Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive

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Sarah Spencer aground near Windsor

9/30 - 10 p.m. Update - At approximately 7 p.m. Tuesday Canadian Enterprise, after unloading Coal in the Rouge Shortcut, was guided alongside the Sarah Spencer by the tugs Wyoming and Superior to begin lightening the load on the Sarah Spencer.

9/30 - 4:30 p.m. Update - As of 3:00 p.m., the Sarah Spencer is still grounded. At this time it is awaiting a gravel barge to lighten its load.

Original Article - 9/30 - The tug Jane Ann IV with barge Sarah Spencer grounded approximately 200 feet off the Southwestern Sales Aggregate dock, in East Windsor, about 6 a.m. Monday morning. Apparently the tug Jane Ann IV lost power in one engine as it was coming in to dock in the channel between Peche Island and the Canadian shore.

Tug and barge remained near the Windsor dock through the day. About 5 p.m. the tug Salvor departed its truck ferry dock down river and reported it was headed to assist the Jane Ann IV. The Salvor arrived on scene around 7 p.m. and was back downbound at 9 p.m. The "G" tugs Superior and Wyoming were also on the scene during the day on Monday.

The tug/barge remain aground at 7:30 a.m. Tuesday. No other details were available at this time.

Photos in the News Photo Gallery, and an updated photos.

Reported by Barry Pigeon

 

Port Reports - September 30

Toledo - Jim Hoffman
John G. Munson finished loading coal at the CSX Docks and departed early Monday afternoon. Tug Michigan with the barge Great Lakes were at the B-P Dock.
It appears that the fall grain trade is finally starting up at this port. On Monday morning the Ojibway arrived at the ADM Elevator and the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin arrived at Anderson's "K" Elevator to load grain.
The revised schedule for coal boats due into the CSX Docks has the tug Salvor and barge and the H. Lee White due in Tuesday.
The revised schedule for ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock has the Algowood due in Friday evening followed by the CSL Assiniboine due in Saturday afternoon.

Buffalo - Brian Wroblewski
The tug Kurt Luedtke should be arriving tonight with the derrick boat #16 and scows, they are expected to start dredging on the Buffalo River soon.
English River headed out Monday around 11 a.m.

Grand Haven - Dick Fox
The barge St. Mary's Conquest and tug Susan W. Hannah came in about 7:30 p.m. Sunday and was still unloading Monday afternoon.

Calumet River - Tom Milton
On Sunday evening the Manitowoc was towed stern first up the Calumet to Beemsterboer. The Yankcanuck appeared to be waiting and the John D. Leitch was taking on coal at KCBX.

 

Updates - September 30

News Photo Gallery updated

Special Welland Gathering gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 30

On September 30, 1896, SUMATRA (wooden schooner-barge, 204 foot, 845 gross tons, built in 1874, at Black River, Ohio) was loaded with rail road rails in tow of the steamer B. W. ARNOLD in a storm on Lake Huron. The SUMATRA was "blown down" and foundered off the Government Pier at Milwaukee. Three of the crew were lost. The four survivors were rescued by the ARNOLD and the U.S. Lifesaving Service. The SUMATRA was owned by the Mills Transportation Company.

The 660-foot forward section of the BELLE RIVER (Hull#716) was side launched on September 30, 1976, at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, by Bay Shipbuilding Co. Renamed b.) WALTER J. McCARTHY, JR. in 1977.

The ARTHUR SIMARD entered service on September 30, 1973, sailing to Montreal, Quebec, to load gasoline.

The GOVERNOR MILLER was towed down the Welland Canal on September 30, 1980, in tow of TUG MALCOLM, STORMONT and ARGUE MARTIN on her way to Quebec City.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY departed light on her maiden voyage from River Rouge, Michigan, on September 30, 1943, bound for Two Harbors, Minnesota, to load iron ore.

On September 30, 1986, the Canadian Coast Guard vessel CARIBOU ISLE struck a rock in Lake Huron's North Channel and began taking on water. C.C.G.S. SAMUEL RISLEY arrived and helped patch the ship. The pair the departed for Parry Sound, Ontario.

On September 30, 1888, AUSTRALIA (wooden schooner, 109 foot, 159 gross tons, built in 1862, at Vermilion, Ohio) was carrying cedar posts from Beaver Island to Chicago when she encountered a gale. She was laid on beam ends and sprung a leak. She headed for shelter at Holland, Michigan, but struck a bar and foundered in the mouth of the harbor. The wreck blocked the harbor until it was removed on October. 5 Her crew was rescued by the U.S. Lifesaving Service.

On September 30, 1875, AMERICAN CHAMPION (wooden scow-schooner, 156 tons, built in 1866, at Trenton, Michigan) dropped anchor to ride out a gale near Leamington, Ontario, on Lake Erie. The chains gave way and she struck a bar and sank to the gunwales. The crew of eight spent the night in the rigging and the next day a local woman and her two sons heroically rescued each one.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II, Father Dowling Collection, and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Port Reports - September 29

Kingston Area - Ron Walsh
The Kathryn Spirit departed Picton at 5:25 p.m., heading to Newport News, Va., with a stop in Montreal. Tug Ecosse, barge and tug Lac Manitoba have departed Dawson Point, Wolfe Island, for Ogdensburg, N.Y.

Buffalo -Brian Wroblewski
Canada Steamship’s Halifax was loading coal at the Gateway Metroport Terminal in Lackawanna on Sunday morning.
LaFarge’s English River arrived off Buffalo around 9 a.m. on Sunday and went to anchor near the traffic buoy. The captain made an arrangement with the captain on the Herbert C. Jackson to wait until the Jackson departed so it would be easier getting through the turn at Ohio Street. The G tug Washington took the Jackson downriver to the north entrance at 1 p.m. She then helped the Jackson turn around as the English River made her way into the north entrance. Once inside the breakwall, the English River turned to starboard and stuck her nose just inside the Outer Harbor where the Washington was waiting. The tug took up the tow line from the cement carrier’s stern and brought her up the river to the LaFarge dock. While all this action was happening at the north end of the harbor, there was plenty going on at the south entrance. The Halifax departed around the time that the English River was inbound for Buffalo at 2 p.m.. As soon as she was clear, the CSL Laurentien came in with more coal for Gateway.

Toledo - Jim Hoffman
The American Mariner finished loading coal and departed from the CSX Coal Dock Sunday afternoon. Algomarine finished unloading grain at the A.R.M.S. Dock and departed Sunday afternoon. Tug Sea Service with the barge Energy 6506 was at the B-P Dock loading cargo. The tug Michigan with the barge Great Lakes was at the Midwest Terminal Dock. CSL Niagara was at the Torco Dock unloading ore. When finished unloading ore she will proceed over to the CSX Docks to load coal late Sunday evening.
The revised schedule for coal boats due into the CSX Docks has the John G. Munson due in Monday followed by the tug Salvor and barge and the H. Lee White on Tuesday. Due into the Torco Ore Docks is the Algowood due Friday, CSL Assiniboine due Saturday followed by the H. Lee White on Sunday.
Canadian Navigator is scheduled for the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock on Monday.

Saginaw River - Todd Shorkey
The tug Barbara Andrie and her tank barge called on the Bit-Mat dock in Bay City Sunday morning to unload. The pair were expected to be outbound Monday morning.

Hamilton/Welland - Eric Holmes
Sunday, the Canadian Miner depart Dofasco at 5 a.m. heading out into Lake Ontario to clean her holds. The Miner returned at 11 a.m. and went to Pier 25 (JRI Elevators) to load grain for Port Cartier. The Emerald Star arrived at 3 p.m. There was a delay in the Welland Canal on Sunday afternoon for 3 hours. The Federal Rhine hit the arrestor cable in Lock 7 and a crane had to be brought in to rectify the situation.

Alpena - Ben & Chanda McClain
The Mississagi arrived at the Alpena Oil Dock late Sunday night. It tied up and unloaded a cargo of road salt. It departed in the early morning hours of Monday.
Also in port Monday morning was the Alpena, loading cement at Lafarge.

Amherstburg - Dave Cozens
The Canadian Coast Guard Base was active with three vessels departing for patrols: the Cape Dundas, Isle Rouge, & Cape Hurd.  J. W. Shelley was upbound with a load of fluorspar to be offloaded at Hearn's dock in Windsor. It will then be trucked by Hearn back to the Honeywell Chemical Plant in Amherstburg where it is used in the production of hydrofluoric acid. The fluorspar is mined in Mexico and was shipped to Montreal on the "tramp steamer" Balsa 73 where it was offloaded, then reloaded onto the Shelley for delivery to Windsor.

 

Updates - September 29

News Photo Gallery updated

and more News Photo Gallery updates

Special Welland Gathering gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 29

September 29, 1930, for the first time in the history of Pittsburgh Steamship Company, the boats of the fleet loaded more than one million tons in a 7 day period. The 64 Pittsburgh boats loaded 1,002,092 tons of cargo between 9/23 and 9/29.

The J. H. SHEADLE (Hull#22) of the Great Lakes Engineering Works, was launched September 29, 1906 , for the Grand Island Steamship Co. (Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.) Renamed b.) F. A. BAILEY in 1924, c.) LA SALLE in 1930. Sold Canadian in 1965, renamed d.) MEAFORD, and e.) PIERSON INDEPENDENT in 1979. She was scrapped at Santander, Spain in 1980.

Henry Ford II, 70, of Grosse Pointe, Michigan, passed away on September 29, 1987. Mr. Ford's namesake was the Ford Motor Company self-unloader.

On September 29, 1986, the Polish tug KORAL left Lauzon, Quebec with the JOHN E. F. MISENER and GOLDEN HIND enroute to Cartagena / Mamonal, Columbia for scrapping.

September 29, 1892 - The ANN ARBOR NO 1 was launched.

On 29 September 1872, ADRIATIC (3 mast wooden schooner-barge, 139 foot, 129 net tons, built in 1865, at Clayton, New York as a bark) was in tow of the tug MOORE along with three other barges in Lake Erie in a heavy gale. She became separated from the tow and foundered. The entire crew of 7 was lost. The wooden schooner DERRICK was used in salvage operations. On 29 September 1854, she had just positioned herself above the wreck of the steamer ERIE off Silver Creek, New York on Lake Erie when she went down in a gale. She had spent the summer trying to salvage valuables from the wreck of the steamer ATLANTIC.

On 29 September 1900, the steamer SAKIE SHEPARD was re-launched at Anderson's shipyard in Marine City. She had been thoroughly rebuilt there during the summer.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Marinelink Explorer arrives at Port Weller

9/28 - Port Weller - The tow of the former heavy-lift salt water vessel Marinelink Explorer arrived at Port Weller Drydock Friday midday. The vessel was put into the deep dry dock.

Port Weller Drydock, which has recently appeared to be closed, is owned by Upper Lakes Shipping, who also own the vessel. The tugs Commodore Straits and Radium Yellowknife handled the tow.

The Marine Link Explorer is the former John Henry and departed Trois-Rivières for the Great Lakes on Monday. John Henry was built in a US shipyard 30 years ago for deep sea service under the US flag. The vessel's future is unknown at this time.

Pictures in the News Photo Gallery

Reported by Paul Beesley

 

Port Reports - September 28

Saginaw River - Todd Shorkey
Olive L. Moore-Lewis J. Kuber were outbound from the Bay Aggregates dock early Friday after unloading there overnight.
The tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 were inbound Friday calling on the Consumers Energy dock. The pair finished unloading, went upriver to the turning basin in Essexville to turn, and then head for the lake late Friday night.
Algorail was inbound Friday night, going up to the Sargent dock in Zilwaukee to unload. She was back outbound Saturday morning.
Mississagi was inbound Saturday morning calling on the Burroughs dock in Zilwaukee. She was expected to be outbound Saturday evening.

Buffalo - Brian Wroblewski
Herbert C. Jackson arrived Saturday after noon and went up the creek to Standard Elevator. She should be outbound Sunday afternoon.

Grand Haven - Dick Fox
The Maumee came in light about 3:30 Saturday afternoon and took on a load of sand at the Construction Aggregates dock in Ferrysburg. Her destination is St. Joseph, MI. This is the second shipment out of our port this season.

Hamilton - Eric Holmes
Saturday the Canadian Miner arrived at 8:30 a.m. with a cargo of iron ore pellets from Port Cartier for Dofasco. The tug Salvor and barge departed at 9:30 a.m. with steel slabs for Detroit. Rt. Hon. Paul J Martin arrived at 11 a.m. with coal from Buffalo for US Steel. Robert S. Pierson arrived at 1:30 pm. with iron ore pellets for US Steel from Superior. Canadian Transport departed at 6 p.m. from Dofasco in ballast. Tim S. Dool arrived at 8:30 p.m. with iron ore pellets for Dofasco.
Algolake arrived at 9 p.m. with coal for Dofasco.

Alpena - Ben & Chanda McClain
Fog that rolled into the area the past few days delayed vessels coming into port. The tug G.L Ostrander and barge Integrity was at Lafarge on Thursday. Late Friday night the tug Samuel de Champlain and barge Innovation was at anchor in the fog along with the Alpena waiting behind it. Both cement carriers were able to come in and load Saturday morning.
The tall ship Highlander Sea is tied up in the Thunder Bay River.

 

Upper Saginaw River dredging on hold until later this year

9/28 - Bay City - A long-awaited project to dredge the Upper Saginaw River for shipping will have to wait a little longer.

Luedtke Engineering Co. of Frankfort was to begin clearing the navigational channel this month, carrying out the first comprehensive maintenance dredging project on the river since the mid-1990s. But the start date has been delayed due to other dredging that Luedtke is finishing up in Buffalo and Cleveland, said Tom Zatkovic, the company's project manager. "Possibly mid-November, more likely the first of December," Zatkovic said of a start date for the Upper Saginaw project.

Crews plan to work until the Saginaw River freezes, he said, then resume and finish the project in the spring.

Luedtke was hired for $1.9 million by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to dredge the Upper River, from Bay City south to Saginaw. A notice to proceed on the work was signed Sept. 19, and the contractor has 120 days from that date to complete the work, Corps officials said. The timeline doesn't count days when work can't be done due to weather, however. The spoils will be scooped from the river and deposited at a new $5 million Dredged Material Disposal Facility constructed on the Bay-Saginaw county line in Frankenlust and Zilwaukee townships.

Jim Koski, Saginaw County public works commissioner, said he's disappointed the start date has been delayed. But Koski has spearheaded the project for years, and dealt with numerous environmental and legal wranglings. "There's been so many things," he said. "I don't think anything has happened as it was supposed to on this thing."

If nothing else, the delay will at least mean the river is mostly clear of pleasure craft traffic during the dredging, Koski said. He said he thinks the work, to dredge more than 200,000 cubic yards from the navigational channel, will take two to three months to complete. Regardless of when dredging begins, Koski said he plans to watch the start from a lawn chair on shore - even if he has to wear a hat and gloves. "You just climb over the hills as they put them in front of you," he said.

From the Bay City Times

 

Nadro Marine transporting wind turbines to Wolf Island

9/28 - Nadro Marine Services Ltd of Port Dover, Ontario, won the contract to transport 86 windmills from Ogdensburg, NY to Wolfe Island, Ont. These windmills will be installed at various places on the Island where there is a prevailing, and fairly consistent, southwest wind.

To meet the contract requirements new docks have been built in both Kingston and Wolfe Island. Nadro Marine Services has four tugs and three barges involved in this operation. McKeil Marine has provided one additional tug. The windmills have all arrived in Ogdensburg from Europe and are now being transported approximately one per day. They are stored at the dock facility until shipped.

Nadro's tug Vigilant 1 runs a ferry service from Kingston to Wolfe Island a number of times each day. This service brings workers, materiel and vehicles to and from Wolfe Island. The transport section of the project should be completed before the end of the 08 shipping season. Installation of the windmills and connection to the grid is forecast to be a 3 year project.

Pictures in the News Photo Gallery

Reported by Paul Beesley

 

Updates - September 28

News Photo Gallery

Special Welland Gathering gallery

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 28

On September 28, 1980, the BURNS HARBOR entered service, departing Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin bound for Superior, Wisconsin to load pellets.

THOMAS WILSON left Toledo on September 28, 1987, in tow of the tug TUSKER for overseas scrapping. WILSON has been laid up since December 16, 1979.

On 28 September 1891, THOMAS PARSONS (2 mast wooden schooner, 135 foot, 350 tons, built in 1868, at Charlotte, New York) was carrying coal out of Ashtabula, Ohio when she foundered in a storm a few miles off Fairport in Lake Erie.

On 28 September 1849, W G BUCKNER (wooden schooner, 75 foot, 107 tons, built in 1837, at Irving, New york) was carrying lumber in a storm on Lake Michigan when she sprang a leak, then capsized. The man to whom the cargo belonged was aboard with his wife and five children. One child was washed overboard while the wife and three children died of exposure. The schooner ERWIN took off the survivors plus the bodies.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Sarah Spencer aground near Windsor

9/30 - 10 p.m. Update - At approximately 7 p.m. Tuesday Canadian Enterprise, after unloading Coal in the Rouge Shortcut, was guided alongside the Sarah Spencer by the tugs Wyoming and Superior to begin lightening the load on the Sarah Spencer.

9/30 - 4:30 p.m. Update - As of 3:00 p.m., the Sarah Spencer is still grounded. At this time it is awaiting a gravel barge to lighten its load.

Original Article - 9/30 - The tug Jane Ann IV with barge Sarah Spencer grounded approximately 200 feet off the Southwestern Sales Aggregate dock, in East Windsor, about 6 a.m. Monday morning. Apparently the tug Jane Ann IV lost power in one engine as it was coming in to dock in the channel between Peche Island and the Canadian shore.

Tug and barge remained near the Windsor dock through the day. About 5 p.m. the tug Salvor departed its truck ferry dock down river and reported it was headed to assist the Jane Ann IV. The Salvor arrived on scene around 7 p.m. and was back downbound at 9 p.m. The "G" tugs Superior and Wyoming were also on the scene during the day on Monday.

The tug/barge remain aground at 7:30 a.m. Tuesday. No other details were available at this time.

Photos in the News Photo Gallery, and an updated photos.

Reported by Barry Pigeon

 

Port Reports - September 30

Toledo - Jim Hoffman
John G. Munson finished loading coal at the CSX Docks and departed early Monday afternoon. Tug Michigan with the barge Great Lakes were at the B-P Dock.
It appears that the fall grain trade is finally starting up at this port. On Monday morning the Ojibway arrived at the ADM Elevator and the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin arrived at Anderson's "K" Elevator to load grain.
The revised schedule for coal boats due into the CSX Docks has the tug Salvor and barge and the H. Lee White due in Tuesday.
The revised schedule for ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock has the Algowood due in Friday evening followed by the CSL Assiniboine due in Saturday afternoon.

Buffalo - Brian Wroblewski
The tug Kurt Luedtke should be arriving tonight with the derrick boat #16 and scows, they are expected to start dredging on the Buffalo River soon.
English River headed out Monday around 11 a.m.

Grand Haven - Dick Fox
The barge St. Mary's Conquest and tug Susan W. Hannah came in about 7:30 p.m. Sunday and was still unloading Monday afternoon.

Calumet River - Tom Milton
On Sunday evening the Manitowoc was towed stern first up the Calumet to Beemsterboer. The Yankcanuck appeared to be waiting and the John D. Leitch was taking on coal at KCBX.

 

Updates - September 30

News Photo Gallery updated

Special Welland Gathering gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 30

On September 30, 1896, SUMATRA (wooden schooner-barge, 204 foot, 845 gross tons, built in 1874, at Black River, Ohio) was loaded with rail road rails in tow of the steamer B. W. ARNOLD in a storm on Lake Huron. The SUMATRA was "blown down" and foundered off the Government Pier at Milwaukee. Three of the crew were lost. The four survivors were rescued by the ARNOLD and the U.S. Lifesaving Service. The SUMATRA was owned by the Mills Transportation Company.

The 660-foot forward section of the BELLE RIVER (Hull#716) was side launched on September 30, 1976, at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, by Bay Shipbuilding Co. Renamed b.) WALTER J. McCARTHY, JR. in 1977.

The ARTHUR SIMARD entered service on September 30, 1973, sailing to Montreal, Quebec, to load gasoline.

The GOVERNOR MILLER was towed down the Welland Canal on September 30, 1980, in tow of TUG MALCOLM, STORMONT and ARGUE MARTIN on her way to Quebec City.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY departed light on her maiden voyage from River Rouge, Michigan, on September 30, 1943, bound for Two Harbors, Minnesota, to load iron ore.

On September 30, 1986, the Canadian Coast Guard vessel CARIBOU ISLE struck a rock in Lake Huron's North Channel and began taking on water. C.C.G.S. SAMUEL RISLEY arrived and helped patch the ship. The pair the departed for Parry Sound, Ontario.

On September 30, 1888, AUSTRALIA (wooden schooner, 109 foot, 159 gross tons, built in 1862, at Vermilion, Ohio) was carrying cedar posts from Beaver Island to Chicago when she encountered a gale. She was laid on beam ends and sprung a leak. She headed for shelter at Holland, Michigan, but struck a bar and foundered in the mouth of the harbor. The wreck blocked the harbor until it was removed on October. 5 Her crew was rescued by the U.S. Lifesaving Service.

On September 30, 1875, AMERICAN CHAMPION (wooden scow-schooner, 156 tons, built in 1866, at Trenton, Michigan) dropped anchor to ride out a gale near Leamington, Ontario, on Lake Erie. The chains gave way and she struck a bar and sank to the gunwales. The crew of eight spent the night in the rigging and the next day a local woman and her two sons heroically rescued each one.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II, Father Dowling Collection, and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Port Reports - September 29

Kingston Area - Ron Walsh
The Kathryn Spirit departed Picton at 5:25 p.m., heading to Newport News, Va., with a stop in Montreal. Tug Ecosse, barge and tug Lac Manitoba have departed Dawson Point, Wolfe Island, for Ogdensburg, N.Y.

Buffalo -Brian Wroblewski
Canada Steamship’s Halifax was loading coal at the Gateway Metroport Terminal in Lackawanna on Sunday morning.
LaFarge’s English River arrived off Buffalo around 9 a.m. on Sunday and went to anchor near the traffic buoy. The captain made an arrangement with the captain on the Herbert C. Jackson to wait until the Jackson departed so it would be easier getting through the turn at Ohio Street. The G tug Washington took the Jackson downriver to the north entrance at 1 p.m. She then helped the Jackson turn around as the English River made her way into the north entrance. Once inside the breakwall, the English River turned to starboard and stuck her nose just inside the Outer Harbor where the Washington was waiting. The tug took up the tow line from the cement carrier’s stern and brought her up the river to the LaFarge dock. While all this action was happening at the north end of the harbor, there was plenty going on at the south entrance. The Halifax departed around the time that the English River was inbound for Buffalo at 2 p.m.. As soon as she was clear, the CSL Laurentien came in with more coal for Gateway.

Toledo - Jim Hoffman
The American Mariner finished loading coal and departed from the CSX Coal Dock Sunday afternoon. Algomarine finished unloading grain at the A.R.M.S. Dock and departed Sunday afternoon. Tug Sea Service with the barge Energy 6506 was at the B-P Dock loading cargo. The tug Michigan with the barge Great Lakes was at the Midwest Terminal Dock. CSL Niagara was at the Torco Dock unloading ore. When finished unloading ore she will proceed over to the CSX Docks to load coal late Sunday evening.
The revised schedule for coal boats due into the CSX Docks has the John G. Munson due in Monday followed by the tug Salvor and barge and the H. Lee White on Tuesday. Due into the Torco Ore Docks is the Algowood due Friday, CSL Assiniboine due Saturday followed by the H. Lee White on Sunday.
Canadian Navigator is scheduled for the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock on Monday.

