Great Lakes NEWS & RUMOR Archive

* Report News


Twin Ports Report

09/30:
All seven of the Twin Ports grain-loading berths remain occupied Sept. 30. This event may continue for another day if the current steady rain continues and delays loading. Several salties cleared port yesterday but more are coming, including Agamemnon and the familiar Lok Prem.

Kaye E. Barker may an unusual call in Duluth Sept. 30 to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal. Another infrequent caller, Fred R. White Jr., arrive Sept. 29 to unload at C. Reiss dock and then transfer to the DMIR ore dock.

Reported by: Al Miller




Two Lakers Still in Lay-up

09/30:
Contrary to popular belief the lakers Comeaudoc and Algogulf remain laid up in Montreal with no scheduled departure dates.

Reported by: John Whitehead




OOCL Belgium

09/30:
The OOCL Belgium, an ice-strengthened containership with a capacity of 2,800 TEUs, was christened for Orient Overseas Container Line at the Okpo shipyard of Daewoo Heavy Industries on Koje Island, South Korea, on 28 Sept. The ship will enter service between northern Europe and Montreal. It is designed to operate at temperatures as low as minus 40 degrees Celsius and features heated ballast tanks. The OOCL Belgium is classed by Lloyd's Register as Ice Class 1A.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 30

The 660 ft. forward section of the a)BELLE RIVER (b) WALTER J. McCARTHY, JR.) was side launched on September 30, 1976.

The ARTHUR SIMARD entered service on September 30, 1973 sailing to Montreal, Que. to load gasoline.

The GOVERNOR MILLER was towed down the Welland Canal on September 30, 1980 in tow of TUG MALCOLM, STORMONT and ARGUE MARTIN on her way to Quebec City.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY departed light on her maiden voyage from River Rouge on September 30, 1943 bound for Two Harbors, MN. to load iron ore.

On September 30, 1986 the Canadian Coast Guard veseel CARIBOU ISLE sturck a rock in Lake Huron's North Channel and began taking on water. CCG SAMUEL RISLEY arrived and helped patch the ship. The pair the departed for Parry Sound.

Data from: Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Toledo G-Tugs move to new dock

09/29:
After 50 years in the C & O coal dock in Oregon, OH the Great Lakes Towing Co. has moved to the west side of the Maumee River. The tugs "Montana", "Tennessee" and the "Louisiana" were spotted Friday the 25th of September shifting out of the C & O coal docks to the Hans Hansen riverfront facilities in Toledo.

According to inside sources, the railroad evicted the tugs due to spiraling liability insurance costs.

Reported by: Dan Ocean




Seaway Queen Enters Service

09/29:
The SEAWAY QUEEN was upbound through the Welland Canal on Monday, September 28. She joins the other Seaway Bulkers now all in service.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Twin Ports Report

09/29:
The Twin Ports remained packed with ships Sept. 29 because of the fall grain rush. All seven active grain-loading berths remained occupied - a rare event. All told, 11 vessels were loading at 7 a.m., two were anchored on the lake and several more were due during the day to load ore. The busiest part of the harbor was the northernmost end of Duluth harbor, where Canadian Transport was unloading salt at Cutler-Magner, Canadian Mariner was in the General Mills layby berth behind saltie Lake Charles in the loading berth; and Canadian Prospector was at Cargill B1.

Reported by: Al Miller




I.M.O. forming trust fund

09/29:
The International Maritime Organization announced 24 Sept. (World Maritime Day) that it is forming a trust fund to honor crewmembers. The fund will be used to create a memorial outside the organization headquarters in London, form a chair of maritime safety and marine pollution prevention at the World Maritime University in Malmo, Sweden, and provide fellowships for maritime training.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 29

PIERSON INDEPENDENT was launched September 29, 1906 as a) J.H. SHEADLE (1), US.203628, for the Grand Island Steamship Co. (Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co., Cleveland, OH., mgr.)

HENRY FORD II, 70, of Grosse Pointe, Michigan, passed away on September 29, 1987. Mr Ford's namesake was the Ford Motor Company self-unloader.

On September 29, 1986 the Polish tug KORAL left Lauzon, Quebec with the JOHN E.F. MISENER and GOLDEN HIND enroute overseas for scrapping.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




25 boats in the Welland Canal

09/28:
There were 25 boats in the Welland Canal on Saturday 26 September

CSL's Frontenac and Hallifax both were upbound loaded and stopped at the Port Colborne Fuel Dock (Warf 18-2). They were both serviced by Geo. Badawey Marine Food Supply Ltd. Taking on bottled water and food stuff and discharging laundry and rubbish.

Also serviced by Badawey was The Naticoke. CSL's Naticoke also upbound stopped at the R and P Dock(warf 16) for repairs being done by Fraser. (Owned byAlgoma) The crank shaft to one engine is being replaced. She is expected to be there about 3 days.

ULS Canadian Leader was Downbound on her first trip after coming out of drydock from her August grounding incident. She passed Bridge 20 at about 20:00 hours after being at Port Colborne achorage for over 3 hours because of traffic.

Ironically the very next day there was hardly any traffic at all in the canal.

Reported by: J J Van Volkenburg




Oakglen Sails

09/28:
The SS Oakglen has fitted out and departed her Owen Sound Lay-up berth at approx 2000 hrs Sept. 25/98. She had tied up ending last season on December 28th and this marks her first trip of 1998.

By this time last year she already made 11 trips to St Lawrence Ports from Thunder Bay and 2 or 3 shorter trips to Goderich or Owen Sound.

Reported by: J J Van Volkenburg and Peter Myatt




Twin Ports Report

09/28:
The Twin Ports grain trade hit full stride Sept. 28 when it recorded its first 'full house' of the season -- all seven active loading berths in Duluth and Superior were occupied as the day began.

The vessel lineup for grain included: Broom Park at Harvest States 1 and the familiar Pomorze Zachodnie at Harvest States 2; Goviken at Peavey Connors Point; Lake Superior at the venerable General Mills Elevator S; Federal Dora at AGP; Lake Charles at General Mills A; and Canadian Transport at Cargill B1.

Other vessels in port for grain include Canadian Mariner at the General Mills layby dock, and Erikousa Wave, Hydra and Samy Aurora, all anchored on Lake Superior.

Adding to the busy day were a vessel unloading at St. Lawrence Cement in Duluth and the cruise ship C. Columbus arriving to dock at the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center. This is the Columbus' third trip to Duluth and its first with U.S. and Canadian passengers aboard.

Reported by: Al Miller




Everyone But the Queen

09/28:
A call to Algoma's and Upper Lakes' fleet tapes reveals that all bulkers are in service except for SEAWAY QUEEEN.

As with every other start to the fall grain rush, the rumor mill has a few vessels sailing '98 as there last season.

To counter these annual rumors, industry insiders say there will be no scrappings in the near future.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Burton Passes through Locks

09/28:
Friday evening, September 25, the Str. Courtney Burton was lock down through the Soo Locks. Jim Grill observes that this vessel has to be one of the best, if not the most, maintained vessels on the lakes, her paint job, hull, decks, and cabins appear to have been just painted, clean - as if just washed down. Her decks, CLEAN - let me tell you, I have seen some vessels still showing previous cargo(s), stone, coal, pellets. The Str. Courtney Burton is one fine looking vessel, her previous namesake (Ernest T. Weir) may rest in peace knowing that the tradition continues. The Captain, Chief Engr., Officers, and Crew of the Str. Courtney Burton deserve a - hip hip hurrah. Makes you really want to win that trip aboard her next season.

Reported by: Jim Grill




Today in Great Lakes History - September 28

On September 28, 1980, the Burns Harbor entered service, departing Sturgeon Bay bound for Superior to load pellets.

THOMAS WILSON left Toledo on September 28, 1997 in tow of the tug TUSKER for overseas scrapping. WILSON has been laid up since December 16, 1979.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - September 27

The H.M.GRIFFITH experienced a smoky conveyor belt fire at Port Colborne, Ont. on September 27, 1989. Repairs were completed there.

The ROGER M. KYES proceeded to Chicago for dry docking, survey and repairs on September 27, 1976. She had struck bottom in Buffalo Harbor September 22, 1976 sustaining holes in two double bottom tanks and damage to three others.

The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2) under tow, locked through the Panama Canal from September 27 to the 30th on her way to the cutters torch.

SEAWAY TRADER was launched September 27, 1947 as a) IMPERIAL COLLINGWOOD for Imperial Oil Ltd., Toronto, Ont.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - September 26

The CHI-CHEEMAUN cleared the shipyard on September 26, 1974.

The H.M. GRIFFITH was christened on September 26, 1973 at Collingwood. The CCGS GRIFFON was launched September 26, 1969 by Davie Shipbuilding Ltd., Lauzon, Que.

ROGER M. KYES (b) ADAM E. CORNELIUS) returned to service on September 26, 1984, she had grounded off McLouth Steel and ended crosswise in the Detroit River's Trenton Channel a month before.

The BELLE RIVER was side swiped by the Liberian FEDERAL RHINE at Duluth on September 26, 1985. Both vessels received minor damage.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

09/25:
Indiana Harbor remained tied up to the Duluth port terminal Sept. 24 undergoing repairs.

A number of Canadian vessels are descending on the Twin Ports this fall. Canadian Miner was anchored off shore Sept. 23. On Sept. 24, Algocen was loading at Cargill B1 in Duluth while Algowood was scheduled to make an unusual call at BN ore dock.

Reported by: Al Miller




Divers Find Old Batteries

09/25:
The St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. is investigating a potential environmental hazard posed by lead/acid batteries discarded from the navigational aids in the St. Lawrence River. In a statement issued Monday, Seaway Corp.acting Administrator David G. Sanders said he has ordered a thorough investigation into reports that navigational batteries were spotted underwater near Waddington, N.Y. This discovery of batteries was made Sunday by members of the Massena Dive Rescue team who routinely dive the River as part of training exercises. At least 14 batteries were sighted underwater near Light 85, a navigational aid near Waddington by the rescue team.

Seaway Corp.spokeswoman Rhonda M. Worden said "If there are batteries down there, they will be removed". Until the late 1980's, The Seaway Corp used chemical batteries about the size of those used in trucks--to power 83 fixed navigational lights along the shipping channel. That ended when the Seaway switched to solar power for the navigational aids. Although it is not known how many of these chemical batteries are on the River bottom, it is believed that throwing the spent batteries into the River was at one time a common practice.

Michael D. Mayette,dive master for the rescue team said that on previous dives at two other navigational aids also had revealed the presence of discarded batteries. "We are aware of numerous spent lead/acid batteries at multiple locations in the St.Lawrence River and have turned over our results to the appropriate authorities for their action." Mr.Mayette said.

Seaway Acting Administrator Sanders said the problem of discarded batteries in waterways is not a new one, nor is it a problem specific to the St. Lawrence River. He said it is a national problem and one which will require coordination with the U.S.Coast Guard to remedy. Coast Guard Lt.Cmdr. Kevin P. Frost said the Coast Guard has a national navigational aid battery removal plan. He said the agency has been aware o the hazard for years and has addressed it in many waterways throughout the country. "The Coast Guard has been going around and systematically removing the batteries. We have to find out where the St. Lawrence fits into this plan," Mr.Frost said.

Just what environmental threat the batteries pose is unknown. A typical truck battery weighs about 36 pounds, half of which is lead. It contains about one gallon of sulfuric acid. Several communities along the St.Lawrence River draw drinking water from the River.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Today in Great Lakes History - September 25

The HENRY C. FRICK departed Bay City on her maiden voyage on September 25, 1905, ramming and damaged the Michigan Central R.R. Bridge at Bay City. Both were repaired.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Buffalo Report

09/24:
The vessels Stephan Reinauer and barge George Morris arrived overnight to unload gasoline at the mobil dock.The J.A.W. Iglehart arived at LaFarge on the Buffalo River.

The Sarah Spencer with the tug Atlantic Hickory in her notch is expected to arrive in port on Oct 3rd.This will be the first self unloading grain boat to visit Buffalo.

Reported by: Tom Coonly




New officer at Oglebay Norton

09/24:
Oglebay Norton Co. announced 23 Sept. that Ronald J. Compiseno has been named as vice president of human resources, a new position. He will be responsible for all human resource issues for the firm and its subsidiaries, including recruitment, employee and labor relations, employee benefits, compensation, succession planning. Compiseno will report to John N. Lauer, chairman, president and chief executive officer.

Compiseno, 47, has most recently the group director of human resources for Invacare Corp. in Elyria, Ohio. He has also been in human resources at TRW, Lubrizol Corp. and Diamond Shamrock Corp. He graduated from John Carroll University with a bachelor of arts degree in 1973 and received an M.B.A. from Sul Ross State University in 1975. Compiseno was also a commissioned officer in the U.S. Army and he lives with his wife, Betsy, and their four children in Rocky River, Ohio.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





The Mather Matters

09/24:
The City of Cleveland is inviting public comment through mid-October 1998 about its Civic Vision 2000 master plan which relocates the Steamship WILLIAM G. MATHER Museum from its present North Coast Harbor location to "somewhere else outside the Harbor" (location not identified). For those who may not know, North Coast Harbor is Cleveland's waterfront area for maritime seasonal (USS COD submarine museum, GOODTIME III excursion boat) and year-round attractions(Great Lakes Science Center, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame & Museum, and possibly the Crawford Museum of Industry and Technology in 2005). There are no comparable areas on Cleveland's waterfront for the MATHER.

