Great Lakes NEWS & RUMOR Archive

* Report News


City of Midland 41 update

09/30:
The City of Midland 41 was scheduled to be towed from Ludington today, but rough weather has postponed the tow until Wednesday Morning.

The former carferry is going to be converted to a barge (see original story dated 9/24).

Reported by: Max Hanley




Barge PATHFINDER Named For Previous Steamer

09/30:
A story in the September 20, 1997 issue of "Skilling Mining Review" indicates that the name PATHFINDER, that is being given to the barge being made out of the str. J. L. MAUTHE, to honor another Interlake Steamship Company steamer named PATHFINDER that was scrapped in 1985 at Port Maitland, Ontario.

The earlier PATHFINDER was built in1906 at River Rouge for Pickands, Mather & Co. as SAMUEL MATHER ((1). She was sold to Interlake in 1913 and renamed PATHFINDER.In 1964, she was sold to ULS who named her GODERICH. She became SOO RIVER TRADER in 1980 when purchased by the Soo River Company. She spent her last two years un the P & H flag as PINEGLEN, and was sold for scrap in 1984.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Cuyahoga loses power

09/30:
According to news reports, at 1100 yesterday, the Cuyahoga lost power off the port of Oswego , N.Y. There was fear that she would run aground but at 1600,she regained some power and went into Oswego harbour for repairs.

Reported by: Ron Walsh




Rare Hungarian Visitor to the Great Lakes

09/30:
A Hungarian ship that has been docked in Toledo for two weeks is only the second vessel from that country to visit the Great Lakes since World War II, Toledo Sister Cities International announced.
The Balaton Arrived in Toldeo Sept. 12 and since then has been unloading 76,000 bags of Mexican sugar at the Toledo World Industries Dock at the foot of Front Street. During the port call, the captain and 16-member crew have had the opportunity to visit Hungarian landmarks in Toledo, including Tony Packo's Cafe (of MASH fame).

Reported by: Jim Flury




More on the Hercegovina

09/30:
Just after midnight 18 Sept., U.S. Coast Guard personnel boarded the Hercegovina (Croatian-registry 30,882-dwt, 197-meter/645-foot motor bulk carrier built in 1977, operated by Atlantska Plovidba dd Dubrovnik) at the Eisenhower Locks of the St. Lawrence Seaway. Three licensed officers aboard were found to be legally intoxicated. The third mate, who was operating the ship's throttles as it neared the locks, was arrested. The Croatian citizen was taken to the jail in Malone, N.Y., and arraigned before a U.S. magistrate. The ship then moved to the Wilson Hill Anchorage and was released on 19 Sept. It was sailing from Venezuela to Toledo, Ohio, to load soybeans.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





More on I.M.O. regulations

09/30:
The International Maritime Organization adopted new regulations to reduce air pollution by ships on 25 Sept. The new rules set limits on nitrogen oxide and sulphur oxide from vessel exhausts and prohibit deliberate release of substances that deplete ozone. The sulphur content of bunker fuel will be reduced to 4.5 percent though the present average is 3 percent. In the Baltic Sea, the sulphur content must be no more than 1.5percent. The fuel regulation will come into effect in 2003 if the new regulations are ratified by 15 countries. The 15 must have merchant fleets that account for more than 50 percent of the gross tonnage of world ships. Also, diesel engines of 130 kilowatts or more for ships built in 2000 and after will be affected by new restrictions on nitrogen oxides. Emissions will have to be no more than 0.34 ounces/9.8 grams per kilowatt for high-speed engines operating for more than an hour with revolutions per minute of 2,000 or more. There will be a compulsory review of the new regulations unless they take effect within five years. The regulations, which have been worked on for six years, will become Annex VI of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships of 1973 as amended in 1978.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 30

The 660 ft. forward section of the a)BELLE RIVER (b) WALTER J. McCARTHY, JR.) was side launched on September 30, 1976.

The ARTHUR SIMARD entered service on September 30, 1973 sailing to Montreal, Que. to load gasoline.

The GOVERNOR MILLER was towed down the Welland Canal on September 30, 1980 in tow of TUG MALCOLM, STORMONT and ARGUE MARTIN on her way to Quebec City.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY departed light on her maiden voyage from River Rouge on September 30, 1943 bound for Two Harbors, MN. to load iron ore.

On September 30, 1986 the Canadian Coast Guard veseel CARIBOU ISLE sturck a rock in Lake Huron's North Channel and began taking on water. CCG SAMUEL RISLEY arrived and helped patch the ship. The pair the departed for Parry Sound.

Data from: Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Seaway Queen update

09/29:
The Seaway Queen is active again and passed Detroit today westbound for Thunder Bay. Also today the re-activated Algosound passed Detroit, eastbound for the St Lawrence Gulf. At 6pm tonight the Laker Saguenay (at Toronto since 1992) was at Welland Canal etd today for an Upper Lake Port

Reported by: John Whitehead




Seaway Queen departs as Saguenay is towed

09/29:
The Seaway Queen departed Toronto, pier 35, on Friday the 26th @ 17:00 hrs. for the lakehead. She has completed her five year drydock certificate & extensive metal work in Toronto.

The Saguenay was towed from Toronto harbour Sunday, at 12:30pm. Destination unknown. Saturday she was accompanied by by two small McKiel tugs, she had a tow line off the aft end and was completely welded up. The ship name & the "Canada Steamship Lines" name have been removed from the ship.

Meanwhile, a little further down the turning basin the "Tarantau" appears to await the same fate. Apparently CSL, owner of Fednav intends to launch new "Fednav" ships as "CSL" ships are taken out of service..

Reported by: Jim Fitzgerald




Rare calls on the Twin Ports

09/29:
Duluth received an extremely rare visit Sept. 28 when Atlantic Huron called at the DMIR ore dock.

American Mariner is scheduled to make another trip Sept. 29 up the St. Louis River to unload stone at the C. Reiss dock. The ship has been up there several times this season.

Another unusual caller scheduled for Sept. 29 is Kaye E. Barker going into the DMIR ore dock at Two Harbors.

Reported by: Al Miller




Cement barge calls on Marysville

09/29:
Medusa Cements barge MEDUSA CONQUEST was seen on September 27 docked at Marysville, Michigan's Detroit Edison Power Plant dock. With the barge was it's tug the SUSAN W. HANNAH. As of late Sunday, September 28, this tug-barge combination was still at this location. Late word had it that another Hannah tug was to dock directly behind the SUSAN W. HANNAH sometime Sunday night. Although Marysville has several calls every year by cement carries, namely the ILT vessels, this I believe is the first time that the MEDUSA CONQUEST has arrived at this location.

Reported by: Ray Bawal Jr.




The Majestic Star passes Harsens Island

09/29:
The new gambling vessel Majestic Star USA passed Harsens Island around 10:30 Sunday morning after departing from Detroit.The ship has a delivery crew of 15 aboard along with twenty others along for the ride. She spent Saturday docked in Detroit's Hart Plaza so residents could get a look at what gambling could be like if the vessels owner is granted one of the three Detroit gaming licenses. She was travelling at a speed of eight and a half knots on the St Clair River on the way to replace the temporary riverboat in Gary, Ind.

Reported by: James Hile




New warehouse for Port of Milwaukee

09/29:
In his budget address on 26 Sept., Milwaukee Mayor John Norquist said that the city has budgeted U.S.$3 million to build a new warehouse at the Port of Milwaukee. It will be built on one the port's piers for use by Federal Marine Terminals Inc. Federal Marine Terminals recently closed a facility in Chicago and will use the Milwaukee location to handle metal cargoes for the domestic market. Increased revenues from Federal Marine Terminals and other businesses are expected to pay back all principal and interest for the project in about 13 years.

In related port news, Milwaukee has asked the Milwaukee County Stadium Board to demand that Mitsubishi International ship about 10,000 tons of steel through the port. The board is overseeing construction of Miller Park, a new stadium for the Milwaukee Brewers baseball team. Mitsubishi International has been contracted to supply and install a retractable roof for the stadium. According to the city, Mitsubishi International is planning to buy steel in a foreign country, ship it to the western or Gulf coast of the United States and then bring it to Milwaukee by rail. The long lengths of steel required are reportedly no longer produced in the United States. Businesses involved in constructing the stadium are given incentives for using local subcontractors, so it is hoped that Mitsubishi International will find using the port economical. Roof construction will begin in the summer and HCH Joint Venture, which is the main contractor for the stadium, will meet with Mitsubishi International in Chicago next week to discuss the steel situation.
The last pile for the stadium's foundation was driven 26 Sept.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 29

PIERSON INDEPENDENT was launched September 29, 1906 as a) J.H. SHEADLE (1), US.203628, for the Grand Island Steamship Co. (Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co., Cleveland, OH., mgr.).

HENRY FORD II, 70, of Grosse Pointe, Michigan, passed away on September 29, 1987. Mr Ford's namesake was the Ford Motor Company self-unloader.

On September 29, 1986 the Polish tug KORAL left Lauzon, Quebec with the JOHN E.F. MISENER and GOLDEN HIND enroute overseas for scrapping.

On September 28, 1980, the Burns Harbor entered service, departing Sturgeon Bay bound for Superior to load pellets.

THOMAS WILSON left Toledo on September 28, 1997 in tow of the tug TUSKER for overseas scrapping. WILSON has been laid up since December 16, 1979.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Port of Thunder Bay figures for August

09/27:
The amount of cargo hanlded by the Port of Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, was 1.314 million metric tons, down from 1.554 million metric tons in July. However, in August 1996, 919,123 metric tons were handled. For 1997, the port has handled 7.024 million metric tons, compared to 5.185 million metric tons in 1996. Most of the increase is due to grain shipments.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





I.M.O. adopts new air pollution regulations

09/27:
The International Maritime Organization adopted new regulations to reduce air pollution by ships on 25 Sept. The new rules set limits on nitrogen oxide and sulphur dioxide from vessel exhausts and prohibit deliberate release of substances that deplete ozone. The regulations, which have been worked on four six years, will become Annex VI of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships of 1973 as amended in 1978.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 27

The H.M.GRIFFITH experienced a smoky conveyor belt fire at Port Colborne, Ont. on September 27, 1989. Repairs were completed there.

The ROGER M. KYES proceeded to Chicago for dry docking, survey and repairs on September 27, 1976. She had struck bottom in Buffalo Harbor September 22, 1976 sustaining holes in two double bottom tanks and damage to three others.