Saginaw River - Todd Shorkey
The tug Barbara Andrie and her tank barge called on the Bit-Mat dock in Bay City Sunday morning to unload. The pair were expected to be outbound Monday morning.

Hamilton/Welland - Eric Holmes
Sunday, the Canadian Miner depart Dofasco at 5 a.m. heading out into Lake Ontario to clean her holds. The Miner returned at 11 a.m. and went to Pier 25 (JRI Elevators) to load grain for Port Cartier. The Emerald Star arrived at 3 p.m. There was a delay in the Welland Canal on Sunday afternoon for 3 hours. The Federal Rhine hit the arrestor cable in Lock 7 and a crane had to be brought in to rectify the situation.

Alpena - Ben & Chanda McClain
The Mississagi arrived at the Alpena Oil Dock late Sunday night. It tied up and unloaded a cargo of road salt. It departed in the early morning hours of Monday.
Also in port Monday morning was the Alpena, loading cement at Lafarge.

Amherstburg - Dave Cozens
The Canadian Coast Guard Base was active with three vessels departing for patrols: the Cape Dundas, Isle Rouge, & Cape Hurd.  J. W. Shelley was upbound with a load of fluorspar to be offloaded at Hearn's dock in Windsor. It will then be trucked by Hearn back to the Honeywell Chemical Plant in Amherstburg where it is used in the production of hydrofluoric acid. The fluorspar is mined in Mexico and was shipped to Montreal on the "tramp steamer" Balsa 73 where it was offloaded, then reloaded onto the Shelley for delivery to Windsor.

 

Detroit River Light Shipping Excursion and Gathering approaching

Co-sponsored by BoatNerd.com and Diamond Jack's River Tours, a special five-hour voyage aboard the Diamond Belle will leave from Bishop Park in Wyandot at 10 a.m., Saturday, October 11.

The Diamond Belle will travel down the Detroit River shipping channels all the way to the Detroit River Light in Lake Erie.

Cost is only $75.00 per person and includes buffet luncheon on board. Reservations are required. Click here to download printable reservation form.

 

Updates - September 29

News Photo Gallery updated

and more News Photo Gallery updates

Special Welland Gathering gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 29

September 29, 1930, for the first time in the history of Pittsburgh Steamship Company, the boats of the fleet loaded more than one million tons in a 7 day period. The 64 Pittsburgh boats loaded 1,002,092 tons of cargo between 9/23 and 9/29.

The J. H. SHEADLE (Hull#22) of the Great Lakes Engineering Works, was launched September 29, 1906 , for the Grand Island Steamship Co. (Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co., Cleveland, Ohio, mgr.) Renamed b.) F. A. BAILEY in 1924, c.) LA SALLE in 1930. Sold Canadian in 1965, renamed d.) MEAFORD, and e.) PIERSON INDEPENDENT in 1979. She was scrapped at Santander, Spain in 1980.

Henry Ford II, 70, of Grosse Pointe, Michigan, passed away on September 29, 1987. Mr. Ford's namesake was the Ford Motor Company self-unloader.

On September 29, 1986, the Polish tug KORAL left Lauzon, Quebec with the JOHN E. F. MISENER and GOLDEN HIND enroute to Cartagena / Mamonal, Columbia for scrapping.

September 29, 1892 - The ANN ARBOR NO 1 was launched.

On 29 September 1872, ADRIATIC (3 mast wooden schooner-barge, 139 foot, 129 net tons, built in 1865, at Clayton, New York as a bark) was in tow of the tug MOORE along with three other barges in Lake Erie in a heavy gale. She became separated from the tow and foundered. The entire crew of 7 was lost. The wooden schooner DERRICK was used in salvage operations. On 29 September 1854, she had just positioned herself above the wreck of the steamer ERIE off Silver Creek, New York on Lake Erie when she went down in a gale. She had spent the summer trying to salvage valuables from the wreck of the steamer ATLANTIC.

On 29 September 1900, the steamer SAKIE SHEPARD was re-launched at Anderson's shipyard in Marine City. She had been thoroughly rebuilt there during the summer.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Marinelink Explorer arrives at Port Weller

9/28 - Port Weller - The tow of the former heavy-lift salt water vessel Marinelink Explorer arrived at Port Weller Drydock Friday midday. The vessel was put into the deep dry dock.

Port Weller Drydock, which has recently appeared to be closed, is owned by Upper Lakes Shipping, who also own the vessel. The tugs Commodore Straits and Radium Yellowknife handled the tow.

The Marine Link Explorer is the former John Henry and departed Trois-Rivières for the Great Lakes on Monday. John Henry was built in a US shipyard 30 years ago for deep sea service under the US flag. The vessel's future is unknown at this time.

Pictures in the News Photo Gallery

Reported by Paul Beesley

 

Port Reports - September 28

Saginaw River - Todd Shorkey
Olive L. Moore-Lewis J. Kuber were outbound from the Bay Aggregates dock early Friday after unloading there overnight.
The tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 were inbound Friday calling on the Consumers Energy dock. The pair finished unloading, went upriver to the turning basin in Essexville to turn, and then head for the lake late Friday night.
Algorail was inbound Friday night, going up to the Sargent dock in Zilwaukee to unload. She was back outbound Saturday morning.
Mississagi was inbound Saturday morning calling on the Burroughs dock in Zilwaukee. She was expected to be outbound Saturday evening.

Buffalo - Brian Wroblewski
Herbert C. Jackson arrived Saturday after noon and went up the creek to Standard Elevator. She should be outbound Sunday afternoon.

Grand Haven - Dick Fox
The Maumee came in light about 3:30 Saturday afternoon and took on a load of sand at the Construction Aggregates dock in Ferrysburg. Her destination is St. Joseph, MI. This is the second shipment out of our port this season.

Hamilton - Eric Holmes
Saturday the Canadian Miner arrived at 8:30 a.m. with a cargo of iron ore pellets from Port Cartier for Dofasco. The tug Salvor and barge departed at 9:30 a.m. with steel slabs for Detroit. Rt. Hon. Paul J Martin arrived at 11 a.m. with coal from Buffalo for US Steel. Robert S. Pierson arrived at 1:30 pm. with iron ore pellets for US Steel from Superior. Canadian Transport departed at 6 p.m. from Dofasco in ballast. Tim S. Dool arrived at 8:30 p.m. with iron ore pellets for Dofasco.
Algolake arrived at 9 p.m. with coal for Dofasco.

Alpena - Ben & Chanda McClain
Fog that rolled into the area the past few days delayed vessels coming into port. The tug G.L Ostrander and barge Integrity was at Lafarge on Thursday. Late Friday night the tug Samuel de Champlain and barge Innovation was at anchor in the fog along with the Alpena waiting behind it. Both cement carriers were able to come in and load Saturday morning.
The tall ship Highlander Sea is tied up in the Thunder Bay River.

 

Upper Saginaw River dredging on hold until later this year

9/28 - Bay City - A long-awaited project to dredge the Upper Saginaw River for shipping will have to wait a little longer.

Luedtke Engineering Co. of Frankfort was to begin clearing the navigational channel this month, carrying out the first comprehensive maintenance dredging project on the river since the mid-1990s. But the start date has been delayed due to other dredging that Luedtke is finishing up in Buffalo and Cleveland, said Tom Zatkovic, the company's project manager. "Possibly mid-November, more likely the first of December," Zatkovic said of a start date for the Upper Saginaw project.

Crews plan to work until the Saginaw River freezes, he said, then resume and finish the project in the spring.

Luedtke was hired for $1.9 million by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to dredge the Upper River, from Bay City south to Saginaw. A notice to proceed on the work was signed Sept. 19, and the contractor has 120 days from that date to complete the work, Corps officials said. The timeline doesn't count days when work can't be done due to weather, however. The spoils will be scooped from the river and deposited at a new $5 million Dredged Material Disposal Facility constructed on the Bay-Saginaw county line in Frankenlust and Zilwaukee townships.

Jim Koski, Saginaw County public works commissioner, said he's disappointed the start date has been delayed. But Koski has spearheaded the project for years, and dealt with numerous environmental and legal wranglings. "There's been so many things," he said. "I don't think anything has happened as it was supposed to on this thing."

If nothing else, the delay will at least mean the river is mostly clear of pleasure craft traffic during the dredging, Koski said. He said he thinks the work, to dredge more than 200,000 cubic yards from the navigational channel, will take two to three months to complete. Regardless of when dredging begins, Koski said he plans to watch the start from a lawn chair on shore - even if he has to wear a hat and gloves. "You just climb over the hills as they put them in front of you," he said.

From the Bay City Times

 

Nadro Marine transporting wind turbines to Wolf Island

9/28 - Nadro Marine Services Ltd of Port Dover, Ontario, won the contract to transport 86 windmills from Ogdensburg, NY to Wolfe Island, Ont. These windmills will be installed at various places on the Island where there is a prevailing, and fairly consistent, southwest wind.

To meet the contract requirements new docks have been built in both Kingston and Wolfe Island. Nadro Marine Services has four tugs and three barges involved in this operation. McKeil Marine has provided one additional tug. The windmills have all arrived in Ogdensburg from Europe and are now being transported approximately one per day. They are stored at the dock facility until shipped.

Nadro's tug Vigilant 1 runs a ferry service from Kingston to Wolfe Island a number of times each day. This service brings workers, materiel and vehicles to and from Wolfe Island. The transport section of the project should be completed before the end of the 08 shipping season. Installation of the windmills and connection to the grid is forecast to be a 3 year project.

Pictures in the News Photo Gallery

Reported by Paul Beesley

 

Updates - September 28

News Photo Gallery

Special Welland Gathering gallery

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 28

On September 28, 1980, the BURNS HARBOR entered service, departing Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin bound for Superior, Wisconsin to load pellets.

THOMAS WILSON left Toledo on September 28, 1987, in tow of the tug TUSKER for overseas scrapping. WILSON has been laid up since December 16, 1979.

On 28 September 1891, THOMAS PARSONS (2 mast wooden schooner, 135 foot, 350 tons, built in 1868, at Charlotte, New York) was carrying coal out of Ashtabula, Ohio when she foundered in a storm a few miles off Fairport in Lake Erie.

On 28 September 1849, W G BUCKNER (wooden schooner, 75 foot, 107 tons, built in 1837, at Irving, New york) was carrying lumber in a storm on Lake Michigan when she sprang a leak, then capsized. The man to whom the cargo belonged was aboard with his wife and five children. One child was washed overboard while the wife and three children died of exposure. The schooner ERWIN took off the survivors plus the bodies.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Mike Nicholls, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Channel not cause of low lakes

9/27 - Sarnia - Early indications are that the so-called "bathtub" effect under the Blue Water Bridge is not responsible for low water levels in the upper Great Lakes. Though more analysis is needed, the underwater videography is now complete and its suggests the riverbed near the bridge hasn't changed, says John Nevin, communications advisor for the International Upper Great Lakes Study.

That flies in the face of assertions made by Georgian Bay homeowners, who claimed in 2005 that ongoing erosion in the riverbed is causing low lake levels. According to the bathtub theory the riverbed is eroding as a result of past dredging, making the channel deeper. With a larger drain-hole at Sarnia, lakes Michigan and Huron are falling.

Some American politicians have pushed for a quick fix involving concrete speed bumps to slow the water flowing under the bridge. That solution has raised concerns among Sarnia-Lambton officials who say they don't want to see changes to the river with far-reaching ramifications, unless there is sufficient information.

Nevin told The Observer that there's no evidence to support the bathtub theory so far. It's possible that old charts of the riverbed under the Blue Water Bridge were misinterpreted, he said. Instead, the study has found that the St. Clair's riverbed south of the Black River appears to have "significantly" changed in size. "It might be a result of maintenance dredging or perhaps it's prop wash from propellers. It's really too early to say," said Nevin.

The $17-million study, commissioned by the International Joint Commission, was expected to take three years. But political pressure from both sides of the border prompted the IJC to expedite the process. The study will be released in February, a full year early, according to Nevin. He cautioned that final conclusions have not been made and that researchers continue to examine the data and are considering the impact of ongoing changes in weather patterns, the amount of ice on the lakes and even the weeds in the river.

The study is also intended to look at outflows that control how much water moves from Lake Superior to Lakes Michigan and Huron. Changing water levels have dramatic impacts on the shipping industry, marina operations and waterfront property owners, Nevin added. There's also an ecological cost, he said, referring to plant and animal species in and around the Great Lakes.

From the Sarnia Observer

 

Port Reports - September 27

Marquette - Rod Burdick
Friday morning, Manitowoc loaded taconite at the Upper Harbor ore dock after unloading coal in Munising Thursday evening.

Toronto - Charlie Gibbons
The salty Cinnamon departed Redpath Sugar this morning, assisted by Groupe Ocean's tug LaPrairie, which departed for Hamilton afterwards.
Algosteel arrived later in the afternoon with a cargo of raw sugar for Redpath.

 

Boatnerds featured in Toronto's Globe and Mail:

Nerds ahoy

You see a scrap yard, they see a treasure trove. For self-described boat nerds, the Great Lakes' aging freighters are gold - and they'll travel vast distances just for a glimpse

9/27 - Port Colborne, ONT. -- Last Sunday, an armada of 60 tourists rumbled through this scenic canal-side town without stopping. Not so much as a brake light for the Onondaga Escarpment, Whisky Run Golf Club, Incredible Shrinking Mill or other charms that snag most visitors. The only attraction fixed in their brains was a yard full of rust and asbestos at the south end of town.

By 10 a.m., cars with U.S. plates and rooftop VHF antennas lined both sides of the gravel driveway leading to the International Marine Salvage scrap yard, all here for the highlight of the 8th Annual Boatnerd Gathering at the Welland Canal. "Any other day of the year, this place is off-limits," says Wayne Brown, a school caretaker who drove three hours and arrived early. "This is really a rare opportunity."

All over the windswept scrap yard, flash bulbs blaze, especially at the yard worker guiding his cutting torch along the hull of the Calumet, a classic straight-decker laid up after 80 year on the Great Lakes. Other yard workers hawk flaking portholes off the back of a pickup truck. "This is history all around us," says Mr. Brown, one of dozens of boat nerds studying rust buckets as though they were art exhibits. "They cut up history here. It's sad ... but it sure is a treat to see it before it's gone."

To an outsider, this "rare opportunity" looks like a visit to a landfill littered with freighter hulks, deck winches and two listing trawlers from Lithuania. To one of the 30,000 people who call up Boatnerd.com every day, this scrap yard is a museum in a state of perpetual self-destruction.

Launched over a decade ago as the modest pet project of a single freighter fan, the website now registers more than 20 million page views a month and acts as a hub for thousands of hobbyists who can recite every arcane detail about every arcane vessel on the lakes. About 140 freighters, or lakers, currently ply the Great Lakes waterways, each carrying a unique history of mishaps, strange cargo and eccentric owners.

The lure of that lore is infectious, says Dave Wobser, one of the volunteers who run Boatnerd.com. The site tracks the location of every ship in the Great Lakes, and reports spills, accidents, launches and scrappings - often before the authorities do. At the scrap yard, that devotion to breaking shipping news was evident in the number of squawking portable radios holstered to hips, all tuned to VHF-FM channel 14.

"It's like air-traffic control for the canal," says Mike Cunningham, a property manager who came from Sarnia with his son, 11-year-old Griffon, named after one of the first commercial ships on the upper Great Lakes.

As a hobby, boat nerding is similar to train- or plane-spotting, but on a much grander scale, as most nerds will gladly point out. Larger lakers - the 1,000-footers with 68,000-tonne cargo holds - can carry the weight of 700 railcars or 2,000 tractor-trailers. "They are the biggest, cheapest way to move bulk commodities that there is," says Mr. Wobser, looking past the listing Calumet to the 730-foot Frontenac loading salt across the canal. "And yet they slip so smoothly and so quietly across the water."

A boat nerd's devotion knows no geographical bounds. Like birders, many keep life lists, ranking all the vessels they'd like to see before they die. They are known to skip work, drive for days, sleep in cars, brave blizzards and monitor ship radios throughout the night, all out of affection for the big tubs that glide across North America's freshwater highways.

The boat nerds are fully aware that some will scoff at this level of obsession. "Most of the professional mariners, they all make fun of us," says Mr. Wobser. "But I guarantee you they read [Boatnerd.com] every damn day. I know because any time we get something wrong they're on our ass correcting us right away. The Coast Guard, especially, they watch us like hawks."

Not long ago, 400 additional freighters plied these waterways. Larger ships with larger payloads have shrunk the fleet size - a boon for scrap yards, which can gross upward of $1-million from a single ship, but a loss for ship lovers. Every so often, the nerds get to celebrate when a ship is saved from the scrap heap.

Earlier this year, the John Sherwin, an 800-foot laker that had been laid up for 25 years, floated back into service. "That got everyone excited," says Matt Miner who, at 30, is a relatively young nerd. "That was big news."

By noon, the boat nerds begin wandering back to their cars, some identifying each piece of scrap as they go. "See that rusty thing? That's a bow thruster from the Tarantau," says Mr. Wobser, feet crunching over iron slag. "That over there's from the Henry Ford II. And that one they use as a fireworks platform in Toronto."

Mr. Wobser drove six hours from Findlay, Ohio, to be here. In June, he drove two days just for a trip aboard a laker, his first. "It was awesome," he says, but not the same as watching from land. "You watch one of those ships slide past from the shore and you can just let your mind wander. Where's it going? What's it carrying? Will it get around that hurricane? It becomes a fantasy."

From the Toronto Globe and Mail

The complete article, with pictures, is available at this link

 

Updates - September 27

News Photo Gallery updated

Special Welland Gathering gallery

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 27

September 27, 1959 The West Neebish Channel, through which downbound traffic normally passes, was temporarily closed to permit dredging to the maximum Seaway depth of 27 feet. Two way traffic was instituted in the Middle Neebish Channel until dredging was completed.

On 27 September 1877, the HIPPOGRIFFE (wooden schooner, 295 tons, built in 1864, at Buffalo, New York) had just left Chicago for Buffalo, loaded with oats, on a fine day with clear weather. The crew saw EMMA A. COYNE (wooden schooner, 155 foot, 497 tons, built in 1867, at Detroit, Michigan) approaching from a long way off loaded with lumber. The two vessels' skippers were brothers. The two schooners collided about 20 miles off Kenosha, Wisconsin. The COYNE came along side and picked up the HIPPOGRIFFE's crew a few minutes before that vessel rolled over and dove for the bottom.

The CITY OF GENOA arrived with the first cargo of iron ore for the new factory at Zug Island. Reported in the The Detroit Free Press on September 28, 1903.

The H. M. GRIFFITH experienced a smoky conveyor belt fire at Port Colborne, Ontario on September 27, 1989. Repairs were completed there.

The ROGER M. KYES proceeded to Chicago for dry-docking, survey and repairs on September 27, 1976. She had struck bottom in Buffalo Harbor September 22, 1976 sustaining holes in two double bottom tanks and damage to three others.

The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY under tow, locked through the Panama Canal from September 27, 1986, to the 30th on her way to the cutters torch at Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

The tanker IMPERIAL COLLINGWOOD (Hull#137) was launched September 27, 1947, at Collingwood, Ontario by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd. for Imperial Oil Ltd., Toronto, Ontario. Renamed b.) SEAWAY TRADER in 1979, sold off the Lakes in 1984, renamed c.) PATRICIA II, d.) BALBOA TRADER in 1992.

September 27, 1909 - The ANN ARBOR NO 4 entered service after being repaired from her capsizing at Manistique, Michigan the previous May.

On 27 September 1884, WALDO A. AVERY (wooden propeller, 204 foot, 1,294 gross tons) was launched at West Bay City, Michigan. Her construction had been subcontracted by F. W. Wheeler & Co. to Thomas F. Murphy.

On 27-29 September 1872, a big storm swept the lower Lakes. Here are the Lake Huron tragedies. The barges HUNTER and DETROIT were destroyed. The tug SANDUSKY rescued the 21 survivors for them. The schooner CORSAIR foundered off Sturgeon Point on Saginaw Bay at 4 p.m. on Sunday the 29th and only 2 of the crew survived. The barge A. LINCOLN was ashore one mile below Au Sable with no loss of life. The barge TABLE ROCK went ashore off Tawas Point and went to pieces. All but one of her crew was lost. The schooner WHITE SQUALL was sunk ten miles off Fish Point -- only one crewman was saved. The schooner SUMMIT went ashore at Fish Point, 7 miles north of Tawas with two lives lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Russ Plumb, Mike Nicholls, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series, Detroit Free Press. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Port Report - September 26

Holland - Bob VandeVusse
The Wilfred Sykes delivered a load of coal to the James DeYoung power plant in Holland on Thursday, departing at about 8:00 a.m.

 

Updates - September 26

News Photo Gallery updated

Special Welland Gathering gallery

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 26

September 26, 1930, the schooner OUR SON, originally launched in 1875, sank during a storm on Lake Michigan. Seventy-three year old Captain Fred Nelson the crew of OUR SON were rescued by the self unloader WILLIAM NELSON.

September 26, 1937, the Canadian Seaman's Union signed a tentative wage contract. Sailors would continue a two watch system (working 12 hours every 24 hours) and be paid the following monthly wages: Wheelsmen and Oilers - $72.50, Watchmen and firemen - $67.50, Second Cooks - $52.50, deckhands and coal passers - $50.00, porters - $45.00, Chief Cooks on the Upper Lakes - $115.00, and Chief Cooks on Canal boats $105.00.

September 26, 1957, Taconite Harbor, Minnesota loaded its first cargo of 10,909 tons of taconite pellets into the holds of the Interlake steamer J. A. CAMPBELL.

On 26 September 1892, JOHN BURT (3-mast wooden schooner, 138 foot, 348 gross tons, built in 1871, at Detroit, Michigan) was carrying grain in a strong northwest gale. Her rudder broke and she was blown past the mouth of Oswego harbor and was driven hard aground. Two died when the vessel struck. The U.S. Lifesaving Service rescued the remaining five crew members. The vessel quickly broke up in the waves.

The CHI-CHEEMAUN cleared the shipyard on September 26, 1974.

The H. M. GRIFFITH was christened on September 26, 1973 at Collingwood for Canada Steamship Lines.

The C.C.G.S. GRIFFON (Hull#664) was launched September 26, 1969 by Davie Shipbuilding Ltd., Lauzon, Quebec for the Canadian Coast Guard.

ROGER M KYES returned to service on September 26, 1984, she had grounded off McLouth Steel and ended crosswise in the Detroit River's Trenton Channel a month before. She was renamed b.) ADAM E. CORNELIUS in 1989.

The BELLE RIVER was side swiped by the Liberian FEDERAL RHINE, of 1977, at Duluth on September 26, 1985. Both vessels received minor damage.

On 26 September 1914, MARY N. BOURKE (wooden schooner-barge, 219 foot, 920 gross tons, built in 1889, at Baraga, Michigan) was docked at Peter's Lumber Dock in St. Mary's Bay, 15 miles north of St. Ignace, Michigan. The crew was awakened at 9:30-10:00 p.m. by smoke coming from her hold and they escaped. The BOURKE burned to the waterline and the fire spread ashore, destroying the dock and a pile of lumber.

At 3:00 a.m., 26 September 1876, the steam barge LADY FRANKLIN burned while moored near Clark's dock, about three miles from Amherstburg, Ontario in the Detroit River. One life was lost. This vessel had been built in 1861, as a passenger steamer and ran between Cleveland, Ohio and Port Stanley, Ontario. In 1874, she was converted into a lumber freighter, running primarily between Saginaw, Michigan and Cleveland. The burned hull was rebuilt in 1882.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Mike Nicholls, Ahoy & Farewell II, Father Dowling Collection, and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Soo Locks malfunction delays shipping

9/25 - Sault Ste Marie, Mi — A gate malfunction caused a temporary shutdown of the biggest Great Lakes shipping lock at Sault Ste. Marie, but the problem was fixed within a couple of hours.

