Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

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* Report News


Roger Stahl Update

09/30:
The tugs Roger Stahl, Caribe Challenger and barges were expected in Quebec City at 2:30 a.m. Saturday morning. Three pilots will be on board to help the unusual group to transit the tricky waters of the St. Lawrence River until the last pilot station of the system in Les Escoumins.

Reported by: J. F. Boutin




Rare Sight in Superior

09/30:
Twin Ports boatwatchers saw a double rarity Sept. 29 when the small saltie Kasteelborg arrived at the CLM dock in Superior to unload its salt cargo using the dock's bridge crane. This bridge crane is one of the few remaining of the dozens that once dotted the harbor skyline. It's often used to move material around the dock after delivery by a self-unloader, but it probably hasn't unloaded a ship since the mid-'80s, when the Kinsman Independent and William A. McGonagle would occasionally deliver stone there. The Kasteelborg's salt cargo also was a rarity. In years past, the few inbound cargoes delivered by salties generally consisted of steel or the occasional heavy-lift project cargo. The "borg" vessels have brought several cargos of wood pulp to Duluth's port terminal and, now, this cargo of salt to CLM. After unloading at CLM and cleaning its holds, Kasteelborg is scheduled to load wheat at the AGP elevator in Duluth.

Reported by: Al Miller




Engine Problems

09/30:
On Thursday afternoon the saltie Fullness developed possible engine problems in Lake Ontario. She gave an e.t.a. for Cape Vincent of 6:00 p.m. but arrived at 11:00 p.m. The fuel pump was thought to have been the cause. She is in ballast sailing for Gary, Indiana.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Toledo Update

09/30:
The Nanticoke was loading grain Friday at Andersons "K" Elevator. The Mantadoc arrived at Andersons "E" Elevator during mid afternoon with the tug Susan Hoey assisting her up the Maumee River.

The USCGC Mobile Bay departed Toledo around 11:00 a.m. The Canadian Navigator was unloading stone at the new CSX stone dock. The Capt. Henry Jackman arrived overnight to unload potash at the Kuhlman Dock. The Agawa Canyon was due in port later in the day.

The next scheduled coal boats are expected to arrive today. The Buffalo is due in the morning while the CSL Niagara is schedule to load Saturday evening. The next scheduled ore boat will be the Reserve due in Saturday morning.

The next grain boats scheduled to arrive are the salties Toro for ADM/Countrymark Elevator and the Ziemia Zamojska for Andersons "K" Elevator. They should be arrive in the next several days.

Lakers scheduled for grain during the next several weeks are the Quebecois, Algocen, Manitoulin and Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin. Additional lakers will be arriving as the grain harvest increases during the next several weeks.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto Update

09/30:
The Quebecois departed her lay-up berth in Toronto harbor at 09:30 a.m. Friday.

The salty Kapitonas Sevcenko was in at Pier 51 while the tug Triton and barge St. Mary's Cement II were berthed at Pier 52. Finikas got under way from Redpath Sugar shortly after 4:00 p.m. with a McKeil tug assisting. The Solta is expected to leave the anchorage and move into Redpath. The unnamed salty remained anchored in Humber Bay.

Toronto Hippo Tours, the amphibious tour company, took delivery of their second craft. They are finished operating for the season.

Reported by: Jim Fitz and Gerry O.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 30

The 660 ft. forward section of the a)BELLE RIVER (b) WALTER J. McCARTHY, JR.) was side launched on September 30, 1976.

The ARTHUR SIMARD entered service on September 30, 1973 sailing to Montreal, Que. to load gasoline.

The GOVERNOR MILLER was towed down the Welland Canal on September 30, 1980 in tow of TUG MALCOLM, STORMONT and ARGUE MARTIN on her way to Quebec City.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY departed light on her maiden voyage from River Rouge on September 30, 1943 bound for Two Harbors, MN. to load iron ore.

On September 30, 1986 the Canadian Coast Guard vessel CARIBOU ISLE struck a rock in Lake Huron's North Channel and began taking on water. CCG SAMUEL RISLEY arrived and helped patch the ship. The pair the departed for Parry Sound.

On 30 September 1888, AUSTRALIA (wooden schooner, 109’, 159GT, built in 1862 at Vermilion, OH) was carrying cedar posts from Beaver Island to Chicago when she encountered a gale. She was laid on beam ends and sprung a leak. She headed for shelter at Holland, MI, but struck a bar and foundered in the mouth of the harbor. The wreck blocked the harbor until it was removed on 5 October. Her crew was rescued by the U.S. Lifesaving Service.

On 30 September 1875, AMERICAN CHAMPION (wooden scow-schooner, 156 t, built in 1866 at Trenton, Michigan) dropped anchor to ride out a gale near Leamington, Ontario on Lake Erie. The chains gave way and she struck a bar and sank to the gunwales. The crew of 8 spent the night in the rigging and the next day a local woman and her two sons heroically rescued each one.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Update

09/29:
The tug Caribe Challenger and Gaelic tug Roger Stahl with two U.S. Navy barges departed Ogdensburg at noon Thursday. The tow waited in Ogdensburg Wednesday for weather. They are expect to pass Montreal at 8:00 a.m. today and Quebec at 10:00 p.m. The tug Roger Stahl hopes to be released Saturday afternoon or Sunday morning. When the Stahl is released the crew has orders to return to the Gaelic Tugboat Company's Maintenance yard in Detroit to give the crew time off before her next job.

Pictures of the tow in the Welland Canal by Brian Harrison
Caribe Challenger pulling the barges into the upper end of the lock.
Stern view.
The Roger Stahl guides the rear of the tow into the lock.
After locking through, the Caribe Challenger pulls the barges from lock.
Tow continues on.

Reported by: the Gaelic Tug Boat Company




Grain Handlers Approve Contract

09/29:
Grain handlers in Thunder Bay voted Thursday night to accept a new contract, ending fears of a strike that threatened to shut down the Lake Superior port at the height of harvest season. The 350 members of the Grain Handlers Union narrowly accepted a new 3-year contract with the Lakehead Terminal Elevators Association. The Thunder Bay Source reports that the new contract included job security, an improved pension plan and a pay increase. Members will get a 1.2% raise in the first two years and 1.5% in the third.

Much of the grain grown on the eastern Canadian Prairies is transported by rail to Thunder Bay where it is transferred to elevators and finally loaded into ships.

The port has an annual capacity of 1.399 million tonnes, making it the largest port in Canada although a greater volume is handled at the western Port of Vancouver.

Reported by: the Ron Konkol




Griffon Update

09/29:
The Canadian Coast Guard ship Griffon arrived at the Government Dock in Sarnia Thursday evening where repairs will be completed after her collision with the Atlantic Huron earlier this week.

Damage is limited to the port bow foc'sle bulwarks in the area of her name. A twenty-foot section is caved in about 2-feet. The repairs will extend to the main deck, as the hull below was untouched. It appears she was hit by the upper rounded part of the Atlantic Huron's forward bulwarks. A press conference will held this morning on board the Griffon.

Reported by: George Lee




Tug and Barges Arrive

09/29:
The tug Avenger IV, tug Radium Yellowknife and their tow of nine deck barges arrived in Thunder Bay. The tow arrived about 1:20 a.m. Thursday morning and tied up at the Old C.N. Ore Dock. The tug Avenger IV then departed, sailing for her dock in Sault Ste. Marie, ONT. The Radium Yellowknife and barges will remain in Thunder Bay.

The unusual tow began on the Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories, Canada transiting the Northwest Passage across the Arctic. Icebreaker assistance was required in Frobisher Bay because of shifting ice fields. They continued down the coast of Labrador, and through the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Three barges each have two stacked on their deck. They are secured together by several steel plates welded along their sides.

The Radium Yellowknife is a 120-foot river style towboat, powered by a pair of V12 D398 Caterpillars, developing approximately 1600 hp. It is interesting to note that the tug that made this rugged voyage is flat bottomed, has a draft of only four feet, and a blunt bow that sent seawater cascading over the wheelhouse.

Reported by: Ron Konkol and George Lee




Back to Back Visitors in Sarnia

09/29:
Thursday was a busy day at Sarnia's grain elevator. The Capt Henry Jackman arrived early morning to unload 6,015.220 short tons of potash, departing later that morning. The Algocen arrived after lunch and began loading wheat. She is expected to finish loading some time tonight or Saturday morning.

Reported by: Doug Schilz




Twin Ports Report

09/29:
Among the vessels calling in the Twin Ports on Sept. 28 were Canadian Prospector, unloading at St. Lawrence Cement in Duluth, and Joe Block, unloading at the Cutler dock before shifting to DMIR ore dock.

Up the shore, Fred R. White Jr. was making one of its occasional calls to Taconite Harbor. It was due to be followed Sept. 29 by James R. Barker and Buckeye. In Two Harbors, Indiana Harbor was making one of its occasional calls there.

Reported by: Al Miller




Green Bay Report

09/29:
Commercial shipping activity has been about average this summer for the Lake Michigan port of Green Bay. Tonnage is reported to be down slightly due to low lake and harbor water levels.

The Port commission is hoping to have the Harbor and Fox River dredged to the same depth as the St. Lawrence Seaway standard to allow for deeper loads as well as invite salt water vessels to the port. Currently, with the water levels as low as they are, steel and other heavy commodities are being shipped to Milwaukee and other ports, then trucked or sent by rail to Green Bay.

Last week, Green Bay's first Tour vessel, the German cruise vessel C. Columbus, canceled its Green Bay port call due to high winds. Apparently, the crew was worried about passing through a railroad bridge in the port.

More information on the Port of Green Bay can be found on the port's web site. The site contains bi-monthly newsletters, port commission meeting minutes, a photo gallery, a photo map, and other interesting information.

Reported by: Jeff DuMez




Toledo Update

09/29:
Thursday the CSL Niagara was loading coal at the CSX Dock with the Canadian Progress waiting to follow. The salties Koninsborg and Lake Carling were at the T.W.I. Dock unloading. The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge were loading cargo at the Sun Oil Dock.

The Philip R. Clarke was unloading salt at the A.R.M.S. Dock. The Nanticoke was at the Andersons "K" Elevator loading grain. The USCGC Mobile Bay remains moored at the City Docks.

The next scheduled coal boat will be the Buffalo expected to arrive late this evening. The next scheduled ore boat will be the Reserve arriving early Saturday morning.

The Capt. Henry Jackman is scheduled to bring in a load of potash to Toledo within the next several days.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Erie Update

09/29:
Thursday evening the Richard Reiss arrived in Erie, Pennsylvania. She entered Erie around 6:30 p.m. with a cargo destined for the Parade St Dock..

Bow View of the Reiss arriving.
Stern View.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Today in Great Lakes History - September 29

PIERSON INDEPENDENT was launched September 29, 1906 as a) J.H. SHEADLE (1), US.203628, for the Grand Island Steamship Co. (Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co., Cleveland, OH., mgr.)

HENRY FORD II, 70, of Grosse Pointe, Michigan, passed away on September 29, 1987. Mr Ford's namesake was the Ford Motor Company self-unloader.

On September 29, 1986 the Polish tug KORAL left Lauzon, Quebec with the JOHN E.F. MISENER and GOLDEN HIND enroute overseas for scrapping.

September 29, 1892 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 1 was launched.

On 29 September 1872, ADRIATIC (3 mast wooden schooner-barge, 139’, 129NT, built in 1865 at Clayton, NY as a bark) was in tow of the tug MOORE along with three other barges in Lake Erie in a heavy gale. She became separated from the tow and foundered. The entire crew of 7 was lost. The wooden schooner DERRICK was used in salvage operations. On 29 September 1854, she had just positioned herself above the wreck of the steamer ERIE off Silver Creek, NY on Lake Erie when she went down in a gale. She had spent the summer trying to salvage valuables from the wreck of the steamer ATLANTIC.

On 29 September 1900, one hundred years ago, the steamer SAKIE SHEPARD was re-launched at Anderson’s shipyard in Marine City. She had been thoroughly rebuilt there during the summer.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Strike By Grain Handlers May be Averted

09/28:
Grain handlers in Thunder Bay were set to begin a strike after midnight Thursday morning, a last minute offer to the 350-grain handlers may prevent a strike. The Thunder Bay Source reports that union negotiators recommended their members ratify a new memorandum of statement with the Lakehead Terminal Elevators Association. The union member will vote on the offer at 6:00 p.m. today.

If the grain handlers do not accept the offer, a strike will begin Friday morning at all Thunder Bay grain terminals. A strike by the grain handlers threatens to shut down the port at the height of harvest season when grain and oilseed exports increase and must be completed before the winter freeze-up. Much of the grain grown on the eastern Canadian Prairies is transported by rail to Thunder Bay where it is transferred to elevators and finally loaded into ships.

The port has an annual capacity of 1.399 million tonnes, making it the largest port in Canada although a greater volume is handled at the western Port of Vancouver.

Reported by: the Ron Konkol




Freighter Collides with Coast Guard Vessel

09/28:
The Canadian Coast Guard ship Griffon sustained damage after being hit by the 730-foot self-unloader Atlantic Huron. The accident took place northeast of Pelee Island in Lake Erie at 1:29 a.m. Monday morning. There were no injuries. The Griffon was at anchor at the time, in the area to perform maintenance on Pelee Light. The Atlantic Huron was eastbound, destined for Halifax.

The crash caused a buckle in the side of the ship approximately 20 feet long and two feet deep. The hull remained watertight, however, there is significant damage above the waterline.

The Griffon will depart the Coast Guard dock in Amherstburg today and proceed to Sarnia where repairs will be made under local contract. The Samuel Risley is being pressed out of temporary summer lay-up to take over the Griffon's duties during repairs.

It is unknown at this time the extent of damage to the Atlantic Huron.

The Griffin is a medium duty icebreaker and Navaids tender, built in 1970. She is 234 feet long and powered by four 8 cylinder opposed piston Fairbanks Morse diesels developing 4000 hp DC electric drive.

Reported by: George Lee and Jamie Kerwin




Roger Stahl Update

09/28:
The tug Caribe Challenger and Gaelic tug Roger Stahl with two U.S. Navy barges continued through the Seaway. Below are pictures of the tow in the Welland Canal by the Gaelic Tugboat Company's retired fleet engineer and tug's namesake Roger Stahl.

The tow approaches the Lock.
Bow view.
Close up of the tug Roger Stahl.
The barges squeeze into the locks.
The tow continues on.

Reported by: the Gaelic Tug Boat Company




Hovercraft Tenacity

09/28:
The hovercraft Tenacity is making its way from the Isle de la Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence near Prince Edward Island, to Toledo, OH. On Monday she was speeding through the Seaway. A normal run of 3 hours from Cape Vincent to Sodus was made in just one hour.

The vessel will be in Toledo to build public support for a high-speed hovercraft to ferry passengers to the Windsor Casino. The Toledo-Windsor service would be the first of its kind in the United States. The Hovercraft can operate at a faster speed and can skim along the surface of a frozen lake in the winter.

The hovercraft is 69-feet long and 32-feet wide and can carry 80 passengers. It is owned by Au Pays des Acadians.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Twin Ports Report

09/28:
Normally a busy elevator, the Cargill terminal in Duluth has seen relatively seen ships in recent months. However, Canadian Leader pulled into the berth late on the afternoon of Sept. 27 to begin loading wheat.

Another uncommon visitor to the Twin Ports was Middletown, which arrived Sept. 27 to unload stone and then shift to the DMIR ore dock for a cargo of pellets.

Reported by: Al Miller




Muskegon Update

09/28:
The cement barge Integrity entered the Muskegon Harbor Wednesday morning heading for the Lafarge plant. The barge was later outbound sailing for Alpena to load.

She was followed a short time later by the 1000-foot Oglebay Norton delivering a load of coal to the power plant.

From the Muskegon live cam.

Reported by: Robin Greathouse




St. Clair River Report

09/28:
Wednesday was a busy day in the St. Clair River and Port Huron/Sarnia area. In Sarnia, the Algoeast is tied at the Government Dock undergoing unspecified repairs. The Sarah Spencer/Atlantic Hickory stopped for about an hour around 1 p.m. at the Smith Dock. The Atlantic Hickory is sporting a new logo on its smokestack as well as a new houseflag.

The Buckeye finished unloading at the Marine City stone dock around noon, just in time to surrender her berth to the waiting Joseph H. Frantz. The U.S. Corps of Engineers survey vessel Paj was also conducting sweeps in the area.

Other traffic in the river Wednesday afternoon included the downbound Canadian Progress, followed by Canadian Enterprise, Algonova, Armco, Federal Yukon, Mary E. Hannah and barge and the George A. Stinson. Upbound vessels Wednesday included Algosteel, American Mariner and Mesabi Miner. In addition, the James A. Hannah and barge were moored at the Sunoco dock.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




Toledo Update

09/28:
Wednesday the saltie Koningsborg was unloading steel products at the T.W.I. Dock. The tanker Gemini was still loading at the B-P Oil Dock. The USCGC Mobile Bay remains at the City Docks. The CSL Niagara was due in at the CSX Docks that evening. The Armco was also due in at the Torco Dock.

Future grain boats schedule to arrive in the next week are the Nanticoke, Mantadoc, Ziemia Zamojska, Quebecois and Algocen. The Algosteel is scheduled to arrive later this week with a load of potash.

The tug Atlantic Hickory and barge Sarah Spencer departed Toledo around 10:30 p.m. Tuesday night.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Report

09/28:
The Calcite II came in early Wednesday morning with the tug Washington for the Salt Dock. They were expected to finish loading Wednesday evening. The tug Idaho assisted the Cuyahoga out of Ontario 4 at 2:30 p.m. The David Z. Norton was upbound at 3:30 p.m. for the LTV Steel Mill. The American Republic was following the Norton an hour or two behind her. The saltie Lake Carling departed 32E with the tug Idaho at 4:00 p.m. The Irma arrived some time over night to unload at 26W.

The Federal Bergen departed Ashtabula shortly after mid-night with two tugs.

Pictures by TZ
Calcite II loading.
Close up of the salt being loaded.
David Z. Norton passing the tug Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys Cement II.
Bow view of the Norton.
The Norton continues up river.
Cuyahoga unloaded.
Lake Carling departs.
Irma at 26 West.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Toronto Update

09/28:
Shortly before 3:00 p.m. Wednesday the Canadian Mariner steamed out of Toronto Harbor, after being fueled by the Hamilton Energy for 2.5 hrs. The Hamilton energy then proceeded through the Cherry Street Bridge to fuel the Quebecois. McKeil tugs pulled the Canadian Provider off the Mariner to whom it had been rafted and deposited the Provider on the south face of Pier 35.

The Harbor was very busy with three sugar ships. The salty Solta lay at anchor in the harbor awaiting the departure of Finikas from Redpath Sugar. Another salty was at anchor in Humber Bay. Saginaw departed the salt dock about 10:00 p.m. The Thomas Rennie was expected to be removed from the Toronto drydock Wednesday.

Reported by: Jim Fitz and Gerry O.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 28

On September 28, 1980, the Burns Harbor entered service, departing Sturgeon Bay bound for Superior to load pellets.

THOMAS WILSON left Toledo on September 28, 1997 in tow of the tug TUSKER for overseas scrapping. WILSON has been laid up since December 16, 1979.

On 28 September 1891, THOMAS PARSONS (2 mast wooden schooner, 135’, 350T, built in 1868 at Charlotte, NY) was carrying coal out of Ashtabula, OH when she foundered in a storm a few miles off Fairport, OH in Lake Erie.

On 28 September 1849, W. G. BUCKNER (wooden schooner, 75', 107 t, built in 1837 at Irving, NY) was carrying lumber in a storm on Lake Michigan when she sprang a leak, then capsized. The man to whom the cargo belonged was aboard with his wife and five children. One child was washed overboard while the wife and three children died of exposure. The schooner ERWIN took off the survivors plus the bodies.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Update

09/27:
The tugs Roger Stahl and Caribe Challenger had an interesting time with their tow when entering the Seaway. About 4.7 miles west of Cape Vincent they shortened the tow, then arrived at Cape Vincent at 10:15 a.m. and docked to the Cape Vincent Breakwall.

Pilots were changed and the tow was rearranged. The second barge was inverted and tied to the first barge, the same configuration as in the transit through the Welland Canal.

They departed Cape Vincent at 1:50 p.m. and estimated 6:20 p.m. for the Crossover. However, they only were traveling at 5.2 knots so the passage took longer than expected. The tow waited for the west bound Kapitonas Sevcenko to clear so they did not meet in the American Narrows section.

The tow stopped at Ogdensburg to fuel and take on supplies. With high winds forecast, the captain decided to stay in Ogdensburg over night. The tow is expected to depart at 11:00 a.m. today, weather permitting.

Check back for updates, please e-mail with sightings or pictures.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Saginaw visits Toronto

09/27:
The Saginaw arrived in Toronto Tuesday afternoon with a load of salt for the Cargil Dock.

The Saginaw passes through the Cherry Street Bridge. (video)
The Saginaw docking. (video)
The Saginaw's cook enjoys a break from the galley.
Canadian Trader and Seaway Queen at their lay up dock.

Reported by: TP




Cruise Ship in the River

09/27:
The cruise ship Le Levant was upbound in the Detroit River Tuesday sailing for Windsor. After the stop in Windsor she will continue upbound for Manitoulin Island.

Le Levant in the Detroit River.
Stern view.

Reported by: Pat Pavlat




Twin Ports Report

09/27:
Cason J. Callaway is scheduled to load next in South Chicago with cargo (likely coal) bound for Ashland, Wis., a port that only receives a handful of cargoes each season.

Several vessels were moving about the Twin Ports early on Sept. 26. Canadian Transport had finished unloading salt at the Cutler Magner dock in Duluth and was waiting for move to Midwest Energy Terminal after Walter J. McCarthy Jr. Edwin H. Gott was outbound with ore for delivery to Nanticoke. At the elevators were Pany R. at Peavey, Armonikos at Cenex Harvest States, and Spar Jade at AGP.

Reported by: Al Miller




Detroit Aerial Views

09/27:
Pilot and photographer Don Coles was flying over the Detroit area Tuesday and sent in the pictures below. All photographs are available for purchase. Don's company, Great Lakes Aerial Photos, is available for hire for any aerial photography need.

George A. Sloan, approaching the Jefferson Ave Bridge in the Rouge River.
Louis R. Desmarais unloading cement on the Rouge River.
Ziemia Zamojska at the Belle Isle Anchorage in the Detroit River.
Ostkap in the anchorage.

For more aerial views click here




Toledo Update

09/27:
Tuesday the Mellissa Desgagnes was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading Aluminum ingots. The tanker Gemini was at the B-P Oil Dock loading cargo. The USCGC Mobile Bay made a return visit and was moored at the City Docks. The tug Atlantic Hickory and barge Sarah Spencer moored at the T.W.I. Dock overnight on Monday waiting for the Manitoulin to finish loading grain at Andersons "K" Elevator. The Manitoulin departed Tuesday morning and the Atlantic Hickory and Sarah Spencer headed upriver to Andersons "K" Elevator to unload grain. The pair were expected to depart Tuesday evening. It is unknown if they will enter Toledo Shipyard or sail on, not entering the ship yard for her scheduled work until sometime in October. The next scheduled coal boat due in at the CSX Dock will be the CSL Niagara with an e.t.a. of 1:00 p.m. today. The next scheduled ore boat scheduled to load at the Torco dock will be the Armco expected in at 11:00 p.m. tonight.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Toronto Update

09/27:
The ferry Thomas Rennie has been on Toronto Drydock for almost two weeks now undergoing inspection and repairs. The former tug Glenmont reconstruction into a passenger vessel for Caribbean service is coming along slowly. Charter boat activity continues, but vessel movements have slowed dramatically since Labor Day.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Boatnerd Tops 1 Million

09/27:
About 1:00 p.m. Tuesday over 1,000,000 visits had been recorded to the main page of the Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping home page. This counter was started as the page was launched in 1995.