A summary of Steamship WILLIAM G. MATHER Museum distinctions and achievements to date is available at: http://little.nhlink.net/wgm/help/mather_matters.html

Summary: The Mather Matters. More than 800,000 have visited "The Ship That Built Cleveland" in its 8 years of existence through on-board tours (225,000), off-site programming (50,000), and/or Web Site "hits" (>525,000). A proven attraction (Great Lakes Treasure) with a bright future as a "Jewel on Cleveland's Waterfront."

Those who have opinions about the location of the Steamship William G. Mather Museum at North Coast Harbor or otherwise should send comments to:
The Honorable Michael R. White, Mayor City of Cleveland
Cleveland City Hall
601 Lakeside Ave.
Cleveland, OH 44114

Sent a courtesy copy (cc:) of the letter to:
Hunter Morrison, Director
Cleveland Planning Commission, Room 501
Cleveland City Hall
601 Lakeside Ave.
Cleveland, OH 44114

Send a file copy to the Mather Museum at wgmather@aol.com or 1001 East Ninth St. Pier/Cleveland, OH 44114 THANK YOU!




World shipbuilding orders increase

09/24:
Lloyd's Register has reported in its World Shipbuilding Statistics that the number of vessels on order worldwide increased to 55.6 million gross tons at at the end of June from 55.2 million gross tons at the end of March. The June figure is up 0.7 percent from the first quarter of the year, when orders fell 2.5 percent from the December total of 56.6 million gross tons.

New orders in the second quarter increased 11 percent from 5.8 million gross tons to 6.5 million gross tons. Much of the increased orderbook was due to new tanker orders, according to Lloyd's Register. Crude oil tanker orders numbered 17 of 1.9 million gross tons and 3.3 million deadweight tons. The total tanker orderbook rose to 16.9 million gross tons and 30.9 million deadweight tons, 40 percent of the total world orderbook in terms of deadweight.

South Korea remained the top crude oil tanker builder at 8.2 million gross tons and 15.6 million deadweight tons. Japan stood at 1.4 million gross tons and 2.4 million deadweight tons.

Total orders in Japan were up about 70 percent in gross tons compared to South Korea, however. Between them, Japan and South Korea have two-thirds of all new constriction. Japan remains the leading country at 18.6 million gross tons followed by South Korea at 18.5 million gross tons.

China remained at third with 2.8 million gross tons compared to 3.2 million at the end of December. Germany increased to 2.3 million gross tons from 1.7 million to place it in the fourth rank.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 24

On September 24th the A.H. FERBERT (2) went hard aground at the Cut-Off Channel’s southeast bend of the St. Clair River. Six tugs, GLENADA, ELMORE M. MISNER, BARBARA ANN, GLENSIDE, SHANNON and WM. A. WHITNEY, worked until late on the 26th to free her.

The FITZGERALD’s first cargo of taconite pellets was loaded September 24, 1958 at Silver Bay, MN. for Toledo, OH.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 entered service September 24, 1924.

In early morning fog on the St. Clair River September 24, 1962 the J.L. REISS was hit three glancing blows by U.S. Steel’s SEWELL AVERY. The AVERY had lost control just below Robert’s Landing and crossed the channel from the Canadian side and struck the J.L. REISS which was proceeding slowly by radar on the U.S. side.

On September 24, 1952, the Charles L. Hutchinson entered service. This vessel was renamed Ernest R. Breech when it was sold to the Ford Motor Company in 1962, and it was given its present name, Kinsman Independent, when it was sold to Kinsman Lines in 1988.

On September 23, 1991, J.W. McGIFFON rescued several people in a 24' pleasure craft off Presque Ile State Park. The group had been disabled since the day before. They were taken aboard the McGIFFON and their boat taken under tow.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

09/23:
Indiana Harbor has spent the past day tied up at the Duluth port terminal undergoing some sort of repairs. On Sept. 21 a wheeled crane was alongside the vessel near the stern.

Last winter was exceedingly mild in northern Minnesota, but no one seems to be expecting a repeat performance. Cutler Magner dock has received several shipments of salt in recent days. The most recent arrived overnight Sept. 21-22 when Algoway paid a rare call to Duluth to unload.

Canadian Enterprise is due in Friday reportedly with another load of salt.

The Twin Ports grain rush seems to be hitting stride. On Sept. 22 Montrealais was loading at Cargill, Pan Hope at Harvest States and the familiar Alexandr Neviskiy at Peavey. Slapy, Goviken and Kapitonas Stulpinas are anchored on Lake Superior waiting to load. Another 13 vessels are expected to arrive for grain during the rest of the week.

Reported by: Al Miller




Algosound prepairing for fit-out

09/23:
ALGOSOUND, still laid up at Morterm in Windsor is in the process of being fully painted, her starboard side is finished and her port side should be done in a few days. Her name is not painted on yet and she is being painted fully black in colour, not like her original blue and white sceme. Rumour has it she will depart sometime next week.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




LCA Explains Value of Large Barges To Kansas Senator

09/23:

LCA has written to Senator Sam Brownback (R-KS) to explain the role of barges on the Great Lakes and other deep-draft waterways. Senator Brownback has introduced legislation in the Senate (S. 2390) to repeal the ownership and construction requirements of the Jones Act as he believes there is insufficient U.S.-Flag capacity to move the nation's agricultural goods. At a hearing before the Senate Commerce Committee in Washington on September 15, Jones Act opponents repeatedly dismissed the viability of barges to meet farmers' needs. The following letter explains that on the Great Lakes, integrated tug/barges such as the PRESQUE ISLE and PATHFINDER equal the hauling power of self-propelled vessels.

Along not discussed in LCA's letter, the same is true on other deep-draft waterways. An integrated tug/barge unit moves 37,000 tons of sugar from the mainland to Hawaii ... 730-foot-long triple-deck trailer barges service Puerto Rico.... Although the self-propelled vessel is far from obsolete, the trend in the maritime industry, especially in niche or specialized trades, is toward the integrated tug/barge.

September 18, 1998

The Honorable Sam Brownback
United States Senate
Washington, DC 20510

Dear Senator Brownback:

Lake Carriers’ Association represents 11 American corporations operating 59 U.S.-flag self-propelled vessels and integrated tug/barge units exclusively on the Great Lakes. In 1997, our members and other Jones Act operators on the Great Lakes moved more than 125 million tons of dry- and liquid-bulk cargo, a modern-day record for our industry.

I attended the September 15 hearing on your bill S.2390 and would like to address what I now realize is a widespread misconception concerning the difference between self-propelled vessels and "barges." I think the word barge evokes the image of a small, shallow draft unit with very limited carrying capacity that requires extensive shoreside equipment to be unloaded. That image is correct for the inland rivers and they offset the smallish carrying capacity of individual barges by combining 15-20 units into one tow.

However, on the Great Lakes (and the U.S coasts and non-contiguous trades), the word barge has a much different meaning. For us, barges are large units with carrying capacities that rival our largest self-propelled units. I am enclosing two photographs. The first is the 1,000-foot-long tug/barge PRESQUE ISLE. This vessel has been serving the Great Lakes iron ore, coal and stone trades since 1973 and routinely carries more than 2.6 million tons of cargo each year.

The second photo is the integrated tug/bargePATHFINDER. This vessel is owned by the Interlake Steamship Company of Cleveland and Interlake’s Chairman, Mr. James R. Barker, testified before the Senate Commerce Committee on September 15. This vessel, shown delivering stone in Cleveland [in the photo that accompanied LCA's letter], is longer than all but one of Cleveland’s skyscrapers are tall! Interlake invested $23 million in this vessel last year to meet increased demand for stone and other cargos on the Great Lakes.

These facts and photos set the stage for my final and most important point - a large tug/barge unit can and does offer customers (such as your Kansas farmers) the same carrying capacity of a self-propelled vessel, and due to differing regulatory regimes, operates at a lower cost than a self-propelled vessel. I will be communicating with you further concerning your legislation as Lake Carriers’ Association sees no need to change any element of the Jones Act, but I did want to first clear up any misunderstanding about the viability of tug/barges to meet the needs of commerce.

Sincerely,
George J. Ryan
President

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Algonorth Out of Lay-up

09/22:
The M/V ALGONORTH is now out of lay-up. She departed her lay-up berth (Pascol's Sherleg Dock) late Sunday afternoon and moved to the Sask. Pool 7A elevator to load grain. The vessel had entered lay-up on December 23, 1997 and depated on the 20th, total lay-up time was 272 days.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Upper Lakes Shipping Bulkers all to fit-out

09/22:
The fall grain rush is heading into high gear. All remaining Upper Lakes Group vessels are scheduled to come out in the next few days.

They include: Steamers Seaway Queen and Canadian Mariner, Provider and Voyager all but one of them have yet to sail this season.

Reported by: J. J. Van Volkenburg




Divers Inspect the Quebecois

09/22:
Reports from the Quebecois have her planned 5-year inspection being postponed. However, divers were used to inspect portions of her hull in Hamilton on 18 Sept. with special attention being given to the stern and shaft areas. The stern was partially tilted out of the water for this inspection. Also, while all Algoma and Upper Lakes boats will sail this year, this might be the end for a few. The rumors continue.

Reported by: Robert Strauss




Today in Great Lakes History - September 22

On September 22, 1958, the Edmund Fitzgerald entered service, departing River Rouge, Michigan for Silver Bay, Minnesota on its first trip. The Fitzgerald's first load was 20,038 tons of taconite pellets for Toledo. The vessel would, in later years, set several iron ore records during the period from 1965 through 1969.

While in ballast, the ROGER M. KYES (b- ADAM E. CORNELIUS) struck bottom in Buffalo Harbor September 22, 1976 sustaining holes in two double bottom tanks and damage to three others, whereupon she proceeded to Chicago for dry docking on September 27, 1976 for survey and repairs.

While being towed from Duluth, MN by the Canadian tug TUSKER on September 22, 1980, the D.G. KERR (2) rammed into the breakwater at Duluth causing $200,000 in damages to the breakwater. The tow apparently failed to make the turning buoy leaving Duluth Harbor.

On September 22, 1911 the HENRY PHIPPS collided with and sank her Steel Trust fleetmate, steamer JOLIET (1), which was at anchor on the fog shrouded St. Clair River near Sarnia, Ont. The JOLIET (1) sank without loss of crew and was declared a total loss. The PHIPPS then continued her downbound journey and collided with the Wyandotte Chemical steamer ALPENA (1) which incurred only minor damage.

The T.W. ROBINSON and US.265808 (former BENSON FORD (2) departed Quebec City in tow of the Polish tug JANTAR bound for Recife where they arrived on September 22, 1987. Scrapping began the next month in October.

MATHILDA DESGAGNES was freed from polar ice in the Arctic on September 22, 1988 by the West German Icebreaker Research Vessel POLARSTERN.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

09/21:
Montrealais is becoming a regular caller in the Twin Ports. It was here again Sept. 19-20 to again unload cement at St. Lawrence Cement.

Canadian Transport made a rare appearance at the Cutler Magner dock in Superior on the night of Sept. 19 to unload salt.

Reported by: Al Miller




News from the Seaway

09/21:
Not confirm yet is the fact that Desgagnés is looking on the sale market to buy another tanker, this one to go in service between St.Romuald from the Ultramar dock near Quebec City to Montreal where she will deliver petroleum products. More later.

Expected to go up the Seaway for the first time at the beginning of the week and having as destination Hamilton will be the small cargo ship Kamilla built in 1985. Of particular interest, this vessel has a dual registry. Despite she is flying the flag of convenience of Antigua & Barbuda, her port of registry is Hamburg according to Lloyd`s Register.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Ships on Stamps

09/21:
A recent release by the Canadian Post Office stated the upcoming sale of two stamps illustrating naval ships. It reads as follow: A two-stamps set will mark the 75th anniversary of the Canadian Naval Reserve on Nov.4. These stamps of $0.45 denominations each will featured the HMCS Sackville and the HMCS Shawinigan. Sackville was one of 122 corvettes launched in Canada during Worl War II, (several of them having been built in Great Lakes shipyard. Sackville is not one of them, having been built in St.John, N.B.) She now serves as a naval museum in Halifax. Commissionned last year, Shawinigan is one of 12 maritime coastal defence vessels built recently. (Last year, she visited several Great Lakes ports on a courtesy visit including Morrisburg, Thunder Bay, Windsor, Cleveland, Hamilton, Toronto and Kingston.)

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Print Version of This web page

09/21:
The response has been overwhelming to last week's edition. Working on your suggestions, I have included many more pictures. Those of you in the Detroit area may have seen one of the printed copies available at the many local businesses offering the newsletter. If you would be interested in downloading and printing your own click on the link below. All I ask is that the page not be modified in any way.