Area Engineer Al Klein says the 1,200-foot Poe Lock experienced a mechanical problem around 9 a.m. Wednesday. It delayed the upbound Edgar B. Speer and downbound tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort with barge Great Lakes Trader. The delay also required another freighter headed toward the locks to slow down. Klein says the problem involved the system that controls the gates. Repairs were finished by 11 a.m.

The Poe is the only one of the Soo Locks that can accommodate the large 1,000-foot vessels that carry much of the iron ore and coal transported on the lakes.

Ships pass through the locks when traveling between Lakes Huron and Superior.

From the Associated Press

 

Marinelink Explorer tow update

9/25 - The tow of the former heavy-lift salt water vessel Marinelink Explorer is expected to arrive at Port Weller Drydock Friday evening. The vessel will be put into the deep dry dock.

Port Weller Drydock, which has recently appeared to be closed, is owned by Upper Lakes Shipping, who also own the vessel. The tugs Commodore Straits and Radium Yellowknife are handling the tow.

The Marine Link Explorer is the former John Henry and departed Trois-Rivières for the Great Lakes on Monday. John Henry was built in a US shipyard 30 years ago for deep sea service under the US flag.

The vessel's future is unknown at this time.

 

Port Report - September 25

Saginaw River - Todd Shorkey
The James Norris was outbound the Saginaw River Wednesday morning after unloading overnight at the BV Dock, once out on the Bay near Light 1 the Captain called for US Coast Guard assistance for two ill crewmembers. Station Saginaw River's 25' response boat, 25510, was sent and retrieved the two crewmembers, taking them back to the station and waiting EMS Ambulances. Apparently, the crewmen were painting in a tunnel and were overcome by fumes. No further info is available at this time on their condition.
Calumet was inbound Wednesday afternoon followed closely by the H. Lee White. Calumet called on the Sargent dock in Essexville and the H. Lee White across the river at the Bay Aggregates dock in Bay City. Both vessels were expected to be outbound late Wednesday night or early Thursday morning.

 

PCA board OKs tough new rules on ballast water

9/25 - ST. PAUL — Minnesota jumped to the lead among Great Lakes states Tuesday night in the battle against invasive species with new rules regulating ballast water. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency’s citizens board voted 6-0 to require crews of all ships releasing ballast water in Minnesota waters of Lake Superior to first treat that water, starting in 2016. The new regulations are the toughest on the Great Lakes and among the strongest in the nation demanding ships’ crews take action so invasive species are less likely to hitchhike in ballast tanks.

The regulations require owners and operators of all ships longer than 150 feet that carry ballast to immediately apply for permits, begin keeping track of and reporting all ballast water discharges, and figure out a plan to eliminate the threat of invasive species being moved from distant ports into Duluth, Two Harbors and Silver Bay. The new rule then phases in the requirement to treat ballast, giving ship owners up to eight years to bring their craft into dry dock to be retrofitted with treatment technology. Any new ships will need to treat ballast starting in 2012.

Of the 180 foreign species in the Great Lakes, scientists say about half probably got here by riding in ships’ ballast tanks. Some of those species, such as quagga mussels, cost millions of dollars to control and threaten native ecosystems. One species, the VHS virus, is killing large numbers of fish. Supporters say the regulations are long overdue but that the state is giving the industry too much time, and asked the PCA for tougher disinfection standards and to speed up requirements to treat ballast. “This industry has had a free pass on the Clean Water Act for about 30 years,’’ John Lenczewski, a volunteer for Trout Unlimited, told the board in support of strong ballast regulation.

But critics say the state is regulating where it doesn’t belong, saying it’s the federal government that should impose ballast regulations to keep standard shipping laws across all U.S. ports. They note that, unless Wisconsin adopts similar regulations, Minnesota’s rules won’t protect the shared waters of the Twin Ports. “We believe this action is a train wreck that’s been a long time coming. A train wreck in that it should be a single federal action and not a list of multiple state regulations,” Jim Sharrow, facilities manager for the Duluth Seaway Port Authority, told the board. “The elephant in the corner of the room here is that this really isn’t going to protect Minnesota waters until Wisconsin and Canada and Michigan all adopt standards.”

Congress has several ballast regulation plans in play, but so far none have passed into law. The federal Environmental Protection Agency has proposed a ballast regulation that requires no treatment of water released. PCA Commissioner Brad Moore said he hopes the state’s action spurs a strong, single federal rule on ballast that renders the state’s move unnecessary. “It seems as if the only thing that spurs federal action is a crisis or some leadership by the states,” Moore said. “I believe that if we pass this we’re building a bridge to get federal action going.”

Minnesota becomes the first state to regulate ballast in both saltwater ships and Great Lakes ships that don’t enter oceans. California is the only other state with strict ballast treatment standards. Michigan requires some saltwater ships to treat ballast, but none that meet the requirement have entered a Michigan port.

From the Duluth News Tribune

 

LCS 1 To Be Commissioned Nov. 8

9/25 - Milwaukee - The Navy's newest ship, the future USS Freedom (LCS 1), will be commissioned Nov. 8 at Veteran's Memorial Park in Milwaukee. The commissioning date set by Secretary of the Navy, Donald C. Winter, was announced by the commissioning committee Aug. 18 in Milwaukee.

"This is a huge milestone, another milestone in the life of USS Freedom," said Cmdr. Michael Doran, prospective commanding officer of Freedom's Gold Crew. "It was a mere 64 months ago that Freedom was a proposal on a piece of paper and here we are announcing the date for its commissioning."

The littoral combat ship was designed to provide the U.S. Navy with greater flexibility and capability in operating in the littoral or "green water" coastal areas. The 377-foot Freedom is capable of speeds in excess of 40 knots and can operate in water less than 20 feet deep. The ship will act as a platform for launch and recovery of manned and unmanned vehicles. Its modular design will support interchangeable mission packages, allowing the ship to be reconfigured for antisubmarine warfare, mine warfare, or surface warfare missions on an as-needed basis.

"It brings to the fleet a lot of flexibility," Doran said. "The ship was built with a specific goal and purpose in mind - to operate in shallow waters. It also has the flexibility, as 40 percent of it is large, reconfigurable space so that you can put the specific mission packages into it." Freedom will be manned by one of two rotational crews, blue and gold, similar to the rotational crews assigned to Trident submarines. The crews will be augmented by one of three mission package crews during focused mission assignments. Of the many new systems being used on Freedom is a highly automated engineering plant and water jet propulsion, both of which give the ship new capabilities.

Freedom was christened Sept. 24, 2006, in Marinette, Wis. LCS 1 is being built at Marinette Marine Corp. by Lockheed Martin. Following commissioning Nov. 8, she will sail to Norfolk, for operational testing and then to her homeport of San Diego. The second ship of the class, Independence, is being built at the Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Ala., by General Dynamics Bath Iron Works.

From Marinelink.com

 

Updates - September 25

News Photo Gallery updated

Special Welland Gathering gallery

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 25

In tandem tow, the MENIHEK LAKE and LEON FALK JR arrived at Vigo, Spain on September 25, 1985. The MENIHEK LAKE was scrapped at Vigo, and the FALK was towed to Gijn, Spain for scrapping.

The HENRY C FRICK departed Bay City on her maiden voyage on September 25, 1905 and rammed and damaged the Michigan Central Railroad Bridge at Bay City.

On 25 September 1869, COMMENCEMENT (2-mast wooden schooner, 75 foot, 73 tons, built in 1853, at Holland, Michigan) was carrying wood in her hold and telegraph poles on deck from Pentwater, Michigan for Milwaukee when she sprang a leak 20 miles off Little Sable Point on Lake Michigan. The incoming water quickly overtook her pump capacity. As the crew was getting aboard the lifeboat, she turned turtle. The crew clung to the upturned hull for 30 hours until the passing steamer ALLEGHENY finally rescued them. COMMENCEMENT later washed ashore, a total wreck.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Port Reports - September 24

Toledo - Jim Hoffman
Manitowoc departed from Ironhead Marine Shipyard and was outbound the Toledo Ship Channel early Tuesday evening.
Shortly afterwards the tug Petite Forte and the barge St. Marys Cement finished unloading cement at the St Marys Cement Dock and departed.
Saginaw was unloading a cargo of oats, that was loaded at Thunder Bay, Ontario, at the Kuhlman Dock.
The revised schedule for coal boats due into the CSX Docks has the Lee A. Tregurtha due in Wednesday, Algolake on Thursday followed by American Mariner, CSL Niagara, and John G. Munson on Sunday.
The revised schedule for ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock has the CSL Niagara due in on Sunday, Algowood on Thursday, followed by CSL Assiniboine on Sunday.

Twin Ports - Al Miller
The Edwin H. Gott arrived in Duluth late Monday afternoon and was using a tug at the stern as it proceeded to the CN/DMIR ore dock to load for Gary. On Tuesday morning the only port action was Herbert C. Jackson sitting at CHS grain terminal with its hatches closed, apparently waiting for morning rain showers to pass before loading. Paul R. Tregurtha and American Century were expected later in the day at Midwest Energy Terminal.

 

Grain elevator returns to life

9/24 - Buffalo - The long-dormant Lake & Rail grain elevator complex along the Buffalo River is back in business.

The 75-year-old elevator received its first ship-delivered load of grain in over a decade, marking a key milestone in its rebirth. The elevator, which is owned by Minnesota-based Whitebox Commodities, had sat quiet and deteriorating until 2006, when it was acquired by River- Wright Energy, a local company planning to produce ethanol.

RiverWright spent more than $1.5 million refurbishing the 4.4 million bushel grain handling facility as part of its fuel production plans before selling it to Whitebox in June for $2 million. Buffalo businessman Rick Smith III, a principal in River- Wright, said he’s thrilled to see the elevator come back to life. “This is the first time one of these old beauties has been brought back from the dead here in Buffalo. She’s come full circle,” Smith said.

RiverWright’s rehabilitation of the elevator included installation of new electrical and conveyor systems, plus general clean-up of the neglected complex. Whitebox has continued to modernize the silos, including installation of a mechanized hopper which allows it to receive grain shipments from “self-unloading” freighters.

Whitebox representatives declined to comment on their Buffalo operation, but local grain handling sources confirmed the commodities company received a 400,000 bushel shipment of wheat Monday morning. The load was delivered to the site from Owen Sound, Ont. by the lake freighter American Fortitude.

In addition to providing a critical test of the Lake & Rail’s new ship unloading machinery, the docking of the 690-foot-long American Fortitude marked the farthest up the Buffalo River a ship that size has ever traveled. The freighter, which is part of the Buffalo-based American Steamship fleet, is one of the largest haulers on the Great Lakes. The giant freighter was guided up the Buffalo River by two tugboats, the New Jersey and the Washington. It was estimated it would take a minimum of 12 hours to unload the inaugural grain shipment.

Whitebox, an investment group which specializes in grain futures trading, recently moved into “hands on” grain handling and storage through the acquisition of grain silos in the Midwest and in Buffalo. It’s estimated Whitebox has brought in more than 2 million bushels of wheat by rail to the Lake & Rail site, just North of the Ohio Street lift bridge, over the past few months. There was a flurry of activity at the site last weekend, with more than 50 rail cars, each carrying some 3,000 bushels of wheat, unloaded at the facility. Whitebox, which controls more the 40 million bushels of elevator capacity at its silo portfolio, is able to boost its revenues by timing sales of its grain assets to achieve higher yields.

As Whitebox switches into high gear at Lake & Rail, River- Wright continues its push toward ethanol production at the 23-acre site. Smith said although his group failed to meet its initial goal of starting alternative fuel production in 2007, RiverWright is now working toward a 2010 start. “Our timetable has changed, but we’re forging ahead. Right now the focus is on bringing some big investors to the project and we’ve just signed an extension to the due diligence period on that,” Smith said.

As it has sought investors, RiverWright has also worked its way through regulatory and permit processes, and fended off a lawsuit aimed at preventing ethanol production at the site. RiverWright owns the American, Perot and Marine ‘A’ elevators along the Buffalo River with a combined storage capacity of 6.3 million bushels.

From the Buffalo News

 

Robert C. Pringle Shipwreck Discovered

9/24 - Milwaukee - The wreck of the steamer Robert C. Pringle (ex Pere Marquette 7, ex Chequamegon) has been located in 300 feet of water off Sheboygan, Wisconsin. A group of divers and historians filmed the wreck, which is in pristine condition, showing few signs of falling 300 ft through the water column and striking bottom.

The Pringle was lost June 19, 1922 while towing the steamer Venezuela from Milwaukee to Sandusky to be cut down as a barge. At about 2 AM, the Pringle was found to be leaking and quickly foundered, her crew escaping to the Venezuela. Originally believe to lie off Manitowoc, the wreck proved to be far from her reported sinking location.

A documentary featuring video and history of this newly discovered wreck will be shown Saturday, October 25th at the Wisconsin Underwater Archeology Association Fall Conference in Milwaukee. For more information, visit www.wuaa.org.

Reported by Brendon Baillod

 

Sharp eyes save sailor on Lake Superior

9/24 - Duluth - Curt Bush describes himself as an “armchair sailor.” But on Sunday afternoon, as he scanned a rough Lake Superior from a friend’s deck high above the Duluth harbor, Bush became a sailor’s savior.

Bush, who lives near Cloquet, was visiting Marna Banks of Duluth. A budding sailor, Bush said he likes to check out the sailboat traffic on the lake. The couple was enjoying the warm, windy day outdoors, and Bush, as usual, was scanning the sailboat traffic. Using a pair of binoculars, he saw a few large sailboats far out in the lake, and a lot of chop closer to shore.

And then, about a half-mile off Minnesota Point, he spotted something tiny and unusual. “It looked like a sailboat with the mast down,” Bush said. He couldn’t see anyone on board, but he noticed the small boat was stuck broadside to oncoming waves. “It just looked like a white sailboat that kept getting lost in the troughs,” Bush said. “I said to Marna: ‘I could be wrong, but let’s call the Coast Guard and tell them.’ ”

Bush called to report a boat in distress, and left his name and number. He got a call back immediately. The Coast Guard had had another report of a sailboat in distress about 2? hours earlier, said First Class Petty Officer Derek Franklin. A crew had been searching for the boat but was unable to locate it in the rough water, he said. The crew headed back out again, this time in cell phone contact with Bush. Keeping an eye on the sailboat and one ear to his phone, Bush was able to direct the rescue crew — “a little to the east, a little to the south” — to the foundering sailboat.

The rescue crew located a single person on the boat, which had its mast strapped down, Franklin said. The sailor had first- and second-degree burns on his legs and hands, and apparently had extinguished a small fire on his boat, he said. Franklin was not sure what had caused the fire. The Coast Guard crew took the sailor aboard the rescue boat and towed the disabled sailboat into the harbor. The sailor was then transported to Miller-Dwan Medical Center, Franklin said, where he was treated and released. The sailor’s name was not available.

The Coast Guard frequently makes use of help from the public, Franklin said, whether it’s to report a boat or swimmer in trouble or to offer more eyes on the water. As for Bush, he said his role in the successful rescue “made me feel really good.” And he certainly isn’t done watching the lake. Next summer, Bush plans to trade in that armchair and the blueberry farm he has nurtured for the past 15 years for a full-time sailing gig. He plans to spend as much time as possible on Lake Superior aboard his newly acquired 26-foot sailboat. A summer on the big lake “should tell me if I want to spend my life on a boat,” Bush said.

From the Duluth News Tribune

 

Updated Local Notice to Mariners

The USCG District Nine Local Notice to Mariners is now available for download at this link.

 

Updates - September 24

News Photo Gallery updated

Special Welland Gathering gallery

Historical Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 24

On September 24th, the A. H. FERBERT went hard aground at the Cut-Off Channel's southeast bend of the St. Clair River. Six tugs, GLENADA, ELMORE M. MISNER, BARBARA ANN, GLENSIDE, SHANNON and WM. A. WHITNEY, worked until late on the 26th to free her.

The EDMUND FITZGERALD's first cargo of taconite pellets was loaded September 24, 1958 at Silver Bay, Minnesota for Toledo, Ohio.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 entered service September 24, 1924.

In early morning fog on the St. Clair River on September 24, 1962, the J L REISS was hit three glancing blows by U.S. Steel's SEWELL AVERY. The AVERY had lost control just below Robert's Landing and crossed the channel from the Canadian side and struck the J L REISS which was proceeding slowly by radar on the U.S. side.

On September 24, 1952, the CHARLES L HUTCHINSON entered service. This vessel was renamed b.) ERNEST R BREECH when it was sold to the Ford Motor Company in 1962, and it was given its present name, c.) KINSMAN INDEPENDENT, when it was sold to Kinsman Lines in 1988. She was sold Canadian converted to a motorship and renamed d.) VOYAGEUR INDEPENDENT in 2005.

On September 23, 1991, J W MC GIFFIN rescued several people in a 24 foot pleasure craft off Presque Ile State Park. The group had been disabled since the day before. They were taken aboard the McGIFFIN and their boat taken under tow. The MC GIFFIN was rebuilt with a new forward section and renamed b.) CSL NIAGARA in 1999.

September 24, 1924 - The PERE MARQUETTE 22 arrived at Ludington, Michigan on her maiden voyage.

On 24 September 1902, H.A. BARR (3 mast wooden schooner, 217 foot, 1,119 gross tons, built in 1893, at W. Bay City, Michigan) was in tow of the 'saltie' THEANO with a load of iron ore in a storm 30 miles off Port Stanley in Lake Erie. She broke her tow line in giant waves and foundered. THEANO rescued her crew.

On 24 September 1879, the tug URANIA was towing the schooner S V R WATSON into Sand Beach at about noon when the schooner struck the tug amidships, cutting a hole in the hull and sinking her in three fathoms of water. No lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, James Neumiller, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Minnesota ready to impose ballast water regulations

9/23 - Duluth - Ballast water steadies Lake Superior’s freighters and lakers. The water also carries invasive species — about 90 of which have invaded the Great Lakes.
More ballast water is discharged in the Twin Ports than all other Great Lakes harbors combined — so advocates say some sort of treatment is long overdue.

But industry insiders say proposed Minnesota rules to regulate ballast water could shut down shipping in Duluth, Silver Bay and Two Harbors. They fear regulatory uncertainty. And retrofitting ships could run $1 million apiece. When Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Commissioner Brad Moore said last winter that his agency was moving to regulate ballast water in Lake Superior ships, few people paid close attention.

Congress at that time appeared ready to act on the issue, taking it out of the state’s hands. And the Environmental Protection Agency was warning the PCA that the federal government, not individual states, would handle such regulations under the Clean Water Act as ordered by federal courts. But Congress has stalled yet again. The proposed EPA rule still doesn’t require ballast treatment. And the PCA citizens’ board on Tuesday was expected to pass the toughest ballast water regulations on the Great Lakes.

Suddenly, lots of people are paying attention to Minnesota.

“If the federal government isn’t going to act on this, then it’s absolutely fantastic Minnesota is getting out ahead. … The key now is to get other states to follow,’’ said Henry VanOffelen, natural resource scientist for the Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy. “We’ve had years of denials and delays and inaction on this issue. I think we’re finally getting beyond that.’’

The new regulation will require nearly all ballasted ships entering Minnesota waters of Lake Superior to register with the state and apply for a permit by Oct. 1. They also must keep track of ballast releases and submit a plan to avoid spreading invasive species as best as possible.

By 2012, any new ships must treat ballast. By 2016, the state demands nearly all ballasted ships treat ballast water to kill invasive species. Minnesota’s rule has the same timeline as a new California ballast regulation and the ballast bill that passed the U.S. House in April, although those call for tougher standards for killing organisms.

But unlike the bill in Congress that only applies to saltwater ships, the Minnesota regulation applies to all Great Lakes freighters, including lakers that never see the ocean. State officials note that any invasive species that are brought to the eastern Great Lakes are easily moved about by lakers, each of which can transfer millions of gallons of ballast water on each visit. It’s estimated that the Twin Ports receives nearly as much ballast water discharges as all other Great Lakes ports combined — more than 5 billion gallons each year — because many ships arrive here empty or with less than a full load. About 95 percent of the discharge is from lakers.

PCA officials say they are acting under authority of existing state pollution discharge laws and don’t need any legislative action. And they say the EPA’s proposed ballast rule — proposed in June with no treatment required — simply isn’t enough to protect Minnesota waters.

“We just don’t see any addition protection for Minnesota waters afforded under the EPA proposal, and we have sent them our comments to that end,’’ said Mary Jean Fenske, the PCA’s vessel discharge program coordinator.

Canadian government officials have questioned the state’s jurisdiction to regulate foreign vessels on the Great Lakes, where commerce is governed by international treaty. The new regulations give the PCA authority to board ships and take samples of ballast water. And if ship owners and operators don’t comply, they are subject to the same penalty schedule as any other Minnesota business with a pollution permit — including negotiated settlements, fines and even court-imposed sanctions.

Other critics say the state is venturing into regulatory waters it has no business in. “Since there will be a federal permit for vessel discharges that includes ballast water, there is no reason for the state of Minnesota to act in issuing their own permit,’’ Adolph Ojard, executive director of the Duluth Seaway Port Authority, said in comments to the PCA. “In fact, such action will be considered detrimental to shipping and to the competitiveness of the state of Minnesota, and is certain to result in cargo shifts and decreased tonnage.’’

It’s estimated that it will cost $1 million or more to add ballast treatment technology to each ship, although no one knows for sure. No system has even been tested on lakers.

Among the most vehemently opposed to the state plan is the Lakes Carriers Association, the group that represents U.S.-flagged lakers that carry taconite, coal and other bulk cargo on the Great Lakes. James Weakley, president of the group, said the state regulation could effectively end shipping in Duluth, Two Harbors and Silver Bay, and send ships to other states. Moreover, Weakley said it could drastically harm the state’s $1.6 billion-a-year taconite industry, which depends on cheap, bulk shipments by water to remain cost effective.

“If adopted in its current form, the [PCA’s ballast regulation] has started the countdown to the cessation of U.S.-flagged shipping from Minnesota’s Great Lakes ports,’’ Weakley said in his formal comments to the PCA. He also noted that any ballast treatment designed for saltwater ships may be too small for lakers. Salties generally use about 3 million gallons of ballast, while 1,000-foot lakers can hold 15 million gallons.

Excerpted from the Duluth News Tribune

 

Port Reports - September 23

Buffalo - Brian Wroblewski
The American Fortitude arrived this morning with the first ever cargo of wheat delivered by self-unloader for the recently re-opened Lake & Rail Elevator on the Buffalo River. She is now the largest ship to ever go up past the turn at Hamburg & South St. and this was also the first cargo for Lake & Rail in roughly 10 years or so.

Trois-Rivières - René Beauchamp
The heavy-lift ship Marine Link Explorer aka John Henry departed Trois-Rivières for the Great Lakes today under tow of Commodore Straits and Radium Yellowknife. John Henry was built in a US shipyard 30 years ago for deep sea service under the US flag.
The tow is expected to enter the Seaway about 11 a.m. Tuesday morning with a destination of Port Weller Drydock.

 

Updates - September 23

News Photo Gallery updated

Special Welland Gathering gallery

Historical Gallery updated

Weekly Updates

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 23

September 23, 1922, the 306 foot NEPTUNE loaded the first Head-of-the-Lakes cargo of pig iron at Zenith Furnace, Duluth, Minnesota. The 5,000 tons of malleable pig iron was delivered to Buffalo, New York.

September 23, 1975, the HERBERT C. JACKSON lost power while upbound on Lake Superior. She was towed back to the Soo by the USS straight decker D. G. KERR.