The millionth visitor was Stephen and Lori Lynch of Darien, WI. Stephen and Lori have been visiting the site daily for close to two years.

My thanks to all the viewers and contributors for making the web site what it is today.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 27

The H.M.GRIFFITH experienced a smoky conveyor belt fire at Port Colborne, Ont. on September 27, 1989. Repairs were completed there.

The ROGER M. KYES proceeded to Chicago for dry-docking, survey and repairs on September 27, 1976. She had struck bottom in Buffalo Harbor September 22, 1976 sustaining holes in two double bottom tanks and damage to three others.

The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2) under tow, locked through the Panama Canal from September 27 to the 30th on her way to the cutters torch.

SEAWAY TRADER was launched September 27, 1947 as a) IMPERIAL COLLINGWOOD for Imperial Oil Ltd., Toronto, Ont.

September 27, 1909 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 4 entered service after being repaired from her capsizing at Manistique the previous May.

On 27 September 1884, WALDO A. AVERY (wooden propeller, 204’, 1294GT) was launched at W. Bay City, MI. Her construction had been subcontracted by F.W. Wheeler to Thomas F. Murphy.

On 27-29 September 1872, a big storm swept the lower Lakes. Here are the Lake Huron tragedies. The barges HUNTER and DETROIT were destroyed. The tug SANDUSKY rescued the 21 survivors for them. The schooner CORSAIR foundered off Sturgeon Point on Saginaw Bay at 4 PM on Sunday the 29th and only 2 of the crew survived. The barge A. LINCON was ashore one mile below Au Sable with no loss of life. The barge TABLE ROCK went ashore off Tawas Point and went to pieces. All but one of her crew was lost. The schooner WHITE SQUALL was sunk ten miles off Fish Point -- only one crewman was saved. The schooner SUMMIT went ashore at Fish Point, 7 miles north of Tawas with two lives lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Update

09/26:
The tug Roger Stahl and tug Caribe Challenger with barges in tow spent Sunday night docked at Port Weller. They departed Monday morning sailing downbound across Lake Ontario. Residents near Point Breeze, New York were treated to the impressive site about 5:30 p.m. Monday as the tow passed.

The tow is scheduled to arrive at Cape Vincent around 11:00 Tuesday morning. The captains plan to break the tow up again and put the barges stern to stern so they can push them through the next series of locks. The next stop will be Ogdensburg for food and fuel.

Check back for updates, please e-mail with sightings or pictures.

Reported by: the Gaelic Tug Boat Company and Ron Ladue




Tug and Barge in Toledo

09/26:
The tug Atlantic Hickory and barge Sarah Spencer were inbound the Maumee Ship Channel Monday evening. The pair are believed to be sailing for the Toledo Shipyard where the barge will be placed in drydock for survey. The tug Atlantic Hickory is expected to sail off the lakes and a different tug will be used to push the Sarah Spencer when she comes off the drydock.

Rumors earlier in the month had the Sarah Spencer undergoing a refit to her pin system in Sturgeon Bay, WI. to receive a new tug. At that time the new tug was reported to be the Jane Ann IV who was expected to join the barge in Sturgeon Bay to receive new rudders and connecting system.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman and Steve Haverty




Coal Shipments to End

09/26:
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported Monday that the Wisconsin Energy Corp. power plant in Port Washington, WI. will be converted from coal to natural gas. This conversion will put an end to Great Lakes freighters delivering coal to the Lake Michigan port. Vessels in the Oglebay Norton Fleet serve the power plant. The Wisconsin Energy Corp. expects to begin construction of the natural gas plant in 2003, be done in 2005.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Fall Grain Rush

09/26:
The Canadian Venture has left her lay-up berth and is on her way to Thunder Bay. The Algoma fleet tape indicated that the Algoriver will depart her lay-up berth in Montreal, Quebec at 4:00 p.m. today She will proceed to Port Cartier, Quebec to load iron ore for Hamilton, Ontario. The Algonorth is scheduled to depart Montreal on Saturday at 4:00 p.m. also heading for Port Cartier to load iron ore for Hamilton. The Algoisle is expected to start loading in Thunder Bay, Ontario for Montreal on Wednesday, October 4th at 2:00 p.m.

Reported by: Philip Nash and David Swain




Rare Visit for the Indiana Harbor

09/26:
On Sunday, September 24, the Indiana Harbor docked at the Consumers Power Plant in Essexville, MI. The Power Plant is located at the mouth of the Saginaw River. The Indiana Harbor had about 26,000 tons of coal from Conneaut, OH. It is especially rare for the Indiana Harbor to bring the coal in. Usually her fleetmate Walter J. McCarthy Jr. will split a load of coal for St. Clair and Essexville. The Indiana Harbor was expected to depart the dock sometime before midnight.

The Indiana Harbor entering Lake St. Clair on Saturday sailing for Essexville.

Reported by: Ryan Kenny and Lon Morgan




Dock Damaged in Cleveland

09/26:
Saturday morning the Wolverine damaged a dock in Cleveland's Old River Bed. The vessel was sailing in bound for the Ontario 4 dock when a failure caused the loss of communications between the bow look out and pilot house. The vessel hit the dock at Tiffanies Cabaret causing no damage to the Wolverine.




Twin Ports Report

09/26:
J.A.W. Iglehart paid a rare visit to the Twin Ports on Sept. 24, unloading at the LaFarge cement terminals in Superior and Duluth. Once a frequent visitor here, it's been almost entirely replace by Alpena on the Lake Superior run.

The Twin Ports were facing a busy day Sept. 25. At 7:30 a.m., Swallow was motoring up the St. Louis River bound for the Hallett dock to load bentonite; Canadian Enterprise was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal; Federal Yukon was completing its load at AGP grain elevator in Duluth, to be replaced in the evening by Spar Jade; Arthur M. Anderson was in an unusual spot, pulled far forward on the east side of Dock 6; Algoville was loading at Cenex Harvest States #1; and Algolake was fueling at the Murphy Oil depot.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

09/26:
Monday was a busy day for the port of Toledo. The Manitoulin was at Andersons "K" Elevator loading grain. The Algosteel was at the A.R.M.S. Dock unloading grain from Thunder Bay, Ontario. The Melissa Desgagnes was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading aluminum ingots. The Lake Carling was expected to arrive by Tuesday evening for the T.W.I. Dock. The CSL Niagara was loading coal at the CSX Dock with the John G. Munson due in to load coal later on that evening.

The next scheduled coal boat will be the CSL Niagara scheduled to arrive Wednesday morning. The next ore boat scheduled to load at the Torco Dock will be the Armco due in on Wednesday evening.

The tug Susan W. Hannah and barge Southdown Conquest was unloading cement at the Southdown Cement Dock next to the Shipyard. The Paul H. Townsend was upbound in the Maumee River approaching the Craig Bridge at 6:00 p.m. bound for the Lafarge Dock to unload cement.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Report

09/26:
The Saginaw departed the Salt Dock at 9:00 a.m. Monday morning with the tug Idaho. The tug Rebecca Lynn and barge was heading out bound with the tug Washington at 10:00 a.m. That evening the saltie Agean Sea departed 22 East with assistance from the tug Washington. She had arrived Monday morning from Ashtabula. The Agean Sea was followed by the Lake Carling who went into 32 East with one tug.

The Sea Eagle II with the barge St. Mary Cement was expected to arrive about 2:30 a.m. this morning for Blue Circle cement.

In Ashtabula Sunday, the Federal Bergen arrived for the Pinney dock and was expected to depart by this afternoon.

Pictures by TZ
Saginaw departs.
Close up of her stern.
Tug Rebecca Lynn.
Rebecca Lynn and barge are towed through the river.
Another view.
A close up of the tug Washington.
The tow continues on.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Toronto Update

09/26:
McKeil tugs were busy Monday turning Finikas at the Redpath Sugar. She was turned at the dock to allow her to finish unloading her cargo of sugar. The cruise ship Le Levant departed the harbor early that morning. Departing a long lay-up Monday afternoon was the Canadian Venture. She departed under her own power via the west gap.

Reported by: Gerry O.




Museum Ship Damaged

09/26:
The Museum Ship Norgoma in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario had its tourist season cut short over the weekend when vandals caused thousands of dollars of damage to the historic vessel. A total of 85 windows and 30 exterior light fixtures were smashed early Sunday morning.

The Norgoma was built in 1950 in Collingwood, carried 100 passengers and freight from Owen Sound to Sault Ste. Marie until 1963, stopping at several northern Lake Huron ports including Manitoulin Island.

The city purchased the vessel in 1975 and each season it attracts close to 10,000 visitors.

Reported by: Bill Bird




Captain of the Mesabi Miner Speaks Out

09/26:
An interesting Letter to the Editor appeared in the September 25 issue of the Detroit Free Press. The letter was from Mesabi Miner Captain Timothy Dayton regarding the ongoing controversy of ballast water entering the Great Lakes and how best to handle it.

Click here to read the letter

Reported by: Ross Ruehle




Will you be 1 Million?

09/26:
The counter on the main page will top 1,000,000 today. Be sure to check the number as you log onto the Home Page. This counter was started as the page was launched in 1995.
Please e-mail if you are the 1 millionth visitor. The millionth visitor will be verified by checking the server log, please do not repeatedly reload the page.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 26

The CHI-CHEEMAUN cleared the shipyard on September 26, 1974.

The H.M. GRIFFITH was christened on September 26, 1973 at Collingwood. The CCGS GRIFFON was launched September 26, 1969 by Davie Shipbuilding Ltd., Lauzon, Que.

ROGER M. KYES (b) ADAM E. CORNELIUS) returned to service on September 26, 1984, she had grounded off McLouth Steel and ended crosswise in the Detroit River's Trenton Channel a month before.

The BELLE RIVER was side swiped by the Liberian FEDERAL RHINE at Duluth on September 26, 1985. Both vessels received minor damage.

On 26 September 1914, MARY N. BOURKE (WOODEN SCHOONER-BARGE, 219’, 920gt, BUILT IN 1889 AT Baraga, MI) was docked at Peter’s Lumber Dock in St. Mary’s Bay, 15 miles north of St. Ignace, MI. The crew was awakened at 9:30-10:00 p.m. by smoke coming from her hold and they escapes. The BOURKE burned to the waterline and the fire spread ashore, destroying the dock and a pile of lumber.

At 3:00 AM, 26 September 1876, the steam barge LADY FRANKLIN burned while moored near Clark's dock, about three miles from Amherstburg in the Detroit River. One life was lost. This vessel had been built in 1861 as a passenger steamer and ran between Cleveland and Port Stanley. In 1874, she was converted into a lumber freighter, running primarily between Saginaw and Cleveland. The burned hull was rebuilt in 1882.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Update

09/25:
The tug Roger Stahl and tug Caribe Challenger with barges in tow docked at Wharf 2 below Lock 1 in the Welland Canal shortly before 6:00 p.m. Sunday. It is unclear if the tow was to continue on last night or wait for daybreak today.

Pictures by Jeff Thoreson taken on Saturday.
Bow view of the Roger Stahl with barges.
Stahl backs away from the barges .
The barges.
Stern view of the tow with the tug Caribe Challenger.

Reported by: Jason Junge




Tadoussac Departs

09/25:
The Tadoussac departed Port Weller Dry Docks at 5:50 p.m. Sunday. The vessel was assisted out by the tug James E. Mcgrath and turned mid-channel to face downbound, she then tied up above Lock 1 to take on ballast. Once ballasting was complete, the vessel passed through Lock 1 for Lake Ontario to conduct tests on the steering gear. She spent three weeks under going repairs to the steering gear.

The Tadoussac will return to Port Weller at the end of the season for a winter-long widening and modernization project. The vessel's width will be increased to 78-feet. The cargo holds will be rebuilt to a single belt system, dust control will be rebuilt for the handling of cement clinker and iron ore. Her gates will also be automated.

Also in for repairs at Port Weller Dry Docks, the Algowood now has port and starboard mid and wing tanks attached The shell plating on the bottom of the vessel has also been repaired.

Reported by: Jason Junge and Mark J. Hall




Great Lakes Trader Makes First Trip

09/25:
Great Lakes Trader made its first call in the Twin Ports overnight on Sept. 23-24 to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal. The vessel departed about 7:30 a.m. Sept. 24, meeting the inbound Oglebay Norton about two miles off the Duluth piers.

Reported by: Al Miller




Oldies but Goodies

09/25:
Older boats made a fine showing in Cleveland Sunday morning. At 8:30 a.m. the Southdown Challenger, the oldest operating vessel on the lakes, was being towed down the river at Center Street by the G tug Delaware. The Saginaw was heading up river to unload stone with the assistance of another G tug at the same time. The Cuyahoga was unloading stone on the old river at the same time. Together the boat's ages made nearly 200 years of shipping on one river.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Soo Update

09/25:
With the high winds that the Soo area has been receiving the last few days, Sunday there were four vessels waiting out low water levels in the lower St. Marys River.

The vessels include the Burns Harbor, the Presque Isle and the Gordon C. Leitch, which are at anchor in the upper river while the Philip R. Clarke locked through and went to the Old Carbide Dock in Sault Saint Marie, Michigan. The Clarke is not only waiting the low water level to rise, but is having work done to her radar.




Special Report

09/25:
Saltwater ships frequently anchor off Duluth-Superior while waiting to load grain. Although the vessels may look idle, work must still be done to prepare their cargo holds to receive grain and clear the ships for arrival in port. This work often involves the ship’s agent, agricultural inspectors and inspectors from a cargo bureau, such as National Bureau of Cargo.

Click here to join a boarding party on their visit to the Spar Jade





Today in Great Lakes History - September 25

In tandem tow, the MENIHEK LAKE and LEON FALK, JR. arrived at Vigo, Spain on September 25, 1985. The MENIHEK LAKE was scrapped at Vigo, and the FALK was towed to Gijón, Spain for scrapping.

The HENRY C. FRICK departed Bay City on her maiden voyage on September 25, 1905 and rammed and damaged the Michigan Central R.R. Bridge at Bay City.

On 25 September 1869, COMMENCEMENT (2-mast wooden schooner, 75', 73 t, built in 1853 at Holland, Michigan) was carrying wood in her hold and telegraph poles on deck from Pentwater, Michigan for Milwaukee when she sprang a leak 20 miles off Little Sable Point on Lake Michigan. The incoming water quickly overtook her pump capacity. As the crew was getting aboard the lifeboat, she turned turtle. The crew clung to the upturned hull for 30 hours until the passing steamer ALLEGHENY finally rescued them. COMMENCEMENT later washed ashore, a total wreck.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Update

09/24: 11:00 a.m. Update
With the ocean tug Caribe Challenger now in the lead towing position and the Gaelic tug Roger Stahl tailing off, the two U.S. Navy barges departed Warf 16 at 8:00 Sunday morning and proceeding downbound the Welland Canal.

Check back for updates, please e-mail with sightings or pictures.

Original Report
The tugs Roger Stahl towing the Navy barges, assisted by the tug Caribe Challenger waited Saturday to passed through the Welland Canal. Due to the wind conditions the tow will wait until Sunday morning to depart Warf 16.

Pictures by Jeff Thoreson taken on Saturday.
Bow view of the Roger Stahl with barges.
Stahl backs away from the barges .
The barges.
Stern view of the tow with the tug Caribe Challenger.

Reported by: the Gaelic Tug Boat Company and Jeff Thoreson




Poe Lock Closure

09/24:
The Poe Lock, the only lock capable of allowing the 1000-footers to pass between Lake Superior and Lake Huron, will be closed to traffic on Tuesday to allow repairs to the lower gates. The Poe is schedule to be closed from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Damage from an unknown source was noticed to one of the gates in late August.




Algowood Update

09/24:
Work continues on the Algowood at Port Weller Dry Docks. Neither side of the vessel has had the hull plating replaced as yet. Below is a recent picture of the work.

A view of the Algowood at Port Weller Dry Docks on Thursday.

Reported by: Dean J. Frazer




Soo Update

09/24:
In at the Algoma Steel Saturday was the Algolake with limestone. Once she finished unloading, she pumped all her ballast out and a dry survey was conducted on her. The Algoport arrived around 1:00 p.m. to unload Coal. Both vessels will head to Duluth, once finished in the Soo. The Algolake to load Coal, the Algoport to load Ore.

The Algosteel was downbound for the Soo last night on an unusual trip. She is sailing downbound from Thunder Bay, loaded with Oats bound for Toledo, Ohio.

Meanwhile the Atlantic Hickory with Sarah Spencer locked down bound, the last time the two will be paired together. The Hickory will be heading to the Coast while the Spencer will be going to the Dry-dock for her 5 year inspection. She will then be paired with a new tug.

The Radium Yellowknife also arrived pushing the 9 Radium Barges, along with the Purvis tug Avenger IV at the lead pulling. They will be staying at the Purvis Dock awaiting the weather on Lake Superior to clear.

Reported by: Eric LaRoue




Twin Ports Report

09/24:
The waters off Duluth were dotted with anchored vessels Saturday. Armonikos, Yria, Algoville, Pany R. and Spar Jade were all anchored out waiting for berths at the elevators. Federal Yukon was expected to join the crowd overnight. Algoville may come in Sunday, but the salties will come in Monday or early next week. Another Canadian laker was anchored off Superior Entry waiting for BNSF ore docks. Inside port, Cartierdoc was loading at Peavey Connors Point and Apj Anjli remained at Cenex Harvest States. Windoc remains in drydock at Fraser Shipyards.

Another view of Windoc at Fraser.
The loneliest boat in town - John Sherwin.

Reported by: Al Miller




Algorail Visits Midland

09/24:
The Algorail arrived in Midland on Friday afternoon around 4:00 p.m. She was carrying a load of silica sand from the Badgely Island quarry in northern Georgian Bay. She unloaded her cargo at the Unimin stone dock and was outbound 8 hours later. Algorail and her fleet mate Algoway have been frequent callers this year.

During the gale force winds on Thursday, the water level in Midland Harbor rose by 1.5 to 2 feet. Being at the extreme south east end of Georgian Bay, Midland is susceptible to the wind's influence on the water level.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - September 24

On September 24th the A.H. FERBERT (2) went hard aground at the Cut-Off Channel’s southeast bend of the St. Clair River. Six tugs, GLENADA, ELMORE M. MISNER, BARBARA ANN, GLENSIDE, SHANNON and WM. A. WHITNEY, worked until late on the 26th to free her.

The FITZGERALD’s first cargo of taconite pellets was loaded September 24, 1958 at Silver Bay, MN. for Toledo, OH.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 entered service September 24, 1924.

In early morning fog on the St. Clair River September 24, 1962 the J.L. REISS was hit three glancing blows by U.S. Steel’s SEWELL AVERY. The AVERY had lost control just below Robert’s Landing and crossed the channel from the Canadian side and struck the J.L. REISS which was proceeding slowly by radar on the U.S. side.

On September 24, 1952, the Charles L. Hutchinson entered service. This vessel was renamed Ernest R. Breech when it was sold to the Ford Motor Company in 1962, and it was given its present name, Kinsman Independent, when it was sold to Kinsman Lines in 1988.

On September 23, 1991, J.W. McGIFFON rescued several people in a 24' pleasure craft off Presque Ile State Park. The group had been disabled since the day before. They were taken aboard the McGIFFON and their boat taken under tow.

September 24, 1924 - The PERE MARQUETTE 22 arrived Ludington on her maiden voyage.

On 24 September 1902, H.A. BARR (3 mast wooden schooner, 217’, 1119GT, built in 1893 at W. Bay City, MI) was in tow of the “saltie” THEANO with a load of iron ore in a storm 30 miles off Port Stanley in Lake Erie. She broke her tow line in giant waves and foundered. THEANO rescued her crew.

On 24 September 1879, the tug URANIA was towing the schooner S. V. R. WATSON into Sand Beach at about noon when the schooner struck the tug amidships, cutting a hole in the hull and sinking her in three fathoms of water. No lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, James Neumiller, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Update

09/23: 10:00 a.m. update
The tug Roger Stahl with two Navy barges arrived at Warf 16 at 8:00 a.m. this morning. Inspection was completed and the tow has been cleared to proceed through the Welland Canal. At 9:30 a.m. both tug crews were turning the aft barge around so the barges were stern to stern and will be cabled together.

The tow will enter Lock 8 with the tug Caribe Challenger on the towline ahead and the Roger Stahl with push gear astern.

In Lock 8 it will be determined if the two tugs and two barges will all fit in a lock together. If not the crew will break up the tow and take one barge at a time through each of the Canal's 8 locks. Pending traffic, the tow should proceed into Lock 8 around noon.

Check back for updates, please e-mail with sightings or pictures.

Original Report
The tug Roger Stahl with two Navy barges in tow was expected to meet the Caribe Challenger at 2:00 a.m. Saturday morning. The tow will secure for inspection before transiting the Welland Canal Saturday.

Pictures by William Hoey Sr., Gaelic Tug Boat Company
Tug Patricia Hoey assists the tow from the dock in Detroit.
The tow pulls away from the dock.
The bow of the first barge in the tow.
Roger Stahl heads out on to the Detroit River.
The massive barges dwarf the Roger Stahl as they depart.
Patricia Hoey trailing the tow as they turn to head down the Detroit River.

Reported by: the Gaelic Tug Boat Company




Grain Handlers Strike

09/23:
The Canadian Press reports that grain handlers in Thunder Bay agreed Thursday to resume negotiations instead of striking against the Lakehead Terminal Elevators Association.

The key issues for the 350-grain handlers are reported to include the use of temporary workers, pension reductions and increased hours of work. Negotiations for a new three-year contract broke off late last week.

A strike by the grain handlers threatened to shut down the port at the height of harvest season when grain and oilseed exports increase and must be completed before the winter freeze-up. Much of the grain grown on the eastern Canadian Prairies is transported by rail to Thunder Bay where it is transferred to elevators and finally loaded into ships.

The port has an annual capacity of 1.399 million tonnes, making it the largest port in Canada although a greater volume is handled at the western Port of Vancouver.

Reported by: John Stark




Milwaukee Duck Raised

09/23:
The Milwaukee Ducks amphibious tour vehicle that sank Monday was raised from the waters of Milwaukee Harbor by commercial salvers and transported to shore late Tuesday afternoon. The vessel sank 75 yards off shore in 26 feet of water.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Tugs Pass

09/23:
Tug Triton was downbound the Detroit River at Fighting Island South Light at 7:30 a.m. Friday morning with the tugs New York and California in tow.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Coast Guard Rescues Four

09/23:
On Thursday the pleasure craft Icarus reported they were aground in heavy waves and taking on water over the stern. The U.S. Coast Guard Station Saginaw and Air Station Detroit responded. A helicopter from Air Station Detroit hoisted the three persons and one dog from the vessel and transported them to the Bad Axe Airport in good condition. The vessel's owner was making arrangements for salvage.