This weeks edition is 6 pages when printed on both sides of a page. I encourage you to print out and distribute the page. If you own a business on the lakes (or else where) please feel free to offer the newsletter to customers at no charge.

This is the first edition and I would appreciate feed back on lay-out and content.

The file is a Microsoft Office '97, Word document.

Click here to download





Today in Great Lakes History - September 21

ALGOWAY (2) left Collingwood on her maiden voyage in 1972 and loaded salt for Michipicoten, Ont. on Lake Superior.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




La Baronessa rolled out

09/20:
La Baronessa, a new 59.4-meter/195-foot yacht built by Palmer Johnson in Sturgeon Bay, Wis., was rolled out on 17 Sept. The U.S.$35 million vessel will be launched next month.

A wall in the building hall had to be taken down in order to get the yacht out. La Baronessa is said to be the largest privately-owned, all-aluminum motor yacht in the world. It is being built for an owner in Singapore. The interior has Australian lacewood, ebony from Madagascar and white granite countertops. Propulsion is provided by two 1,950-brake-horsepower diesel engines with two propellers.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





New Warehouse in Milwaukee

09/20:
Anderson-Ashton Inc., an architectural firm in New Berlin, Wis., has received a contract to provide design services for a new warehouse at the Port of Milwaukee. The new building, which will be 122 meters/400 feet long, 38.1 meters/125 feet wide and 14 meters/45 feet high, will be used to store bulk steel coils.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Don't Give Up The Ship

09/20:
The Society for the Preservation of the S.S. City of Milwaukee has printed up yard signs and t-shirts with the logo "Don't Give Up The Ship". These are part of the SPCM's campaign to fight the Village of Elberta's eviction. The yard signs are being displayed all over Elberta, Benzie County and even on Mackinaw Island. Yard signs are free on request, and may be picked up at the carferry. Grey 99% Cotton, 1% Polyester t-shirts with the logo are available at the carferry or by mail. Cost is $11.00 plus $5.00 shipping (if applicable).

For a listing of additional SPCM items available, please check out our Ship's Store at www.carferry.com or e-mail sscitymilw@aol.com

To order, please make your check payable to SPCM. Please mail to "SPCM Ship's Store, C/O George Micka, 1308 W. Summit Ave, Muskegon MI 49441. Please allow 2-4 weeks for processing and shipping (the shirts have been selling fast!). If you would rather pick them up at the carferry, the S.S. City of Milwaukee is open for membership tours Saturday's at 2 and 4pm thru the month of September. Cost is $5.00 per person (1 day), $15.00 (Annual individual membership) or $25.00 (family annual membership). The ship is located at the former Ann Arbor carferry docks in Elberta, Michigan. You can also take a free virtual tour at our website, www.carferry.com. Ship tours are available by arrangement.

The SPCM is also seeking applications for one open board position and volunteers. If you would be interested in helping preserve the carferry, please contact us at sscitymilw@aol.com or write to SPCM, P.O. Box 506, Beulah MI 49617.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 20

On September 20, 1986, vandals started a $5,000. fire aboard the laid up NIPIGON BAY at Kingston where she had been since April, 1984.

GEORGE A. STINSON's self-unloading boom was replaced on September 20 1983. The Boom had collapsed onto her deck due to a mechanical failure on the night of April 19, 1983 at Detroit. No injuries were reported. She continued hauling cargoes without a boom until replacement.

On September 20, 1980, the EDGAR B. SPEER entered service.

The CHARLES E. WILSON sailed light on her maiden voyage from Sturgeon Bay September 20, 1973 bound for Escanaba, MI to load ore.

The CHARLES M. WHITE was christened at Baltimore on September 20, 1951.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Today in Great Lakes History - September 19

LEON FALK, JR. and MENIHEK LAKE arrived in Spain on September 19, 1985 for scrapping.

When SATURN (4) entered service and made her first trip to Toledo, OH on September 19, 1974, she became the first of three tankers built for the fleet's modernization program.

The EDGAR B. SPEER departed the shipyard on her maiden voyage September 19, 1980 bound for Two Harbors, MN where she loaded her first cargo of taconite pellets.

The GRAND HAVEN (Twin Screw Rail Car Ferry) was laid up in the spring of 1965 at the old Pennsylvania Dock at Cleveland and later at dockage on the Old River Bed where she sank on September 19, 1969.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

09/18:
Boatwatchers in the Twin Ports got a treat Sept. 17 when Cason J. Callaway departed about 7:30 a.m. followed immediately by Charles M. Beeghly. Callaway had unloaded stone at the DMIR ore dock before shifting to load taconite pellets there. The Beeghly loaded coal at Midwest Energy Terminal and was bound for Taconite Harbor.

Fred R. White Jr., an unusual visitor in the Twin Ports, was loading taconite pellets Sept. 17 at the DMIR ore dock in Duluth.

Joe Block made an unusual appearance Sept. 16 in Silver Bay to load taconite pellets at Northshore Mining Co.

Reported by: Al Miller




August Stone Trade Stays Apace With Last Year

09/18:
Although the July fire at Calcite has reduced shipments from the facility to a degree, the Lakes stone trade remained steady in August. Shipments from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 4,965,911 net tons, virtually the same as a year ago. For the season, the Lakes stone trade stands at 23.9 million tons, an increase of 6.1 percent compared to last year.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Lake Erie Coal Dips Slightly in August; Still Up Nicely For The Season

09/18:
Coal shipments from Lake Erie ports totaled 2,648,906 net tons in August, a decrease of roughly 120,000 tons compared to a year ago. However, for the season, the coal trade from Lake Erie ports has increased 7.5 percent to 12,949,296 tons.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association




Today in Great Lakes History - September 18

The E.J. BLOCK returned to service on September 18, 1946 as the first large bulk freighter powered by a diesel-electric power plant and one of the first equipped with commercial radar on the Great Lakes.

On September 18, 1959 the HENRY FORD II ran aground in the St. Marys River and damaged 18 bottom plates.

On September 18, 1958 the BEN MOREELL (2) collided with and sank the car ferry ASHTABULA in the harbor at Ashtabula, OH.

LAKE WINNIPEG was the first vessel to enter the Nipigon Transport fleet. She loaded her first cargo of 22,584 gross tons of iron ore clearing Sept Îles, Que. on September 18, 1962 bound for Cleveland.

The Pere Marquette carferry City of Midland 41 was launched on September 18, 1940, at Manitowoc, WI. She was built by Manitowoc Shipbuilding Corporation at a cost of $2 million. She was named after Midland, MI for one of the Pere Marquette Railway's biggest customers, Dow Chemical Co. The City of Midland has been in layup at Ludington, MI since 1988.

Data from: Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




"The Jones Act Works," Industry Leader Tells Congress

09/17:

Washington, DC--Thanks to the Jones Act, the United States "has developed a highly-competitive, economically efficient domestic marine transportation system that is unmatched in the world," a leading U.S. maritime official today told the Senate Commerce Committee. "The Jones Act works," declared James R. Barker, Vice Chairman of Mormac Marine Group, speaking on behalf of the Maritime Cabotage Task Force. The Jones Act requires that cargo moving between two U.S. ports be carried in vessels that the U.S.-owned, U.S.-built and U.S.-crewed.

Barker stressed that U.S.-flag vessels in domestic commerce now annually move more than 1 billion tons of cargo and that U.S.-flag operators have a long history of "providing innovative solutions to meet the shipping needs of American business." He further emphasized that American ship operators continue to add "new and more modern vessels to our growing fleets," so much so that since 1965, the U.S. domestic fleet has more than doubled in sized and tripled its productivity.

Citing examples from the Great Lakes trades, one of Barker’s two primary businesses, the longtime shipping executive noted that just one of the 1,000-foot-long vessels his company and other U.S-flag operators built during the boom economy of the 1970s "offers the same seasonal lift capacity as four 1960s era ships." Additionally, these ships are self-unloaders that can discharge directly onto a receiving area that is nothing more than a flat open field, "thus permitting virtually any waterfront property to become a working dock on the Great Lakes."

Testimony to be submitted for the record by the Maritime Cabotage Task Force will detail similar efficiencies and innovations in every segment of the Jones Act fleet.

Barker then warned the Committee that the bill under consideration to permit foreign-owned and foreign-built ships into domestic commerce would do irreparable harm to the domestic marine transportation system in the United States. "Private investment is the key to future growth and there is no better way to stifle such investment than through bills such as S.2390 that would undermine the level playing field necessary to sustain that investment in the future." Barker noted that his companies "have invested over $100 million of completely private capital in building new or modernizing our existing ships in the last few years. S.2390, if enacted, would simply destroy the basis for that investment in a single stroke."

Nationwide, the 44,000 vessels in the Jones Act fleet represent an investment of $26 billion.

Barker dismissed the basis for the legislation, a supposed shortage of U.S.-flag vessels, noting that one of his Lakes competitors has recently acquired a Jones Act eligible, ocean classed, integrated tug/dry bulk covered hopper barge with a 34,330 ton load capacity for coal or 1,452,000 cubic foot capacity for grain. "The vessel [is] exceptionally well suited for coastwise bulk service, including such cargos as grain for North Carolina or kaolin clay from Georgia. This is exactly the type of vessel that proponents of S.2390 claim does not exist in the Jones Act fleet."

Despite the Senate hearing, there is little support for changes in the Jones Act among official Washington. An Administration witness, Maritime Administrator Clyde Hart, expressed full support for the existing law. The U.S. Navy has recently reaffirmed its longstanding support, citing the law as "vital" to national security. A Resolution in support of the Jones Act in the House of Representatives has 242 cosponsors.

The Maritime Cabotage Task Force promotes awareness of the vital role of a U.S.-flag domestic fleet. The Task Force represents more than 400 organizations involved in all aspects of domestic waterborne commerce. Its landmark study, Full Speed Ahead, illustrates the dramatic growth of U.S.-flag shipping in recent years. The domestic fleet has doubled in size since 1965 and productivity has more than tripled to the point where U.S.-flag vessels routinely move more than 1 billion tons of cargo and 100 million passengers between U.S. ports each year.

For more information contact:
Glen G. Nekvasil, Director of Media Relations, 1-888-400-9429

Visit the Maritime Cabotage Task Force Home page for more information on Great Lakes Shipping





Keel Laid for New CSL Vessel

09/17:
St. Catharines, Ont.: The keel for the first hull in Canada Steamship Lines' (CSL) major fleet investment project was laid in a ceremony at Port Weller Dry Docks Monday.

Calling it one of the most significant shipbuilding projects undertaken on the Great Lakes in the past two decades, CSL President and CEO, Ray Johnston, said the new hulls represent the start of a new era.

"These ships will bring with them an increased level of versatility and efficiency that represent our commitment to our customers now and well into the next century. It's exciting to see the first keel being laid here today."

The $100-million project will see three of CSL¹s self-unloaders rejunvenated with new forebody sections over the next three years. Canadian Shipbuilding and Engineering (CSE) of St. Catharines is handling the work.

A forebody replacement involves removing the original cargo hold portion of a vessel foreword of the engine room and accommodation area and replacing it with an entirely new section. The procedure is expected to add up to 25 years of service life to each ship.

CSL's J.W. McGiffin is the first vessel scheduled for forebody replacement. The 730-foot laker, launched in 1972, will enter dry dock at the end of the 1998 navigation season. The removal of the existing forebody and joining of the new one will take place during the Seaway's winter shutdown.

The new ships will incorporate a design that takes advantage of the Seaway's new size allowances. The length of the three ships will increase to 225.5 metres (740 feet) from 222.5 (730 feet). The breadth will be 23.8 metres (78 feet), up from 22.9 (75 feet). The ships will also feature the latest in cargo-handling systems.

The two other CSL vessels are slated for forebody replacement in 2000 and 2001. The company also holds options to contract with CSE on two more ships which would be done in 2002 and 2003.

CSL owns and operates one of the largest fleets of self-unloaders in the world. These ships employ a state-of-the art system of hoppers, conveyors and a discharge boom to unload dry-bulk cargo at rates of up to 6,000 tonnes per hour.

Reported by: Canada Steamship Lines Inc.




Minntac Mine Shutting Down Production Line

09/17:
U.S. Steel's Minntac Mine, North America's largest producer of taconite pellets, is shutting down one of its five production lines in response to steel imports flooding into the United States' steel market.

Minntac's Line 3 will be shut down Oct. 5 for at least six months. The line produces 12 percent of Minntac's pellets. Some employees may be laid off, although the company and the Steelworkers union will consider a plan to avoid layoffs by reducing overtime for other employees.

U.S. Steel has said demand for steel in the United States remains strong but that record imports are creating a backlog of products and forcing domestic producers to cut production. U.S. Steel has shut down or reduced production at several of its blast furnaces.

Minntac ships its pellets primarily through Two Harbors aboard vessels of USS Great Lakes Fleet.

