessee. The "Steven Reinauer " has been shuttling gasoline to Nanticoke the last two weeks from the BP dock in the Maumee River.

Reported by: D. Ocean




Busy day on the Saginaw River

08/28:
Yesterday was a full day of boats on the Saginaw River between Bay City and Saginaw Michigan. First came the American Mariner late Wednesday evening. Next on Thursday morning the second trip of the Reborn Canadian Transfer followed by the M/V Sam Laud. The parade continued with the Barge Integrity and pusher Tug Jacklyn M. Along with these vessels is the dredge Ojibway and the tug Shirly Joy. All of these vessels are in the same general area either trying to unload, dredge or turn around to head out. The Captain on the Transfer had apparently never been in this river before the first trip earlier this week as he is quite apprehensive and takes a very slow approach as he moves the new/old vessel thru, be safe not sorry. A sure sign that winter must be coming is the way the stone is arriving at the various docks.

Reported by: Dan Maus




Pleasure Boat in the News

08/28:
The PRINCESS MARLA,a 133-foot yacht owned by actor Paul Newman, passed through the Eisenhower and Snell locks in Massena, New York at about 9AM on Wednesday. It was unknown whether Mr. Newman was on the vessel as it travel the Seaway toward Montreal.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Today in Great Lakes History - August 28

EDWIN H. GOTT, 78, of Pittsburgh, died on August 28, 1986. The namesake of the 1,000 footer, he retired as Chief Executive Officer of U.S. Steel in 1973.

On August 28, 1962, the Edward L. Ryerson set a Great Lakes cargo record for iron ore. The Ryerson loaded 25,018 gross tons of iron ore in Superior, Wisconsin, breaking by 14 tons the record held by the Canadian bulk freighter Red Wing which was set in the 1961 season. The Ryerson held this record well into 1965.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 was repowered with two 2,850 ihp four cylinder Skinner Unaflow steeple compound steam engines, 19 1/2", 43" dia. x 26" stroke, built in 1953 by the Skinner Engine Co., Erie, PA and four coal-fired Foster-Wheeler water tube boilers with a total heating surface of 25,032 sq.ft. built in 1953. The repowering work was completed on August 28, 1954. Her 1954 tonnage was 3551 GRT, 1925 NRT, 2450 dwt. A new starboard tail shaft was installed at this time. Her service speed increased to 18 knots (20.7 mph).

The JOHN ANDERSON was outbound through the Duluth Ship Canal on August 28, 1928, the ANDERSON struck the north pier suffering $18,000 in damage.

The REGENT entered service on August 28, 1934. She was built for low clearances on the New York State Barge Canal and was equipped with five cargo tanks and one dry cargo hold.

The WILLIAM A. REISS (2) was laid up for the last time on August 28, 1981 at Toledo, OH and remained idle there until July 15, 1994 when she was towed to be scrapped.

On 28 August 1870, CHASKA (wooden scow-schooner, 72'/50T, built in 1869 at Duluth originally as a scow-brig) was wrecked in a northwesterly storm near Duluth. Reportedly she's the first vessel built at Duluth.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Probing Wake From Freighters

08/27:
It was reported in the 26 August 1998 issue of the Port Huron Times Herald that St. Clair County Sheriff Department Marine Division officials are interviewing property owners along a one mile stretch of the St. Clair River, after several residents reported wake damage on Monday, August 24.

According to the Canadian Coast Guard's Sarnia Traffic Control, the Algolake passed the Salt Docks (a speed control point where freighters are required to radio their position) at 2:17 AM. The Elton Hoyt II passed the same point at 2:21 AM, and was observed to overtake and pass the Algoma vessel. Both vessels were upbound. Property damage was reported from Roberts Landing northward about a mile. In one location the line of debris left by the wake reached 108 feet from the water's edge. Vessel speed is limited to 10.4 knots (12 mph) in the St. Clair River.

Reported by: John Decator




Update on the M/V Buffalo - Lighthouse crash

08/27:
From the "The Keepers Log" (USLHS Bulletin): Detroit River Lighthouse - 1, Great Lakes Freighter - 0

Last December the American Steamship Company's BUFFALO, a 625-foot Great Lakes freighter, rammed the Detroit River Lighthouse. Although minor repairs were needed at the lighthouse, the freighter sustained major damage. Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. Dave Bird, of Toledo, said "It looked like someone took a large can about 25 feet in diameter and shoved it into the bow of the ship, then withdrew the can, leaving the impression". The crew did try to avert the mishap at the last minute, but to no avail.

The accident allegedly happened after the course was set through a global positioning system (GPS) to go toward the lighthouse, and most of the crew was downstairs reading the mail they had just picked up in Detroit. The crew member on watch (it was twilight, and clear) realized that they were headed straight for the lighthouse. After several attempts to contact the wheelhouse went unanswered, he moved to the rear of the ship where the navigation equipment is located...but the ship struck hard. After contacting traffic officials, the crew was able to deballast forward sections and back clear of the structure. The ship eventually made it to Toledo and unloaded her partial cargo of coke before heading to a shipyard. Repairs cost approximately $1.2 million. All crew members on duty at the time of the accident were fired. The lighthouse, stalwart and true, sent out its beam before, during and after the incident.

Click here for pictures of the bow in the dry dock


Reported by: Dave Wobser




Today in Great Lakes History - August 27

The AGAWA CANYON was launched in 1971 at Collingwood Shipyards Ltd.

The SAMUEL RISLEY arrived at Toronto, Ont. on August 27, 1985 on her way to Thunder Bay, Ont. where she replaced the retired CCGC ALEXANDER HENRY.

ELMGLEN (2) was launched August 27, 1952 as a) JOHN O. McKELLAR (2) for the Colonial Steamship Co. Ltd. (Scott Misener, mgr.), Port Colborne, Ont.

The WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) then renamed US.266029 departed her lay-up berth at the Rouge slip on August 20, 1986 in tow of Gaelic tugs and she was taken to Detroit Marine Terminals on the Rouge River, where her pilothouse was removed to be displayed at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Detroit's Belle Isle. The hull was moved to Nicholson's River Rouge dock on August 27th.

MERLE M. McCURDY was launched August 27, 1910 as a) WILLIAM B. DICKSON for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

The U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tender (WAGL-305) MESQUITE was commissioned on August 27, 1943 and served on the Pacific Ocean in the 7th Fleet in 1944 and 1945.

On August 27, 1940, the William A. Irvin set the Great Lakes record for the fastest unloading of an iron ore cargo using shoreside equipment. The Irvin unloaded 13,856 gross tons of iron ore in 2 hours, 55 minutes (including the time to arrive and depart the dock!) in Conneaut, Ohio. This record still stands, and consequently the Irvin is one of the few Great Lakes vessels to be retired while still holding a Great Lakes cargo record.

On August 27, 1929, the Myron C. Taylor entered service.

On Aug. 25, 1923, the Duluth, Missabe & Northern ore dock in Duluth loaded 208,212 tons of ore into 23 ships.

On 27 August 1924, CITY QUEEN (wooden propeller steam tug, 71'/69GT, built in 1900 at Midland, Ontario) burned to a total loss ¼ mile east of the Manitou Dock in Georgian Bay.

Data from: Al Miller, Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Salt Water Vessel strikes bridge in the Maumee River

08/26:
The saltie Wana Naree outbound to Lake Erie from the Anderson's Elevator in Toledo struck the Norfolk & Southern Railroad bridge in the wee hours of Tuesday morning. She was loaded with grain and being assisted by harbor tugs. No damage was reported on the bridge and the vessel proceeded to the Welland Canal.

Reported by: R. Stephens




Algosteel towed with damaged rudder

08/26:
The Algosteel , with significant rudder damage, was escorted from Sarnia Government Dock down to Detroit by the triple Z- drive tractor tug "Kodiak" owned by PHS Tugboat Service of Port Huron, MI. She arrived in the Belle Isle anchorage and waited for the the English River to unload it's cargo at the LaFarge Atwater Dock . At 2030 on Tuesday the Algosteel shifted to the Atwater dock and unloaded her cargo of stone.

At 0030 on the 26th the tug Pennsylvania from the Great Lakes Towing took a line on her stern and escorted the Algosteel down to the Toledo Shipyard Drydock. It is not known when she will be out of the drydock or the extent of the damage.

Reported by: R. Stephens




Delays in the Welland Canal Update

08/26:
Delays in the Welland Canal continue due to work on the East side of the Flight Locks. Authorities are reporting that there is up to a 24 hour stand by time due to the one way traffic caused by the work. Repairs are expected to be completed tomorrow morning.

Reported by: D. Ocean




More on U.S. Coast Guard project

08/26:
The first phase of the U.S. Coast Guard contract recently awarded to several consortiums, one of which includes Marinette Marine Corp., will last 16 months. The first contracts for vessels are planned for February 2000 and the project will last a decade at a cost of U.S.$8 billion to U.S.$10 billion. The contracts will be awarded at the end of phase two, when selected consortiums will have developed their proposals outlined during phase one, the program recently awarded. In addition to replacing the cutters, the integrated project will also involve replacement of aircraft including helicopters.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - August 26

The Edgar B. Speer's sea trials were successfully completed on August 26, 1980.

The BEECHGLEN was towed out of Owen Sound by the McKeil tug KAY COLE on August 26, 1994 en route to Port Maitland, Ont. for scrapping.

The MICHIPICOTEN (2) was launched August 26, 1905 as a) HENRY C. FRICK.

EMORY L. FORD (b RAYMOND H. REISS) entered service on August 26, 1916 to load iron ore at Marquette, MI.

SILVERDALE was launched August 26, 1925 as the straight decker a) GLENEAGLES

The CHIEF WAWATAM was launched on August 26, 1911. She was built with three large propellers, two in the stern for propulsion and one in the bow for icebreaking.

The passenger-cargo ship FEDERAL PALM was christened August 26, 1961. She was built on the Great Lakes, but never served their ports.

On August 26, 1934, while on a Sunday sightseeing cruise, MIDLAND CITY damaged her bottom on a shoal near Present Island. She settled with her stern under water and her bow high in the air.

On 26 August 1875, COMET (propeller passenger/package freight, 181'/744T, built in 1857 at Cleveland, OH) was carrying ore and pig iron in Lake Superior on a foggy night. While trying to pass the Beatty Line steamer MANITOBA, 7 miles SE of Whitefish Point, signals were misunderstood and COMET veered into the path of MANITOBA. COMET was rammed amidships and sank in ten minutes. 11 of the 21 aboard lost their lives. This wasn't the first such accident for COMET. In October 1869, she suffered a similar mishap with the propeller HUNTER and that time both vessels sank.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Naticoke in for repairs

08/25:
Canada Steamship Lines Naticoke is at wharf 16 the old R and P dock in Port Colborne for repairs to one of her engines. She will be there at least another 5 days. The vessel has been there since early Fri.

Reported by: J.J. Van Volkenburg




Stowaways Arrive in Ecorse

08/25:
Today's Detroit News reports that jail and continued confinement -- not the hoped-for haven -- awaited 22 Caribbean stowaways aboard a cargo ship searched by federal officials Monday after it docked on the Detroit River.

Officials said some crew members on the ship -- the NST Challenge -- may have been part of an illegal alien smuggling ring.

"Because of the sheer numbers, we think that this could be part of a smuggling operation," said Carol Jenifer, district supervisor for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) in Detroit.

"We've never had this many (stowaways) in Michigan," she said.

Two of the 22 men were taken off the ship: a 20-year-old Cuban who is seeking political asylum in the United States and a Dominican, 42, who is wanted on drug charges in New York City.

Neither man's name was released. Both are being held at undisclosed area jails, officials said. The others, including two teens, are being kept under guard on board the ship until they can be returned to the Dominican Republic. Authorities believe that the stowaways hid away on the ship in the Dominican Republic. The vessel, manned by a Chinese crew, began its voyage in Panama and was bound finally for Chicago.

The ship was set to leave for Chicago from Detroit today. But by late Monday federal officials still had not decided if they would let the stowaways disembark in Chicago.

The plight of the stowaways came to light last Thursday after three of them jumped from the Detroit-bound vessel into the St. Lawrence River and swam ashore to Trois-Rivieres, Canada. The men told Canadian officials that they had not eaten for nine days and that they feared there were crocodiles in the river, according to a published report. They had no idea what country they were in.

Aboard ship, they were kept in an 18-by-20 foot room without windows, but with access to a bathroom, officials said. The ship's captain told authorities he discovered the 22 other stowaways after the three jumped ship. He requested the help of Canadian immigration officials, saying some of the illegal passengers had gotten violent.

But Jenifer said that report was not true. And since Canadian immigration officials boarded the ship three days ago, the stowaways, although kept under guard, were allowed to work in exchange for food.

"They're in pretty good shape considering what they've been through," she said, adding that none of the men required emergency medical care.

The rusted cargo ship was beset by dozens of federal agents looking for drugs and additional stowaways after it docked around noon at Nicholson's Marina in Ecorse, an industrial port area near Zug Island. Detroit Police Department divers also searched under the hull of the ship for other stowaways in hidden compartments attached to the bottom of the vessel.

An attorney for the ship's owners, Great Lake Marine Co. in Detroit, did not return telephone calls Monday. But Jenifer said the company will be fined $10,000 per stowaway and charged with all the INS costs relating to the stowaways, including agents' overtime and any detention costs.

The jailed drug suspect will be extradited to New York, pending positive identification, Jenifer said.

The fate of the Cuban native, who is seeking asylum, is in the hands of an immigration judge. The judge will hear that case within the month. A third suspect among the stowaways was a man who had tried three times unsuccessfully to enter the United States by illegal means. That man will be returned to the Dominican Republic along with the 19 others, Jenifer said.