The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2) under tow, locked through the Panama Canal from September 27 to the 30th on her way to the cutters torch.

SEAWAY TRADER was launched September 27, 1947 as a) IMPERIAL COLLINGWOOD for Imperial Oil Ltd., Toronto, Ont.



Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Oglebay Norton to try ECPINS

09/26:
Oglebay Norton Co. has bought an ECPINS system from Offshore Systems International Ltd. for operational evaluation, with an eye towards ordering systems for the balance of its ships. ECPINS continuously displays, in real-time, a vessel's actual position relative to land, charted objects, aids to navigation and other items.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Algoma Central in acquisition

09/26:
Algoma Central Corp said on Thursday that it agreed in principle to acquire a 50 percent stake in Upper Lakes Group Inc's Marbulk Canada Inc unit through the C$33 million purchase of treasury shares.

Algoma Central said the transaction was subject to due diligence and approval by the respective boards and was scheduled to close by October 31.

Marbulk Canada and its Marbulk Shipping Inc subsidiary, which is based in Salem, Mass., own and operate four ocean vessels that trade on the eastern seaboard and South America. Marbulk Shipping will soon take delivery of a fifth vessel with a carrying capacity of 70,000 tonnes

Reported by: James Neumiller




Today in Great Lakes History - September 26

The CHI-CHEEMAUN cleared the shipyard on September 26, 1974.

The H.M. GRIFFITH was christened on September 26, 1973 at Collingwood.

The CCGS GRIFFON was launched September 26, 1969 by Davie Shipbuilding Ltd., Lauzon, Que.

ROGER M. KYES (b) ADAM E. CORNELIUS) returned to service on September 26, 1984, she had grounded off McLouth Steel and ended crosswise in the Detroit River's Trenton Channel a month before.

The BELLE RIVER was side swiped by the Liberian FEDERAL RHINE at Duluth on September 26, 1985. Both vessels received minor damage.

Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Parade of Algoma boats

09/25:
The parade of Algoma boats continues at the Harvest States grain elevator in Superior. Several Algoma boats have loaded there in recent weeks. Algowest presently in the loading berth and Algoville is anchored on Lake Superior waiting its turn. Also in port for grain is Algoriver, which is loading at the Peavey elevator.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - September 25

The HENRY C. FRICK departed Bay City on her maiden voyage on September 25, 1905 and rammed and damaged the Michigan Central R.R. Bridge at Bay City. Both were repaired.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




City of Midland 41 to be converted to a barge

09/24:
The City of Midland 41 is being readied to be towed to either Muskegon or most likely Holland, where she will be converted to a barge. According to James Anderson, executive vice-president at Lake Michigan Carferry, she will be leaving as early as next Tuesday. Crews have been hard at work removing interior items of all types.

Robert Manglitz, president and chief executive officer at LMC, announced that she will be part of a new tug-barge company that he has formed, called P.M. Shipping, Inc. Plans are to begin operations next spring or early summer and will serve shippers throughout the Great Lakes.

The City of Midland 41 was launched at Manitowoc on September 18, 1940 and made her maiden voyage on March 12, 1941. She was the last carferry built by The Manitowoc Shipbuilding Corporation for the Pere Marquette Railway, ending a relationship which began with the Pere Marquette 21 in 1924. The City of Midland has been in layup in Ludington since 1988.

Reported by: Max Hanley




Croatian ship halted by Coast Guard

09/24:
Late news reported by Watertown Daily Times reveals that a Croatian ship was forced the moor at the Wilson Hill anchoring area Wednesday,September 17th after the U.S Coast Guard officers, during a routine ballast water test at the Snell lock, determined that the navigating crew members were under the influence of alcohol. The Coast Guard officers summoned State Police and a sobriety test was administered. The Captain tested under the legal limit and returned to the ship but the 3rd Mate was found to be legally intoxicated and was taken to Franklin County jail in Malone to be arraigned before a U.S.magistrate. Both crew members are from Croatia. The ship was en route to Toledo. Ohio from Venezuela to pick up soybeans. It was not carrying any cargo at the time of the incident. The Seaway Authority spokesman said that "our main concern was safety, obviously safety was a factor here."

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Stranded Ship remains at Cape Vincent

09/24:
The cargo vessel, Seba M, is still stalled off the shoreline of Cape Vincent as of Monday, September 22nd awaiting the parts needed for repair to arrive from Montreal. A Seaway Authority spokeswoman, Rhonda M Worden, said "The ship is stable and hasn't changed positions. It's still sitting where it has been." She also said that the ship would be required to undergo inspection by the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority,the U.S. Coast Guard and the Seaway Authority of Canada before it is permitted to resume its journey.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




More on Fednav International's order

09/24:
Fednav International Ltd. signed a contract with Sumitomo Corp. in Tokyo on 18 Sept. for four 34,000-dwt bulk carriers at a cost of 12 billion Japanese yen/U.S.$98 million. They will be built by Oshima Shipbuilding Co. Ltd. at Nagasaki, Japan, for delivery in the latter half of 1999 and the first half of 2000. In addition to acting as Fednav International's contractor, Sumitomo will be a partner with Fednav International in owning the vessels. Each ship will have six cargo holds and three 30-ton cranes. The bulk carriers will be built for navigating the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 24

On September 24th the A.H. FERBERT (2) went hard aground at the Cut-Off Channel’s southeast bend of the St. Clair River. Six tugs, GLENADA, ELMORE M. MISNER, BARBARA ANN, GLENSIDE, SHANNON and WM. A. WHITNEY, worked until late on the 26th to free her.

The FITZGERALD’s first cargo of taconite pellets was loaded September 24, 1958 at Silver Bay, MN. for Toledo, OH.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 entered service September 24, 1924.

In early morning fog on the St. Clair River September 24, 1962 the J.L. REISS was hit three glancing blows by U.S. Steel’s SEWELL AVERY. The AVERY had lost control just below Robert’s Landing and crossed the channel from the Canadian side and struck the J.L. REISS which was proceeding slowly by radar on the U.S. side.

On September 24, 1952, the Charles L. Hutchinson entered service. This vessel was renamed Ernest R. Breech when it was sold to the Ford Motor Company in 1962, and it was given its present name, Kinsman Independent, when it was sold to Kinsman Lines in 1988.

On September 23, 1991, J.W. McGIFFON rescued several people in a 24' pleasure craft off Presque Ile State Park. The group had been disabled since the day before. They were taken aboard the McGIFFON and their boat taken under tow.

Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Collision in the Welland Canal

09/22:
At 5:15AM Saturday morning the tug Anglian Lady was towing a barge below Lock 1 in the Welland Canal when she collided with the CSL vessel Nanticoke. The tow was heading from Hamilton to Sarnia. After the Anglian Lady's collision with the Nanticoke, she collided twice with the canal walls. The Toronto Sun reported that the tugboat's captain was later arrested by Niagara Regional Police for operating the vessel while intoxicated.

Reported by: Ron Walsh, J J Van Volkenburg and Brian Bernard




Stranded Ship Sitting Off Cape Vincent Break-Wall

09/22:
The cargo vessel Seba M, a 424 foot vessel registered in Lebanon and bound for Chicago, lost power Friday, September 18th and was forced to drop anchor. The ship developed problems when it slowed down to change pilots at Cape Vincent. Strong winds came up overnight and the vessel began to drift toward shore until a second anchor was dropped. The ship which has 22 crew members is carrying 10,000 metric tons of steel. The parts needed to repair the engine are coming from Montreal and it was hoped that the repairs would be completed by yesterday, so the vessel can continue. Late Saturday night,the ship remained about 1000 feet from the break-wall at the Cape but had not moved since dropping the second anchor although winds continue to be stong. Village residents expressed concern that the vessel would break loose from its mooring and smash into the break-wall as it is an imposing sight from the shoreline. The Jefferson county emergency director has discussed the situation with the Seaway Authority and was told that "everything was holding firm." The Seaway Authority has said there is no danger that the ship would run aground and that there is no danger of leaking fuel.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




More on the Seba M.

09/22:
The Lebanese vessel Seba M. was built in Japan in 1976-7244 GRT. She was registered as Hans Leonhart-CYP prior to her name change this year. The vessel entered the St Lawrence Seaway Sept 01 and has experienced several days delay for engine repairs at both Beauharnois Locks and at Wilson Hill anchorage prior to the current incident at Cape Vincent

Under her old name she was here many times and is the first LEB vessel in the Seaway-Lakes since the Late 60's

Reported by: John Whitehead




C. Columbus arrives in Windsor

09/22:
The new 13,950-ton Hapag-Lloyd cruise ship c. COLUMBUS arrived in Windsor yesterday about 4:00 P.M. The new 420-passenger German-built cruise ship was greeted by an enthusiastic crowd lining the river front to witness this historic event. Passengers were shuttled off to various locations around Windsor and Detroit, only to return to catch the ship by about 2:30 A.M. when she departed Windsor for Macinac Island.
Pictures will be posted to this page later in the week.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




News from the Seaway

09/22:
Thorswave-CYP, which departed Montreal for Sea Sept 12 on her first voyage for Christensen Cdn African Line, is psg w at Quebec City , returning to Montreal

Cruising Ships currently in the St Lawrence include Silver Cloud-BAH, Royal Princess-BR, Regal Empress-BAH, Seabourn Pride-NOR and Astor-BAH. Above Montreal the Grande Caribe -USA 1997, is at Oswego since 0912 and the Canadian Empress-CDN was at Cornwallis Isl. today for Kingston Ont. The c.Columbus was on passage west at SE Shoal at noon bound for Windsor Ont.