Reported by: Al Miller from the Duluth News-Tribune




Wooden Toilet Heads Back to Wreck

09/17:
On Tuesday three divers from Michigan's Underwater Recovery Unit spent about an hour returning a wooden toilet to the wreck of the Grecian in Lake Huron.

The Grecian, a 296 foot steel bulk freight, was lost June 15, 1906 off Thunder Bay, MI.

The toilet was removed from the wreck and on display in a Chicago marina when a diver recognized the toilet and reported it to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

The wreck site is classified as a preserve and the person in Chicago possessing this historic toilet may face legal action.

Edited from a story in the Detroit News




Today in Great Lakes History - September 17

EVA DESGAGNES was launched September 17, 1955 as a) GRIFFON (2) for Beaconsfield Steamship Ltd., Montreal, Que.

On September 17, 1985, PATERSON suffered a crank case explosion as she was bound for Quebec City from Montreal. She was repaired and cleared on September 21.

Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




New Cruise Ships Planned for Lakes Service

09/16:
The Chicago Tribune (Tuesday 9/15) reports that American Classic Voyages plans to order five new ships with the intention of expanding regular passenger cruises into the Great Lakes market. The new ships costing 30 million apiece will be small enough to lock through the St. Lawrence Seaway as well as visit smaller ports on the Atlantic and the Pacific.

The proposed coastal cruisers will be 300 feet long and 50 feet wide and will draw only 12 1/2 feet of water, which will allow them to use shallow ports unable to handle larger ships. They will be powered with diesel engines at a top speed of 13 m.p.h. With room for 228 passengers, each ship will have a dining room seating 144, a saloon seating 160, a chart room bar, heated outside bar and gift shop. Guido Perla & Associates, naval architects in Seattle, are designing the vessels. Construction of the first vessel is scheduled to begin Feb. 1 for launching in June 2000.

American Classic Voyages is the parent of the Great Hawaiian Cruise Line and the Delta Queen Steamboat Co., which operates paddle-wheel cruises on the Mississippi River system.

The Great Lakes cruise market, which early in this century supported as many as 50 ships, died in 1967 when the Chicago-based Chicago, Duluth and Georgian Bay Transit Co. decided not to replace its last surviving vessel, the South American.

Interest in lake cruises was renewed last year when Germany's Hapag-Lloyd Tours GmbH sent its motor ship C. Columbus on a tour of the Lakes and Seaway. The vessel returned this year, and Christopher Wright, a Cambridge, Ontario, consultant working on Great Lakes tours said the 90-passenger French ship Le LeVant is scheduled to cruise the lakes next year.

Reported by: Brian Sanderlin




Rouge River Channel now Open

09/16:
Dredging on the south side of the Rouge River in Detroit has been completed and vessels with a draft of up to 7.3 meters/24 feet and a beam of 24 meters/80 feet are being permitted to use the south side of the channel. A draft of 8.2 meters/27 feet may be allowed as of 24 Sept.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Twin Ports Report

09/16:
American Mariner called in the Twin Ports Sept. 14-15, unloading stone at Northland Constructors dock and then moving up river to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal. This is a routine the Mariner performs two or three times a year.

Kinsman Independent is back on its routine run again, loading Sept. 14-15 at Harvest States gallery. Reflecting the increase in fall grain shipments, Harvest States' second berth has been fairly busy. Sept. 15 it was loading Makeefka.

Fall seems to bring more unusual vessel calls. St. Clair was loading at BN ore dock Sept. 15 while Fred R. White Jr. was scheduled to unload at Duluth's Reiss Inland dock before sailing up the shore to load at Two Harbors.

Reported by: Al Miller




American Steamship Carrying Algoma Cargoes

09/16:
American Steamship's CHARLES E. WILSON and H. LEE WHITE, have recently carried taconite pellets from Marquette to Algoma Steel at the Soo. One of Marquette's regulars, ALGOSTEEL,is out of service undergoing repairs to her rudder in Toledo. This may have prompted Algoma to look for other carriers.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




St Lawrence Pilots Feel Their Concerns of Fatigue Go Unheeded

09/16:
According to the President of the St Lawrence Seaway Pilots Association, Capt. Roger S. Paulus, a U.S. Coast Guard Rear Admiral was briefed on the report of the Human Factors Survey last April and at that time expressed concern, agreeing with the substance of the report but questioning the conclusions. Since then they have had no further word a and Capt. Paulus feels Washington is dragging its feet on the issue and nothing has changed but at the same time, this year has been the busiest for the pilots since 1978 and the heacy shipping season is just starting. The survey conducted by the Human Factors Group, an association of researchers, doctors and other professionals, involved a trip by their surveyor on a freighter from starting point at the 3 locks to the unboarding at Cape Vincent, also questionaires completed by the pilots and their spouses and data from other scientific research on the problem on fatigue.

The Seaway pilots are asking to have the same working rules as their Canadian counterparts who are allowed more time to rest. Often these U.S. pilots must travel 98 miles to get to their ship and this time is not counted as work time. They feel that time on task should include the time it takes to travel to and from ship, including the wait to board at a lock ot the time it takes to go on a pilot boat and board ships near Cape Vincent. At present, Seaway pilots feel they have reached a level of job fatigue that could result in poor work performance which could have serious consequences if there is not a revision in their work rules.

The director of the Great Lakes pilotage, Frank J. Flyntz objects to any suggestion that nothing is being done. "To expect an instantaneous change is unrealistic," Mr. Flyntz said from his office in Washington. "The Coast Guard has been looking into the pilot's concerns and will continue to do so," Mr Flyntz said. He acknowledged data used in the pilot study are good, although "some may be skewed and there were questions about the conclusions". According to Mr Flyntz, Federal rules dictate how policies are changed and any changes have to be opened to public comment, even though temporary measures can be instituted in times of emergency. Ship owners, agents, shippers, and even port representatives would want to be heard. Article from Watertown Times Watertown, N.Y.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Lives, ships lost decreased in 1997

09/16:
The number of vessels lost, either through sinkings or total constructive losses, fell to a 10-year low last year, according to information from the Institute of London Underwriters released 14 Sept. at the International Union of Marine Insurance conference in Lisbon, Portugal. The number of lives lost at sea also declined.

A total of 170 vessels of at least 500 gross tons were lost, compared to 223 in 1996 and 245 in 1995. In 1997, 263 people died, the lowest number in a decade, but the ILU estimated that "well over 2,000" people were killed aboard vessels under 500 gross tons, for which not as much information is available.

Last year, 0.2 percent of the world's tankers were involved in losses along with 0.11 percent of bulk carriers.

By registry, Panama has lost the most ships, an average of 18.4 vessels annually between 1993 and 1997. Other registries, by decreasing numbers, are: Pakistan, 7.8; Honduras, 6.6; St. Vincent and the Grenadines, 6.4; and Cyprus, 3.8.

Reported by: Steve Schultz

From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Today in Great Lakes History - September 16

At about 8:30 a.m. Sunday, September 16, 1990 the inbound motor ship BUFFALO passed close by while JUPITER was unloading unleaded gasoline at the Total Petroleum dock in the Saginaw River near Bay City, MI. The suction of BUFFALO's propellers caused the JUPITER, which was facing upriver, to pull away from the dock. As a result the aft pilings broke off and the fuel lines parted which caused a spark and ignited the spilled fuel. At the time 22,000 barrels of a total of 54,000 barrels were still aboard. Flames catapulted over 100 feet high filling the air with smoke that could be seen for 50 miles. The fire was still burning the next morning when a six man crew from Williams, Boots & Coots Firefighters and Hazard Control Specialists of Port Neches, TX arrived to fight the fire. By Monday afternoon they extinguished the fire only to have it re-ignite that night resulting in multiple explosions. Not until Tuesday morning on the 18th was the fire finally subdued with the assistance of the U.S. Coast Guard's BRAMBLE and BRISTOL BAY. The tanker, which was valued at $9 million, was declared a total constructive loss, though the engine room was relatively untouched. Unfortunately the fire claimed the life of one crew member who drowned attempting to swim ashore. As a result the Coast Guard closed the river to all navigation. On October 19th the river was opened to navigation after the Gaelic tugs SUSAN HOEY and CAROLYN HOEY towed the JUPITER up river to the Hirschfield & Sons dock at Bay City (formerly the DeFoe Shipyard) where a crane was erected for dismantling the burned out hulk. Her engines were removed and shipped to New Bedford, MA for future use. The river opening allowed American S.S.'s BUFFALO to depart the LaFarge dock where she had been trapped since the explosion. JUPITER's dismantling was completed over the winter of 1990-91.

P & H purchased all nine of the Soo River's fleet on September 16, 1982 for a reported C$2.5 million and all nine returned to service, although only four were running at the end of the season.

NORISLE went into service September 16, 1946 as the first Canadian passenger ship commissioned since the NORONIC's commissioning in 1913.

On September 16, 1952, the Cason J. Callaway departed River Rouge, Michigan for Duluth on its maiden voyage.

Data from: Jody L. Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Interlake to Take Delivery of tug Today

09/15:
The Interlake Steamship Company is scheduled to take delivery of their new tug "Dorothy Ann" from Bay Shipbuilding today.

The Dorothy Ann will float off the drydock at approximately noon on Wednesday. She will be picked up by several Selvick tugs and towed to the C. Reiss dock in Escanaba for final fitout. The delivery is much later that originally anticipated, but the engines and z-drives were installed at BSC which should expedite the final outfitting process.

This new tug will be mated with the barge Pathfinder, replacing the tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort which has pushed the barge this season.

Please e-mail if you take pictures of the event.


Reported by: The Interlake Steamship Company




Cuyahoga gets name painted on Bridge

09/15:
The Cuyahoga had her name painted on her bridge in black paint with red highlighting while loading stone in Port Colborne. She then made a rare stop at the fuel dock in Port Colborne on her way to Cleveland. The vessel usually takes on fuel in Windsor.

Reported by: J. J. Van Volkenburg




Interlake Moving Headquarters

09/15:
Effective September 26, The Interlake Steamship Company. operating nine vessels principally in the Great Lakes iron ore, coal and stone trades, is moving its headquarters from downtown Cleveland to Richfield Ohio, 20 miles south. The company will occupy the third floor of a new building known as Interlake Corporate Center just off I-77 and I-271. During the past eight years, Interlake has occupied Suite 2550 of the National City Bank Building at 1900 E. 9th Street, just off Euclid in downtown Cleveland. The company employs about 20 persons at its headquarters.

Interlake Steamship's new address is Suite 300, Interlake Corporate Center, 4199 Kinross Lakes Parkway, Richfield, OH 44286.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Today in Great Lakes History - September 15

The A.H. FERBERT (2) was towed out of Duluth by the Sandrin tug GLENADA September 15, 1987, they encountered rough weather on Lake Superior and required the assistance of the another tug to reach the Soo on the 19th. On the 21st the FERBERT had to anchor off Detour, MI after she had run aground in the St. Marys River when her towline parted. Her hull was punctured and the Coast Guard ordered repairs to her hull before she could continue. Again problems struck on September 24th, when the FERBERT went hard aground at the Cut-Off Channel's southeast bend of the St. Clair River. Six tugs, GLENADA, ELMORE M. MISNER, BARBARA ANN, GLENSIDE, SHANNON and WM. A. WHITNEY, worked until late on the 26th to free her. The FERBERT finally arrived in tow of GLENSIDE and W.N. TWOLAN at Lauzon, Que. on October 7th.

The FERNGLEN was launched September 15, 1917 as a) WILLIAM A. AMBERG.

On September 15, 1925 the JOHN A. TOPPING left River Rouge light on her maiden voyage to Ashland, WI to load iron ore for delivery to Cleveland, OH.

September 15th lightering was completed on the AUGUST ZIESING, she had grounded above the Rock Cut two days earlier blocking the channel.

September 15, 1959 was the last day the U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tender MESQUITE was stationed at Sault Ste. Marie, MI.

MIDDLETOWN suffered a fire in her tunnels on September 15, 1986. 2nd & 3rd degree burns were suffered by two crewmembers.

Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News from the Seaway Updates

09/14:
The MILLENIUM CONDOR ex Holck-Larsen was about to enter the lower Beauharnois lock yesterday morning. Her funnel is painted all white and the letters LT (for Larsen Toubro the previous owner) are still painted on her bow. Her destination which was Detroit according to first reports has now been changed to Oshawa. After unloading, it is to be expected she will visit other ports west of the Welland Canal including Detroit more than likely.

More details on the new tanker STOLT KENT which went to Hamilton at the end of August. She was built by Gijon Naval yard at Gijon, Spain and is yard no. 551. Her registered owner is listed as Bibby Line according to Lloyd's and is managed by Bibby International IOM. She has a sister ship named KRISTIN KNUTSEN, yard no. 550. Knutsen tankers are frequent callers to Great Lakes ports so it is quite possible she too will be visiting the inland seas soon or later.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Michigan Governor wants new lock at Soo

09/14:
For more than three decades, there has been talk of building a second lock at Sault Ste. Marie capable of handling the massive 1,000-footers. There are thirteen 1000-footers included in the 69 vessels U.S.-flag fleet and carry a large amount of the yearly tonnage. The paper quotes Michigan Governor John Engler as saying that Michigan faces "severe economic consequences" if there is further delay, vowing to "lead an effort to rally support" for building a new lock on the St. Marys River that connects lakes Superior and Huron.