Click here for the complete story and pictures





Transfer on the Move

08/25:
The Canadian Transfer was inbound on the Saginaw River this morning at 09:30 enroute to Crow Island (Saginaw) with a load of stone from Manitoulin Island. She can be found near the Zilwaukee bridge on the east side of the river.

Reported by: Dan Maus




Delays in the Welland Canal

08/25:
Reports from the Welland Canal tell of delays for both upbound and downbound vessels. Work is in progress on the East side of the Flight Locks, allowing for only one way traffic.

Reported by: D. Ocean




Cruise Ship Enters the Seaway

08/25:
cColumbus was heading to Montreal overnight, from Quebec City. This is the second year of crusing the Seaway and Great Lakes for the vessel.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Today in Great Lakes History - August 25

On August 25, 1984 the hard luck ROGER M. KYES (b ADAM E. CORNELIUS) grounded off McLouth Steel and ended crosswise in the Detroit River's Trenton Channel.

The GEORGE M. STEINBRENNER (2) arrived at Port Colborne, Ont. on August 25, 1978 in tow of the tug WILFRED M. COHEN for scrapping.

On 25 August 1919, CABOTIA (formerly HIAWATHA, wooden propeller freighter, 235'/1299GT, built 1880 at Gibraltar, MI) went ashore on Main Duck Island in Lake Ontario and split her hull, becoming a constructive loss.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Canadian Leader Refloated

08/24:
Late Sunday afternoon the Canadian Leader was pulled off the shore of Drummond Island by the Purvis Marine Tugs Anglican Lady, Avenger IV, and Wilfred M. Cohen. In addition, the small PML tug Osprey was on hand to assist and the large lighter Salvager was made fast to to Canadian Leader to accomplish any offloading of grain deemed necessary. The effort to pull the vessel off the shore started at approximately 12:00 pm and took about four hours to accomplish.

The Canadian Leader came off with a pronounced list to starboard. At anchorage last night she still had a slight starboard list.

The only discharge from the Canadian Leader during the stranding was a small quantity of spilled wheat.

Unofficial reports state that her steering failed and there is visible damage to the rudder. Also reported was water entering the vessel through the forepeak area.

Reported by: Randy Hayes Roger LeLievre and Jill R. Lucy




Transfer heads upbound

08/24:
After the Canadian Transfer finished unloading at Sarnia Sunday she refueled at the Shell dock At Corunna, Ontario. She then proceeded upbound to load stone at her next destination, Meldrum Bay -on the western tip of Manitoulin Island. She passed under the Blue Water Bridge at 2PM.

Reported by: Bruce Hurd and Joe K.




Stowaways Heading to Detroit area

08/24:
Today's Deroit News reports that the Philippine registered Chinese manned NST CHALLENGE, a 16000 ton bulk carrier, loaded with at least 22 stowaways who hid on the ship in the Dominican Republic was expected to dock in Detroit on Sunday evening.

Three of the original 25 stowaways jumped ship in the St. Lawrence River at Trois-Rivieres, Canada, and swam ashore. They were treated at a local hospital and released. None of the three had passports, but all asked to remain in Canada.

It is unknown where the vessel will dock and if the U.S. or Canadian authorities will have to deal with the stowaways.




Twin Ports Report

08/24:
Charles M. Beeghly has called at Duluth's DMIR ore dock several times in recent weeks. Its most recent visit was Aug. 23.

Atlantic Hickory and Sarah Spencer are scheduled to make an unusual visit to the BNSF ore dock in Superior. The ITB will go to anchor to wait for Burns Harbor to load.

Reported by: Al Miller




News from the Seaway

08/24:
Departing Montreal for Venezuela loaded with grain on August 23 was the Liberian-flag, Chinese-owned APTMARINER. She had stop in Montreal to take on bunker at section 94 on her way back from the Great Lakes. She had load that grain cargo at Thunder Bay. Entering the Seaway on June 16, she has spent a total of 69 days in the Seaway/Great Lakes ever since. It will be remembered she went aground the day she entered the Seaway off St.Nicholas Island at the eastern end of Lake St.Louis. She was refloated two days later and was allowed to deliver her cargo of steel at Cleveland before being sent to Port Weller to be repaired. When she left the bunkering dock, it was easy to see the area to which repairs were done as a new coat of black paint was in evidence on the lowere bow area.

Arriving in Montreal on her maiden trip on August 19 was the Canadian-owned, Bermuda-flag container ship CANMAR PRIDE. She had been delivered from a South Korean shipyard a few weeks earlier. She is owned by Canada Maritime and a sister-ship will follow in her path before the end of the year. She will be christened Canmar Honour, the first vessel named as such in theit fleet. Canmar Pride is the second one to be named that way. The first one was a Greek-registered vessel on charter. A third sister-ship will follow, but that one will be owned by Orient Overseas Container Line and the name chosen for her will be OOCL Belgium.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Great Lakes Maritime Academy welcomes new cadets

08/24:
The Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Traverse City, Michigan welcomed its new class of 31 cadets. The incoming class was treated to an afternoon sail on the tall ships Malabar and Inland Seas on West Grand Traverse Bay. The first two weeks at the Academy are spent learning proper lifeboat handling and other survival at sea techniques. The Acedamy offers a three year program culminating in the issuance of Coast Guard licenses for either 3rd Assistant Engineer or 3rd Mate including Great Lakes Pilotage.

Reported by: Gary Schweitzer




Today in Great Lakes History - August 24

LEON SIMARD was launched August 24, 1974.

On August 24, 1910 the THOMAS F. COLE ran aground on a shoal in the St. Marys River severely damaging her hull plates.

The C.H. McCULLOUGH, JR was launched on August 24, 1907 as a) WARD AMES .

On August 24, 1985, PAUL H. CARNAHAN arrived for her final lay up at Nicholson's in Ecorse, Michigan. Ironically, only a few hours later, her near sister LEON FALK, JR. departed the same slip on her final trip bound for Quebec City and overseas scrapping.

The BURLINGTON burned to the water's edge in Mississauga Strait near Manitoulin Island on August 24, 1895.

On 24 August 1885, IOSCO (wooden schooner-barge, 124'/230GT, built at Alabaster, MI in 1873) was heavily damaged by fire. She was rebuilt as an unrigged barge and lasted until 1912.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Canadian Leader Aground in St. Marys River

08/23:
At about 11:00 pm on Aug 21 the Canadian Leader ran aground on the Crab Island Shoal on the Drummond Island side of Detour Channel. The Canadian Leader was downbound at the time and because of a steering casualty, crossed the upbound channel and struck Drummond Island. She reports her bow is lying in 26 feet of water and her stern is in 76 feet of water. At dawn two tugs were on the scene.

She is at almost right angles to the shore and is riding easily. Both forward anchors are down but the stern anchor is still in its chocks. She is located approximately a half a mile north of Crab Point on the southwest side of Drummond.

Reports were that water was entering the vessel in the forepeak. The extent of the damage is unknown at this time.

Reported by: Randy Hayes, Scott McLellan and Jill R. Lucy




Transfer Loads Stone

08/23:
Upper Lakes newest vessel Canadian Transfer departed the port of Marblehead with a load of stone for Sarnia. She was upbound at the Detroit River Light at 1400 hours Saturday afternoon. She resembles the James Norris while approaching her and also has that "Beechglen'ish" look. She proceeded upbound past Detroit at approx. 1700 hours, passing the rare visitor to the area, Indiana Harbor Steamship Company's Joeseph L. Block. The Transfer is expected to load a salt cargo in Goderich after departing Sarnia Sunday.

Reported by: Todd L. Davidson and Brian McCune




Algowest Unloading Problem

08/23:
The Algowest arrived at LaFarge in Windsor on the Detroit River late yesterday morning but was unable to unload. The problem was caused by a failure in her unloading system, her unloading gates would not open. It is not known when repairs will be complete.

The Algowest was recently converted to a self unloader.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




New Look for Challenger

08/23:
On Saturday, August 22 the Medusa Challenger arrived in Milwaukee with a new look; the familiar "Medusa Cement" billboards on the side of the hull are no more. The crew painted them out during an unload at Manitowoc, WI August 11. No official word yet if "Southdown Cement" will be painted on as a replacement.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Unsual Sightings on the St. Clair & Detroit Rivers

08/23:
Early morning boatwatchers observed the H. Lee White unloading stone at the McLouth dock. Early afternoon observers were treated with the voyage of the Joseph L. Block down bound to Ashtabula. And, early evening boatwatchers (7:00+ p.m.) observed the Canadian Transfer upbound on its maiden voyage on the St. Clair River.

The M/V St. Clair made a rare trip into Detroit yesterday arriving at the LaFarge Dock mid-morning. She was headed downbound in the river about 10:00 A.M. and made a turn under Belle Isle to tie up at the dock just East of down town Detroit. Once secured she began to unload a cargo of stone.

Reported by: John Meyland, David Michelson and N. Schultheiss .




Huron Ore Dock Receives Two Pellet Cargoes

08/23:
On July 25, the Wheeling & Lake Erie Ry. handled two incoming cargoes at the Huron Ohio ore dock on western Lake Erie for transfer to rail cars destined for Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corp.'s Steubenville , Ohio plant, 300 miles distant. The two cargoes were 21,700 gross tons of Royal Empire flux pellets discharged from the ELTON HOYT II of the Interlake Steamship fleet, and 25,634 tons of Wabush pellets from the CANADIAN CENTURY of the Upper Lakes Group fleet.

Reported by: D. Ocean




Today in Great Lakes History - August 23

The GEMINI sailed on her maiden voyage August 23, 1978 from the shipyard to load fuel oil at Baytown, TX, for delivery at Detroit, MI.

The wooden-hulled steamer AURORA was launched on August 23, 1887.

On August 23, 1979, KINSMAN ENTERPRISE was towed out of the Frog Pond, having escaped the scrapper's torch, and sold to the Port Huron Seaway Terminal to be used as a storage barge.

On 23 AUG 1887, CLARA (2-mast, wooden scow-schooner) was carrying a load of hardwood lumber bound from Manistee for Chicago when she was caught in a storm and capsized. Her hull later washed ashore upside-down near Miller's Station, IN.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Stowaways in Montreal

08/22:
The Montreal Gazette of August 21st reports 22 stowaways on board the Philipine registered Chinese manned NST CHALLENGE, a 16000 ton bulk carrier, have been locked in the hold of the ship, as they have refused to disembark until the ship arrives in Detroit USA. Anchored in Montreal August 20th, awaiting a Seaway pilot, the vessel is expected to depart for Detroit August 21. Earlier on August 20th 3 stowaways jumped ship (?) into the St Lawrence River at Three Rivers Quebec during a pilot change. The vessel had departed a week ago from the Dominican town of Rio Haina

Reported by: John Whitehead




News From the Seaway - Kingston Report

08/22:
On August 11th a severe storm move through the area. The Frontenac reported that at 1445 she was 6 miles SW of Pointe Petre and had winds of 40 knots , gusting to 50 knots and heavy rain. Some of Prince Edward County and the American span of the Thousand Island Bridge had large hail later. Aboard the Island Belle , passengers watched the extremely black cloud go SW of the vessel.

On Aug. 10 the Empire Sandy from Toronto and the Bonnie Belle, a small paddle wheeler from Alexandria Bay, N.Y., were in Kingston. Along with two other, large, two masted sailing yachts were used to transform the Royal Military College dock into a movie set. The dock was also covered in fake cotton bales, wood mulch and many movie extras. It was supposed to simulate a wharf in turn of the century New Orleans Louisianna. The movie is Vendetta , being produced by HBO. The Empire Sandy and the Bonnie Belle laft the next day. The crew of teh Bonnie Belle reported they were having quite a time getting all the Cotton balls off the boat before she resumed her normal cruises.

The port of Oswego seem to be very busy with Tankers. Enerchem ships and the Saturn are visiting the Port Often. There are also several tugs and barges. Oil for the power plant seems to be the cargo.

We still seem to have a pilot shortage. The pilots are working hard but they legally must rest. On Tues. Aug. 18 , I heard the Seaway Control station in Sodus tell one eastbound ship that whoever got to Cape Vincent first, her or the Utviken, would get the pilot while the other would have to wait until 2330. I guess the era of the great steamboat race is not over yet!! On Aug. 14 both the Lake Carling and Golden Sky had delays.

On Friday, Aug. 14, the Louis R. Desmarais came up the Seaway with a cargo of cement for Detroit.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Marinette Marine part of new U.S. Coast Guard project

08/22:
The U.S. Coast Guard awarded three U.S.$7 million contracts on 21 Aug. to start initial concept development for its Integrated Deepwater System acquisition program. The system includes air and surface equipment, command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, sensors and reconnaissance and the supporting logistical structure. The center of the project is the construction of a class of ships to replace the Coast Guard's high-endurance and medium-endurance cutters.

The three teams that received contracts will also receive funding for development of their concept. The three teams are: Avondale Industries Inc. with Boeing Co. and John J. McMullen Associates Inc.; Lockheed Martin Corp. with Ingalls Shipbuilding Inc.; and Science Applications International Corp. with Bath Iron Works Corp., Marinette Marine Corp. and Sikorsky Aircraft Corp.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Tall Ships Coming to Goderich

08/22:
The tall ships are coming to Goderich, Ontario, August 28-30 as part of the Marine Heritage Festival. The four ships coming are the ANNA KRISTINA, TRUE NORTH, FAIR JEANNE and the PATHFINDER/PLAYFAIR. Plenty of entertainment will be held during the festival including the Black Knights Medieval performance to be held on the Lakefront, Friday afternoon and evening. Saturday the legends of Rock and Country concert featuring look-a-likes and sound-a-likes of performers such as Kenny Rogers, Shania Twain, and Mick Jagger. Sunday will see the Lemon Tree Productions performing with their celebrity puppets. There will be plenty of entertainment for the whole family. Goderich is located on the Eastern Shore of Lake Huron, on Highway 21, approximately 2 hours by car from Port Huron, Michigan.