The new /replacement gambling casino Majestic Star-USA departed Montreal anchorage at 2pm to transit the Seaway en route to Gary IND.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Flu outbreak on cruise from Montreal

09/22:
The Westerdam (Dutch-registry 5,340-dwt passenger ship built in 1986, operated by Holland America Line Westours Inc.) was sanitized at a dock in New York on 20 Sept. after a flu outbreak during a cruise from Montreal. At least 96 passengers and crew had symptoms of Influenza A during the voyage, which began 11 Sept. Epidemiologists from the Canadian national health service and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention boarded the vessel in Nova Scotia, Canada, in an attempt to treat the disease. All 2,100 people aboard (roughly 1,400 passengers and 600 crew) were given vaccinations and Romantadine, meant to keep the virus from spreading. However, 53 passengers and 43 crewmembers reported aches, pains, fevers and coughs. Influenza A is spread by personal contact, so new passengers do not face an undue risk. It is believed the virus was brought aboard by a group of Australian citizens on the ship's previous voyage from New York to Montreal. On that cruise, some 40 passengers and 40 crewmembers reported flu symptoms and six were hospitalized in Montreal. Passengers on the cruise to New York have been offered a refund.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 22

On September 22, 1958, the Edmund Fitzgerald entered service, departing River Rouge, Michigan for Silver Bay, Minnesota on its first trip. The Fitzgerald's first load was 20,038 tons of taconite pellets for Toledo. The vessel would, in later years, set several iron ore records during the period from 1965 through 1969.

While in ballast, the ROGER M. KYES (b- ADAM E. CORNELIUS) struck bottom in Buffalo Harbor September 22, 1976 sustaining holes in two double bottom tanks and damage to three others, whereupon she proceeded to Chicago for dry docking on September 27, 1976 for survey and repairs.

While being towed from Duluth, MN by the Canadian tug TUSKER on September 22, 1980, the D.G. KERR (2) rammed into the breakwater at Duluth causing $200,000 in damages to the breakwater. The tow apparently failed to make the turning buoy leaving Duluth Harbor.

On September 22, 1911 the HENRY PHIPPS collided with and sank her Steel Trust fleetmate, steamer JOLIET (1), which was at anchor on the fog shrouded St. Clair River near Sarnia, Ont. The JOLIET (1) sank without loss of crew and was declared a total loss. The PHIPPS then continued her downbound journey and collided with the Wyandotte Chemical steamer ALPENA (1) which incurred only minor damage.

The T.W. ROBINSON and US.265808 (former BENSON FORD (2) departed Quebec City in tow of the Polish tug JANTAR bound for Recife where they arrived on September 22, 1987. Scrapping began the next month in October.

MATHILDA DESGAGNES was freed from polar ice in the Arctic on September 22, 1988 by the West German Icebreaker Research Vessel POLARSTERN.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




300 Million tons of taconite reserves

09/20:
A newly approved plan opens up 300 million tons of taconite reserves in northern Minnesota to Hibbing Taconite and USX's Minntac.

The agreement approved by the State Executive Council divides up an ore reserve near the center of the Mesabi Range. It allows Hibbing Taconite to move east as it mines taconite from the Buhl-Kinney area. Minntac gains easier access to taconite adjacent to its existing West Pit near Mountain Iron.

The deal enabled the two companies -- the two largest producers of taconite pellets in Minnesota -- to swap land so they could mine ore closer to their processing plants.

Minntac gains an estimated 16-year supply of taconite based on current production rates. Minntac already has begun stripping operations on the land in preparation for mining it.

Hibbing Taconite isn't expected to begin mining its newly acquired land for about four years.

Minntac ships its taconite pellets through Two Harbors. Hibbing Taconite's pellets go to the BNSF ore dock in Superior.

Reported by: Al Miller




Duluth-Superior trade up

09/20:
Cargo handled by the Ports of Duluth, Minn., and Superior, Wis., increased 5.4 percent for the first six months of the year compared to the same period last year. Some 16.1 million metric tons were handled, compared to the five-year average of 17.1 million metric tons. Both domestic and foreign cargoes increased 10 percent.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





News from the Twin Ports

09/20:
Several unusual callers are expected on Lake Superior Sept. 20. After a prolonged absence, J.A.W. Iglehart is scheduled to make its second call in about a week to Duluth-Superior. John B. Aird is due into Silver Bay and Buckeye is expected to load at the DMIR ore dock in Duluth.

Fred R. White Jr. made a rare appearance in Duluth on Sept. 19 when it pulled in the DMIR ore dock ('west of 6 Missabe', in local parlance) to load.

The recent parade of Canadian ships through the Midwest Energy Terminal continues. There have been several in the past few weeks. The latest was Algolake, which pulled in to load Sept. 18.

Reported by: Al Miller




Raymond Luzar dies at 66

09/20:
Raymond W. Luzar, who some considered the "dean" of shipping agents at the Port of Cleveland, died 8 Sept. of cancer. He was 66. A native of Cleveland, Luzar was a state roller-skating champion and a boxer in the U.S. Marine Corps before attending a local business college. He joined Pulp & Paper Co. before becoming an agent at what is now Norton Lilly International Inc. in 1956. Luzar founded the Ohio Foreign Commerce Association in 1971 and helped start the Cleveland World Trade Week. He advised on trade education for Cleveland State University, Cuyahoga Community College and John Carroll University. He was also a member of the board of the northeastern Ohio chapter of Christians and Jews. Luzar is survived by his wife of 32 years, Cory, and three sons, a daughter and two grandchildren.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 20

On September 20, 1986, vandals started a $5,000. fire aboard the laid up NIPIGON BAY at Kingston where she had been since April, 1984.

GEORGE A. STINSON's self-unloading boom was replaced on September 20 1983. The Boom had collapsed onto her deck due to a mechanical failure on the night of April 19, 1983 at Detroit. No injuries were reported. She continued hauling cargoes without a boom until replacement

On September 20, 1980, the EDGAR B. SPEER entered service.

The CHARLES E. WILSON sailed light on her maiden voyage from Sturgeon Bay September 20, 1973 bound for Escanaba, MI to load ore.

The CHARLES M. WHITE was christened at Baltimore on September 20, 1951.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




New gambling vessel enters system

09/19:
The newly built gambling vessel MAJESTIC STAR-USA traversed the Cabot Strait Sept 17 on a delivery voyage to Gary Indiana.

Reported by: John Whitehead




U.S. Coast Guard seeking private lighthouse operators

09/19:
Fednav International Ltd. signed a contract with Sumitomo Corp. in Tokyo on 18 Sept. for four bulk carriers. They will be built by Oshima Shipbuilding Co. Ltd. at Oshima, Japan, for delivery in 1999 and 2000. In addition to acting as Fednav International's contractor, Sumitomo will be a partner with Fednav International in owning the vessels. Each ship will have six cargo holds and three 30-ton cranes. The bulk carriers are designed for navigating the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 19

LEON FALK, JR. and MENIHEK LAKE arrived in Spain on September 19, 1985 for scrapping.

When SATURN (4) entered service and made her first trip to Toledo, OH on September 19, 1974, she became the first of three tankers built for the fleet's modernization program.

The EDGAR B. SPEER departed the shipyard on her maiden voyage September 19, 1980 bound for Two Harbors, MN where she loaded her first cargo of taconite pellets.

The GRAND HAVEN (Twin Screw Rail Car Ferry) was laid up in the spring of 1965 at the old Pennsylvania Dock at Cleveland and later at dockage on the Old River Bed where she sank on September 19, 1969.



Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News from the Seaway

09/18:
Two of the three lakers laid up in Montreal are to get under way. The Algoriver is scheduled to depart September 18th and Algogulf on Sept 20th. The Comeaudoc appears unmoved by it all and remains berthed in the vicinity of the passenger ship c.Columbus-BAH, which arrived Montreal Sept 17th at 8am and was re-fueled by the oiler Horizon Montreal in preparation for her departure last night for the Great Lakes

The container ship Maersk Montreal-CYP, 21,584 GRTons will arrive Montreal section 67 tonight to open a new combined service to Northern Europe

Reported by: John Whitehead




Today in Great Lakes History - September 18

The E.J. BLOCK returned to service on September 18, 1946 as the first large bulk freighter powered by a diesel-electric power plant and one of the first equipped with commercial radar on the Great Lakes.

On September 18, 1959 the HENRY FORD II ran aground in the St. Marys River and damaged 18 bottom plates.

On September 18, 1958 the BEN MOREELL (2) collided with and sank the car ferry ASHTABULA in the harbor at Ashtabula, OH.

LAKE WINNIPEG was the first vessel to enter the Nipigon Transport fleet. She loaded her first cargo of 22,584 gross tons of iron ore clearing Sept Îles, Que. on September 18, 1962 bound for Cleveland.

The Pere Marquette carferry City of Midland 41 was launched on September 18, 1940, at Manitowoc, WI. She was built by Manitowoc Shipbuilding Corporation at a cost of $2 million. She was named after Midland, MI for one of the Pere Marquette Railway's biggest customers, Dow Chemical Co. The City of Midland has been in layup at Ludington, MI since 1988.

Data from: Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Update on the Mauthe Conversion

09/17:
At Bay-Shipbuilding Company in Sturgeon Bay, WI, work is progressing on conversion of the JL MAUTHE to a self-unloading barge. Her pilot house has been removed and cabin interiors gutted. Simultaneous work is underway on removing machinery and steel from the stern, cargo hold modification, and boom fabrication. Completion is scheduled for December 19, 1997, and she will be renamed PATHFINDER. A new 8000 HP tug to push the PATHFINDER has been designed by Ocean Tug & Barge Engineering of Boston, MA. The 124' x 44' tug will have 14 individual staterooms and be powered by twin Z-drives, making her the largest and most powerful Z-drive tug ever built in North America. She will be suitable for ocean service. Eight shipyards - four on the lakes, four in the Gulf area - have bid on construction.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




More on the C. Columbus

09/17:
For the first time since 1975, a foreign flag will fly over a passenger liner passing through the St. Lawrence Seaway. The 472 foot German-owned passenger liner, the C.Columbus will pass through the Eisenhower and Snell locks at Massena on Thursday, September 19th. It is on a maiden voyage on a nine day cruise from Montreal to Chicago with stops along the Seaway and through the Great Lakes. It is the first modern passenger vessel to be built to Seaway size specifications and will have about 420 passengers and 169 crew on this trip. It was built this year at the Mathisa-Werft Wismer shipyard in Wisma,Germany for the Hapag-Lloyd Cruise Ship Management Co. It has been fitted with state-of-the-art navigational technology and has numerous passenger amenities such as a swimming pool, spacious passenger accommodations, a lounge for receptions, shows and other entertainment. The C.Columbus is scheduled to make two 0ther Great Lakes cruises while on the Seaway system this year

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




August Float Is Post-Recession Record

09/17:
U.S.-Flag vessel operators carried 14,569,883 net tons of dry- and liquid-bulk cargo on the Great Lakes in August, the most cargo to move on the nation's "Fourth Seacoast" in any single month since the recession of the early- and mid-1980s. A total of 66 U.S.-Flag ships and tug/barge units were required to move that tonnage.