Twin Ports Report

09/23:
Great Lakes Trader is scheduled to make its first trip to the Twin Ports on Sept. 23. It's due to arrive at Midwest Energy Terminal about 5 p.m. local time.

Midwest Energy Terminal has a busy weekend scheduled. Although subject to change and delays, the line-up as of Friday was Paul R. Tregurtha, Great Lakes Trader and Algolake arriving Sept. 23, followed by Oglebay Norton and Canadian Enterprise on Sept. 24.

Cenex Harvest States remains the busiest grain elevator in the Twin Ports. Kinsman Independent cleared the #1 loading berth late Thursday or early Friday and was replaced by Apj Anjli. The only other elevator loading on Friday was Peavey Connors Point, handling the Cartierdoc. Several salties are due to arrive in port or to anchor on the lake this weekend. They include Pany R., Amonikos, Spar Jade, and Admiral Ushakov, all calling for grain. Swallow is due at Hallett Dock to load bentonite, a clay-like material often used to bind other materials together. Canadian Ranger also is due over the weekend to load grain.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

09/23:
Friday the Mantadoc was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator. She was expected to depart Friday night or sometime Saturday depending on the loading process. The tanker Gemini was at the B-P Oil Dock preparing to load cargo.

The tug Mary E. Hannah with her barge was at the Sun Oil Dock loading cargo. The saltie TORO was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading steel products. Salties scheduled to arrive at the T.W.I. Dock are the Lake Champlain and Lake Carling due sometime within the next week.

The Armco was at the Torco Dock unloading ore. The next scheduled ore boat will be the Armco due in on Wednesday at 5:00 p.m. No boats were loading at the CSX Coal Docks. The next scheduled coal boats are the Wolverine, Algosoo and CSL Niagra all due in Sunday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Indiana Harbor in Conneaut

09/23:
The Indiana Harbor, in a break from her normal run, unloaded ore in Conneaut, OH. She arrived on Thursday night. After unloading the vessel shifted to the coal dock Friday morning.

The Indiana Harbor loading. Jeff Thoreson

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson and Mike Madigan




Large Pleasure Craft in the Seaway

09/23:
Friday was an unusual day on the Seaway. Pleasure craft are seldom heard calling on the radio to check in to the control stations unless they are large. Friday three vessel were in the Seaway near Kingston:
Sea Quest 92-feet - eastbound, Crossover
Islander C 154-feet sailing vessel from Toronto - eastbound, Sodus Lady M (W) 92-feet - westbound, Cape Vincent.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Coast Guard Exercise Simulates Major Incident

09/23:
Early Wednesday morning U.S. and Canadian agencies conducted a drill simulating a major accident in the Detroit River. The drill was practice if there was ever a need of a multi-area and bi-national response operation.

The exercise involved the collision of the tank barge Hannah 3601 and motor vessel H. Lee White near the Detroit River Light along U.S./Canada border in the Detroit River. Details presumed 100,000 gallons of #6 oil from #1 port cargo tank was discharged from the Hannah 3601. The barge remained anchored at the site of collision with Detroit River Corridor shut down to commercial traffic.

Put in place was Emergency Vessel Traffic Service system with Canadian Coast Guard Sarnia, Ontario, Marine Communications and Traffic Services (MCTS). The drill detailed damage to both vessels with no pollution from freighter. Damage to freighter was forward of the collision bulkhead and the vessel was enroute to Detroit Edison Trenton, Mich., to offload coal cargo and refuel in anticipation of more complete dockside survey with orders to proceed to shipyard for repair.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 23

On 23 September 1910, BETHLEHEM (steel propeller package freighter, 290’, 2633GT, built in 1888 at Cleveland) was carrying general merchandise when she went ashore in a gale on the SW side of S. Manitou Island in Lake Michigan. Lifesavers and the crew unloaded her over several days. Although battered by several storms while ashore, she was eventually pulled free and repaired. She lasted until 1925 when she was scrapped.

The scow WAUBONSIE was launched at the Curtis yard in Fort Gratiot, Michigan on 23 September 1873.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Departs

09/22:
With the strong westerly winds easing, Captain John Wellington of Gaelic Tugboat Company's tug Roger Stahl ordered the lines let go at 5:45 p.m. Thursday and departed Nicholson Terminal Detroit. With the two US Navy barges in tow and with the assistance of the tug Patricia Hoey tailing off the tow, they proceeded down the Detroit River bound for Port Colborne. The twin engine, 3,000 horsepower Stahl expects to take 30 hours to tow the barges to Port Colborne, the Lake Erie entrance of the Welland Canal.

Once the Roger Stahl and barges arrive off the Welland Canal the tug Carbie Challenger will join the tow for the trip through the Seaway. The Carbie Challenger is currently waiting in Buffalo.

The trip through the Welland will be interesting and sure to draw a lot of attention. It will be a tight fit as the two tugs and two barges squeeze into each lock of the canal. The locks can accommodate vessels with a maximum length of 740-feet over all.

Pictures by William Hoey Sr., Gaelic Tug Boat Company
Tug Patricia Hoey assists the tow from the dock.
The tow pulls away from the dock.
The bow of the first barge in the tow.
Roger Stahl heads out on to the Detroit River.
The massive barges dwarf the Roger Stahl as they depart.
Patricia Hoey trailing the tow as they turn to head down the Detroit River.

Reported by: the Gaelic Tug Boat Company




Tow Departs Sarnia

09/22:
At dock in Sarnia for more than a week were the tug Radium Yellowknife and her tow of nine deck barges. The tow has been waiting for weather to improve before continuing upbound for Thunder Bay. The unusual tow began on the Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories, Canada transiting the Northwest Passage across the Arctic. Icebreaker assistance was required in Frobisher Bay because of shifting ice fields. They continued down the coast of Labrador, and through the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Three barges each have two stacked on their deck. They are secured together by several steel plates welded along their sides.

The Radium Yellowknife is a 120-foot river style towboat, powered by a pair of V12 D398 Caterpillars, developing approx. 1600 hp. It is interesting to note that the tug that made this rugged voyage is flat bottomed, has a draft of only four feet, and a blunt bow that sent seawater cascading over the wheelhouse. The tug will remain in Thunder Bay once this long tow is completed.

Reported by: George Lee




Mapleglen in Sarnia

09/22:
The Mapleglen arrived in Sarnia Thursday morning at 6:20 a.m. to load feed wheat for Goderich, Ont. She departed that afternoon after loading 3,238 metric tonnes.

Reported by: Doug Schilz




More Weather Delays

09/22:
Gale Warnings on Lake Ontario yesterday sent some vessels to anchor. On eastern Lake Ontario the Algosoo and Manitoulin were anchored east of Carelton Island waiting for the weather to improve. Overnight the gale warnings were expected to be downgraded to winds of 10 knots.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Twin Ports Report

09/22:
The Twin Ports were not exactly bustling with activity Sept. 21, but several vessels were busy. Kinsman Independent was loading grain at Cenex Harvest States while Cartierdoc was arriving through Superior Entry bound for the Peavey Connors Point elevator. Kaye E. Barker departed DMIR ore dock after unloading stone. It stopped to fuel at the port terminal and then departed right behind Mesabi Miner, which had loaded coal overnight at Midwest Energy Terminal.
Kinsman Independent loading at Cenex Harvest States.
Kaye E. Barker fueling at the Murphy Oil fuel dock.
Mesabi Miner picks up speed as it departs Midwest Energy Terminal.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - September 22

On September 22, 1958, the Edmund Fitzgerald entered service, departing River Rouge, Michigan for Silver Bay, Minnesota on its first trip. The Fitzgerald's first load was 20,038 tons of taconite pellets for Toledo. The vessel would, in later years, set several iron ore records during the period from 1965 through 1969.

While in ballast, the ROGER M. KYES (b- ADAM E. CORNELIUS) struck bottom in Buffalo Harbor September 22, 1976 sustaining holes in two double bottom tanks and damage to three others, whereupon she proceeded to Chicago for dry docking on September 27, 1976 for survey and repairs.

While being towed from Duluth, MN by the Canadian tug TUSKER on September 22, 1980, the D.G. KERR (2) rammed into the breakwater at Duluth causing $200,000 in damages to the breakwater. The tow apparently failed to make the turning buoy leaving Duluth Harbor.

On September 22, 1911 the HENRY PHIPPS collided with and sank her Steel Trust fleetmate, steamer JOLIET (1), which was at anchor on the fog shrouded St. Clair River near Sarnia, Ont. The JOLIET (1) sank without loss of crew and was declared a total loss. The PHIPPS then continued her downbound journey and collided with the Wyandotte Chemical steamer ALPENA (1) that incurred only minor damage.

The T.W. ROBINSON and US.265808 (former BENSON FORD (2) departed Quebec City in tow of the Polish tug JANTAR bound for Recife where they arrived on September 22, 1987. Scrapping began the next month in October.

The West freed MATHILDA DESGAGNES from polar ice in the Arctic on September 22, 1988 German Icebreaker Research Vessel POLARSTERN.

September 22, 1913 - The ANN ARBOR NO. 5 struck bottom in the Sturgeon Bay Canal and damaged her rudder and steering gear. After undergoing repairs at Milwaukee, she was back in service the following October.

On 22 September 1887, ADA E. ALLEN (wooden propeller steam barge, 90’, 170GC, built in 1872 at Walpole Island, Ont.) caught fire while moored at Amherstburg, Ont. She was cut loose and set adrift to prevent the fire from spreading ashore. She drifted to Bois Blanc (Bob-Lo) Island and burned to a total loss.

On 22 September 1882, Mr. H. N. Jex accepted the contract to recover the engine and boiler from the MAYFLOWER, which sank in the Detroit River in 1864. He was to be paid $600 upon delivery of the machinery at Windsor, Ontario. He succeeded in raising the engine on 12 October and the boiler shortly thereafter.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, James Neumiller, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Update

09/21: 11:30 a.m. update
Gaelic Tugboat Company's tug Roger Stahl and its tow of two big US Navy barracks barges enroute from Marinette, WI. to the sea are still awaiting the gale warnings to be removed from Lake Erie. As shown in the photos below at Nicholson Terminal in Detroit, the tug has been refueled, supplied and moved into position. With its big towing machine cable attached to the tow, they are ready to proceed when the weather improves.

Reports from the seagoing tug Carbie Challenger waiting for the tow at Buffalo is very strong winds from the West. Captain John Wellington has everything in order and ready to sail. The next forecast will be issued at 4:00 p.m.

Pictures by William Hoey Sr., Gaelic Tug Boat Company
The Patricia Hoey assists asembleing the tow.
Another View.
The Stahl waits at the dock.
Looking from the Roger Stahl to the barges.
The tugs Roger Stahl and Patricia Hoey at dock.
Captian Wellington waits on the Roger Stahl.

Original Report
The tug Roger Stahl and Navy barrack barges remain docked off the Detroit River waiting for the strong winds to calm before departing for the Welland Canal. Wednesday night Lake Erie was under a gale warning with winds forecast to turn westerly with gales 30 to 40 knots overnight.

The tug crew was expected to prepare the barges for tow today. As soon as the Gale warnings are discontinued the Tug Roger Stahl and Patricia Hoey will depart with the tow bound for the Seaway.

Check back for updates, please e-mail with sightings or pictures.

Don Coles of Great Lakes Aerial Photos flew over the barges docked at the Nicholson Terminal - Ecorse Dock. Below are digital images taken by Don.
Wide view of the Terminal.
Closer look.

Mike Nault was on the ground and sent in the images below.
Looking from the front of the slip, the former Bob-Lo boats with the barges at the far end.
The barges at dock.
Close up of the bow.

Reported by: the Gaelic Tug Boat Company




Paterson Loads

09/21:
Paterson arrived early Tuesday morning to load at the Cargill Elevators in Sarnia. She departed on Wednesday night after loading 27,482 metric tonnes of #2 white wheat bound for Sorel, Quebec.

The vessel was loaded down to 25-feet 3-inches and reported her sounding machine as reading "0" feet clearance under the keel as they departed the dock.

Reported by: Doug Schilz




Twin Ports Report

09/21: 11:30 a.m. update
The Paterson boat that entered drydock at Fraser Shipyards on Sept. 20 was Windoc and not the Cartierdoc, as originally reported.

Windoc arrived in Duluth on the morning of Sept. 20. Later in the day, it proceeded to enter Fraser Shipyards for unspecified repairs. This is one of the few times in recent memory that a Canadian vessel has called at the shipyard.
Windoc at Fraser Shipyards Thursday morning.
A closer look.
Bow View.

After standing idle for about a day and a half, the Kinsman Independent departed the General Mills layby dock in Duluth shortly before noon Sept. 20 and proceeded to the turning basin below the Blatnik Bridge to wait for Milin Karnak to clear the Cenex Harvest States dock. The KI stood off to one side for the departing saltie and the immediately proceeded into the dock.

Kaye E. Barker was due into DMIR late in the afternoon to unload stone before proceeding to Silver Bay for pellets. Mesabi Miner was due into DMIR late Sept. 20 to load ore. Lee A. Tregurtha was scheduled to arrive BNSF in Superior for ore.

Duluth's entry looked like a parade route Wednesday morning with Walter J. McCarthy Jr., James R. Barker and a third vessel -- possibly Cartierdoc -- arriving within about 30 minutes. McCarthy went straight to Midwest Energy Terminal to begin the 8-hour loading process. Barker spent a couple hours in port, then departed, reportedly to load at Two Harbors. Later in the day, Mesabi Miner was due into port to load at Midwest Energy. It wasn't clear whether the Barker was rerouted to avoid a delay at the coal dock or for some reason involving the DMIR ore dock.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

09/21:
Wednesday the Cuyahoga was loading corn at the Andersons "E" Elevator. The Mantadoc was at the T.W.I. Dock. The USCGC Mobile Bay was at the City Dock. The Algoport was the next scheduled coal boat expected to load Wednesday evening. After the Algoport the next boat to load coal will be the Algosoo. She is expected to arrive on Saturday evening. The next scheduled ore boat for the Torco Dock will be the Fred R. White JR. on Friday evening.

Tentative grain vessels scheduled to arrive are the Mantadoc for Andersons "E" Elevator, Tadoussac and Ziemia Zamojska for Andersons "K" Elevator. With gale force winds predicted for Lake Erie for the next two days there will likely be changes or delays for the vessels scheduled to arrive in port.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - September 21

ALGOWAY (2) left Collingwood on her maiden voyage in 1972 and loaded salt for Michipicoten, Ont. on Lake Superior.

On 21 September 1844, JOHN JACOB ASTOR (wooden brig, 78’, 112T, Built in 1835 at Pointe Aux Pins, Ont, but precut at Lorain, OH) was carrying furs and trade goods when she struck a reef and foundered near Copper Harbor, MI. She was owned by Astor’s American Fur Company. She was reportedly by the first commercial vessel on Lake Superior.

On 21 September 1855, ASIA (2-mast wooden schooner, 108', 204 t, built in 1848 at Black River, Ohio) was carrying corn from Chicago for Buffalo when she collided with the propeller FOREST CITY off the mouth of Grand Traverse Bay. ASIA went down in deep water in about 10 minutes, but her crew just had enough time to escape in her boat. The schooner HAMLET picked them up.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Update

09/20:
Tuesday morning the Gaelic Tugboat Company tugs Roger Stahl and Shannon arrived off Detroit, each towing one of the Navy barrack barges. The tug Patricia Hoey assisted the barges into the dock at the Nicholson Terminal - Ecorse Dock. This slip is located south of Detroit off the Detroit River and shared by the former Bob-Lo boats in lay-up.

The Roger Stahl and barges will now wait for the winds to calm before departing for the Welland Canal. The weather forecast calls for 30 knot or higher winds for the next two days, the tow needs a 36 - 48 hours weather window to cross Lake Erie.

Once the Roger Stahl and barges arrive off the Welland Canal the tug Carbie Challenger will join the tow for the trip through the canal. The Carbie Challenger is currently waiting in Buffalo.

The floating Navy barracks barges were built by Marinette Marine in Marinette, WI. They are en route to Norfolk, VA. and San Diego, CA. The barges are called APLs (auxiliary personnel living) and are complete temporary living quarters for Navy crews of ships that are being repaired.

Marinette Marine has built 15 floating barracks (then called YMBLs) of various sizes previous to these two.

These are true barges requiring shore power to operate. Each is 269-feet in length, 69-feet wide drawing 16-feet. The living quarters rise about 64-feet above the waterline with a displacement of 2,500 tons. There are berths for 250 Navy personnel and these are true living quarters with a barber shop, hair salon, fitness rooms, TV lounges, classrooms, computer labs and offices. The galley on board is capable of serving 1,150 meals in 90 minutes. One level of each barge is unreserved and can be used as needed; this space can berth another 100 people if needed.

Check back for updates, please e-mail with sightings or pictures.

Don Coles of Great Lakes Aerial Photos flew over the tow Monday. The tow was four miles east of the Harbor Beach Light in Lake Huron, below are pictures taken by Don.

The Roger Stahl towing the massive barges.
Another view.
Bow view of the tow.

Reported by: the Gaelic Tug Boat Company, Pat Pavlat and Marinette Marine Corporation




Ship Fueling Terminal Opens in Rogers City

09/20:
Halron Oil Company announces the opening of their new 3.2 million gallon, double-walled marine fueling terminal in Rogers City, MI. The terminal is located on the northern Lake Huron shoreline at the Michigan Limestone Operations (MLO). The fueling terminal is near the north end of the "Frog Pond" about 1000 feet from the Calcite Stone Docks. Great Lakes vessels regularly visit the dock to load stone.

Halron will lease the property from MLO and run the business independently. The terminal, which has a circumference of 411.8 feet, is the first one of this size in Michigan. It is doubled-walled so there was no need for land excavation and it will contain any leaks. The terminal has state-of-the-arts monitoring to detect any leaks.

The marine terminal will dispense fuel via a pipe line directly into a ship or by loading docks to semi-trucks for land-based fuel operations.

Reported by: Jerry Heinzel




Milwaukee Duck Sinks

09/20:
19 people were rescued from a Milwaukee Ducks amphibious tour vehicle Monday shortly before it sank in 26 feet of water inside the Milwaukee breakwall.

The 1960's British amphibious vehicle built by Alvis Stalwart has been carrying passengers on land and water tours around Milwaukee since June.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that several U.S. Coast Guard officers and Milwaukee police officers noticed the amphibious vehicle riding low in the water as they ate lunch. Coast Guard and Milwaukee police rescue craft were en route before the tour vehicle called for assistance. Their quick response allowed all 17 passengers and 2 crewmembers to be removed before the vessel sank about 200 feet from the Coast Guard station.

The vessel is expected to be recovered from the bottom of the harbor, at that time investigators will try to determine the cause of the sinking.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Twin Ports Report

09/20:
Kinsman Independent was in Duluth early on Sept. 19, tied up at the General Mills layby dock apparently waiting for the Cenex Harvest States grain elevator. Other lakers in port included Lee A. Tregurtha fueling at the Murphy Oil dock before making an unusual call at Midwest Energy Terminal, and Edwin H. Gott loading at the DMIR ore dock. Edgar B. Speer was due about midday at BNSF ore dock.

Sept. 20 also looks like an interesting day for boatwatchers. James R. Barker is scheduled to make one of its occasional calls at Midwest Energy Terminal, Kaye E. Barker will make an unusual call at DMIR to unload stone and Cartierdoc will be in port presumably for grain.

Reported by: Al Miller




Cleveland Update

09/20:
Tuesday was a busy day of traffic in and out of Cleveland. The tug Delaware assisted the Cuyahoga from the West Third Dock at 9:00 a.m. The Calcite II departed the Osterland dock at 1:00 p.m. The tug Idaho assisted the Paul H. Townsend into the Lafarge dock after the Iglehart departed. The Stephen B. Roman departed with two tugs about 3:00 p.m. after the American Republic passed.

The Ziemia Zamojska was expected to depart about 5:30 p.m. The Richard Reiss, Wolverine and an unknown salty are scheduled to arrive over night.

Pictures by TZ
Paul H. Townsend arrives with the tug Idaho.
A closer view.
The Townsend at dock.
American Republic passing the Stephen B. Roman.
Another view.
The Roman on her tow out.
Roman departs.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Show your support for the Steamship William G. Mather

09/20:
Your help is most urgently needed. Mayor White of Cleveland released a lakefront plan this summer that did not include the Steamship William G. Mather Museum. Now, with less than a week of notice, five public meetings have been scheduled throughout Cuyahoga County beginning September 19, 2000 to seek public input. Your presence and expressed support is critical at one or more of the following meetings.

Wednesday, Sept. 20, 7:00-8:30 PM
Gunning Park Center (16700 Puritas Ave.)

Saturday, Sept. 23, 9:00-10:30 AM
Middleburg Hts. Community Ctr. (16000 E. Bagley Rd.)

Saturday, Sept. 23, 9:00-10:30 AM
11:30 AM-1:00 PM Visiting Nurse Association (2500 E. 22nd St.)

Saturday, Sept. 23, 9:00-10:30 AM
2:30-4:00 PM Beachwood Cuyahoga Cty. Library (25501 Shaker Blvd.)

For more information please visit the Steamer William G Mather Museum Homepage




Today in Great Lakes History - September 20

On September 20, 1986, vandals started a $5,000. fire aboard the laid up NIPIGON BAY at Kingston where she had been since April, 1984.

GEORGE A. STINSON's self-unloading boom was replaced on September 20 1983. The Boom had collapsed onto her deck due to a mechanical failure on the night of April 19, 1983 at Detroit. No injuries were reported. She continued hauling cargoes without a boom until replacement.

On September 20, 1980, the EDGAR B. SPEER entered service.

The CHARLES E. WILSON sailed light on her maiden voyage from Sturgeon Bay September 20, 1973 bound for Escanaba, MI to load ore.

The CHARLES M. WHITE was christened at Baltimore on September 20, 1951.

On 20 September 1873, W.L. PECK (2 mast wooden schooner-barge, 154’, 361GT) was launched at Carrollton, MI.

On 20 September 1856, COLONEL CAMP (3-mast wooden bark, 137', 350 t, built in 1854 at Three Mile Bay, NY) was carrying wheat to Oswego, NY when she collided with the wooden steamer PLYMOUTH and sank in just a few minutes. No lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Update

09/19:
The tug Roger Stahl and tow arrived in lower Lake Huron Monday evening where they met the tug Shannon. The two captains, John Wellington on the Stahl and William Cline on the Shannon decided the best and safest way to handle the tow down the river was to break the tow up and each take a barge down the rivers.

The Shannon took a barge in tow and passed under the Blue Water Bridges about 10:30 p.m. The Stahl followed a few minutes behind. The tugs effortlessly towed their barges through the swift current below the bridges and continued downbound through the St. Clair and Detroit Rivers.