Reported by: Philip Nash




Today in Great Lakes History - August 22

The ALGOPORT left Collingwood August 22, 1979 on her maiden voyage for Calcite, MI to load limestone bound for Spragge, Ont.

ONTADOC was launched August 22, 1903 as a) R.L. IRELAND.

The ENDERS M. VOORHEES was towed out of Duluth on August 22, 1987 by the tugs AVENGER IV and CHIPPEWA, and was the first of the 'Supers' towed off the Lakes for scrap.

The a) ROGER M. KYES (b ADAM E. CORNELIUS) sailed on her maiden voyage on August 22,1973 from Toledo to load iron ore at Escanaba, MI. She was built under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. This program allowed U.S. shipping companies to construct new vessels or to modernize their existing fleet by government guaranteed financing and tax deferred benefits. The KYES was the second of ten ships launched for American Steamship but the first to enter service under this arrangement. The total cost of the ten ships was more than $250 million.

On 22 August 1863, WILLIAM S. BULL (wooden propeller steam tug, 16T, built in 1861 at Buffalo) waterlogged and went down in a storm 40 miles east of Erie, PA. She was in company of the tug G.W. GARDNER and the canal boat M.E. PAINE, who saved her crew.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Transfers Delivers first Cargo

08/21:
The Canadian Transfer arrived in Buffalo through the South Entrance on the afternoon of the 20th. She transited the outer harbor and pulled into the Buffalo Port Terminal Slip "A". She then began unloading grain directly into the open hatches of the laid-up Kinsman Enterprise.

As of 10:00 P.M. last night she was still unloading. There is not much room to move in the slip and it was taking them a long time to transfer their cargo.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski



Tanker in Essexville

08/21:
The Tanker Enerchem Catalyst made her second trip of the season to the Saginaw River yesterday. The vessel stopped at the Triple clean fuel dock in Essexville.

Reported by: Danny McNeil




Seaway Book will Soon be Available

08/21:
Seaway Ships 1998 Mid-season illustrated edition.
René Beauchamp's popular annual publication is to be released the second or third week of September. The book offers a complete list of all new ships which transited the St. Lawrence Seaway up to the end of August, both foreign and inland vessels. Corrections and additions to previous editions. Cost: $3.65 including postage.

Click here for more information





Today in Great Lakes History - August 21

The BUFFALO's sea trials were conducted from August 21 through August 24, 1978.

The GEORGE A. STINSON was christened at Detroit, MI on August 21, 1978.

The f) CEDARGLEN arrived under tow at Port Maitland, Ont. on August 21, 1994 where she was scrapped.

THE HARVESTER cleared Lorain August 21, 1911 on her maiden voyage loaded with coal for Duluth, MN.

IMPERIAL QUEBEC was launched August 21, 1957

The KINSMAN INDEPENDENT (1) encountered steering problems downbound at the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River on August 21, 1973. She avoided hitting the stone embankments but ran aground after clearing the cut. The damage sustained in this grounding ended her career.

The VENUS was sold to Acme Metals Inc. and was towed to Ashtabula, OH on August 21, 1975 where she was broken up in 1976.

On August 21, 1971 the CHARLES DICK severed two underwater cables in the Maumee River, cutting off power to east Toledo and the Cherry Street Bridge. Massive traffic jams developed on Toledo's streets.

The graceful schooner HUNTER SAVIDGE was launched on August 21, 1879 by the Grand Haven Ship Building Company.

On 21 August 1856, CHARTER (wooden, propeller vessel, 132'/197T, built in 1849 at Huron, OH as a sidewheeler) was bound from Cleveland for Buffalo with flour, oats and rye. She swamped and sank in a storm 6 miles above Fairport, OH. By the end of August, she had been damaged beyond repair but her machinery was recovered as she lay in relatively shallow water.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




More on the Transfers first trip

08/20:
At long last the CANADIAN TRANSFER has left Port Weller Drydocks to begin trading for Upper Lakes Shipping. Yesterday morning at around 07:00 the tugs JAMES E. McGRATH and ARGUE MARTIN secured to Transfer's stern and bow respectively and began pulling her across the canal to the approach wall above lock 1. There was a very strong northeast wind at the time which aided the move westward across the channel.

Once CANADIAN TRANSFER was secure along the west wall above lock 1 a few final tests were done and around 09:30 she started into lock 1 under her own power. At around 10:20 she cleared Port Weller piers and headed around 10 miles off shore to undergo her sea trials. Speed, navigation, stopping, turning and mechanical tests were done to determine the ship's seaworthiness. Officials from Port Weller Drydocks and Upper Lakes Shipping were aboard for the trials which were later hailed as a complete success. The ship attained at top speed of just over 14 knots at 85% of maximum power and the ship's systems performed up to expectation.

At 18:30 CANADIAN TRANSFER came within a few kilometers of Port Weller piers and summoned the Port Weller pilot boat out to meet her to bring the company and drydock officials back to land and shortly after that was done she turned westward and sailed at full speed to Hamilton where she was to begin loading her first cargo.

Her first cargo is reportly Ontario grain and she is due to unload in Buffalo, NY. at 10:00 A.M. this morning.

Reported by: Jeff Cameron

For more Welland Canal Activity visit Jeff's home page





Salty Renamed in Cleveland

08/20:
For the second time this year, another salty was renamed in a Great Lakes port. That was the Hong Kong-flag heavy-load carrier SAILER JUPITER renamed ENCHANTER at Cleveland lately. She had entered the Seaway on August 10 and cleared on August 18 with her new name, going to one of the Montreal anchorages. She is now registered in Panama. A regular caller to Great Lakes ports, the bulker GOLDEN SKY was seen lately again with a new registry, this time the one of Malta. She was upbound for Toronto. Since 1992, she was reflagged four times, always keeping the same name. Last year, Bahamas was her registry and in fact, she is still listed as registered there by the Canadian Coast Guard on their marine information bulletin which is not always reliable. Earlier this season, a new tour boat started operating in the Thousand Islands from Alexandria Bay, N.Y. so giving direct competition to the well established Uncle Sam`s Boat Tours dating back to 1926. The name of the two decks vessel is SPIRIT OF ALEX BAY and is owned by Alex Bay Boat Tours founded last year with two very small tour boats. Spirit of Alex Bay was previously in service on Lake Seneca as Seneca Dreamer on on Lake Champlain as Spirit of Ethan Allen.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




No Dog Days Of Summer For Lakes Jones Act Fleet

08/20:
U.S.-Flag vessels moved more than 14 million net tons of dry-bulk cargo on the Great Lakes in July. The increase is slight compared to a year ago, but only because a major stone shipping dock temporarily curtailed production after a fire. For the season, cargo movement in Jones Act lakers stands at 58,256,816 tons, an increase of 5.6 percent over the record-setting 1997 navigation season.

Iron ore shipments in U.S. bottoms topped 7.2 million tons in July, the highest monthly "float" in several years. Despite the labor dispute at General Motors, the American steel industry continues to operate at virtually full capacity and steel shipments from North American mills are up 4.6 percent through June. Therefore, as July ended, U.S.-Flag iron ore cargos had increased 8.2 percent to 30.6 million tons.

Coal cargos in U.S.-Flag lakers totaled 2,564,525 tons in July, a decrease of roughly 150,000 tons. Some falloff was expected as July was vacation month at many of the nation's coal mines. For the season, U.S.-Flag coal cargos stand at 10.1 million tons, a decrease of 4 percent. The mild winter meant many utilities found themselves with high inventories as the season began, so the need to rebuild stockpiles has lessened to a degree.

U.S.-Flag lakers hauled 3.5 million tons of stone in July, a seemingly significant decrease, but a fire at Michigan Limestone's Calcite operation, one of the largest stone-loading facilities on the Lakes, temporarily reduced production. For the season, stone shipments in U.S. hulls total 14.8 million tons, an increase of 10.7 percent.

As of today (August 19), U.S.-Flag Great Lakes operators have 67 of their 69 vessels in service. A small cement carrier (E. M. FORD) and a mid-sized grain carrier (KINSMAN ENTERPRISE) remain available for service should demand for those cargos increase.

Reported by: Lake Carriers'Association




I.S.M. Code rule finalized

08/20:
The U.S. Coast Guard's final rule requiring certain vessels on international voyages to include their International Safety Management Code certification status in notice of arrival messages was published in the U.S. government's Federal Register on 17 Aug. Since 1 July, vessels carrying more than 12 passengers; tankers; bulk ships; and high-speed freight vessels of 500 gross tons or more have had to have I.S.M. Code certification worldwide. As of 16 Sept., those same vessels, except those less than 500 gross tons carrying more than 12 passengers, will have to provide their I.S.M. Code status at least one day before entering a U.S. port.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - August 20

The INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORT arrived at Toronto, Ont. August 20, 1969 on her maiden voyage with fuel oil.

The R. BRUCE ANGUS in tandem tow with the ULS steamer GORDON C. LEITCH behind the tug IRVING CEDAR arrived at Setúbal, Portugal August 20, 1985 where they were broken up.

August 20, 1920 the WILLIS L. KING, upbound light in Whitefish Bay, was in collision with and sank the downbound Steel Trust steamer SUPERIOR CITY. The SUPERIOR CITY was struck nearly amidships and when the cold water reached her engine room, her boilers exploded. She sank immediately with 29 of her 33 crew members aboard.

The US.266029 (a.WILLIAM CLAY FORD (1) departed her lay-up berth at the Rouge slip on August 20, 1986 in tow of Gaelic tugs and she was taken to Detroit Marine Terminals on the Rouge River, where her pilothouse was removed to be displayed at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Detroit's Belle Isle.

The TEXACO WARRIOR (1) punctured her tank in a grounding accident in the Welland Canal near Bridge 10 on August 20, 1964.

On 20 August 1899, HUNTER SAVIDGE (2-mast, wooden schooner, 117'/152GT, built in 1879 at Grand Haven, MI) capsized in a squall or tornado in Lake Huron. 5 survivors, including Capt. Fred Sharpstein, were rescued from the overturned schooner by the steamer ALEX McVITTIE. However, 5 lost their lives, including the captain's wife and their son, the ship's owner's wife and daughter, and the Mate. Capt. Sharpstein patrolled the beaches looking for the bodies of his wife and son for months but they were never found. The wreck was found in 1987 near Grindstone City, MI.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Transfers first trip Update

08/19:
It was reported yesterday that the Canadian Transfer cleared Lock 1 at 10:30 in the morning and headed toward Hamilton. This was the start of her sea trials and was planning to load her first cargo, Ontario grain, at Hamilton, bound for Buffalo, NY.

Reported by:Roger Tottman



Lake Ontario Hydrofoil Gets Swamped

08/19:
The Sunrise VI, owned and operated by Shaker Cruise Lines, was crossing Lake Ontario yesterday (August 18) when it encountered a weather system that - according to the Captain - had not been predicted. Seven foot waves replaced the anticipated "one metre or less" and one wave came over the bow, crashing into the plexiglass window on the Port side. The window shattered, giving way to a torrent of water. Several subsequent waves compounded the problem by flooding the compartment.

Communications Director Peter Green was on-board, along with Captain Ihab Shaker, hosting the Provincial Tourism Minister and 2 assistants. After the initial damage and resulting flooding, Green was instructed by Captain Shaker to hold a makeshift barrier in place over the shattered window. The next wave struck while Green was getting into position and knocked him over, injuring a knee. Green was able to return to the window and held the barrier fast for the remainder of the trip.

The true "story" here is the professionalism of the Marine Crew aboard the Sunrise VI. The Chief Engineer (names withheld until after Transport Canada's investigation) was, according to Green, "extremely calm, cool and collected. He immediately set about placing the ship's pumps, ensuring the safety and comfort of passengers, and tending to other duties. He and Captain Shaker (serving as Mate for this promotional voyage) took control - the Tourism Minister (Al Palladini) was very impressed with their professionalism and expertise." Green noted that there was no sense of Panic on the vessel.

The Sunrise VI gave a Mayday call that resulted in Shaker Cruise Line's Ocean-going Ferry the Lakerunner responding concurrently with the Catamaran owned and operated by Waterways Transportation Services. A Coast Guard vessel arrived prepared to assist with the pumping (if necessary) and Green further credits the Captains and Crew of each responding vessel "the media asked about the irony of a competitor coming to render assistance. I explained that there are no colours on the Lakes, they are all on the same team when something like this happens. Waterways did what we would do if they were faced with the same situation, and I commend their professionalism and courage for standing by us during what was a very traumatic 40-minute trip into Port Dalhousie Harbour from where the incident occured.

Shaker Cruise Lines is cooperating with the Transportation Safety Board investigation and has replaced the original plexiglass with Lexan glass.

Reported by: Erin Diel, Corner House Imaginations

Origianl Report:
Shaker Cruise Lines hydrofoil SUNRISE VI sustained damage yesterday morning on Lake Ontario while enroute from Toronto to Port Dalhousie. A 2 meter wave broke through one of the vessel's forward windows, flooding the passenger cabin. The hydrofoil's pumps were able to keep up with in inflow of water, but a mayday call was placed to Canadian Coast Guard. The hydrofoil was escorted to Port Dalhousie by Coast Guard, where she has been impounded by Transport Canada pending the completion of their investigation. Ten passengers were aboard the vessel, including Ontario Minister of Tourism Al Paladini, who cancelled his Niagara tour today. Mr. Paladini said that the Shaker Cruise Line employees handled the affair professionally. One crew member was injured when he fell backward during the accident and twisted his knee, no injuries amoungst the passenger were reported.

Reported by: Bill Moran




Twin Ports Report

08/19:
After its mid-summer hiatus, Kinsman Independent is back in Superior Aug. 19. It's backed into the Harvest States gallery berth with hatches open and ready to load despite today's threat of rain.