September 23, 1952, the steamer CHARLES L HUTCHINSON became the first boat christened at Cleveland since the early years of World War II. The 644 foot HUTCHINSON, Captain T. A. Johnson, is the new flagship of the Pioneer fleet and one of 35 boats in the three fleets operated by Hutchinson & Co. Renamed b.) ERNEST R. BREECH in 1962, c.) KINSMAN INDEPENDENT in 1988. Sold Canadian in 2005, and sails today as the motorship d.) VOYAGEUR INDEPENDENT.

On 23 September 1910, the BETHLEHEM (steel propeller package freighter, 290 foot, 2,633 gross tons, built in 1888, at Cleveland, Ohio) was carrying general merchandise when she went ashore in a gale on the SW side of S. Manitou Island in Lake Michigan. Lifesavers and the crew unloaded her over several days. Although battered by several storms while ashore, she was eventually pulled free and repaired. She lasted until 1925, when she was scrapped.

The scow WAUBONSIE was launched at the Curtis yard in Fort Gratiot, Michigan on 23 September 1873.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

J. W. Shelley to be christened

9/22 - Sarnia - There was a lot of excitement on the waterfront this past week as the newly-renamed J. W. Shelley made her inaugural sail past Sarnia Tuesday on her way to Duluth. After picking up a load of grain, she passed by Sarnia again a few days later and headed for Montreal.

This 730-foot laker once belonged to Algoma Central and was called the Algocen. For many years - from 1968 to 2004 - she was a familiar sight in the Great Lakes system. But the shipping company sold her in 2004 and she was sent to New Jersey and used as a containment and reclamation barge for dredge materials.

This past May, Kim and John Shelley Jr. of Sarnia purchased the Algocen with three partners and renamed her the J. W. Shelley in honour of John's ailing father, John Shelley Sr. John Sr. was the founder of the former Shelley Machine and Marine and loved the sea. "He worked on the ships for years," Kim Shelley said. "This is a real tribute to him."

During the first week of October, the J. W. Shelley is expected back in Sarnia where she will be officially christened at the government docks, says Shelley. She, her husband and business partners bought the vessel from a Danish company and dead towed her to the Brooklyn naval shipyard for steel work and repairs over the summer. "Then we sailed her back to the Great Lakes," she said. "We were really excited when she went through Sarnia for the first time."

The partners have established Vanguard Shipping, a new company that the Shelleys expect will grow. Vanguard Shipping already has its first contract, a five-year agreement with J. R. I to haul grain in the Great Lakes. The captain of the J. W. Shelley is Jim Perkins and a company shareholder. Michael and Laurie Huneault of Ridgeville, Ontario also have a financial interest.

Details of the christening will be released as they are confirmed.

From the Sarnia Observer

 

Port Reports - September 22

Alpena - Ben & Chanda McClain
Saturday the tall ship Denis Sullivan arrived and tied up in the Thunder Bay River.
Late Saturday night the Manistee made its way into the river also to deliver a load of road salt. Before 6 a.m. on Sunday it departed to head for Stoneport.

The research vessel Sturgeon was tied up in the river Sunday afternoon.
The tug Samuel de Champlain and barge Innovation is expected in port Monday morning with the Alpena scheduled for Monday night.

Saginaw River - Todd Shorkey
The American Century called on the Consumers Energy dock in Essexville on Sunday to unload coal. She finished her unload, backed from the dock, and turned at Light 12 to head for the lake Sunday night. This is scheduled to be the last load of coal by boat this season as Consumers is to begin rebuilding and modernizing its docking facilities.

Marquette - Lee Rowe
Sunday was a busy day in Marquette. The Robert S Pierson loaded and left, then the Lee A Tregurtha came in for a load of taconite. Fleetmate Herbert C Jackson came in with coal later.

 

Updates - September 22

News Photo Gallery updated

Special Welland Gathering gallery

Historical Gallery updated

Weekly Updates

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 22

On September 22, 1958, the EDMUND FITZGERALD entered service, departing River Rouge, Michigan for Silver Bay, Minnesota on its first trip. The FITZGERALD's first load was 20,038 tons of taconite pellets for Toledo. The vessel would, in later years, set several iron ore records during the period from 1965 through 1969.

While in ballast, the ROGER M. KYES struck bottom in Buffalo Harbor September 22, 1976, sustaining holes in two double bottom tanks and damage to three others, whereupon she proceeded to Chicago for dry docking on September 27, 1976, for survey and repairs. Renamed b.) ADAM E CORNELIUS in 1989.

While being towed from Duluth, Minnesota by the Canadian tug TUSKER on September 22, 1980, the D G KERR rammed into the breakwater at Duluth causing $200,000 in damages to the breakwater. The tow apparently failed to make the turning buoy leaving Duluth Harbor.

On September 22, 1911 the HENRY PHIPPS collided with and sank her Steel Trust fleet mate, steamer JOLIET, of 1890, which was at anchor on the fog shrouded St. Clair River near Sarnia, Ontario. The JOLIET sank without loss of crew and was declared a total loss. The PHIPPS then continued her downbound journey and collided with the Wyandotte Chemical steamer ALPENA, of 1909, that incurred only minor damage.

The T W ROBINSON and US.265808 (former BENSON FORD departed Quebec City in tow of the Polish tug JANTAR bound for Recife where they arrived on September 22, 1987. Scrapping began the next month in October.

MATHILDA DESGAGNES was freed from polar ice in the Arctic on September 22, 1988, by the West German Icebreaker Research Vessel POLARSTERN.

September 22, 1913 - The ANN ARBOR No. 5 struck bottom in the Sturgeon Bay Canal and damaged her rudder and steering gear. After undergoing repairs at Milwaukee, she was back in service the following October.

On 22 September 1887, ADA E. ALLEN (wooden propeller steam barge, 90 foot, 170 gross tons, built in 1872, at Walpole Island, Ontario.) caught fire while moored at Amherstburg, Ontario. She was cut loose and set adrift to prevent the fire from spreading ashore. She drifted to Bois Blanc (Bob-Lo) Island and burned to a total loss.

On 22 September 1882, Mr. H. N. Jex accepted the contract to recover the engine and boiler from the MAYFLOWER, which sank in the Detroit River in 1864. He was to be paid $600 upon delivery of the machinery at Windsor, Ontario. He succeeded in raising the engine on 12 October and the boiler shortly thereafter.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, James Neumiller, Jody Aho, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Port Reports - September 21

Toronto - Dave Robinson
The Canadian Navy frigate HMCS Charlottetown is in port for the weekend and recieving visitors at the foot of Jarvis Street.
Around 4 p.m., English River came into port through a huge fleet of sailboats out enjoying the last Saturday of the summer. She tied up at the cement plant.

Owen Sound - Ed. Saliwonchyk
American Fortitude was making her turn in Owen Sound Bay and departing Owen Sound 3:30 Saturday afternoon.

 

Updates - September 21

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 21

On 21 September 1892, the whaleback steamer JAMES B COLGATE (steel propeller whaleback freighter, 308 foot, 1,713 gross tons) was launched by the American Steel Barge Co. (Hull #121) at W. Superior, Wisconsin. She only lasted until 1916, when she foundered in the "Black Friday Storm" on Lake Erie with the loss of 26 lives.

ALGOWAY left Collingwood on her maiden voyage in 1972, and loaded salt for Michipicoten, Ontario on Lake Superior.

On 21 September 1844, JOHN JACOB ASTOR (wooden brig, 78 foot, 112 tons, Built in 1835, at Pointe aux Pins, Ontario but precut at Lorain, Ohio) was carrying furs and trade goods when she struck a reef and foundered near Copper Harbor, Michigan. She was owned by Astor’s American Fur Company. She was reportedly by the first commercial vessel on Lake Superior.

On 21 September 1855, ASIA (2-mast wooden schooner, 108 foot, 204 tons, built in 1848, at Black River, Ohio) was carrying corn from Chicago for Buffalo when she collided with the propeller FOREST CITY off the mouth of Grand Traverse Bay. ASIA went down in deep water in about 10 minutes, but her crew just had enough time to escape in her boat. The schooner HAMLET picked them up.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, B.G.S.U. and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Port Reports - September 20

Marquette - Rod Burdick
Friday morning at the Upper Harbor ore dock, H. Lee White loaded taconite, and Saginaw arrived to load.

Twin Ports - Al Miller
Friday morning found plenty of business at Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior. Algowood was completing its load about 7:30 a.m. while Mesabi Miner sat in the channel waiting for the dock.
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was docked at the Murphy Oil fueling station, waiting to follow the Miner.
Elsewhere, the saltie BBC Maine was unloading wind turbine assemblies at the port terminal. Most of the port authority’s Garfield C and D dock is being used for ground storage of wind turbine towers. Periodically the various giant parts are loaded on special truck trailers and a convoy of trucks hauls them off to wind farms in western Minnesota and the Dakotas.

Lorain - Paul Csizmadia
On Thursday the Isolda arrived in Lorain, OH to take on a load of coke. With the assist of the G tugs California and Iowa she was turned to enter the harbor waters stern First and traveled up the Black River passing through the Charles Berry Bridge and under the Norfolk & Southern Railway Bridge.

Owen Sound - Ed Saliwonchyk
American Fortitude arrived in Owen Sound sometime overnight Thursday. On Friday morning, she was again loading at Great Lakes Grain Elevators.

Saginaw River - Todd Shorkey
The Manistee was outbound Friday afternoon from the Wirt Stone dock in Saginaw.

Oscoda - Gloria Beckstrom
The small dredger Arthur J. left the mouth of the AuSable at Oscoda. MI. before sunset on Thursday, heading for Bay City.

Marquette - Rod Burdick
Friday morning at the Upper Harbor ore dock, H. Lee White loaded taconite, and Saginaw arrived to load.

 

Transportation leaders gather for summit, freight conference

9/20 - Toledo - Transportation officials and industry leaders from Ohio, several other states and Canada met in Toledo for the 2008 Transportation Summit and Ohio Conference on Freight at the SeaGate Convention Centre.

The Toledo Metropolitan Area Council of Governments (TMACOG) presented the event as a lead-in to the Ohio Conference on Freight Sept. 15 to 17. It included numerous workshops with local, regional and national speakers, a reception and dinner with national keynote speaker Mortimer Downey. “There is a lack of national vision or commitment to transportation,” said Downey, a former U.S. deputy secretary of transportation who managed the department's strategic-planning process for eight years. “We are far from sustaining the system we have let alone the needs of the future, and it's causing a lot of concern. This is a federal concern, and time is the critical element. They have to do something quickly.

“The transportation policy needs to shift, but it usually doesn't happen quickly. We need to get things started now and do it right. “We can and should be doing a better job of moving goods in this country. Failure to make that investment in transportation infrastructure is going to have serious repercussions. We just haven't come to grips with how to pay for it. The feds think the private sector should invest more in that infrastructure. “It's hard to get a consensus of effort on freight and transportation at the federal level.”

Congress is beginning to consider those needs. An authorization bill in the legislature will address the current transportation needs, but most important is that it must reflect the needs of the 21st century, said Downey, chairman of the board of PB Consult Inc. “Moving freight is going to require serious planning and investment. Providing capital investment to create that movement will require changes in the way we move it,” he said. “Transportation must be our priority. Our business is transportation and it depends on moving freight,” said William Carroll, chairman of the board for the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority.

Carroll reminded the audience that Gov. Ted Strickland's economic stimulus package, Building Ohio Jobs, includes $100 million for transportation and jobs in the state. “We don't have the money to maintain the commitments ODOT has made in 2008,” said David Dysard, deputy director of Ohio Department of Transportation District 2.

Even with a $660 million budget and only 3 percent coming from federal funds, Ohio still ranks 48th among the states in support of public transportation, Dysard said. “We've lost 43 percent of our purchasing power due to inflation in the cost of goods and services. The costs are killing us. It's one of our biggest challenges. We're looking for future efficiencies to reduce those costs,” he said.

Revenues flattened out and are declining due to a reduced consumption of gasoline. Despite the increased cost of gasoline, the state only receives 48 cents per gallon no matter what a gallon costs, Dysard said. The uncertain solvency of the Federal Highway Trust Fund is another concern. There is a shortfall in that fund, said Fred Abousleman, executive director of the National Association of Regional Councils, who works closely with TMACOG.

“We have to maintain the infrastructure, which is critical to our country's economy. We don't have enough funding to maintain what we have or what we need in the future,” Abousleman said. He estimated it would cost $225 billion to maintain the existing system over the next 50 years. Transportation accounts for 3 percent of all federal expenditures or 1 percent of the gross national product spent on infrastructure, while China is spending 9 percent and India 3.5 percent of their Gross National Product (GNP) on transportation. “We need to take a regional approach that focuses on all forms of transportation in Northwest Ohio and Southeast Michigan,” said Jerry Wingate, president of Alexis Transit System Inc. and the Toledo Trucking Association.

The region has the strategic geography with air, land, rail and waterways to compete for intermodal transportation business and facilities, said Richard Martinko, director of the Intermodal Transportation Institute at UT. With intermodal sites in Cleveland, Columbus, Chicago, Detroit and Fort Wayne, Ind., Toledo is in a position to fill the gap at the west end of Lake Erie, Martinko said.

Within a 100-mile radius of Toledo, the region has six million people and $270 billion in GNP, making it the eighth largest region or equal to the 17th largest state in the country. The Great Lakes mega-region is one of 10 emerging mega-regions in the country, he said. The region has three of the top 11 gateways for freight traffic with Interstate 80 Interstate 90 running east and west, and Interstate 75 and U.S. 23 running north and south; three class-one railroads; a world-class port and an airport strategically situated for freight traffic.

“You can get there from here. We have the pieces for regional economic development and the opportunity for growth,” Martinko said.

From the Toledo Free Press

 

Funds sought to help Galop Canal Revitalization

9/20 - Efforts are underway to raise funds in support of the Lock 25 Restoration Project at Iroquois, Ont. The non-profit Galop Canal Revitalization Project is asking for a donation of $12 to the project, and in return donors will receive a copy of a small booklet featuring historic black and white photos of vessels passing through the canal. For details on the project, visit www.galopcanal.com.

The canal was originally built in 1846 at 9 feet deep with 200 foot locks. In 1898 it was enlarged to 14 foot depth and the locks extended to 270 feet.

In 1958 it was closed and partially inundated with the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway.

To donate, send checks payable to the Galop Canal Revitalization Project to Ron Beaupre, PO Box 3190, Morrisburg, ON K0C 1X0.

Reported by Ron Beaupre

 

Updates - September 20

News Photo Gallery updated

And More News Photo Gallery updates

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 20

John Jonathon Boland was born on 20 September 1875, in New York. Along with Adam E. Cornelius, he formed the partnership of Boland and Cornelius in 1903, and was one of the founders of the American Steamship Company in 1907. He died in 1956.

On September 20, 1986, vandals started a $5,000. fire aboard the laid up NIPIGON BAY at Kingston, Ontario where she had been since April, 1984.

GEORGE A. STINSON's self-unloading boom was replaced on September 20 1983. The boom had collapsed onto her deck due to a mechanical failure on the night of April 19, 1983, at Detroit, Michigan. No injuries were reported. She continued hauling cargoes without a boom until replacement. She was renamed b.) AMERICAN SPIRIT in 2004.

On September 20, 1980, the EDGAR B. SPEER entered service for the U.S. Steel Fleet.

The CHARLES E. WILSON sailed light on her maiden voyage from Sturgeon Bay September 20, 1973, bound for Escanaba, Michigan to load ore. She was renamed b.) JOHN J. BOLAND in 2000.

The CHARLES M. WHITE was christened at Baltimore, Maryland on September 20, 1951.

On 20 September 1873, W. L. PECK (2 mast wooden schooner-barge, 154 foot, 361 gross tons) was launched at Carrollton, Michigan.

On 20 September 1856, COLONEL CAMP (3-mast wooden bark, 137 foot, 350 tons, built in 1854, at Three Mile Bay, New York) was carrying wheat to Oswego, New York when she collided with the wooden steamer PLYMOUTH and sank in just a few minutes. No lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Port Reports - September 19

Grand Haven- Dick Fox
The barge Lewis Kuber and tug Olive Moore came into port late Wednesday afternoon after lightering in Muskegon. It delivered a cargo to Verplank's dock in Ferrysburg and was gone before morning.

Saginaw River - Todd Shorkey
The tug James A. Hannah and her tank barge were inbound Wednesday afternoon, calling on the Bit-Mat dock in Bay City. The pair were expected to be outbound early Thursday morning. The tug Mark Hannah and barge were outbound Wednesday morning from the Dow Chemical dock.

Buffalo Brian Wroblewski
Adam E Cornelius was still unloading Thursday at 11:30 a.m. The boom was still attached to the elevator.
The Army Corp of Engineers tug Cheraw and her barge B0-2979 was out working on the breakwall towards the southern entrance. They were stacking new stone blocks. The second barge had a large load of stone.

South Chicago - Steve B.
The Spruceglen was at the KCBX south dock shortly after arriving just before noon on Thursday.
Edward L. Ryerson was heard making its security call around 12:20 p.m., and was seen off Calumet Harbor about 12:45 headed for Mittal dock 7 at Indiana Harbor.
Behind the Ryerson about 45 minutes was the Algoway, which came into Calumet Harbor around 1:30 p.m., where she spun and was assisted by the G Tug South Carolina to the North American Salt dock at 92nd St.

 

GBL's Hal McCarney Passes On

9/19 - The Thousand Island region has lost one of its most loved and honoured icons in recent memory. Gananoque Boat Line's own Hal McCarney has died at the age of 81 on Tuesday, Sept 16.

McCarney designed and built the prototype triple decker Thousand Islander with fellow owners Robert Beckstead and Harry Clark back in the early 1970's. Today, GBL boasts five triple deckers touring the Thousand Island's under Hal's tireless leadership for nearly four decades.

A broken leg sidelined the former football star and later coach at Queen's University here in Kingston. Complications later arose until the 'sun finally set' on this tireless coach, boss and friend. "He was the pulse of the community," said John Nalon, president of the Gananoque Historical Society. "A definite, exciting era has now passed. There will never be another Hal McCarney."

Funeral service will take place on Saturday at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church on Stone Street, Gananoque. Friends may call at the Tompkins Funeral Home at 63 Garden Street, Gananoque, Ontario from 7-9 pm on Thurs. and 2-4 and 7-9 Friday.

Reported by Brian Johnson

 

Updates - September 19

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 19

At Rush Street in Chicago, Illinois, a hand-operated ferry carried pedestrians across the Chicago River. The ferry operator would pull on a rope, hand over hand, to move the ferry across the river. At a signal from schooners, the rope was dropped and the schooner would sail over it. On 19 September 1856, the rope was dropped but the impatient passengers picked it up to move the ferry themselves. The incoming schooner snagged the rope and the ferry was spun around and capsized. 15 people were drowned.

When Cleveland Tankers new SATURN entered service and made her first trip to Toledo, Ohio on September 19, 1974, she became the first of three tankers built for the fleet's modernization program.

The EDGAR B. SPEER departed the shipyard on her maiden voyage for U.S. Steel on September 19, 1980, bound for Two Harbors, Minnesota where she loaded her first cargo of taconite pellets.

The twin screw rail car ferry GRAND HAVEN of 1903, was laid up in the spring of 1965, at the old Pennsylvania Dock at Cleveland, Ohio and later at dockage on the Old River Bed where she sank on September 19, 1969.

September 19, 1997 - officials at Lake Michigan Carferry, Inc. announced that the CITY OF MIDLAND 41 would be converted to a barge.

On 19 September 1893, SAMUEL BOLTON (wooden schooner-barge, 150 foot, 330 gross tons, built in 1867, at Bangor, Michigan as a schooner) was loaded with lumber and being towed in fog in Lake Huron. She got lost from the tow and drifted ashore near Richmond, Michigan where she broke in two and was then torn apart by waves. She was owned by Brazil Hoose of Detroit.

On Saturday, 19 September 1891, at 11:00 a.m., the whaleback steamer CHARLES W. WETMORE left Philadelphia, Pennsylvania loaded with the materials to build a nail mill, iron smelter and shipyard for the new city of Everett, Washington. Her skipper was Captain Joseph B. Hastings and she had a crew of 22.

On 19 September 1900, the Great Lakes schooner S L WATSON foundered off Cape Cod, Massachusetts. She had been sent to the Atlantic the previous autumn by her owner J. C. Gilchrist of Cleveland.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Seaway workers give union OK to strike after Oct. 10

9/18 - Ottawa - The company that runs the St Lawrence Seaway, the giant waterway that links the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean, said on Tuesday its 445 unionized workers had voted in favor of giving their union a strike mandate but added it hoped to avoid a stoppage.

The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp said it "continues to be confident" it can reach a new collective agreement with the Canadian Auto Workers union when talks start up again on October 6. The union has a mandate to strike with 72 hours' notice at any time after Oct 10. The corporation has a total of 525 employees.

Around 10 to 12 cargo vessels a day use the waterway, which stretches more 374 miles from Montreal to Lake Erie and forms part of the 2,340-mile Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway System.
The management corporation, looking to remove clauses from the collective agreement "that impede reasonable flexibility in work rules," wants to introduce new technology and says no job losses will result.

"If the strike proceeds the Seaway will be closed during the period of the strike," said spokesman Andrew Bogora. There have been no strikes in recent decades.

From Reuters

 

Deeper loads boost lakes ore trade in August;
Shipping still shortchanged by dredging crisis

9/18 – Cleveland - With higher water levels allowing Great Lakes freighters to carry bigger cargos, the iron ore trade on the Great Lakes totaled 6.8 million net tons in August, an increase of 8.6 percent compared to a year ago. The increase in water levels did allow one U.S.-flag laker to twice carry more than 68,000 tons in a single trip.

However, if dredging of the Great Lakes navigation system was sufficient to allow for a full load, the 1,000-foot-long vessel would have carried more than 71,000 tons each trip.

For the year, the Great Lakes iron ore trade stands at 39 million tons, an increase of 10 percent compared to a year ago. Shipments also are ahead of the 5-year average for the January-August timeframe by a like margin.

More information is available at www.lcaships.com

Source: Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Port Reports - September - 19

Ogdensburg
The Port of Ogdensburg, N.Y., was bustling Wednesday with five tugs, two barges and the arrival of the last of the "windmill ships.” The tug, Ecosse, assisted by Lac Manitoba, has been working around the clock to move the newly-arrived windmills from the pier in Ogdensburg to the marshalling area on Wolfe Island. With the season winding down and still many windmills to move, McKeil Marine enlisted the assistance of a second barge, towed by the Florence M and assisted by the tug Seahound. All were at the pier this morning when the Beluga Endurance arrived with the last shipment of windmills. The docking tug Abaco was also at the pier. After some shuffling of positions, Beluga Endurance was assisted in backing into the slip by the Abaco. This should be the last of the ship arrivals, and Abaco has returned to her home port in Clayton, N.Y. McKeil will apparently use much of the remaining season to move the windmills to their lot on Wolfe Island.

Marquette - Lee Rowe
The Lee A Tregurtha arrived in Marquette for a load of ore followed later in the day by fleetmate Kaye E Barker.
After the Tregurtha departed, the James Barker arrived later with coal for the WE Power Plant.

Buffalo - Brian Wroblewski
Adam E Cornelius arrived for the General Mills Frontier Elevator around 7 a.m. Wednesday morning. The American Fortitude was towed out of the river at 3:50 a.m. Wednesday morning.

 

Maritime security exercise scheduled Thursday at Port Huron

9/18 - Port Huron - The U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies will conduct a maritime security exercise on the St. Clair River Thursday morning. The event is part of a two-day Boundary Blitz exercise throughout the Detroit area designed to help the Coast Guard evaluate its response time to an emergency.