For the season, U.S.-Flag carriage stands at 70,855,525 tons, an increase of 8.7 percent compared to last year's end-of-August total. The 1996 "float" for U.S.-Flag lakers, 117 million tons, is the current top season for the industry since the recession, but that record could well be toppled if the current pace continues.

George J. Ryan, President of Lake Carriers' Association, congratulated the entire Great Lakes maritime community on this accomplishment. "Although ships are the most visible component of our industry, achieving peak efficiency requires the contributions of many others besides the American mariners onboard U.S.-Flag lakers. The dockworkers who load the vessels, the shipyard workers who perform repairs quickly when needed, the U.S. Coast Guard who maintains the Aids to Navigation, the Corps of Engineers who operate the Soo Locks and dredge the channels... all played a major role in this new benchmark for Great Lakes shipping."

Ryan further noted that this new tonnage record is good news for the entire Great Lakes industrial basin. "Waterborne commerce is not a speculative business. The U.S.-Flag Lakes fleet moved those cargos because our steel mills, power plants and other industrial complexes continue to operate at very high levels of productivity and employment. That's good news for America."

Shipments of iron ore for the steel industry in U.S. bottoms totaled 6,866,511 net tons in August, an increase of 4 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. Since the resumption of the iron ore trade out of Escanaba, Michigan, on March 8, shipments in U.S.-Flag lakers stand at 35.1 million tons, an increase of 6.3 percent compared to last year's end-of-August total.

Coal loadings in U.S.-Flag vessels topped 2.8 million tons in August, an increase of 7.4 percent. For the season, the U.S.-Flag coal float totals 13.4 million tons, an increase of 18.3 percent.

Stone, the third pillar in domestic waterborne commerce on the Great Lakes, approached 4 million tons in August, and for the season, stands at 17.3 million tons, an increase of 9.3 percent.

Reported by: The Lake Carriers Association




U.S. Coast Guard seeking private lighthouse operators

09/17:
During the summer of 1996, the U.S. Coast Guard sought public comments on plans to disestablish (stop operating) eight lighthouses on the U.S. Great Lakes. Following a review, the Coast Guard has announced that the Fort Gratiot Light has been taken off the closure list, while action regarding the seven others has been indefinitely delayed. Instead, the Coast Guard has decided to seek local organizations to aid in finding private operators for the lights. Operators have been found for the St. Helena Light on the Straits of Mackinac in Michigan and the Thirty Mile Light on Lake Ontario in New York. The five remaining are Forty Mile Light, Point Aux Barques, Point Sanilac, and Sturgeon Point in Michigan on Lake Huron and Dunkirk in New York on Lake Erie. Capt. Tim Sullivan and Lt. Cmdr. Bob Desh of the Coast Guard's Ninth District Aids to Navigation will be at the Second Annual Great Lakes Lighthouse Vessel in Alpena, Mich., on 11 Oct. to discuss the issue. Desh will also make a presentation on the lighthouses at 1900 11 Oct. For information, contact Desh at 216-902-6065 or Lt. J.G. Henige at 216-902-6066.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 17

EVA DESGAGNES was launched September 17, 1955 as a) GRIFFON (2) for Beaconsfield Steamship Ltd., Montreal, Que.

On September 17, 1985, PATERSON suffered a crank case explosion as she was bound for Quebec City from Montreal. She was repaired and cleared on September 21.

Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Grain rush in full swing

09/16:
Duluth's AGP grain elevator handles only a handful of ships each season, but it's due to take back-to-back callers this week. Federal Fuji is loading there on Sept. 15-16. The saltie Marillis T is anchored off Duluth and due to arrive at AGP as soon as the Fuji clears.

Another unusual grain load is taking place at the old Great Northern elevator (now apparently leased by General Mills) in Superior. The Federal Fraser pulled into the slip Sept. 15. The Fraser is easily the largest ship to ever call at this old elevator, which is immediately adjacent to Midwest Energy Terminal. In a good year it might see three or four ships.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - September 16

At about 8:30 a.m. Sunday, September 16, 1990 the inbound motor ship BUFFALO passed close by while JUPITER was unloading unleaded gasoline at the Total Petroleum dock in the Saginaw River near Bay City, MI. The suction of BUFFALO's propellers caused the JUPITER, which was facing upriver, to pull away from the dock. As a result the aft pilings broke off and the fuel lines parted which caused a spark and ignited the spilled fuel. At the time 22,000 barrels of a total of 54,000 barrels were still aboard. Flames catapulted over 100 feet high filling the air with smoke that could be seen for 50 miles. The fire was still burning the next morning when a six man crew from Williams, Boots & Coots Firefighters and Hazard Control Specialists of Port Neches, TX arrived to fight the fire. By Monday afternoon they extinguished the fire only to have it re-ignite that night resulting in multiple explosions. Not until Tuesday morning on the 18th was the fire finally subdued with the assistance of the U.S. Coast Guard's BRAMBLE and BRISTOL BAY. The tanker, which was valued at $9 million, was declared a total constructive loss, though the engine room was relatively untouched. Unfortunately the fire claimed the life of one crew member who drowned attempting to swim ashore. As a result the Coast Guard closed the river to all navigation. On October 19th the river was opened to navigation after the Gaelic tugs SUSAN HOEY and CAROLYN HOEY towed the JUPITER up river to the Hirschfield & Sons dock at Bay City (formerly the DeFoe Shipyard) where a crane was erected for dismantling the burned out hulk. Her engines were removed and shipped to New Bedford, MA for future use. The river opening allowed American S.S.'s BUFFALO to depart the LaFarge dock where she had been trapped since the explosion. JUPITER's dismantling was completed over the winter of 1990-91.

P & H purchased all nine of the Soo River's fleet on September 16, 1982 for a reported C$2.5 million and all nine returned to service, although only four were running at the end of the season.

NORISLE went into service September 16, 1946 as the first Canadian passenger ship commissioned since the NORONIC's commissioning in 1913.

On September 16, 1952, the Cason J. Callaway departed River Rouge, Michigan for Duluth on its maiden voyage.

Data from: Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Cruise Ship enters system

09/15:
The passenger liner C. Columbus -BAH. is in the Lower St lawrence River heading for Quebec City, and reported at 7 am - eta Escoumains Pilot 0915/1200. -right on schedule for her visit to the Great Lakes

Reported by: John Whitehead




Unusual calls for the USS fleet

09/15:
Vessels from Great Lakes Fleet are showing up in some unusual places this week. Arthur M. Anderson was in Escanaba Sept. 14; Philip R. Clarke was in Silver Bay Sept. 14; John G. Munson will be way up the St. Louis River Sept. 16 to unload at the Reiss Inland dock in Duluth

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - September 15

On September 15, 1985 the HON. PAUL MARTIN loaded a cargo of gypsum at Halifax, N.S. for delivery to Tampa, FL and New Orleans, LA. A problem occurred while unloading gypsum. She proceeded to Port Weller Dry Docks at St. Catharines, Ont. on June 24, 1988 for repairs. After repairs were completed, the MARTIN was being assisted from the dry dock on September 23rd when the tug JAMES E. McGRATH was swamped and sunk by the MARTIN's prop wash. The crew of two were saved and the tug was raised the following day.

The A.H. FERBERT (2) was towed out of Duluth by the Sandrin tug GLENADA September 15, 1987, they encountered rough weather on Lake Superior and required the assistance of the tug W.J. IVAN PURVIS to reach the Soo on the 19th. On September 21st the FERBERT had to anchor off Detour, MI after she had run aground in the St. Marys River when her towline parted. Her hull was punctured and required inspection by the U.S. Coast Guard which ordered repairs to her hull before she could continue. Again problems struck on September 24th, when the FERBERT went hard aground at the Cut-Off Channel's southeast bend of the St. Clair River. Six tugs, GLENADA, ELMORE M. MISNER, BARBARA ANN, GLENSIDE, SHANNON and WM. A. WHITNEY, worked until late on the 26th to free her. The FERBERT finally arrived in tow of GLENSIDE and W.N. TWOLAN at Lauzon, Que. on October 7th.

The FERNGLEN was launched September 15, 1917 as a) WILLIAM A. AMBERG.

On September 15, 1925 the JOHN A. TOPPING left River Rouge light on her maiden voyage to Ashland, WI to load iron ore for delivery to Cleveland, OH.

September 15th lightering was completed on the AUGUST ZIESING, she had grounded above the Rock Cut two days earlier blocking the channel.

The MESQUITE was commissioned on August 27, 1943 and served on the Pacific Ocean in the 7th Fleet September 15, 1959 was the last day the U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tender MESQUITE was stationed at Sault Ste. Marie, MI.

MIDDLETOWN suffered a fire in her tunnels on September 15, 1986. 2nd & 3rd degree burns were suffered by two crewmembers.



Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Canada to change liability limit

09/14:
On 9 Sept., Canadian Transport Minister David Collenette signed the May 1996 protocol to amend the 1976 Convention on Limitation of Liability for Maritime Claims in London. As a result, the Canada Shipping Act, which bases its liability limitation on the International Convention Relating to the Limitation of Liability of Owners of Sea-Going Vessels on 1957, will be revised. Under the protocol, the maximum compensation abailable for claimants will increase.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Grampa Woo III calls on Lakehead

09/14:
The Grampa Woo III will arrive in Thunder Bay a week early. The cruise ship was to start a series of fall trips between Grand Portage, Minnesota and Thunder Bay September 20th. However, Captain Dana Kollars says the trip is so popular, they've added two more visits. The first is this weekend with the second additional trip scheduled for September 17, 18. While in Thunder Bay, passengers will stay at the Prince Arthur Hotel. Shore excursions include a visit to Silver Islet on the Sleeping Giant penninsula. The Grampa Woo III is the replacement ship for the Grampa Woo II which was destroyed during a viscious storm last fall. Kollars bought the new ship which had been the Southern Comfort. He shrugs off lore against renaming a ship by saying he's countered that with good luck traditions like tossing salt over the shoulder and putting a coin in the bilge. Kollars is looking forward to meeting Captain Garry Dawson and the crew of the tugboat Glenada. They're the ones who braved 20-foot waves to rescue Kollars and his first mate during the storm that claimed the Grampa woo II.