The parade of ships continues unabated at Midwest Energy Terminal. The lineup for the next few days includes Canadian Enterprise, Aug. 20; Oglebay Norton, Aug. 21; Buckeye, Aug. 21; Walter J. McCarthy Jr., Aug. 21; Mesabi Miner, Aug. 22; Paul R. Tregurtha, Aug. 23.

Reported by: Al Miller




Boland in the St. Clair River

08/19:
John J. Boland was observed upbound in the St. Clar River early Monday evening. She stopped at the Sarnia oil docks for fueling about 9 PM.

It appears that she is back to her routine after last weeks self-unloading repairs.

Reported by: John Decator




Possible Trip to Alpena

08/19:
Unconfirmed reports have the Great Lakes Towing Co. tug "Wisconsin" preparing to assist a salt water vessel into the Lafarge facility at Alpena, MI some time this week. This will be the first saltie to call on Alpena , it is believed that this vessel will be unloading stone.

Reported by: D. Ocean




Lakes Visitor in Canadian North

08/19:
Lloyds of London are reporting on a well known salty which has visited the Great Lakes several times in the past few years:

"Cyprus bulk carrier BLUEBILL, 16,810 gross tons, reported main engine failure while approaching dock with tanker alongside discharging, at Churchill, Manitoba on August 10. Tugs pushed the vessel clear. (Monday August 17 1998)"

Churchill, Manitoba on Hudson's Bay in the Canadian North is open to shipping usually for only 6 weeks each summer.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Today in Great Lakes History - August 19

The JOHN E.F. MISENER (2) grounded near Hard Island on the St. Lawrence River August 19, 1966 suffering bow damage.

The ROBERT S. PIERSON was sold to P & H. Shipping Ltd. on August 19, 1982 and renamed e) SPRUCEGLEN.

The ARIZONA was launched on August 19, 1868.

On August 19, 1915, the HENRY PEDWELL burned at Wiarton.

CARDINAL (3) was towed to the Strathearne Terminal in Hamilton, Ont. on August 19, 1974 for scrapping.

On 19 August 1909, CITY OF GREENBAY (wooden propeller passenger/package freight, 134'/257GT, built in 1880 at Fort Howard, WI as the sidewheeler M. C. HAWLEY) caught fire while crossing Saginaw Bay, burned to the waterline and sank.. This wasn't her first experience with this type of accident since on 17 November 1887, she had burned to a "total loss" in Lake Michigan.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Transfers first trip Update

08/18:
The Canadian Transfer cleared Lock 1 at 10:30 this morning and is heading towards Hamilton. She appears to be making very good time. The weather was poor so the pictures may not be very good.

Reported by: Roger Tottman



Twin Ports Report

08/18:
After a brief summer slowdown, the Twin Ports grain trade has picked up the pace again. Rail traffic to the elevators remains brisk. On Aug. 18, four salties were loading grain: Pintail at Peavey, Lake Champlain at AGP, Solta at Harvest States and Stefania I at Cargill. Novicki I is anchored on Lake Superior. Due in later in the day is Kinsman Independent for Harvest States.

Algocape was in Duluth to unload at St. Lawrence Cement. Alpena paid another call to the Huron Cement terminals in Superior and Duluth. The Alpena seems to be the ports' regular ILM vessel these days, with only rare visits from the once common J.A.W. Iglehart.

Reported by: Al Miller




Roy A. Jodrey Dive Completed

08/18:
Work to salvage eight drums of petroleum from the Roy A. Jodrey in Alexandria Bay, N.Y., were completed the night of 14 Aug., the U.S. Coast Guard has announced. They are thought to contain a total of 1,520 liters/400 gallons of machine and lubricating oil. On 15 Aug., divers did a survey of the ship looking for additional pollution sources. None were found, although fuel tank vents were plugged as a precaution.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Callaway Departs

08/17:
Cason J. Callaway departed Fraser Shipyards Aug. 15 after undergoing what appeared to be repairs involving its unloading system. On Aug. 14, wooden cribbing had been placed on deck to support its unloading boom.

Reported by: Al Miller




New Tug Arrives

08/17:
One of the two new tugs ordered in June 1997 by the Ocean Group from their own shipyard at Ile aux Coudres, namely Ocean Industries arrived in Montreal at the end of her delivery trip on August 13. She had been launched on July 18 and christened OCEAN INTREPIDE. She has a bollard pull of 48 metric tons, has a length of 24.39 m. and is a twin-screw Z-Drive tug. She underwent brief sea-trials on August 14 and I believe her first job was the following day when she undocked the big tanker Torm Alice with the help of her fleetmate Ocean Golf. The second one will be delivered before the end of the year and will be named Ocean Jupiter. A third one has just been ordered from the same shipyard founded in 1960. It is about 65 miles downstream from Quebec City.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




New Buoy Tender Launched

08/17:
The launch of the latest Keeper Class coastal buoy tender, the U.S.C.G.C. JOSHUA APPLEBY (WLM 556) took place on Saturday August 8, in Marinette, WI. The WLM 555, JAMES RANKIN was still at the yard being readied for her departure probably by the end of this month. The next WLM, U.S.C.G.C. FRANK DREW was still in the shed at the yard. Marinette expects to launch her yet this year.

She was launched with a spectacular splash. The launch can be seen and photographed from the Michigan side of the river. The view from the shipyard is equally interesting. Marinette will also launch the WLB 205, U.S.C.G.C. WALNUT before the end of the year.

Reported by: Grassey




Repairs Complete on Boland

08/16:
The Boland sailed on Thursday morning at 11:30 am and headed for the Morton Salt dock a Fairport Harbor, then Lackawanna.

Reported by: J Hufstader




Transfers first trip Update

08/16:
A call to the ULS update line has the Canadian Transfer departing Port Weller for sea trials on Tuesday the 18th. After a few false starts it would be great to finally see her hit the waves.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski



Roy A. Jodrey update

08/16:
Operations to recover drums of petroleum from the Roy A. Jodrey in Alexandria Bay, N.Y., were delayed the morning of 13 Aug. until insurance issues between Algoma Central Corp. and McKeil Marine Ltd. were resolved, the U.S. Coast Guard said. As of the afternoon of 13 Aug., four of eight drums had been recovered, Coast Guard observers said. Liquid leaking from the drums appears to be lubrication oil. Operations are expected to continue until 16 Aug.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Sykes Correction

08/16:
Regarding the grounding of the Wilfred Sykes reported on the 13th, it has been brought to my attention that the grounding likely took place near Grand Haven, contrary to previous information.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - August 18

CANADIAN ENTERPRISE was float launched on August 18, 1979.

On August 18, 1972, $50,000 in bottom damage occurred when the CHAMPLAIN (3) hit an obstruction in the Trenton Channel, on the lower Detroit River.

The KINSMAN ENTERPRISE (1) was launched August 18, 1906 as a) NORMAN B. REAM for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH.

On 18 August 1907, KATE WHITE (wooden propeller steam tug, 62'/28GT, built at Erie, PA in 1885 as a yacht) sank near the harbor entrance at Fairport, OH.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - August 15

The JOSEPH L. BLOCK sailed light on her maiden voyage from the Bay Ship Building Co., Sturgeon Bay, WI to load 32,600 long tons of taconite ore pellets at Escanaba, MI for delivery to Indiana Harbor, IN on August 15, 1976.

The OTTERCLIFFE HALL, the last "straight deck" Great Lakes bulk freighter built with a pilot house forward was bare boat chartered to Misener Transportation Ltd. on August 15, 1983.

Under threat of a strike on August 15, 1978, the GEORGE A. STINSON was towed out of Lorain before her completion by six tugs and was taken to Detroit's Nicholson's Terminal & Dock to finish her fit-out.

The LEON FALK, JR. was laid up for the last time August 15, 1980 at the Great Lakes Engineering Work's old slip at River Rouge, MI.

On August 15, 1985 the MENIHEK LAKE sailed under her own power to Quebec City (from there by tug), the first leg of her journey to the cutter torch in Spain.

J.P. MORGAN, JR. arrived in tow of Hannah Marine's tug DARYL C. HANNAH at Buffalo, NY on August 15th where she was delayed until she could obtain clearance to transit the Welland Canal. Permission to pass down the Canal was refused because of the MORGAN, JR.'s improper condition after a collision with the 480 foot Interlake steamer CRETE on June 23, 1948 in dense fog off Devils Island, in the Apostle Islands, on Lake Superior.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




More on the Markborg

08/14:
On 5 Aug., the Markborg (Dutch-registry, 9,200-dwt, 134-meter/441-foot dry cargo ship built in 1996, operated by Wagenborg Shipping B.V.) hit an arresting cable and fendering mechanism in the Snell Lock at Massena, N.Y., while downbound. Repairs were completed to the lock about 1100 6 Aug. A steering control wire aboard the ship broke and a wire for controlling propeller pitch in the remote propulsion control box became loose. After repairs at the lock's upper wall, the Markborg was cleared to sail.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Roy A. Jodrey update

08/14:
The first of eight drums aboard the Roy A. Jodrey that are suspected of leaking oil into Alexandria Bay, N.Y., was recovered the afternoon of 12 Aug.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - August 14

Sea trials for the HENRY FORD II took place on August 14, 1924 and shortly after she left on her maiden voyage with coal from Toledo, OH to Duluth, MN and returned with iron ore to the Ford Rouge Plant at Dearborn.

Having been sold for scrap, the GOVERNOR MILLER was towed down the Soo Locks on August 14, 1980 for Milwaukee, WI to load scrap.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Transfers first trip

08/12:
The Canadian Transfer is scheduled for sea trials Friday (August 14), and is planning to load her first cargo, Ontario grain, at Hamilton on the weekend, bound for Buffalo, NY.

Long terms plans are to work the ship up into the upper lakes, into the stone/iron ore/aggregates trade.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit.



Wilfred Sykes grounds

08/13:
(See correction 8/16) The Wilfred Sykes ran aground the afternoon of 11 Aug. in the Grand River at Grand River, Mich. The ship reportedly maneuvered to avoid a vessel partially blocking the channel and grounded on soft mud. The Wilfred Sykes refloated itself with no reported damage.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Saltie News

08/13:
Vessels that had visited the Seaway/Great Lakes over the years were seen on the East coast. At Norfolk, Va, there was the tanker MARINOR undergoing engine repairs at Norfolk SB & DD. In the Port of Norfolk, there was the dredge NORTHERLY ISLAND. Her port of registry is Cleveland, OH. At the navy base were several tugs built in the Great Lakes. Kingston, N.Y. had the dutch flag sailing ship HALF MOON open to visitors. She was seen in several Great Lakes ports in June and July 1994.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Transfers first trip Update

08/18:
The Canadian Transfer cleared Lock 1 at 10:30 this morning and is heading towards Hamilton. She appears to be making very good time. The weather was poor so the pictures may not be very good.

Reported by: Roger Tottman



Twin Ports Report

08/18:
After a brief summer slowdown, the Twin Ports grain trade has picked up the pace again. Rail traffic to the elevators remains brisk. On Aug. 18, four salties were loading grain: Pintail at Peavey, Lake Champlain at AGP, Solta at Harvest States and Stefania I at Cargill. Novicki I is anchored on Lake Superior. Due in later in the day is Kinsman Independent for Harvest States.

Algocape was in Duluth to unload at St. Lawrence Cement. Alpena paid another call to the Huron Cement terminals in Superior and Duluth. The Alpena seems to be the ports' regular ILM vessel these days, with only rare visits from the once common J.A.W. Iglehart.

Reported by: Al Miller




Roy A. Jodrey Dive Completed

08/18:
Work to salvage eight drums of petroleum from the Roy A. Jodrey in Alexandria Bay, N.Y., were completed the night of 14 Aug., the U.S. Coast Guard has announced. They are thought to contain a total of 1,520 liters/400 gallons of machine and lubricating oil. On 15 Aug., divers did a survey of the ship looking for additional pollution sources. None were found, although fuel tank vents were plugged as a precaution.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Callaway Departs

08/17:
Cason J. Callaway departed Fraser Shipyards Aug. 15 after undergoing what appeared to be repairs involving its unloading system. On Aug. 14, wooden cribbing had been placed on deck to support its unloading boom.

Reported by: Al Miller




New Tug Arrives

08/17:
One of the two new tugs ordered in June 1997 by the Ocean Group from their own shipyard at Ile aux Coudres, namely Ocean Industries arrived in Montreal at the end of her delivery trip on August 13. She had been launched on July 18 and christened OCEAN INTREPIDE. She has a bollard pull of 48 metric tons, has a length of 24.39 m. and is a twin-screw Z-Drive tug. She underwent brief sea-trials on August 14 and I believe her first job was the following day when she undocked the big tanker Torm Alice with the help of her fleetmate Ocean Golf. The second one will be delivered before the end of the year and will be named Ocean Jupiter. A third one has just been ordered from the same shipyard founded in 1960. It is about 65 miles downstream from Quebec City.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




New Buoy Tender Launched

08/17:
The launch of the latest Keeper Class coastal buoy tender, the U.S.C.G.C. JOSHUA APPLEBY (WLM 556) took place on Saturday August 8, in Marinette, WI. The WLM 555, JAMES RANKIN was still at the yard being readied for her departure probably by the end of this month. The next WLM, U.S.C.G.C. FRANK DREW was still in the shed at the yard. Marinette expects to launch her yet this year.

She was launched with a spectacular splash. The launch can be seen and photographed from the Michigan side of the river. The view from the shipyard is equally interesting. Marinette will also launch the WLB 205, U.S.C.G.C. WALNUT before the end of the year.