"It captures the complexities of dealing with ... a pollution spill or security threat with an international border," said Cmdr. Jim Jenkins, with Coast Guard Sector Detroit. The exercise on the St. Clair River will start about 9 a.m. and will involve a security threat at a power plant. Coast Guard officials would not release further details.

Others participating in the drill will include emergency responders from local and state agencies and Canada. Some representatives from the private sector also will be involved. Jeffrey Friedland, director of St. Clair County Homeland Security/Emergency Management, said it's important the community as a whole is prepared for a security threat. "The government can't do everything," he said. "We have to (work) as a community ... to develop a strong private partnership."

Jenkins said the Coast Guard does a full-scale exercise, such as the one planned Thursday, once a year. Smaller exercises are done several times a year. Other than seeing aircraft overhead and some extra boat traffic on the river, Jenkins said people won't even know the exercise is being conducted. "It's at a facility people normally wouldn't be walking around on," Jenkins said. "We're not going to impact the whole river."

From the Port Huron Times Herald

 

Updates - September 18

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 18

On September 18, 1855, SEBASTOPOL (wooden side-wheel steamer, 230 foot, 863 tons, built in 1855, at Cleveland, Ohio) was sailing on Lake Michigan in a gale. Her cargo included copper, tin, lead and iron ingots, safes and general merchandise. Her skipper misread the shore lights while she was coming in to Milwaukee and she stranded 500 feet from shore, broadside to the storm waves which pounded her to pieces. Most of the crew and 60 passengers were saved with the help of small boats from shore, but about 6 lives were lost. This was the vessel's first year of operation. Her paddlewheels were 50 feet in diameter.

On September 18,1679, GRIFFON, the first sailing ship on the upper Lakes, left Green Bay with a cargo of furs. She left the explorer Robert Cavelier, Sieur de la Salle, behind. GRIFFON never reached her planned destination.

The E J BLOCK, a.) W. R. WOODFORD of 1908, returned to service on September 18, 1946, as the first large bulk freighter powered by a diesel-electric power plant and one of the first equipped with commercial radar on the Great Lakes. She lasted until scrapped at Ramey's Bend in 1988.

On September 18, 1959, the HENRY FORD II ran aground in the St. Marys River and damaged 18 bottom plates.

On September 18, 1958, the BEN MOREELL, a.) JAMES MAC NAUGHTON collided with and sank the car ferry ASHTABULA in the harbor at Ashtabula, Ohio. Captain Louis Sabo was in command of the ASHTABULA.

LAKE WINNIPEG was the first vessel to enter the Nipigon Transport fleet. She loaded her first cargo of 22,584 gross tons of iron ore clearing Sept Isles, Quebec., on September 18, 1962, bound for Cleveland, Ohio.

The Pere Marquette carferry CITY OF MIDLAND 41 (Hull#311) was launched on September 18, 1940, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin. She was built by Manitowoc Shipbuilding Corporation at a cost of $2 million. She was named after Midland, Michigan, for one of the Pere Marquette Railway's biggest customers, Dow Chemical Co. She was christened by Miss Helen Dow, daughter of Willard H. Dow, president of Dow Chemical Co. Converted to a barge in 1998, renamed PERE MARQUETTE 41.

On September 18, 1871, E. B. ALLEN (wooden schooner, 111 foot, 275 tons, built in 1864, at Ogdensburg, New York) was carrying grain when she collided with the bark NEWSBOY and sank off Thunder Bay Island in Lake Huron.

On September 18, 1900, the large steamer CAPTAIN THOMAS WILSON was taken from her launch site on the Black River in Port Huron out to the St. Clair River. The tug HAYNES was at the bow and the tug BOYNTON at the stern. It took an hour and a half to maneuver through the various bridges. Newspapers estimated that a couple thousand persons watched the event. Once the WILSON made it to the St. Clair River, she was towed to Jenks Shipbuilding Company where she was completed and received her machinery.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Port Reports - September 17

Saginaw River - Todd Shorkey
The tug Mark Hannah, pushing a tank barge, was inbound the Saginaw River Tuesday morning, calling on the Dow Chemical dock in Bay City., Mich. Once the tug and barge passed the Essroc dock the CSL Tadoussac departed, backing out of the river and out to Light 12 in the Saginaw Bay to turn and head for the lake. The Mark Hannah was expected to be outbound early Wednesday.

Goderich - Jacob Smith
On Monday evening Algoma's Tim S. Dool came into Goderich and loaded grain.
Tuesday morning Algoma's Algoway came in and loaded at the Sifto salt dock.

Toledo - Jim Hoffman
On Tuesday, Robert S. Pierson was loading coal at the CSX Docks and was expected to depart late Tuesday evening.
The tug Wilfred M. Cohen and barge, the tug Sea Service with the barge Energy 6506, and the salt water vessel Pochard were at the Midwest Terminals Overseas Dock.
Manitowoc remains in layup and is undergoing repairs at the Ironhead Marine Shipyard. She has a tentative eta for the CSX Docks Thursday afternoon.
The tug Michigan with the barge Great Lakes departed from the B-P Dock Tuesday morning bound for the Midwest Terminals Dock where she stayed for several hours. Tuesday afternoon the tug/barge combo departed this dock and were bound for an upper Great Lakes port.
The revised schedule for coal boats due into the CSX Docks has the Atlantic Huron due in Wednesday evening, Manitowoc due in Thursday afternoon, Herbert C. Jackson due in Friday evening followed by the Lee A. Tregurtha on Saturday morning.
The revised schedule for ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock has the Canadian Progress due in Wednesday afternoon, CSL Assiniboine and Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin due in Friday followed by the Peter R. Creswell on Saturday.
Work is progressing on the new Nabisco Elevator dock site with new sheet piling being installed for the dock face as well as a considerable amount of dredging being done in front of the elevator facility. Dredging is being done by the George Gradel Company, using various tugs and barges. This new dock is being built so it can handle self unloaders bringing grain into this facility for the manufacturing of their products. The Nabisco Elevator complex is located just south and is right next door to the Ironhead Marine Shipyard.

 

Updates - September 17

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 17

On September 17, 1898, KEEPSAKE (2-mast wooden schooner, 183 foot, 286 gross tons, built in 1867, at Newport [Marine City], Michigan) was carrying coal from Ashtabula when she was struck by a terrible storm on Lake Erie. Her rudder was damaged, a sail torn away and her bulwarks were smashed. The CITY OF ERIE saw her distress signals at 3:30 a.m. and came to help. With the CITY OF ERIE's searchlight shining on the doomed schooner, a huge wave swept over the vessel taking away everything on deck and snapping both masts. The crew, some only half dressed, all managed to get into the lifeboat. They rowed to the CITY OF ERIE and were all rescued. Three days later, the other lifeboat and some wreckage from the KEEPSAKE were found near Ashtabula by some fishermen.

GRIFFON (Hull#18) was launched September 17, 1955, at St. Catharines, Ontario by Port Weller Drydocks Ltd. for Beaconsfield Steamship Ltd., Montreal, Quebec. Renamed b.) FRANQUELIN in 1967, c.) EVA DESGAGNES in 1987. Sold foreign in 1989, renamed d.) TELCHAC, scrapped at Tuxpan, Mexico, in 1992.

On September 17, 1985, PATERSON suffered a crank case explosion as she was bound for Quebec City from Montreal. She was repaired and cleared on September 21. Renamed b.) PINEGLEN in 2002.

On September 17, 1830, WILLIAM PEACOCK (wood side wheel steamer, 102 foot, 120 tons, built in 1829, at Barcelona, New York) suffered the first major boiler explosion on Lake Erie while she was docked in Buffalo, New York. 15 - 30 lives were lost. She was rebuilt two years later and eventually foundered in a storm in 1835, near Ripley, Ohio.

On September 17, 1875, the barge HARMONY was wrecked in a gale at Chicago, Illinois, by colliding with the north pier which was under water. This was the same place where the schooner ONONGA was wrecked a week earlier and HARMONY came in contact with that sunken schooner. No lives were lost.

On September 17, 1900, a storm carried away the cabin and masts of the wrecked wooden 4-mast bulk freight barge FONTANA. The 231-foot vessel had been wrecked and sunk in a collision at the mouth of the St. Clair River in the St. Clair Flats on August 3,1900. She had settled in the mud and gradually shifted her position. She eventually broke in two. After unsuccessful salvage attempts, the wreck was dynamited.

Tragedy struck in 1949, when the Canada Steamship Lines cruise ship NORONIC burned at Pier 9 in Toronto, Ontario. By morning the ship was gutted, 104 passengers were known to be dead and 14 were missing. Because of land reclamation and the changing face of the harbor, the actual site of Noronic's berth is now in the lobby of the Harbour Castle Westin hotel.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Port Reports - September 16

Duluth/Superior - Chris Mazzella
Friday was a busy day in the twin ports. The Kaministiqua was at CHS 1 loading grain while the Quebecois loaded at CHS 2.
Other vessels in the harbor were the American Integrity at SMET, Paul R. Tregurtha at anchor waiting for the American Integrity to finish and the Algonorth was also at anchor waiting for the Quebecois to load. The St. Clair was at BN Superior.
The Drummond Islander II remained at the Meehan dock with dredging equipment.
J. W. Shelley was at Peavey Superior waiting for repairs to be made to the grain elevator.
Presque Isle was at the CN ore dock, then moved over to Hallett 5 for repairs, and the Alpena unloaded cement at LaFarge Superior.
Saturday wasn't as busy. Kaministiqua was still loading at CHS, along with the Algonorth in the morning.
Adam E. Cornelius was loading at General Mills Superior, Indiana Harbor was at SMET, Joseph H. Thompson was unloading salt at Cutler, the CSL Niagara and salty Carola were at anchor.
The J. W. Shelley remained at Peavey, the Algocape arrived at BN Superior in the early afternoon. Presque Isle and Kaministiqua departed in the early evening hours. The Carola arrived at CHS 1 in the early evening with the help of the Edward H. (formerly the Forney).

Toledo - Jim Hoffman
On Monday, CSL Laurentian was at the Torco Dock unloading ore.
The salt water vessel Pochard and the tug/barge combo Sea Service/Energy 6506 were at the Midwest Terminal Dock.
The tug Michigan with the barge Great Lakes was at the B-P Dock.
Manitowoc remains at the Ironhead Marine Shipyard undergoing repairs.
The revised schedule for coal boats due into the CSX Docks has the Manitowoc and Robert S. Pierson due in Tuesday morning, Atlantic Huron due in Wednesday evening followed by the Herbert C. Jackson and Lee A. Tregurtha on Saturday.
The revised schedule for ore boats due into the Torco Dock has the CSL Assiniboine and Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin due in Saturday.

Grand Haven - Dick Fox
The Mississagi came in at 7 p.m. Sunday night with a load of stone for Meekhof's D & M dock next to the Power Plant on Harbor Island in Grand Haven, Mich. The Calumet was still at the Power plant completing its delivery of coal. Both boats left early in the morning, the Calumet leaving first followed shorly by the Mississagi. They were seen at 8:30 a.m. out in the lake heading north as the ATB Invincible/McKee Sons approached with a load of stone which it delivered to Verplank's dock in Ferrysburg. The McKee Sons/Invincible was gone by late afternoon.

Green Bay - Wendell Wilke
The tug/barge Jane Ann IV/Sarah Spencer were off-loading salt at Fox River Dock on Sunday. This was possibly their first time into Green Bay.

Saginaw River - Todd Shorkey
After a number of days with no activity on the Saginaw River, Monday saw the CSL Tadoussac inbound for the Essroc Dock in Essexville. She was inbound during the early evening hours and was expected to be outbound Tuesday morning.

 

Updates - September 16

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 16

On September 16, 1893, HATTIE EARL (wooden schooner, 96 foot, 101 gross tons, built in 1869, at South Haven, Michigan) was driven ashore just outside the harbor of Michigan City, Indiana, and was pounded to pieces by the waves. No lives were lost.

At about 8:30 a.m. Sunday, September 16, 1990, the inbound motor ship BUFFALO passed close by while the tanker JUPITER was unloading unleaded gasoline at the Total Petroleum dock in the Saginaw River near Bay City, Michigan. As the BUFFALO passed the dock's aft pilings broke off and the fuel lines parted which caused a spark and ignited the spilled fuel. At the time 22,000 barrels of a total of 54,000 barrels were still aboard. Flames catapulted over 100 feet high filling the air with smoke that could be seen for 50 miles. The fire was still burning the next morning when a six man crew from Williams, Boots & Coots Firefighters and Hazard Control Specialists of Port Neches, Texas, arrived to fight the fire. By Monday afternoon they extinguished the fire only to have it re-ignite that night resulting in multiple explosions. Not until Tuesday morning on the 18th was the fire finally subdued with the assistance of the U.S. Coast Guard's BRAMBLE and BRISTOL BAY. The tanker, which was valued at $9 million, was declared a total constructive loss, though the engine room was relatively untouched. Unfortunately the fire claimed the life of one crew member who drowned attempting to swim ashore. As a result the Coast Guard closed the river to all navigation. On October 19th the river was opened to navigation after the Gaelic tugs SUSAN HOEY and CAROLYN HOEY towed the JUPITER up river to the Hirschfield & Sons Dock at Bay City (formerly the Defoe Shipyard) where a crane was erected for dismantling the burned out hulk. Her engines were removed and shipped to New Bedford, Massachusetts, for future use. The river opening allowed American Steamship's BUFFALO to depart the Lafarge dock where she had been trapped since the explosion. JUPITER's dismantling was completed over the winter of 1990-91. Subsequent investigation by the NTSB, U.S. Coast Guard and the findings of a federal judge all exonerated the master and BUFFALO in the tragedy.

Parrish & Heimbecker Ltd. purchased all nine of the Soo River's fleet on September 16, 1982, for a reported C$2.5 million and all nine returned to service, although only four were running at the end of the season.

The NORISLE went into service September 16, 1946, as the first Canadian passenger ship commissioned since the NORONIC in 1913.

On September 16, 1952, the CASON J CALLAWAY departed River Rouge, Michigan, for Duluth, Minnesota, on its maiden voyage for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.

On September 16, 1895, ARCTIC (2 mast wooden schooner, 113 foot, 85 gross tons, built in 1853, at Ashtabula, Ohio) was rammed and sunk by the steamer CLYDE in broad daylight and calm weather. ARCTIC was almost cut in half by the blow. The skipper of CLYDE was censured for the wreck and for his callous treatment of the schooner's crew afterwards. Luckily no lives were lost.

On September 16,1877, the 46 foot tug RED RIBBON, owned by W. H. Morris of Port Huron, Michigan, burned about 2 miles below St. Clair, Michigan. Capt. Morris ran the tug ashore and hurried to St. Clair to get assistance, but officials there refused to allow the steam fire engine to go outside the city. The tug was a total loss and was only insured for $1,000, half her value. She had just started in service in May of 1877, and was named for the reform movement that was in full swing at the time of her launch.

On September 16, 1900, LULU BEATRICE (2-mast wooden schooner, 72 foot, 48 gross tons, built in 1896, at Port Burwell, Ontario) was carrying coal on Lake Erie when she was wrecked on the shore near the harbor entrance at Port Burwell in a storm. One life was lost, the captain's wife.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Port Reports - September 15

Port Colborne - Michel Gosselin
Lithuanian trawlers Sekme and Treimani arrived at International Marine Salvage in Port Colborne, Ont., around 7:30 a.m. with the tugboats Commodore Straits and Radium Yellowknife.

Grand Haven - Dick Fox
The Calumet came in about 7 a.m. Sunday with a load of coal for the Board of Light and Power Sims Plant on Harbor Island in Grand Haven, Mich.

Owen Sound - Ed Saliwonchyk
American Fortitude departed Owen Sound, Ont., on an overcast Sunday afternoon. It was a year ago almost to the day that she last departed Owen Sound with what was at that time reported as a load of oats for Buffalo.

Alpena - Ben & Chanda McClain
The tug G. L. Ostrander/barge Integrity was in port on Saturday. Sunday morning the Samuel de Champlain/barge Innovation was first to dock under the silos at Lafarge while the Alpena waited at anchor out in the bay. The Alpena came in during the afternoon to load again for a return trip to Superior, WI.

 

Updates - September 14

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 15

On 15 September 1886, F. J. KING (wooden schooner, 140 foot, 280 tons, built in 1867, at Toledo, Ohio) was carrying iron ore from Escanaba, Michigan, to Chicago, Illinois. She sprang a leak and sank in a heavy southwesterly gale three miles off Rawley Bay, Wisconsin. Her crew reached shore in the yawl. Her loss was valued at $7,500.

The A. H. FERBERT of 1942 was towed out of Duluth by the Sandrin tug GLENADA September 15, 1987; they encountered rough weather on Lake Superior and required the assistance of the another tug to reach the Soo on the 19th. On the 21st the FERBERT had to anchor off Detour, Michigan, after she ran aground in the St. Marys River when her towline parted. Her hull was punctured and the Coast Guard ordered repairs to her hull before she could continue. Again problems struck on September 24th, when the FERBERT went hard aground at the Cut-Off Channel's southeast bend of the St. Clair River. Six tugs, GLENADA, ELMORE M. MISNER, BARBARA ANN, GLENSIDE, SHANNON and WM. A. WHITNEY, worked until late on the 26th to free her. The FERBERT finally arrived in tow of GLENSIDE and W. N. TWOLAN at Lauzon, Quebec, on October 7th.

The steamer WILLIAM A. AMBERG (Hull#723) was launched September 15, 1917, at Lorain, Ohio, by American Ship Building Co. for the Producers Steamship Co., (M. A. Hanna, mgr.). Renamed b.) ALBERT E. HEEKIN in 1932, c.) SILVER BAY in 1955, d.) JUDITH M. PIERSON in 1975 and e.) FERNGLEN in 1982. Scrapped at Port Maitland, Ontario, in 1985.

On September 15, 1925, the JOHN A. TOPPING left River Rouge, Michigan, light on her maiden voyage to Ashland, Wisconsin, to load iron ore for delivery to Cleveland, Ohio. Renamed b.) WILLIAM A. REISS in 1934, she was scrapped at Alang, India, in 1994.

On September 15th, lightering was completed on the AUGUST ZIESING; she had grounded above the Rock Cut two days earlier, blocking the channel.

September 15, 1959, was the last day the U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tender MESQUITE was stationed at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan.

MIDDLETOWN suffered a fire in her tunnels on September 15, 1986. Second and third degree burns were suffered by two crew members. She was renamed f.) AMERICAN VICTORY in 2006.

In 1934, the ANN ARBOR NO 6 collided with the steamer N. F. LEOPOLD in a heavy fog.

September 15, 1993 - Robert Manglitz became CEO and president of Lake Michigan Carferry Service after Charles Conrad announced his retirement and the sale of most of his stock.

On 15 September 1873, IRONSIDES (wooden propeller passenger/package freight vessel, 220 foot, 1,123 tons, built in 1864, at Cleveland, Ohio) became disabled when she sprang a leak and flooded. The water poured in and put out her fires. She sank about 7 miles off Grand Haven, Michigan, on Lake Michigan. Reports of the number of survivors varied from 17 to 32 and the number lost varied from 18 to 28.

On 15 September 1872, A. J. BEMIS (wood propeller tug, 49 tons, built in 1859, at Buffalo, New York) caught fire while underway. The fire originated under her boiler. She ran for shore but sank 3Ú4 mile short, about six miles from Alpena, Michigan. No lives lost.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Port Reports - September 14

Hamilton - John McCreery and Eric Holmes
Friday was a quiet day at Hamilton with the exception of the Federal Ems arriving in port from Montreal.
Saturday afternoon at 2 p.m. the Federal Ems departed Pier 14 with steel products for Milwaukee.
Canadian Ranger arrived at 2:30 p.m., and went to Pier 10 for engine repairs.
Robert S. Pierson arrived at 4:30 p.m., going to U.S. Steel with iron ore pellets.
The salty Yucatan arrived at 7 p.m.

Amherstburg - Dave Cozens

CCG Griffon delivered freshly painted spar buoys ,or "cans," to the Amherstburg CCG Base on Thursday. The cans will be used to replace the illuminated buoys prior to the winter freeze up.

Toledo - Jim Hoffman
The saltwater vessel Pochard, and the tug Sea Service with the barge Energy 6506, were at the Midwest Terminal Dock.
Herbert C. Jackson was loading coal at the CSX Dock.
American Mariner was inbound the Toledo Ship Channel Saturday evening and was bound for the CSX Docks. She will follow the Jackson loading coal.
Manitowoc was at the Ironhead Shipyard undergoing repairs. As of Saturday repairs are expected to be completed soon and she is scheduled into the CSX Docks to load coal Tuesday morning.
The revised schedule for coal boats due into the CSX Docks has the Saginaw due in Sunday, with Manitowoc and Robert S. Pierson due in Tuesday. Atlantic Huron due in Wednesday followed by the Lee A. Tregurtha on Friday.
The revised schedule for ore boats due into the Torco Ore Dock has the CSL Laurentien due in Monday, Canadian Progress on Wednesday followed by the CSL Assiniboine on Friday.

 

Antalina rides out Ike; crew of 22 safe

9/14 - Houston - A tugboat on Saturday reached a disabled freighter carrying 22 people, hours after the ship road out Hurricane Ike without power, Coast Guard spokesman Mike O'Berry said.

O'Berry said the tugboat Rotterdam arrived shortly before 2 p.m. (3 p.m. ET). Repairs will be made aboard the Antalina, which has a broken fuel pump, while at sea, he added. The tugboat will then tow the ship to Port Arthur, Texas, where it will undergo additional repairs and eventually offload its cargo­ petroleum coke, a petroleum byproduct.

The crew members aboard the Antalina, a Cypriot-flagged freighter, are all in good health, said Coast Guard Cmdr. Ron Labrec. The freighter suffered no major damage from the storm, said Darrell Wilson, a spokesman for the company that manages the ship.

Aircraft from the Coast Guard and Air Force were sent Friday afternoon to try to rescue the crew of the freighter. But high winds forced the military to abort the rescue, O'Berry said. The Coast Guard then instructed the freighter to contact it each hour. It also told told the crew to turn on the ship's emergency radio beacon so its
position could be monitored.

From CNN

 

A note of thanks from the family of Doug Fairchild

Editor’s Note: Doug Fairchild, an avid ship fan and friend of BoatNerd, died in 2007. A bench in his honor was dedicated this past summer at Rotary Park in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., with a view of the St. Marys River.

Dear Boat Watching Friends:

We can't begin to tell you how very much we appreciate your kindness, support, friendship and the special gift of Doug's bench. The bench and plaque are wonderful and the location you selected is perfect!

It meant more than words can say to have Roger give the lovely dedication and to hear all of your kind words in the celebration of Doug's life. You touched our hearts. It was very special to be with you at Mission Point on such a beautiful day. Thank you for everything.

Take care of your very dear selves. We truly look forward to future opportunities to share time with our dear boat watching friends.

Smooth sailing to you all and lots of hugs . . . always.

Nancy, Betty and Don Fairchild

 

Updates - September 14

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 14

September 14, 1962, the HORACE S. WILKINSON was involved in a collision with the Canadian freighter CAROL LAKE in the Welland Canal. Rather than repair the WILKINSON, Wilson Marine had her towed to Superior, Wisconsin, for conversion to a barge. All cabin superstructure, the engine, boilers, and auxiliary machinery were removed. The stern was squared off and notched to receive a tug. The WILKINSON was renamed WILTRANCO I and re-entered service in 1963, as a tug-barge combination with a crew of 10, pushed by the tug FRANCIS A. SMALL of 1966.

September 14, 1963, the BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS, Captain Earl C. Bauman, received a National Safety Council Award of Merit for operating 1,001,248 consecutive man-hours without a lost time accident. This accomplishment required 15 years, 600 round trips, and 1,200 passages through the Soo locks.