A new lock at the Soo has a new urgency, especially for Metro Detroit factories and utilities depending on iron ore, coal and other cargos. Two of the four current locks -- the Davis and Sabin -- were built during World War I and are "deteriorating and functionally obsolete," according to the Michigan Department of Transportation. Estimated cost of the new lock is about $225 million. Federal funds would cover most it, with eight Great Lakes states being responsible for the rest. Michigan's share could range between $8 million and $18 million.

The Soo project is among priorities in a 32-page "agenda for a third term" that Engler will release Tuesday in Lansing on such issues as education, crime, welfare reform, the environment and "building a transportation system that is second to none."

Debbie Marshall, Engler's transportation adviser and Washington lobbyist, said "reliance on the Poe Lock has reached a critical level." The Poe Lock was built in the 1960s. Marshall will lead Engler's effort to replace the obsolete Sabin and Davis locks.

This item was edited from a story Sunday's Detroit News by George Weeks.




Seaway Book Now Available

09/14:
Seaway Ships 1998 Mid-season illustrated edition.
René Beauchamp's popular annual publication is now available. The book offers a complete list of all new ships which transited the St. Lawrence Seaway up to the end of August, both foreign and inland vessels. Corrections and additions to previous editions. Cost: $3.65 including postage.

Click here for more information





Print Version of This web page

09/14:
Many of you have told me you print this web page out for friends and other non-commercial purposes. Those of you in the Detroit area may have seen one of the printed copies available at the many local businesses offering the newsletter. If you would be interested in downloading and printing your own click on the link at the bottom of the page. All I ask is that the page not be modified in any way.

This weeks edition is 4 pages when printed on both sides of a page. I encourage you to print out and distribute the page. If you own a business on the lakes (or else where) please feel free to offer the newsletter to customers at no charge.

This is the first edition and I would appreciate feed back on lay-out and content.

The file is a Microsoft Office '97, Word document.

Click here to download





Coming this Saturday to Toledo

09/14:
Maritime Market Toledo, OH
Str Willis B. Boyer Museum Ship third annual Maritime Market to be held on Sept. 19 from 10am to 5pm at the Toledo Sports Arena Exhibit Hall, 1 Main St, Toledo (across from International Park).
Vendors will be selling: nautical antiques from around the lakes, pictures, videos, books, steamship memorabilia and anything else lakes related.
All proceeds go to the Restoration of the Str. Willis B. Boyer. Admission: Adults $3.00 - Students 12 and under, $1.00. Free shuttle bus from the Boyer & U.S. Brig Niagara. For more infomation on the show call (419)936-3070.

U.S. brig Niagara will visit Toledo's International Park, Toledo,Ohio 0n Sept. 17 to 20. Public tours 17&18, 3pm to 5pm; 19&20 10am to 5pm - Admisssion fee charged. Sponsered by Willis B. Boyer Museum Ship. For more infomation call (419)936-3070.

Look for me at the Marine Publishing display. We will have a computer display and free copies of the above mentioned newsletter.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 14

The CLARENCE B. RANDALL (2) was launched September 14, 1907 as a) J.J. SULLIVAN for the Superior Steamship Co.

Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




News from the Seaway

09/13:
Two lakers laid up in Montreal since Dec. 1997 went back into service lately, both leaving downbound for lowere St. Lawrence River ports. CARTIERDOC departed Mtl. for Pointe Noire on Sept. 10 and QUEBECOIS departed the next day for Port Cartier. Expected to go back in service too will be CANADIAN VOYAGER on Sept.26 according to the Port of Montreal. No words yet if ALGOGULF and COMEAUDOC will be reactivated too.

Great Lakes ships can now be drydocked at the Verreault Shipyard at Les Méchins since it was expanded for the second time in a few years. Arriving there on August 10 and still there as of Sept.11 is ATLANTIC ERIE.

Swinging at anchor at Sorel since August 13 is the small Bahamas-flag BALTIMAR ORION waiting for orders. This vessel was in Montreal on August 10 unloading components for a new gantry crane ordered by Canada Maritime.

Expected to go up the Seaway bound for Detroit on Sept.13 will be the Cayman Islands-flag bulker MILLENIUM CONDOR. Under her previous name of Holck-Larsen, she was a regular caller to Great Lakes ports. Before her renaming in August, she had actually completed two trips this year. She also did at least one trip under her original name of Eggarlock in the early eighties. It is interesting to note she was built in two sections, the forward section in 1980 at Setoda and the aft section at Toyama in 1981, both locations in Japan.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Today in Great Lakes History - September 13

The EDMUND FITZGERALD's sea trials occurred on September 13, 1958.

The HOFFMAN (United States Army Corps of Engineers Twin Screw Hopper Dredge) collided with the Japanese salty KUNISHIMA MARU at Toledo, OH, September 13, 1962. Reportedly the blame was placed on the pilot of the Japanese salty. Apparently the damage was minor.

On September 13, 1968 the AUGUST ZIESING grounded in fog two-hundred yards above the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River. The grounded vessel swung into the shipping channel blocking it until September 15th when lightering was completed.

Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Transfer enters Dry Dock

09/12:
Reports from Thunder Bay have the Canadian Transfer entering the Pascol dry dock some time on the 10th. No word on how long the repairs will take.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Seaway Pilots Say Safety Jeopardized

09/12:
The St.Lawrence River pilots held a forum Thursday night in Alexandria Bay, N.Y. This public meeting was dubbed "The Safety of Shipping on the St.Lawrence Seaway--Who's Asleep at the Wheel." A fatigue study commissioned by the pilots blasts the number of hours they work guiding freighters through the inherently dangerous shoul waters of the 1000 Islands and three locks downriver. The study by the Human Factors Group of Maryland cites cases when tired U.S pilots asked for relief but did not get it. Captain Lawrence J. Hickey, a U.S. river pilot who has been vocal about Seaway policies in the past, called fatigue a "time bomb" ready to explode on the river. He referred to the 1989 EXXON VALDEZ disaster in Alaska when 11 million gallons of crude oil spilled into Prince William Sound. "We're fatigued," Capt.Hickey said, "We're dead tired. There's no way around it."

Among the conclusions of this HFG study are that: Pilots are forced to work at inappropriate levels of risk to health and safety U.S. practices of assigning pilots do not "consistantly" support the safety of navigation and the protection of the marine environment. U.S.pilots, their families,vessels and the Seaway are at risk Economic considerations out-weigh concern for safety. David G Sanders, acting administrator of the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp., has called safety the Seaway's No 1 priority and said the system of dispatching pilots did not make the river unsafe. The standing rule, Mr. Sanders has said, is that over-tired pilots should anchor their vessels and rest. No one is pushing them to do the physically impossible, he said/Capt.Hickey suggested that anchoring vessels would cause economic backlash. He said there have been times when pilots did anchor and were accused of delaying Seaway traffic and told they should have rested while off duty. As it is, U.S. pilots are guaranteed 10 hours off after reaching the boarding point at either Cape Vincent or Eisenhower Lock. They have to be available for an assignment within 2 hours. Their Canadian counterparts get 13 hours of rest between trips and one hour travel time, although they have to be able to take assignments within two hours of being notified as well. U.S.pilots typically spend 11.3 hours on the bridge of a ship per trip, according to the Human Factors Group study. That does not include the time it takes to get on board and off again and driving to and from assigments which is often 98 miles. Last year, there were 11 trips when pilots were on the bridge 24 hours or more. Longer shifts sometimes occur because ships go aground, have engine failure, or run into foul weather. "We're playing Russian roulette every time we get on board a ship," Capt. Hickey said. He admitted he once fell asleep at a lock. Ships are involved in dozens of incidents each year on the St.Lawrence River, although most are minor. One of the worst shipping disasters in recent memory was on June 23, 1976, when the NEPCO 140 barge dumped more that 300,000 gallons of oil in the river after striking a shoal near Alexandria Bay. Watertown Times article. Watertown, N.Y.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Dock Collapse Update

09/12:
A story in yesterday's Detroit News reports that work is progressing on clearing the 50,000 tons of limestone gravel that spilled into the Rouge River, cutting off deliveries to the businesses upstream. The paper quotes Bill Hornberger, vice-president and spokesman for Rouge Steel Co. as saying "Since the problem, we have probably turned away four boats carrying raw materials." In a typical season Rouge Steel receives 150 boatloads per year of iron ore, limestone and coal. Each vessel must pass through the now blocked Rouge Short Cut Canal to reach the mill .

Officers with the U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are overseeing the removal operation, they expect to have the southern half of the 200-foot-wide channel opened to a 25-foot depth by tomorrow. The North side may take more time.

Reported by: N. Schultheiss




Last week for Free Cruises on the Saginaw River

09/12:
As a reminder the Free cruise's on the Princess Wenonah will be available for one more week (ending 9/18). The cruises are on The Saginaw River, one day the cruise goes to the Zilwaukee and the next day it goes to the Saginaw Bay. All cruise's are narrated live by a noted historian and much of the river's history including the lumbering days can be learned.

Please call (517)891-BOAT to make sure the boat is running.

Reported by: Dan Maus




Today in Great Lakes History - September 12

The ROGER BLOUGH was laid up at Sturgeon Bay, WI from September 12, 1981 through 1986 because of economic conditions.

CANADIAN PIONEER was christened at Port Weller on September 12, 1981 by Louise Powis, wife of the Chairman and President of Noranda Mines.

CARTIERCLIFFE HALL was towed by the tug WILFRED M. COHEN to Collingwood, Ont. for repairs from a June 5th fire and arrived at Collingwood on September 12, 1979.

Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Limited at Collingwood, Ontario closed the yard on September 12, 1986 after 103 years of shipbuilding. She was famous for her spectacular side launches. 214 ships were built at Collingwood.

While unloading steel in South Chicago from the CANADA MARQUIS on September 12, 1988, a shoreside crane lifting a payloader into the hold, collapsed onto the ship. CANADA MARQUIS had a hole in her tank top and damage to her hatch coaming.

Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Dock Collapse Changes Routes

09/11:
The dock collapse in the Rouge has apparently diverted several vessels that normally haul ore between Marquette and Rouge Steel. Lee A. Tregurtha made a rare visit to Taconite Harbor on 9/7, Charles M. Beeghly was headed for Midwest Energy in Duluth on 9/9 (probably to load for Taconite Harbor), and Elton Hoyt 2nd. loaded a stone cargo at Drummond Dolomite on 9/9.

The U.S. Coast Guard reported yesterday that seven percent of the stone has been removed.

Reported by: Mike Cleary




Twin Ports Report

09/11:
The cruise ship Columbus departed Duluth about 6 p.m. September 9. Improvements made to the dock behind the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center enabled the ship to dock without any problems this year

Mesabi Miner was due into Superior's Midwest Energy Terminal on September 9, but was instead sent to load at the BN ore dock. Charles M. Beeghly is now due at Midwest Energy Terminal on Sept. 10 and Lee A. Tregurtha on September 13. Both are infrequent callers at the coal dock.

After a season of infrequent visits, the Joe Block is back at the DMIR ore dock in Duluth on September 10 for its second call in about a week. Another infrequent caller, Edwin H. Gott, was also due in yesterday.

Reported by: Al Miller




Today in Great Lakes History - September 11

The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (1) was patched and refloated on September 11, 1944. She had sunk in 80 feet of water after a collision with the steamer D.M. CLEMSON (2) off Old Point Light, on June 15, 1943. On May 6, 1944 the barges MAITLAND NO.1 and HILDA were employed as pontoons for the salvage operation positioned over the sunken hull. cables were attached to the HUMPHREY's hull and to the barges. The hull was raised through a series of lifts which allowed it to be brought into shallower water. Partial buoyancy was provided by the HUMPHREY's ballast tanks which were pumped out to about 25% of capacity. The HUMPHREY was patched and refloated on September 11, 1944. She was taken to the Manitowoc Ship Building Co. first for an estimate of repairs which totaled $469,400, and then was towed to Sturgeon Bay for reconditioning which was completed at a reported cost of $437,000. Captain John Roen's Roen Transportation Co. assumed ownership on September 18, 1944 and the next year the ship was renamed b) CAPTAIN JOHN ROEN. She re-entered service on May 1, 1945 chartered to the Pioneer Steamship Co. on a commission basis.

On September 11, 1987 while in lay-up at Point Edward, the FORT YORK caught fire which gutted her bridge.

Carrying cargos off the Lakes, the CANADA MARQUIS departed Halifax bound for Philadelphia with a cargo of grain. The HON. PAUL MARTIN departed Halifax the same day on her way to Tampa with a load of gypsum.

The HORACE JOHNSON sailed on her maiden voyage light from Lorain September 11, 1929 bound for Two Harbors, MN to load iron ore.