The tows are expected to arrive off Detroit about 5:15 a.m., Capt. William Hoey Jr. will bring the tug Patricia Hoey out to assist the barges into the dock at Nicholson Terminal, south of Detroit. The barges will be docked stern first so crews can reassemble the tow as one unit. The Roger Stahl will refuel and take on supplies and the tow will then be ready to depart depending on weather. Strong southwest winds are predicted Tuesday night and into Wednesday.

Check back for updates, please e-mail with sightings or pictures.

Don Coles of Great Lakes Aerial Photos flew over the tow about noon on Monday. The tow was four miles east of the Harbor Beach Light in Lake Huron, below are pictures taken by Don.

The Roger Stahl towing the massive barges.
Another view.
Bow view of the tow.

Reported by: the Gaelic Tug Boat Company, Doug Schilz and Wayne Brusate




Cecilia Desgagnes Sold for Scrap - Correction

09/19:
The report on Monday stating the Cecelia Desgagnes had been sold for scrap was said to be incorrect by officials with Group Desgagnes. They report that she has not been sold, but is perfectly seaworthy and sailing to the Arctic at this time.




Speer to Load in Superior

09/19:
The Edgar B. Speer was due Monday at the BNSF dock in Superior, WI. to load for Burns Harbor IN. This is her first call to the dock in many years. She is due in Burns Harbor on the 22nd.

Reported by: David French.




Taylor Waits

09/19:
The Myron C. Taylor anchored in Hedgehog Harbor yesterday, at the tip of the Door County, Wisconsin Peninsula. She was waiting for improved weather. There were gale warnings up on Lake Michigan, with waves already running about 10-feet from the southwest.

Reported by: Chuck Klima




Strike in Thunder Bay?

09/19:
The Reuters News Service reports that grain workers in Thunder Bay, ONT. voted in favor of a strike Sunday that would halt shipments of Canadian wheat and canola at the height of the harvest season. The report stated that a strike could take place as soon as 72 hours after union officials served noticed of the possible strike. A walkout could begin Thursday morning if a settlement is not reached.

The key issues for the 350-grain handlers are reported to include the use of temporary workers, pension reductions and increased hours of work.

Negotiations for a new three-year contract with the Western Grain Elevators Association (WGEA) and its Thunder Bay group, the Lakehead Terminal Elevators Association, broke off late last week.

Much of the grain grown on the eastern Canadian Prairies is transported by rail to Thunder Bay where it is transferred to elevators and finally loaded into ships.




Canadian Olympic Helps Save Life

09/19:
On the evening of September 13, the U.S. Coast Guard Group Buffalo responded to a vessel taking on water approximately nine miles north of Olcott, New York. As rescue craft were in route, communications with the 24-foot sailboat Polynesian was lost U.S. Coast Guard Station Niagara responded with their 41-foot rescue boat, Olcott county responded with three marine units and the Canadian Olympic scanned the area with her radar. The Canadian Olympic located the sailboat and witnessed flares in the vicinity of the sailboat. Station Niagara arrived on scene a short time later to find the sailboat unoccupied. They immediately began searching and located the sailboat's single occupant The man was reported to be mildly hypothermic but in good condition.




Tug and Barge Adrift on Lake Michigan

09/19:
Also on Sept. 13, the 60-foot tug Carol Anne broke tow with an unnamed crane barge transiting the vicinity of Manistee, MI. After a man was put on board the barge to reattach the tow, the tug collided with the barge and became disabled after losing her steering. U.S. Coast Guard Station Frankfort responded with a 44-foot rescue boat and was able to take the tug under tow. The barge was recovered by a sister tug from same fleet. Both vessels were enroute to Frankfort, MI.




Tough First Visit

09/19:
Last week the barge McKee Sons and tug Invincible made their first visit as a pair up the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland. The tug and barge were carrying a load for the LTV Steel Mill when they ran soft aground in the vicinity of the Columbus St. Bridge. The U.S. Coast Guard reports that while maneuvering back into the navigation channel, the McKee Sons backed into a moored recreational boat, significantly damaging the vessel's transom. The McKee Sons continued her transit and collided with the docked tug Frank Palladino, Jr. Inspectors from the U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Office in Cleveland boarded the vessel and found an approximate 8-inch fracture on the McKee Sons' starboard bow. The McKee Sons was later cleared to sail and no obvious damage was found at any other river location or to any other vessels.




Cleveland Update

09/19:
Monday the J.A.W. Iglehart came into to Lafarge with the tug Idaho at 6:00 p.m. The tug Delaware assisted the Calcite II up to Osterland Road Products (West Third) at 7:00 p.m. and was expected to depart about 5 to 6 hours later. The Stephen B. Roman was also expected to depart Monday night.

The Ziemia Zamojska arrived from the Welland Canal docking at 24 East to unload. The Cuyahoga was expected to arrive about 1:00 a.m.

Pictures by TZ
The Idaho working with the J.A.W. Iglehart.
Close up.
Approaching the Lafarge Dock.
Calcite II arrives at the Cleveland lighthouse.
Close up of her bow entering the river.
In the river.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Show your support for the Steamship William G. Mather

09/19:
Your help is most urgently needed. Mayor White of Cleveland released a lakefront plan this summer that did not include the Steamship William G. Mather Museum. Now, with less than a week of notice, five public meetings have been scheduled throughout Cuyahoga County beginning September 19, 2000 to seek public input. Your presence and expressed support is critical at one or more of the following meetings.

Tuesday, Sept. 19, 7:00-8:30 PM
Slovenian National Home Hall (6409 St. Clair Ave.)

Wednesday, Sept. 20, 7:00-8:30 PM
Gunning Park Center (16700 Puritas Ave.)

Saturday, Sept. 23, 9:00-10:30 AM
Middleburg Hts. Community Ctr. (16000 E. Bagley Rd.)

Saturday, Sept. 23, 9:00-10:30 AM
11:30 AM-1:00 PM Visiting Nurse Association (2500 E. 22nd St.)

Saturday, Sept. 23, 9:00-10:30 AM
2:30-4:00 PM Beachwood Cuyahoga Cty. Library (25501 Shaker Blvd.)

For more information please visit the Steamer William G Mather Museum Homepage




Oglebay Norton Acquires J.M. Huber Limestone Operation

09/19:
Global Stone Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Oglebay Norton Company announced last week that it acquired the assets of the J.M. Huber Corporation limestone processing facility located near Portage, Indiana. The purchase price was approximately $12 million. Global Stone intends to expand the facility, which will be known as Global Stone Portage, LLC, and will diversify the product and customer base over the coming year. Oglebay Norton management expects the transaction will be accretive to earnings in 2000.

The acquired assets include the processing equipment, a long-term lease for the property located in the Burns Harbor area at the Port of Indiana which includes dock access to Lake Michigan, and the assignment of key customer contracts. The facility currently provides fine-ground limestone for use in environmental applications to regional utilities.

Danny R. Shepherd, President of Global Stone said: "We expect this acquisition to strengthen our leadership position in our environmental technologies and industrial fillers business. We will broaden the facility's customer base and product portfolio to include roofing materials and industrial fillers for customers in the Midwest. In addition, we have negotiated extensions to the agreements with key customers at the facility and anticipate excellent long-term relationships with them."

John N. Lauer, Chairman, President and CEO of Oglebay Norton Company added: "This acquisition is an example of our ability to integrate the entire supply chain from the limestone quarry to final end-use customers. Global Stone Portage will use high quality limestone from our Michigan Limestone quarries. The limestone will then be transported by our Marine Services vessels to our new facility at Burns Harbor where it will be processed into finished products and delivered to our customers. With this fully integrated process, we can provide high quality products and timely service for our customers."

J.M. Huber is a privately held diversified multinational supplier of engineered materials, natural resources and technology-based services. Global Stone Corporation, headquartered in Roswell, Georgia, is a leading supplier of industrial fillers, lime, aggregates and other limestone products.

Reported by: the Oglebay Norton Company




Today in Great Lakes History - September 19

LEON FALK, JR. and MENIHEK LAKE arrived in Spain on September 19, 1985 for scrapping.

When SATURN (4) entered service and made her first trip to Toledo, OH on September 19, 1974, she became the first of three tankers built for the fleet's modernization program.

The EDGAR B. SPEER departed the shipyard on her maiden voyage September 19, 1980 bound for Two Harbors, MN where she loaded her first cargo of taconite pellets.

The GRAND HAVEN (Twin Screw Rail Car Ferry) was laid up in the spring of 1965 at the old Pennsylvania Dock at Cleveland and later at dockage on the Old River Bed where she sank on September 19, 1969.

September 19, 1997 - officials at Lake Michigan Carferry, Inc. announced that the CITY OF MIDLAND 41 would be converted to a barge.

On 19 September 1893, SAMUEL BOLTON (wooden schooner-barge, 150’, 330GT, built in 1867 at Bangor, MI as a schooner) was loaded with lumber and being towed in fog in Lake Huron. She got lost from the tow and drifted ashore near Richmond, MI where she broke in two and was then torn apart by waves. She was owned by Brazil Hoose of Detroit.

On Saturday, 19 September 1891, at 11:00 AM, the whaleback steamer CHARLES W. WETMORE left Philadelphia, Pennsylvania loaded with the materials to build a nail mill, iron smelter and shipyard for the new city of Everett, Washington. Her skipper was Captain Joseph B. Hastings and she had a crew of 22.

On 19 September 1900, one hundred years ago, the Great Lakes schooner S. L. WATSON foundered off Cape Cod. She had been sent to the Atlantic the previous Autumn by her owned J. C. Gilchrist of Cleveland.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Update

09/18: 8:30 a.m. update
The Tug Roger Stahl and tow are scheduled to arrive at the Blue Water Bridges about 10:00 p.m. tonight. The tug Shannon is due to depart the Gaelic Yard between 12:30 and 1:00 p.m. to meet and assist the tow down the St. Clair and Detroit Rivers. The tow will stop for weather in Detroit for an unknown period of time. 30+ knot winds are forecast for the next several days.

Original Report
Strong southwest winds have caused the tow to run at a reduced speed. Along with a course change to avoid the heavy sea conditions, the tug Roger Stahl with Navy barrack barges in tow now expects to arrive in lower Lake Huron above the St. Clair River about 8:00 p.m. Monday night.

The tow passed under the Mackinac Bridge shortly after 11:00 a.m. Sunday drawing a lot of attention from those on shore and the bridge.

Gaelic's tug Shannon will depart the Gaelic Yard in Detroit to meet the tow in lower Lake Huron and assist through the rivers. The tug Patricia Hoey will then meet the tow at the Ambassador Bridge. The Patricia will assist the tow into the dock so the Roger Stahl can refuel.

Once clear of the rivers, the 3000 horsepower Stahl will tow the barges to Port Colborne where it will meet the Tug Caribe Challenger. The two tugs will tow the barges out the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Check back for updates, please e-mail with sightings or pictures.

The 3000 horsepower tug Roger Stahl.
The massive barracks at dock in Marinette. Pat Pavlat
Another view. Pat Pavlat

Reported by: the Gaelic Tug Boat Company and Maureen Martin




Algosteel Grounds

09/18:
The Algosteel grounded off Amherstburg, ONT. in the lower Detroit River late Sunday. Gaelic tugboat's tug Carolyn Hoey and Shannon departed their dock to assist the stranded vessel. The tug Patricia Hoey followed the pair shortly after assisting the Algomarine into the Rouge River. The Patricia was heard clearing the Rouge at 9:27 p.m.

With the Patricia on scene a short time later, the trio made quick work of refloating the Algosteel. About 11:00 p.m. the tugs turned upbound for the Gaelic Yard on the Rouge River.

The Algosteel reached her destination at the Allied Chemical Dock a few minutes later and reported she would unload and depart about 4:00 a.m. for Toledo. There were no reports of damage to the Steel.




Cecilia Desgagnes Sold for Scrap

09/18:
Correction 9/19
The report below stating the Cecelia Desgagnes had been sold for scrap was said to be incorrect by officials with Group Desgagnes. They report that she has not been sold, but is perfectly seaworthy and sailing to the Arctic at this time.

Original report. The Group Desgagnes ship Cecelia Desgagnes has been sold for scrap at a reported rate of $148 dollars per ton. It is not known where she will be scrapped. The vessel was built in 1971 in Rauma Finland, and launched as the Carl Grothon. She was renamed Federal Pioneer in 1981. She was given her final name in 1985. Her dimensions were 374 ft. long x 55 ft. wide. x 35 ft. deep.

Reported by: Chris Franckowiak




G Tugs on the Move

09/18:
The Great Lakes Towing tug Triton arrived off the Milwaukee harbor entrance early Sunday Morning. They slowed down long enough for the crew on the Milwaukee based tug Superior to take their new tug the Arkansas in tow. The Triton then continued on to Chicago to drop off the Kansas. The Triton will take the Chicago based tug New York back to Cleveland along with the California from Milwaukee.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Cleveland Update

09/18:
Sunday morning traffic continued moving on the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland. The Richard Reiss departed CBS II (west third) at 4:30 a.m.

American republic continued to run the LTV shuttle. The Republic left LTV at 8:30 that morning. The Kellstone barge departed the river at 9:00 a.m. The James Hannah with an oil barge also came in Sunday morning sailing for west LTV.

The Stephen B. Roman was berthed at the cement dock at the mouth of the river lighten before heading up the river. At about 1:00 p.m. the G tugs Delaware and Idaho assisted the Roman upriver to the Blue Circle dock. The two tug crews did an outstanding job in the high winds with the Roman. This is a rare visit for the Roman up the Cuyahoga, only the second time this year she has gone to Blue Circle Cement (Owned by St. Mary's Cement). She was expected to depart sometime Tuesday.

Pictures by TZ
Richard Reiss unloading at night.
Stephen B. Roman at dock.
Stern view of the Roman.
Roman heading upriver at Collision Bend.
Tug Delaware assists the Roman into the Blue Circle dock.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy and Mike Madigan




Lake Erie Update

09/18:
The busy week for Conneaut, OH. started at approximately 3:00 a.m. with the H. Lee White at anchored off the port. About 5:00 a.m. the Cason J. Callaway entered port to unload ore. The barge Pere Marquette 41 had no trouble entering Conneaut about 7:00 a.m. The Arthur M. Anderson followed to unload at the stone dock. The Jean Parisien was scheduled to arrive about 10:00 p.m.

In Ashtabula, OH. the arrival of the Courtney Burton was delayed more than 12 hours due to poor weather. She was expected Sunday night at about 11:00 p.m.

The Anderson unloading. The H. Lee White is visible in the background to the right.
Another view of the Anderson.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson and Mike Madigan




Lake Superior Marine Museum Association to Transfer Collection

09/18:
SUPERIOR, Wis. - Thousands of historical photographs, documents and publications about Great Lakes shipping are being transferred from the collection of the Lake Superior Marine Museum Association to Jim Dan Hill Library at the University of Wisconsin-Superior.

The Association’s collection has been assembled since the 1973 opening of the Lake Superior Maritime Visitors Center in Duluth’s Canal Park. The Association’s 600 members support the mission of the Visitors Center, which is operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Materials in the collection have been donated over the years by individuals, businesses and government organizations, and are used by Visitors Center staff to assist in educating people about commerce on Lake Superior.

The decision to transfer the Association’s collection to UW-Superior was carefully considered by the LSMMA’s directors before they approved the action.

"Board members agreed that the transfer is in the best long-term interest for a valuable collection," said Association President Dennis Medjo. " Space was limited at the Visitors Center. This transfer is an opportunity for the collection to continue to grow, to receive the archival care it deserves, and to be more accessible to researchers and other users."

At UW-Superior, the collection will be under an archivist’s care and housed in a dedicated room in Jim Dan Hill Library. Everything will be cataloged, and fragile items such as old books and photographs will be placed in protective storage. Materials will be available for study during many of the hours that the library is open.

Bob Carmack, director of Jim Dan Hill Library, said the University is pleased to receive the collection. "The Lake Superior Marine Museum Association collection is going to receive wonderful care," he said. "We’ll be able to increase its availability to users, and it will become a key part of the research collection for UW-Superior’s program in Transportation and Logistics Management."

The collection includes more than 30,000 photographs of current and historic ships; books, journals, pamphlets and government registers; historic harbor charts; several hundred ship blueprints; and thousands of information files on nearly all modern commercial vessels that have sailed the lakes. Artifacts such as uniforms, liferings, and other items from ships will remain in the Association’s care at the Visitors Center.

C. Patrick Labadie, the former Visitors Center director who assembled much of the collection, endorsed its transfer to UW-Superior. "The collection is an important regional resource; the largest on the subject of Great Lakes commerce west of Milwaukee. I’d rate it among the best on the Lakes," he said. "It needs to receive the best possible care to be preserved for future generations."

As the collection is processed, the staff at Jim Dan Hill Library will put parts of the collection online and inform researchers how to access the collection.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - September 18

The E.J. BLOCK returned to service on September 18, 1946 as the first large bulk freighter powered by a diesel-electric power plant and one of the first equipped with commercial radar on the Great Lakes.

On September 18, 1959 the HENRY FORD II ran aground in the St. Marys River and damaged 18 bottom plates.

On September 18, 1958 the BEN MOREELL (2) collided with and sank the car ferry ASHTABULA in the harbor at Ashtabula, OH.

LAKE WINNIPEG was the first vessel to enter the Nipigon Transport fleet. She loaded her first cargo of 22,584 gross tons of iron ore clearing Sept Îles, Que. on September 18, 1962 bound for Cleveland.

The Pere Marquette carferry City of Midland 41 was launched on September 18, 1940, at Manitowoc, WI. She was built by Manitowoc Shipbuilding Corporation at a cost of $2 million. She was named after Midland, MI for one of the Pere Marquette Railway's biggest customers, Dow Chemical Co. She was christened by Miss Helen Dow, daughter of Willard H. Dow, president of Dow Chemical Co.

September 18, 1958 - The ASHTABULA sank after colliding with the Ben Moreel. Captain Louis Sabo in command.

On 18 September 1871, E.B. ALLEN (wooden schooner, 111’, 275T, built in 1864 at Ogdensburg, NY) was carrying grain when she collided with the bark NEWSBOY and sank off Thunder Bay Island in Lake Huron.

One hundred years ago today, on 18 September 1900, the large steamer CAPTAIN THOMAS WILSON was taken from her launch site on the Black River in Port Huron out to the St. Clair River. The tug HAYNES was at the bow and the tug BOYNTON at the stern. It took an hour and a half to maneuver through the various bridges. Newspapers estimated that a couple thousand persons watched the event. Once the WILSON made it to the St. Clair River, she was towed to Jenks Shipbuilding Company where she was completed and received her machinery.

On 18 September 1679, GRIFFON, the first sailing ship on the upper Lakes, left Green Bay with a cargo of furs. She left the explorer Robert Cavelier, Sieur de la Salle, behind. GRIFFON never reached her planned destination

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Departs - Update

09/17: 11:00 a.m. Update
The tug Roger Stahl with Navy barrack barges in tow is making better speed than originally expected. The tow was due to pass under the Mackinac Bridge at 10:30 a.m. this morning. At their present speed and weather conditions they could be down at the Blue Water Bridges Monday afternoon around 3:00 p.m. Gaelic's tug Shannon will depart the Gaelic Yard in Detroit Monday morning to meet the tow in lower Lake Huron and assist through the rivers. The tug Patricia Hoey will then meet the tow at the Ambassador Bridge around 10:00 p.m. The Patricia will assist the tow into the dock so the Roger Stahl can refuel.
Check back for updates, please e-mail with sightings or pictures.

Original Report
The tug Roger Stahl departed the Marinette, WI. Breakwall at 2:45 p.m. EDT with the two massive Navy barrack barges in tow. The tug put out 1000-feet of tow wire at 3:30 p.m. as the tow set out onto Lake Michigan. The powerful tug's 1-3/4" cable on the towing winch pulls the lead barge with the second barge following. The barges are connected by two 4-inch diameter lines and 1-1/4" cables.

With the tugs Jimmy L and Carla Anne Selvick assisting, the Roger Stahl towed the first barge through the Menakaunee Lift Bridge Saturday morning at 10:30 and tied the barge near the range light on the breakwall. The three tugs then proceeded back for the second barge. After clearing the bridge with the second barge they began assembling the tow. Veteran Captain John Wellington and crew made the work look easy despite worries about how much clearance there would be through the Menakaunee Bridge. As the Roger Stahl headed out past the lighthouse, Captain Wellington blew a series of salutes to the large crowd that had gathered to watch.

The tow is expected to pass under the Mackinac Bridge about noon today. The tow is then scheduled to meet an assist tug in lower Lake Huron Tuesday morning for the trip down the St. Clair and Detroit Rivers. In Detroit the tow will stop briefly for the Stahl to get fuel and supplies.

Once clear of the rivers, the 3000 horsepower Stahl will tow the barges to Port Colborne where it will meet the Tug Caribe Challenger. The two tugs will tow the barges out the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Check back for updates, please e-mail with sightings or pictures.

The 3000 horsepower tug Roger Stahl.
The massive barracks at dock in Marinette. Pat Pavlat
Another view. Pat Pavlat

Reported by: the Gaelic Tug Boat Company and Scott Best




Algorail at the Soo

09/17:
Shortly after noon hour Saturday the Algorail arrived to unload a partial load of road salt in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. Three hours later she finished. A few hours past before she would depart up bound after the Federal Fuji cleared the Soo Locks down. She then proceeded up to Lake Superior to unload the remainder of her cargo.




Cleveland Update

09/17:
The McKee Sons and tug Invincible departed Friday morning followed by the English River that afternoon.

High winds caused the McKee Sons to wait out the weather at the Cleveland Bulk Terminal. The tug and barge departed at 7:30 Saturday morning sailing upbound. The pair were in the Detroit River Saturday afternoon. The Richard Reiss was expected to arrive Friday morning but went to anchor to wait out the weather. She entered the Cuyahoga River 6:00 p.m. for West Third. The Reiss was expected to depart late Saturday night. The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder unloaded Friday night at the Osborne dock. The American Republic has been working the Lorain to Cleveland shuttle.

Pictures by TZ
Tug Invincible under tow.
Another view.
Stern view of the English River.
Video of the tow 1.3 meg

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Erie Update

09/17:
Erie's Big Boats on the Bay festival, in its second day proved to be a success Saturday. Hundreds showed up under to view the tall ships. In other Erie news, the H. Lee White entered Erie with a cargo for the Mounfort Terminal. She was next due in Conneaut, OH. at 3:00 this morning to load.

The Conneaut schedule looks interesting for the next week:
Sunday: H. Lee White, barge Pere Marquette 41 and Jean Parisien for the coal dock. The Cason J. Callaway for the ore dock and Arthur M. Anderson for the stone dock.

Monday: David Z. Norton for the coal dock.

Tuesday: David Z. Norton for the stone dock, barge Pere Marquette 41 , David Z. Norton and Elton Hoyt 2nd for the coal dock.

Wednesday: Coal Dock - CSL Niagara. Thursday: Ore Dock - Indiana Harbor. Coal Dock - barge Pere Marquette 41 and George A. Sloan.

Friday: Coal Dock - Indiana Harbor. Saturday: Algobay and Pere Marquette for the coal dock. Sept 28: Ore dock - Roger Blough.