Reported by: Grassey




Today in Great Lakes History - August 17

On 17 August 1921, CONDOR (wooden schooner-barge, 193'/633GC, built in 1888 at Montreal, Quebec) was bound for Montreal when she went aground in a storm on the south side of Traverse Point, 30 miles WSW of Kingston, Ontario. Her remains are reportedly still visible ashore.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Repairs Complete on Boland

08/16:
The Boland sailed on Thursday morning at 11:30 am and headed for the Morton Salt dock a Fairport Harbor, then Lackawanna.

Reported by: J Hufstader




Transfers first trip Update

08/16:
A call to the ULS update line has the Canadian Transfer departing Port Weller for sea trials on Tuesday the 18th. After a few false starts it would be great to finally see her hit the waves.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski



Roy A. Jodrey update

08/16:
Operations to recover drums of petroleum from the Roy A. Jodrey in Alexandria Bay, N.Y., were delayed the morning of 13 Aug. until insurance issues between Algoma Central Corp. and McKeil Marine Ltd. were resolved, the U.S. Coast Guard said. As of the afternoon of 13 Aug., four of eight drums had been recovered, Coast Guard observers said. Liquid leaking from the drums appears to be lubrication oil. Operations are expected to continue until 16 Aug.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Sykes Correction

08/16:
Regarding the grounding of the Wilfred Sykes reported on the 13th, it has been brought to my attention that the grounding likely took place near Grand Haven, contrary to previous information.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - August 16

On 16 August, 1890, ANNIE WATT (wooden propeller, passenger and package freight "packet", 75'/62GC, built in 1884 at Lion's Head, Ontario) collided with the ship ALDERSON and sank. off of Gunn Point, Ontario. Just the previous year (8 November 1889), ANNIE WATT had burned and been declared total loss, but she was rebuilt.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - August 15

The JOSEPH L. BLOCK sailed light on her maiden voyage from the Bay Ship Building Co., Sturgeon Bay, WI to load 32,600 long tons of taconite ore pellets at Escanaba, MI for delivery to Indiana Harbor, IN on August 15, 1976.

The OTTERCLIFFE HALL, the last "straight deck" Great Lakes bulk freighter built with a pilot house forward was bare boat chartered to Misener Transportation Ltd. on August 15, 1983.

Under threat of a strike on August 15, 1978, the GEORGE A. STINSON was towed out of Lorain before her completion by six tugs and was taken to Detroit's Nicholson's Terminal & Dock to finish her fit-out.

The LEON FALK, JR. was laid up for the last time August 15, 1980 at the Great Lakes Engineering Work's old slip at River Rouge, MI.

On August 15, 1985 the MENIHEK LAKE sailed under her own power to Quebec City (from there by tug), the first leg of her journey to the cutter torch in Spain.

J.P. MORGAN, JR. arrived in tow of Hannah Marine's tug DARYL C. HANNAH at Buffalo, NY on August 15th where she was delayed until she could obtain clearance to transit the Welland Canal. Permission to pass down the Canal was refused because of the MORGAN, JR.'s improper condition after a collision with the 480 foot Interlake steamer CRETE on June 23, 1948 in dense fog off Devils Island, in the Apostle Islands, on Lake Superior.

On 15 August 1856, WELLAND (sidewheel steamer, wood, passenger & package freight, 145'/300T, built 1853 at St. Catharine's, Ontario) burned to a total loss at her dock. at Port Dalhousie, Ontario. She was owned by Port Dalhousie and Thorold Railroad Co.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




More on the Markborg

08/14:
On 5 Aug., the Markborg (Dutch-registry, 9,200-dwt, 134-meter/441-foot dry cargo ship built in 1996, operated by Wagenborg Shipping B.V.) hit an arresting cable and fendering mechanism in the Snell Lock at Massena, N.Y., while downbound. Repairs were completed to the lock about 1100 6 Aug. A steering control wire aboard the ship broke and a wire for controlling propeller pitch in the remote propulsion control box became loose. After repairs at the lock's upper wall, the Markborg was cleared to sail.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Roy A. Jodrey update

08/14:
The first of eight drums aboard the Roy A. Jodrey that are suspected of leaking oil into Alexandria Bay, N.Y., was recovered the afternoon of 12 Aug.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - August 14

Sea trials for the HENRY FORD II took place on August 14, 1924 and shortly after she left on her maiden voyage with coal from Toledo, OH to Duluth, MN and returned with iron ore to the Ford Rouge Plant at Dearborn.

Having been sold for scrap, the GOVERNOR MILLER was towed down the Soo Locks on August 14, 1980 for Milwaukee, WI to load scrap.

On 14 August 1873, CHESTER B. JONES (3-mast, wooden schooner, 167'/493GT) was launched at E. Saginaw, MI. She was built by Chesley Wheeler. The spars and top hamper ordered for her were broken in a log jam, so the 3-master received her spars at Buffalo, NY on her first trip.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Transfers first trip

08/12:
The Canadian Transfer is scheduled for sea trials Friday (August 14), and is planning to load her first cargo, Ontario grain, at Hamilton on the weekend, bound for Buffalo, NY.

Long terms plans are to work the ship up into the upper lakes, into the stone/iron ore/aggregates trade.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit.



Wilfred Sykes grounds

08/13:
(See correction 8/16) The Wilfred Sykes ran aground the afternoon of 11 Aug. in the Grand River at Grand River, Mich. The ship reportedly maneuvered to avoid a vessel partially blocking the channel and grounded on soft mud. The Wilfred Sykes refloated itself with no reported damage.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Saltie News

08/13:
Vessels that had visited the Seaway/Great Lakes over the years were seen on the East coast. At Norfolk, Va, there was the tanker MARINOR undergoing engine repairs at Norfolk SB & DD. In the Port of Norfolk, there was the dredge NORTHERLY ISLAND. Her port of registry is Cleveland, OH. At the navy base were several tugs built in the Great Lakes. Kingston, N.Y. had the dutch flag sailing ship HALF MOON open to visitors. She was seen in several Great Lakes ports in June and July 1994.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Today in Great Lakes History - August 13

Operated by a crew of retired Hanna captains, chief engineers and executives, the GEORGE M. HUMPHREY departed Great Lakes Engineering Works under her own power on August 13, 1986 for Lauzon, Que. The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY cleared Lauzon September 3rd with the former Hanna steamer PAUL H. CARNAHAN in tow of the Dutch tug SMIT LLOYD 109. The tow locked through the Panama Canal,September 27th through 30th, and arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan December 10, 1986 completing a trip of over 14,000 miles. The HUMPHREY was scrapped in 1987 by Shiong Yek Steel Corp.

On 13 August 1899, H. G. CLEVELAND (wooden schooner, 137'/264T, built in 1867 at Black River, OH) sank with a full load of limestone, 7 miles from the Cleveland harbor entrance.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Transfers first trip

08/12:
The Canadian Transfer is scheduled for sea trials Friday (August 14), and is planning to load her first cargo, Ontario grain, at Hamilton on the weekend, bound for Buffalo, NY.

Long terms plans are to work the ship up into the upper lakes, into the stone/iron ore/aggregates trade.

Reported by: Marine Historical Society of Detroit.




Canadian Miner stops above Lock 8 for repairs

08/12:
Upper Lakes Group Canadian Miner stopped above Lock 8 on Sunday for repairs to her air conditioning. The day worker told me that it was over 100 degrees f in his room while they were docked at the ore dock in Hamilton the previous day. The boat was enroute back to Thunder Bay for another load of grain for St Lawrence Ports.

Reported by: J J Van Volkenburg




Welland Canal Report

08/12:
There has been a lot of activity aboard the newest ULS self-unloader, Canadian Transfer. Yesterday tests on her unloading system were undertaken and exhaust was noticed coming from the smokestack. All of her flags are flying, the painting appears to be complete, nearly all of the drydock's equipment has been removed and yesterday evening she started taking on ballast water. Her departure must be coming any day now. Check the Welland Canal passages for daily updates.

Another vessel which has spent time at Port Weller Drydocks is preparing to depart likely tomorrow. The Liberian registered Aptmariner (see Welland Canal transits for picture) is due to be pulled from the shallow dock by the tugs James E. McGrath, Argue Martin and Atomic. She was in for repairs since July 6th, to damage that was sustained in 1 possibly 2 groundings in the St. Lawrence River late in June. Bow plates on both sides, internal ribs and her lower forepeak were badly bent out of shape and required complete replacement. She is due out during the morning of the 12th and will secure below lock 2 to take on ballast water for a few hours. She is then apparently heading for Duluth to load a cargo for overseas.

On August 10th, the 143 ft tug, Rosa M. passed downbound through the canal destined for the east coast. She was the former Carl William Selvick and this was her last voyage through the local waterway since her new owners intend to use her around the southern states. She was built in 1943 as A.T.A. 172 by Gulfport Boiler & Welding Works Inc., in Port Arthur, Texas, and sailed from then until 1947 for the United States Department of the Navy. In '47 she was purchased by the Panama Canal Railroad Co., renamed Taboga and put to work assisting merchant ships through the Panama Canal. In 1971 Keith Malcolm purchased the tug and brought her to the lakes under the same name however a sale to Hannah Marine Corp in 1974 saw the name change to Daryl C. Hannah (1). In 1984, Hannah shortened her name to simply Daryl C. and in 1988 when the Selvick Marine Towing Corp. bought her the name changed to Carl William Selvick. One of the crew members aboard said that they are heading for Charleston, South Carolina, for drydocking and repairs before heading onwards to San Diego, California. Following the completion of work there she will be returning to Miami, Florida for other contracts.

Reported by: Jeff Cameron




Rumor Mill update

08/12:
Last week the rumor mill had turned up that the Vandoc was sold.

A call to N.M. Paterson & Sons proves this rumor wrong. Word from the company is: "The VANDOC has not been sold nor are any plans to do so. We continue to look for business opportunities for this vessel as the hull and machinery still have considerable life left."




Today in Great Lakes History - August 12

The C&O carferry S.S. Spartan, in a heavy fog while inbound from Kewanee on the morning of August 12, 1976, struck rocks at the entrance to the Ludington harbor. She suffered severe damage to about 120 feet of her bottom plating. She was taken to Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay on August 18th for repairs. There were no injuries as a result of this incident.

The TOM M. GIRDLER was christened August 12, 1951, she was the first of the C4 conversions.

The MAUNALOA II was launched August 12, 1899

The RIDGETOWN (a WILLIAM E. COREY) sailed from Chicago on her maiden voyage August 12, 1905 bound for Duluth, MN to load iron ore.

Data from: Max S. Hanley, Jody L. Aho , Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

08/11:
Algocen, an infrequent visitor to the Twin Ports, has been in town the past several days to unload cement at St. Lawrence Cement, then to load grain at Peavey Connors Point grain elevator.

The slowdown in summer grain traffic seems to have arrived a few weeks later than usual this year. Nonetheless, loading grain Aug. 10 along with Algocen is Balaban 1 at Harvest States berth 2. Anchored out on the lake is Spring Laker, waiting for Peavey.

Familiar names in unusual places Aug. 9 and 10 include Fred R. White Jr. loading at the DMIR ore dock in Duluth and John G. Munson loading at Silver Bay.

Reported by: Al Miller




Boland in for Repairs Update

08/11:
Reports from Toledo have the crew on the John J. Boland reporting back on board at 0800 Thursday August 13th.

She tied up at the C&O dock on the 6th for repairs to her self-unloading system.

Reported by: J Hufstader




Badger Skips Run

08/11:
The Lake Michigan Carferry S.S. Badger has fallen behind schedule due to a bad piston. The decision has been made to skip the Tuesday night run this week to diagnose and fix the problem.

Reported by: Max S. Hanley




Stone Trade Impacted By Fire

08/11:
Shipments of limestone and gypsum on the Great Lakes totaled 4.7 million net tons in July, a decrease of 5.3 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. The decrease is the result of a fire that impacted processing operations at Michigan Limestone (Rogers City, MI), one of the largest stone-shipping operations on the Lakes.

For the season, the Lakes stone trade is approaching 19 million tons, an increase of 7.9 percent compared to the same point in the benchmark 1997 shipping season. During 1997, stone shipments set their fourth consecutive post-recession record - 39.1 million tons.

Reported by: Lake Carriers'Association




July Total Doesn't Mar Strong Season For Lake Erie Coal

08/11:
Coal shipments from Lake Erie ports totaled 2.3 million tons in July, a decrease of 9.3 percent compared to a year ago. However, for the season, the Lake Erie coal trade stands at 10.3 million tons, an increase of 11 percent over 1997.

Shipments by port were:

Ashtabula - 798,764
Conneaut - 527,942
Sandusky - 429,848
Toledo - 565,946

Reported by: Lake Carriers'Association




Today in Great Lakes History - August 11

The H.M. GRIFFITH was the first self-unloader to unload grain at Robin Hood's new hopper unloading facility at Port Colborne, Ont on August 11, 1987.

On August 11, 1977 the THOMAS LAMONT was the first vessel to take on fuel at Shell's new fuel dock at Sarnia, Ont. The dock's fueling rate was 60 to 70,000 gallons per minute and was built to accommodate one-thousand footers.

Opening ceremonies for the METEOR (2) museum ship were held on August 11, 1973 with the President of Cleveland Tankers present whose company had donated the ship. This historically unique ship was enshrined into the National Maritime Hall of Fame.

The T.W. ROBINSON and US.265808 (former BENSON FORD (2) departed Quebec City on August 11, 1987 along with US.265808 (former BENSON FORD (2) in tow of the Polish tug JANTAR bound for Recife where they arrived on September 22, 1987. Scrapping began the next month in October.

On 11 August 1862, B.F. BRUCE (wooden propeller passenger steamer, 110'/169T, built in 1852 at Buffalo as a tug) was carrying staves when she caught fire a few miles off Port Stanley, Ontario in Lake Erie. She was run to the beach, where she burned to a total loss with no loss of life. Arson was suspected. She had been rebuilt from a tug to this small passenger steamer the winter before her loss.