Data from: James Neumiller and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Transfer Tow Arrives in Thunder Bay

09/10:
The tug Avenger IV and Canadian Transfer arrived in port at 0100 hrs this morning. The tug departed immediately, heading back to the Soo. The Tranfer was scheduled to enter the dry dock at first light. At last report she was anchored 1.75 miles from the North entrance.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Dock Collapses on Rouge River - Update

09/10:
On 4 Sept., a dry cargo dock on the south side of the Rouge River in Detroit collapsed, spilling stone on the dock into the river. Navigation was restricted to vessels with a draft of no more than 21 feet. As of 9 Sept., 1,800 cubic yards of material had been removed. A draft of 25 feet is expected to be available on the southern half of the river by the morning of 14 Sept. According to information from the Lake Carriers Association cited by the U.S. Coast Guard, six iron ore shipments to facilities on the river have been canceled as a result of the dock collapse. Originally, it had been estimated that the river would be restricted for 30 days and Blue Circle Cement has forecast losses approaching U.S.$1 million if that occurs.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Canadian Transport Delivers Annual Load

09/10:
The Canadian Transport entered the Keweenaw waterway at 1330 yesterday from the Upper Entry. She turned at Harrinton Island and backed the rest of the way to the Mattila Dock in Hancock, Michigan. She has the annual load of salt for the Copper Country.

Reported by: Bill H.




Busy day in Buffalo

09/10:
It was a rare busy day in the Port of Buffalo yesterday with four vessels visiting. The George A. Sloan was at the sand docks, the Kinsman Independent was unloading grain, the English River was at the LaFarge cement dock and the Stephen Reinauer was unloading at Mobil.

Reported by: Coonly




Today in Great Lakes History - September 10

The METEOR (2) was towed from Manitowoc by the tug JOHN ROEN IV to Superior on September 10, 1972.

The Harry Coulby (now Kinsman Enterprise) turns 71 years old on September 10. When she entered service on this date in 1927, the 631-foot bulk freighter was the third largest on the Great Lakes.

While upbound in the Welland Canal on September 9, 1986 it was noted that the port anchor of the J.W. McGIFFON was missing, her chain was almost touching the water.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Transfer Tow passes Through the Soo

09/09:
The Canadian Transfer tow heading to Thunder Bay passed Detour Village yesterday morning. She came in with one tug pulling her about 9:15 A.M. There was a second tug waiting for them in the River. The second tug went to her stern and the crew of the Transfer handed down a tow line to the tug.

The Cason J. Callaway passed the group near the Drummond Isle ferry dock on her way to the locks.

Reported by: Jill Lucy (Snappy)




Vessel Survey

09/09:
The major U.S.-Flag Lakes lines had 66 of their 69 vessels in service on September 1, an increase one dry-bulk carrier compared to a year ago. Prior to the survey date, the cement carrier PAUL H. TOWNSEND entered short term lay-up, and on September 3, the ore carrier EDWARD L. RYERSON likewise entered short term lay-up.

Visit the Lake Carriers'Association home page for complete details





Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Toledo

09/09:
The Great Lakes Maritime Academy will have a recruiting representative in Toledo at the 1998 Maritime Market. The Maritime Market, sponsored by the SS Willis B. Boyer, will be held Saturday, September the 19th at the Toledo Sports Arena from 10am to 5pm. Anyone who wants to learn more about the great career opportunities available as a licensed officer aboard Great Lakes commercial vessels is encourged to attend.

Reported by: Gary Schweitzer




New Threat to Lakes Shipping

09/09:
A story in the September 2nd Wall Street Journal reports that the administration is likely to propose a new "user fee" to pay for operations and maintenance of channels and harbors. An administration proposal says the fee would be paid by "the primary users of federal channel and harbor projects, namely the commercial vessel owners/operators." The fee would be based on such factors as ship size, "movement frequency and the operational characteristics of particular vessel categories."

The Supreme Court earlier this year struck down the harbor-maintenance tax as applied to exports passing through U.S. harbors. The court said the tax, which was part of a 1986 law, violated a constitutional ban on taxation of exports. Recently, the U.S. Court of International Trade said the harbor-maintenance tax also can't apply to charges imposed on shippers for transporting passengers. The administration is expected to send a formal proposal to Congress soon.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 09

The WOLVERINE (4) was launched September 9, 1974 for the Union Commerce Bank (Ohio), Trustee (Oglebay Norton Co., mgr.), Cleveland, OH.

DETROIT EDISON (2) was launched September 9, 1954 as a) DETROIT EDISON (2) for the American Steamship Co. (Boland & Cornelius, mgr.) Buffalo, NY.

The Steamer Pere Marquette #18 sank on September 9, 1910 with a loss of 29 lives. No cause for the sinking has ever been determined. The Pere Marquette #17 picked up 33 survivors, losing 2 of her own crew during the rescue.

Data from: Max S. Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

09/08:
The cruise ship Columbus docked Tuesday morning behind the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center.

The fall grain rush seems to be well under way in the Twin Ports. On the morning of Sept. 8, salties were loading at the Cargill, Peavey and Harvest States elevators while another was unloading at the Duluth port terminal. Three more salties are anchored on Lake Superior waiting for loading berths.

Reported by: Al Miller




Dock Collapses on Rouge River - Update

09/08:
Dredging operations were underway on September 6th to clear the channel of stone from the DMT1 dock in the Rouge River. On the 4th the dock collapsed causing the pile of stone on the dock to go into the river (See original story dated 9/06). No large vessels have entered the Rouge since the collapse. However, the tug Karen Andrie with the barge A-410 and the tug Rebecca Lynn and barge A-410 have moved through the river since the accident. Dredging is being done by Faust Corp. with the Gaelic Tugboat Co. moving the spoils by barge to Pte. Mouillee off the Detroit River Light.

Reported by: Wade P. Streeter




Free Cruises on the Saginaw River to Resume today

09/08:
As A reminder, the Princess Wenonah is scheduled to resume the free and very popular cruises on the Saginaw River this morning. The cruises are offered on a first come first served basis. The dock can be found at the southeast corner of the Veterans Memorial bridge on the east side of the river. This cruise has a historian aboard that tells all about the events that have been part of the history of the development of this mighty river.

Please call (517)891-BOAT if you have any questions.

Reported by: Dan Maus




Today in Great Lakes History - September 08

The GEMINI sailed on her maiden voyage in August 1978 from the shipyard to load fuel oil at Baytown, TX, for delivery at Detroit, MI. Passing upbound the next month on September 8th through the Welland Canal, GEMINI became the largest U.S. flagged tanker on the Great Lakes with a capacity of 76,000 barrels.

The W.E. FITZGERALD was launched September 8, 1906 for the Chicago Navigation Co., Chicago, IL (D. Sullivan, mgr.).

The W.W. HOLLOWAY was launched September 8, 1906 as the straight decker a) HENRY A. HAWGOOD for Minerva Steamship Co. (W.A. & H.A. Hawgood, mgr.), Cleveland.

The RADIANT departed the shipyard September 8, 1913 light on her maiden voyage bound for Montreal, Que.

On September 8, 1985 the downbound the Panamanian NORCHEM collided with the upbound CANADIAN PROSPECTOR near Kanawake. PROSPECTOR had little damage but NORCHEM was ripped open near her port anchor.

Data from: James Neumiller, Al Miller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Transfer Tow from Saginaw Underway

09/07:
About 0900 hours this morning the tug Avenger IV and tug Wisconsin began the long operation of towing the Canadian Transfer to Thunder Bay. (see original story dated 9/04).

The Avenger IV is pulling from the bow and the Wisconsin is tailing off the vessel, playing rudder. The Transfer's prop was turning at a good clip and the bow thruster was also functioning.

At 12:30 P.M. the tow entered Saginaw Bay setting a course north enroute to Thunder Bay.

The tow is heading to the Pascol Engineering's dry dock in Thunder Bay. This is the closest dry dock available to the Transfer. Reports from Thunder Bay have the Canadian Olympic occupying this dry dock, but should be clear by the time the Transfer arrives.

Reported by: Dan Maus




More Trouble on the Saginaw River

09/07:
When the Cuyahoga entered the Saginaw River this morning she became stuck on the same shallow spot where she had grounded in June. The vessel had to work to get her self free, but did not require lightering as she did last time. Once free, the Cuyahoga tied up at the Buena Vista dock and began off loading her cargo.

This same spot has given a few other vessels problems , it would seem these ships should keep a more shallow draft going to Saginaw, at least until the problem is corrected .

Reported by: Dan Maus




Canadian Venture Returns to Service

09/07:
Upper Lakes Group's Canadian Venture returned to service the afternoon of Saturday September 5. She departed upbound in the afternoon, passing under the Bluewater Bridge at 3:30pm. The ship was laid up in the North Slip in Point Edward with a damaged engine, caused when the lubrication system failed.

Reported by: Bill Moran




Today in Great Lakes History - September 07

On September 7, 1978 the ROGER M. KYES (b. ADAM E. CORNELIUS) lost all power in Lake St. Clair requiring tug assistance from the GLT tugs MARYLAND and MAINE which escorted her to the Great Lakes Steel dock.

The CADILLAC (4) was laid up on September 7, 1981 for the last time at Toledo, OH. She was later transferred to a West coast marine operation in preparation for conversion for a proposed container ship for service between Chicago, Detroit and Quebec City. However these plans never materialized.

On September 7, 1921, the D.G. KERR pulled up to the ore dock at Two Harbors, MN to load exactly 12,507 gross tons of iron ore in the record breaking time of sixteen and a half minutes. This was accomplished through the cooperation of the dock superintendent, the dock employees concerned, the ship's captain and crew and the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. as a means of "showing up" the competition. Her time of arrival and departure to and from the dock took only nineteen minutes. For comparison, a good average loading time at that time was about three hours and forty-five minutes.

On September 7, 1975 on the St. Marys River loaded with iron ore pellets, the WILLIAM G. MATHER, forced out of the channel by a salt water vessel, struck bottom. Upon proceeding further onto Lake Huron it was soon discovered that her pumps were unable to cope with incoming water caused by the damage. She was beached at Frying Pan Island in 19 feet of water when it became evident they couldn't make dock.

Data from: Al Miller, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Transfer in Saginaw with Rudder Damage Update

09/06:
Yesterday morning assisted by tug, the M/V Canadian Transfer was moved across the river to a grain elevator to clear the 6th Street turning basin.

Sources close to the Great Lakes Towing Co. are saying that the tug "Wisconsin" will be crewed up from Detroit and go to Saginaw to assist the "Canadian Transfer" out of the Saginaw River. At 12:25 A.M. this morning, the tug had departed her base in Detroit and finished fueling at Sterling Fuels. As she headed upbound she gave an estimated passage time of 21 hours to Bay City.

The "Wisconsin" will escort her out of the Saginaw River and up to the Soo where she will be transfered over to other tugs.

This marks the "Wisconsin's" first long trip for the 1998 shipping season. The last long trip she made was tailing off on the "S.T. Crapo" as she was towed up through the Detroit River, Lake St. Clair and the St. Clair River in September of 1997.

Reported by: Dan Maus and Wade P. Streeter




Dock Collapses on River - Detroit

09/06:
Sometime between 8:00 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., the lower portion of the DMT 1 (Conmix) dock collapsed into the Rouge River. Into the river went the majority of the stone that was unloaded by the M/V Charles E. Wilson earlier that day. No word on the cause, however, this is a "new" dock for the Rouge River this year. The Lee A. Tregurtha, outbound, encountered and reported the collapse. She was able to pass the obstruction only by skillful shiphandling. The river is obstructed to just past the middle of the channel. USGG Captain of the Port has restricted traffic in the Rouge to no more than 75 feet wide, and no more than 22 feet in draft.

Emergency dredging was scheduled to begin some time today. No word yet as to who will be doing the dredging. It appears that the M/V Louis R. Desmarais successfully transit the river this morning and are now due to depart Blue Circle Cement (St. Mary's) at approximately 0200. No word yet on whether they had any problems or not.

Reported by: Wade P. Streeter




C. Columbus Update

09/06:
The cruise ship C. Columbus arrived in Milwaukee on Saturday morning, Sept. 5 with a shipload of German tourists ready to inspect a city rich in German heritage. Interestingly the Columbus docked at the Group Milwaukee US Coast Guard base. This dock is a more scenic dock than last year when they had to tie up at our liquid petroleum pier.

The C. Columbus left at 5:00PM bound for Beaver Island. They will be back in Milwaukee on Sept. 25 with another tour.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Today in Great Lakes History - September 06

The S.S. Badger was launched on September 6, 1952, at Sturgeon Bay, WI. In a christening ceremony that included the S.S. Spartan (launched earlier that year). The S.S. Badger was named in honor of the University of Wisconsin. The Badger was built by Christy Corporation, and is powered by two Skinner 4 cylinder Steeple Compound Unaflow Marine Steam engines, developing over 7,000 horsepower. She was the last of the large, coal-fired steamers to be built in the United States, and the only ship of her type still operating on the Great Lakes. The S.S. Badger offers seasonal passenger service from Ludington, MI to Manitowoc, WI from mid May to early October.