Reported by: Richard Boon




Cort gives Boatwatchers a treat

09/14:
Boatwatchers in Duluth got a rare treat Sept. 13 when Stewart J. Cort sailed through the Duluth piers before tying up at the port terminal. The Cort, which almost always uses the Superior entry, was waiting for Indiana Harbor to load at the BNSF ore dock.

Reported by: Al Miller




Canada to change liability limit

09/14:
On 9 Sept., Canadian Transport Minister David Collenette signed the May 1996 protocol to amend the 1976 Convention on Limitation of Liability for Maritime Claims in London. As a result, the Canada Shipping Act, which bases its liability limitation on the International Convention Relating to the Limitation of Liability of Owners of Sea-Going Vessels on 1957, will be revised. Under the protocol, the maximum compensation abailable for claimants will increase.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





HMCS Shawinigan tied up in Thunder Bay

09/14:
One of Canada's newest warships, the HMCS Shawinigan has been in the Port of Thunder Bay since Thursday, September 11. While in port, it will provide training exercises for local sea cadets. On Saturday, September 13, the ship will be open for public tours and will also host a private reception. The Shawinigan is tentatively scheduled to ship out on Monday, September 15.

Reported by: Richard Boon




Today in Great Lakes History - September 14

The CLARENCE B. RANDALL (2) was launched September 14, 1907 as a) J.J. SULLIVAN for the Superior Steamship Co.



Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
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Today in Great Lakes History - September 13

The EDMUND FITZGERALD's sea trials occurred on September 13th.

Tthe HOFFMAN (United States Army Corps of Engineers Twin Screw Hopper Dredge) collided with the Japanese salty KUNISHIMA MARU at Toledo, OH, September 13, 1962. Reportedly the blame was placed on the pilot of the Japanese salty. Apparently the damage was minor.

On September 13, 1968 the AUGUST ZIESING grounded in fog two-hundred yards above the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River. The grounded vessel swung into the shipping channel blocking it until September 15th when lightering was completed.



Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
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Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Toledo

09/12:
The Great Lakes Maririme Academy will have a representative in Toledo on Saturday September 13. If you have an interest in attending the Academy or are just curious about their program please stop by the S.S. Willis B Boyer "Maritime Market" from 10am to 5pm.

Reported by: Gary Schweitzer




Today in Great Lakes History - September 12

The ROGER BLOUGH was laid up at Sturgeon Bay, WI from September 12, 1981 through 1986 because of economic conditions.

CANADIAN PIONEER was christened at Port Weller on September 12, 1981 by Louise Powis, wife of the Chairman and President of Noranda Mines.

CARTIERCLIFFE HALL was towed by the tug WILFRED M. COHEN to Collingwood, Ont. for repairs from a June 5th fire and arrived at Collingwood on September 12, 1979.

Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Limited at Collingwood, Ontario closed the yard on September 12, 1986 after 103 years of shipbuilding. She was famous for her spectacular side launches. 214 ships were built at Collingwood.

While unloading steel in South Chicago from the CANADA MARQUIS on September 12, 1988, a shoreside crane lifting a payloader into the hold, collapsed onto the ship. CANADA MARQUIS had a hole in her tank top and damage to her hatch coaming.

Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




S.T. Crapo tow making progress

09/11:
The S.T.CRAPO tow was due at lake St.Clair crib light at 7:10 yesterday morning. The tow was running about one hour slower than regular traffic. According to Sarnia Traffic it was taking 3 1/2 hrs from Grassy Island to the crib light.

Later in the day it was a somber moment in Marysville, as about a dozen boat watchers watched the tow of the CRAPO go by. The group preceded to follow it under the Blue Water Bridge. Sort of a mini funeral prosection.

Reported by: Andrew Severson




Sloan working Lake Erie ports

09/11:
George A. Sloan is on the Lake Erie run for the next few days. It's scheduled to call in Buffalo Sept. 11 before proceeding to Port Colborne and then to Cleveland.

Reported by: Al Miller




August Coal Shipments From Lake Erie

09/11:
The Lake Erie ports of Toledo, Sandusky, Ashtabula and Conneaut shipped 2,767,135 net tons of coal in August, the highest monthly total since the 1991 navigation season. Compared to a year ago, August loadings were up 22.4 percent.

For the season, coal loadings at Ohio's Lake Erie ports stand at 12,031,507 net tons, an increase of 27.1 percent compared to last year.

Reported by: The Lake Carriers Association




Today in Great Lakes History - September 11

CANADA MARQUIS departed Halifax bound for Philadelphia with a cargo of grain. The HON. PAUL MARTIN departed Halifax the same day on her way to Tampa with a load of gypsum.

The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (1) was patched and refloated on September 11, 1944. She had sunk in 80 feet of water after a collision with the steamer D.M. CLEMSON (2) , 1 7/8 miles, 79 degrees off Old Point Light, at 2:50 a.m. on June 15, 1943. The HUMPHREY was downbound in the fog shrouded Straits of Mackinac with 13,992 tons of ore for South Chicago, IL. Thirty-one of the crew were rescued by the steamer LAGONDA, the remaining eight by the CLEMSON. Kinsman abandoned the HUMPHREY to the underwriters as a total loss for $860,000. A contract for salvaging the wreck was awarded to Captain John Roen of Sturgeon Bay, WI in late October, 1943 to either remove the wreck by October 1, 1944 or demolish it in order to maintain a clearance of 35 feet of water over her deck. The first step was to salvage as much of the cargo as possible. About 8,000 tons of ore were lightered from a depth of 80 feet by clamshell bucket before winter ice formed. The cargo was sold to Algoma Steel Co. at the Canadian Soo. On May 6, 1944 the barges MAITLAND NO.1 and HILDA were employed as pontoons which were positioned over the sunken hull. Cables were attached to the HUMPHREY's hull and to the barges. The hull was raised through a series of lifts which allowed it to be brought into shallower water. Partial buoyancy was provided by the HUMPHREY's ballast tanks which were pumped out to about 25% of capacity. The HUMPHREY was patched and refloated on September 11, 1944. She was taken to the Manitowoc Ship Building Co., Manitowoc, WI first for an estimate of repairs which totaled $469,400, and then was towed to Sturgeon Bay by the tug JOHN ROEN III arriving there on September 9th. for reconditioning which was completed at a reported cost of $437,000. Captain John Roen's Roen Transportation Co. assumed ownership on September 18, 1944 and the next year the ship was renamed b) CAPTAIN JOHN ROEN. She re-entered service on May 1, 1945 chartered to the Pioneer Steamship Co., managed by Hutchinson & Co. on a commission basis.

On September 11, 1987 while in lay-up at Point Edward, the FORT YORK caught fire which gutted her bridge.

The HORACE JOHNSON sailed on her maiden voyage light from Lorain September 11, 1929 bound for Two Harbors, MN to load iron ore.



Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Seaway Bulk Carriers Gearing Up For Grain Rush

09/10:
With the re-activation of ACM's ALGOISLE on September 8, and ULS's CANADIAN MARINER this past weekend, Seaway Bulk Carriers is gearing up for the autumn grain rush.

Seaway Bulk Carriers operate 24 straight deck bulk carriers. On Tuesday, September 9, nineteen were in service, leaving the following 5 in inactive:

MONTREALAIS Port Weller Dry Docks
SEAWAY QUEEN Toronto
ALGOGULF Montreal
ALGORIVER Montreal
ALGOSOUND Thunder Bay

ALGOGULF, ALGORIVER, and SEAWAY QUEEN have yet to operate this year, while both ALGOSOUND and MONTREALAIS were used briefly during the summer.

Incidently, the reports on the Canadian side indicate that the 1997 grain harvests in Canada are far better than last year's. The bean crops should begin being harvested in October, or late September at the earliest, and they too appear to be headed for a banner year.

Last year, all 24 vessels operated by S.B.C. saw at least some work, so it is hopeful that the remaining 5 inactive ships will operate in 1997.

Reported by: Mark Jackson




U.S. Stone Ports Up 2.6% In August

09/10:
U.S. Stone Ports Up 2.6% In August The eight U.S. stone shipping ports on the Great Lakes loaded 4,359,141 net tons in August, an increase of 2.6 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. For the season, stone shipments from U.S. ports stand at 19.6 million tons, an increase of 9.8 percent.

Reported by: The Lake Carriers Association




M.V. ALGOISLE Departs Layup

09/10:
After being inactive since December 25, 1996, the M.V. ALGOISLE has finally departed her winter layup berth at Pier 10 in Hamilton.

The bunkering vessel HAMILTON ENERGY fueled the vessel on Monday, September 8, and ALGOISLE departed shortly after.

She was upbound the Welland Canal early on Tuesday Sept. 9 in ballast. Her E.T.A. for Thunder Bay, Ontario is 0800 on September 12, to load for a St. Lawrence port.

ALGOISLE is the ex- SILVER ISLE that was built in 1963 at Verlome Cork Shipyards Ltd. in Cork, Ireland. She was owned by Mohawk Navigation from 1963 to 1980, and Pioneer Shipping from 1980 to 1991. She was added to the vessel pool of Great Lakes Bulk Carriers, and operated for that company until the end of the 1993 shipping season. Algoma Central Marine purchased and renamed the vessel in 1994.

Reported by: Mark Jackson




Today in Great Lakes History - September 10

The METEOR (2) was towed from Manitowoc by the tug JOHN ROEN IV to Superior on September 10, 1972.

The Harry Coulby (now Kinsman Enterprise) turns 70 years old on September 10. When she entered service on this date in 1927, the 631-foot bulk freighter was the third largest on the Great Lakes.

While upbound in the Welland Canal on September 9, 1986 it was noted that the port anchor of the J.W. McGIFFON was missing, her chain was almost touching the water.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News from around the lakes

09/09:
The Wolf River, built in 1956 as Tecumseh and which later sailed as the New York News and Stella Desgagnes, was towed deadship up through the Soo August 31 by the tug Peninsula. After a brief stop for fuel at Government Dock in Soo, Canada, the two locked upbound around midnight, destination Thunder Bay. The pair are owned by Gravel and Lake Services of Thunder Bay. The Wolf River has a fairly fresh coat of black hull paint, her cabin and stack are plain white. Reports indicate the pair may be used in some cross-lake cargo service.