Captain Albert Edgar Goodrich died on September 14,1885, at the age of 59, at his residence in Chicago. He was a pioneer steamboat man and founded the Goodrich Transportation Company, famous for its passenger/package freight steamers on Lake Michigan.

The J. J. SULLIVAN (Hull#439) was launched September 14, 1907, at Cleveland, Ohio, by American Ship Building Co. for the Superior Steamship Co. (Hutchinson & Co., mgr.). Renamed b.) CLARENCE B. RANDALL in 1963. She was scrapped at Windsor, Ontario in 1988.

On September 14, 1871, R. J. CARNEY (wooden barge, 150 foot, 397 gross tons) was launched at Saginaw, Michigan.

The 203 foot wooden schooner KATE WINSLOW was launched at J. Davidson's yard in East Saginaw, Michigan, on 14 September 1872.

The steamer ASIA sank in a storm off Byng Inlet on Georgian Bay September 14, 1882. Over 100 people lost their lives with only two people, a man and a woman, rescued. ASIA was built in St. Catharines, Ontario, in 1873, and was bound from Collingwood, Ontario, to the French River and Canadian Sault.

Data from: Clive Reddin, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history

 

Lakes Coal Dock Sets New Record in August

9/13 - Cleveland—Superior Midwest Energy Terminal (SMET) in Superior, Wisconsin, set a new record for the most coal ever shipped from a single dock in a month on the Great Lakes in August. The facility loaded 2,665,538 net tons of coal. The previous record, also held by SMET, was 2,548,173 tons loaded in July of 2002. SMET operated virtually around the clock in August, loading 54 vessels.

The new record still falls short of what the dock could ship if the Great Lakes Navigation System was dredged to project depths. Even the largest cargo loaded this August – 67,799 tons – came up well short of the all-time top load from the facility: 71,369 tons.

Shipments from all Great Lakes coal docks in August totaled 4.1 million tons, a decrease of nearly 11 percent compared to a year ago, and some 14 percent off the month’s 5-year average. However, a major Lake Erie loading dock was idled most of the month by a silo fire on August 5. For the year, the Great Lakes coal trade stands at 23.9 million tons, a decrease of about 1 percent compared to a year ago. The trade is 3 percent off the 5-year average for the January-August timeframe.

Source: Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Port Reports - September 13

Buffalo - Brian Wroblewski
The Maumee entered the inner harbor around 2:15 Friday afternoon and headed up the Buffalo River.

Owen Sound - Ed. Saliwonchyk
American Fortitude arrived in Owen Sound Friday afternoon and began loading at the Great Lakes Grain Elevators.

Twin Ports - Al Miller
Duluth-Superior harbor Friday looked like a reunion for old friends with new names. J. W. Shelley, formerly the Algocen, was loading at the Peavey grain elevator in Superior.
Not far away, Kaministiqua, formerly the Saskatchewan Pioneer, was loading at the CHS elevator’s berth 2.
Elsewhere, Quebecois was loading at CHS 1, with the saltie Carola set to follow.
Alpena was unloading at the Superior cement terminal and American Integrity was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal. Paul R. Tregurtha was out on Lake Superior waiting for its turn at the Midwest Energy Terminal dock.

 

No rescue for crew of Antalina, in Ike's path

9/13 - Houston - As Hurricane Ike approached the Texas coast, the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Air Force were forced to abort a rescue mission Friday to save the 22 crew members on a Cyprus-flag bulker. The Coast Guard received a call around 4 a.m. Sept. 12 from the Antalina, a 584-foot freighter with 22 people aboard and carrying petroleum coke, reporting that it had lost main propulsion 90-miles southeast of Galveston and was drifting southwest away from the coast. The Antalina has visited the Great Lakes.

The Antalina departed Port Arthur, Texas to seek a safe haven away from Hurricane Ike when the vessel lost propulsion. The Houston Chronicle web site reports New Orleans based Petty Officer Jaclyn Young as saying Friday afternoon that the five helicopters and planes sent to assist the ship could not safely rescue the crew. "We will talk to them hourly and they have electricity and no injuries. They have an emergency beacon to put on if they get in distress,'' she said. But the Coast Guard will not be able to approach until the storm passes, she said.

"Unfortunately there were 80-knot winds on scene, well beyond the operating conditions for the air crews to safely rescue the crew of the Antalina. The safety of the rescue crews and the crew of the Antalina are of the utmost importance to us. The Coast Guard will continue to maintain contact with the crew of the Antalina and monitor their situation very closely," said Rear Adm. Joel R. Whitehead, commander, Eighth Coast Guard District.

Saturday morning the crew reported they had made it through the storm safely.

From The Houston Chronicle

 

Lack of tourists could mean auction block instead of dock for Duluth's Sundew

9/13 - Duluth - If you’re in the market for a retired Coast Guard buoy tender, this could be your lucky hour. The Coast Guard Cutter Sundew soon could go up for auction. The vessel’s current owner, the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center, has quietly been shopping the Sundew around in recent weeks.

During an interview Thursday, Bob Hom, the DECC’s operations director, confirmed that he has been assigned the admittedly sad task of determining whether there’s a potential market for the 180-foot-long ship. The Sundew has deep local roots. It was born of a Duluth shipyard in 1944 and served the Twin Ports until its decommissioning in 2004. The ship subsequently was donated to the DECC for use as a local floating museum.

However, Hom said the Sundew has proven less of a tourist draw than he hoped. The DECC initially tried charging visitors individual admission to the Sundew but decided to package it with the more popular William A. Irvin, a retired laker, because of sparse ticket sales. Even though people who pay for admission to the Irvin now can tour the Sundew for no additional fee, Hom said only about 5 percent of visitors have set foot aboard the retired cutter in recent years.

Meanwhile, the DECC’s 5-year lease of the dock where the Sundew is moored will expire April 30, 2009. The DECC’s board of directors will need to decide whether it makes sense to renew that lease in light of poor traffic through the floating exhibit. Hom said the DECC pays about $13,000 per year in docking fees for the vessel and also incurs maintenance costs which make owning the Sundew a money-losing proposition.

Hom said he will recommend putting the cutter up for auction only if he has good reason to hope it will garner bids of $150,000 or more. He described the 64-year-old ship as being in excellent condition. What’s more, the Sundew’s fuel tanks are filled with 24,000 gallons of diesel, which could add to its value, assuming the fuel still is usable.

Hom has had contact with a few potential local buyers. “We would like to keep it in our harbor if we possibly can,” he said. The DECC was required to operate the Sundew as an exhibit for at least four years following the vessel’s donation. It fulfilled that obligation on May 27, 2008. Hom expects to offer a recommendation to the DECC’s board members at its Oct. 28 meeting. It will be up to them to determine whether the cutter should go on the auction block.

Capt. Franz Von Riedel, owner of Zenith Tugboat Co. of Superior, suspects the Sundew will face a tough sell. “It’s such a specialized and unusual vessel that it’s hard to find an aftermarket use for it,” he said. “It’s good for buoy tending and icebreaking, but there’s little else you can do with it. It’s so slow and big.” Von Riedel should know. He bought the Spar, a retired Coast Guard buoy tender of the same class, several years ago from a scrapper on the East Coast for $50,000.

After getting the vessel in good working order, Von Riedel placed it on the market but had no takers. He eventually wound up selling the cutter’s engines and coolers for more than he had paid for the entire ship. Von Riedel then stripped and cleaned the hull before the Spar was sunk off the coast of Wilmington, N.C., for use as marine habitat and a diving attraction. He added that scrapping a vessel on the Great Lakes probably would be far more difficult because of the lack of facilities doing such work. And sinking the hull probably would not be an option. There’s also the potential public fallout to consider. “I’m sure a lot of people would be upset if someone were to part out the Sundew like that,” Von Riedel said.

Hom cautioned against overreaction to the DECC’s exploratory activities. “I don’t want to get everyone up in arms and ready to start a ‘Save the Sundew’ campaign.” “It’s not a done deal by any stretch of the imagination,” Hom said. “If we can’t get a minimum of $150,000, the DECC is not going to put the Sundew up for sale.”

From the Duluth News Tribune

 

Potential bidders inspect historic Duluth lighthouse up for sale

9/13 - Duluth - David Gerth of Duluth stood looking up at the 67-foot-tall lighthouse next to the Aerial Lift Bridge on Thursday, transfixed. “It’s an historic lighthouse,” he said. “It just needs to be taken care of. It’s not in too bad a shape right now.”

Gerth was one of six potential bidders who put down a $5,000 deposit to register with the federal government to inspect it. Each had to sign a liability waiver for the trek up the narrowing cast-iron spiral staircase inside the central cylinder that leads to the top lantern room. The potential buyers ranged in age from Gerth’s 27 years to men and women in their 50s, said Patrick Lammersen of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Aids to Navigation Team in Duluth, who served as tour guide.

The U.S. General Services Administration wants to sell the 107-year-old lighthouse, formerly known as the Duluth Harbor South Breakwater Inner Light Tower. Built before radio, radar and GPS, the government no longer needs it. It first offered the tower at no cost to schools, nonprofits and community development organizations, but no group came forward. The tower now is available to individuals through an online auction that starts Tuesday on the government’s online auction Web site, www.auctionrp.com. Bids start at $5,000 and increase in $5,000 increments.

But while the buyer is to maintain the structure, the Coast Guard will tend to the automatic rotating beacon that continues to operate as an aid to navigation. There are other restrictions. The lighthouse, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, cannot be moved. Before alterations or improvements are made, a new owner must get government approval.

Some who toured the lighthouse on Thursday had just seen pictures of it and thought the inside was smaller than they expected, Lammersen said. “Most kept to themselves,” he said.

Of those who inspected the lighthouse, none lingered longer than Gerth, a maintenance worker for Duluth schools. “It’s one of the oldest lighthouses of this whole area, even older than the Lift Bridge,” Gerth said. “When you look at old pictures of the breakwater, the lighthouse is there.” If Gerth did buy it, he said he would maintain and preserve it. And occasionally open it up for tours.

From the Duluth News Tribune

 

Bell of ship associated with Toronto procured

9/13 - Port Dalhousie - A piece of Port Dalhousie's past will soon be on permanent display in the village. The fundraising drive to buy a historic ship's bell from the Northumberland has paid off, exceeding the $5,000 target by more than $1,800. "Mission accomplished," said St. Catharines Regional Coun. Bruce Timms, who helped spearhead the effort for the Port Dalhousie Business Association.

The $6,859 raised by the campaign over the summer will cover the cost of purchasing the bell from Port Dalhousie senior David Roseman and building a display case to house it. Timms said the goal is to eventually display the bell inside the Lock and Main Market. "Hopefully we can get it up by the end of the year," he said. The fundraising campaign received a boost to put it over the top with two recent donations of $2,500 apiece from Nino Donatelli of Port Pier Marina and the Friends of Port Dalhousie Harbor.

Built in England in 1891, the Northumberland initially ferried passengers across the Northumberland Strait between Charlottetown, P. E. I., and Pictou, N. S. It later left the salt waters of the Atlantic and ferried tourists between Toronto and Port Dalhousie for nearly 30 years. The ship was destroyed in a fire on the night of June 2, 1949, while docked in Port. Roseman, 88, a history buff, bought the bell a decade ago after his son discovered it at an antique store in Shakespeare, Ont.

Until it gets a permanent home, the bell will remain on display at the Breakfast Corner restaurant in Port Dalhousie.

From the St. Catharines Standard

 

Book Signing in Port Huron Saturday

9/13 - Port Huron – The authors of “Collision Under The Bridge” will hold a book signing in Port Huron and St. Clair Saturday. The book documents, in photos and narrative, the histories of both ships and details the days and moments leading up to the collision that changed the flow of vessel traffic in the St. Clair River forever. Follow the compelling story of the monumental salvage effort to clear the sunken Str. Sidney E. Smith Jr. from the shipping channel, brought to life by photos taken by the authors and original diagrams from the salvagers.

The book signing will be held at Vantage Point from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., and then at Sue's Coffee House in St. Clair from 3-6 p.m.

The book can be purchased at the book signings or Online here.

 

Updates - September 13

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 13

On 13 September 1872, the wooden schooner RAPID left Pigeon Bay, Ontario bound for Buffalo, New York with 5000 railroad ties. While on Lake Erie, a storm blew in and Capt. Henderson decided to turn for Rondeau. While turning, the vessel capsized. Annie Brown, the cook, was trapped below decks and drowned. The seven other crew members strapped themselves to the rail and waited to be rescued. One by one they died. Finally, 60-hours later, the schooner PARAGON found the floating wreck with just one man, James Low, the first mate, barely alive.

The EDMUND FITZGERALD's sea trials occurred on September 13, 1958.

The HOFFMAN (United States Army Corps of Engineers Twin Screw Hopper Dredge) collided with the Japanese salty KUNISHIMA MARU at Toledo, Ohio, September 13, 1962. Reportedly the blame was placed on the pilot of the Japanese salty. Apparently the damage was minor.

On September 13, 1968, the AUGUST ZIESING grounded in fog two-hundred yards above the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River. The grounded vessel swung into the shipping channel blocking it until September 15th when lightering was completed.

September 13, 1953 - The PERE MARQUETTE 22 made her second maiden voyage since she was new in 1924. She was cut in half, lengthened, had new boilers and engines installed.

On 13 September 1875, CITY OF BUFFALO (wooden schooner, 91 foot, 128 tons, built in 1859, at Buffalo, New York as a propeller canal boat) beached and sank after striking a rock in the St. Mary's River. The tug MAGNET worked for days to release her before she went to pieces on 19 September. No lives were lost.

On 13 September 1871, the bark S. D. POMEROY was anchored off Menominee, Michigan during a storm. Archie Dickie, James Steele, John Davidson and James Mechie were seen to lower the yawl to go to shore. Later the empty yawl drifted ashore and then the bodies of all four men floated in.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Port Reports - September 12

Oscoda - Gloria Beckstrom
The small dredge Arthur J. worked through the night Wednesday at the mouth of the AuSable River in Oscoda.

Grand Haven - Dick Fox
The barge St. Mary's Conquest with tug Susan W. Hannah in the notch came thru the pierheads about 8 p.m. Wednesday night with a load for the St. Mary's Cement Terminal in Ferrysburg. It unloaded all night and most of Thursday leaving about mid afternoon. It used the seldom used turning basin by the railroad swing bridge so it could go out bow first.

 

August U.S.-flag float hints of Great Lakes shipping after dredging crisis is solved

9/12 - Cleveland - August marked the second month in a row that the U.S.-Flag Great Lakes fleet moved more than 12 million net tons of cargo on the Great Lakes. Rising water levels even allowed for two iron ore cargos to top 68,000 tons. Those are the heaviest loads carried in some time and represent 95 percent of the vessel’s rated carrying capacity.

While higher water levels allowed some vessels to at least be within striking distance of full loads, the industry continues to sacrifice significant capacity to the dredging crisis. Even those 68,000-ton cargos meant roughly 3,000 tons of iron ore were left at the loading dock. Furthermore, Great Lakes water levels normally begin to drop in the fall, so even more capacity will be negated in the coming months due to lack of adequate dredging.

For the year, U.S.-Flag carriage stands at 63.1 million tons, a slight increase (380,000 tons) compared to a year ago, but also a slight decrease from the 5-year average for the January-August timeframe.

Source: Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Government study says ocean ships pollute the environment with soot

9/12 - Ocean freighters spew twice as much soot into the air as previously believed and tugboats are among the worst maritime offenders when it comes to air pollution, according to a new government study.

Soot is comprised of tiny particles of black carbon, which become airborne during the burning of diesel and other fossil fuels, wildfires and the burning of vegetation for agricultural purposes. Soot can settle in human lungs, causing asthma and premature deaths; researchers also believe soot emissions may contribute to global warming.

The study by scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Colorado estimated that commercial ships release 130,000 metric tons of soot per year, 1.7 percent of the global total, into the air. They said that figure could rise as global shipping traffic increases.

"Commercial shipping emissions have been one of the least studied areas of all combustion emissions," said Daniel Lack, a NOAA scientist who led the study. Researchers studied plumes of black smoke from 96 different ships, including cargo freighters, tankers, ferries, large fishing boats and tugs. Most of the boats were sampled in the Houston Ship Channel.

The results were significant for the Great Lakes for two reasons: Hundreds of diesel-powered freighters, tugboats and ferries ply the lakes; and some coastal communities in the region violate the federal air quality standard for soot.

James Weakley, executive director of the Lake Carriers Association, said lake freighters that operate exclusively within the Great Lakes emit less soot than ocean ships. The reason: Lake freighters burn a lighter grade of diesel fuel, which produces less soot than the thicker fuel ocean freighters use.

"A straight comparison between an oceangoing ship and a laker is not a fair comparison," said Weakley, whose group represents 63 U.S.-flagged ships on the Great Lakes.

Tugboats emit nearly a gram of soot per kilogram of fuel burned -- twice as much as any other vessel type, according to the researchers. They attributed the disproportionate amount of soot emissions from tugs to the thick, tar-like fuel the small but mighty vessels burn in their engines.

"Tugboats are a huge source of black carbon that may be underreported or not reported at all in emissions inventories compiled by ports," Lack said in a press release.

Ocean freighters emit a half-gram of soot per kilogram of fuel burned while docked and slightly less when traveling. Lack said that figure was twice the amount of soot emissions researchers previously assigned to ships.

Results of the study were published in the July 11 edition of the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

Weakley said lake freighters, which are equipped with bow thrusters to improve maneuverability, use tugboats less often than ocean freighters. He said freighters are the cleanest way to move large volumes of cargo; freighters haul about 200 million tons of cargo on the Great Lakes annually.

"If you take into account the economies of scale and the tons of cargo moved per mile of fuel consumption, our ships move a ton of cargo from Duluth to Detroit on one gallon of fuel," Weakley said. "That's a distance of about 800 miles on one gallon of fuel -- you couldn't get that kind of mileage in a Toyota Prius."


Source: The Muskegon Chronicle

 

Updates - September 12

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 12

On September 12, 1902, EXPERIMENT (2-mast wooden schooner, 65 foot, 50 gross tons, built in 1854, at St. Joseph, Michigan) was carrying firewood in a storm on Lake Michigan when she went out of control in the harbor at St. Joseph, Michigan, after swerving to miss an unmarked construction crib. She wrecked and was declared a total loss. Her crew was rescued by the U.S. Lifesaving Service. Three days later she was stripped and abandoned in place.

The ROGER BLOUGH was laid up at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, from September 12, 1981, through 1986, because of economic conditions.

CANADIAN PIONEER was christened at Port Weller Drydocks Ltd. on September 12, 1981, by Mrs. Louise Powis, wife of the Chairman and President of Noranda Mines for Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd. Renamed b.) PIONEER in 1987, she operates in ocean service flagged from Vanuatu.

CARTIERCLIFFE HALL, a.) RUHR ORE, was towed by the tug WILFRED M. COHEN to Collingwood, Ontario, for repairs from a June 5th fire and arrived at Collingwood Shipyards Ltd. on September 12, 1979. Renamed c.) WINNIPEG in 1988, and d.) ALGONTARIO in 1994.

Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Limited at Collingwood, Ontario, closed the yard on September 12, 1986, after 103 years of shipbuilding. Collingwood was famous for its spectacular side launches. 214 ships were built at Collingwood.

While unloading steel in South Chicago from the a.) CANADA MARQUIS on September 12, 1988, a shoreside crane lifting a payloader into the hold, collapsed onto the ship. CANADA MARQUIS had a hole in her tank top and damage to her hatch coaming. She sails today on the ocean and lakes today as e.) BIRCHGLEN, for CSL.

On September 12,1900, ALBACORE (2 mast wooden schooner, 137 foot, 327 tons, built in 1872, at Port Dalhousie, Ontario) had a storm blow out her sails, driving her into the seawall at Fort Bank just east of Oswego, New York, where she broke up. The tug J NAVAGH tried unsuccessfully to save her. Her crew of 7 was rescued by the U.S. Lifesaving Service.

After an extremely dry summer, forests were burning all over the Great Lakes region in the autumn of 1871. The smoke from these fires affected navigation. Newspaper reports stated that on September 12, 1871, 38 ships and four strings of barges anchored near Point Pelee on Lake Erie due to the restricted visibility caused by the smoke from the forest fires.

On September 12, 1900, the schooner H W SAGE was raised by the Mc Morran Wrecking Company and was then towed to Port Huron for repairs. She had sunk near Algonac, Michigan, in a collision with the steamer CHICAGO on 30 July 1900.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Port Reports - September 8

Marquette - Rod Burdick and Lee Rowe
The tug Dorothy Ann and barge Pathfinder loaded taconite, and the tug Victory and barge James L. Kuber unloaded limestone into the hopper. The Victory and Kuber's visit was a first to the Upper Harbor, although the pair did unload stone at the Lower Harbor in early May. Michipicoten waited outside the harbor for Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder to finish loading.

Hamilton - Eric Holmes
Tug Petite Forte and barge St. Mary's Cement arrived at 11 a.m. Sunday. Edward L. Ryerson departed Dofasco's Pier 21 at 6 p.m. and headed down the lake. Her next port of call is reported to be Valleyfield, Que.

 

Canadian frigate HMCS Charlottetown to visit lakes

9/8 - The Canadian frigate HMCS Charlottetown, commissioned on Sept. 9 1995, is scheduled to depart Montreal Monday for the Seaway. The 4,750 ton vessel, which measures 442 feet long, 54 feet wide and 16 feet deep, has a speed of 29-plus knots with a peacetime crew of 185.

Visits are scheduled for Sept. 10, Cleveland; Sept. 12, Windsor; Sept. 16, Port Colborne; Sept. 18, Toronto; Sept. 22, Hamilton; Sept, 25, Oshawa; and Sept. 30, Cornwall.

Reported by Kent Malo

 

Updates - September 8

News Photo Gallery updated

Historical Perspectives Gallery updated

Calendar of Events updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 8

September 8, 1936, the Interlake steamer CRETE and the Pittsburgh steamer CORNELL collided in heavy fog above Whitefish Point. After temporary repairs were made in the Weitzel lock, the CRETE proceeded to Chicago Shipbuilding to repair a damaged bow. The CORNELL proceeded to Manitowoc to repair damage to her starboard side just forward of her boiler house.

On September 8,1868, HIPPOCAMPUS (wooden propeller, 152 tons, built in 1867, at St. Joseph, Michigan) stranded in a storm off St. Joseph and was pounded to pieces. 36 of the 41 passengers were lost. Litigation continued until November 10,1884, when the owner was held innocent of blame in the U. S. Court at Grand Rapids, Michigan.

The GEMINI (Hull#745) sailed on her maiden voyage in August, 1978, from Levingston Shipbuilding Co., at Orange, Texas, to load fuel oil at Baytown, Texas, for delivery at Detroit, Michigan. Passing up bound the next month on September 8 through the Welland Canal, GEMINI became the largest U.S. flagged tanker on the Great Lakes with a capacity of 76,000 barrels. GEMINI was renamed b.) ALGOSAR in 2005.

The W. E. FITZGERALD (Hull#167) was launched September 8, 1906, at Wyandotte, Michigan, by Detroit Ship Building Co. for the Chicago Navigation Co., Chicago, Illinois (D. Sullivan, mgr.).

The bulk freighter HENRY A. HAWGOOD was launched on September 8, 1906, at Cleveland, Ohio by the American Ship Building Co. for Minerva Steamship Co. (W. A. & H.A. Hawgood, mgr.), Cleveland. Renamed b.) C. RUSSELL HUBBARD in 1912, and c.) W. W. HOLLOWAY in 1935.

The RADIANT departed the shipyard September 8, 1913, light on her maiden voyage bound for Montreal, Quebec.