The BELLE RIVER began her maiden voyage when she loaded 56,073 long tons of western coal at Superior, WI on August 31, 1977 and arrived at Edison CO's Belle River power plant at Recors Point on September 6, 1977. today sails as: b) WALTER J. McCARTHY JR.

On Sunday morning September 6, 1990 at approximately 0800, the BUFFALO, traveling upstream on the Saginaw River, passed the JUPITER which was unloading gasoline at the Total Petroleum dock near Bay City, MI. The ship's passing caused a suction which pulled the JUPITER away from the dock. The aft pilings subsequently broke away and the parting fuel lines caused a spark which resulted in a fire which totally destroyed the tanker. One of the JUPITER's crew was lost overboard.

On September 6, 1992 the H. LEE WHITE was in tow of the "G" tugs COLORADO and LOUISIANA entering the Trenton Channel when she struck a section of the toll bridge at Grosse Ile, MI knocking down a 150 foot span immediately east of the main river channel. The WHITE was not damaged but a new section of the bridge had to be installed at a cost of $1.7 million. The bridge was back in service in late January, 1993.

The CHARLES E. WILSON completed her sea trials on September 6th.

The GEORGIAN BAY collided with the steamer CHARLES HUBBARD in the fog-covered lower St. Marys River September 6, 1955.

On September 6, 1989 the Twin Screw Rail Car Ferry GRAND RAPIDS left Muskegon in tow of the tugs ANGLIAN LADY and PRINCESS NO.1 and arrived at Port Maitland, Ont. on September llth. Scrapping was completed in the fall of 1994. Data from: Max S. Hanley Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Algoma awards $5.3 million contract to Port Weller Dry Docks

09/05:
(St. Catharines, Ont.) – Sept. 4, 1998 – Algoma Central Marine has awarded a $5.3 million contract to Port Weller Dry Docks for a major refit of the self-unloader M.V. Agawa Canyon. As a consequence of this contract and other work already underway at Port Weller, more than 50 new employees have been hired, bringing total employment at the Dry Docks to more than 450. Steel-cutting and other preparatory work to renew the Agawa Canyon will begin in October, and the ship will arrive at Port Weller in mid-December. The ship will be delivered in April, 1999 to coincide with the beginning of the Great Lakes shipping season. This contract represents the third modernization of this type for the Algoma fleet in less than three years. Since 1996, two other Algoma vessels, the M.V. Algorail and the M.V. Algoway, have undergone similar mid-life refits at Port Weller. In July, the M.V. Algowest was rededicated after $20 million conversion to a self-unloader at Port Weller.

"This renewal of the Agawa Canyon demonstrates our confidence in Port Weller Dry Docks, and in the long-term viability of Great Lakes shipping," said Tim Dool, Vice President, Marine Group. "This investment will ensure the Agawa Canyon will serve our customers well for the next 20 years," added Dool. The 646.5-foot Agawa Canyon, a self-unloading bulk carrier with a 24,500-tonne cargo capacity, was built in 1970 at Collingwood Shipyards in Collingwood, Ont.

"The shipbuilders of Port Weller deserve to be proud of their high-quality work," said Charles Payne, General Manager, Port Weller Dry Docks. "Their skill and expertise, combined with their teamwork, is the reason we have been awarded this contract."

A new, patent-pending gate, designed by Algoma in co-operation with EMS-Tech Inc., Belleville, Ont., will be installed, making the Agawa Canyon one of only two ships in the Algoma fleet with this unique innovation. Major components in the cargo holds will be replaced, the hydraulic systems in the tunnels renewed, and fixed frame rollers installed. Like the Algorail, the Agawa Canyon will also be fitted with wash water holding tanks, which offer both environmental and economical advantages. "Because these tanks enable the ship to contain cargo sweepings and wash waters, our customers will benefit by greatly increased efficiency in loading and unloading cargo," said Al Vanagas, General Manager, Ship Management.

The Agawa Canyon is a part of Seaway Self Unloaders' fleet of 21 vessels. St. Catharines-based Seaway Self Unloaders manages commercially Algoma's self-unloading vessels. "These ships serve an important niche in Great Lakes shipping, for customers and facilities which require their unique characteristics, shorter length, narrower breadth, and a bow-positioned unloading boom. These vessels excel in narrow waterways and docks that larger, full Seaway-sized vessels cannot reach," said Wayne Smith, Vice President and General Manager, Seaway Self Unloaders. Port Weller Dry Docks is the only Canadian shipbuilder on the Great Lakes. A division of Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd., Port Weller was established in 1946, and received ISO 9002 certification in 1997.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 05

On September 5, 1964, the 730-foot bulk freighter Leecliffe Hall sank after colliding with the Greek ocean vessel Appolonia in the St. Lawrence River.

The CHI-CHEEMAUN completed her sea trials on September 5, 1974 and then cleared the shipyard on September 26th.

The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS cleared Lorain on her maiden voyage September 5, 1942.

The MORGAN, JR. returned to service September 5, 1948 after repairs suffered in an accident in June.

The NEW QUEDOC arrived at McLouth Steel, Trenton, MI on her maiden voyage September 5, 1960 with a load of Labrador iron ore.

The WYANDOTTE (2) was towed down the Welland Canal on September 5th & 6th on her way to the cutter torch.

Data from: Jody L. Aho,Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Transfer in Saginaw with Rudder Damage

09/04:
On Wednesday the M/V Canadian Transfer sail into the Saginaw River with a load of cargo. Some time after unloading the vessel headed up river to turn around when she experienced some type of rudder failure. Reports from the river this morning have the vessel's rudder broken off and it is being supported by three chain falls. Ship yard personal are on scene and there is no word on when she'll be seaworthy. She is tied up at Saginaw Rock Products Dock in East Saginaw.

Reported by: Dan Maus




Ryerson Enters Lay-up

09/04:
Due to a breakdown at the Escanaba loading dock, The Edward L. Ryerson was laid up at Bay ship yesterday, September 3. She arrived at berth 8 at 1524 hrs. The layup looks to be 30 days. She will then fit out and run the remainder of the season. The painting over of her "Inland Steel" billboards on the side of the vessel is now complete.

Reported by: R. Brezinski




More on Davie Industries

09/04:
Davie Industries was forced to shut down on September 3 putting 1,060 employees out of work according to the Globe and Mail of Toronto. The shipyard's parent company, Dominion Bridge Corp. was reported to have sought bankruptcy protection eariler this week.

Two potential buyers of the Lévis shipyard are Groupe Océan Inc of Quebec City and Groupe Maritime Verrault Inc of Les Méchins, Quebec. According to the Globe and Mail, the yard's work-in-hand includes the construction of two Amethyst offshore oil drilling platforms and the modernization of an 84-year old (sic) oil rig called the Spirit of Columbus for two Brazilian clients.

Reported by: Norman Eakins




Twin Ports Report

09/04:
Kinsman Independent called briefly Sept. 3 at the former Great Northern grain elevator in Superior. This very old elevator, now run by General Mills, has been busily unloading a long string of grain hoppers -- most of them Canadian -- in recent days. The KI pulled out of the loading berth late in the afternoon and on Sept. 4 was loading at the Peavey Connors Point elevator.

Joe Block was loading Sept. 4 at Inland Steel's usual spot on the east side of the DMIR ore dock in Duluth. The Block was once a frequent caller in Duluth, but it has made far fewer calls here since the company leased the Adam E. Cornelius.

Reported by: Al Miller




News from the Seaway

09/04:
The new tanker STOLT KENT came back from Hamilton on Sept.2 docking at section 74 in Mtl. Hamilton was her only port of call on her first trip to the Lakes. I have more information on her. She was delivered a few weeks ago from a shipyard at Gijon, Spain. She has a length of 148.44 m., is 12 141 gross tons and is owned by Stolt Parcel Tankers Inc. Offered for sale lately and tenders ending at the end of last month were six navy ships described as minesweepers by the Canadian Government through its agency Crown Assets Distribution Center. All of them were available for viewing at Esquimalt, B.C. near Victoria. One of them was built in a Great Lakes shipyard. THUNDER (PB161) was built by Port Arthur Shipbuilding Co. of Port Arthur, Ont. Her keel had been laid down on Sept.lst, 1955, she was launched on Oct.27, 1956 and commissionned on Oct.3, 1957. Two others were built by Davie Shipbuilding Co. at Lauzon, Qc (now Lévis). They are FUNDY and CHIGNECTO commissionned respectively 0n Nov.27, 1956 and August 1, 1957.

Reported by: René Beauchamp




Greek Salty on the St. Clair

09/04:
The Greek-flagged MARIANA was upbound in the St.Clair River on September 2. She last visited as the ANAMELI in September last year. By all accounts we were lucky to see her as she caught fire in the Bosphorus while bound from Constantza, Romania with timber and steel for Canada on June 9. According to "Marine News" of the World Ship Society she was towed into the Sea of Marmara to avoid damaging nearby houses. The crew was then evacuated and the fire extinguished.

Reported by: Norman Eakins




Today in Great Lakes History - September 04

Two favorites of many boatwatchers, entered service on August 4. The William Clay Ford (1) entered service on August 4, 1953, and the Edward L. Ryerson entered service on August 4, 1960.

The MELISSA DESGAGNES sailed to Holland under her 'a' name ONTADOC (2) with a load of Bentonite from Chicago on August 4, 1979.

The E.J. BLOCK was laid up for the last time at Indiana Harbor, IN on August 4 1984, the E.J. BLOCK was sold for scrap in late May, 1987.

The D.M. CLEMSON (2) left Superior on August 4, 1980 in tow of Malcolm Marine's tug TUG MALCOLM for Thunder Bay where she was dismantled.

The HOCHELAGA (2) was launched August 4, 1949 at the Collingwood Shipyards Ltd., Collingwood, Ont. for Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., Montreal, Que

On a foggy August 4, 1977 the POINTE NOIRE went hard aground near the entrance to the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River and blocked the channel. After her grain cargo was lightered by Columbia Transportation's crane steamer BUCKEYE, the POINTE NOIRE was released on August 6th. She was reloaded in Hay Lake and continued her downbound trip. Repairs to her bottom damage were completed at Thunder Bay. Ont.

Data from: Jody L. Aho,Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Davie Industries future unclear

09/03:
Dominion Bridge Corp. has sought bankruptcy protection. The company is the parent of Davie Industries Inc., the shipyard in Levis, Quebec.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Transfer's Third Trip in Two Weeks to the Saginaw River

09/03:
Late yesterday, boatnerds along the banks of the mighty Saginaw River had the opportunity to see the new M/V Canadian Transfer sail into and tie up at the Beuna Vista Dock at Carrolton, north of Saginaw. It is likely she will be leaving sometime this morning. The vessel does attract a lot of attention as it certainly does look different than anything else on the lakes. Her pilot house now forward, from her former pilot house at the stern end to the different design of the superstructures at both ends. We wish her a long safe and profitable life.

Reported by: Dan Maus




Today in Great Lakes History - September 03

On September 3, 1977, the Belle River (now Walter J. McCarthy, Jr.) set a Great Lakes record for coal when it loaded 62,802 tons of coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal on its maiden voyage. This record has since been surpassed many times.

On September 3, 1981, the U.S. Steel bulk freighter Sewell Avery was laid up for the final time in Duluth.

Keel laying ceremonies for the 437 foot bow section of the ROGER BLOUGH took place on September 3, 1968 and was float launched December 21, 1968 less ballast tanks because the existing dry dock wasn’t wide enough to accommodate her 105 foot width.

SOODOC (b) AMELIA DESGAGNES ) departed on her maiden voyage when she loaded salt at Goderich, Ont. on September 3, 1976.

The SEWELL AVERY was laid up for the last time September 3, 1981 at Superior, WI.

The THOMAS LAMONT was cited for “exemplary service” by the U.S. Coast Guard. On September 3, 1981 for her role in the rescue of seventeen crew members from the burning CARTIERCLIFFE HALL on Lake Superior. The THOMAS LAMONT was laid up for the last time at Duluth’s Hallett dock #6A.

The H.H. PORTER sailed on her maiden voyage September 3, 1920 light from Lorain to load iron ore at Two Harbors, MN.

On September 3, 1985, PHILIP R. CLARKE plowed into the Drawbridge Cove Marina in Lorain's Black River damaging 5-10 small craft and sinking one at the steel dock. CLARKE managed to stop before hitting the Route 6 drawbridge.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Canadian Leader Update

09/02:
On August 21st the Canadian Leader ran aground in the St. Marys River.

The damaged vessel arrived at the Port Weller Dry Docks Monday night heading for the dry dock. She was under going a survey to determine the extent of damage on Tuesday morning.

Reported by: Roger Tottman




Algosteel Update

09/02:
It was reported last week that the Algosteel was towed to the Toledo Shipyard Drydock with rudder damage.