A visit to the LaFarge dock in Saginaw Sept. 4 found the E.M. Ford with a fresh coat of paint on the majority of her starboard side. Evidence of other cosmetic work could also be seen, leanding some credit to rumors she may come out to celebrate her centennial.

A report from the Sturgeon Bay area indicates the J.L. Mauthe's barge conversion may not be ready for service until spring. Predictions earlier this year indicated the job woud be done by fall.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




S.T. Crapo ready for tow

09/09:
The S. T. Crapo tow is ready to depart Cleveland. Her tow to Green Bay was to take place either yesterday afternoon or this morning. Reports yesterday had her moving down river to unload her storage cargo and then returning to her collision bend berth. A large air-compressor was on her deck. There were also some workers checking the operation of her mast and running lights.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde and Bob Martel




ULS Canadian Mariner underway

09/09:
Upper Lakes Group Canadian Mariner was upbound in the Welland enroute to Thunder Bay, on Sat. 6 Sept. This marks the first trip since going aground in June in the American Narrows. (1000 Island section.) (That trip marked the 1st since coming out of Port Weller and her 5 year inspection.)

Reported by: J. J. Van Volkenburg




Rare salty call in Duluth

09/09: Regina Oldendorff arrived in Duluth on Sept. 7 and proceeded to the port terminal, where Sept. 8 it was unloading steel coils. The Oldendorff is one of the few salties to call at the terminal this year.

Reported by: Al Miller




Seaway East News

09/09:
First information on the new Joint Nedlloyd-PO-Sealand-Maersk weekly Container Service to Montreal can be found on the Maersk website at http//www.maersk.com. Vessels for this weekly year round service include Maersk Montreal, Maersk Toronto and a third TBA. The first vessel departs Rotterdam on Sept 10 and is scheduled to arrive Montreal Sept 18

The Elan Vital-CYP '93-16,075 grt is in Montreal at Section 50 preparing for service with Christensen Canadian African Line. Although already renamed THORSRIVER, this name will not be used by reporting agencies until she makes her first movement, currently scheduled for Sept 12. Under a former name of KOVROV-RUS she was arrested after arrival in Tahiti May09/96 and sold under auction within 2 weeks. She is listed in LLoyds index as a roll on/roll off vessel and is equipped with a stern quarter lifting ramp and side doors.

After a quiet summer with little news on her activites in the Lakes the hospital ship CARIBBEAN MERCY-PAN will transit the Eastern Seaway tomorrow on her way to Sea

Reported by: John Whitehead




Vessel assignments for new service

09/09:
Maersk Line, P&O Nedlloyd Container Line Ltd. and Sea-Land Service Inc., which will begin a container service between northern Europe and Canada this month, have announced vessel assignments. The weekly container service will use three ice-class containerships with 1,000-TEU capacity. Two will be operated by Maersk Line and one will be operated by Sea-Land Service with P&O Nedlloyd Container Line purchasing slots. Calls will be made at Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Bremerhaven, Germany; Felixstowe, England; and Montreal.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 09

The WOLVERINE (4) was launched September 9, 1974 for the Union Commerce Bank (Ohio), Trustee (Oglebay Norton Co., mgr.), Cleveland, OH.

DETROIT EDISON (2) was launched September 9, 1954 as a) DETROIT EDISON (2) for the American Steamship Co. (Boland & Cornelius, mgr.) Buffalo, NY.

The Steamer Pere Marquette #18 sank on September 9, 1910 with a loss of 29 lives. No cause for the sinking has ever been determined. The Pere Marquette #17 picked up 33 survivors, losing 2 of her own crew during the rescue.



Data from: Max S. Hanley, and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
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U.S. Coast Guard orders four more tenders

09/08:
The U.S. Coast Guard announced 5 Sept. that Marinette Marine Corp. in Marinette, Wis., has received a U.S.$50 million contract to build four more Ida Lewis-class Coastal Buoy Tenders. Under the contract for the lead ship awarded 22 June, 1993, 13 options were included. The order announced 5 Sept. are the last four of these options, for a class of 14 ships. Construction of the last four will begin this year for delivery between 2000 and 2002.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Rare Appearance in Duluth

09/08:
J.A.W. Iglehart made a rare appearance in Duluth on Sept. 6 when it was seen unloading at the Lafarge Cement Terminal. Once a regular on the Duluth-Superior run, the ship has been rarely seen up here for the past two seasons. The Alpena has been handling most of the duty along with a few visits from the tug/barge Integrity and Jacklyn M.

Reported by: Al Miller




Oglebay Norton Increases Quarterly Dividend

09/08:
Directors of Oglebay Norton Company at a meeting held August 27, 1997, approved a $0.05 (14.3%) per share dividend increase by declaring a cash dividend of $.40 per share of common stock to be paid September 26, 1997 to stockholders of record on September 9, 1997.

Separately, the directors of Oglebay Norton Company authorized a 2-for-1 split of the Company's common stock, which will be effected through a 100% stock dividend at the rate of one share of common stock for each current share of common stock held. The stock dividend will be made on October 30, 1997 to stockholders of record on October 10, 1997.

According to R. Thomas Green, Jr., Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Oglebay Norton Company, ``The strong operating results posted by the Company to date, along with the increase in the price of the Company's common stock warrants the increase in the cash dividend. That increase, along with the 2-for-1 stock split declared today, is a result of the Company's continued drive to increase returns and liquidity for its investors.''

Reported by: James Neumiller




Medusa Acquires White Stone Company

09/08:
Medusa Corporation announced Aug. 28 that it had acquired White Stone Company of Southwest Virginia (``White Stone''), a privately owned industrial limestone and aggregates producer based in Castlewood, Virginia. White Stone also operates a limestone pelletizing plant in Paradise, Pennsylvania. Terms of the cash transaction were not disclosed.

White Stone is a leading producer of home and garden products and other industrial limestone products in certain Mid-Atlantic markets and the Southeast. White Stone is also a leading producer of construction aggregates in Southwest Virginia. White Stone home & garden products include the White's Pelletized Limestone, White's Pulverized Limestone, White's Pelletized Gypsum, White's Micro-pellet Limestone and White's Micro-pellet Gypsum brands.

The combination of White Stone with Medusa operations in Thomasville, Pennsylvania, and Sparta, New Jersey will give Medusa significant added presence in lawn & garden and industrial limestone products in the Eastern half of the country. The White Stone acquisition represents another step in Medusa's strategy to grow in these market segments. As previously announced, Lime Crest Corporation, based in Sparta, New Jersey was acquired in January 1997. Medusa anticipates that its expanded geographic presence will provide customers of both Medusa and White Stone with a broader range of products at a higher level of service.

Medusa Corporation produces and sells portland and masonry cements; mines, processes, and sells construction aggregates, lawn & garden and industrial limestone products; and provides construction services for highway safety. Medusa operations are principally in the eastern half of the United States with strong market positions in the Great Lakes and Southeast regions.

Reported by: James Neumiller




Carey reappointed to commission

09/08:
William C. Carey, a former aide to the late Henry Maier, a longtime mayor of Milwaukee, has been reappointed by Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson as the state's representative to the Great Lakes Compact Commission. The appointment is for four years. Carey was initially appointed in 1992. The commission promotes development, use and conservation of the water of the Canadian/U.S. Great Lakes.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 08

The GEMINI sailed on her maiden voyage in August 1978 from the shipyard to load fuel oil at Baytown, TX, for delivery at Detroit, MI. Passing upbound the next month on September 8th through the Welland Canal, GEMINI became the largest U.S. flagged tanker on the Great Lakes with a capacity of 76,000 barrels.

The W.E. FITZGERALD was launched September 8, 1906 for the Chicago Navigation Co., Chicago, IL (D. Sullivan, mgr.).

The W.W. HOLLOWAY was launched September 8, 1906 as the straight decker a) HENRY A. HAWGOOD for Minerva Steamship Co. (W.A. & H.A. Hawgood, mgr.), Cleveland.

The RADIANT departed the shipyard September 8, 1913 light on her maiden voyage bound for Montreal, Que.

On September 8, 1985 the downbound the Panamanian NORCHEM collided with the upbound CANADIAN PROSPECTOR near Kanawake. PROSPECTOR had little damage but NORCHEM was ripped open near her port anchor.

On Sept. 7, 1921, D.G. KERR loaded 12,507 gross tons in 16 and 1/2 minutes at the Duluth & Iron Range Railway dock in Two Harbors.

Data from: James Neumiller, Al Miller, and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




New seaway toll postponed

09/06:
Canada has decided to delay a planned toll increase for ships using the St. Lawrence Seaway. Instead, it will work to complete negotiations with an industry group seeking to control the Canadian operations of the seaway. A toll increase of 2.5 percent was to have been put in place 1 Aug. Rates have been frozen since 1994.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Passenger liner Season Opens and Canadian Navy visits

09/06:
The 1997 Montreal Passenger ship Season opened with a visit from the 56,000 ton dutch vessel Westerdam . Other vessels scheduled to make one or more visits this year are: Crystal Symphony, Royal Princess, Silver Cloud, Seabourn Pride, Astor, Dreamward, Astra 11, and the new vessel Columbus which is currently scheduled to arrive and depart Montreal 0900 & 2400 on September 17th, and 0800 & 2200 October 21th. In between these dates she will be making several Great Lakes cruises

Canadian Navy Visits
The new ship HMCS Shawinigan entered the St Lawrence Seaway yesterday evening for points west.She is the seventh Canadian naval vessel to enter the Seaway and Great Lakes this year.

Reported by: John Whitehead




New contract for Canada Steamship Lines

09/06: Steel Dynamics, Inc. announced Thursday that its wholly owned subsidiary, Iron Dynamics, Inc. (IDI) has finalized and executed several major contracts related to its project to build a scrap substitute production facility at Butler, Indiana. For IDI's first reduced iron module at Butler, Indiana, IDI has finalized long term contracts with Quebec Cartier Mining Company to supply iron ore concentrate from the Mt Wright and Port Cartier operations in Quebec; U.S. Steel Mining Company, LLC to supply coal from the Pinnacle Coal Mine in West Virginia; Canada Steamship Lines Inc. of Montreal to provide self-unloader vessel transportation of iron ore concentrates from Port Cartier, Quebec to Lake Erie ports; and Norfolk Southern Railway Company to provide rail transportation of iron ore concentrate and coal to IDI's facility at Butler, Indiana.