Data from: Jody L. Aho , Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - August 10

On August 10, 1952, the Arthur M. Anderson entered service. Exactly fourteen years later, on August 10, 1966, the vessel's namesake, Arthur Marvin Anderson, passed away.

On August 10, 1969, the Edmund Fitzgerald set the last of many cargo records it set during the 1960s. The Fitzgerald loaded 27,402 gross tons of taconite pellets at Silver Bay on this date. This record was broken by the Fitzgerald's sister ship, the Arthur B. Homer, during the 1970 shipping season.

On 10 August 1937, B.H. BECKER (steel tug, 19T, built in 1932 at Marine City, MI) foundered in heavy seas, 9 miles north of Oscoda, MI.

Data from: Jody L. Aho , Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Snell Lock repairs complete

08/09:
Repairs were completed about 1100 6 Aug. to the Snell Lock at Massena, N.Y., after it was hit by the Markborg (Dutch-registry 9,200-dwt, 134-meter/441-foot dry cargo ship built in 1996, operated by Wagenborg Shipping B.V.). A steering control wire broke and a wire for controlling propeller pitch in the remote propulsion control box became loose. After repairs at the lock's upper wall, the Markborg was cleared to sail downbound.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





More on Roy A. Jodrey

08/09:
A survey by divers of Donjon Marine Co. Inc. of the stern of the Roy A. Jodrey in Alexandria Bay, N.Y., has located eight drums in a damaged rack on the upper deck along the port side against the stack.

Chief David Roman of the Coast Guard Marine Safety Office in Massena, N.Y. said only one of the 55 gallon tanks appear to be leaking but all of the drums will be removed at the expense of the owner of the JODREY, Algoma Central. They have accepted responsibility and a plan for removal has been requested from them by the Coast Guard. It is anticipated that the drums can be removed early next week.

Diving began after oil sheens were seen on the St. Lawrence River during July. The Roy A. Jodrey, a 195.2-meter/640.5-foot Canadian-registry motor bulk carrier operated by Algoma Central Railway, sank on 21 Nov., 1974, after hitting Pullman Shoal near Wellesley Island. It was built in 1965 by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd. at Collingwood, Ontario, and later broke in half. The vessel was carrying 20,050 gross tons of iron ore pellets and 190,000 liters/50,000 gallons of petroleum for its own use. All 29 crew were rescued. The ship was sailing from Seven Islands, Quebec, to Detroit.

Reported by: Steve Schultz and Joan Baldwin




Free Cruises on the Saginaw River

08/09:
It was reported in the Friday, August 7th Bay City Times that free cruises are set to be offered on the Princess, a former ohio ferry boat [one of Millers ] now crowned Princess Wenonah and calling Bay city her home port The ferry boat arrived in Bay City this summer and beginning on Monday will offer free tours of the river. The Princess Wenonah already has been hosting events such as wedding receptions and private parties.

Princess Wenonah co-owners Bill Fournier and Scott McIntyre are offering the free, two hour cruises Monday thru Friday starting at 10 a.m., shoving off from at the southeast corner of Veterans Memorial Bridge near the F. P. Horak Co. parking lot 401 Saginaw St.

The free cruises will be available until Labor Day. the vessel has room for 254 people and it's first come , first served. The cruises are sponsored by mortgage America, The Bay City Times, Saginaw Bay Underwriters and F.P. Horak. Fournier and McIntyer don't know if the cruises will be offered next year.

Tom Bork a local historian will narate the cruises and offer facts about the former DeFoe Shipbuilding Co and downtown Wenonah Park and other interesting facts of the area.

Reported by: Dan Maus




Changes in services to Montreal

08/09:
Canada Maritime Services Ltd. and Orient Overseas Container Line have made vessel changes to services calling Montreal. Canada Maritime Services is replacing the Canmar Courage (Bermudan-registry 34,330-dwt, 2,200-TEU containership built in 1996) and the Canmar Fortune (Bermudan-registry 34,330-dwt, 2,200-TEU containership built in 1995) with the Canmar Honour and the Canmar Pride, two 2,800-TEU containerships built in South Korea this year by Daewoo, on its Northern Service Route 1. Calls are made at Thamesport, England; Antwerp, Belgium; Le Havre, France; and Montreal. The Canmar Courage and the Canmar Fortune will be placed on Northern Service Route 2, which calls at Montreal, Hamburg, Germany and Antwerp. They will in turn replace two 1,800-TEU ships. Meanwhile, O.O.C.L. will replace the OOCL Canada (Hong Kong-registry 33,659-dwt, 2,200-TEU containership built in 1996) on Northern Service Route 1 with the OOCL Belgium of 2,800 TEUs. The route is operated with Canada Maritime Services. The OOCL Canada will shift to Canada Maritime Services' Northern Service Route 2.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Correction - Canadian Transfer's first trip

08/09:
Unfortunately the report concerning Canadian Transfer's first trip from Hamilton to Buffalo Friday was in error. As of 24:00 on the 8th, she was still secured alongside Port Weller Drydock's long fitout wall. The Upper Lakes flag and the Seaway Self-Unloaders flag are now both flying atop her masts but as yet there is no activity that would indicate her impending departure.

Reported by: Jeff Cameron




Today in Great Lakes History - August 09

The keel was laid for the INDIANA HARBOR on August 9, 1978.

The HAMILDOC (3) was christened on August 9, 1963.

The G.A. TOMLINSON (1) entered service August 9, 1909.

The SHAUGHNESSY with the former CSL steamer ASHCROFT in tow of the Polish tug JANTAR arrived in Castellon, Spain for scrapping in 1969.

On August 9, 1989 the tug FAIRPLAY IX departed Sorel with the FORT CHAMBLY and NIPIGON BAY in tandem tow bound for Aliaga, Turkey for scrapping.

On the night of August 9, 1865, METEOR met her running mate, the propellor PEWABIC, off Thunder Bay on Lake Huron around 9:00 p.m. As the two approached, somehow METEOR sheered and struck her sister, sinking the PEWABIC within minutes in 180 feet of water. About one hundred twenty-five people went down with her, and 86 others were saved.

On 9 August 1850, CHAUTAUQUE (wooden sidewheel steamer, 124'/162T, built in 1839 at Buffalo, NY) caught fire in the St. Clair River and burned to a total loss. In previous years she had been driven ashore (1844) and sank twice – once in 1846 and again in 1848. In September 1846, she made the newspaper by purposely ramming a schooner which blocked her path while she was attempting to leave the harbor at Monroe, MI.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Boland in for repairs

08/08:
On Thursday the John J. Boland headed into Toledo for repairs to the bucket line of her self-unloading system. She ordered one tug to assist her into the C&O dock that evening around 1700. According to a reports she could be out of commission for six to ten days.

Reported by: J Hufstader




More on the Algowest repairs

08/08:
Reports from Sarnia estimate that the ALGOWEST's engine repair will keep her at the Government dock until the 16th of this month.

Reported by: Andrew Severson




Cause of OIl Slick in Seaway may be due to Tampering with Wreck

08/08:
An oil sheen on the St. Lawrence River may be caused by souvenir-seekers tampering with oil-filled equiptment on the sunken vessel, ROY A.JODREY. The last of three dives by the company hired by the Coast Guard to examine the vessel for oil leaks was to be made yesterday. The diving operation near Alexandria Bay, N.Y. will cost about $165,000.

According to Lt.Cmdr Kevin Frost of the Coast Guard Marine Safety Office, Buffalo, N.Y., the accessible areas of the ship were found to be in excellent condition. Although the fuel tanks were not closely examined, he said that it is unlikely that they are leaking given the ship's overall condition. He feels "a likely scenario is divers in the spring and summer going down and taking stuff off the ship. A lot of the bridge is ramsacked in an area where there are numerous instruments that contain oil". One theory is that souvenir-hunters may have cut fuel lines to free the equiptment.

The ship is presently resting in a depth of about 250 feet. The first of several light oil sheens was reported on July 9th, but there has been no reports of oil in the vacinity of the sunken ship for about 2 weeks/ The rainbow sheen was a "long silvery wispy stuff" which indicates that the fuel is old according to Lt.Cmdr Frost.

Steven D.Hardy, commander of the Buffalo Office said if the vessel is leaking oil, the owner, Algoma Central will become a party to the cleanup.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




U.S.S. Samuel Eliot Morrison in Port Huron

08/08:
The U.S.S. Samuel Eliot arrived in Port Huron yesterday evening at 1930 at the Seaway Terminal, assited by the tug William C. Selvick. She drew quite a crowd along the river when she came down out of the lake. She will be at the Seaway Terminal through Sunday and open for tours.

Reported by: Andrew Severson




Today in Great Lakes History - August 08

The JAMES R. BARKER became the longest vessel on the Great Lakes when it entered service on August 8, 1976. It held at least a tie for this honor until the Paul R. Tregurtha entered service on May 10, 1981.The BARKER's deckhouse had been built at AmShip's Chicago yard and was transported in sections to Lorain on the deck of the steamer GEORGE D. GOBLE.

The BUFFALO was christened August 8, 1978

The E.B. BARBER along with the motor vessel SAGINAW BAY arrived August 8, 1985 under tow in Vigo, Spain. Demolition began on August 9, 1985 by Miguel Martins Periera at Guixar-Vigo.

The Soo River Company was forced into receivership on August 8, 1982.

On 8 August 1887, CITY OF ASHLAND (wooden sidewheel tug, 90'/85GT, built in 1883 at Ashland, WI) was towing a log raft near Washburn, WI in Lake Superior. Fire broke out near the boilers and quickly cut off the crew from the lifeboat. They jumped overboard and all but 1 or 2 were picked up by local tugs. The burned hull sank soon afterward.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody L. Aho , Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Repairs to Start Today

08/07:
Algowest's damaged diesel engine will be repaired starting today (Friday) in Sarnia. No word on why one of her engines failed

Reported by: D. Ocean




Rumor Mill

08/07:
Please note: this rumor was found to be untrue 8/11

The rumor mill has turned up the Vandoc as being sold to Black Creek Shipping and will be convereted to a self unloader to sail as a fleetmate to Cuyahoga.

Reported by: R. LeLievre




U.S.C.G.C. Abbie Burgess commissioned

08/07:
The U.S. Coast Guard's Ida Lewis-class Coastal Buoy Tender U.S.C.G.C. Abbie Burgess (WLM 553) was commissioned at Coast Guard Station Rockland, Maine, at 1000 31 July. The tender will work between Pemaquid Point, Maine, and the Canadian border under the command of Chief Warrant Officer Vernon Shay of Cushing, Maine. Its sponsor was Linda Trent, wife of Rick Trent, the former Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard.

WLM 553 is named for the daughter of the lighthouse keeper at Matinicus Island Light in Maine. In 1856, at the age of 14, she tended the twin lights, her ill mother and four younger siblings for more than a month while her father was kept ashore by storms.

The tender was built by Marinette Marine Corp. in Marinette, Wis., and launched on 1 April, 1997.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Algoma Central Second Quarter Results

08/07:
Net income for the six months ended June 30, 1998 decreased by $1,174,000 from $7,045,000 in 1997 to $5,871,000 in 1998. Excluding a non-recurring gain in 1997 of $1,278,000 on the sale of certain lands, net income in 1998 to June 30 increased by $104,000 or $0.03 per share when compared to the same period in 1997.

Capital asset purchases for the three months ended June 30,1998 totalled $22,584,000. Included in this are amounts spent on the conversion of the M/V Algowest from a bulker to a self-unloading vessel, various vessel modernization projects, and our share of additions to ocean-going vessels by Marbulk Canada Inc. The Algowest conversion was completed and the vessel returned to service in July 1998.

On July 10, 1998 the Board of Directors declared a dividend of $0.25 per common share payable on Tuesday, September 1, 1998 to shareholders of record on August 18, 1998.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




Farnquist to speak in Milwaukee

08/07:
Thomas L. Farnquist, founder and director of the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum in Whitefish Point, Mich., will speak about the shipwreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald at 1900 10 Sept. at the Wisconsin Lake Schooner Education Association, 500 N. Harbor Dr. in Milwaukee. Farnquist has led three expeditions to the shipwreck including one that recovered the ship's bell.In addition, he has received Emmy Awards for his documentaries "Fitzgerald" and "Graveyard of the Great Lakes." The cost is $10 for members of the association and $15 for non-members. Telepone 414-276-7700 for reservations.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Apostle Islands lighthouse tours

08/07:
The third annual Apostle Islands Lighthouse Celebration will be held in Wisconsin's Apostle Islands from 9 to 16 Sept. Tours of the islands' seven lighthouses will be available and vessels will carry passengers between the lights. For information, contact the Keeper of the Light gift store at P.O. Box 990, 19 Front St., Bayfield, Wis., 54814; telephone 800-779-4487; or view (www.apostleisland.com).

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





SMET Heading For Record Season

08/07:
Coal loadings at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wis., totaled 1,915,979 net tons in July, an increase of 3.8 percent compared to last year. For the season, shipments of western, low-sulfur coal from SMET stand at 7.4 million tons, an increase of 13 percent compared to last year. The dock reports having booked 16 million tons for 1998, a total that will constitute a new record for the facility.

Reported by: Lake Carriers'Association




USX to pay $54.9 mln

08/07:
WASHINGTON, The biggest U.S. steelmaker, has agreed to pay $30 million to clean up the Grand Calumet River in Indiana as part of a $54.9 million environmental settlement, the U.S. Justice Department said on Thursday.

Federal and state authorities had accused USX of illegally discharging waste water contaminated with PCB's, heavy metals, oil and grease, benzene and other polluting substances that kill fish and harm migratory birds, the department said.

The company agreed to pay $30 million to clean up the river, $22 million on future pollution abatement at the plant and a $2.9 million civil penalty as part of two consent agreements to settle the charges, the department said.