Latest reports from Toledo have the Algosteel in the drydock at Toledo Ship Repair until at least the 15th of September. Sources close to the vessel report she will be getting a new rudder built by a crew at the Toledo Ship Repair. The Captain who was commanding the vessel at the time of damage is now aboard the Algoville, the captian claims the vessel hit somthing in Georgian Bay while navigating in a marked channel.

Reported by: R. Stephens




Twin Ports Report

09/02:
St. Clair was scheduled to make an unusual appearance Monday night in Two Harbors.

Despite reports of a nationwide slowdown in grain exports, saltie traffic remains brisk in the Twin Ports. Peonia departed Aug. 31. On Sept. 1, Solveig is loading at Peavey Connors Point while Necat-A and Lake Erie are occupying the berths at Harvest States.

Reported by: Al Miller




Update on the Sherwin

09/02:
A call to the Interlake Steamship Co. reveals that the company has been conducting tests on putting the John Sherwin back in service as a self unloader. If she is converted to a self unloader, the Sherwin will sail as a steamer not a barge.

Reported by: Dustin




New Bob-Lo Ferry

09/02:
Until a few weeks ago, ferry service between Amherstburg and Bob-Lo Island was being provided by the CRYSTAL-O (the former Harsens Island ferry ST. CLAIR FLATS)which arrived on the scene in 1997. This ferry was proving inadequate with her 30 tonnes capacity in view of the increased construction activity on the island and has been replaced by a new 180 tonne capacity vessel.The new ferry is the M. BOURBONNAIS VI which was built this year at Masson, Quebec by Les Ateliers M. Bourbonnais Ltée. She was christened as the COURTNEY-O at Amherstburg on August 21 although as at last weekend neither the former or present name appeared on the vessel. Application of her new name will be quite a challenge as she is operating on a 24-hour, seven days a week basis. According to the "Amherstburg Echo" she cost $2.5 million which is "close to what her owner paid for the entire island". Still at Amherstburg is the tug MARVIN-O and her barge which provided service prior to the arrival of the CRYSTAL-O. This tug was built at Erieau as the BUOY TENDER in 1957.

Reported by: Norman Eakins




Free Cruises on the Saginaw River Update

09/02:
Due to mechanical problems, the free cruises on the Saginaw River had to be cancelled for this week. Beginning September 8th they will resume and the free trips will be extended until Friday, September 18th. The operators are sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused anyone. Please replan your trip and you can call (517)891-BOAT to see if the boat is running.

Reported by: Dan Maus




Today in Great Lakes History - September 02

ALGOSEA (built in 1970 by Lithgows Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland as Hull #1177) was launched on September 2, 1970 as a) BROOKNES for "Langra" Schiffahrsges G.m.b.H. & Co., Hamburg, Germany. She is now the c) SAUNIERE

ROBERT KOCH's first trip was on September 2, 1977 up the Welland Canal bound for Buffalo with cement.

The W.F WHITE was one of the earliest ships built as a self-unloader on the Great Lakes. On her maiden voyage September 2, 1915 the WHITE loaded coal at Erie, PA and sailed for Menominee, MI. She was the largest self-unloading bulk carrier on the Lakes at that time with a cargo capacity of 10,500 tons.

The RALPH H. WATSON departed light September 2, 1938 from Detroit, MI upbound to load iron ore at Duluth, MN. She was built as part of a fleet modernization plan for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH. of four new "GOVERNOR MILLER' class bulk carriers.

On September 2, 1938, the Ralph H. Watson, only the fourth steam turbine powered vessel on the Lakes, entered service.

HUBERT GAUCHER ran aground in the lower St. Lawrence on September 2, 1988. It took three tugs to free her, repairs took place at Quebec City.

ZIEMIA TARNOWSKA lost her engine while docking at Pier 24 in Cleveland, ramming the dock and caused about $100,000 in damage to the dock on September 2, 1988. The Polish vessel had minimal damage to her bulbous bow.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Ryerson to be Painted

09/01:
On August 29th the crew of the Ryerson was scheduled to remove the Inland Steel billboard from the Ryerson's port side. The starboard side will be painted out when she arrives in Indiana Harbor on Tuesday, September 1. The Sykes has already started to paint out the billboard.

Also reported is that the Ryerson my see a short lay-up around Labor Day and the possibility of another Lake Superior trip.

Reported by: R. Brezinski




Close call for Integrity

09/01:
While the tug/barge Jacklyn M./Integrity were departed Muskegon on August 25th the vessel is reported to have nearly collided with a sail boat in Muskegon Lake. The ship sounded the danger signal twice and then stopped the ship and backed up. The Coast Guard was there within 5 minutes. I have no confirmation on whether or not it did strike the boat.

Reported by: Scott Golin




Twin Ports Report

09/01:
Duluth's Hallett 5 dock has been busy, receiving George A. Sloan on Aug. 30 and Tadoussac Aug. 31.

Two unusual vessel calls are scheduled in the Twin Ports this week. Mesabi Miner is due into BN ore dock in Superior on Sept. 1 and Nanticoke is to call at the DMIR ore dock in Duluth on Sept. 2.

Everyone's favorite straightdecker, Kinsman Independent, is due into port Sept. 2.

Twin Ports boatwatchers got a treat Aug. 30 when Alpena and George A. Sloan both put in appearances in Duluth. Several camera-toting boat buffs were on the remains of the old Interstate Bridge as the Sloan headed up the St. Louis River in beautiful late afternoon sunlight.

Canadian straightdeckers have been scarce in the Twin Ports this summer, but Montrealais is back again, loading Aug. 28 at the Harvest States elevator.

Reported by: Al Miller




Hydrofoil Accident on Niagara River

09/01:
The Seaflight I, a 139-passenger Hydrofoil owned and operated by Hydrofoil Lake Jet Lines, struck and sank a sailboat and damaged several others on the Niagara River Saturday night. Media reports indicate that the Captain has been charged with safety violations after the Hydrofoil apparently lost control of it's steering. No injuries were reported in the incident.

A sharped tongue U.S. Coast Guard barred the Seaflight One from entering U.S. territorial waters until the steering system was repaired.

This incident is the latest of several that have plagued the cross-lake Ferry industry. Seaflight I ran aground last October near Grosse Island in Lake Erie. It took over 10 days to free the vessel. Seaflight I, and her sister ship Seaflight II, operate between the foot of Sherbourne Street in Toronto and Queenston - on the Niagara River.

Shaker Cruise Lines operates two smaller, 71-passenger Hydrofoils that have had their share of misfortune during the past 2 weeks. On August 18 the Sunrise VI suffered a damaged portside forward window that collapsed under a 7-foot wave. The result was a mayday call and response from Waterways I, Shaker Cruise Line's Lakerunner, and the Canadian Coast Guard. The Sunrise VI managed to pump out the water and arrived in Port Dalhousie under her own power. On Sunday, August 23, the Sunrise V struck a submerged object and suffered major damage to her propeller.

Captain Ihab Shaker, President of Shaker Cruise Lines, believes that the Recreational Boating Community needs to better understand Commercial vessels - now that cross-lake Service on Lake Ontario has been restored by 3 companies. In early July Captain Shaker hosted the Junior Sailing School of the Niagara on the Lake Sailing Club. The 1-hour visit included an address by a Senior Captain, a question & answer session about Hydrofoil operations, a trip up and down the Niagara River (including Wheelhouse and Engine Room visits) and pizza for lunch. Captain Shaker intends to maintain positive relations with the boating community and encourage communications between pleasure boaters and commercial operators.

Reported by: Erin Diel, Bill Moran and Steve Schultz




U.S. Steel says trade cases likely in Sept.

09/01:
Domestic steel producers will probably lodge formal trade complaints next month against foreign producers to stop a relentless onslaught of imports that are hurting the U.S. market, Paul Wilhelm, president of U.S. Steel, said Friday.

Wilhelm also said the high import level, which has depressed prices in the domestic market, will hurt his company's third-quarter earnings.

``Pricing has been devastated; our order entry is way off,'' Wilhelm said in a brief phone interview with Reuters. ``We had a good first half but the imports hit hard in the third quarter.

``Our third quarter will be hit. I can't tell you how much at this point, but it will be hit.''

According to the American Iron and Steel Institute, imports in the first half of the year totaled 18,238,888 tons, more than 12 percent higher than the same period last year.

Wilhelm said if that six-month total is annualized, imports are on track to surpass 1997's record full-year level of 31 million tons.

Wilhelm said his company and other U.S. integrated steelmakers are scheduled to meet in Washington, D.C., early next month, and at that time they will likely file unfair trade cases against foreign producers.

Trade cases typically ebb the flow of imports because foreign producers don't want to pay the penalties that the government can slap them with after the cases are filed.

To have penalties imposed against foreign steelmakers, the U.S. industry must prove it has been injured by imports. Wilhelm said U.S. producers have been accumulating data that prove injury for several months.

U.S. Steel, for its part, has curtailed some of its production operations because orders for steel have fallen off, Wilhelm said. That has forced the company to lay off about 100 hourly workers at one of its operations in Pittsburgh.

``Orders are off about 30 percent (for the current quarter) so far,'' he said.

Moreover, Wilhelm said prices have plummeted as a result of import pressure. He said the worst drop has been on hot-rolled sheet, a commodity product.

``That's not to say the (demand) isn't there,'' he said. ``It's still out there. But the speculation is that prices will keep going down so (customers) are holding off on ordering.''

Wilhelm said imports have been heavy from Asian countries, which are undergoing a currency crisis, but imports have been heavy as well from Russia and other former Eastern Bloc countries.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




Visit of Navy Ship

09/01:
The SAMUEL ELIOT MORISON,an active guided missile frigate touring the Great Lakes region, visiting communities along the lakes to give people a glimpse of the ship and Navy life, will be arriving at the Ogdensburg Port Authority in New York State at 4pm on Monday and present free guided tours for the public from 1 to 6pm on Tuesday. A committee from the local Chamber of Commerce will use this visit to take a sounding as to how interested people might be in a future proposal to bring the decommissioned Navy destroyer USS DES MOINES to the area as a tourist attraction.

Reported by: Joan Baldwin




Indiana Harbor Experiences Trouble

09/01:
The Indiana Harbor went to anchor off Indian Point at about 1900 hours Friday when she experienced a problem with her left propeller. She advised Sarnia Traffic that she didn't want to attempt passing under the Blue Water Bridge until she knew or corrected what was wrong. No update on what the problem was.

Reported by: Bruce Hurd




Navy Orders Barracks Craft

09/01:
The U.S. Navy said 28 Aug. that Marinette Marine Corp. of Marinette, Wis., is being awarded U.S.$32,490,516 for the design and construction of two barracks craft, APL 65 and APL 66. They will provide accomodations for crews of Navy surface vessels during repair and overhaul periods. Each is a semi-permanently moored, self-propelled barge that has berthing for 230, messing for 1,130 and other support facilities. Work on the two will be done by December 2000. Bids were solicited via the Internet and three were received.

Reported by: Steve Schultz
From the weekly electronic publication "The World Maritime News"





Free Cruises on the Saginaw River Update

09/01:
It was reported last month that free cruises were being offered on the Princess, a former ohio ferry boat [one of Millers ] now crowned Princess Wenonah in Bay City.

The last cruise is scheduled for this Friday, September 4th. The free Saginaw River cruises have been wildly popular and are usually filled by 9:15am or so. So the crew were recommending that would be cruise-goers arrive by around 0900 to pick up a ticket. If you would like to take a cruise please call 517-891-BOAT to verify the boat is sailing that day.

Reported by: Vernon Sondak




The Best of Marquette 1984-1998

09/01:
Marine Photographer Rod Burdick has announced his new catalog of vessel photographs titled: "The Best of Marquette 1984-1998"

It features photos taken during those years. Arrivals, departures, loadings, unloadings, and night scenes are featured. The Catalog can be ordered by sending $3 to:
Rod Burdick
412 Edsel Apt 4
Kingsford MI 49802
Ordering information is included.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 01

Tragedy struck four days after the launch of the AGAWA CANYON, September 1, 1970, when the ship was rocked by an engine room explosion killing one of the crew and injuring seven more. The AGAWA CANYON entered service in November, 1970. New engines were fitted in 1975, equipped with four 10 cylinder, two stroke cycle, single acting opposed piston diesel engines, 203mm (8") bore x 254mm (10") stroke, built in 1970 by Fairbanks, Morse (Canada), Kingston, Ont. Total bhp 6,680. Rated service speed: 12 knots (13.8 mph).

LAKE NIPIGON was launched September 1, 1970 as a) TEMPLE BAR, BR.341240, for Lambert Bros. (Shipping) Ltd., London, England.

Upon her arrival at Quebec City on September 1, 1962, the LAKE WINNIPEG was the first vessel to enter the Nipigon Transport fleet.

ROGERS CITY (2) was launched September 1, 1923 as a) B.H. TAYLOR, the third self-unloader built for the Bradley Transportation Co., Rogers City, MI.

From September 1, 1947 to September 15, 1959 the MESQUITE was stationed at Sault Ste. Marie, MI

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





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