Reported by: James Neumiller




New grain terminal at Hamilton

09/06:
James Richardson International will build an 18,000-ton capacity grain terminal at Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The terminal will handle maize, soybeans and wheat grown in Ontario.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 06

The S.S. Badger was launched on September 6, 1952, at Sturgeon Bay, WI. In a christening ceremony that included the S.S. Spartan (launched earlier that year). The S.S. Badger was named in honor of the University of Wisconsin. The Badger was built by Christy Corporation, and is powered by two Skinner 4 cylinder Steeple Compound Unaflow Marine Steam engines, developing over 7,000 horsepower. She was the last of the large, coal-fired steamers to be built in the United States, and the only ship of her type still operating on the Great Lakes. The S.S. Badger offers seasonal passenger service from Ludington, MI to Manitowoc, WI from mid May to early October.

The BELLE RIVER began her maiden voyage when she loaded 56,073 long tons of western coal at Superior, WI on August 31, 1977 and arrived at Edison CO's Belle River power plant at Recors Point on September 6, 1977. today sails as: b) WALTER J. McCARTHY JR.

On Sunday morning September 6, 1990 at approximately 0800, the BUFFALO, traveling upstream on the Saginaw River, passed the JUPITER which was unloading gasoline at the Total Petroleum dock near Bay City, MI. The ship's passing caused a suction which pulled the JUPITER away from the dock. The aft pilings subsequently broke away and the parting fuel lines caused a spark which resulted in a fire which totally destroyed the tanker. One of the JUPITER's crew was lost overboard.

On September 6, 1992 the H. LEE WHITE was in tow of the "G" tugs COLORADO and LOUISIANA entering the Trenton Channel when she struck a section of the toll bridge at Grosse Ile, MI knocking down a 150 foot span immediately east of the main river channel. The WHITE was not damaged but a new section of the bridge had to be installed at a cost of $1.7 million. The bridge was back in service in late January, 1993.

The CHARLES E. WILSON completed her sea trials on September 6th.

The GEORGIAN BAY collided with the steamer CHARLES HUBBARD in the fog-covered lower St. Marys River September 6, 1955.

On September 6, 1989 the Twin Screw Rail Car Ferry GRAND RAPIDS left Muskegon in tow of the tugs ANGLIAN LADY and PRINCESS NO.1 and arrived at Port Maitland, Ont. on September llth. Scrapping was completed in the fall of 1994.

Data from: Max S. Hanley, and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Grain rush in theTwin Ports

09/05:
t's becoming difficult to tell the players without a scorecard as the fall grain rush begins in the Twin Ports. Canadian Provider and Algonorth departed with grain Sept. 3. Meanwhile, Kinsman Independent arrived to load at Harvest States 1, LT Argosy is loading at Peavey Connors Point and Wartanes is loading at Cargill. Anchored on Lake Superior waiting for a grain berth are Algoville (waiting for Harvest States), Yuriy Dolgurukiy (waiting for Harvest States) and Canadian Miner.

Reported by: Al Miller




Expansion of Wisconsin spoils dump denied

09/05:
New uses are being sought for Wisconsin's Renard Isle dump, a 22-hectare/55-acre site containing spoils from dredging, after an adminstrative law judge denied an application for a water quality permit as part of an expansion plan. Suggestions have included a golf course or a public park. The dump, off Bay Beach Park in Green Bay, Wis., contains toxic spoils from the nearby Fox River and lower Green Bay channels. The Brown County (Wis.) Harbor Commission and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had proposed expanding the site to 70.4 hectares/176 acres at a cost of U.S.$20 million. The water quality permit was part of the clearances necessary for the project. Due to the lack of places to dump spoils, dredging in Brown County has decreased from 357,000 cubic meters/470,000 cubic yards annually to less than 114,000 cubic meters/150,000 cubic yards.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





U.S. Coast Guard tender transferred to Estonia

09/05:
The U.S. Coast Guard's Balsam-class Seagoing Buoy Tender Bittersweet (WLB 389), which was decommissioned 18 Aug., will be transferred to Estonia during a ceremony 1300 5 Sept. at Woods Hole, Mass. Renamed the Valvas, the ship will sail Estonian territorial waters undertaking border patrol, law enforcement, search and rescue and icebreaking. The Estonian crew has been undergoing training and familiarlization since the ship was decommissioned. The tender was laid down 16 Sept., 1943, and launched 11 Nov., 1943, at Duluth Iron & Shipbuilding Co. in Duluth, Minn. It was commissioned 11 May, 1944.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 05

On September 5, 1964, the 730-foot bulk freighter Leecliffe Hall sank after colliding with the Greek ocean vessel Appolonia in the St. Lawrence River.

The CHI-CHEEMAUN completed her sea trials on September 5, 1974 and then cleared the shipyard on September 26th.

The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS cleared Lorain on her maiden voyage September 5, 1942.

The MORGAN, JR. returned to service September 5, 1948 after repairs suffered in an accident in June.

The NEW QUEDOC arrived at McLouth Steel, Trenton, MI on her maiden voyage September 5, 1960 with a load of Labrador iron ore.

The WYANDOTTE (2) was towed down the Welland Canal on September 5th & 6th on her way to the cutter torch.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Crapo to Greenbay

09/04:
Weather permiting, the Great Lakes Towing tug Ohio is scheduled to tow the S.T. Crapo out of Cleveland Thursday and take it to Green Bay. The Crapo has been layed up in Cleveland ever since the ILM officers walked off the LaFarge boats in early September1996. The Crapo will be used for cement storage in Green Bay.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




News from the Seaway

09/04:
Coastal shipping
The Algoport and Nanticoke arrived in Montreal today and are discharging. They are both classified by the Port of Montreal as "coastal" (appropriately) versus the usual "inland" category given to Lakers

The Isle of Man registered ex German Tanker Weserstern, 5480grt,is discharging at Ultramar in Montreal East after arriving from overseas. Similar in style to Canadian coasters Jade, Emerald and Diamond Star but smaller, this vessel is to become Canadian registered, with a "star" name and be active in the coastal trade soon, along with a larger sister Isarstern.

Ocean Shipping
The Elan Vital-CYP, 16075 grt, arrived in Montreal yesterday and was renamed Thorsriver-GRK. This appears to be a replacement vessel for Christensens' Canadian African service. She may make a Seaway voyage before departing for sea on Sept 12.

The Markborg-NED, 1996, is expected to depart Montreal Sept 04 and enter the Seaway for the first time.The Misty-WIN, and Admiral Ushakov-RUS, are also expected to make a Seaway trip. in the next few days The Wana Maree-THAI, is due at Montreal anchorage for Seaway clearance on Sep 05. The Captain Christos-PAN, is departing for the Seaway from Sorel momentarily

In response to an e-mail sent to the submarine HMCS Okanagan, on behalf of the Montreal Boat Paparazzi re her itinery for the trip from Toronto to Montreal, they have replied she will be between Iroquois lock and Montreal from 0600 to 2200 Sep 04.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Algoma Awards C$5.5 Million For Refit of M/V ALGORAIL

09/04:
Algoma Central Marine, St. Catharines, Ontario, has awarded a C$5.5 million contract to Port Weller Dry Docks for a major refit of the self-unloader M/V ALGORAIL. Improvements to the ALGORAIL are part of Algoma's C$85 million modernization program for its 23-vessel fleet. In addition to the Port Weller refit, other improvements to the ALGORAIL during the winter works program will bring the total investment this year in the ship to C$7.2 million.

Tim Dool, vice president, marine group, said that the investment in the ALGORAIL demonstrates the company's confidence in Port Weller Dry Docks, and in the long-term viability of Great Lakes shipping. He said that this investment will ensure the ALGORAIL will serve Algoma's customers well for the next 20 years. This is the second modernization of this type for the Algoma fleet. Last year, the mv. ALGOWAY underwent a similar mid-life refit at Port Weller.

The ALGORAIL will arrive at Port Weller December 3. A new patent-pending gate, designed by Algoma in cooperation with EMS-Tech, Inc., Belleville. On will be installed, making ALGORAIL the first ship in the Algoma fleet with this unique innovation. The self-unloading boom cable-hoisting system will be replaced with a new hydraulic hoisting system, offering increased reliability and ease of maintenance. major components in the cargo holds will be replaced, the hydraulic and electrical systems in the tunnels renewed, and a Garland roller system installed.

ALGORAIL will also be fitted with wash water holding tanks, which offer both environmental and economical advantages. The ship will be delivered April 3, 1998 to coincide with the beginning of the Great Lakes shipping season.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Big Ten in Ludington

09/04:
It was a "Big Ten" day in Ludington this Labor Day. In port at the same time were the Badger, Spartan and Wolverine.

Reported by: Jim Bearman




Western Coal Trade Continues To Outpace Last Year

09/04:
Coal shipments from Superior Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior, Wisconsin, totaled 1,750,855 net tons in August, an increase of 3.6 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. For the season, coal loadings at SMET stand at 8.3 million tons, an increase of 10.5 percent

Reported by: The Lake Carriers Association




Update on The E.M. Ford

09/03:
It was reported last month that the E.M. Ford would sail this year, as we head into fall this does not look like it will happen. However, if demand warrents, she'll run next year for at least a few months in honor of 100th birthday.

Reported by: D. Ocean




Oakglen and Mapleglen in the News

09/03:
P + H 's Oakglen was anchored off Port Colborne Monday from 07:00- 17:00 hours waiting for the Port Colborne Fuel Dock. The Thelassa Desgagnas was unloading fuel at the Shell dock.

The Mapleglen which has been in drydock since the first week of August at Port Weller was slated to come out yesterday
and pull up above Lock 1 and take on Ballast. She is slated to go to the Thunder Bay for Grain. It is believed that the Mapleglen will resume running from Thunderbay to St Lawrence Ports and The Oakglen will resume the shorter run from Thunder Bay to Owen Sound or Goderich.
Mapleglen x Algocape and Carol Lake 1960
Oakglen x T.R. McLagen 1954 (Last boat built at Midland, ON)

Reported by: J. J. Van Volkenburg




Twin Ports Reports

09/03:
Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior saw a string of unusual callers over the past several days. Armco was loading at the terminal Sept. 2 with coal bound for the power plant at Taconite Harbor. Algolake loaded at the terminal Sept. 1 and Canadian Enterprise is due in Sept. 3.
Arthur M. Anderson unloaded coal at Ashland, Wis., over the weekend then made a rare trip to Silver Bay on Sept. 2 to load.