September 8, 1970 - The MILWAUKEE CLIPPER made her last run from Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

On September 8, 1985, the downbound the Panamanian NORCHEM collided with the up bound CANADIAN PROSPECTOR near Kanawake, Quebec. PROSPECTOR had little damage but NORCHEM was ripped open near her port anchor.

On September 8,1885, ADVANCE (wooden schooner, 119 foot, 180 gross tons, built in 1853, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin) was carrying wood when she became waterlogged and capsized in a gale and blinding rain near Port Washington, Wisconsin, in Lake Michigan. All but one of her crew of seven drowned when her yawl capsized in the surf.

On September 8,1871, the schooner MORNING LIGHT was sailing from Kelley's Island on Lake Erie with a cargo of stone for Marquette, Michigan, in heavy weather. Trying to enter the Detroit River, the crew miscalculated their position and ran the ship aground on Pointe Mouille, just below Gibraltar. The crew scuttled the vessel in the shallow water to save her from harm. The following day, the tug GEORGE N. BRADY was sent out with steam pumps and hawsers and the MORNING LIGHT was raised and towed to Detroit for repairs.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Al Miller, David Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

Port Reports - September 7

Hamilton - Eric Holmes
Saturday morning the Maritime Trader departed JRI Elevators ( Pier 25 ) with a cargo of wheat for Port Cartier, Que. Algolake departed Dofasco at 10:30 a.m. for the Welland Canal. Halifax departed U.S. Steel also at 10:30 a.m. for Sandusky, Ohio. Algoport arrived at 4 p.m. for unknown repairs at Pier 26. The Ocean Group tug LaPrairie arrived at 4:30 p.m. Petrolia Desgagnes departed the Petro Canada Pier in Bronte at 5 p.m. for Sarnia, Ont. The Apollon departed Hamilton at 7 p.m. from Pier 14.

Toronto - Charlie Gibbons
The salty Eider finished unloading at Redpath Sugar and departed just after noon Saturday with the assistance of the tug LaPrairie.

Saginaw River - Todd Shorkey
The Manitowoc was inbound the Saginaw River early Saturday morning calling on the Bay Aggregates dock in Bay City. She allowed the outbound tug Karen Andrie and barge A-397 to pass before turning into the Bay Aggregates slip to unload. The tug Gregory J. Busch was also outbound on Saturday afternoon, pushing her deck barge.

 

Updates - September 7

News Photo Gallery updated

Historical Perspectives Gallery updated

Calendar of Events updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 7

On September 7, 1978, the ROGER M. KYES lost all power in Lake St. Clair requiring tug assistance from the Great Lakes Towing Co. tugs MARYLAND and MAINE which escorted her to the Great Lakes Steel dock. Renamed b.) ADAM E. CORNELIUS in 1989.

The CADILLAC of 1943, was laid up on September 7, 1981, for the last time at Toledo, Ohio. She was later transferred to a West coast marine operation in preparation for conversion for a proposed container ship for service between Chicago, Detroit and Quebec City. However these plans never materialized.

On September 7, 1921, the D. G. KERR pulled up to the ore dock at Two Harbors, Minnesota to load exactly 12,507 gross tons of iron ore in the record breaking time of sixteen and a half minutes. This was accomplished through the cooperation of the dock superintendent, the dock employees concerned, the ship's captain and crew and the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. as a means of "showing up" the competition. Her time of arrival and departure to and from the dock took only nineteen minutes. For comparison, a good average loading time at that time was about three hours and forty-five minutes.

On September 7, 1975, on the St. Marys River loaded with iron ore pellets, the WILLIAM G MATHER, forced out of the channel by a salt water vessel, struck bottom. Upon proceeding further onto Lake Huron it was soon discovered that her pumps were unable to cope with incoming water caused by the damage. She was beached at Frying Pan Island (De Tour, Michigan) in 19 feet of water when it became evident they couldn't make dock.

On 7 September 1883, LAURA BELL (wooden schooner, 138 foot, 269 gross tons, built in 1870, at Toledo, Ohio) was carrying coal from Cleveland, Ohio to Marquette, Michigan when she stranded off Shot Point, east of Marquette in Lake Superior. Her crew spent 3 days in her rigging and all but one was rescued by a tug from Marquette.

September 7, 1916 - The PERE MARQUETTE 3 ran aground 10 miles north of Milwaukee.

September 7, 1996 - The American Society of Mechanical Engineers designated the propulsion system of the BADGER a mechanical engineering landmark.

The launch of the 188 foot wooden schooner ELIZABETH A. NICHOLSON was set for 4:00 p.m., on 7 September 1872, at E. Fitzgerald's shipyard in Port Huron, Michigan. Just before 4:00 p.m., a telegram was received at the shipyard from Capt. Nicholson, the owner of the new vessel, which read, "Wait a while. We are coming." The launch was delayed until another dispatch was received which said to go ahead anyway. The boat Capt. Nicholson was on had broken down. The launch went well. The vessel was painted deep green with her name in gilt. All present cheered the sight, but there was no party afterwards. All of the food and beverages for the celebration were with Capt. Nicholson on the disabled vessel.

On 07 September 1883, the COLORADO (wooden schooner-barge, 118 foot, built in 1866, at Fairport, Ohio) was in tow of the steamer DON M. DICKINSON along with the schooner-barge N. P. GOODELL in a gale on Lake Huron. As the gale worsened, the string of vessels went to shelter in the harbor at Sand Beach (now Harbor Beach), Michigan. The COLORADO broke loose as they entered the harbor. Deckhand Abbot Way jumped on to the breakwater with a line to secure the COLORADO, but the line broke as soon as it went taut. It broke three times and the barge drifted out into the gale, stranding Mr. Way on the breakwater with six foot waves washing over it. He managed to get to the harbor light at the end of the breakwater and climbed up above the waves where he was stranded for two hours until the crew of the Lifesaving Station got to him. COLORADO beached herself with no loss of life. She was later recovered and lasted until 1902 when she was abandoned.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, Tin Stackers - The History of the Pittsburgh Steamship Company, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships. We Remember series This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

J. W. Shelley update

10:30 a.m. Update - The Shelley left the Pointe aux Trembles anchorage at 9 a.m., an hour late. The anchorage is located at the east end of Montreal close to the oil docks. She will not show on the Seaway map until she reaches CIP 2, which is the entrance to the Seaway.

9/6 - Montreal - The J. W. Shelley arrived in Montreal at 7:30 p.m. Friday and went to anchor at Pointe aux Trembles Quebec. Custom clearance is the norm after a vessel arrives from a foreign country, and a Seaway inspection must be done, before the vessel can depart up bound for the Seaway. Her destination is still unknown, although the Port of Montreal reports Duluth, MN, as her next port of call.

The Shelley was scheduled to depart the anchorage at 8 a.m. Saturday.

Reported by Kent Malo and Ron Beaupre

 

New dock will help Essar Steel Algoma double capacity

9/6 - Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. - Essar Steel Algoma is a beehive of activity these days as it prepares to nearly double steel-making capacity by the end of next year, including building a new dock-face to accommodate hundreds more vessels. "It's very tight. There's not a lot of capacity left," said chief operating officer Armando Plastino.

With the No. 6 blast furnace now up and running alongside No. 7, Essar aims to be able to ship out four million tons of finished coil and slab by the end of 2009. That means bringing in that much more raw material. Essar currently imports approximately 4.5 to 4.6 million tons of iron ore pellets a year and 1.6 to 1.7 million tons of coal. At next year's capacity, that will go to about 5.7 million tons of iron ore and 2.3 million tons of coal, Plastino said.

Algoma has just under 500 boat deliveries coming in and out over a typical shipping season. Plastino expects that to increase to about 700, with little room for snags, he said. "You've got to get all your raw materials here by Dec. 15, and the locks don't reopen until the end of March. You've got to have enough raw materials to last you through the winter."

The Sault Ste. Marie Region Conservation Authority issued Essar a permit earlier this summer to dredge 89,000 cubic metres of sediment at Sawmill Bay Point on the Sault Ste. Marie steelmaker's western grounds. One of eight docking and off-loading locations on the sprawling steelworks, Sawmill Bay Point is about 24 feet deep compared to 28 feet in the surrounding channel.

Dredging another four feet and shoring it up with sheet piling will allow it to handle large lake freighters, which have self-unloaders and dramatically reduce loading times. "It takes the burden away from some of those other docks," Plastino said.

From The Sault Star

 

Scrap tow of trawlers underway

9/6 - Montreal - The tug Commodore Straits was abeam of Baie Comeau, Quebec, Saturday morning, heading west, towing two ex Lithuanian trawlers abandoned in 2001 at Bay Roberts Newfoundland.

The two Lithuanian trawlers are named Sekme and Treimani. They are identical sisters, built in Kiev for Russia. Treimani was built as Zarya Oktyabya in 1977. The tow left Bay Roberts, Newfoundland on August 30.

The trawlers are going for scrap at IMS in Port Colborne.

Reported by Kent Malo and Mac McKay

 

Oswego Harbor dredging begins Monday

9/6 - Syracuse - The long-awaited dredging of Oswego Harbor will begin Monday. Equipment for the month-long project, including cranes and tugboats, began arriving Thursday. "This is something we've been waiting for a long time," said Jonathan Daniels, director of the Port of Oswego Authority.

The dredging will allow more cargo into the harbor on fewer ships. In recent years, Lake Ontario's lower water levels, combined with a buildup of silt and sediments in the harbor, have made the port too shallow to accommodate some fully loaded ships. Sometimes it has taken four ships to transport the cargo it should take three to carry into the harbor. During the dredging, sediment will be loaded onto barges and taken to federally approved dumping areas in the lake's deeper areas, Daniels said.

Boaters should stay clear of the dredging operation, Daniels said. "Mariners need to be aware of the situation," Daniels said. "Though, with the cranes, barges and tugboats, it's not something you're going to sneak up on." The dredging will cost about $650,000. The harbor was last dredged in 2004.

The dredging almost did not happen this year because the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers did not have the money for the work. In February, Congress allotted the engineers $6.5 million to clear its backlog of Great Lakes dredging.

From the Syracuse Post-Standard

 

Port Reports - September 6

Saginaw River - Todd Shorkey
Thursday saw a number of vessels on the Saginaw River. The CSL Tadoussac called at the Essroc dock in Essexville to unload clinker. She was outbound later in the day. The Indiana Harbor was also inbound, delivering coal to the Consumers Energy dock in Essexville. She backed from the river and out to Light 12 to turn and head for the lake Friday morning after unloading. The Olive L. Moore / Lewis J. Kuber were in as well, stopping at the Sargent dock in Essexville before heading upriver to the Saginaw Rock Products dock in Saginaw. The pair were outbound Friday afternoon. The tug Karen Andrie and her tank barge were inbound Friday morning, calling on the SEM Materials dock in Essexville. They were expected to be outbound early Saturday morning.

Detroit
Algoma Spirit departed Nicholson's Detroit dock about 4 p.m. on Friday. The vessel is still sailing under the Bahamanian flag and was unloading steel products in Detroit. The Spirit is upbound for Milwaukee.

Buffalo - Brian Wroblewski
The Canadian Coast Guard cutter Samuel Risley was sitting on the hook until about 6 p.m. Friday, when they pulled up anchor and headed to Port Colborne, Ont. On their way out from Buffalo they passed the inbound Rebecca Lynn towing her barge A-410 for the North Entrance. The Lynn came inside the Outer Harbor and then switched out of pulling gear and went into the notch. She then headed down the Black Rock Canal around 7 p.m. bound for the lock and on to the Marathon Asphalt Terminal. The captain told the Ferry Street Bridge operator that he would be coming out either late Saturday morning or possibly in the early afternoon depending on the weather.

Hamilton - Eric Holmes
Friday afternoon saw the bunkering ship Hamilton Energy depart at 1:30 p.m. The Frontenac departed from US Steel at 4 p.m. heading to Superior. Halifax arrived at 6 pm. with coal from Toledo for US Steel. After discharging her cargo Ashtabula will be the next port of call. Federal Weser arrived at 7 p.m. from Toledo and went to Pier 14. Her next port will be Sorel and then onto Antwerp Germany. The Petrolia Desgagnes arrived at the Petro Canada Pier in Bronte at 7:30 p.m. and the Algolake arrived in Hamilton at 10 p.m.

South Chicago - Brian Z.
The Arthur M. Anderson arrived at KCBX Terminals in South Chicago on Friday after taking a lengthy delay coming in and out of U.S. Steel in Gary, Indiana. Rough conditions at this end of Lake Michigan sent the Anderson to anchor upon arrival at Gary. A brief letup of wind allowed the Anderson to enter the piers and unload. After discharging, the Anderson attempted to depart, however, lake conditions prevented her from leaving. Finally, things calmed down enough for the Anderson to make South Chicago and load coal for Wyandotte, MI.

 

Replica hull of HMS Detroit headed for Rhode Island

9/6 – Amherstburg, Ont. - The 25-year-old dream of a replica 19th century warship based in historic Amherstburg, Ont., luring tourists, offering sunset cruises and sailing lessons to youngsters, is finally dead.
The replica hull of the HMS Detroit was towed Wednesday from its longtime LaSalle berth at Dean Construction and is now headed to Rhode Island.

Amherstburg businessman Ryan Deslippe said the $339,000 (US) sale to Tall Ships Rhode Island formally closed Aug. 25 – almost exactly six years after the christening of the HMS Detroit on Aug. 24, 2002.
Tall Ships Rhode Island assumed all costs of arranging for the Toronto-based tug M.R. Kane to tow it through the Great Lakes to its new home, said Deslippe.

More than $1.5 million of federal, municipal, corporate and community donations went into the HMS Detroit project over its quarter-century history.

Deslippe and business partner Bob Sicolo came to the rescue of HMS Detroit with loans three years ago when more than $300,000 was still owed to Hike Metal Products of Wheatley, which built the steel hull for about $1.2 million.

Every conceivable idea for raising money to complete the project was canvassed in the past three years but nothing worked, said Deslippe. An estimated $4 million to $5 million was needed to complete the ship and build a permanent berth.

In a strange twist of history, the hull will be finished, renamed and used to commemorate U.S. maritime history -in particular the exploits of Oliver Perry, who led the small U.S. fleet on Lake Erie in the War of 1812 and captured the original HMS Detroit. Perry was educated in Newport and is buried there.

The Windsor Star

 

Three bodies recovered after boat capsizes near Conneaut

9/6 – Conneaut - The U.S. Coast Guard says the bodies of three boaters have been recovered after the watercraft they were in capsized off Turkey Creek near Conneaut, Ohio.

The Canadian Coast Guard picked up the initial mayday call from the boat, but could not pinpoint the exact location from which the distress signal originated. U.S. Coast Guard Command out of Buffalo took over the search with the help of crews from Coast Guard Erie and Ashtabula as well as from Air Station Detroit.

Two men wearing life jackets were eventually located about eight miles north of Conneaut. They were unconscious and not breathing when they were found. At around 11 p.m. Wednesday night a third boater was found in the water faced down. The identities of all three boaters have not been released.

The incident remains under investigation.

From WKYC-TV Cleveland

 

Updates - September 6

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 06

On August 29, 1872, a storm struck Lake Erie. On September 6,1872, nine days after she set sail from Port Colborne for Detroit, the schooner J. W. SARGENT was listed as missing in the Detroit newspapers, probably a victim of that storm. Later on the same day that the newspaper announcement was published, the SARGENT arrived in Detroit. Captain William Simms stated that the storm drove him south to Erie, Pennsylvania, where he sheltered for a few days. He sent a telegraph message to the ship's owner but the news was not relayed to Detroit. The SARGENT only lasted another three months. In November 1872, a storm got her on Lake Erie.

The BADGER was launched on September 6, 1952, at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. A christening ceremony included the SPARTAN (launched earlier that year). The BADGER was named in honor of the University of Wisconsin. The BADGER was built by Christy Corporation, and is powered by two Skinner 4 cylinder Steeple Compound Uniflow Marine Steam engines, developing over 7,000 horsepower. She was the last of the large, coal-fired steamers to be built in the United States, and the only ship of her type still operating on the Great Lakes. The BADGER offers seasonal passenger service from Ludington, Michigan, to Manitowoc, Wisconsin, from mid May to early October.

The BELLE RIVER began her maiden voyage when she loaded 56,073 long tons of western coal at Superior, Wisconsin, on August 31, 1977, and arrived at Detroit Edison Co.'s Belle River power plant at Recors Point on September 6, 1977. Renamed in 1990, she sails today as b.) WALTER J. McCARTHY, JR.

On September 6, 1992, the H. LEE WHITE was in tow of the "G" tugs COLORADO and LOUISIANA entering the Trenton Channel when she struck a section of the toll bridge at Grosse Ile, Michigan, knocking down a 150 foot span immediately east of the main river channel. The WHITE was not damaged but a new section of the bridge had to be installed at a cost of $1.7 million. The bridge was back in service in late January, 1993. The U.S. Coast Guard investigated this casualty and their report states that it was the failure of the bridge tender to operate and open the bridge which caused this casualty. The Coast Guard found that the master of the WHITE was operating his vessel in a prudent and lawful manner including the use of whistle signals.

The CHARLES E. WILSON completed her sea trials in 1973. Renamed b.) JOHN J. BOLAND in 2000.

The GEORGIAN BAY collided with the steamer CHARLES HUBBARD in the fog-covered lower St. Marys River September 6, 1955.

On September 6, 1989, the twin screw rail car ferry GRAND RAPIDS left Muskegon, Michigan, in tow of the tugs ANGLIAN LADY and PRINCESS NO 1, and arrived at Port Maitland, Ontario, on September 11th. Scrapping was completed in the fall of 1994.

On September 6, 1887, BLUE BELL (2-mast wooden scow-schooner, 84 foot, 122 gross tons, built in 1867, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin) was carrying lumber from Wilt's Bay, Michigan, to Milwaukee when she missed the harbor entrance at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, in a storm. She was driven ashore where she broke up. Her crew made it to the beach with the aid of the local U.S. Life Saving crew. The total loss was valued at $5,000.

On September 6,1871, the wooden schooner ROSA STEARNS, loaded with coal, was battling a storm for hours off Cleveland, Ohio. The ship was driven on the stone breakwater about 1 a.m. and was pounded to pieces. The crew jumped onto the breakwater and crawled to safety as the waves crashed over them.

Data from: Joe Barr, Jody L. Aho, Max S. Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

J. W. Shelley due at Montreal on Friday

9/5 - The J. W. Shelley picked up a pilot Thursday and was heading west; she departed Les Escoumins, Quebec, at 1930, her next pilot change was at Quebec City, 120 nautical miles west of Les Escoumins.

At the speed she is traveling, and barring any problems, that should put her at Quebec City, at 0500 hours Friday, with another pilot change at Trois Rivieres, Quebec, she should arrive at Montreal around 1700 hrs Friday.

 

Dredging begins for new dock near Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.

9/5 - Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. - Essar Steel Algoma Inc. has been dredging this month at Saw Mill Point on the upper St. Marys River. The company is building a new deep water dock at that location because there's currently insufficient draft at the Essar slip for most lake freighters to carry to capacity.

Chief Operating Officer Armando Plastino says dredging began late last month.

"The dredging contractor, Purvis Marine, has acquired new, state-of-the-art dredging equipment that provides for less sediment disturbance and features global positioning system (GPS) devices on the hoist. allowing for very accurate, targeted dredging," says Brenda Stenta, Essar's manager of corporate communications.

Essar is using silt curtains to ensure any sediment that may be disturbed will not be carried downstream. They are disposing of the dredged material in an approved landfill located on Essar property.

The permit, issued through a new one-stop-shopping process, included comments and input from all three levels of government and all appropriate agencies within those governments.

Essar Steel Algoma asked to dredge 89,000 cubic metres of sediment from its slip on the upper St. Marys River because of dropping water levels, rising shipping and receiving demands and expected production increases.

From Sault Today

 

Port Reports - September 5

Twin Ports - Al Miller
Buffalo spent Wednesday afternoon and part of the night in Fraser Shipyards with a dockside crane near the stern for some sort of work. The vessel had cleared the shipyard by Thursday morning, apparently loading at Midwest Energy Terminal with cargo for Silver Bay. Paul R. Tregurtha and the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin were scheduled for the coal dock later in Thursday.
American Spirit was loading at BNSF ore dock.

Toledo - Jim Hoffman
The Federal Weser was at the Midwest Terminals Overseas Dock. The tug G. L. Ostrander with the barge Integrity was at the Lafarge Cement Dock unloading cement. The revised schedule for coal boats due into the CSX Dock has the Herbert C. Jackson due in Friday morning. The Calumet and Kaye E. Barker on Saturday followed by the American Mariner and Algosoo on Monday. The revised schedule for ore boats due into the Torco Dock has the CSL Assiniboine due in Friday. The Peter R. Creswell is due into the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock Friday evening. The Cuyahoga was inbound the Toledo Ship Channel Thursday evening bound for one of the grain elevators to load grain on Friday.
Work continues on installing a dock site and dredging the area at the Nabisco Plant next to the Ironhead Marine Shipyard. When the work is completed the Nabisco Plant will be able to receive grain by self unloaders. Various tugs and barges from the George Gradel Company are working on this project. The Nabisco plant does not ship grain out, they only receive grain for the manufacturing of their products.

Grand Haven - Dick Fox
Manistee expected Wednesday for the construction Aggregates dock was canceled.
The Wilfred Sykes backed in thru the pier heads at 4:15 p.m. Thursday afternoon with a load for Verplank's Dock in Ferrysburg.

 

Updates - September 5

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History- September 5

September 5, 1899, the DOUGLASS HOUGHTON grounded at Sailors Encampment and sank when rammed by her barge, JOHN FRITZ. The HOUGHTON completely blocked St. Marys River traffic for five days. More than 300 boats were delayed at an estimated loss of $600,000.

On 05 September 1898, the MONTGOMERY (wooden schooner-barge, 204 foot, 709 tons, built in 1856, at Newport [Marine City], Michigan as a passenger/package freight steamer) sank in 21 feet of water on Lake St. Clair after colliding with the whaleback barge 137 (steel barge, 345 foot, 2,480 gross tons, built in 1896, at W. Superior, Wisconsin) which was being towed by the ALEXANDER McDOUGALL (steel propeller semi-whaleback freighter, 413 foot, 3,686 gross tons, built in 1898, at West Superior, Wisconsin). The MONTGOMERY was raised and repaired. She lasted another two years before breaking up in a storm in 1901.

On September 5, 1964, the 730-foot bulk freighter LEECLIFFE HALL sank after colliding with the Greek ocean vessel APPOLONIA in the St. Lawrence River.

The CHI-CHEEMAUN completed her sea trials on September 5, 1974, and then cleared the Collingwood shipyard on September 26th.

The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS cleared Lorain on her maiden voyage September 5, 1942 for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co..

The J. P. MORGAN, JR. returned to service September 5, 1948, after repairs suffered in an accident in June.

The NEW QUEDOC arrived at McLouth Steel, Trenton, Michigan on her maiden voyage September 5, 1960, with a load of Labrador iron ore. Renamed b.) QUEDOC in 1963. QUEDOC was scrapped at Curacao Island, Lesser Antilles in 1985.

The WYANDOTTE of 1916, a.) CONNEAUT, was towed down the Welland Canal on September 5- 6, 1973, on her way to the cutters torch at Santander, Spain.

On 5 September 1905, ABERCORN (wooden propeller 'rabbit', 126 foot, 261 gross tons, built in 1873, at Marine City, Michigan) burned at the dock at Goderich, Ontario, while unloading coal. She reportedly caught fire from the explosion of a signal lamp.

The schooner CALEDONIA, wrecked the previous autumn near the Fishing Islands on Lake Huron, was raised and arrived in Port Huron, Michigan, on September 5, 1882, under tow to be rebuilt.