Tall Ship Red Witch.
H.Lee White inbound.
Stern View.
The tall ship Picton Castle as seen from the True North.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Kingston News

09/17:
On Saturday the Chios Charm was tied up at Lock 3 Beauharnois for inspection. Apparently the vessel bumped the lower wall.

Saturday morning down bound vessel were told that two tugs were coming to move the vessel of the way and that traffic should be moving with out delay.

The Saturn was anchored again last night, for weather. She was anchored 2 miles West of Ostrander Point (Prince Edward County) on the North Shore.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Today in Great Lakes History - September 17

EVA DESGAGNES was launched September 17, 1955 as a) GRIFFON (2) for Beaconsfield Steamship Ltd., Montreal, Que.

On September 17, 1985, PATERSON suffered a crank case explosion as she was bound for Quebec City from Montreal. She was repaired and cleared on September 21.

On 17 September 1830, WILLIAM PEACOCK (wood sidewheel steamer, 102’, 120T, built in 1829 at Barcelona, NY) suffered the first major boiler explosion on Lake Erie while she was docked in Buffalo, NY. 15 - 30 lives were lost. She was rebuilt two years later and eventually foundered in a storm in 1835 near Ripley, OH.

On 17 September 1875, the barge HARMONY was wrecked in a gale at Chicago by colliding with the north pier which was under water. This was the same place where the schooner ONONGA was wrecked a week earlier and HARMONY came in contact with that sunken schooner. No lives were lost.

One hundred years ago, on 17 September 1900, a storm carried away the cabin and masts of the wrecked wooden 4-mast bulk freight barge FONTANA. The 231-foot vessel had been wrecked and sunk in a collision at the mouth of the St. Clair River in the St. Clair Flats on 3 August 1900. She had settled in the mud and gradually shifted her position. She eventually broke in two. After unsuccessful salvage attempts, the wreck was dynamited.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Arrives

09/16:
The tug Roger Stahl arrived in Marinette, Wisconsin at 2:00 a.m. Friday morning. The crew spent the day assembling the tow. Due to the weather the tow will not depart until Sunday morning.

The 3000 horsepower tug will tow two massive Navy barrack barges through the Seaway. The barges were recently built at the shipyard and will be stationed at Norfolk, Va. and San Diego Ca.

The Stahl will tow the barges to Port Colborne where it will meet the Tug Caribe Challenger. The two tugs will tow the barges out the St. Lawrence Seaway.

The first challenge will come moving the barges through the Menakaunee Lift Bridge as they depart Marinette.

The 3000 horsepower tug Roger Stahl.
The massive barracks at dock in Marinette. Pat Pavlat
Another view. Pat Pavlat

Reported by: William Hoey Jr., Gaelic Tug Boat Company




Interesting Tow Waits in Sarnia

09/16:
On Friday, the tugs W.N. Twolan and Radium Yellowknife laid at the government dock awaiting weather. The pair are towing nine identical deck barges to Thunder Bay, Ontario for use in the wood products trade.

The unusual tow began on the Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories, Canada transiting the Northwest Passage across the Arctic. Icebreaker assistance was required in Frobisher Bay because of shifting ice fields. They continued down the coast of Labrador, and through the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Three barges each have two stacked on their deck. They are secured together by several steel plates welded along their sides.

The Radium Yellowknife is a 120 foot river style towboat, powered by a pair of V12 D398 Caterpillars, developing approx. 1600 hp. It is interesting to note that the tug that made this rugged voyage is flat bottomed, has a draft of only four feet, and a blunt bow which sent sea water cascading over the wheelhouse. The tug will remain in Thunder Bay once this long tow is completed.

Reported by: George Lee




Twin Ports Report

09/16:
Perhaps the most unusual sight of the season in the Twin Ports took place the morning of Sept. 15 with Elton Hoyt II pulling into Cenex Harvest States berth 1 for its fourth grain trip to Superior while Mapleglen loaded in Cenex Harvest States berth 2 on what may be its first trip of the season to the Twin Ports.

The cruise shp C. Columbus is scheduled to make its second trip of the season to Duluth, arriving the morning of Sept. 17.

The smaller vessels of USS Great Lakes Fleet have calling at some interesting ports in the past few days. Cason J. Callaway was scheduled to load in Toledo on Sept. 17 with cargo bound for Escanaba; Philip R. Clarke unloaded cargo in Green Bay on the 15th; John G. Munson was due to unload at Ontonagon, Mich., on the 15th before proceeding on to Two Harbors to load; Myron C. Taylor also called at Green Bay on the 15th; and Calcite II was in Green Bay on the 14th.

Reported by: Al Miller




Kingston News

09/16:
After a busy day yesterday the seaway was very quiet. Friday morning there were no eastbound ETA's east of midlake for a long time. The Mantadoc was eastbound early that morning. The Admiral Ushakov (W) was told he was the only vessel on Lake Ontario.

The tanker Saturn was at anchor, 1.2 miles West of lighted Buoy 244 waiting for weather. He requested reports from the Admiral Ushakov once he reached the Main Duck Island area. The tanker was anchored because of wind.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Tug for Sale

09/16:
The "G" Tug Ohio is available for immediate sale or bareboat charter. The tug is a single-screw 2,000 hp tug, fitted with an Almon Johnson Towing machine. The tug is ABS Classed with Loadline and has just recently completed class drydocking surveys. The tug is 197 gross tons and is 101' LOA, with a 26' Beam and a 13' 07" depth. The tug is powered by an EMD 16-645-E6 and is currently located in Cleveland, OH.

The tug Ohio. TZ
For more information, please contact J.C. DeSimone at jcd@thegreatlakesgroup.com or by telephone at 216-621-4854, ext 133.




Jupiter Fire Anniversary Broadcast

09/16:
Ten years ago the tanker Jupiter, with its cargo of gasoline, exploded in a fire that burned for three days in the Saginaw River in Bay City. Friday, WNEM-5 aired a special one-hour newscast to recount the event. 6-to-7pm.

Reported by: Eric Jylha




Today in Great Lakes History - September 16

At about 8:30 a.m. Sunday, September 16, 1990 the inbound motor ship BUFFALO passed close by while JUPITER was unloading unleaded gasoline at the Total Petroleum dock in the Saginaw River near Bay City, MI. The suction of BUFFALO's propellers caused the JUPITER, which was facing upriver, to pull away from the dock. As a result the aft pilings broke off and the fuel lines parted which caused a spark and ignited the spilled fuel. At the time 22,000 barrels of a total of 54,000 barrels were still aboard. Flames catapulted over 100 feet high filling the air with smoke that could be seen for 50 miles. The fire was still burning the next morning when a six man crew from Williams, Boots & Coots Firefighters and Hazard Control Specialists of Port Neches, TX arrived to fight the fire. By Monday afternoon they extinguished the fire only to have it re-ignite that night resulting in multiple explosions. Not until Tuesday morning on the 18th was the fire finally subdued with the assistance of the U.S. Coast Guard's BRAMBLE and BRISTOL BAY. The tanker, which was valued at $9 million, was declared a total constructive loss, though the engine room was relatively untouched. Unfortunately the fire claimed the life of one crew member who drowned attempting to swim ashore. As a result the Coast Guard closed the river to all navigation. On October 19th the river was opened to navigation after the Gaelic tugs SUSAN HOEY and CAROLYN HOEY towed the JUPITER up river to the Hirschfield & Sons dock at Bay City (formerly the DeFoe Shipyard) where a crane was erected for dismantling the burned out hulk. Her engines were removed and shipped to New Bedford, MA for future use. The river opening allowed American S.S.'s BUFFALO to depart the LaFarge dock where she had been trapped since the explosion. JUPITER's dismantling was completed over the winter of 1990-91.

P & H purchased all nine of the Soo River's fleet on September 16, 1982 for a reported C$2.5 million and all nine returned to service, although only four were running at the end of the season.

NORISLE went into service September 16, 1946 as the first Canadian passenger ship commissioned since the NORONIC's commissioning in 1913.

On September 16, 1952, the Cason J. Callaway departed River Rouge, Michigan for Duluth on its maiden voyage.

On 16 September 1895, ARCTIC (2 mast wooden schooner, 113’, 85GT, built in 1853 at Ashtabula, OH) was rammed and sunk by the steamer CLYDE in broad daylight and calm weather. ARCTIC was almost cut in half by the blow. The skipper of CLYDE was censured for the wreck and for his callous treatment of the schooner’s crew afterwards. Luckily no lives were lost.

On 16 September 1877, the little tug (46') RED RIBBON, owned by W. H. Morris of Port Huron, burned about 2 miles below St. Clair, Michigan. Capt. Morris ran the tug ashore and hurried to St. Clair to get assistance, but officials there refused to allow the steam fire engine to go outside the city. The tug was a total loss and was only insured for $1,000, half her value. She had just started in service in May of 1877 and was named for the reform movement that was in full swing at the time of her launch.

One hundred years ago, on 16 September 1900, LULU BEATRICE (2-mast wooden schooner, 72’, 48 gc, built in 1896 at Port Burwell, Ontario) was carrying coal on Lake Erie when she was wrecked on the shore near the harbor entrance at Port Burwell in a storm. One life was lost, the captain’s wife.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Roger Stahl Departs

09/15:
Gaelic Tugboat's 3000 horsepower tug Roger Stahl departed the Gaelic Yard on Wednesday morning under the command of Captain John Wellington bound for Marinette, Wisconsin. The Tug will tow two Navy barracks recently built at the shipyard that are going to be stationed at Norfolk, Va. and San Diego Ca.

The Stahl will tow the barges to Port Colborne where it will meet the Tug Caribe Challenger. The two tugs will tow the barges out the St. Lawrence Seaway.

The 3000 horsepower tug Roger Stahl.

Reported by: William Hoey Jr.




Speer to Load in Superior

09/15:
The Edgar B. Speer is scheduled to load the BNSF Dock 5 in Superior, WI. on the Monday at 4:00 p.m. Her destination is unknown, but this is her first call to the dock in many years.

Reported by: David French.




McKee Sons In Cleveland

09/15:
The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons arrived in Cleveland yesterday for the LTV Steel mill. This is the pair's first trip on the Lorain to Cleveland shuttle run. They are expected to make two more runs.

Other traffic included the tug Sea Eagle II and barge St. Mary Cement arriving Wednesday night for Blue Circle cement. The Richard Reiss was in port Thursday unloading at Ontario 4 and then departed passing the Fred R. White Jr. at the Lakefront. The White had unloaded at Ontario 4.

Pictures by TZ
The McKee Sons entering Cleveland viewed from a Cleveland office building. Mike Reindel
Close up of the tug Invincible passing the White.
Tug Invincible in the McKee Sons notch.
The tug Dorothy Ann pushing the Pathfinder.
Riess passing the White.
A close up of the Reiss' rudder.
The bow of the Richard Reiss.
Bow view of the Fred R. White Jr.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Erie Update

09/15:
Erie, Pennsylvania is ready to kick off the first Big Boats on the Bay Festival which will include six tall ships from the Great Lakes and the Picton Castle from the Cook Islands. The tall ship Picton Castle has already arrived. The rest are scheduled to arrive today. The festival runs Friday through Sunday and features an all day concert on Saturday of maritime themed music. The vessels are to be moored across from the former carferry Viking.

Vessels to be featured are:
U.S Brig Niagara from Erie.
Picton Castle
True North of Toronto
Kajama, also of Toronto
Red Witch of Port Clinton Ohio
Highlander of Halifax Nova Scotia.

In Conneaut and Ashtabula, OH. news, the Atlantic Huron made her second trip to those ports on Wednesday, making this her second trip there in three days. On Monday she loaded in Ashtabula and Wednesday in Conneaut. She has become a rather frequent caller there this year.

Picton Castle at dock.
Kajama at dock.
The former carferry Viking at her lay-up dock.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Steamship Ferries Steam Automobiles

09/15:
A group of 11 participants boarded the Lake Michigan Carferry Badger Wednesday night as part of their 900-mile Great Lakes Tour. The tour began at Northport, MI. The cars are made up of mostly Stanley Steamers, with a few White Steamers. The cars get from 25 to 35 miles to a tank of water.

A Stanley Steamer is driven onto the Badger's car deck.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Twin Ports Report

09/15:
The fall grain rush has begun and it has brought a number of Canadian straightdeckers to the Twin Ports. On Sept. 14, Algocen cleared the Cenex Harvest States elevator, to be replace by the Mapleglen, paying a rare visit to Superior. Over in Duluth, Canadian Miner was loading at the General Mills elevator.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

09/15:
On Thursday the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was loading grain at Andersons "E" Elevator and was scheduled to depart later that afternoon. This was her first trip into Toledo. Earlier this week the Halifax was also in port loading grain at the same elevator. The Cuyahoga is due back to load corn early next week at one of the Anderson Elevators.

The Armco was loading coal at the CSX Dock with the Jean Parisien to follow. The J.A.W. Iglehart was unloading cement at the Lafarge Dock and departed mid afternoon. The tanker Gemini was at the B.P. Dock loading cargo.

The next scheduled coal boat is the John J. Boland expected to arrive at 9:00 a.m. this morning. The next scheduled ore boat is the Reserve with an e.t.a. of 6:00 p.m. Saturday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Busy Day in Seaway

09/15:
Thursday was a busy day in the Kingston area of the Seaway. No less than 14 ships were heard between 7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. The Algosoo, Atlantic Erie, Canadian Empress, Diamond Star, Canadian Olympic, Lake Charles, Tavi, Canadian Century, and Manitoulin were eastbound. The westbound parade included the Algowest, Nanticoke, Menominee, and James Norris. During this time the CCGS Limnos was sampling water in eastern Lake Ontario and the CCGS Caribou Isle went from Kingston to Main Duck Island for buoy work before returning to Kingston.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Today in Great Lakes History - September 15

The A.H. FERBERT (2) was towed out of Duluth by the Sandrin tug GLENADA September 15, 1987, they encountered rough weather on Lake Superior and required the assistance of the another tug to reach the Soo on the 19th. On the 21st the FERBERT had to anchor off Detour, MI after she had run aground in the St. Marys River when her towline parted. Her hull was punctured and the Coast Guard ordered repairs to her hull before she could continue. Again problems struck on September 24th, when the FERBERT went hard aground at the Cut-Off Channel's southeast bend of the St. Clair River. Six tugs, GLENADA, ELMORE M. MISNER, BARBARA ANN, GLENSIDE, SHANNON and WM. A. WHITNEY, worked until late on the 26th to free her. The FERBERT finally arrived in tow of GLENSIDE and W.N. TWOLAN at Lauzon, Que. on October 7th.

The FERNGLEN was launched September 15, 1917 as a) WILLIAM A. AMBERG.

On September 15, 1925 the JOHN A. TOPPING left River Rouge light on her maiden voyage to Ashland, WI to load iron ore for delivery to Cleveland, OH.

September 15th lightering was completed on the AUGUST ZIESING, she had grounded above the Rock Cut two days earlier blocking the channel.

September 15, 1959 was the last day the U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tender MESQUITE was stationed at Sault Ste. Marie, MI.

MIDDLETOWN suffered a fire in her tunnels on September 15, 1986. 2nd & 3rd degree burns were suffered by two crewmembers.

In 1934 the ANN ARBOR NO. 6 collided with the steamer N.F. LEOPOLD in a heavy fog.

September 15, 1993 - Robert Manglitz became CEO and president of Lake Michigan Carferry Service after Charles Conrad announced his retirement and the sale of most of his stock.

On 15 September 1873, IRONSIDES (wooden propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 220', 1123 t, built in 1864 at Cleveland) became disabled when she sprang a leak and flooded. The water poured in and put out her fires. She sank about 7 miles off Grand haven, Michigan on Lake Michigan. Reports of the number of survivors varied from 17 to 32 and the number lost varied from 18 to 28.

On 15 September 1872, A.J. BEMIS (wood propeller tug, 49T, built in 1859 at Buffalo) caught fire while underway. The fire originated under her boiler. She ran for shore but sank ¾ mile short, about 6 miles from Alpena, MI. No lives lost.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




IVI Arrives

09/14:
The salt water vessel IVI, with the assistance of the Selvick Tugs Jimmy L and Carla Anne Selvick, entered the Menominee River around 2:00 p.m. Wednesday in a vicious crosswind. After passing the Menominee Lighthouse the IVI was caught by the wind and her stern proceeded to be blown toward Government Pier (on the Marinette, WI side of the channel).

The Jimmy L was on the bow and the Carla Anne on the stern. The Carla Anne is normally stern to stern with the tow, this time she was proceeding bow to stern.

When the IVI started blowing toward the Marinette pier, the Carla Anne did a quick pivot in mid-river and quickly hauled the tow back to the middle of the channel. The IVI did not come close to the Government Pier, but close to the edge of the dredged channel.

When she started to be blown off course she appeared to put her rudder over with full engine power, kicking up a huge cloud of mud. It was quick thinking by the crew of the Carla Anne, as she was turned about in less than a minute and had the tow back on course in just a few minutes.

Jimmy L leading the IVI into port.
IVI between the Menominee Lighthouse pier and Marinette Government pier.
IVI kicking up a cloud of mud with the tug Carla Anne Selvick bow to stern.
IVI back on course (with the Carla Anne Selvick now "stern to stern").
Jimmy L assists docking the IVI to the crane ship William H. Donner at Marinette Fuel & Dock.

Reported by: Dick Lund




Algoma Reduces Production

09/14:
Algoma Steel announced Tuesday a temporary 15% reduction in steel production at its facilities in Sault Ste. Marie.

This reduction is a result of adverse market conditions mainly attributable to a high level of unfairly traded imports and the temporary shutdown of the 106``/166'' Strip Mill Complex to complete the installation of Automatic Gauge Control.

The Company will be taking various cost reduction measures during the temporary reduction in operations including some lay-offs. Algoma Steel will also be aggressively pursuing all measures available to it under Canadian trade law to stem the flood of unfairly traded imports that have had such a severe impact on Canadian steel markets.

Algoma Steel, based in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, is Canada's third largest integrated steel producer. Revenues are derived primarily from the manufacture and sale of rolled steel products, including hot and cold rolled sheet and plate.




Quebec Update

09/14:
Wednesday morning offered a treat for boatwatchers in the Quebec City area. A pair of rare callers met the usual traffic in the river. CSL's Halifax, a rare visitor, was waiting at Lévis' anchorage for the Canadian Ranger to finish unloading at Pier 107. At the same time about one mile downbound, another ULS vessel the Canadian Prospector was docked at pier 28 delivering a load of grain at Bunge's terminal.

The huge Ceres Hellenic VLCC Cap Georges (180,000 dwt, 1999 built), with the assistance of 3 Groupe Océan tugs came in for near Ultramar terminal fully loaded with Algerian crude oil. The supertanker was met by Algoma's Algosea who was downbound in ballast from Contrecoeur.

Also passing was the regular Quebec Ferries Society vessels, the Millenium Yama still under repairs at pier 104 and the big bulker Luise Oldendorff unloading iron ore at section 53 and you had festive picture.

In other news it is rumored that the Millenium Yama moored at pier 104 since last April after developing engine troubles in the Gulf could soon become a member of Groupe Desgagnés' fleet.

Reported by: Jean-François Boutin




Coast Guard Finds Drugs

09/14:
On Friday, September 8th the U.S. Coast Guard was conducting boardings near Wilson, New York. A Station Buffalo rescue boat observed several ziploc bags of marijuana in the water in the vicinity of the sailing vessel Sasparilla. The vessel was boarded and approximately three pounds of marijuana was located. The amount and type of packaging indicated the persons onboard were preparing the marijuana for distribution.




Twin Ports Report

09/14:
A laden Arthur M. Anderson was tied up under the gravity chutes on the east side of DMIR dock 6 early on Sept. 13. There was no way to tell whether the vessel had not yet begun unloading its stone cargo or if it was completing its ore load. Stmr. Reserve also was due into DMIR the same day. Friday also will be an interesting day at DMIR, with Buckeye and Joe Block due.

Midwest Energy Terminal is loading quite a few smaller vessels over the next few days. Canadian Enterprise was loading there on the morning of Sept. 13; Canadian Transport, Algoport and Algobay were all due Sept. 14; and American Mariner and CSL Niagara are due Sept. 15. The only 1,000-footer scheduled during this span is Walter J. McCarthy Jr. on the 14th.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - September 14

The CLARENCE B. RANDALL (2) was launched September 14, 1907 as a) J.J. SULLIVAN for the Superior Steamship Co.

On 14 September 1871, R.J. CARNEY (wooden barge, 150’, 397GT) was launched at Saginaw, MI.

The 203' wooden schooner KATE WINSLOW was launched at J. Davidson's yard in E. Saginaw, Michigan on 14 September 1872.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




McKee Sons Loads in Lorain

09/13:
The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons were in Lorain, OH. yesterday loading for LTV Steel in Cleveland. The pair are expected to make two more shuttle runs.

Pictures by TZ
Loading at Lorain.
Bow view.
The pilot house of the barge.
Stern view of the tug in the barge's notch.
Close up of the tug.
Close up of the name on the barge.
On board the tug looking forward.
Looking down at the notch.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Traffic Jam on the Saginaw River

09/13:
Visits by three vessels at Saginaw area docks created an early morning traffic jam Tuesday on the Saginaw River.

The cement carrier Paul H. Townsend was preparing to depart the LaFarge dock at about 6:00 a.m. while the steamer Saginaw was approaching upbound with a load of stone for the GM dock in Saginaw. The Agawa Canyon was following the Saginaw by about an hour to deliver salt to the International Materials dock. Both docks are within a few hundred yards of the Lafarge dock.

The Townsend delayed her departure until about 7:00 a.m. to allow the Saginaw time to secure to the GM dock and lighter enough to move closer to the bank. The Townsend then turned and headed out the river past the Saginaw. The Agawa Canyon, meanwhile, tied up near the Zilwaukee Bridge to permit the Townsend to pass. The Canyon then proceeded up to her destination, arriving about 10 a.m.

Several three-way "conference calls" were heard over the radio as the vessels coordinated their movements during the early-morning hours.

The Saginaw finished unloading just before noon and was outbound from Saginaw at 12:30 p.m. The Agawa Canyon departed the dock at 3:15 p.m. and was outbound after turning.

Reported by: Stephen Hause




G Tugs on the Move

09/13:
Tuesday evening at 7:40 the tug Triton departed Sterling Fuel in Windsor with the tugs Kansas and Arkansas in tow. They proceeded upbound, destination unknown. There are three G Tugs in Detroit, the Pennsylvania, Vermont which has been repaired and the Wyoming.

As part of a normal tug rotation, the tow will head to Chicago to drop off one of the tugs and pick up the New York. They will then head to Milwaukee to drop off the Arkansas and pick up the California and bring them back to Cleveland. The operation is expected to take 9 days depending on weather.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Port Stanley Dredging to Begin

09/13:
On October 1 Dean Construction will bring there fleet to Port Stanley Harbor for dredging operations. The dredging will allow vessels to enter the Lakes Terminals, James Richardson, and McAsphalt Industries.

In recent years the Lake Erie port has suffered from silting that has drastically reduced the depth of the harbor. With out the dredging shipping in the port could have stop all together. Transport Canada will pay the $2.9-million (C) cost for the work because of the commercial impact on the port.