Reported by: Al Miller




Nanticoke returns to St. Lawrence

09/03:
With the ballasting finished, of the Hibernia oil rig off Newfoundland (see story in News Archive dated 6/10/97), the Canada Steamship Lines NANTICOKE is returning to Montreal. She reported being in the St Lawrence Gulf on passage west for Montreal and expected to arrive at Escoumains Pilot 0903/0015

Reported by: John Whitehead




September 1 Vessel Report

09/03:
On September 1, U.S.-Flag Great Lakes carriers had 64 of their 70 ships and tug/barge units in service. This total represents a decrease of two ships compared to a year ago. As of the survey date, a 1,000-foot-long vessel is in the shipyard for repairs {BURNS HARBOR in the yard for a stern tube seal} and a cement carrier {PAUL H. TOWNSEND} is in short-term lay-up.

Vessels yet to see service this season are the straight-decker KINSMAN ENTERPRISE and the small cement carriers S. T. CRAPO and E. M. FORD. The ships can be activated if demand warrants. The idle cement carriers are presently holding storage cargos of cement.

The straight-decker J. L. MAUTHE is currently undergoing conversion to a self-unloading tug/barge at Bay Shipbuilding Company in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.

Reported by: The Lake Carriers Association




Dry-Bulk Trades top 17 Million Tons In July

09/03:
A record month for stone shipments and a strong coal float pushed the major Great Lakes dry-bulk trades to nearly 17.3 million tons in July, the highest monthly total recorded yet this season and an increase of 3.7 percent compared to the corresponding period last year.

Stone shipments from U.S. and Canadian ports totaled 4,980,154 net tons in July, the highest monthly total for the stone trade since LCA began its survey last decade. Spurred by strong demand from the construction industry, through July, the stone trade stands at 17.5 million tons, an increase of 13.3 percent compared to 1996's end-of-July tally.

Coal shipments in July neared 4.7 million tons, an increase of 16 percent. For the season, the coal trade stands at 17,256,626 tons, an increase of 20.1 percent. Increased demand from a Canadian utility is a major factor in coal's revival this season.

Iron ore shipments dipped slightly in July, totaling 7.6 million tons. While the July float represents a decrease of 3.7 percent, for the season, the ore trade is 2 percent ahead of last year's pace.

Reported by: The Lake Carriers Association




Mint Thrust departs Great Lakes

09/03:
The medium sized salty MINT THRUST, completed her Great Lakes voyage and has departed Montreal for Sea. She is offered up for charter on the west coast of South America on Sept 15th.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Today in Great Lakes History - September 03

On September 3, 1977, the Belle River (now Walter J. McCarthy, Jr.) set a Great Lakes record for coal when it loaded 62,802 tons of coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal on its maiden voyage. This record has since been surpassed many times.

On September 3, 1981, the U.S. Steel bulk freighter Sewell Avery was laid up for the final time in Duluth.

Keel laying ceremonies for the 437 foot bow section of the ROGER BLOUGH took place on September 3, 1968 and was float launched December 21, 1968 less ballast tanks because the existing dry dock wasn’t wide enough to accommodate her 105 foot width. In the mean time a new 125 foot wide dry dock at Lorain was being built and at its completion the keel for the full width stern section of Hull #900 was laid on December 29, 1969. The bow section was floated into the new dry dock on July 25, 1970 and was joined with the 421 foot stern section. The launch of the completed hull was scheduled for July, 1971 but a fire broke out in the engine room on June 24, 1971 killing four yard workers and extensively damaging her Pielstick diesel engines. Extensive repairs, which included replacement of both engines, delayed the launch for nearly a year. The vessel was moved out of the dry dock on June 3, 1972. She was christened June 5, 1972 as a) ROGER BLOUGH, honoring the retired Chairman of the Board of the United States Steel Corp. Sea trials began on June 9th.

SOODOC (b) AMELIA DESGAGNES ) departed on her maiden voyage when she loaded salt at Goderich, Ont. on September 3, 1976.

The SEWELL AVERY was laid up for the last time September 3, 1981 at Superior, WI.

The THOMAS LAMONT was cited for “exemplary service” by the U.S. Coast Guard. On September 3, 1981 for her role in the rescue of seventeen crew members from the burning CARTIERCLIFFE HALL on Lake Superior. The THOMAS LAMONT was laid up the last time at Duluth’s Hallett dock #6A.

The H.H. PORTER sailed on her maiden voyage September 3, 1920 light from Lorain to load iron ore at Two Harbors, MN.

On September 3, 1985, PHILIP R. CLARKE plowed into the Drawbridge Cove Marina in Lorain's Black River damaging 5-10 small craft and sinking one at the steel dock. CLARKE managed to stop before hitting the Route 6 drawbridge.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Collingwood-built ship to sail British Columbia

09/02:
Trevor Jones, a Canadian property developer, has formed Inside Passage Cruises, a passenger line that will sail Canada's inside passage between Vancouver Island and the British Columbia mainland. The line will use the Taverner (Canadian-registry 357-dwt passenger ferry) which had been operated by Marine Atlantic Inc. The vessel will receive a Canadian$7 million/U.S.$5 million refit in Vancouver, entering service in March as the Pacific Aurora. There will be berths for 70 to 80 people and a crew of 22 to 24. The Pacific Aurora will be registered in Canada and homeported at Prince Rupert, British Columbia. It will operate seasonally with a four to five-month lay-up during the winter. The connection to the Canadian/U.S. Great Lakes is that the Taverner was built in 1962 by Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd.'s Collingwood Shipyards Division in Collingwood, Ontario, Canada.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 02

ALGOSEA (built in 1970 by Lithgows Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland as Hull #1177) was launched on September 2, 1970 as a) BROOKNES for "Langra" Schiffahrsges G.m.b.H. & Co., Hamburg, Germany. She is now the c) SAUNIERE

ROBERT KOCH's first trip was on September 2, 1977 up the Welland Canal bound for Buffalo with cement.

The W.F WHITE was one of the earliest ships built as a self-unloader on the Great Lakes. On her maiden voyage September 2, 1915 the WHITE loaded coal at Erie, PA and sailed for Menominee, MI. She was the largest self-unloading bulk carrier on the Lakes at that time with a cargo capacity of 10,500 tons.

The RALPH H. WATSON departed light September 2, 1938 from Detroit, MI upbound to load iron ore at Duluth, MN. She was built as part of a fleet modernization plan for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH. of four new "GOVERNOR MILLER' class bulk carriers.

On September 2, 1938, the Ralph H. Watson, only the fourth steam turbine powered vessel on the Lakes, entered service.

HUBERT GAUCHER ran aground in the lower St. Lawrence on September 2, 1988. It took three tugs to free her, repairs took place at Quebec City.

ZIEMIA TARNOWSKA lost her engine while docking at Pier 24 in Cleveland, ramming the dock and caused about $100,000 in damage to the dock on September 2, 1988. The Polish vessel had minimal damage to her bulbous bow.



Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Grain rush ready to begin?

09/01:
The fall grain rush may be starting in the Twin Ports. Several vessels called for grain last week. On Aug. 30 Canadian Provider, Algoville and a Russian salty were anchored off Duluth waiting to load tuesday.

Reported by: Al Miller




Indiana Harbor update

09/01:
A couple of unusual callers at Indiana Harbor this weekend. Canadian Miner arrived on 8/29 for Inland Steel. Kaye E. Barker was unloading the evening of 8/31 at LTV Steel.

Reported by: Gary R. Clark




Apostle Islands Lighthouse Celebration

09/01:
The Apostle Islands Lighthouse Celebration will be held around Bayfield, Wis., from 3 to 7 Sept. Centering around six 19th century lighthouses in the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, activities will include tours, displays and a production of "Keeper of the Light" at Lake Superior Big Top Chautauqua. For information, telephone 715-779-5619.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Canadian Salt at Cutler

09/01:
CSL's Frontenac pulled into the Cutler-Magner dock in Duluth on Aug. 30 to unload salt. It was the third ship carrying Canadian salt to unload at Cutler in the past two weeks. Most of the dock's salt comes by Algoma boats.

Reported by: Al Miller




Maritime Days in Milwaukee

09/01:
The Bud Light Maritime Days - Taste of Wisconsin festival is underway in Milwaukee from 29 Aug. to 1 Sept. Several vessels are on display and open for tours, including the U.S. Coast Guard's Katmai Bay-class Icebreaking Tug U.S.C.G.C. Mobile Bay (WTGB 103).

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 01

Tragedy struck four days after the launch of the AGAWA CANYON, September 1, 1970, when the ship was rocked by an engine room explosion killing one of the crew and injuring seven more. The AGAWA CANYON entered service in November, 1970. New engines were fitted in 1975, equipped with four 10 cylinder, two stroke cycle, single acting opposed piston diesel engines, 203mm (8") bore x 254mm (10") stroke, built in 1970 by Fairbanks, Morse (Canada), Kingston, Ont. Total bhp 6,680. Rated service speed: 12 knots (13.8 mph).

LAKE NIPIGON was launched September 1, 1970 as a) TEMPLE BAR, BR.341240, for Lambert Bros. (Shipping) Ltd., London, England.

Upon her arrival at Quebec City on September 1, 1962, the LAKE WINNIPEG was the first vessel to enter the Nipigon Transport fleet.

ROGERS CITY (2) was launched September 1, 1923 as a) B.H. TAYLOR, the third self-unloader built for the Bradley Transportation Co., Rogers City, MI.

From September 1, 1947 to September 15, 1959 the MESQUITE was stationed at Sault Ste. Marie, MI

On August 31, 1977, the Walter J. McCarthy, Jr. (formerly Belle River) entered service, departing Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, for Superior.

In mid-August 1987 a paregrine falcon whom had disappeared from Regina, Saskatchewan two weeks earlier landed on the deck of a lake freighter on Lake Huron. The bird was captured and taken to a bird sanctuary in Vineland, Ontario. The vessel name is unknown.

In mid-August 1985, the Belgium saltie Federal Thames loaded 25,400 tons of low-concentrate chrome ore at Duluth's Hallett Dock and was bound for Sweden. This ore dates back to World War II when she was mined in Montana. Other shipments were to have been made later as well.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, and Ahoy & Farewell II

This is a small sample, the book includes many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





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