The USX plant in Gary, Ind., is the largest steel making plant in the United States. The Pittsburgh-based company, formerly known as US Steel, agreed to remove and dispose of nearly 700,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediments from five miles of the river. It has five years to do the job, the Justice Department said.

The agency also said that as part of the cleanup, the company must restore 32 acres of wetlands next to the river and construct a disposal facility for contaminated sediments.

The department said the company also agreed to buy 139 acres of property for the National Park Service in order to expand a wildlife habitat along the souther shore of Lake Michigan. It agreed to acquire a separate 77 acres for the State of Indiana to enhance wildlife habitat and provide more access to the river for fishermen, the department said.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




"Dual-fuel" concept supported

08/07:
The International Maritime Organization's Safety of Navigation Subcommittee has recommended that raster chart display systems be used on electronic chart display equipment. The subcommittee in effect has approved the "dual-fuel" concept, which allows for raster and vector information. Raster chartes are digital copies of conventional chartes and vector, or electronic navigational charts, allows information to be identified and viewed separately. Extensive raster charts are available but vector information from official data is not widespread. By using both, charts can be electronically updated more easily. In practice, the "dual-fuel" concept allows for a navigational system to automaticaly select sections of vector data where available and revert to raster for other areas. However, the subcommittee approval calls for paper charts to be carried when equipment is operated only in raster mode. The subcommittee's recommendation will be submitted to to the Maritime Safety Committee in December.

Separately, the first direct chart reader for digital navigational charts has been demonstrated by Sperry Marine and the U.S. National Imagery & Mapping Agency.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Second quarter casualties

08/07:
The Institute of London Underwriters has announced that 18 vessels of 500 gross tons or more were lost in the second quarter of this year, down from 24 in the first quarter. The 42 ships accouned for 210,673 gross tons and included 18 total losses with 11 general cargo vessels, two bulk carrirs and a liquefied gas carrier. As of 30 June, 1997, 48 ships had been lost of 376,502 gross tons. In the first six months of this year, 159 people were killed compared to 142 in the same period of 1997. In the first three months of 1998, 113 people were killed. It is believed that as many as 1,300 people were killed in the first six months through losses of vessels that are not always clearly documented, such as small vessels with illegal migrants. Fishing accidents killed 61 people.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Norasia Samantha sets record

08/07:
Norasia Shipping Services S.A. has set a new record for completing a round-trip voyage between northern Europe and Montreal in 12 days and six hours. The Norasia Samantha, 1,400-TEU containership built this year by Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft AG in Kiel, Germany, broke the record of 7.5 days between northern Europe and Montreal as part of the Canada-Europe Express. It averaged more than 25 knots and sailed from Antwerp, Belgium, to Montreal in less than six days.

The Norasia Samantha arrives and departs during weekends on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, allowing cargo delivery to ports during the week and pick-up early the following week. In addition, unit trains leave Montreal during the weekend and arrive in Detroit and Toronto on Monday and Chicago and Tuesday. Transit from Felixstowe, England, to Montreal and then by train to Chicago takes nine days.

The rotation is: Antwerp, Felixstowe, Montreal and Antwerp. A follow-on ship to the Norasia Samantha, the Norasia Savannah, will enter service in Antwerp on 8 Aug.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





CSL Asia Investments wins part of A.N.L.

08/07:
The Australian government has chosen Cie. Generale Maritime as the preferred bidder for the liner business of Australian National Line Ltd. while Auscan Self-Unloaders Pty. Ltd. has been chosen for bulk cabotage. Efforts to privatize Australian National Line, which operates nine ships, started in 1991. It lost Australian$130 million between 1991 and 1997 and following the disposal of several operations, recently had a small profit. Auscan Self-Unloaders is a joint venture of CSL Asia Investments Ltd. and Intercontinental Ship Management Pty. Ltd.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - August 07

The JAMES R. BARKER was christened August 7, 1976 she was to become Interlake's first 1000 footer and the flag ship of the fleet for Moore McCormack Leasing, Inc. (Interlake Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.). She was built at a cost of more than $43 million under Title XI of the Merchant Marine Act of 1970. She was the third thousand footer to sail on the Lakes and the first built entirely on the Lakes.

On 7 August 1844, DANIEL WHITNEY, a wooden schooner, was found floating upside-down, with her crew of 4 missing and presumed dead.. She was six miles off mouth of the Kalamazoo River in Lake Michigan.

From "Skilling Mining Review- 50 Years Ago"
August 7, 1948 - Edward L. Ryerson, chairman of Inland Steel Company has announced that the new ore boat under construction for Inland will be named the WILFRED SYKES in honor of the president of the company. Mr. Sykes has been associated with Inland since 1923, when he was employed to take charge of engineering and construction work. From 1927 to 1930 he served as assistant general superintendent and from 1930 to 1941 as assistenat to the president in charge of operations. He became president of Inland in May, 1941. He has been a director of the company since 1935. The new ship will be the largest and fastest on the Great Lakes, having a carrying capacity in intermediate depth of 20,000 gross tons. The ship will be 678 ft. long, 70 ft. wide and 37 ft. deep, and will run at 16 miles per hour when loaded.

Data from: Dave Wobster, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Sunken Ship Likely Source of Oil in St Lawrence Seaway

08/06:
Oil from the ROY A. JODREY, which sank in the narrows on the St Lawrence River 24 years ago, could be the source of a light sheen that has been seen near Alexandria Bay, New York the past several weeks. The 640 foot Canadian freighter sank in 150 to 200 feet of water November 21, 1974, after the ship ripped its bottom on Pullman shoal and began taking on water. Built in 1965, the freighter was ruled unsalvageable by its owner, the Algoma Central Railway, Sault Ste.Marie, Ontario because it had broken in half. The ship had a value of $9.5 million but to recover and repair it would have cost at least $10 million, the owner reported at the time. The ship, which was carrying a cargo of iron ore pellets and about 50,000 gallons of fuel and lubricating oil for its giant diesel engines, sank in about five hours in full view of the crew of the Coast Guard Station after the 29 people on board had been rescued. Despite the size of the ship and the knowledge of where it sank, it tool divers seven days to locate the vessel in the dark depths of the St. Lawrence River narrows. Two divers were lost in this diving attempt due to water depth and current. The ship presently lies between the Coast Guard Station and Cherry Island, across the Seaway shipping channel. Coast Guard official, Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Frost said this week that the oil sheen was reported to the Coast Guard by fishing charter guides in mid-July and each time the oil dissipated quickly. The vessel "is highly suspect" and an "extensive investigation" to determine the source of the oil will be performed Lt.Cmdr Frost said. The Coast Guard has hired Don-Jons Marine Co. Hillside, New Jersey to conduct the underwater assessment of the JODREY and the surrounding area. The St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. tug ROBIINSON BAY and a deck barge will be used as work platforms for the diving operation. Thomas G.Voss, an oil spill technician with the Watertown, N.Y. regional office of the state Department of Environmental Conservation, said oil booms will be placed around the area where the ship went down, but the operation is difficult because of the swift current in the narrows.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Today in Great Lakes History - August 06

WALTER J. McCARTHY JR.'s bottom was damaged at the fit-out dock and required dry docking on August 6, 1977 for repairs prior to her maiden voyage.

The IMPERIAL BEDFORD was delivered to Imperial Oil Co. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. on August 6,1969.

The fourth Welland Canal was officially opened with much ceremony on August 6, 1932 when the steamer LEMOYNE, then the largest bulk carrier on the Lakes, locked down the Flight Locks.

On August 6, 1982 the Pierson fleet was placed in receivership and eventually the entire fleet was purchased by Parrish & Heimbecker Ltd. (P&H Shipping Ltd.,), Mississauga, Ont.

The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 was launched August 6, 1929.

The WILLIAM CLAY loaded her first cargo of iron ore on August 6, 1953 to be delivered to her home port at the Ford Rouge Plant south of Detroit, MI.

On August 6, 1965 the JOHN T. HUTCHINSON, upbound in the Trenton Channel of the Detroit River after having unloaded taconite ore at McLouth Steel, lost steering control and struck a stationary section of the Grosse Ile toll bridge. This caused the bridge section and two cars to drop into the river. Fortunately no one was seriously hurt, but the bridge was closed for several months. The HUTCHINSON sailed to AmShip's South Chicago yard for repairs.

The KINGDOC (2) was launched August 6, 1963 for N.M. Paterson & Sons Ltd.

The POINTE NOIRE was released on August 6, 1977 after running aground two days prior in the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River blocking the channel.

On 6 August 1890, MICHIGAN (Steel sidewheel carferry, 296'/1730GT) was launched at W. Bay City, MI. She was built by F. W. Wheeler (hull # 76) for the Canadian pacific Railway for use on the Detroit River and had a capacity of 16 railroad cars. She was retired in 1916 and converted to an unrigged pulpwood barge.

Data from: Jody L. Aho , Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




New vessel created from two re-commissioned at Port Weller

08/05:
(St. Catharines, Ont.) - August 4, 1998 - The newly created Upper Lakes Group vessel M.V. Canadian Transfer was re-commissioned in a ceremony today at Port Weller Dry Docks. The multi-million dollar project involved combining components of two existing ships to create a new one. The highly complex engineering job was completed at Port Weller Dry Docks during the past 4 months.

Special guests at the re-commissioning ceremony for the Canadian Transfer included Hon. Tony Clement, Minister of Transportation. Also in attendance were James Bradley, MPP, Tom Froese, MPP, John Maloney, MP and Gary Pillitteri, MP.

“We are proud that the new vessel, which is now equipped with updated unloading gear, deck equipment and electronics, will be 40% faster, more manoeuverable, and will use less fuel to operate,” said Marcel Rivard, President and CEO of Upper Lakes Group Inc.

Charles Payne, General Manager of Port Weller Dry Docks said, “Completing this unique project required the expertise of people from a number of our divisions, from naval architects and engineers, to welders and electricians. We’re proud of that expertise, and pleased to have been selected by Upper Lakes Group to complete such a complex operation to make two ships into one bigger and better vessel.”

The Canadian Transfer is 198.27 metres in length and 18.29 metres wide, with an unloading capacity of 4,000 tonnes per hour. The Canadian Transfer will join the Seaway Self Unloaders fleet, a partnership of Upper Lakes Group Inc., Toronto, and Algoma Central Marine, St. Catharines, Ont.

Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd. (CSE) is the parent company of Port Weller Dry Docks. CSE is one of Canada’s premier shipbuilding and repair companies, with operating divisions at Port Weller, Canal Marine and CSE Marine Services, St. Catharines; Pascol Engineering, Thunder Bay, Ont.; and, Lansdowne Technologies Inc. in Ottawa.

Background: M.V. Canadian Transfer
re-constructed at Port Weller Dry Docks, St. Catharines, Ont. from portions of the M.V. Hamilton Transfer, and the M.V. Canadian Explorer
re-commissioned August 4, 1998
two Upper Lakes Group ships were combined into one self-unloading vessel:
the engine room portion of the M.V. Canadian Explorer, a 730-foot straight deck bulk carrier was joined to the M.V. Hamilton Transfer, a 620-foot self-unloading vessel; the cargo hold, wheelhouse, and self-loading system of the Hamilton Transfer were retained; a new, 24-foot section was built to join the two ships.
the vessel’s self-unloading equipment is a twin-belt gravity system with a single-bucket elevator. It will unload at a rate of 4,000 tonnes per hour.
The M.V. Canadian Transfer carries a compliment of 24, consisting of 16 crew and 8 officers. Capt. Ed Seward, of Welland, Ont. is Master of the vessel. Martin Desaulniers of Lac Beauport, Que. is Chief Engineer.

The principal dimensions of the M.V. Canadian Transfer are:
Overall length 198.27 metres (650 feet 6 inches)
Beam 18.29 metres (60 feet)
Depth 10.67 metres (35 feet)
Deadweight15,250 tonnes
Horse power 6,000 BHP
Cargo capacity16,000 tonnes
Unloading capacity 4,000 tonnes per hour

Upper Lakes Group Inc., Toronto, owns and operates one of Canada’s largest fleets on the Great Lakes. With the addition of the Canadian Transfer, the number of self-unloading vessels in the Upper Lakes fleet increases to 8, with an additional 13 bulk carriers.
ship owned and operated by Upper Lakes Group Inc., will be chartered to the Seaway Self Unloaders, St. Catharines, Ont. fleet.

For more information:
Charles Payne Eric McKenzie Laura Bruce
General Manager General Manager, Engineering OEB International
Port Weller Dry DocksUpper Lakes Group Inc. (905) 682-7203
(905) 934-2581 (905) 688-1580

Fact Sheet: Port Weller Dry Docks, St. Catharines, Ontario

the only Canadian shipyard on the Great Lakes.
employs approximately 400 people; 1997 payroll totaled more than $18 million.
certified ISO 9002-4 in 1997.
in 1998, will complete a $5 million technology investment.
founded in 1946 by Charles A. Ansell, former General Manager of the Muir Bros. Dry Dock at Port Dalhousie. Port Weller celebrated its 50th anniversary in 1996.
located above Lock One on the Fourth Welland Canal connecting Lake Ontario and Lake Erie.
equipped to build or convert vessels while retaining the capability of the full-service repair facility.
the dry docks are unique because they flood and empty by gravity rather than by the traditional method of pumping water. The yard itself consists of two parts, a deep dock for maximum-size Seaway vessels with a water depth of 26 feet -- equal to the Welland Canal -- and a shelf with a water depth of 14 feet.
from 1950 to 1985, Port Weller built 65 ships totaling more than 800,000 tonnes deadweight. During that time, Port Weller, then a division of Upper Lakes Shipping, was the second-largest employer in the Niagara Peninsula, with a workforce peaking at 1200.
in 1986, Canada Steamship Lines and Upper Lakes Shipping -- then the two largest great Lakes fleets -- merged their shipbuilding and ship repair assets to create Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd.
Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd. is the parent company of Port Weller Dry Docks.
CSE is one of Canada’s premier shipbuilding and ship repair companies, with operating divisions at Port Weller, Canal Marine and CSE Marine Services, St. Catharines, Pascol Engineering, Thunder Bay, and Lansdowne Technologies Inc., Ottawa.