Reported by: Richard Hill




Twin Ports Report

09/13:
The Twin Ports waterfront was busy early on Sept. 12 and was expected to stay that way throughout the day as vessels come and go. Loading grain were Algocen at Peavey Connors Point, Antalina at Cenex Harvest States, Federal Maas and General Mills and Yick Hua at AGP. Rays was anchored on the lake waiting for Cenex Harvest States. Canadian Miner and Ziemia Suwalska were both expected to arrive later in the day to load at Cenex Harvest States. Federal Fuji was due at the Duluth port terminal to unload steel.

In the ore and coal trades, Paul R. Tregurtha was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal, to be followed later in the day by Oglebay Norton and Algoport. Indiana Harbor was loading at DMIR ore dock while James R. Barker was fueling at the Murphy Oil dock and waiting for a turn at the DMIR shiploader. Frontenac and George A. Stinson were both expected at the BNSF ore dock during the day.

Reported by: Al Miller




Monthly Marquette Update

09/13:
Marquette harbors experienced a decrease in vessel traffic compared to the month of July. A total of 48 vessels visited Marquette during the month of Aug compared to 59 in July. This equates to a 19% decrease in vessel traffic. The lower harbor experienced a 44% decrease when only 5 vessels visited in August compared to July. H. Lee White lead all vessel visits at the lower harbor with 9 visits this season, the American Mariner has 8 visits while the Adam Cornelius has 6 visits and the John Boland has 5. The U.S.C.G has four visits and 9 other vessels each have 1 visit each. All vessels are American with the American Steamship leading the way.

Meanwhile, the upper harbor experienced a 14% decrease when 43 vessels arrived at the ore dock. The Canadian Transfer continues to lead all vessels to the upper harbor with 49 visits this season. This is followed by the Elton Hoyt 2nd with 27, the Lee Tregurtha with 22 and the Charles Beeghly with 20 visits. The Kaye Barker and the American Mariner each have 13 visits this season while the John Boland has 11 visits. The H. Lee White had 10 visits. Seventeen other vessel have 9 or less visits to Marquette. So far approximately 68% of the vessels visiting the upper harbor have been American lead by the Lakes Steamship Co.

Reported by: Art Pickering




Midland Update

09/13:
On Monday the cruise ship c. Columbus was outbound from Midland after spending the night alongside the Midland Town dock. By the time she reached open water at Sawlog Point she was making good speed.

The tug and barge combo Atlantic Hickory & Sarah Spencer was outbound Midland at 6:30 a.m. Tuesday. She had just finished unloading a cargo of grain at the ADM Ogilvie Mill. It is worth noting that a giant mural is being painted on the side of the ADM grain elevators. By the time it is complete it is reputed to be the largest mural in the world.

Reported by: Rudy Smith




USCGC Westwind (WAGB-281) Reunion

09/13:
The first reunion for the decommissioned "Wind Class" Icebreaker was held in Milwaukee, Aug 26, 2000. There were more than 20 Coasties with family and a couple of "plank owners" present. The committee formed the Westwind society and will hold reunions every two years. The vessel had been sent to the Great Lakes in 1968 and remained there until moved to Mobile, Al. in 1982.

The vessels history was rich in sea stories and accomplishments. During operation taconite in '78-79 the vessel holed the Anderson's forward hold in an accident. The Westwind was the only U.S. registered vessel to almost make it to the north pole. The vessel went to 83.45n off the north east coast of Greenland in 1979. Her record held until the summer of 1996 when a Polar class icebreaker out of Seattle made it all the way to the North Pole in 1996.

Any one interested in joining the society and attending the next reunion can contact the Chairman: LCDR (Res) F. Roberts or BM1 (Ret) Jon Brown

Reported by: Jon Brown




Today in Great Lakes History - September 13

The EDMUND FITZGERALD's sea trials occurred on September 13, 1958.

The HOFFMAN (United States Army Corps of Engineers Twin Screw Hopper Dredge) collided with the Japanese salty KUNISHIMA MARU at Toledo, OH, September 13, 1962. Reportedly the blame was placed on the pilot of the Japanese salty. Apparently the damage was minor.

On September 13, 1968 the AUGUST ZIESING grounded in fog two-hundred yards above the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River. The grounded vessel swung into the shipping channel blocking it until September 15th when lightering was completed.

September 13, 1953 - The PERE MARQUETTE 22 made her second maiden voyage since she was new in 1924. She was cut in half, lengthened, had new boilers and engines installed.

On 13 September 1875, CITY OF BUFFALO (wooden schooner, 91’, 128T, built in 1859 at Buffalo as a propeller canal boat) beached and sank after striking a rock in the St. Mary’s River. The tug MAGNET worked for days to release her before she went to pieces on 19 September. No lives were lost.

On 13 September 1871, the bark S. D. POMEROY was anchored off Menominee, Michigan during a storm. Archie Dickie, James Steele, John Davidson and James Mechie were seen to lower the yawl to go to shore. Later the empty yawl drifted ashore and then the bodies of all four men floated in.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Cuyahoga in For Repairs

09/12:
The Cuyahoga was docked in Sarnia yesterday for repairs to her exhaust system. An expansion joint on the main engine exhaust cracked Sunday night while the vessel was downbound on Lake Huron. The engine room was evacuated except for one engineer who wore a Scott Airpack, a type of self-contained breathing apparatus. The Cuyahoga was able to continue to Sarnia where repairs could take two days.




Busy Weekend at the Soo

09/12:
The vessel loading ports on Lake Superior were no doubt busy last week as more than 20 vessels passed down through the Soo Locks on Thursday and Friday of last week, with several additional downbounders on Saturday. Boatwatchers were treated to a rare sight at Mission Point below the locks late Friday afternoon as four vessels were visible together. The downbound Edgar B. Speer and Algocape were just below mission while fleetmates Reserve (downbound) and Courtney Burton (upbound) passed right at Mission offering a series of salutes to a small group of lucky boatwatchers.

Reported by: Ross Ruehle




UM Terminal Busy

09/12:
Hamilton's UM Canada terminal was busy loading the Russian visitor Khirurg Vishnevskiy with soya oil for Tunisia. When the Khirurg Vishnevskiy departed the tug barge combination Angelica B and barge PMC 2501 backed into the slip to unload coal tar for VFT Canada. No sooner had the tug docked then the Stolt Asperation was pulled into the slip backwards by a McKeil tug. The Asperation is to take on Tallow for Europe and the loading was expected to take 12 hours.




Twin Ports Report

09/12:
BNSF ore dock was unusually busy Sept. 10 handling Canadian Transfer, Algoport and Burns Harbor.

Interesting callers in the Twin Ports and Two Harbors on Sept. 11 included Alpena, finishing its load at the LaFarge terminal in Superior and proceeding to the Duluth terminal to finish; Lee A. Tregurtha, which was scheduled to unload coal at the Reiss Inland dock before proceeding to Taconite Harbor to load pellets; and St. Clair loading in Two Harbors.

The wave of Fedmar ships continues in the Twin Ports grain trade. On Sept. 11, Federal Maas was loading at General Mills in Superior and Federal Saguenay was still at AGP in Duluth. Federal Saguenay was at the Peavey Connors Point elevator in Superior on Sept. 10. Other grain ships in port Sept. 11 included Antalina and Canadian Voyager at Cenex Harvest States.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - September 12

The ROGER BLOUGH was laid up at Sturgeon Bay, WI from September 12, 1981 through 1986 because of economic conditions.

CANADIAN PIONEER was christened at Port Weller on September 12, 1981 by Louise Powis, wife of the Chairman and President of Noranda Mines.

CARTIERCLIFFE HALL was towed by the tug WILFRED M. COHEN to Collingwood, Ont. for repairs from a June 5th fire and arrived at Collingwood on September 12, 1979.

Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Limited at Collingwood, Ontario closed the yard on September 12, 1986 after 103 years of shipbuilding. She was famous for her spectacular side launches. 214 ships were built at Collingwood.

While unloading steel in South Chicago from the CANADA MARQUIS on September 12, 1988, a shoreside crane lifting a payloader into the hold, collapsed onto the ship. CANADA MARQUIS had a hole in her tank top and damage to her hatch coaming.

On 12 September 1900, ALBACORE (2 mast wooden schooner, 137’, 327T, built in 1872 at Port Dalhousie, Ont.) had a storm blow out her sails, driving her into the seawall at Fort Bank just east of Oswego, NY where she broke up. The tug J. NAVAGH tried unsuccessfully to save her. Her crew of 7 was rescued by the U.S. Lifesaving Service.

After an extremely dry summer, forests were burning all over the Great lakes region in the Autumn of 1871. The smoke from these fires affected navigation. Newspaper reports stated that on 12 September 1871, 38 ships and four strings of barges anchored near Point Pelee on Lake Erie due to the restricted visibility caused by the smoke from the forest fires.

One hundred years ago today, on 12 September 1900, the schooner H. W. SAGE was raised by the McMorran Wrecking Company and was then towed to Port Huron for repairs. She had sunk near Algonac, Michigan in a collision with the steamer CHICAGO on 30 July 1900.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Barge Collides in Rouge River

09/11:
Saturday night the tug John Spence with the loaded tank barge McAsphalt 401 lost control in the Rouge River just after clearing the Jefferson Ave. bridge outbound. She struck the corner of Ferriss Marine Deck Barge #48, causing some damage to the barge.

As the tug and barge passed through the Short Cut Bridge, the captain reported to Sarnia traffic that the McAsphalt 401 had a dent and hole in the barge and was taking on water. Her cargo of asphalt remained intact. They proceeded at very slow speed to the Nicholson Dock & Terminal Co. in Ecorse, where they docked to survey the damage.

Preliminary inspection found a fracture in the #1 port cargo tank approximately 6-inches long at the collision bulkhead and shear. No other significant damage was found. The vessel was cleared by the U.S. Coast Guard to transit to Windsor for some type of repair.

At the time of the incident the tug and barge were passing the Adam E. Cornelius who was docking at the Marblehead Dock directly across the river.




Soo Update

09/11:
The Algoport departed Algoma Steel Saturday, after spending 20 hours unloading coal. As well the Algoway arrived in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan Saturday night at 10:30 and unloaded salt for just over three hours at the Carbide dock, just downriver from the locks. Upon departure she was heading to Hancock, MI. It is assumed that she had a split cargo of salt, with the other part going there.

Shortly after noon the tanker Algonova arrived to discharge her cargo at the Purvis Dock, and the Algosteel arrived mid afternoon at the Algoma Steel to unload coal.

The c.Columbus departed the Soo with 369 passengers bound for Parry Sound and will return at 4:00 a.m. on Friday, Sept. 15.

The downbound Burns Harbor went to anchor above Gros Cap in the St. Mary's river on Sunday night. She was reported to have a problem with both of her gyro compasses as fog was forming in the river. She was expected to get underway by daylight.

Reported by: Dan Sweeley




Cleveland Report

09/11:
Sunday the Agawa Canyon departed West Third at 9:30 a.m. and the Earl W. Oglebay departed LTV at the same time. Both vessels were assisted by tugs.

The tug crews then went to Ashtabula to assist the Spar Garnet into the Pinney dock at 3:00 p.m. The Spar Garnet was expected to depart today.

The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons was expected in Fairport Sunday but was down bound in the Detroit River. After visiting Fairport, the pair are expected to sail for Lorain to load for Cleveland. She is expected to make two shuttle runs.

Pictures by TZ
The Spar Garnet arrives.
Close up of her bow.
Tug Rhode Island working with the Spar Garnet.
Stern view of the Spar Garnet at dock.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Erie Update

09/11:
Sunday the Richard Reiss arrived in Erie, Pennsylvania carrying a load of stone for the Old Ore Dock. With the J.S. St John at the dock, boatwatchers got to see the entire Erie Sand fleet. John Emery, St John, Reiss and Day Peckinpaugh were all in port.

The Reiss inbound.
A deck hand is lowered to the dock.
The Reiss docked behind the St. John.

Reported by: Jeff Thoreson




Water Levels

09/11:
Precipitation for August was above average on the lakes Superior and Erie, basins, but was below average for the lakes Michigan-Huron and Ontario basins. For the last 12 months, precipitation over the individual lakes and entire Great Lakes basin was above average.

Lake Levels
Superior, 10 inches below average
Michigan-Huron 19 inches below average
St. Clair 6 inches below average
Erie 1 inch below average
Lake Ontario was 7 inches above average.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 11

The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (1) was patched and refloated on September 11, 1944. She had sunk in 80 feet of water after a collision with the steamer D.M. CLEMSON (2) off Old Point Light, on June 15, 1943. On May 6, 1944 the barges MAITLAND NO.1 and HILDA were employed as pontoons for the salvage operation positioned over the sunken hull. cables were attached to the HUMPHREY's hull and to the barges. The hull was raised through a series of lifts which allowed it to be brought into shallower water. Partial buoyancy was provided by the HUMPHREY's ballast tanks which were pumped out to about 25% of capacity. The HUMPHREY was patched and refloated on September 11, 1944. She was taken to the Manitowoc Ship Building Co. first for an estimate of repairs which totaled $469,400, and then was towed to Sturgeon Bay for reconditioning which was completed at a reported cost of $437,000. Captain John Roen's Roen Transportation Co. assumed ownership on September 18, 1944 and the next year the ship was renamed b) CAPTAIN JOHN ROEN. She re-entered service on May 1, 1945 chartered to the Pioneer Steamship Co. on a commission basis.

On September 11, 1987 while in lay-up at Point Edward, the FORT YORK caught fire which gutted her bridge.

Carrying cargoes off the Lakes, the CANADA MARQUIS departed Halifax bound for Philadelphia with a cargo of grain. The HON. PAUL MARTIN departed Halifax the same day on her way to Tampa with a load of gypsum.

The HORACE JOHNSON sailed on her maiden voyage light from Lorain September 11, 1929 bound for Two Harbors, MN to load iron ore.

On 11 September 1895, S. P. AMES (2 mast wooden schooner, 61’, 43GT) was driven ashore at Pointe Aux Barques, MI in a storm. She was quickly stripped before she went to pieces. She had been built in 1879 at Montrose, MI, in farm country, well inland, on the Flint River by Mr. Seth Ames. He wanted to use her to return to sea, but he died the day before her hull was launched.

On 11 September 1876, the schooner HARVEST HOME sank on Lake Michigan while bound from Chicago for Cleveland with a load of scrap iron. She was about 26 miles off Grand Haven, Michigan. The crew were taken off by the schooner GRACIE M. FILER just as the boat was going down.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Repairs Completed on Clarke

09/10:
With repairs completed, the Philip R. Clarke, USS Great Lakes Fleet's 767' self-unloader, backed away from the docks at Bay Shipbuilding Friday and continued out to the mouth of Sturgeon Bay stern first. Just east of Sherwood Point, she began a 180 degree turn and headed out into Green Bay. Repairs had been made to the boom which was damaged while unloading salt in Sandusky, OH. She was sailing for Green Bay to unload the remaining load of salt.

Clarke passing Harsen's Island in the St. Clair River on Sept. 3.
A closer view of the boom.
The damaged area.
Another view.
The rear portion of the boom.

Reported by: Paul Graf




New Dredge to Lake Michigan Contractors

09/10:
Friday moonlit waters highlighted the late evening departure of the James B., the new suction dredge that has been under construction at Bay Shipbuilding of Sturgeon Bay. Pushed by LMCs 72' tug Shirley Joy, the James B.'s white superstructure is contrasted with the bright red piping that is a part of the dredge's suction equipment. It is reported that construction took approximately 13 months.

Reported by: Paul Graf




Cleveland Report

09/10:
Early Saturday morning the tug Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys Cement II arrived in Cleveland. With and assistance from a G tug she dock at Blue Circle cement about 3:30 a.m. The Myron C. Taylor entered the Cuyahoga River docking at Ontario 1, she used a tug to assist her turning at the dock at 11:30 a.m. The Taylor was expected to depart around 4:00 p.m. The Earl W. Oglebay departed LTV Steel Saturday morning and is expected back for one more Lorain to LTV shuttle.

The Agawa Canyon was expected to arrive Saturday night for CBS II. She was expected to depart early this morning. The American Republic was scheduled to arrive at the LTV Steel Mill at 6:00 p.m. The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons was in Fairport scheduled to sail for Lorain to load for Cleveland. She is expected to make two shuttle runs.

Pictures by TZ
The tug Delaware working with the Myron C. Taylor.
Another view as small boaters watch.
Earl W. Oglebay is towed stern first down the river.
Tight fit as she passes the cement barge St Marys Cement II.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - September 10

The METEOR (2) was towed from Manitowoc by the tug JOHN ROEN IV to Superior on September 10, 1972.

The Harry Coulby (now Kinsman Enterprise) turns 71 years old on September 10. When she entered service on this date in 1927, the 631-foot bulk freighter was the third largest on the Great Lakes.

While upbound in the Welland Canal on September 9, 1986 it was noted that the port anchor of the J.W. McGIFFON was missing, her chain was almost touching the water.

On 10 September 1909, COLUMBUS (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 136', 439 GC, built in 1874 as the tug JOHN OWEN) burned to a total loss at her dock at Gargantua, Ontario in Lake Superior. She was cut loose and allowed to drift out into the bay where she sank. The top of her engine reportedly still shows above the water.

September 10, 1979 - The S.S. SPARTAN was laid up.

The barge N. MILLS was launched at P. Lester's yard in Marysville, Michigan on 10 September 1870. Her dimensions were 164' x 30' x 12'.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Unusual Passage on the Saginaw River

09/09:
The Sam Laud and the Algorail executed an unexpected and unusual maneuver at Saginaw on Friday afternoon, passing each other while both were still underway in the narrow shipping channel of the Saginaw River.

The Algorail was outbound from the First Street turning basin in Saginaw at about 4:15 p.m. as the Sam Laud was arriving with a cargo for Saginaw Rock Products. The two vessels passed each other port to port just upstream from where the E.M. Ford is docked at the Lafarge cement silos.

Normally, an empty outbound vessel on the Saginaw River will tie up at an available dock to await passage of an upbound vessel before continuing out the river.

Reported by: Stephen Hause




McKeil Marine/Nadro Marine Update

09/09:
McKeil Marine Ltd. in Hamilton, Ont. has taken over operation of the former Nadro tug Progress. She will be operated in McKeil colors. Last fall the tug was repowered and converted to twin screw using two rebuilt Detroit Diesel 12-149's. The Progress is making use of the two spare bronze propellers from the former University of Michigan research vessel Inland Seas.

McKeil's supply tug Offshore Supplier is being transferred to Nadro operation in Port Dover, Ont. McKeil and Nadro are related companies.

Reported by: George Lee




Port Dover, Ontario Update

09/09:
Harry Gamble Shipyards tug 'John D.' towed the tug 'Jiggs' (ex Patricia McQueen) from Lorain, Ohio to Port Dover for engine removal. The stack and part of the deckhouse has been cut off. It is unknown at this time whether the tandem GM 6-110 diesels will be reinstalled, or if she will receive new power.

The 61 foot tug was built in 1911 and has maintained her handsome, traditional lines.

Reported by: George Lee




Twin Ports Report

09/07:
With the arrival of fall, the Twin Ports grain trade is hitting high gear. On Sept. 8, Canadian Leader was loading soybeans at General Mills in Duluth; Federal Saguenay was completing its load at AGP in Duluth; Millennium Falcon was at Cenex Harvest States in Superior loading wheat while on the other side, Millennium Eagle was loading barley bound for Tunisia. Antalina was anchored out waiting for a berth at Cenex Harvest States. Federal Rhine was expected to arrive during the day for the Peavey elevator in Superior.

Coast Guard Cutter Sundew was expected to depart on the 8th to proceed to Lake Michigan and Lake Huron for exercises and lighthouse painting.

Reported by: Al Miller




Cleveland Report

09/09:
The J.A.W. Iglehart arrived on Thursday to unload a cargo of cement. She departed later on Thursday. Early Friday morning the Earl W. Oglebay arrived on her fourth of five shuttles carrying taconite from Lorain, OH. to the LTV steel mill. She departed about 12:30 p.m.

The Richard Reiss arrived at the Osborne dock Thursday night. After unloading the vessel departed with a tug at 4:30 a.m. The Reiss passed the Earl W. at close quarters at Collision Bend.

Pictures by TZ
Stern view of the Earl W. Oglebay underway.
The Earl W. unloading at LTV.
Reiss unloading.
Richard Reiss passing the Earl. W. at Collision Bend.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




Today in Great Lakes History - September 09

The WOLVERINE (4) was launched September 9, 1974 for the Union Commerce Bank (Ohio), Trustee (Oglebay Norton Co., mgr.), Cleveland, OH.

DETROIT EDISON (2) was launched September 9, 1954 as a) DETROIT EDISON (2) for the American Steamship Co. (Boland & Cornelius, mgr.) Buffalo, NY.

The Steamer Pere Marquette #18 sank on September 9, 1910 with a loss of 29 lives. No cause for the sinking has ever been determined. The Pere Marquette #17 picked up 33 survivors, losing 2 of her own crew during the rescue.

The first of two fires suffered by the Grand Trunk carferry GRAND RAPIDS occurred on September 9, 1980. The cause of the fire was not determined.

On 9 September 1929, ANDASTE (steel propeller self-unloading sandsucker, 247’, built in 1892 at Cleveland) was probably overloaded with gravel when she “went missing” west of Holland, MI. The entire crew of 25 was lost. When built, she was the sister of the “semi-whaleback” CHOCTAW, but was shortened 20 feet in 1920-21 to allow her to use the Welland Canal.

On 9 September 1871, Captain Hicks of the schooner A. H. MOSS fired the Mate, a popular fellow, in a fit of anger the same time that a tug arrived to tow the schooner out of Cleveland harbor. The crew was upset to say the least, and when the tow line was cast off and Capt. Hicks ordered the sails hoisted, the crew refused to do any work. The skipper finally raised the signal flags and had the tug towed his vessel back into the harbor. When the MOSS dropped anchor, he fired the entire crew then went ashore to hire another crew.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




More Fall Sailings for Algoma

09/08:
Crews will be called back next week to prepare the Algosound, Algoriver, and the Algoisle for sailing. They are expected to depart September 17th. The Algonorth will sail September 30th. The Algosound, Algoriver and Algonorth are currently laid up in Montreal, Quebec. The Algoisle is laid up in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The Algocape was loading in Thunder Bay, Ontario on September 6th after a short lay-up in Thunder Bay dry-dock for hull coating.

Reported by: Philip Nash




More on the Algocape

09/08:
The Algocape was moved from Pascol Engineering's drydock in Thunder Bay Wednesday afternoon by the tugs Peninsula and George N. Carleton. The Algocape proceeded to Richardson's Elevator to load grain. She was on the drydock for 14 days arriving August-24.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Sarnia Update

09/08:
On Thursday, the tug Sea Eagle II and barge St. Marys Cement II were at the Government dock transferring cement cargo into the Petite Forte's barge St. Marys, which was tied alongside.

Reported by: George Lee




Toledo Update

09/08:
On Thursday the tanker Khirurg Vishnevskiy departed Andersons "K" Elevator under tow with the "G" tug Illinois on the bow and Louisiana on the stern. The tow proceeded to the T.W.I. Dock to have a portion of her mast re-installed on the top cabin of the vessel. She was scheduled to depart late that afternoon bound for Hamilton, Ontario to load cargo.

The next coal vessels are scheduled to arrive today. The Lee A. Tregurtha was scheduled in at 8:00 a.m. followed by the Algosteel at 8:00 p.m. The next ore boat scheduled to arrive is the Armco due in at 5:00 a.m. today.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - September 08

The GEMINI sailed on her maiden voyage in August 1978 from the shipyard to load fuel oil at Baytown, TX, for delivery at Detroit, MI. Passing upbound the next month on September 8th through the Welland Canal, GEMINI became the largest U.S. flagged tanker on the Great Lakes with a capacity of 76,000 barrels.

The W.E. FITZGERALD was launched September 8, 1906 for the Chicago Navigation Co., Chicago, IL (D. Sullivan, mgr.).

The W.W. HOLLOWAY was launched September 8, 1906 as the straight decker a) HENRY A. HAWGOOD for Minerva Steamship Co. (W.A. & H.A. Hawgood, mgr.), Cleveland.

The RADIANT departed the shipyard September 8, 1913 light on her maiden voyage bound for Montreal, Que.

September 8, 1970 - The MILWAUKEE CLIPPER made her last run from Milwaukee.

On September 8, 1985 the downbound the Panamanian NORCHEM collided with the upbound CANADIAN PROSPECTOR near Kanawake. PROSPECTOR had little damage but NORCHEM was ripped open near her port anchor.

On 8 September 1885, ADVANCE (wooden schooner, 119’, 180GT, built in 1853 at Milwaukee) was carrying wood when she became waterlogged and capsized in a gale and blinding rain near Port Washington, WI in Lake Michigan. All but one of her crew of 7 drowned when her yawl capsized in the surf.

On 8 September 1871, the schooner MORNING LIGHT was sailing from Kelley's Island on Lake Erie with a cargo of stone for Marquette, Michigan in heavy weather. Trying to enter the Detroit River, the crew miscalculated their position and ran the ship aground on Point Moullier, just below Gibraltar. The crew scuttled the vessel in the shallow water to save her from harm. The following day, the tug GEORGE N. BRADY was sent out with steam pumps and hawsers and the MORNING LIGHT was raised and towed to Detroit for repairs.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Al Miller, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Algolake Makes Rare Move

09/07:
The Algolake made a rare move Sept. 5 when it backed through the Duluth ship canal after loading coal at Midwest Energy Terminal and fueling at the Duluth port terminal.

``It's fairly uncommon,'' Kevin Gange of the Lake Superior Maritime Visitors Center, told the Duluth News Tribune. ``It was nice weather for it. They wouldn't have done it if it was high winds or bad weather.''

Vessels often wind in the Duluth harbor off the port terminal and back their way up St. Louis Bay to the Midwest Energy Terminal, but they rarely back out of port.

No reason was given for the 730-foot vessel making the unusual maneuver. However, if it fueled after loading, it likely was easier and faster to back away from the port terminal and out the entry rather than to proceed ahead, wind 180 degrees with a dredge barge nearby and then proceed back to the entry.

Reported by: Al Miller




Grain Rush Ready to Begin

09/07:
With the fall harvest ready to be carried from the North American heartland, many of the Canadian straight deckers are preparing to depart their seasonal lay-up. From the Algoma Fleet will be the Algosound, Algoriver, and Algoisle scheduled to depart on September 17. The Algonorth is due to depart on September 30.

Reported by: David Swain




New Record

09/07:
The saltie Lake Erie last week set a new record for grain carried by an oceangoing ship from Duluth-Superior.

The ship, operated by Fednav Ltd. of Montreal, loaded 25,621 metric tons of soybeans at the Cenex Harvest States grain elevator. That cargo broke the old record -- held by the Lake Erie -- of 25,585 metric tons set in 1998. The cargo is bound for Rotterdam.

Lake Erie's cargo was just 125 tons short of setting the Great Lakes record for a cargo carried by a saltie. The record is held by Federal Maas, which in 1993 loaded 25,747 metric tons of durum at Thunder Bay.

Reported by: Al Miller




McKee Sons Sighting

09/07:
The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons were seen sailing under the Mackinaw Bridge at 5:00 PM. yesterday. The pair were sailing up the lake from Chicago after their initial trip in new colors.

Reported by: Dan Sweeley




Rays Unloads

09/07:
The saltie Rays was unloading in Oshawa, Ont. Wednesday. The vessel was docked on the east side of port entrance, unloading steel rods. She is expected to remain in port until late today or early Friday morning.

Ray at dock.
Close up of stern.
Forward section as the cargo is unloaded.

Reported by: Jim Gallacher




Twin Ports Report

09/07:
The cruise ship C. Columbus is expected to arrive in Duluth at 5:30 a.m. Sept. 7. The vessel will fuel at the port terminal and receive a welcome there before shifting to its usual dock behind the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center.

Midwest Energy Terminal has an interesting line-up scheduled for Sept. 7. Regular caller Oglebay Norton is scheduled to load for Detroit Edison, then infrequent visitors Fred R. White Jr. and Atlantic Erie are scheduled to load. The White is taking coal to Taconite Harbor while Atlantic Erie is bound for Ontario Power Generating in Nanticoke. The following day promises to be busy, too, with Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and Columbia Star both scheduled to load.

The Cenex Harvest States grain elevator has been setting a hectic pace this week. Kinsman Independent loaded there in a day on Sept. 5, clearing during the night. On Sept. 6, Millennium Eagle and Federal St. Laurent were loading. Both ships were scheduled to clear port late in the day, to be replaced by Millennium Falcon and Antalina, both of which had anchored on Lake Superior to wait for their berths.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

09/07:
Wednesday the Canadian Ranger was still loading grain at the ADM Elevator and was scheduled to depart early afternoon. The Russian tanker Khirurg Vishnevskiy was still in port at Andersons "K" Elevator unloading liquid urea, she was expected to depart Wednesday night or today depending how the unloading process goes. The saltie Federal Fuji was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo.

The next scheduled coal boats are expected to arrive on Friday. The Algosteel is due in at noon and the Charles M. Beeghly at 4:00 p.m. The next scheduled ore boat will be the Armco also due to arrive Friday at 5:00 a.m.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Best Month Yet For Western Coal Trade

09/06:
Shipments of low-sulfur coal from Superior Midwest Energy Terminal totaled 2 million tons in August, the best month yet this season for the facility. Vessels loading at SMET also benefited from a slight rise in water levels. There were several cargoes in excess of 64,000 tons.

For the season, shipments from SMET stand at 9.3 million net tons, a decrease of 4 percent compared to the same point in the 1999 navigation season.

Visit the Lake Carriers' Association home page for complete details.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 07

On September 7, 1978 the ROGER M. KYES (b. ADAM E. CORNELIUS) lost all power in Lake St. Clair requiring tug assistance from the GLT tugs MARYLAND and MAINE which escorted her to the Great Lakes Steel dock.

The CADILLAC (4) was laid up on September 7, 1981 for the last time at Toledo, OH. She was later transferred to a West coast marine operation in preparation for conversion for a proposed container ship for service between Chicago, Detroit and Quebec City. However these plans never materialized.

On September 7, 1921, the D.G. KERR pulled up to the ore dock at Two Harbors, MN to load exactly 12,507 gross tons of iron ore in the record breaking time of sixteen and a half minutes. This was accomplished through the cooperation of the dock superintendent, the dock employees concerned, the ship's captain and crew and the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. as a means of "showing up" the competition. Her time of arrival and departure to and from the dock took only nineteen minutes. For comparison, a good average loading time at that time was about three hours and forty-five minutes.

On September 7, 1975 on the St. Marys River loaded with iron ore pellets, the WILLIAM G. MATHER, forced out of the channel by a salt water vessel, struck bottom. Upon proceeding further onto Lake Huron it was soon discovered that her pumps were unable to cope with incoming water caused by the damage. She was beached at Frying Pan Island in 19 feet of water when it became evident they couldn't make dock.

On 7 September 1883, LAURA BELL (wooden schooner, 138’, 269GT, built in 1870 at Toledo, OH) was carrying coal from Cleveland to Marquette, MI when she stranded off Shot Point, east of Marquette in Lake Superior. Her crew spent 3 days in her rigging and all but one were rescued by a tug from Marquette.

September 7, 1916 - The PERE MARQUETTE 3 ran aground 10 miles north of Milwaukee.

September 7, 1996 - The American Society of Mechanical Engineers designated the propulsion system of the BADGER a mechanical engineering landmark.

The launch of the 188' wooden schooner ELIZABETH A. NICHOLSON was set for 4:00 PM on 7 September 1872 at E. Fitzgerald's shipyard in Port Huron, Michigan. Just before 4:00 PM, a telegram was received at the shipyard from Capt. Nicholson, the owner of the new vessel, which read, "Wait a while. We are coming." The launch was delayed until another dispatch was received which said to go ahead anyway. The boat Capt. Nicholson was on had broken down. The launch went well. The vessel was painted deep green with her name in gilt. All present cheered thTermne sight, but there was no party afterwards. All of the food and beverages for the celebration were with Capt. Nicholson on the disabled vessel.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Tin Stackers - The History of the Pittsburgh Steamship Company, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Clarke Update

09/06:
The Philip R. Clarke arrived at Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay, WI. late Monday evening for repairs to her unloading boom. The damage was caused while unloading in Sandusky, OH. and not Toledo as originally reported. A failure in the boom caused it to fall on the salt pile the boom was unloading. It was reported that the vessel had 6,000 tons of salt onboard that could not be unloaded.

Clarke passing Harsen's Island in the St. Clair River Sunday.
A closer view of the boom.
The damaged area.
Another view.
The rear portion of the boom.




Sturgeon Bay Report

09/06:
Under clearing skies in the early morning of September 4, the 127-foot tug Petite Forte pushing the cement barge St. Mary's Cement I departed Bay Shipbuilding and entered the waters of Green Bay. The Petite Forte had arrived at the shipyard last week to pick up the barge that had been in for repairs for about five weeks.

On July 7 the 360-foot barge ran aground near St. Martin's Island while being pushed by the tug Petite Forte. In the grounding the forepeak of the barge was holed.

Earlier in the week, the tug John Purvis exited Bay Ship after its five year inspection and a long summertime lay-up.

Reported by: Paul Graf




Naticoke in Sarnia

09/06:
On Monday the Nanticoke was fighting a stiff North East wind and strong current while docking at the grain elevator in Sarnia. While fighting the wind to maneuver the vessel's bow made contact with the dock damaging a small area. An unloaded vessel can be difficult to control as it sits much high in the water and is susceptible to strong winds.

Nanticoke at dock.
Close up of the bow and damage to the dock.
Bow as the Nanticoke docks.

Reported by: Steve Vanden Bosch




Lake Charles in Oshawa

09/06:
Visiting Oshawa Harbor this week was the saltie Lake Charles. She departed Monday about 4:30 p.m. after unloading steel beams. She is sailing upbound for Thunder Bay to load grain.

Steel channel beams being unloaded.
Former name, Ziemia Gornoslaska showing beneath current name.
Preparing to depart.
With assistance by the tugs Atomic and Misford the Lake Charles departs.
Lake Charles departs as the saltie Rays is at anchor waiting to Enter.

Reported by: Jim Gallacher




Tadoussac Update - Correction

09/06:
The Tadoussac arrived at Port Weller Dry Docks Sunday morning for repairs to a steering gear. The vessel is expected to remain at the dock for 4 to 5 days. This winter the vessel is expected to return for a widening and modernization project.




Twin Ports Report

09/06:
Following a slow Labor Day holiday, quite a few vessels were in the Twin Ports early Sept. 5. Kinsman Independent was pulling up to the Cenex Harvest States elevator about 7:30 a.m. Not far away, Algolake was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal while CSL Niagara waited out on the lake for the loading berth. James R. Barker was departing from DMIR ore dock. American Mariner was in the most interesting location: It had backed into the Cargill B1 loading slip and was unloading stone onto the former dock between the Cargill and General Mills elevators. This spot is now used by a construction company, but generally does not receive cargo.

As of 7 p.m., Kinsman Independent was still loading, was down close to its marks and appeared to be nearly ready to clear port. That's a far cry from the early '80s when Kinsman boats would spend two or three days loading. After unloading its stone cargo, American Mariner shifted to Midwest Energy Terminal to load coal.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

09/06:
On Tuesday the Canadian Ranger was at the ADM Elevator loading grain. The Russian tanker Khirurg Vishnevskiy expected to arrive at Andersons "K" Elevator to unload liquid urea. An unidentified saltie was seen at the T.W.I. Dock.

The tug Mary Hannah with her barge was at the Sun Oil Dock loading cargo. The Algomarine was at the coal dock loading coal.

The Algosteel and Charles M. Beeghly are the next coal boats expected to arrive on Friday, Sept. 8 to load. The next ore boat will be the Armco also expected on Friday.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Cleveland Report

09/06:
Early Tuesday morning the tanker Gemini departed Fleet Supply. She had arrived late Sunday night. The Gemini's departure was delayed for a short time as the Cuyahoga arrived heading for Ontario 4. The Cuyahoga had been at anchor since 6:30 p.m. Monday because of high winds. The Cuyahoga departed with a tug 2:00 p.m.

The saltie The Federal Fuji was assisted into 24 West at 7:00 a.m. She departed at 4:30 p.m. The Earl W. Oglebay arrived shortly after the Gemini had cleared about 8:00 a.m. The Earl unloaded stone at the Osborne an departed by 5:30 p.m.

Pictures by TZ
Cuyahoga arriving.
Close up of her bow.
Gemini passes the Cuyahoga.
Heading for Lake Erie.
Close up of the Gemini departing.

Reported by: Rex Cassidy




September 1 Vessel Survey

09/06:
63 U.S.-Flag lakers were in service on September 1, the same total as a year earlier. In service for the first time this season is the self-unloading barge McKee Sons. The active fleet will grow to 64 with the September 6 sailing of the cement carrier Paul H. Townsend. Two liquid-bulk tug/barge units may be reactivated as well this month.

Visit www.lcaships.com for complete details




Today in Great Lakes History - September 06

The S.S. Badger was launched on September 6, 1952, at Sturgeon Bay, WI. In a christening ceremony that included the S.S. Spartan (launched earlier that year). The S.S. Badger was named in honor of the University of Wisconsin. The Badger was built by Christy Corporation, and is powered by two Skinner 4 cylinder Steeple Compound Unaflow Marine Steam engines, developing over 7,000 horsepower. She was the last of the large, coal-fired steamers to be built in the United States, and the only ship of her type still operating on the Great Lakes. The S.S. Badger offers seasonal passenger service from Ludington, MI to Manitowoc, WI from mid May to early October.

The BELLE RIVER began her maiden voyage when she loaded 56,073 long tons of western coal at Superior, WI on August 31, 1977 and arrived at Edison CO's Belle River power plant at Recors Point on September 6, 1977. today sails as: b) WALTER J. McCARTHY JR.

On Sunday morning September 6, 1990 at approximately 0800, the BUFFALO, traveling upstream on the Saginaw River, passed the JUPITER which was unloading gasoline at the Total Petroleum dock near Bay City, MI. The ship's passing caused a suction which pulled the JUPITER away from the dock. The aft pilings subsequently broke away and the parting fuel lines caused a spark which resulted in a fire which totally destroyed the tanker. One of the JUPITER's crew was lost overboard.

On September 6, 1992 the H. LEE WHITE was in tow of the "G" tugs COLORADO and LOUISIANA entering the Trenton Channel when she struck a section of the toll bridge at Grosse Ile, MI knocking down a 150 foot span immediately east of the main river channel. The WHITE was not damaged but a new section of the bridge had to be installed at a cost of $1.7 million. The bridge was back in service in late January, 1993.

The John J. Boland (A. CHARLES E. WILSON) completed her sea trials in 1973.

The GEORGIAN BAY collided with the steamer CHARLES HUBBARD in the fog-covered lower St. Marys River September 6, 1955.

On September 6, 1989 the Twin Screw Rail Car Ferry GRAND RAPIDS left Muskegon in tow of the tugs ANGLIAN LADY and PRINCESS NO.1 and arrived at Port Maitland, Ont. on September llth. Scrapping was completed in the fall of 1994.

On 6 September 1887, BLUE BELL (2-mast wooden scow-schooner, 84’, 122GT, built in 1867 at Milwaukee) was carrying lumber from Wilt’s Bay, MI to Milwaukee when she missed the harbor entrance at Sturgeon Bay, WI in a storm. She was driven ashore where she broke up. Her crew made it to the beach with the aid of the local U.S. Life Saving crew. The total loss was valued at $5,000.

On 6 September 1871, the wooden schooner ROSA STEARNS, loaded with coal, was battling a storm for hours off Cleveland, Ohio. The ship was driven on the stone breakwater about 1:00 AM and was pounded to pieces. The crew jumped onto the breakwater and crawled to safety as the waves crashed over them.

Data from: Joe Barr, Jody L. Aho, Max S. Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Tadoussac Arrives

09/05:
The Tadoussac arrived at Port Weller Dry Docks Sunday morning. It is unknow if this was for repairs or for her winter-long widening and modernization project. She is docked at the fit-out wall.

She was expected to arrive this winter for the project. The vessel's width with be increased to 78-feet. The cargo holds will be rebuilt to a single belt system, dust control will be rebuilt for the handling of cement clinker and iron ore. Her gates will also be automated.

Canada Steamship lines President and CEO Sam Hayes announced in March that the company will convert and widen the Tadoussac, this winter, alongside the building of the new forebody for the Louis R. Desmarais. The cost for the Tadoussac will be an estimated $20 million (CAN).

Reported by: Jason Junge




McKee Sons First Trip

09/05:
The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons were unloading a cargo of stone in Chicago on Monday afternoon. This marks the first trip for the tug and barge since they were paired by their new owners. They unloaded north of the 106th Street Bridge in the Calumet River and were expected to depart sometime Monday.

Reported by: Larry Jackson




Hoyt Unloads

09/05:
The Elton Hoyt 2nd arrived at in Buffalo about midnight on Sept. 3. She unloaded a split cargo of two different types of grain at the ADM Standard elevator and departed with one tug at 5:00 p.m. Monday. This was her third grain cargo that was carried from Superior, WI.

The Hoyt departed Buffalo sailing upbound for Marquette to load Taconite for Rouge Steel.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Today in Great Lakes History - September 05

On September 5, 1964, the 730-foot bulk freighter Leecliffe Hall sank after colliding with the Greek ocean vessel Appolonia in the St. Lawrence River.

The CHI-CHEEMAUN completed her sea trials on September 5, 1974 and then cleared the shipyard on September 26th.

The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS cleared Lorain on her maiden voyage September 5, 1942.

The MORGAN, JR. returned to service September 5, 1948 after repairs suffered in an accident in June.

The NEW QUEDOC arrived at McLouth Steel, Trenton, MI on her maiden voyage September 5, 1960 with a load of Labrador iron ore.

The WYANDOTTE (2) was towed down the Welland Canal on September 5th & 6th on her way to the cutters torch.

On 5 September 1905, ABERCORN (wooden propeller “rabbit”, 126’, 261GT, built in 1873 at Marine City, MI) burned at the dock at Goderich, Ont. While unloading coal. She reportedly caught fire from the explosion of a signal lamp.

The schooner CALEDONIA, wrecked the previous autumn near the Fishing Islands on Lake Huron, was raised and arrived in Port Huron on 5 September 1882 under tow to be rebuilt.

Data from: Joe Barr, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Clarke Damages Boom

09/04:
While unloading salt in Toledo the Philip R. Clarke experienced some type of failure in its unloading boom. The boom was reported to have dropped damaging the saddle and angle iron. The Clarke was reported upbound in the Detroit River yesterday heading for Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay, WI for repairs. It is unknown how long the vessel will be out of service.

Clarke passing Harsen's Island in the St. Clair River Sunday.
A closer view of the boom.
The damaged area.
Another view.
The rear portion of the boom.

Reported by: Mike Nicholls




Oakglen Enters Lay-up

09/04:
On Saturday the Oakglen entered lay-up in Thunder Bay. She tied up beside the Algontario at Pascol Engineering's Shearleg Dock late that morning. It is unknown how long she will be in Lay-up.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Independent Continues North

09/04:
The Kinsman Independent was upbound the Detroit River Friday evening. She arrived at the Sterling fuel dock at 7:45 p.m. The U.S. Mailboat J.W. Westcott serviced the vessel while at the fuel dock. She is bound for Duluth to load a cargo of grain for Buffalo.

Reported by: Kenneth Borg and Mike Nicholls




Saginaw Update

09/04:
On Saturday night the Sam Laud entered the river sailing upbound for Saginaw. It is uncertain at which dock the Laud delivered her cargo, but it was most likely Saginaw Rock Products.

The Laud was outbound from the First Street turning basin in Saginaw at 7:50 a.m. Sunday and stopped at the Sargent dock near the I-75 bridge to meet a fuel truck. She was outbound after fueling at 11:50 a.m.

The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder arrived at Saginaw Rock Products at about 9:30 a.m. Sunday. The vessel departed the dock at 2:45 p.m. and was outbound after turning.

Reported by: Stephen Hause




Toledo Update

09/04:
Saturday the Catharine Desgagnes was at the T.W.I. Dock unloading pig iron. The Armco arrived at the Torco Dock around 4:00 p.m.

Future arrivals expected in Toledo during the next several days are the salties Federal Maas and the russian tanker Khirurg Vishnevskiy.

The next scheduled coal boat was the John J. Boland. The Boland was expected to arrive Sunday morning. The next scheduled ore boat was the Reserve due to arrive at 2:00 a.m. this morning.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Iron Ore

09/04:
Iron ore consumption by domestic steel makers in June was 14 percent above June 1999 consumption levels, according to the American Iron Ore Association. June consumption was 6 million tons compared with 5.3 million tons in June 1999. Year-to-date consumption through June was 36.9 million tons, or 14 percent more than last year.

Iron ore inventories in the United States increased 1 percent from May to June, but were 15 percent below June 1999 levels. Inventories were 25.8 million tons in May 1999, 25.9 million tons in June 1999 and 30.4 million tons in June 1999.

Shipments of U.S. and Canadian iron ore headed for North American unloading points were 8.5 million tons in July, 10 percent above 1999 levels during the same time period. Year-to-date shipments through July were 40.7 million tons, 13 percent above 1999.

Reported by: Al Miller




Diamond Jack Cruise

09/04:
On Sunday morning the Diamond Belle departed her dock in Detroit with a full load of passengers cruising across Lake St. Clair to Sans Souci on Harsens Island. The Belle arrived at the Island about 11:30 a.m. where the passengers enjoyed shopping and a picnic lunch in a tent in Sans Souci on the edge of the St. Clair River. Below are pictures from the cruise.

Diamond Belle at her Detroit dock.
Fog provided an interesting back drop as the Walter J. McCarthy passed downbound in Lake St. Clair.
Stern view as she passes with a salute from her whistles.
Following close behind was the saltie Daviken.
Stern view.
Diamond Belle docked at Sans Souci.
The Capetan Michalis passes the Diamond Belle.
Philip R. Clarke followed the Edwin H. Gott upbound.
Departing the island passengers were treated to a trip down the South Channel leading into Lake St. Clair. Captain William Hoey Sr. guides the Belle down the channel.
Entering the Detroit River the barge Great Lakes Trader pushed by the tug Joyce L. VanEnkevort passed.
Stern view.
The Catherine Desgagnes passed the Diamond Belle in the Detroit River.
Stern view.

Reported by: William Hoey Sr.




Vessel Wanted - To Sink

09/04:
The West Michigan Artificial Reef Society is searching for a vessel to sink in Lake Michigan as a diving attraction. The vessel will be sunk in a planned position two miles off the coast of Muskegon County in Lake Michigan north of the breakwall in about 100-feet of water.

The Society has the support of local governments, senators, and representatives. Creating an artificial reef will benefit the marine environment, provide a diving attraction and offer economic benefits.

Please contact the group with any information or leads on a vessel that may be a good candidate. The West Michigan Artificial Reef Society is a 501c3 tax exempt organization. A vessel could be donated for a tax credit.

Please e-mail Steve Kauranen




Marconi Marine VHF Radio

09/04:
Available to a museum or enthusiast, a large Green Marconi VHF Marine Radio. This was one of the original VHF radios used for communications on the Great Lakes ships. The set includes connecting cable and telephone handset. Not included is the control section which had the channel selector. The set is available for free to any group or individual willing to pick up the set.

Please e-mail Ron Walsh for more details.




Service Note

09/04:
A service upgrade left parts of the site unavailable Sunday and early Monday morning. Service should return to normal this morning.
I apologize for any inconvenience.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 04

Two favorites of many boatwatchers, entered service on August 4. The William Clay Ford (1) entered service on August 4, 1953, and the Edward L. Ryerson entered service on August 4, 1960.

The MELISSA DESGAGNES sailed to Holland under her 'a' name ONTADOC (2) with a load of Bentonite from Chicago on August 4, 1979.

The E.J. BLOCK was laid up for the last time at Indiana Harbor, IN on August 4 1984, the E.J. BLOCK was sold for scrap in late May, 1987.

The D.M. CLEMSON (2) left Superior on August 4, 1980 in tow of Malcolm Marine's tug TUG MALCOLM for Thunder Bay where she was dismantled.

The HOCHELAGA (2) was launched August 4, 1949 at the Collingwood Shipyards Ltd., Collingwood, Ont. for Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., Montreal, Que.

On a foggy August 4, 1977 the POINTE NOIRE went hard aground near the entrance to the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River and blocked the channel. After her grain cargo was lightered by Columbia Transportation's crane steamer BUCKEYE, the POINTE NOIRE was released on August 6th. She was reloaded in Hay Lake and continued her downbound trip. Repairs to her bottom damage were completed at Thunder Bay. Ont.

On 4 September 1902, ALICE M. BEERS (2-mast wooden schooner, 105’, 154GT, built in 1864 at Algonac, MI) was light when she hove to off the dock at Glen Arbor, MI in a gale. However, she slipped her anchor and was driven onto the channel marker. She was holed and drifted ashore where she later broke up. No lives lost.

On 4 September 1876, CITY OF PORT HURON, a wooden steam barge, sank a few miles off shore near Lexington, Michigan at about noon. She was heavily loaded with iron ore and sprang a leak at about 11 o'clock. Most of the crew managed to get on top of the cabin while two were in the forward rigging as she went down in 6 fathoms of water. The heavy seas washed over those on the cabin. Captain George Davis and two others floated ashore on wreckage while a fish boat picked up the five others. No lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Saginaw Visits Thunder Bay

09/03:
The Saginaw made her first trip to the Lake Superior port of Thunder Bay. The vessel departed on Friday after unloading a cargo of stone at the Irwin Stone Dock.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Sugar Islander II to the Rescue

09/03:
On Friday August 25, a 36-foot wooden Carver yacht was backing away from a dock below the Soo Locks on the St. Marys River when the pleasure craft grounded in a shoal area. The boaters were able to float free of the shoal and then ran into the rocks in the Channel. They were again able free themselves and proceed down river towards Sugar Island. The Lee A. Tregurtha was downbound, and the Coast Guard reported a boat adrift near the Sugar Island ferry.

The Tregurtha came close to the reckless boaters. After the groundings the small boat had lost power and was truly adrift. The boat drifted into the middle of the shipping channel and the Algomarine was approaching upbound.

The carferry Sugar Islander II spotted the boat and radioed to Soo Traffic explaining the situation. They quickly dropped off their load of cars and in true Great Lakes seamanship, proceeded downstream and got along side the boat. The Sugar Islander II pushed the boat out of the way of the now slowed Algomarine.

The Sugar Islander II finally got a line tied to the boat and awaited the arrival of the Coast Guard. The U.S. Coast Guard arrived and towed the boat to the U.S. Coast Guard base below the Locks. The operator of the boat was suspected of being intoxicated.

Reported by: Todd Davidson




Today in Great Lakes History - September 03

On September 3, 1977, the Belle River (now Walter J. McCarthy, Jr.) set a Great Lakes record for coal when it loaded 62,802 tons of coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal on its maiden voyage. This record has since been surpassed many times.

On September 3, 1981, the U.S. Steel bulk freighter Sewell Avery was laid up for the final time in Duluth.

Keel laying ceremonies for the 437 foot bow section of the ROGER BLOUGH took place on September 3, 1968 and was float launched December 21, 1968 less ballast tanks because the existing dry dock wasn’t wide enough to accommodate her 105 foot width.

SOODOC (b) AMELIA DESGAGNES ) departed on her maiden voyage when she loaded salt at Goderich, Ont. on September 3, 1976.

The SEWELL AVERY was laid up for the last time September 3, 1981 at Superior, WI.

The THOMAS LAMONT was cited for “exemplary service” by the U.S. Coast Guard. On September 3, 1981 for her role in the rescue of seventeen crew members from the burning CARTIERCLIFFE HALL on Lake Superior. The THOMAS LAMONT was laid up for the last time at Duluth’s Hallett dock #6A.

The H.H. PORTER sailed on her maiden voyage September 3, 1920 light from Lorain to load iron ore at Two Harbors, MN.

On September 3, 1985, PHILIP R. CLARKE plowed into the Drawbridge Cove Marina in Lorain's Black River damaging 5-10 small craft and sinking one at the steel dock. CLARKE managed to stop before hitting the Route 6 drawbridge.

On 3 September 1887, BULGARIA (wooden propeller, 280’, 1888GT) was launched at W. Bay City, MI by J. Davidson (hull #16).

September 3, 1910 - The MARQUETTE & BESSEMER No. 2 (2) was launched in Cleveland by American Shipbuilding.

On 3 September 1869, the 167' wooden propeller BOSCOBEL burned about two miles below St. Clair, Michigan. Three lives were lost. The ship was only about two years old and was in service of the New York Central Railroad, though owned by the Peshtigo Lumbering Co. of Chicago. The burned hulk was raised in 1876 and rebuilt as a schooner-barge at Algona, Michigan. She lasted until 1909 when she sank on Lake Huron.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




Kinsman Independent Returns to Service

09/02:
The Kinsman Independent departed her lay-up dock at the Port Terminal in Buffalo Friday. She departed at 8:00 p.m. bound for Duluth to load a cargo of grain.

The Independent is expected to return around Sept. 10. The Elton Hoyt 2nd should arrive on Sunday evening.

The trips by the Elton Hoyt 2nd carrying grain to Buffalo had led some to question the future of the Independent, the last active U.S. straight decker.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Seaway Queen Repainted

09/02:
At lay-up on the Toronto waterfront the Seaway Queen has been returned to her original colors. The forward superstructure was back to white and the stack was its usual red and black with the white diamond. The forward cabins and stack had been painted gray for her role in a movie that included the visiting liberty ship John W. Brown.

Reported by: Bill Bird




Detroit Traffic

09/02:
Friday was a busy day on the Detroit River, below are images of some of the traffic.

CCGS Limnos upbound near Grassy Island.
Niagara Prince downbound headed for Wyandotte.
Niagara Prince docked in front of the Diamond Jack.
Capt. Henry Jackman makes her first turn heading for Amherstburg.
Federal Fraser docked at the Detroit Marine Terminals with the Yick Hua docked behind her.
Herbert C. Jackson enters the Rouge Short Cut bound for Rouge Steel.
J.A.W. Iglehart upbound at Grassy Island bound for Lafarge Windsor.
Algosoo downbound at Belle Isle.
Pathfinder and tug Dorothy Ann at Lafarge Detroit

Report and pictures by: Pat Pavlat




Buckeye Sighting

09/02:
The Buckeye was passing Detroit at 6:00 p.m. Friday evening. She was flying a large flag from each of the Big 10 (11) Universities. Five were on each side of the forward cabin, and the U of M flag was up top.

Buckeye underway with flags flying.

Reported by: Lawrence Yost




Twin Ports Report

09/02:
Despite sporadic showers, Elton Hoyt 2nd made quick work of loading its third grain cargo in Superior, departing early evening on Aug. 31 on Cenex Harvest States. It was quickly replaced by Darya Kamal.

After unloading stone at the Reiss Inland dock in Duluth on Aug. 31, Adam E. Cornelius cross the harbor to load pellets at the BNSF ore dock. It departed early on Sept. 1.

Walter J. McCarthy Jr. cleared Midwest Energy Terminal during the evening of Aug. 31 with coal bound for Nanticoke, Ontario.

The DMIR ore dock in Two Harbors was booked for Sept. 1, with Arthur M. Anderson, Presque Isle and Roger Blough scheduled to arrive.

Reported by: Al Miller




Toledo Update

09/02:
On Friday the Mantadoc departed Andersons "E" Elevator with the tug William Hoey on the stern assisting her downriver through the bridges. The saltie Fossnes remained at the T.W.I. Dock unloading cargo. She was due to depart later in the day.

The Philip R. Clarke was at the A.R.M.S. Dock unloading salt. She departed very early in the morning. The Middletown was unloading ore at the Torco Dock, when finished she was expected to proceed over to the CSX Coal Docks to load.

The next coal boat will be the John J. Boland due in Sunday morning about 6:00 a.m. The next ore boat will be the Armco due in today at 4:00 p.m.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Gales of November program set in Duluth

09/02:
Reservations are now being accepted for the 13th annual Gales of November shipwreck and diving program Nov. 11 in Duluth.

The Gales of November program features a full day of speakers and exhibitors about shipwrecks and diving. The evening dinner speaker is Capt. Jimmie Hobaugh, who will speak about the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald.

Other organizations are holding events that same weekend. Visitors to Split Rock lighthouse can take part in the annual memorial lighting of the beacon. Coast Guard vessels are tentatively scheduled to be open for visitors.

To see a schedule, visit www.lsmma.com/gales2000.html

Reported by: Al Miller




Teach the Great Lakes

09/02:
The Education And Curriculum Homesite (TEACH Great Lakes), a new component of the Great Lakes Information Network, is a source for Great Lakes-related educational materials for teachers, students and interested citizens. Featuring topics on the environment, history and culture, geography, pollution, and careers and business, current modules include water levels, non-native invasive species, shoreline geology, and ports and shipping. TEACH also features a Questions and Answers section, where kids can submit questions about the Great Lakes to be answered by the TEACH team. One question is featured each month, and all answers are archived in the "Great Lakes Vault of Knowledge." TEACH is a project of the Great Lakes Commission through a grant from the U.S. EPA-Great Lakes National Program Office.

www.great-lakes.net/teach

Reported by: Christine Manninen




Today in Great Lakes History - September 02

ALGOSEA (built in 1970 by Lithgows Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland as Hull #1177) was launched on September 2, 1970 as a) BROOKNES for "Langra" Schiffahrsges G.m.b.H. & Co., Hamburg, Germany. She is now the c) SAUNIERE

ROBERT KOCH's first trip was on September 2, 1977 up the Welland Canal bound for Buffalo with cement.

The W.F WHITE was one of the earliest ships built as a self-unloader on the Great Lakes. On her maiden voyage September 2, 1915 the WHITE loaded coal at Erie, PA and sailed for Menominee, MI. She was the largest self-unloading bulk carrier on the Lakes at that time with a cargo capacity of 10,500 tons.

The RALPH H. WATSON departed light September 2, 1938 from Detroit, MI upbound to load iron ore at Duluth, MN. She was built as part of a fleet modernization plan for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH. of four new "GOVERNOR MILLER' class bulk carriers.

On September 2, 1938, the Ralph H. Watson, only the fourth steam turbine powered vessel on the Lakes, entered service.

HUBERT GAUCHER ran aground in the lower St. Lawrence on September 2, 1988. It took three tugs to free her, repairs took place at Quebec City.

ZIEMIA TARNOWSKA lost her engine while docking at Pier 24 in Cleveland, ramming the dock and caused about $100,000 in damage to the dock on September 2, 1988. The Polish vessel had minimal damage to her bulbous bow.

On 2 September 1851, BUNKER HILL (wooden sidewheeler, 154’, 457T, built in 1835 at Black River, OH) burned to a total loss at Tonawanda, NY.

The COLONEL ELLSWORTH (wooden schooner, 138', 319 gt, built in 1861 at Euclid, Ohio as a bark) was beached on Whitefish Point in Lake Superior the entire winter of 1895-96. She was repaired and put back into service late in the summer of 1896. Then, on 2 September 1896, the newly rebuilt vessel collided with the schooner EMILY B. MAXWELL about 6 miles from White Shoals on Lake Michigan and sank at about 4:00 AM. Her crew escaped in the yawl and was picked up by the MAXWELL.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




McKee Sons Departs

09/01:
The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons departed the North Slip in Sarnia Thursday sailing on their maiden voyage together. The tug and barge headed a short distance down the St. Clair River to fuel at the Shell Dock in Corunna. They tied up at 10:50 a.m. and were expected to be at the dock for two 1/2 to three hours. The destination of their first trip is unknown at this time other than the pair will upbound into Lake Huron.

The barge McKee Sons is operating under a bareboat charter to the Grand River Navigation Company of Cleveland, OH. Grand River is affiliated with the Lower Lakes Towing Company, Port Dover, ON. The company name Lower Lakes Transportation Company is painted on the tug and barge.

Below are pictures of the pair at the Government Dock taken in July by Matt Miner
McKee Sons at dock.
Tug Invincible from the McKee Sons.
Stern view of the pair.
Long view showing the Government Dock.

Reported by: Barry Hiscocks




Desmaris Stops for Repairs

09/01:
The Louis R. Desmarais arrived at the Soo early Tuesday morning passing upbound for Superior, WI. The vessel developed some type of problem believed to be in her engines. A tug was sent to assist her to the east wall at the Carbide Dock. She remained there yesterday and it is unknown when she will depart.

Reported by: Jerry Masson




More on the Wexford

09/01:
As reported on Wednesday, the steamer Wexford, lost with all hands in the "Big Storm" of 1913, has been found by Canadian divers. She was found at 11:00 a.m. on Aug. 25. The Wexford is one of only three lost ships left to be found from the Great Storm of November, 1913. One of the finders, Brent Bamford, sends this brief description of the wreck:
"This is one of the nicest and easiest wrecks dives I have seen in the Great Lakes. She is resting almost perfectly upright with no visible signs of trauma. Portholes are in place with the glass still intact. A lifeboat davit still stands with the block attached and bow anchors are in place. The hatch covers are gone thus making for safe, easy and well lit penetration. To this point in time we have seen no sign or either the propeller nor the rudder - perhaps this explains the disaster? The ship's exterior is covered with about 2 inches of zebra mussels, but the interior is basically free of the little critters. The hull appears to be so intact that she would float (raise the Titanic???) Bow and stern windlasses have started to collapse the decking and much of the engine compartment and engines appear to be intact."

Reported by: David Swayze with information from Brent Bamford and Paul Carroll




Seaway West Update

09/01:
The Halifax was anchored in Lake Ontario at 11:00 a.m. Thursday morning for some type of repairs. They estimated they would be under way by 3:00 p.m.

The Valentine Moran and the Pennsylvania barge were anchored 3 miles west of Galloo Island Thursday. The pair were waiting for another tug at Cape Vincent. They estimated an e.t.a. at Cape Vincent of 5:30 p.m.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Possible Sale

09/01
Rumors continue surrounding a possible sale of the Calcite II, Myron C. Taylor and George A. Sloan. Last month it was reported that the three vessels were to be sold by the USS Great Lakes Fleet to the Canadian shipping company, Lower Lakes Towing (LLT).

The latest rumors have the trio entering lay-up by early October as their new owners prepare the vessels for use. There have been no official announcements by USS or LLT.




Twin Ports Report

09/01:
Elton Hoyt 2nd made its third trip to the Twin Ports to load grain on Aug. 31, and displayed its versatility by calling at its third different elevator. The Hoyt was docked at Cenex Harvest States #1 waiting to load, although rain may cause delays.

Another unusual sight about 7:30 a.m. Aug. 31 was Adam E. Cornelius proceeding slowly up the St. Louis River with cargo for the Reiss Inland dock.

Reported by: Al Miller




Midland Update

09/01:
The past few days have been a dream come true for boat watchers in Midland, Ontario. Last weekend, the tug Atlantic Hickory and barge Sarah Spencer arrived and unloaded grain at the ADM Ogilvy mill. She was outbound on a crisp cold Saturday night at about 11:00 p.m.

Over the past four days, the Algorail made two back to back trips to the Unimin stone dock to unload a cargo of limestone. She headed out Tuesday evening on an incredibly still night and the roar of her engines could be heard long after she disappeared past Adams Point.

At 1:00 p.m. Wednesday the cruise ship C. Columbus departed Midland for Owen Sound. Her striking shape is even more impressive when she is seen at speed.

Reported by: Rudy Smith




Toledo Update

09/01:
On Thursday the Mantadoc continued to load grain at the Andersons "E" Elevator, she was expected to depart that Thursday night or sometime today depending on how the loading process goes. The tanker Gemini remained at the B-P Oil Dock. The saltie Fossnes was at the T.W.I. Dock.

The Algosteel finished loading coal and departed the CSX Dock around 1:30 p.m. The CSL Niagara shifted over from the # 2 Dock and started loading around 2:00 p.m. She was expected to depart later on that evening. The next scheduled ore and coal boat is the Middletown. Her e.t.a. for the Torco Dock is at 9:00 a.m. today to unload ore. When finished she will proceed over to the CSX Dock to load coal. She is expected at the coal dock at 3:00 p.m.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Welland Report

09/01:
The upbound Mapleglen tied up just North of Lock 8 for about one hour Wednesday as she took on supplies. Her docking there held up the Paterson in Lock 8 for a few minutes while she was trying to tie up. The Mapleglen was upbound with a load of ore for delivery to Chicago. At the same time, the downbound Tadoussac was tied up just below the entrance to Lock 8 in Port Colborne for an unknown reason.

Reported by: Dan Sweeley




Boatnerd Labor Day Cruise

09/01:
On Sunday, September 3, the Diamond Belle will make a special trip from Detroit, across Lake St. Clair to Sans Souci on Harsens Island. The cruise is just a few days away, call now to reserve your tickets.

This cruise is a great opportunity for ship enthusiasts to see and photograph the traffic as the cruise takes place in the shipping channels. The trip leaves Stroh's River Place at the foot of Jos. Campau at 8:00 a.m., picnic lunch in a tent in Sans Souci on the edge of the St. Clair River, returning to Detroit at about 4:15 pm. Cost is $55 per person, by reservation only. For information call: 313-843-9376

Diamond Belle on the Detroit River. Photo by Mike Nicholls

Reported by: Diamond Jack's River Tours




Boatnerd Clearance Sale

09/01:
The first run of merchandise was so popular, we are preparing for our new Fall line of Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping merchandise. Force 5 Trading and Promotions must make room in there warehouse. Below is a list of all items at reduced prices. Once these items are gone the new merchandise will return to normal prices. First Come first buy.

All items feature the popular Edward L. Ryerson logo embroidered on high quality clothing.

T-shirts Sale price $10.00
off white / natural
XXL- 1

Ash/gray
Med- 1

Navy
Large-1

White
Large-1
XL- 1
XXL- 1

Hooded Jacket reg. 50.00 sale 38.00
With sweatshirt lining- Green
1- Large

1/4 zip fleece shirts off white. reg. 50.00 sale. 32.00
1- XL
1- large

POLO shirts reg. $ 26.00 - $34.00
Sale price: M-XLARGE $ 20.00 plus shipping
XXL $ 22.00 plus shipping

Yellow:
Med- 2
XL- 1
XXL- 2

Black-
Med- 1
Large- 2
XL- 4
XXL- 2

White:
med- 1
large-2
XLARGE-3
XXL- 5

Now available from Force 5, Official Interlake Steamship Company T-shirts
Regularly $ 22.00 M-XL
XXL: $ 24.00
3XL: $ 26.00
4XL: $ 28.00
SALE PRICES: M-XL $ 16.00
XXL-4XL $ 18.00 plus delivery.

Click here to view merchandise or send you order by e-mail




Today in Great Lakes History - September 01

Tragedy struck four days after the launch of the AGAWA CANYON, September 1, 1970, when the ship was rocked by an engine room explosion killing one of the crew and injuring seven more. The AGAWA CANYON entered service in November, 1970. New engines were fitted in 1975, equipped with four 10 cylinder, two stroke cycle, single acting opposed piston diesel engines, built in 1970 by Fairbanks, Morse (Canada), Kingston, Ont. Total bhp 6,680. Rated service speed: 12 knots (13.8 mph).

LAKE NIPIGON was launched September 1, 1970 as a) TEMPLE BAR, BR.341240, for Lambert Bros. (Shipping) Ltd., London, England.

Upon her arrival at Quebec City on September 1, 1962, the LAKE WINNIPEG was the first vessel to enter the Nipigon Transport fleet.

ROGERS CITY (2) was launched September 1, 1923 as a) B.H. TAYLOR, the third self-unloader built for the Bradley Transportation Co., Rogers City, MI.

From September 1, 1947 to September 15, 1959 the MESQUITE was stationed at Sault Ste. Marie, MI

On 1 September 1854, ABIAH (2-mast wooden schooner or brig, 134’, 353T, built in 1848 at Irving, NY) was sailing light from Chicago to Oconto, WI when she capsized and sank in a squall about 10 miles off Sheboygan, WI. The schooner L. LUDDINGTON rescued her crew and 2 passengers.

The 135' wooden schooner JOSEPH E. SPARROW was launched at Bangor, Michigan on 1 September 1873.

One hundred years ago today, on 1 September 1900, the Canadian steamer ADVANCE (wooden propeller package freighter, 168’, 1178 gt, built in 1884 at St. Catharine’s, Ontario) was placed in service. In August 1899, when she was named SIR S. L. TILLEY, she had caught fire off shore, about 7 miles from Fairport, Ohio and was destroyed. However, the hull was later recovered and used as the basis of the steamer ADVANCE. She lasted in this role until 1903 when she burned again.

September 1, 1919 - A switchman was killed in the yard at Manitowoc while the ANN ARBOR NO. 6 was being loaded. This caused a delay of four hours in her sailing time.

September 1, 1931 - W.L. Mercereau retired as superintendent of steamships, a position he had held since 1899.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history




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