Data from: Joe Barr, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

J. W. Shelley update

8 a.m. Update - Thursday morning, the vessel is on a west bound course at a reduced speed. There is no indication as to what port she is heading for at this time. The tug later reported that the vessel was having problems typical after a long layup.

9/4 - A tug in the Gulf of St Lawrence reported hearing a conversation between a Coast Guard aircraft and the J. W. Shelley. The Shelley reported leaving Brooklyn, New York, with a crew of 16, and the next port of call was Sept. Iles, Quebec. The tug crew member reported the J. W. Shelley 50 nautical miles behind the tug at noon Wednesday. The tug and her barge had departed Iles de la Madeleine, Quebec, proceeding to Forestville, Quebec.

Reported by Kent Malo

 

Off-course laker causes damage in Lorain

9/4 - Lorain — Two recreational boats and a pier at Spitzer Marina were damaged when a freighter went off course in the Black River early Wednesday morning, according to the Ninth Coast Guard District.

The Canadian Progress made a late turn while going up river about 2:30 a.m. in the area of Freshwater Drive and Arizona Avenue.

The late turn produced a wake which caused significant damage to the pier, according to the Coast Guard. The impact damaged docks nine through 15 and their walkways. The boat tied to dock nine was also damaged, the report said. No one was aboard the boat that was damage and no one else was injured.

Yesterday, Matt Edwards, general manager of Spitzer Marina, said there was definite dock damage, but could not offer an estimate at the monetary damage. “We came into this this morning,” he said. “(The freighter) hit where there was not any boats.”

The U.S. Coast Guard is continuing its investigation.

From the Lorain Morning Journal

 

Port Reports - September 4

Twin Ports - Al Miller
Early Wednesday morning found Canadian Ranger loading at CHS elevator in Superior. Nearby, the Buffalo was slowing proceeding into Fraser Shipyards for repair. The saltie Keizersborg was at the Duluth port terminal to unload wind turbines.

Sturgeon Bay - Wendell Wilke
James R. Barker arrived Bay Shipbuilding mid-afternoon Wednesday. She was assisted stern first, from just north of the yard, by Selvick's tug Jimmy L.

South Chicago - Brian Z.
Algoma's Tim S. Dool loaded a cargo of petroleum coke at the Beemsterboer Dock Wednesday, bound for Quebec. Lower Lakes' McKee Sons also loaded a cargo at Chicago Fuels Terminal and was spotted outbound at 6 a.m. Wednesday morning.

 

Dredging OK enables Wallaceburg barge service to resume

9/4 - Wallaceburg - The Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans has completed extensive tests in Wallaceburg's Sydenham River for possible endangered species such as the rare hickory or round pigtoe mussels. None were detected in the stretch near the Don Truan (Base Line) Bridge and the Bruinsma Dock.

When dredging is completed this fall, it will enable resumption of barge service to Wallaceburg, once a busy port.

During late 2006, the tug Radium Yellowknife barged corn to Toledo ,while 2000 saw the tug Keewatin bring in stone on the barge Stone Merchant. Local officials hope the dredging of the Sydenham River will regain Wallaceburg's status as an inland port.

Reported by Al Mann

 

Retired shipping agent passes

9/4 - Cleveland - David E. Lewis, 60, retired former shipping agent for many years at Cleveland, Ohio, passed away unexpectedly on August 30. Lewis represented Upper Lakes Shipping Group, Inc. and Seaway Marine Transport. He was the husband of Dorothy (nee-Hunt), and father of Trish.

Memorial service Saturday, Sept. 6, at Messiah Lutheran Church, W. 215 and Lorain Rd., Fairview Park at 11 a.m. The family will receive friends in the Dicicco-Berry Funeral Home, 23040 Center Ridge Rd., Westlake 3-9 P.M. Memorial contributions may be made to Messiah Lutheran Church or Great Lakes Historical Society, 480 Main St., Vermillion, OH 44089

Reported by William Carle III

 

Updates - September 4

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History- September 4

On September 4,1889, the new steamer CHEROKEE (wooden propeller freighter, 209 foot, 1,002 gross tons) arrived in Port Huron, Michigan, from M. P. Lester's yard in Marine City, Michigan, for the Phoenix Iron Works in Port Huron to installed the engine and boiler. Her outfitting was then completed by Carleton and Cole of Port Huron.

On September 4, 1876, CITY OF PORT HURON, a wooden steam barge, sank a few miles off shore near Lexington, Michigan, at about noon. She was heavily loaded with iron ore and sprang a leak at about 11 o'clock. Most of the crew managed to get on top of the cabin while two were in the forward rigging as she went down in 6 fathoms of water. The heavy seas washed over those on the cabin. Captain George Davis and two others floated ashore on wreckage while a fish boat picked up the five others. No lives were lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

J. W. Shelley reaches Canso Causeway

9/3 - The J. W. Shelley passed through the Canso Causeway, which spans Cape Breton Island and mainland Nova Scotia, at 9 p.m. Tuesday.

The 1968-built vessel, which formerly sailed the Great Lakes as Algocen, is reportedly returning to the lakes for further service after several years of use as a spoils barge on the U.S. East coast. In June she was reflagged Canadian and ownership was changed to Vanguard Shipping Ltd of Ridgeville, ON.

 

Port Reports - September 3

Grand Haven - Dick Fox
The tug Invincible and barge McKee Sons came in at 2 a.m. with a load of stone for Meekhof's D & M dock next to the power plant on Harbor Island in Grand Haven.
The Manistee is expected at 8 a.m. on Wednesday to take out a load of sand from the Construction Aggregates dock.

South Chicago - Steve Bauer
The Tim S. Dool was inbound, stern first, at the 92nd Street bridge Tuesday afternoon at 1 p.m., with the assistance of the "G" tug South Carolina on the stern and the Colorado on the bow. Her destination was KCBX to load coal.

 

Update on Lake Superior outflow

9/3 - Detroit - The International Lake Superior Board of Control, under authority granted to it by the International Joint Commission, has set the Lake Superior outflow to 2,250 cubic metres per second (m3/s) (79.5 thousand cubic feet per second (tcfs)) for the month of September. This is the outflow recommended by the regulation plan for the month of September and is a decrease from the August outflow, which was 2,460 m3/s (86.9 tcfs).

The September outflow will be released by discharging about 2,122 m3/s (74.9 tcfs) through the three hydropower plants and passing most of the remaining flow through the control structure at the head of the St. Marys Rapids. The gate setting of the control structure was decreased to the equivalent of one gate half open on September 2. As a result, the flow and water levels have decreased in the St. Marys Rapids.

This past month the water supplies to the lakes Superior and Michigan-Huron basins were well below their long-term averages for August. Lake Superior is currently 19 cm (7 inches) above its chart datum level.

The level of Lake Superior is expected to remain stable in September. Currently, the Lake Superior level is about 16 cm (6 inches) below its long-term average beginning of September level, but is 39 cm (15 inches) above the level recorded a year ago. This past month the level of Lake Superior fell 5 cm (2 inches), while on average the level rises by 1 cm (1/2 inch) in August.

The level of Lakes Michigan-Huron fell by 8 cm (3 inches) this August, while on average the level falls by 4 cm (2 inches) in August. The level of Lakes Michigan-Huron is now about 36 cm (14 inches) below its long-term average beginning-of-September level, and is 19 cm (7 inches) higher than it was a year ago, and 18 cm (7 inches) above chart datum. The level of Lakes Michigan-Huron is expected to decline in September.

Additional information can be found at this link  or here

 

Updates - September 3

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 3

September 3, 1919, the WILLIAM A. McGONAGLE loaded a record 15,160 tons of soft coal at Toledo, Ohio for delivery to Gary, Indiana. The record lasted less than 24 hours as the D. G. KERR, Captain Harry Harbottle, loaded 15,532 tons of coal at the same Toledo dock for delivery to Gary, Indiana.

September 3, 1942, The 250 foot STEEL VENDOR, Captain G. L. Kane, sank at 3:45 a.m. on Lake Superior with a cargo of 3,000 tons of iron ore. The lone casualty was Oiler John N. Sicken. Twenty-two survivors were rescued by the CHARLES M. SCHWAB, Captain Alfred Drouillard, and 2 survivors were rescued by the WILLIAM G. CLYDE, Captain David M. LeRoy. Other boats standing by were the B. F. AFFLECK, ELBERT H. GARY, JOLIET, and EUGENE P. THOMAS.

September 3, 1957, the HARRIS N. SNYDER of the Boland & Cornelius fleet, Captain Elmer Murray and Chief Engineer Frank Mc Cabe, rescued 2 from the waters of Lake Michigan. Not only did the crew rescue Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Colby, but the crew used the unloading boom to recover their sailboat and place it on the deck of the SNYDER. The entire maneuver only required 55 minutes.

On September 3, 1899, the Great Lakes Towing Company's RED CLOUD (wooden propeller tug, 62 foot, 40 gross tons, built in 1883, at Buffalo, New York) was sailing on Lake Erie for Lorain, Ohio when a storm forced her to head for port at Cedar Point, Ohio. However she was thrown on a reef and broke in two - a total loss. The crew made it to Sandusky, Ohio.

On September 3, the BELLE RIVER (now WALTER J. McCARTHY, JR.) set a then Great Lakes record for coal when it loaded 62,802 tons of coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal on its maiden voyage. This record has since been surpassed many times.

At Lorain, Ohio keel laying ceremonies for the 437 foot bow section of the ROGER BLOUGH (Hull#900) took place on September 3, 1968, and was float-launched December 21, 1968, less ballast tanks because the existing dry dock wasn't wide enough to accommodate her 105 foot width.

SOODOC (Hull#210) of 1976, on her maiden voyage from Collingwood, Ontario, loaded salt at Goderich, Ontario, on September 3, 1976. Renamed b.) AMELIA DESGAGNES in 1990.

U.S. Steel's SEWELL AVERY was laid up for the last time September 3, 1981, at Superior, Wisconsin. She was towed to Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, in 1987, where the superstructure was removed and the hull was sunk for use as a dock.

The THOMAS W. LAMONT was laid up for the last time at Duluth’s Hallett dock #6A on September 3, 1981. She was scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey, in 1987.

The H. H. PORTER sailed on her maiden voyage for the Brier Hill Steamship Co. (Pickands, Mather, mgr.) on September 3, 1920, light from Lorain, Ohio, to load iron ore at Two Harbors, Minnesota. Renamed b.) WALTER E. WATSON in 1957 and c.) NATIONAL TRADER in 1973. She was scrapped at Thunder Bay, Ontario, in 1978.

On September 3, 1985, PHILIP R. CLARKE plowed into the Drawbridge Cove Marina in Lorain's Black River damaging 5-10 small craft and sinking one at the steel dock. CLARKE managed to stop before hitting the Route 6 drawbridge.

On September 3,1887, BULGARIA (wooden propeller, 280 foot, 1,888 gross tons) was launched at West Bay City, Michigan, by J. Davidson, as their hull number 16.

September 3, 1910 - The MARQUETTE & BESSEMER NO 2 (Hull#450) was launched in Cleveland, Ohio by the American Ship Building Co. for the Marquette & Bessemer Dock & Navigation Co. She was the replacement for the MARQUETTE & BESSEMER NO 2 of 1905, (Hull#428), which foundered on Lake Erie, December 7, 1909.

On September 3, 1869, the 167 foot wooden propeller BOSCOBEL burned about two miles below St. Clair, Michigan. Three lives were lost. The ship was only about two years old and was in service of the New York Central Railroad, though owned by the Peshtigo Lumbering Co. of Chicago. The burned hulk was raised in 1876 and rebuilt as a schooner-barge at Algonac, Michigan. She lasted until 1909, when she sank on Lake Huron.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

J. W. Shelley headed north

9/2 - Cape Cod - The J. W. Shelley (Ex-Algocen) was observed transiting the Cape Cod Canal Sunday around 2 p.m.

The vessel was headed north into Cape Cod Bay and points north.

Reported by Bob Richards

 

Port Reports - September 2

Buffalo - Brian Wroblewski
tug Karen Andrie and barge A-397 were unloading at the Noco Oil Product Terminal in Tonawanda on the Sunday evening. The pair departed around 10 a.m. for Toledo.
The installation of the exterior part of the new self-unloader hopper at the Lake & Rail Elevator seems to be pretty much complete as of Monday. The work equipment was still on the dock but it looked to be ready for a boat soon.

Toronto - David Robinson and Charlie Gibbons
In the midst of a huge fleet of small craft out watching the Canadian International Air Show, the English River arrived and backed into the cement plant, and the barge Exiderdome with tug Evans McKeil in the lead and Ivory Coast in the slot came into Toronto's inner harbour, turned 180 degrees and proceeded out the eastern gap.
The salty Eider arrived and was assisted into the Redpath slip by Groupe Ocean's tugs LaPrairie and Omni Richelieu.
CCG vessels Samuel Risley and a Cape class vessel were amongst the vessels on hand to support the air show.

Hamilton - Eric Holmes
The Algosoo arrived at 11 a.m. going to Dofasco with a load of coal and then departed at 7:30 p.m. Ocean Group tugs Omni Richelieu and LaPrairie departed at 12 noon for Toronto and arrived back at 7:15 p.m. Halifax arrived at 4 p.m. with coal for US Steel from Sandusky. Canadian Coast Guard Ship Cape Hurd arrived at 5:30 p.m. going to The Canada Centre for Inland Waters in Burlington.

St. Joseph - Greg Barber
On Labor Day morning the Sam Laud entered the St. Joe breakwall at 7:30 in the morning with a load of stone for dock 63.

 

CCI-USW deal set

9/2 - Ishpeming -Cleveland Cliffs Inc. announced at 8:15 p.m. Sunday that work will continue unhindered at the Empire and Tilden mines.

The announcement of a tentative agreement between CCI and its hourly workers came just under four hours before a midnight Sunday deadline that would have left the workers, who are represented by the United Steelworkers, without a contract.

"This is great news for everyone," said Dale Hemmila, the district manager of public affairs for CCI. "From our standpoint, we're certainly happy about being able to reach a labor contract before the deadline."

Mike Roy, the financial secretary for USW Local 4950, said that work will continue normally. "The gist of it is, we have a tentative agreement and we want the workers to show up for their regular schedules," he said.

According to the Cleveland Cliffs press release, the agreement is a new four-year labor contract that will cover approximately 2,300 USW-represented workers at Cliffs' Empire and Tilden Mines in Michigan, and its United Taconite and Hibbing mines in Minnesota.

"We are pleased to reach a new tentative labor contract that is fair and equitable to both parties," Donald J. Gallagher, the president of CCI's North American Business Unit, said in a prepared statement, "Cliffs' most valuable resource is our employee base, and we look forward to continuing our partnership with the USW, which will enable all employees to share in the good fortune resulting from their hard work, and provide us a solid platform for future achievement."

The agreement replaces the current four-year deal and must be ratified by USW local union members and Cliffs' Board of Directors.

From the Marquette Mining Journal

 

Updates - September 2

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 2

On 02 September 1902, the White Star Line’s TASHMOO (steel side-wheel excursion steamer, 308 foot, 1,344 gross tons, built in 1900, at Wyandotte, Michigan) hosted President Theodore Roosevelt when he came to Detroit, Michigan to speak to Spanish American War veterans. The vessel took the president and his party on a sight seeing tour up and down the river while flying the president's blue and gold flag from the main mast.

The BROOKNES (Hull #1177) was launched on September 2, 1970, at Glasgow, Scotland by Lithgows Ltd. for "Langra" Schiffahrsges G.m.b.H. & Co., Hamburg, Germany. Brought to the Lakes in 1976, converted to a self-unloader and renamed b.) ALGOSEA and sails today as c.) SAUNIERE.

ROBERT KOCH's first trip was on September 2, 1977, up the Welland Canal bound for Buffalo with cement.

The W. F. WHITE was one of the earliest ships built as a self-unloader on the Great Lakes. On her maiden voyage September 2, 1915, the WHITE loaded coal at Erie, Pennsylvania and sailed for Menominee, Michigan. She was the largest self-unloading bulk carrier on the Lakes at that time with a cargo capacity of 10,500 tons.

The RALPH H. WATSON departed light September 2, 1938, from Detroit, Michigan upbound to load iron ore at Duluth, Minnesota. She was built as part of a fleet modernization plan for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, Ohio, of four new "GOVERNOR MILLER' class bulk carriers, the other two were the JOHN HULST and the WILLIAM A IRVIN. The WATSON was only the fourth steam turbine powered vessel on the Lakes

HUBERT GAUCHER ran aground in the lower St. Lawrence on September 2, 1988. It took three tugs to free her, repairs took place at Quebec City.

ZIEMIA TARNOWSKA lost her engine while docking at Pier 24, in Cleveland, ramming the dock and caused about $100,000 in damage on September 2, 1988. The Polish vessel had minimal damage to her bulbous bow.

On 2 September 1851, BUNKER HILL (wooden sidewheeler, 154 foot, 457 tons, built in 1835, at Black River, Ohio) burned to a total loss at Tonawanda, New York.

The COLONEL ELLSWORTH (wooden schooner, 138 foot, 319 gross tons, built in 1861, at Euclid, Ohio as a bark) was beached on Whitefish Point in Lake Superior the entire winter of 1895-96. She was repaired and put back into service late in the summer of 1896. Then, on 2 September 1896, the newly rebuilt vessel collided with the schooner EMILY B MAXWELL about 6 miles from White Shoals on Lake Michigan and sank at about 4:00 a.m. Her crew escaped in the yawl and was picked up by the MAXWELL.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 

J. W. Shelley reported to have departed for the Lakes

9/1 - NYC - The J. W. Shelley, the former Algocen, is reported to be returning to the lakes. She laid up for what was thought to be the final time in Montreal on January 4, 2005. Before the end of the month, her registry was changed with a new owner, Recycling Technologies, Inc. (subsidiary of Bayshore Recycling) in New Jersey. She was used as a spoils storage barge.

After being renamed Valgocen and flagged Panamanian in July of 2005, the retired laker departed Montreal on July 25, 2005 bound for New Jersey in tow. The tow arrived at Bayshore's dock in Keasbey, NJ on August 3, 2005.

In summer 2008 it was rumored that she would be returning to Great Lakes service.

In June she was reflagged Canadian and ownership was changed to Vanguard Shipping Ltd of Ridgeville, ON. In August 2008 the J. W. Shelley was spotted in the Brooklyn Navy Yard under going refurbishment and fit out. The vessel departed on August 29 and was rumored to be returning to the lakes.

Though no official announcements have been made, her color scheme matches that of the Maritime Trader which is owned by Voyageur Marine Transport Ltd., also of Ridgeville, ON.

 

Port Reports - September 1

Toledo - Jim Hoffman
BBC Plata was at the Midwest Terminals Dock on Sunday.
The tug Sea Service with the barge Energy 6506 was at the B-P Dock.
Calumet and Herbert C. Jackson, that were due into the CSX Docks to load coal on Sunday were cancelled out. The Calumet ended up at Marblehead, Ohio to load stone while the Herbert C. Jackson ended up at Sandusky, Ohio to load coal.
The revised schedule for coal boats due into the CSX Docks has the Catherine Desgagnes and American Republic due in Tuesday followed by the Halifax on Wednesday. The schedule for ore boats due into the Torco Ore Docks has the Kaye E. Barker due in Monday followed by the CSL Assiniboine on Thursday.

Rochester - Tom Brewer
The Stephen B. Roman arrived at the Essroc Dock on Sunday afternoon with a load of bulk cement.

Buffalo - Brian Wroblewski
At 1 p.m. Sunday, LaFarge's Innovation, powered by the Samuel de Champlain, backed herself out of the Creek, did a 270 degree pivot and headed out the North Entrance.

Bécancour, Québec - Bruno Boissonneault
The short and stubby Dutch Runner has departed Bécancour, Québec at 10 p.m. on Saturday with a full load of containers for Argentia, NL.

Toronto - Charlie Gibbons
The barge Exiderdome with tugs Evans McKeil and Ivory Coast did not get underway Saturday as expected and were still sitting at Pier 51 Sunday afternoon.

 

Updates - September 1

News Photo Gallery updated

 

Today in Great Lakes History - September 1

September 1, 1880, the Cleveland Vessel Owners Association, later Lake Carriers Association, was created with Alva Bradley as its first president.

September 1, 1892, the upbound WESTERN RESERVE, flagship of the Kinsman fleet, sank approximately 60 miles above Whitefish Point. There were 31 casualties among the crew and passengers. The lone survivor was Wheelsman Harry W. Stewart.

On 01 September 1891, EDWARD H JENKS (wooden propeller freighter, 119 foot over all, 180 gross tons, built in 1882, at Port Dover, Ontario as the passenger/package freight steamer E M FOSTER) was carrying limestone up the Detroit River during a foggy night when she collided with GEORGE W MORLEY (wooden propeller freighter, 193 foot, 1,045 gross tons, built in 1888, at W. Bay City, Michigan) in a misunderstanding of passing signals. Three were killed in the collision and the JENKS quickly sank at Ballard's Reef on the Detroit River. Her cargo kept her in place until she was recovered the following month and rebuilt.

Tragedy struck four days after the launch of the AGAWA CANYON, September 1, 1970, when the ship was rocked by an engine room explosion, killing one of the crew and injuring seven more. The AGAWA CANYON entered service in November, 1970, equipped with four 10 cylinder, two stroke cycle, single acting opposed piston diesel engines, built in 1970, by Fairbanks, Morse (Canada), Kingston, Ontario. Total bhp 6,680. Rated service speed: 12 knots (13.8 mph).

The TEMPLE BAR (Hull#101G) was launched September 1, 1970, at Govan, Scotland by the Govan Division of Upper Clyde Shipbuilders Ltd. for Lambert Bros. (Shipping) Ltd., London, England. Renamed b.) LAKE NIPIGON in 1977, c.) LAKETON in 1984, d.) LAKE NIPIGON in 1986, and e.) ALGONORTH in 1987.

Upon her arrival at Quebec City on September 1, 1962, the LAKE WINNIPEG was the first vessel of the Nipigon Transport Ltd. (Carryore Ltd., mgr.) fleet.

The self-unloader B H TAYLOR (Hull#787) was launched September 1, 1923, at Lorain, Ohio by American Ship Building Co., the third self-unloader built for the Bradley Transportation Co., Rogers City, Michigan. Renamed b.) ROGERS CITY in 1957. Scrapped at Recife, Brazil in 1988.

From September 1, 1947, to September 15, 1959, the U.S.C.G.C. MESQUITE was stationed at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan

On 1 September 1854, ABIAH (2-mast wooden schooner or brig, 134 foot, 353 tons, built in 1848, at Irving, New York) was sailing light from Chicago, Illinois to Oconto, Wisconsin when she capsized and sank in a squall about 10 miles off Sheboygan, Wisconsin. The schooner L LUDDINGTON rescued her crew and 2 passengers.

The 135 foot wooden schooner JOSEPH E. SPARROW was launched at Bangor, Michigan on 1 September 1873.

On 1 September 1900, the Canadian steamer ADVANCE (wooden propeller package freighter, 168 foot, 1,178 gross tons, built in 1884, at St. Catharines, Ontario) was placed in service. In August 1899, when she was named SIR S. L. TILLEY, she had caught fire off shore, about 7 miles from Fairport, Ohio and was destroyed. However, the hull was later recovered and used as the basis of the steamer ADVANCE. She lasted in this role until 1903, when she burned again.

September 1, 1919 - A switchman was killed in the yard at Manitowoc, Wisconsin while the ANN ARBOR No. 6 was being loaded. This caused a delay of four hours in her sailing time.

September 1, 1931 - W. L. Mercereau retired as superintendent of steamships, a position he had held since 1899.

Data from: Max Hanley, Joe Barr, David Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series. This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history.

 



News Archive - August 1996 to present


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