Twin Ports Report

08/05:
Dredging recently was completed along the dockface behind the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center. This area now has a depth of 20 feet, allowing vessels to tie up there without the need for improvised fenders. The work was done in anticipation of the cruise ship Columbus returning to Duluth for two trips in September.

Joseph H. Thompson has been a regular caller in the Twin Ports this year, making a number of runs carrying coal from Superior Midwest Energy Terminal to the power plant in Taconite Harbor.

Reported by: Al Miller




Algowest running on one engine

08/05:
Following up on a previous report. The Algowest did lose one of her two diesel engines and is running on one for now. It is better to run at a reduced speed and carry some cargoes. No word on when repairs will be made.

Reported by: A. Torrence




S.S. City of Milwaukee now open for public tours

08/05:
The Society for the Preservation of the S.S. City of Milwaukee has opened the 1931 railroad carferry for public tours. The public can tour the ship on Monday, Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00, 4:00 and 6:00 p.m. Cost is $5.00 per person. Society memberships are also available. The SPCM is also hosting it's Annual Meeting on Saturday, August 22 at 2:00 p.m. The carferry is located at Elberta, Michigan, about an hour North of Ludington. Volunteer tour guides are also needed. For more information, contact the SPCM at (616) 882-9688 or check out .




Today in Great Lakes History - August 05

The Richard M. Marshall (later Joseph S. Wood, John Dykstra, Benson Ford, and, finally, 265808) entered service on August 5, 1953. From 1966 until it was retired at the end of 1984, this vessel and the William Clay Ford (1) were fleetmates. There is only one other instance of two boats being owned by the same company at some point in their careers with as close or closer age difference. The Charles M. Beeghly (originally Shenango II) and the Herbert C. Jackson, fleetmates since 1967, both entered service on May 14, 1959.

The aft section of the WALTER J. McCARTHY JR.was float launched August 5, 1976. She was American Steamship's first thousand-footer and the first thousand-footer built at Bay Ship.

The G.A. TOMLINSON (2). was sold outright to Columbia Transportation Co. (an Oglebay Norton Co.), on August 5, 1971 along with the last two Tomlinson vessels, the SYLVANIA and the JAMES DAVIDSON.

On 5 August 1850, ST. CLAIR (sidewheel steamer, passenger & package freight, 140'/210T, built in 1843 at Detroit, MI) was reported as lost with no details given whatsoever. The report of her loss was published 3 days BEFORE she was enrolled at Detroit by J. Watkin.

Data from: Jody L. Aho , Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Canadian Transfer Moved

08/04:
The newly joined CANADIAN TRANSFER was moved from the drydock to the fitout dock at Port Weller on Sunday afternoon. The move was delayed slightly when the saltie ZIEMIA TARNOWSKA lost steering and went to the wall below Lock 3. This delayed other traffic, which was allowed to clear before TRANSFER was pulled from the drydock by the tugs JAMES J. McGRATH, AGUE MARTIN and GLENBROOK. The move was completed by about 4:00 pm.

The heritage of CANADIAN TRANSFER is obviously from two diferent eras, with her square stylish pilothouse and new rounded stern. When the painting is finished on the stern, she may look a little better. In any case, most boatwatchers would agree that she looks better than MIDLAND 41 or PATHFINDER.

Recommisioning is today at 11.00am.

Reported by: Dave Wobser and Roger Tottman




Salties Still Backed up in Canal

08/04:
The shortage of canal pilots has resulted in a backup of ocean traffic at both ends of the Welland Canal. As many as 7 vessels were anchored off Port Weller in recent days, and 3-4 off Port Colborne. Scanner traffic offered no explanation for the shortage, except "we'll give you a two hour call as soon as we know". This was not pleasant news for the ocean skippers.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Pilot House Updates

08/04:
It was reported that the City of Midland 41's fore and aft pilot houses appeared to be refurbished.

Mike Modderman reports that the pilot houses aren't refurbished and actually in pretty bad shape. The fore pilot house has had everything cut off the roof leaving large holes but that is for sale for $4000. As for the aft pilot house almost everything is intact except for what LMC removed, but that was $2000 and Mike is the new owner of it.




August Vessel Report

08/04:
The major U.S.-Flag lines had 66 of their 69 vessels in service on August 1, an increase of one ship compared to a year ago. The active fleet is expected to number 67 when a grain carrier returns to service later this week.

Only two U.S.-Flag lakers have not seen service in 1998 - the small cement carrier E. M. FORD and the grain carrier KINSMAN ENTERPRISE. While both ships could be activated to meet increased demand for those specific products, neither vessel is currently scheduled to sail this year.

LCA recently received a question concerning our August 1 vessel survey. We state that only two U.S.-Flag lakers have yet to see service this year - the E. M. FORD and the KINSMAN ENTERPRISE. A reader wondered why we did not count the JOHN SHERWIN. The SHERWIN and the L. E. BLOCK, while physically in existence, are not what the maritime industry considers "in class." Vessels "in class" have passed inspection by the American Bureau of Shipping and have a Certicate of Inspection issued by the U.S. Coast Guard. Both an ABS inspection and a COI are prerequisites for carrying cargo. If and when these vessels are again in class, they will be counted in our data base.

Reported by: Lake Carriers'Association




Bay Shipbuilding contract

08/04:
Bay Shipbuilding Co. in Sturgeon Bay, Wis., recently received a U.S.$636,413 contract from the U.S. Coast Guard for drydock repairs.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - August 04

Two favorites of many boatwatchers, entered service on August 4. The William Clay Ford (1) entered service on August 4, 1953, and the Edward L. Ryerson entered service on August 4, 1960.

The MELISSA DESGAGNES sailed to Holland under her 'a' name ONTADOC (2) with a load of Bentonite from Chicago on August 4, 1979.

The E.J. BLOCK was laid up for the last time at Indiana Harbor, IN on August 4 1984, the E.J. BLOCK was sold for scrap in late May, 1987.

The D.M. CLEMSON (2) left Superior on August 4, 1980 in tow of Malcolm Marine's tug TUG MALCOLM for Thunder Bay where she was dismantled.

The HOCHELAGA (2) was launched August 4, 1949 at the Collingwood Shipyards Ltd., Collingwood, Ont. for Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., Montreal, Que

On a foggy August 4, 1977 the POINTE NOIRE went hard aground near the entrance to the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River and blocked the channel. After her grain cargo was lightered by Columbia Transportation's crane steamer BUCKEYE, the POINTE NOIRE was released on August 6th. She was reloaded in Hay Lake and continued her downbound trip. Repairs to her bottom damage were completed at Thunder Bay. Ont.

On 4 August 1902, CITY OF VENICE (wooden propeller freighter, 301'/2108GT, built in 1892 at W. Bay City, MI). was sailing in perfect weather in Lake Erie abreast of Rondeau, Ontario with a load of iron ore. The steamer SEGUIN collided with the CITY OF VENICE, sinking her. U.S. marshals later impounded the SEGUIN for damages.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




New Barge makes first trip to Lower Lakes

08/03:
The barge PERE MARQUETTE 41 pushed by tug UNDAUNTED passed Grassy Island at 15:15 on Sunday. They reported that they were bound for Cleveland with a load of stone. This is her first trip past Detroit since entering service.

Other tug/barge units in the area included the PATHFINDER who was in the Rouge, unloading stone at Inland Lime. She departed for Toledo and cleared the Detroit River Light about 19:00 hours.

Reported by: Grassey




Independent Scheduled to Depart

08/03:
The KINSMAN INDEPENDENT is scheduled to depart Buffalo on Friday August 7th for the first time since June. She has port calls planned for Thunder Bay and Duluth.

Reported by: Tom Coonly




Interlake Pair

08/03:
Interlake's James R. Barker and Charles M. Beeghly both made runs to the D.M.&I.R. ore dock in Duluth on the 1st. The Barker arrived first and the Beeghly second . The Barker departed first followed by the Beeghly an hour and a half later.

Reported by: David F.




Sloan makes rare run

08/03:
After taking on cargo at Cleveland,USSGLF's George A. Sloan will be making a run on to Lake Superior and to her homeport of Duluth. She will arrive on the 3rd at 1100 C.S.T for the Hallet Dock #5.

Reported by: David F.




Boatnerd's New Look

08/03:
By now you have seen the new look and navigation of this web site. Please e-mail and let me know what you think. I would like to hear from Netscape users, please let me know how the layout looks. I'm down to 104 meg on my hard drive and can't get Netscape to launch.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 03

On 3 August 1915, ALEXANDRIA (wooden sidewheel passenger/package freight, 174'/863GT, built in 1866 at Hull, Quebec, formerly CONSORT) was carrying food stuff in Lake Ontario when she was blown on a bar in a storm and fog. She broke up by wave action under the Scarborough Bluffs, east of Toronto. Lifesavers worked for hours and rescued the entire crew.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Laid up Lakers

08/02:
There are 5 lakers in Montreal which have been inactive so-far this season. However the Quebecois and Canadian Voyager now have scheduled departure dates for September 25th and 26th respectively. There is no indication of activity yet for Comeaudoc, Cartierdoc, or Algogulf.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Today in Great Lakes History - August 02

The AMERICAN MARINER was launched on August 2, 1979 for the Connecticut Bank & Trust Co., (American Steamship Co., Buffalo, NY, mgr.). She was to be named CHICAGO (3), but that name was removed before launch.

The U.S. Coast Guard's report on the sinking of the EDMUND FITZGERALD was released on August 2, 1977. It cited faulty hatch covers, lack of water tight cargo hold bulkheads and damage caused from an undetermined source as the cause of her loss.

The BENSON FORD's maiden voyage was on August 2, 1924 with coal from Toledo, OH to Duluth, MN and returned with iron ore to the Ford Rouge Plant at Dearborn.

On August 2, 1990 the Lightship HURON was dedicated as a National Historic Landmark. LIGHTSHIP 103 had been almost completely restored and was opened to the public for tours and remains so at this time.

On 2 August 1877, GRACE A. CHANNON (wooden schooner, 141'/266GT, built in 1873 at E. Saginaw, MI) was bound from Chicago for Buffalo when she collided with the propeller tug FAVORITE and sank 12 miles south of Milwaukee, WI. The young son of the owner of the CHANNON lost his life in this accident.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Transfer to Move from Dry Dock Update

08/01:
The undocking of the Canadian Transfer is delayed for 24hrs. It will now take place on Sunday August 2nd at 1.00pm.

Reported by: Roger Tottman




Twin Ports Report

08/01:
Northshore Mining Co., a taconite producer located in Babbitt and Silver Bay, Minn., is purchasing a new fleet of five 205-ton Komatsu 30E Haulpak production trucks for its Peter Mitchell Mine in Babbitt. The move is aimed at bringing more operating efficiency to the mine and lowering crude ore production costs. The $8.6 million cost of the trucks -- and a $1.7 million renovation of the mine's coarse crusher to accommodate them -- is a total Cleveland-Cliffs, Inc., investment of $10.3 million. Northshore ships its taconite through its loading dock at Silver Bay.

Demolition continues on the storage silos located between the former Cargill C and D elevators in Duluth. The structure is being demolished in steps rather than all at once. An attempt to demolish part of Cargill C in one blast resulted only in the structure's partial collapse. To see a news story and illustration of the project visit: http://www.duluthnews.com/dnt/news/drug4.htm

Reported by: Al Miller




News from the Seaway

08/01:
On Sunday, July 26th the SEADORE (spelling) (E) was reported crosssways to the Iroquois Lock at 1401. By 1630 she was reported as tied to the south wall due to engine trouble.

On Monday, July 27th there was again a shortage of pilots for ocean vessels , at Cape Vincent. This was both for river and lake pilots. The Pontocratas waws the first to get a pilot and the pilto was due at 2230. The Great Laker, and Emerald Star were also waiting for pilots.

The Ursala was also anchored but got underway at 1410 for Hamilton. This is the second time I have noted several ships waiting for pilots at Cape Vincent.

On Wed. July 29 The Federal MacKenzie was eastbound and passed Midlake at approx. 0800. She spent the next five hours drifting in Lake Ontario due to turbocharger repairs. At1255, she got underway and reported an ETA of 1500 for Sodus.

Again their seems to be a backup at Cape Vincent due to a shortage of pilots or a large number of Ocean vessels. The tanker Saturn cleared Oswego Eastbound , at 0700 today and was due at Cape Vincent at 1125. She will not get a pilot until 1420 and will go to anchor. There are several west and east bound vessels that will require pilots and they are being told they do not know whenthe pilot will be available. This is the third time this summer I have heard the same problem.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Narragansett Docked in Marinette, WI

08/01:
The salt water vessel Narragansett from Monrovia has been unloading iron ore at the Marinette dock on the Menominee River for the past several days. Unloading appears to be finished, no word on where she will go from here.

Reported by: C. Fletcher




Who will be the 100,000th Visitor?

08/01:
The counter turned 100,000 yesterday evening when Chris Edyvean of Green Bay, WI logged on to read the news.

Thanks again to all who visit and contribute!!!




Today in Great Lakes History - August 01

On August 1, 1982, the Canadian tanker Hubert Gaucher entered service

On 1 August 1849, CHICAGO (wooden propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 951/151T, built in 1842 at Oswego, NY) burned to a total loss in Buffalo harbor. No lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history







Return to the News Archive

Return to Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping

Comments, news, and suggestions to:moderator@boatnerd.netComments, news, and suggestions to: