Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News ARCHIVE

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Blough Sails, Others Anchor

09/30:
Roger Blough ended its lay-up when it departed the Twin Ports about 4 p.m. Sept. 29 bound for Two Harbors. The vessel gave its security call as departing from "west of 6 Missabe" (the DMIR dock in Duluth), so it wasn't clear whether it went there to take a partial load or to complete preparations for getting under way.

Edgar B. Speer is slated for an unusual loading. It's scheduled to take a partial load in Silver Bay on Oct. 1, then complete loading in Two Harbors with cargo destined for Conneaut on the 4th.

Foul weather on the lower lakes forced several GLF vessels to anchor. The fleet's hotline reported that Cason J. Callaway was waiting for weather in Gary; Philip R. Clarke was waiting for weather in Conneaut; George A. Sloan and Myron C Taylor were anchored in the Straits of Mackinac; and Calcite II was waiting for weather in Cleveland.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Straits Boatwatchers Get Rare Treat

09/30:
As mentioned above the forecasted heavy winds sent the George A. Sloan and Myron C Taylor to anchor in the Straits just off of St. Ignace. The Sloan arrived late Tuesday or early Wednesday, while the Taylor arrived about 5:00pm Wednesday, and stayed for only 3 hours. Nonetheless, it was a rare sight seeing the two USS boats at anchor together off of East Moran Bay.

Reported by: Terry Foley




Paul R. Tregurtha off normal run

09/30:
Interlake Steamship Company's M/V Paul R Tregurtha will be taking a short break from her normal coal run from SMET in Superior to Edison in St. Clair. After Loading at SMET as normal she'll unload in Marquette, MI. Then back to her usual run.

Reported by: Scott Tomlinson




Canadian Transfer participates in grain rush

09/30:
Upper Lakes' Canadian Transfer slowly backed away from the Sarnia grain elevator Tuesday evening at 8:30 with a full load of grain. Sarnia has seen above average traffic this summer.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 30

The 660 ft. forward section of the a)BELLE RIVER (b) WALTER J. McCARTHY, JR.) was side launched on September 30, 1976.

The ARTHUR SIMARD entered service on September 30, 1973 sailing to Montreal, Que. to load gasoline.

The GOVERNOR MILLER was towed down the Welland Canal on September 30, 1980 in tow of TUG MALCOLM, STORMONT and ARGUE MARTIN on her way to Quebec City.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY departed light on her maiden voyage from River Rouge on September 30, 1943 bound for Two Harbors, MN. to load iron ore.

On September 30, 1986 the Canadian Coast Guard vessel CARIBOU ISLE struck a rock in Lake Huron's North Channel and began taking on water. CCG SAMUEL RISLEY arrived and helped patch the ship. The pair the departed for Parry Sound.

On 30 September 1888, AUSTRALIA (wooden schooner, 109’, 159GT, built in 1862 at Vermilion, OH) was carrying cedar posts from Beaver Island to Chicago when she encountered a gale. She was laid on beam ends and sprung a leak. She headed for shelter at Holland, MI, but struck a bar and foundered in the mouth of the harbor. The wreck blocked the harbor until it was removed on 5 October. Her crew was rescued by the U.S. Lifesaving Service.

Data from: Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Blough to Depart Lay-up Today

09/29: 07:00 update
Exhaust was seen coming out of the stack on the Roger Blough this morning. The vessel is scheduled to departed Fraser Shipyards between 1300 and 1600. She was due to arrive in Two Harbors at 1800. The Blough entered temporary lay-up on August 18th.

The Arthur M. Anderson is also preparing to end her short-term lay-up. Crews are being called back to fit the vessel out. She entered temporary lay-up on September 5th.

In other interesting USS news, the Presque Isle will call on Cedarville yet again this season.

Reported by: David French and Al Miller




Seaway Queen Re-registered

09/29:
On Thursday September 30th, the ULS Corporation bulker Seaway Queen is scheduled to leave Toronto harbour around 08:00 for the Welland Canal.

While this may not seem such a news worthy detail, the fact that she will be sporting U.S. registration will be significant. She has been the scene of a movie shoot over the past few months and the Welland Canal transit is to be included within the finished movie rumored to take place in the 1930s.

Her Toronto registration will be replaced with Chicago for the duration of the Welland Canal transit. Once she reaches Port Colborne she will secure and Toronto will be re-applied to the ship's stern. This is a once in a lifetime chance for a unique photograph. She is currently due at Port Weller around 10:00 on the 30th.

Reported by: Jeff Cameron




CSL Niagara Visits Toledo

09/29:
Yesterday the CSL Niagara arrived in Toledo, making her first trip ever as that vessel. She is loading 980,000 bushels of soybeans for Baie Comeau. This load is about 62,000 bushels more than the traditional 730-foot straight decker normally loads. The Niagara is expected back to Toledo in October for a load of corn.

The grain rush is truly on at all three elevators in port. The Petka was at the ADM Elevator, Algoisle at Anderson's "K" elevator (near the railroad bridge) and the Canadian Voyager at Anderson's "E" elevator (ex Cargill). The CSL Niagara waited at the Kuhlman Dock for the Algoisle to depart.

The Calcite II was unloading a salt cargo at the A.R.M.S. Dock near the Craig Bridge (I-280) and the Southdown Conquest was at her dock.

At T.W.I. Dock were the salties Lake Ontario, Utviken and Gunay-A all unloading various cargoes.

Expected yesterday was the H.M. Griffith due at the Coal Dock and the Wolverine was due in with a load of ore pellets at the Torco Dock.

At the Toledo Shipyard was the small sandsucker F.M. Osborne who is in the drydock for survey and miscellaneous work.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Twin Ports Report

09/29:
Duluth's grain elevators enjoyed a full house Sept. 28, with unusual callers Algonorth at General Mills and Paterson at AGP. Montrealais continues its long stay in port at the Cargill elevator to load corn.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Algoway and Port Stanley

09/29:
On Monday the Algoway arrived off Port Stanley with a load of coal for Lakes Terminals and Warehousing. The Port Stanley harbor has seen severe silting and is in need of dredging. Vessels calling on the port have been carrying partial loads and still experiencing problems. The Algoway tried for 40 minutes to enter the harbor but could not make it in. She departed and took her cargo to Sarnia.

Reported by: Richard Hill




Today in Great Lakes History - September 29

PIERSON INDEPENDENT was launched September 29, 1906 as a) J.H. SHEADLE (1), US.203628, for the Grand Island Steamship Co. (Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co., Cleveland, OH., mgr.)

HENRY FORD II, 70, of Grosse Pointe, Michigan, passed away on September 29, 1987. Mr Ford's namesake was the Ford Motor Company self-unloader.

On September 29, 1986 the Polish tug KORAL left Lauzon, Quebec with the JOHN E.F. MISENER and GOLDEN HIND enroute overseas for scrapping.

On 29 September 1872, ADRIATIC (3 mast wooden schooner-barge, 139’, 129NT, built in 1865 at Clayton, NY as a bark) was in tow of the tug MOORE along with three other barges in Lake Erie in a heavy gale. She became separated from the tow and foundered. The entire crew of 7 was lost.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history






The News Archive 8/96 to present


Return to Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping


Twin Ports Report

09/28:
Twin Ports maritime traffic was fairly slow on the morning of Sept. 27.

Presque Isle was backed into the slip along the east side of DMIR Dock 6 after spending Sunday undergoing repairs at the port terminal. It was scheduled to load at Midwest Energy Terminal later in the morning.

Indiana Harbor was docked at the Duluth port terminal, ballasted down by the bow with repairs apparently under way around its stern. The vessel was expected to leave Duluth by the end of the day to proceed to Two Harbors to load taconite pellets.

Algorail was unloading salt at the Cutler-Magner dock in Duluth. Montrealais was at the Carill grain terminal and the saltie Paragon was waiting to load at Harvest States.

Reported by: Al Miller and Kent Rengo
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Cruise Ship Grounding update

09/28:
The damaged cruise ship Norwegian Sky returned to Québec City harbour on Sunday night with more than 2700 people onboard. The 848-foot cruise ship went aground early Friday afternoon in the St. Lawrence River, near the exit of Saguenay River.

Tying up at wharves 105 and 106, the vessel was inspected by divers on Sunday afternoon and Monday. The grounding is reported to have damaged her hull and the propulsion system. A Transport Canada spokesman said the ship is in stable condition and they have no worries that it will sink in port.

Passengers started to leave Sunday by plane and bus heading to Boston and Chicago. Norwegian Cruise Lines offered the stranded passengers a future cruise and paid for all their return expenses.

On Wednesday afternoon at about 5:00pm (high tide) the Norwegian Sky is expected to move to Davie Shipbuilding, in Lévis where repairs will be made. The entire crew will stay onboard while shipyard workers make repairs, it is expected to take two weeks.

Early reports point to a navigational error as the cause for the grounding. An official with Norwegian Cruiseline confirmed Sunday that the vessel had altered its course to watch some whales when it ran aground about 300 kilometers northeast of Quebec City.

Reported by: J.F. Boutin and Rose Phillips
Click here for a live cam on the Norwegian Sky




"Big 3" Trades Down Again

09/28:
Shipments of iron ore, coal and stone from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports totaled 16.9 million net tons in August, a decrease of 3.8 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. These commodities comprised the bulk of cargo moving on the Lakes and so are considered the "Big 3" of Great Lakes shipping.

The steel-dependent iron ore trade continued to be plagued by all the foreign steel being exported to the United States. Shipments slipped below 7 million tons in August, a decrease of nearly 11 percent. For the season, the iron ore trade stands at 38.5 million tons, a decrease of 9.8 percent.

The coal trade benefited from a record month at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal and increased by 7 percent to 5.1 million tons. For the season, coal loadings are slightly ahead of last year's pace.

Stone loading again remained below last year' pace and for the season are nearly 8 percent less than 1998's end-of-August total.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association Click here for more information




August Cargo Report - Cuyahoga River

09/28:
Added to the Lakes Carriers' Association home page yesterday is the August Cargo Report for the Cuyahoga River.

Click here for the report




Coast Guard Intercepts Illegal Aliens

09/28:
A U.S. Coast Guard crew from Station Port Huron was driving in a government vehicle in the area of Algonac State Park in Michigan when they observed an unlit boat crossing the St. Clair River. The boat fit a known smuggling boat profile was maneuvering toward shore while a van pulled up to the park ramp area.

The boat stopped approximately 25-50 yards offshore and dropped off six illegal Chinese immigrants who waded to shore and got into the van. The station's crew proceeded to the ramp and attempted to get to the vessel but it fled the scene into Canadian waters.

The Clay Township, Algonac Police Department, U.S. Border Patrol and U.S. INS arrived shortly thereafter and detained the suspected smugglers and aliens.

All occupants were transported to Algonac Customs Office and formally arrested, and transferred to Detroit INS.




Project Liberty Ship

09/28:
The John W. Brown, one of two restored WWII Liberty Ships in the world, will be steaming from Baltimore to the Great Lakes next June. The reason is for a dry-docking at the Toledo Shipyard for approximately 15,000 rivets. Experienced riveting crews are few and far between on salt water these days. Not so on the Great Lakes where many riveted hulls are still in existence.

Project Liberty Ship has announced two, six hour "Voyage into History" day cruises while they are in the Lakes. The cruises include continental breakfast, all-you-can-eat buffet lunch, live music of the '40's, re-enactors demonstrating military equipment and flybys of wartime aircraft. All passengers are allowed to roam the ship, including the engine room to watch the triple expansion steam engine in action.

The first cruise is July 22 out of Detroit. The second cruise is July 29 out of Cleveland. Tickets are $115 and are partially tax deductible. This is truly living history. The Detroit cruise will be their 31st. All past trips have been sell outs.

Additional information and tickets can be obtained at Project Liberty Ship, PO Box 25846 Highlandtown Station, Baltimore, MD 21224-0546 410-558-0164 (fax) 410-558-0164

I had the opportunity to take the May 22nd cruise out of Baltimore this past spring and highly recommend it. It was totally entertaining from beginning to end. The Andrews Sisters, Abbott & Costello, Gen. George S. Patton and FDR were also on board. You will enjoy this trip. Do not be left at the dock next July!

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Today in Great Lakes History - September 28

On September 28, 1980, the Burns Harbor entered service, departing Sturgeon Bay bound for Superior to load pellets.

THOMAS WILSON left Toledo on September 28, 1997 in tow of the tug TUSKER for overseas scrapping. WILSON has been laid up since December 16, 1979.

On 28 September 1891, THOMAS PARSONS (2 mast wooden schooner, 135’, 350T, built in 1868 at Charlotte, NY) was carrying coal out of Ashtabula, OH when she foundered in a storm a few miles off Fairport, OH in Lake Erie.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Hull Problems May Send Schooner to Bottom of Bay

09/27:
The 105-foot two masted schooner Malabar, which had served for 12 years on Grand Traverse Bay, was deemed unsailable this season. Problems with her hull kept her from sailing and may lead to the vessel be sunk as a dive attraction.

The vessel's hull was constructed from ferro-cement. In this type of construction cement is applied to a chicken wire mesh in the shape of a hull. When the concrete deteriorates it is not water tight causing other areas to weaken and begin to crumble. The chicken wire frame may also rust.

The Traverse City Record-Eagle reports that faced with the high cost of repairs the owner Dick Budinger is considering sinking the vessel as a dive attraction. Budinger said he filed an application with the state Department of Natural Resources to scuttle the ship about a 1 1/4 mile southwest of Power Island. The paper quoted him as saying "If we can't find a way to repair (it) economically, then we may sink her as a dive site," he said. "She has some serious problems."

Reported by: Steve Vanden Bosch




Twin Ports Report

09/27:
Edgar B. Speer is scheduled to make a rare trip to Silver Bay, arriving there Oct. 1.

Presque Isle was under repair Sept. 26 at the Duluth port terminal. It was expected to return to the DMIR ore dock on the 27th to finish unloading stone.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Pipe Bridge

09/27:
Work will begin early on the 30th on the removal of the Baily Ave. Pipe bridge. The pipe bridge was built in 1927 to a height of 100 feet and a width of 170 feet. It carried two 20 inch and three 16 inch natural gas pipe lines. At that time it was expected that the Buffalo River would be dredged to allow vessel traffic past Baily Ave.

The river channeling stopped about a 1/4 mile downriver and was never completed. The pipe bridge has been a South Buffalo land mark for almost 70 years even though no ship has ever passed beneath it's span.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Today in Great Lakes History - September 27

The H.M.GRIFFITH experienced a smoky conveyor belt fire at Port Colborne, Ont. on September 27, 1989. Repairs were completed there.

The ROGER M. KYES proceeded to Chicago for dry docking, survey and repairs on September 27, 1976. She had struck bottom in Buffalo Harbor September 22, 1976 sustaining holes in two double bottom tanks and damage to three others.

The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (2) under tow, locked through the Panama Canal from September 27 to the 30th on her way to the cutters torch.

SEAWAY TRADER was launched September 27, 1947 as a) IMPERIAL COLLINGWOOD for Imperial Oil Ltd., Toronto, Ont.

On 27 September 1884, WALDO A. AVERY (wooden propeller, 204’, 1294GT) was launched at W. Bay City, MI. Her construction had been subcontracted by F.W. Wheeler to Thomas F. Murphy.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Salty Disabled in Lake Erie - Update

09/26:
The 428-foot Kroonborg departed her anchorage in Lake Erie yesterday afternoon bound for the Welland Canal.

The vessel had been anchored since Wednesday afternoon when the ship developed a problem with the main engine governor, leaving her crew of ten stranded in Lake Erie West of the Pelee Passage.

The ship was built in 1995 and the engine repair was under warranty.

A repairman was flow in from Florida and taken by the J.W. Westcott Company to the vessel. Crewed by Captain Sam Buchanan and Joe Salerno, the Westcott's back up mail boat Joseph J. Hogan experienced stiff winds and 3-4 foot seas on their four-hour trip out to the stricken vessel.

Repairs were complete in about two hours and the Kroonborg quickly lifted anchor and continued on her trip. She is loaded with grain from Thunder Bay destine for Tilbury England and she will be stopping in Montreal for fuel.




Toledo Update

09/26:
The grain rush continues in Toledo, the CANADIAN VOYAGER is due on the 27th, ALGORIVER on the 28th. It appears that the orders for the ALGONORTH and ALGOISLE have been switched. The NORTH will be heading over to Thunder Bay instead of Toledo. It is quite common this time of year to have vessels trade orders if there are lengthy dock delays along the various St. Lawrence ports.

The ATLANTIC ERIE arrived at Toledo this past Thursday evening (late). Yesterday she was loading a cargo of "bug dust" a finely granulated coal that is like sand at the T.W.I. Dock. She was due out last night or early today depending on how the loading process goes. This type cargo is difficult to handle. It is dirty and quite sticky once it gets in the cargo hold and is difficult to unload.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




Today in Great Lakes History - September 26

The CHI-CHEEMAUN cleared the shipyard on September 26, 1974.

The H.M. GRIFFITH was christened on September 26, 1973 at Collingwood. The CCGS GRIFFON was launched September 26, 1969 by Davie Shipbuilding Ltd., Lauzon, Que.

ROGER M. KYES (b) ADAM E. CORNELIUS) returned to service on September 26, 1984, she had grounded off McLouth Steel and ended crosswise in the Detroit River's Trenton Channel a month before.

The BELLE RIVER was side swiped by the Liberian FEDERAL RHINE at Duluth on September 26, 1985. Both vessels received minor damage.

On 26 September 1914, MARY N. BOURKE (WOODEN SCHOONER-BARGE, 219’, 920gt, BUILT IN 1889 AT Baraga, MI) was docked at Peter’s Lumber Dock in St. Mary’s Bay, 15 miles north of St. Ignace, MI. The crew was awakened at 9:30-10:00 p.m. by smoke coming from her hold and they escapes. The BOURKE burned to the waterline and the fire spread ashore, destroying the dock and a pile of lumber.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Cruise Ship Grounds in St. Lawrence River

09/25:
Early Friday afternoon the 848-foot cruise ship Norwegian Sky went aground on a sand bar off the shores of Ile Rouge, about 7 miles from Tadoussac on the St. Lawrence River, near the exit of Saguenay River.

The vessel is a brand new cruise ship with more than 2700 people onboard. She departed Québec harbour Thursday night, bypassing the Saguenay River en route to Boston, Mass. Two pilots from Quebec City were onboard.

The ship was able to escape from banks at 1500h during high tide. An upbound tug and a Canadian Coast Guard vessel, the Ile Rouge, helped free the ship by pushing on her stern. The Norwegian Sky was then directed to Ile aux Basques sector to anchor for an inspection by Transport Canada officials.

There were no injuries suffered during the grounding, but on-scene reports said that the passengers were assembled on deck with life jackets while the Norwegian Sky's crew made preparations to evacuate the ship with all the rafts and life boats ready to be launch. The situation on board was described as calm and evacuation was not necessary.

M.V. Norwegian Sky is the largest cruise ship to have ever been in Quebec City, a port that regularly receives large vessels such as the Queen Elizabeth II.

Reported by: J.F. Boutin
Click here for a live cam on the Norwegian Sky




Skillful Ship Handling at Saginaw

09/25:
The steamer Alpena was required to undertake some tight maneuvering in the Saginaw River turning basin at Saginaw Friday morning in order to work her way around the Joseph H Frantz.

The Frantz was docked at Valley Asphalt stone docks with its boom extended out and the stern partway in the turning basin. The Frantz had reported an electrical problem that apparently restricted her ability to reposition herself.

After a discussion of the situation between the captains of the two vessels, the Alpena moved up from the Lafarge Dock and eased around the Frantz, placing the bow near the west side of the river, then backing into the turning basin.

The Alpena was then able to complete the turn without incident and steam down river toward Saginaw Bay.

Watching the captains maneuver their vessels in the tight confines of the Saginaw River, even under ideal conditions, lends credence to the adage that they are the best ship handlers in the world.

Reported by: Stephen Hause




Twin Ports Report

09/25:
After unloading stone at the DMIR dock in Duluth, Presque Isle is scheduled to make a rare call Sept. 26 at Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior to load coal for delivery to Nanticoke.

Philip R. Clarke remains busy on the lower lakes. It loaded at Fairport on the 23rd and its due into Sandusky on the 24th to unload. From there it proceeds to Conneaut to load for Dunkirk.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Grain Rush in Toledo

09/25:
The grain rush for Toledo is going to be on a fast track during the month of October. Fourteen vessels are scheduled in so far and as the harvest progresses more boats will likely be calling there. Canadian Provider was in port yesterday. The Algonorth is the next vessel due in, sailing from Sarnia. The Algoriver will follow coming from Hamilton.

Reported by: Jim Hoffman




USS News

09/25:
In normal fashion, USS has swapped orders between the Edgar B. Speer and Edwin H. Gott. The Speer will now call on Conneaut on the 28th while the Gott will arrive in Gary on the 27th.

As reported above, another interesting trip will begin for the Presque Isle loading coal for Nanticoke.

Last but not least, the DM&IR update tape has the Roger Blough set to arrive in Two Harbors to load on the 29th. This will certainly be good for boatwatchers around the lakes. The Blough entered temporary lay-up on August 18th.

The Arthur M. Anderson is expected to return to service in the next few weeks. She entered temporary lay-up on September 5th.

Reported by: David French




Algogulf Departs

09/25:
The Algogulf departed Montreal yesterday on her first sailing this season. She will load in Pointe Noire QC, for a Lakes port, probably Hamilton.

Reported by: John Whitehead




Salty Disabled in Lake Erie

09/25:
The Kroonborg, a salty registered in the Netherlands, suffered a mechanical failure in Lake Erie leaving the ship at anchor in the area of Colchester, Ont. West of the Pelee Passage.

Crews from the J.W. Westcott Company in Detroit will depart Saturday in the back up mail boat Joseph J. Hogan to bring needed parts and a repair person to the stricken vessel. Repairs should be completed some time Saturday afternoon allowing the Kroonborg to coninue sailing downbound for Port Colburn.




Thorscape Waits

09/25:
The Singapore-registered Thorscape has been anchored in Toronto since August 10 awaiting some type of long-term charter to take her off the lakes.

The Toronto Star reports that vessel was owned by the Christensen Canadian African Lines (CCAL) of Toronto. Several years ago, CCAL sold it to a Singapore company but paid to keep running it as a charter. That charter ended July 25 because CCAL is replacing the Thorscape and a sister ship with newer models.

The international crew of 18 bide their time by completing various maintenance projects while on work hours. A rec room, gym and even a small swimming pool entertain the crew on their time off. The crew is also able to spend time ashore.

The going price for chartering a ship of her size is about $7,500 a day, and fuel is extra, said David Bauman, president of CCAL. He estimated the price of the ship at $4 million.

The Thorscape is not paying fees to the Toronto Port Authority, said Mike Jones, assistant harbor master in a statement to the Toronto Star. She moved from a commercial dock further into the lake to avoid paying docking charges.

Reported by: Jim Fitzgerald
Click here for the full story




Waterspouts Spotted Off Port Stanley

09/25:
Three to six waterspouts were sighted yesterday afternoon about 3 miles off Port Stanley harbor heading down the Lake. Residents lined the shore to view the event with the waterspouts shooting water about 50 feet in the air.

Reported by: Richard Hill




Proposed Ferry Service Threatens Lake Michigan Car Ferry

09/25:
A proposed high speed car ferry between Muskegon and Milwaukee is causing a controversy with many asking what effect it will have on the existing Lake Michigan Carferry.

The proposed ferry would be operated by Hydrolink LLC, a Wisconsin-based company. This company is intending to apply for a federal loan guarantee for approximately $80 million. If approved, the loan guarantee would give Hydrolink an unfair competitive advantage over the Lake Michigan Carferry.

The Lake Michigan Carferry (LMC)operating out of Ludington MI. was founded by a local entrepreneur, without government assistance. The LMC continues to operate today without any government assistance.

Click here for full details and how you can help.




Today in Great Lakes History - August 25

On August 25, 1984 the hard luck ROGER M. KYES (b ADAM E. CORNELIUS) grounded off McLouth Steel and ended crosswise in the Detroit River's Trenton Channel.

The GEORGE M. STEINBRENNER (2) arrived at Port Colborne, Ont. on August 25, 1978 in tow of the tug WILFRED M. COHEN for scrapping.

On 25 August 1919, CABOTIA (formerly HIAWATHA, wooden propeller freighter, 235'/1299GT, built 1880 at Gibraltar, MI) went ashore on Main Duck Island in Lake Ontario and split her hull, becoming a constructive loss.

On 25 September 1905, HENRY C. FRICK (steel propeller, 549’/6490GT, later MICHIPICOTEN) rammed and damaged the Michigan Central Railroad Bridge at Bay City, MI while leaving the Saginaw River on her maiden voyage. She and her sisters GARY, WILLIAM E. COREY and GEO. W. PERKINS, were the largest vessels on the Lakes when built.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Crewman Killed in Accident

09/24:
An Indian crewman on board the Lok Maheshwari was killed Wednesday morning in the Welland Canal. The vessel was tying up for inspection below Lock 1 when a pedestal roller on board the ship snapped, sending a line back, striking the man and throwing him into a metal rail.

The St.Catharines Standard reports that A. U. Dhanse, 52, of India, suffered massive injuries to his left arm and chest, and trauma to the back of his head. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

The 605-foot vessel was built in 1986 and is owned by the Indian Government. She is reported to be carrying steel coils from India bound for Cleveland.

The vessel was detained and inspected by Transport Canada officials. Reports this morning had the ship sailing on Lake Erie shortly after midnight.

The accident is being investigated by the Niagara Regional Police, Transport Canada and the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority.

Reported by: Bill Lloyd




CSL Management Changes

09/24:
Acomarit, a ship management and consultancy company has signed a deal with Canada Steamship Lines to take over technical operations of the CSL domestic fleet. Taking effect next month, Acomarit will assume responsibility for crewing, labor relations, maintenance and purchasing.

No changes are expected among shipboard personnel but some changes have all ready been made in the CSL offices with more expected.

In March of 1998 Acomarit was awarded the shipmanagement contract for Canada Steamship Lines' international fleet.

Acomarit has over 190 ships under management from offices in Geneva, Glasgow and worldwide.




Algoma's Remaining Vessels Join Grain Rush

09/24:
The rest of Algoma's laid-up bulker fleet is scheduled to come out within the next few days. Tentative sailing times are as follows:
Algogulf - En route to Pointe Noire ETA Sept 24; Algosound - Leaves today for Port Cartier; Algonorth - Sept. 24 for Toledo; Algoisle - Sept. 25 for Duluth; Algoriver - Sept. 26 for Toledo.

Reported by: David Swain




More Lay-ups

09/24:
The cement boat Paul H. Townsend was scheduled to enter a "temporary lay up" in Milwaukee yesterday.

American Steamship Company's Adam E. Cornelius is reported to be joining the US flag lay-up fleet. She will lay-up for a few weeks and the current plan is for her to tie up in Toledo, OH.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde and Scott B. Tomlinson




Twin Ports Report

09/24:
A truly rare sight greeted Twin Ports boatwatchers on Sept. 23: Both loading berths at the Harvest States grain elevator were occupied by straightdeckers. Loading in Berth 1 closest to the Blatnik Bridge was Kinsman Independent. On the other side of the terminal, Mapleglen occupied Berth 2.

Columbia Star was expected to stop briefly at the Duluth port terminal of repairs on Sept. 23 before proceeding to Midwest Energy Terminal to load.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Gap Continues To Widen In August

09/24:
Reduced demand for domestically-made steel and uneven demand for stone from the construction industry again produced a shortfall in U.S.-Flag carriage on the Great Lakes in August. Cargo movement in U.S. bottoms totaled 12,761,930 net tons, a decrease of 8.3 percent. The season-long slump has now left a gap of nearly 6.2 million tons between the end-of-August totals in 1999 and 1998.

Steel mill-bound iron ore cargoes slipped below 6 million tons in August as several ore carriers were withdrawn from service. For the season, the U.S.-Flag ore float stands at 33.2 million tons, a decrease of 10.9 percent.

Thanks to a record month at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal, coal loadings in U.S.-Flag lakers increased slightly in August, but the season-to-date total remains slightly behind last year's pace.

The steel- and construction-related slump in stone loadings showed no signs of ending in August; the month's total represents a decrease of 6.2 percent compared to the corresponding period last year. Since the resumption of stone loadings in late March, U.S.-Flag cargoes have declined by 11.7 percent.

The U.S.-Flag Lakes fleet had 62 of its 69 vessels in service on August 1, but as noted several ore carriers entered lay-up during the month. No firm sail dates have been established for those vessels (ELTON HOYT 2ND, ROGER BLOUGH and ARTHUR M. ANDERSON).

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association Click here for more information




Today in Great Lakes History - September 24

On September 24th the A.H. FERBERT (2) went hard aground at the Cut-Off Channel’s southeast bend of the St. Clair River. Six tugs, GLENADA, ELMORE M. MISNER, BARBARA ANN, GLENSIDE, SHANNON and WM. A. WHITNEY, worked until late on the 26th to free her.

The FITZGERALD’s first cargo of taconite pellets was loaded September 24, 1958 at Silver Bay, MN. for Toledo, OH.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 entered service September 24, 1924.

In early morning fog on the St. Clair River September 24, 1962 the J.L. REISS was hit three glancing blows by U.S. Steel’s SEWELL AVERY. The AVERY had lost control just below Robert’s Landing and crossed the channel from the Canadian side and struck the J.L. REISS which was proceeding slowly by radar on the U.S. side.

On September 24, 1952, the Charles L. Hutchinson entered service. This vessel was renamed Ernest R. Breech when it was sold to the Ford Motor Company in 1962, and it was given its present name, Kinsman Independent, when it was sold to Kinsman Lines in 1988.

On September 23, 1991, J.W. McGIFFON rescued several people in a 24' pleasure craft off Presque Ile State Park. The group had been disabled since the day before. They were taken aboard the McGIFFON and their boat taken under tow.

On 24 September 1902, H.A. BARR (3 mast wooden schooner, 217’, 1119GT, built in 1893 at W. Bay City, MI) was in tow of the “saltie” THEANO with a load of iron ore in a storm 30 miles off Port Stanley in Lake Erie. She broke her tow line in giant waves and foundered. THEANO rescued her crew.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Benson Ford Summer Home Sold

09/23:
The bow section of the former Benson Ford, a summer home on a 30 foot cliff located on the northwest corner of South Bass Island has a new owner.

After a twelve minute auction on Tuesday night the ship/house sold for $410,000 to Bryan Kasper, owner of the Kasper Auto Group of Sandusky. The former owner put about $700,000 into the structure and intended to use it for a bed and breakfast.

Mr. Kasper said that he plans to use it for a vacation home and keep it for about 50 years!

Reported by: Ed Miller




Algosound Departs Lay-up

09/23:
On Wednesday the Algosound departed her lay-up berth at Pascol Engineering's fit-out dock in Thunder Bay. She departed the dock early in the morning and went over to load grain at Richardson's Elevator.

The Algosound was in lay-up for 39 days arriving August 15 and departing September 22.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Algoisle to Sail

09/23:
The Algoisle is scheduled to depart Windsor Ontario Saturday, September 26th. She has not sailed at all this season.

Reported by: James H. Neumiller




USS News

09/23:
An interesting run will occur soon when the Edwin H. Gott when she calls on Conneaut with a load of ore, she is set to arrive there on the 27th.

The Philip R. Clarke has been on many lower lake runs for the past few weeks. She has done many shuttle runs from Conneaut to Dunkirk probably due to the other lay-ups in the fleet.

Reported by: David French




Today in Great Lakes History - September 23

On 23 September 1910, BETHLEHEM (steel propeller package freighter, 290’, 2633GT, built in 1888 at Cleveland) was carrying general merchandise when she went ashore in a gale on the SW side of S. Manitou Island in Lake Michigan. Lifesavers and the crew unloaded her over several days. Although battered by several storms while ashore, she was eventually pulled free and repaired. She lasted until 1925 when she was scrapped.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze




The Grain Rush Heats Up

09/22:
The Upper Lakes bulker fleet has begun their Fall return to the Lakes. The Canadian Provider began the parade yesterday and was on her way from Port Weller to Toledo. The Canadian Mariner is due out today, departing Toronto for a U.S. Lake Superior port. The Canadian Trader and Seaway Queen are scheduled to depart next week.

Ron Konkol reports that the Quebecois is also out of summer lay-up. She departed Pasco's Shearleg Dock in Thunder Bay Monday afternoon and went over to Valley Camp to load grain for a St. Lawrence River port. The vessel was laid-up for 56 days - July 27 to September 20.

Reported by: David Swain and Ron Konkol




Twin Ports Report

09/22:
St. Clair will spend a couple of days shuttling among Lake Superior ports. It's due to load coal at Midwest Energy Terminal in Superior on Sept. 21, unload that cargo at Taconite Harbor on the 22nd, and then proceed to Two Harbors to load taconite pellets on the 23rd.

Kinsman Independent is due back in Superior on Sept. 22 to load at Harvest States berth 1.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Interesting Trips for USS boats

09/22:
Cason J. Callaway is scheduled to make a rare appearance in Ashland, Wis., on Sept. 24 to deliver coal. Arthur M. Anderson, now laid up, usually handles the deliveries to Ashland.

The 1000-foot tug/barge Presque Isle is scheduled to arrive in Calcite, MI this morning to take on a half load of stone. She will then proceed to Cedarville MI to complete the load. From Cedarville the vessel will sail for the DM&IR dock in Duluth arriving on the 25th.

Reported by: Al Miller and David French




Civil War in Bay City

09/22:
See the Civil war encampment on the west banks of the Saginaw River at the Veterans Park, Bay City , Michigan Saturday September 25 and Sunday September 26th. Other sites on the river this weekend will include the Princess which is the only live steam walking beam engine steamboat on the Saginaw River. Actors dressed in period costumes will reenact battles that including firing cannons and music.

Reported by: Dan Maus




Today in Great Lakes History - September 22

On September 22, 1958, the Edmund Fitzgerald entered service, departing River Rouge, Michigan for Silver Bay, Minnesota on its first trip. The Fitzgerald's first load was 20,038 tons of taconite pellets for Toledo. The vessel would, in later years, set several iron ore records during the period from 1965 through 1969.

While in ballast, the ROGER M. KYES (b- ADAM E. CORNELIUS) struck bottom in Buffalo Harbor September 22, 1976 sustaining holes in two double bottom tanks and damage to three others, whereupon she proceeded to Chicago for dry docking on September 27, 1976 for survey and repairs.

While being towed from Duluth, MN by the Canadian tug TUSKER on September 22, 1980, the D.G. KERR (2) rammed into the breakwater at Duluth causing $200,000 in damages to the breakwater. The tow apparently failed to make the turning buoy leaving Duluth Harbor.

On September 22, 1911 the HENRY PHIPPS collided with and sank her Steel Trust fleetmate, steamer JOLIET (1), which was at anchor on the fog shrouded St. Clair River near Sarnia, Ont. The JOLIET (1) sank without loss of crew and was declared a total loss. The PHIPPS then continued her downbound journey and collided with the Wyandotte Chemical steamer ALPENA (1) which incurred only minor damage.

The T.W. ROBINSON and US.265808 (former BENSON FORD (2) departed Quebec City in tow of the Polish tug JANTAR bound for Recife where they arrived on September 22, 1987. Scrapping began the next month in October.

MATHILDA DESGAGNES was freed from polar ice in the Arctic on September 22, 1988 by the West German Icebreaker Research Vessel POLARSTERN.

On 22 September 1887, ADA E. ALLEN (wooden propeller steam barge, 90’, 170GC, built in 1872 at Walpole Island, Ont.) caught fire while moored at Amherstburg, Ont. She was cut loose and set adrift to prevent the fire from spreading ashore. She drifted to Bois Blanc (Bob-Lo) Island and burned to a total loss.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

09/21:
The fall grain rush continues to bring interesting visitors to the Twin Ports. Windoc nipped into port over the weekend, finished loading at AGP elevator in Duluth on Sunday -- a sure sign the rush has begun. Mapleglen is due in port on Sept. 21 to load at Cargill.

Another uncommon caller on Lake Superior was Earl W. Oglebay, which loaded Sept. 20 in Silver Bay.

Presque Isle has made relatively few trips to Duluth this season, but it's scheduled to call at DMIR on Sept. 24.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Lake Erie Coal

09/21:
Coal shipments from Lake Erie ports totaled 2,742,519 net tons in August, an increase of roughly 100,000 tons compared to the corresponding period last year. This August's total is also the highest level achieved by Lake Erie ports this season. For the season, the Lake Erie coal trade stands at 12.1 million tons, a decrease of 6.6 percent.

August coal shipments by port were as follows:

Toledo - 579,432 n.t.
Sandusky - 564,169 n.t.
Ashtabula - 798,110 n.t.
Conneaut - 800,808 n.t.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association Click here for more information




Bridge Work

09/21:
About a decade after its last major overhaul, Duluth's Aerial Lift Bridge will undergo another major repair project. The $5 million rehabilitation project will mean the bridge won't be able to life for ships from Dec. 15 until March 22. Lakers using the port for the remainder of the 1999 season will use the Superior entry and reach Duluth harbor and St. Louis Bay docks by the Front Channel.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Michigan Coast Guard Aids in Hurricane Rescues

09/21:
Two U.S. Coast Guard helicopters stationed in Michigan were recently deployed to Charleston, West Virginia to aid in flood relief efforts after a hurricane caused extensive flooding in the region.

One of Air Station Detroit's helicopters recovered two people and four dogs on Sept. 18. Both aircraft and all aircrews returned to base on Sept. 19.




Exotic Species Report

09/21:
The Lake Carriers Association has issued facts regarding a "white paper" written for the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality. This white paper is said to contain flaws in some sections dealing with the spread of exotic species and Great Lakes shipping.

Click here for more information





Today in Great Lakes History - September 21

ALGOWAY (2) left Collingwood on her maiden voyage in 1972 and loaded salt for Michipicoten, Ont. on Lake Superior.

On 21 September 1844, JOHN JACOB ASTOR (wooden brig, 78’, 112T, Built in 1835 at Pointe Aux Pins, Ont, but precut at Lorain, OH) was carrying furs and trade goods when she struck a reef and foundered near Copper Harbor, MI. She was owned by Astor’s American Fur Company. She was reportedly by the first commercial vessel on Lake Superior.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Thousand Footers Pass

09/20:
Twin Ports boatwatchers got a treat the morning of Sept. 19 when Paul R. Tregurtha and Oglebay Norton passed each other in the Duluth harbor basin. Oglebay Norton was outbound with coal from Midwest Energy Terminal while the Tregurtha was inbound to load at the same dock.

Paul R. Tregurtha approaching Duluth.
Paul R. Tregurtha in the Duluth ship canal (movie)
Oglebay Norton in Duluth harbor making the turn toward the ship canal.
Oglebay Norton entering the Duluth ship canal (movie)


Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Take A Trip on a 1000-footer

09/20:
The International Ship Masters' Association Port Huron Lodge is offering a Chance to win a trip on an American Steamship Company vessel.

A cruise aboard a lakes freighter is only available to the shipping company's customers and some family members. The only chance for the general public to enjoy a once-in-a-life-time cruise is through non-profit raffles such as this.

Grand Prize is one Trip for 4 Adults aboard an American Steamship Company thousand footer during the 2000 Sailing season.

Click here for more information




Today in Great Lakes History - September 20

On September 20, 1986, vandals started a $5,000. fire aboard the laid up NIPIGON BAY at Kingston where she had been since April, 1984.

GEORGE A. STINSON's self-unloading boom was replaced on September 20 1983. The Boom had collapsed onto her deck due to a mechanical failure on the night of April 19, 1983 at Detroit. No injuries were reported. She continued hauling cargoes without a boom until replacement.

On September 20, 1980, the EDGAR B. SPEER entered service.

The CHARLES E. WILSON sailed light on her maiden voyage from Sturgeon Bay September 20, 1973 bound for Escanaba, MI to load ore.

The CHARLES M. WHITE was christened at Baltimore on September 20, 1951.

On 20 September 1873, W.L. PECK (2 mast wooden schooner-barge, 154’, 361GT) was launched at Carrollton, MI.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Northshore Mining Co. to Remain Open

09/19:
Northshore Mining Co. in Babbitt and Silver Bay, Minn., announced Friday that it would not shutdown its plant this fall due to changes in its customers' orders.

The plant had idled one production line and had planned to idle the entire processing plant late this year. The company told the Duluth News-Tribune that the idle production line would remain out of service but that the plant itself would remain in operations.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Pig Iron

09/19:
In other Northshore Mining Co. news, officials are proceeding with ground work for a possible pig iron facility to be built within the current pellet plant at Silver Bay. Although CCI hasn't given official approval for the project, they have proceeded steadily in prep work, i.e., environmental permitting process.

Reported by: Dave Schauer




Today in Great Lakes History - September 19

LEON FALK, JR. and MENIHEK LAKE arrived in Spain on September 19, 1985 for scrapping.

When SATURN (4) entered service and made her first trip to Toledo, OH on September 19, 1974, she became the first of three tankers built for the fleet's modernization program.

The EDGAR B. SPEER departed the shipyard on her maiden voyage September 19, 1980 bound for Two Harbors, MN where she loaded her first cargo of taconite pellets.

The GRAND HAVEN (Twin Screw Rail Car Ferry) was laid up in the spring of 1965 at the old Pennsylvania Dock at Cleveland and later at dockage on the Old River Bed where she sank on September 19, 1969.

On 19 September 1893, SAMUEL BOLTON (wooden schooner-barge, 150’, 330GT, built in 1867 at Bangor, MI as a schooner) was loaded with lumber and being towed in fog in Lake Huron. She got lost from the tow and drifted ashore near Richmond, MI where she broke in two and was then torn apart by waves. She was owned by Brazil Hoose of Detroit.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Agreement Reached

09/18:
An agreement has been reached between the Interlake Steamship Co. and Steelworkers Local 5000.

Details were not available, but the tentative agreement will now be put to the union's membership for ratification.

Looks for updates as the information becomes available.




H. Lee White Departs Drydock

09/18:
American Steamship Company's H. Lee White departed the Toledo Ship repair drydock at 12:30 p.m. yesterday.

She tied up at the old Interlake Furnace for fuel and ballast and was due to head for Conneaut, OH. to load coal.




Twin Ports Report

09/18:
Edwin H. Gott made another trip to the DMIR in Duluth Sept. 17 to load pellets for Nanticoke. Before loading, the vessel stopped at the Murphy Oil fuel dock at the port terminal to refuel.

Tugs assist Federal Rhine on Sept. 17 as it crosses Duluth Harbor on its way to the Harvest States grain terminal in Superior.

Edwin H. Gott
Federal Rhine under tow.
close up of tug.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Joyce L. in Drydock

09/18:
The tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort is now on the drydock at Bayship in Sturgeon Bay for special hull paint before departing the Great Lakes for Mississippi.

The special hull paint will allow the vessel to sail in salt water. The new barge Great Lakes Trader is under construction in Pearlington, Mississippi.




No Rebound In Stone Trade In August

09/18:
Shipments of limestone and gypsum from U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports again declined in August. Loadings totaled 4.8 million net tons, a decrease of 2.8 percent compared to the corresponding period in 1998. For the season, the stone trade is now nearly 1.9 million tons behind last year's pace, a deficit that will be difficult to erase between now and the close of navigation. In all likelihood, stone's 5-year string of modern-day records has come to an end. Reduced domestic steel production, a result of continued high levels of steel imports, and a sluggish construction market share the blame for the disappointing tally.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association Click here for more information




Highway 16 Update

09/18:
The USS Silversides Foundation is moving forward with plans to restore the Highway 16 to her original LST 393 configuration in World War II and open the vessel as a museum ship.

The Foundation acquired the Highway 16 from the Wisconsin & Michigan Steamship Co. this summer. Needless to say the LST Association, a group of Veterans who served on LST's in WWII, is ecstatic that one of their own will be preserved.

The Highway 16 returned light boat from Milwaukee on August 17, 1972 and was carefully laid up in Muskegon at a secure site. The boat is in remarkable condition and according to a recent inspection and could be made operational in less then 2 weeks if needed. The original bell is still above the pilot house. The original bow doors and ramp where plated over when the ship was converted to an automobile carrier and once the steel is removed the ship will revert back to a genuine LST. Many internal revisions were done when LST 393 was converted, but nothing that can't be overcome.

Future plans call for one day displaying LST 393 next the USS Silversides submarine at a new dock in downtown Muskegon. Hopefully one day the LST will again fire up her diesel engines and carry veterans and volunteers through the Muskegon harbor entrance and out in to Lake Michigan. Some would like to see the day that LST 393 will ride up on a sandy beach near Muskegon and a convoy of restored WWII military vehicles will storm ashore.

Highway 16 USS LST 393 was launched November 11, 1942 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company in Newport News, VA.

The Landing Ship Tank was commissioned on Dec., 11, 1942 and took part in three invasions, including D-Day. She was decommissioned at New Orleans on March 1, 1946.

In March of 1948 the LST was sold to the Wisconsin & Michigan Steamship Co. and converted to an automobile carrier in New Orleans. The ship was brought into Lake Michigan via the Mississippi River, Illinois Coastal Waterway and the Chicago Drainage Canal. She was renamed "Highway 16" to complete the Highway that runs from Detroit to Muskegon and then continues through Wisconsin starting at Milwaukee.

What makes the Highway 16 so unusual is that there is only one other known WW II LST still in existence and it's in Greece.

Reported by: Andy LaBorde




Boyer Marine Mart Today

09/18:
Today from 10 am - 5 pm the Willis B. Boyer museum ship in Toledo is hosting a marine mart and model ship show. Admission is $3.00 for adults and $1.00 for children under 12. Admission to the ship will be free on Saturday. For more info call 419/936-3070.

The Willis B. Boyer museum ship was the largest bulk carrier in the world when it was built in 1911. It's steam powered machinery, dual station helms in the original pilot house and vintage passenger spaces are all open to the public and included in the cruise.

Look for me, Boatnerd at the Know Your Ships booth at the flea market.

Click here for a map




Shipboard News

09/18:
Recently I have been contacted by a number of crew members sailing on the Great Lakes who check this page by personal cell phones hooked up to a computer.

For those sailing, if you would like a daily version of this news page sent by e-mail please contact me at the link below. This offers daily news that will down load faster than the web page.

For the time being this offer is only for those sailing.

Click here to E-mail




Today in Great Lakes History - September 18

The E.J. BLOCK returned to service on September 18, 1946 as the first large bulk freighter powered by a diesel-electric power plant and one of the first equipped with commercial radar on the Great Lakes.

On September 18, 1959 the HENRY FORD II ran aground in the St. Marys River and damaged 18 bottom plates.

On September 18, 1958 the BEN MOREELL (2) collided with and sank the car ferry ASHTABULA in the harbor at Ashtabula, OH.

LAKE WINNIPEG was the first vessel to enter the Nipigon Transport fleet. She loaded her first cargo of 22,584 gross tons of iron ore clearing Sept Îles, Que. on September 18, 1962 bound for Cleveland.

The Pere Marquette carferry City of Midland 41 was launched on September 18, 1940, at Manitowoc, WI. She was built by Manitowoc Shipbuilding Corporation at a cost of $2 million. She was named after Midland, MI for one of the Pere Marquette Railway's biggest customers, Dow Chemical Co. The City of Midland has been in layup at Ludington, MI since 1988.

On 18 September 1871, E.B. ALLEN (wooden schooner, 111’, 275T, built in 1864 at Ogdensburg, NY) was carrying grain when she collided with the bark NEWSBOY and sank off Thunder Bay Island in Lake Huron.

Data from: Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Medical evacuation from c. Columbus

09/17:
Early Wednesday evening U.S. Coast Guard Group Detroit received a request from the German cruise ship c. Columbus to medevac a crewman who had fallen earlier and had a seizure. The ship's doctor was connected with the Ninth District flight surgeon for consultation and he decided a medevac via helicopter to a trauma center would be appropriate.

A helicopter from Air Station Detroit was launched and executed the medevac. The patient was delivered to Medical College of Ohio in Toledo, OH.




Twin Ports Report

09/17:
Oakglen put in its first appearance of the season in Superior on Sept. 15-16. The vessel took a partial load at the Peavey elevator, then shifted around the end of Connors Point with the aid of one tug to maneuver into the Harvest States elevator's #2 berth. This photo shows the vessel loading Sept. 16 at Harvest States.

Edgar B. Speer's reprieve from early lay-up is continuing. Great Lakes Fleet reports the boat is due again in Two Harbors Sept. 18.

John G. Munson is headed to Wyandotte on Sept. 16, then loads coal at Toledo for another trip to Ontonagon, Mich.

Roger Blough in its lay-up berth at Fraser Shipyards.
John J. Boland in her lay-up.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Winners of ISMA Lodge No. 7 Raffle Make Trip

09/17:
On September 10, Mr. Jim Russell of Algonac, Michigan boarded the S/S Courtney Burton with 5 of his guests to begin the trip which Mr. Russell won in the recent raffle held by Detroit Lodge No. 7. Lodge No. 7 members Paul Jagenow and John Sarns accompanied the party.

The group enjoyed good weather for the entire trip, which went to Silver Bay, Minnesota, and returned to Toledo on September 15th. The hospitality extended by Captain Gary Mielke and the entire crew of the Courtney Burton made for a wonderful time.

Detroit Lodge No. 7 is grateful to Bro. Stuart Theis, president of Oglebay Norton Marine Services Company, for donating this trip, and assisting the lodge in its preparation for the 2002 ISMA Grand Lodge Convention in the Port of Detroit.

Reported by: John Sarns




New Casino Site

09/17:
The old Canada Steamship Lines/Canadian National Railway sheds at Point Edward, Ontario have been completely leveled for a new Casino. This is an old landmark that contributed much to the commerce of Ontario and Canada.

The former sheds were a predominate feature on the Canadian side of the St. Clair River when viewed from Thomas Edison Park in Port Huron.

Reported by: Al Jackman




Today in Great Lakes History - September 17

EVA DESGAGNES was launched September 17, 1955 as a) GRIFFON (2) for Beaconsfield Steamship Ltd., Montreal, Que.

On September 17, 1985, PATERSON suffered a crank case explosion as she was bound for Quebec City from Montreal. She was repaired and cleared on September 21.

On 17 September 1830, WILLIAM PEACOCK (wood sidewheel steamer, 102’, 120T, built in 1829 at Barcelona, NY) suffered the first major boiler explosion on Lake Erie while she was docked in Buffalo, NY. 15 - 30 lives were lost. She was rebuilt two years later and eventually foundered in a storm in 1835 near Ripley, OH.

Data from: James Neumiller Joe Barr, Dave Swayze and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Columbus Makes Stop in Cleveland

09/16:
The cruise ship c. Columbus arrived in Cleveland yesterday. The ship docked across from the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland's Inner-harbor. Many happy tourists enjoyed not only a day in Cleveland but received an added bonus by seeing an array of Coast Guard ships that were docked at the port authority. The Coast Guard boats even included the Mackinaw.

Reported by: Al Leonard




Take Your Own Cruise

09/16:
The Great Lakes Cruise Company markets and sells passenger cruises on the Great Lakes. The company chartered the MV Columbus, a 3-4 star passenger vessel with a capacity of 420 people. This sailing is sold out in 1999.

Additional cruises in 2000 include two 7 night sailing's from Toronto to Chicago, sailing four of the five Great Lakes on a luxurious French yacht with the capacity of 90 passengers. Also available is one 9-night sailing from Detroit to Chicago through Lake Superior aboard the German cruise ship the MV Columbus.

These cruises are sold only through The Great Lakes Cruise Company.
For brochure information call (734) 477-6045 or view/download a brochure at www.greatlakescruiseco.com.




Twin Ports Report

09/16:
Oakglen made a rare call in the Twin Ports on Sept. 15 to load at the Peavey elevator in Superior.

Another unusual caller, Windoc, is due in port on the 16th.

Gordon C. Leitch is becoming a regular on the Twin Ports grain run. It's back again Sept. 14 to load at Cargill in Duluth.

The taconite trade is plugging along. Here's the recent line-ups:
DMIR Two Harbors: Herbert C. Jackson, Sept. 16; Presque Isle, Sept. 17; Edgar B. Speer, Sept. 18; John G. Munson, Sept. 19; St. Clair, Sept. 23.

DMIR Duluth: St. Clair, Sept. 15; Buckeye, Sept. 16; Edwin H. Gott, Sept. 17; Frontenac, Sept. 18; Joseph H. Thompson, Sept. 22.

BNSF Superior: Manitoulin, Sept. 15

Taconite Harbor: Joseph H. Thompson, Sept. 15

Silver Bay: Middletown, Sept. 16

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Tug Delivered

09/16:
The 70 foot tug Duluth arrived in St. Joe, MI on Saturday. The tug was donated at no cost to the Berrien County Sheriff's Department Marine Division. The tug came from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers with the provision that it not be sold for two years.

The tug has an estimated value of about $220,000.

The Duluth has an interesting history. She was owned by the US Dept. of Army from 1954-62 and then the Army Corps from 1962 to present. It was originally named ST-2015 and given the name Duluth in 1962 when she went to the Corps.

The tug will be used by the Marine Division as a work platform for operations such as diving in search, rescue and recovery operations. She will also be used as a patrol vessel for events such as the Venetian Festival, 4th of July fireworks and other special events.

The 600 hp diesel powered tug was delivered by Captain Kenny Scoggins and has a beam of 20 feet and a draft of 9 feet at 82 gross tons.

Reported by: Mike Schroeder




Today in Great Lakes History - September 16

At about 8:30 a.m. Sunday, September 16, 1990 the inbound motor ship BUFFALO passed close by while JUPITER was unloading unleaded gasoline at the Total Petroleum dock in the Saginaw River near Bay City, MI. The suction of BUFFALO's propellers caused the JUPITER, which was facing upriver, to pull away from the dock. As a result the aft pilings broke off and the fuel lines parted which caused a spark and ignited the spilled fuel. At the time 22,000 barrels of a total of 54,000 barrels were still aboard. Flames catapulted over 100 feet high filling the air with smoke that could be seen for 50 miles. The fire was still burning the next morning when a six man crew from Williams, Boots & Coots Firefighters and Hazard Control Specialists of Port Neches, TX arrived to fight the fire. By Monday afternoon they extinguished the fire only to have it re-ignite that night resulting in multiple explosions. Not until Tuesday morning on the 18th was the fire finally subdued with the assistance of the U.S. Coast Guard's BRAMBLE and BRISTOL BAY. The tanker, which was valued at $9 million, was declared a total constructive loss, though the engine room was relatively untouched. Unfortunately the fire claimed the life of one crew member who drowned attempting to swim ashore. As a result the Coast Guard closed the river to all navigation. On October 19th the river was opened to navigation after the Gaelic tugs SUSAN HOEY and CAROLYN HOEY towed the JUPITER up river to the Hirschfield & Sons dock at Bay City (formerly the DeFoe Shipyard) where a crane was erected for dismantling the burned out hulk. Her engines were removed and shipped to New Bedford, MA for future use. The river opening allowed American S.S.'s BUFFALO to depart the LaFarge dock where she had been trapped since the explosion. JUPITER's dismantling was completed over the winter of 1990-91.

P & H purchased all nine of the Soo River's fleet on September 16, 1982 for a reported C$2.5 million and all nine returned to service, although only four were running at the end of the season.

NORISLE went into service September 16, 1946 as the first Canadian passenger ship commissioned since the NORONIC's commissioning in 1913.

On September 16, 1952, the Cason J. Callaway departed River Rouge, Michigan for Duluth on its maiden voyage.

On 16 September 1895, ARCTIC (2 mast wooden schooner, 113’, 85GT, built in 1853 at Ashtabula, OH) was rammed and sunk by the steamer CLYDE in broad daylight and calm weather. ARCTIC was almost cut in half by the blow. The skipper of CLYDE was censured for the wreck and for his callous treatment of the schooner’s crew afterwards. Luckily no lives were lost.

Data from: Jody L. Aho Joe Barr, Dave Swayze and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Boom Removed

09/15:
Updates from Thunder Bay report that Pascol Engineering ship yard workers have now removed the last pieces of the M.A.C. Gagne's self-unloading boom.

Crews are also removing engine parts. A crankshaft can be seen just inside the port engine room door.

The vessel had been in long term lay-up in Toronto since 1992 and was moved to Thunder Bay in October of 1997. Her name was then changed from Saguenay and the vessel was used to hold the spoils from a dredging operation.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Twin Ports Report

09/15:
Kinsman Independent was finishing its load Sept. 14 at the General Mills Elevator S in Superior.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Leudke Aids in Search

09/15:
The tug Kurt Leudke assisted the Coast Guard in their search for a person in the waters off Buffalo on the night of the 14th.

The Coast Guard had a surface search underway for an individual reported floating in the water near Bethlehem Steel in Lackawanna. The Erie County Air One helicopter was also in the area when the Leudke spotted a person climbing out of the water near the South Entrance Channel.

Her crew reported the sighting to the Coast Guard and the individual was then taken to the Buffalo Base by the patrol craft.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Century Makes First Visit

09/15:
Yesterday in Grand Haven the Canadian Century arrived at the Verplanks dock to unload a cargo of slag. This was the first time the Canadian Century has visited the Lake Michigan port.

She delivered the load of slag after partially unloading in Detroit.

Reported by: David Swain




Contract Approved

09/15:
Ispat Inland employees voted overwhelmingly Sept. 13 to approve a five-year contract, the Duluth News-Tribune reported.

The contract includes a no-strike, no-lockout clause when the contract expires in 2004. In exchange for the no-strike clause, Ispat Inland agreed to refurbish or replace two aging blast furnaces at its Indiana Harbor steel plant. Inland could replace the furnaces with new ones, refurbish the existing furnaces or build an electric arc furnace. The latter course of action would mean a decline in the company's use of taconite pellets.

Workers at all Iron Range mines now have five-year contracts except for those at EVTAC Mining Co. Those employees are working under their old contract until Oct. 16 while company officials negotiate with Minnesota Iron and Steel Co. about a possible buy-out.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Maritime Academy in Toledo

09/15:
Anyone interested in learning about the four year bachelor degree program offered through the Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Traverse City, Michigan is invited to meet with a recruiter who will be at the Maritime Market in Toledo on Saturday, September 18th.

The Maritime Market will be held at International Park in downtown Toledo. Call the Maritime Academy at 800-748-0566, ext. 1200, to lean more about a career as a ship's officer on the Lakes.

Reported by: Gary Schweitzer




Today in Great Lakes History - September 15

The A.H. FERBERT (2) was towed out of Duluth by the Sandrin tug GLENADA September 15, 1987, they encountered rough weather on Lake Superior and required the assistance of the another tug to reach the Soo on the 19th. On the 21st the FERBERT had to anchor off Detour, MI after she had run aground in the St. Marys River when her towline parted. Her hull was punctured and the Coast Guard ordered repairs to her hull before she could continue. Again problems struck on September 24th, when the FERBERT went hard aground at the Cut-Off Channel's southeast bend of the St. Clair River. Six tugs, GLENADA, ELMORE M. MISNER, BARBARA ANN, GLENSIDE, SHANNON and WM. A. WHITNEY, worked until late on the 26th to free her. The FERBERT finally arrived in tow of GLENSIDE and W.N. TWOLAN at Lauzon, Que. on October 7th.

The FERNGLEN was launched September 15, 1917 as a) WILLIAM A. AMBERG.

On September 15, 1925 the JOHN A. TOPPING left River Rouge light on her maiden voyage to Ashland, WI to load iron ore for delivery to Cleveland, OH.

September 15th lightering was completed on the AUGUST ZIESING, she had grounded above the Rock Cut two days earlier blocking the channel.

September 15, 1959 was the last day the U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tender MESQUITE was stationed at Sault Ste. Marie, MI.

MIDDLETOWN suffered a fire in her tunnels on September 15, 1986. 2nd & 3rd degree burns were suffered by two crewmembers.

On 15 September 1872, A.J. BEMIS (wood propeller tug, 49T, built in 1859 at Buffalo) caught fire while underway. The fire originated under her boiler. She ran for shore but sank ¾ mile short, about 6 miles from Alpena, MI. No lives lost.

Data from: James Neumiller Joe Barr, Dave Swayze and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

09/14:
Lake Superior's North Shore ports were busy Sept. 12. Edgar B. Speer loaded at Two Harbors, Reserve and Courtney Burton loaded at Silver Bay, and Oglebay Norton was at Taconite Harbor. The ports' only scheduled traffic for Sept. 13 was James R. Barker arriving at Taconite Harbor.

The Twin Ports were unusually quiet on the morning of Sept. 13. Kinsman Independent was the only boat in port at 7:30, waiting to load at Harvest States 1. Salties Adimon and Clipper Falcon were anchored out waiting for elevator berths. However, Paul R. Tregurtha was due later in the day for Midwest Energy Terminal and Mesabi Miner was due at the DMIR dock.

Paul R. Tregurtha reportedly tied up briefly at Hallett Dock 5 on Sept. 13 for repairs. It was scheduled to fuel later in the day and then proceed to Midwest Energy Terminal to load.

Autumn always seems to bring unusual visitors to the Twin Ports, and several are scheduled to make rare calls here in the coming weeks. Nanticoke is due at Midwest Energy Terminal on the 15th and Atlantic Erie is due at DMIR on the 16th. According to Duluth Shipping News, Mapleglen is scheduled for Harvest States Sept. 22; and Oakglen is scheduled for Harvest States on the 30th.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Cruise Ships

09/14:
The French cruise ship Le Levant was sailing westbound yesterday through the Seaway and was expected at the Iroquois Locks at 1200. The vessel will complete her Seaway cruise on Wednesday in Toronto. The 327-foot vessel will then load passengers for the next cruise taking passengers for an eight day trip up the lakes ending in Chicago.

Also making her rounds is the cruise ship c. Columbus. She departed Windsor, Ontario yesterday bound for Port Colborne where she will begin a ten-day cruise also ending in Chicago.




Oakglen Out

09/14:
The Oakglen departed her lay-up berth in Owen Sound sometime yesterday morning before day light.

Reported by: Peter Bowers




Superior Midwest Energy Terminal Sets New Monthly Record

09/14:
Superior Midwest Energy Terminal set an all-time record for coal loaded in a single month this August - 2,023,055 net tons. The total surpasses the previous record month, June 1999, by 37,616 tons. With 55 vessels loading at SMET in August, the boat loader was in virtually continuous operation.

Compared to a year ago, August loadings at SMET increased 22 percent. For the season, shipments of western coal from SMET stand at 9,738,957 tons, an increase of 7.3 percent compared to the same point in the 1998 navigation season.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association Click here for more information




Today in Great Lakes History - September 14

The CLARENCE B. RANDALL (2) was launched September 14, 1907 as a) J.J. SULLIVAN for the Superior Steamship Co.

On 14 September 1871, R.J. CARNEY (wooden barge, 150’, 397GT) was launched at Saginaw, MI.

Data from: James Neumiller Joe Barr, Dave Swayze and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Diver Lost on Wreck

09/13:
Last week a diver was lost while investigating the wreck of the steamer Lakeland which lies in 180 ft. of water off the south entry to the Sturgeon Bay ship canal. The Lakeland was not a car ferry but does carry a number of vehicles still in her hold. She was reputedly scuttled for the insurance money on December 3, 1924. She is now an often visited dive target for sport divers.

The diver who was lost was an extremely experienced deep diver who was diving with an elite group of deep Great Lakes divers. All were well qualified to execute the dive. The accident was caused by a train of events which began with a regulator free flow at about 170 ft. The diver and his buddy ascended to 80 ft., but when the diver who initially had the free flow ascended to his next safety stop at 40 ft., his buddy did not and could not be located. The divers conducted an extensive search, but to date the diver's body has yet to be recovered. The exact cause of the death remains unknown.

The Lakeland was one of the first wrecks explored with mixed gasses and it is known that some of the early divers to visit her in the 1930s died while doing so.

Reported by: Brendon Baillod




New Company

09/13:
Recently added to the links page Force 5 Trading & Promotions. Offers a wide variety of clothing and other merchandise all displaying Great Lakes ships and/or shipping companies. Purchase one of the many logos available or have your organization’s logo set up.

The first company to offer individual items embroidered, silk-screened and printed with the Interlake Steamship Co., Pathfinder, M/V James R. Barker, Mormac, William G. Mather, & Propeller Club just to name a few.

Visit their web site at http://www.force5-trading.com to see complete selection.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 13

The EDMUND FITZGERALD's sea trials occurred on September 13, 1958.

The HOFFMAN (United States Army Corps of Engineers Twin Screw Hopper Dredge) collided with the Japanese salty KUNISHIMA MARU at Toledo, OH, September 13, 1962. Reportedly the blame was placed on the pilot of the Japanese salty. Apparently the damage was minor.

On September 13, 1968 the AUGUST ZIESING grounded in fog two-hundred yards above the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River. The grounded vessel swung into the shipping channel blocking it until September 15th when lightering was completed.

On 13 September 1875, CITY OF BUFFALO (wooden schooner, 91’, 128T, built in 1859 at Buffalo as a propeller canal boat) beached and sank after striking a rock in the St. Mary’s River. The tug MAGNET worked for days to release her before she went to pieces on 19 September. No lives were lost.

Data from: James Neumiller Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Sloan Heading for Repairs

09/12:
George A. Sloan is due into the Sturgeon Bay shipyard on Sept. 12 for unspecified repairs. It is due next in Brevort on the 14th.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




J.B. Ford to Move

09/12:
Plans are in the making for the J.B. Ford to be moved to another LaFarge terminal this coming spring. Reports from the South Chicago terminal confirm that the new cement storage silo obviates the need for the holding vessel. It is believed that the Ford will stay in service, although she'll not sail again moving as a dead ship.

The Ford last operated in 1985 and currently serves as stationary cement storage and transfer vessel in South Chicago.

Reported by: David Swain




New Web Site and Logo

09/12:
CLEVELAND, Ohio, September 10, 1999 - Oglebay Norton Company today unveiled a new website design, featuring additional information regarding the company, improved navigational features, a brighter image and new corporate logo. The website can be accessed at http://www.oglebaynorton.com .

"The newly enhanced website has been revamped to reflect the Company’s new growth-oriented business strategy featuring its three operating subsidiaries - Global Stone Corporation, Oglebay Norton Marine Services Company and Oglebay Norton Industrial Sands, Inc.," said John N. Lauer, Chairman, President and CEO of Oglebay Norton Company. "In addition, we have expanded the corporate and investor relations pages with new features and tools for evaluating the company as an investment," he added. As with the former site, the individual business segments continue to have customer and public information, photos and links to related topics. In keeping with the company’s commitment to providing information to stakeholders as it becomes available, the company intends to update this new site regularly and has future plans to provide an email mechanism enabling investors to receive alerts whenever new company information is posted to this site.

Oglebay Norton Company, a Cleveland, Ohio-based company, is a leading supplier of essential natural resources for industrial and commercial customers. Through its three operating segments, Lime and Limestone, Industrial Sands, and Marine Services, it serves the environmental technologies, construction, oil and gas, ceramic, chemical, glass, electric utility and steel industries.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 12

The ROGER BLOUGH was laid up at Sturgeon Bay, WI from September 12, 1981 through 1986 because of economic conditions.

CANADIAN PIONEER was christened at Port Weller on September 12, 1981 by Louise Powis, wife of the Chairman and President of Noranda Mines.

CARTIERCLIFFE HALL was towed by the tug WILFRED M. COHEN to Collingwood, Ont. for repairs from a June 5th fire and arrived at Collingwood on September 12, 1979.

Canadian Shipbuilding & Engineering Limited at Collingwood, Ontario closed the yard on September 12, 1986 after 103 years of shipbuilding. She was famous for her spectacular side launches. 214 ships were built at Collingwood.

While unloading steel in South Chicago from the CANADA MARQUIS on September 12, 1988, a shoreside crane lifting a payloader into the hold, collapsed onto the ship. CANADA MARQUIS had a hole in her tank top and damage to her hatch coaming.

On 12 September 1900, ALBACORE (2 mast wooden schooner, 137’, 327T, built in 1872 at Port Dalhousie, Ont.) had a storm blow out her sails, driving her into the seawall at Fort Bank just east of Oswego, NY where she broke up. The tug J. NAVAGH tried unsuccessfully to save her. Her crew of 7 was rescued by the U.S. Lifesaving Service.

Data from: James Neumiller Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Speer Gets a Reprieve

09/11:
Edgar B. Speer received a change in orders yesterday. Instead of going into lay-up at Sturgeon Bay, USS Great Lakes Fleet now says the vessel will load at Two Harbors on Sept. 11 with pellets due in Gary on the 14th.

In other Twin Ports news the Atlantic Erie is scheduled to pay a rare visit to Duluth on Sept. 16, when it's scheduled for the DMIR dock.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Diamond Jack to Retire From Tours

09/11:
Detroit's Diamond Jack's regular tour vessel will be retired from her regular tour schedule at the end of this season. The staunch 65 foot Detroit River tour vessel will be replaced by her larger sister Diamond Queen in the spring of 2000.

Diamond Jack was built in 1955 as Emerald Isle for the Beaver Island Ferry Company which it served until 1962, when she was sold to the Arnold Transit Company of Mackinac Island. She was purchased by Diamond Jacks as an experiment to improve riverfront usage in Detroit in 1991.

During the past two years the vessel has been pushed to capacity and a larger vessel is now required for this service. The "Jack" will continue on her schedule through the end of September, with her last voyage scheduled for Sunday, September 26. Schedule information is available at 313-843-7676

Click here to visit the Diamond Jack's web Site




4-in-a-row for Algowest

09/11:
Seaway Self-Unloader, Algowest, made her fourth consecutive visit to Marquette arriving early on September 10. Engine problems may explain her being in the "short shuttle" of taconite from Marquette to Algoma Steel at the Soo.

Algowest made her first appearance in Marquette back in April and hasn't returned until this month.

Reported by: Rod Burdick




Sara Spencer

09/11:
Spotted yesterday morning passing Belle Isle in the Detroit River was the barge Sarah Spencer upbound with a new paint job. Her hull looked like a dark blue and her forecastle was white. Crews were still painting her forward end with her name painted around and was still in white lettering.

The Spencer is the former self-unloading bulk freighter Adam E. Cornelius cut down to a barge.

Reported by: Andrew Severson




Owen Sound happenings

09/11:
A sure sign that fall must be coming. The Oakglen is currently fitting out and should be sailing within the next few days.

The Owen Sound lay-up fleet grew a few weeks ago when the small ferry Upper Canada tied up along side of the Ontario Northland's long out of service Nindawayma.

Upper Canada apparently was replaced by a former US flagged ferry.

Reported by: Peter Bowers




Seaway Report

09/11:
The Ellie was allowed to pick up anchor at one minute after midnight, (0001 Sept. 10) to go down the Seaway. She was anchored 1 mile North of Main Duck Island , in Canadian waters. She was due at Cape Vincent at 0145.

It was reported yesterday that she was not allowed to enter the U.S. Seaway due to Y2K compliant issues. Yesterday was the first test of possible Y2K software glitches with a date reading 9999. This reading was an ending code used in some types of older programming languages.



Reported by: Ron Walsh




Buffalo Update

09/11:
The 10th was a day of delays in Buffalo. The tug Undaunted had her hands full with the barge Pere Marquette 41. She was backing down the City Ship Canal at 6PM when high winds set her in towards the old Michigan St. bridge abutments.

As the vessel maneuvered to center herself, swirling winds bouncing of the General Mills elevator kept her from steering a straight course. The crew had to back up and down the channel four times before they cleared the obstacles.

The tug Kurt Leudke spent about 45 minutes in the Outer Harbor waiting for the Undaunted to clear the North Entrance. The Leudke was then delayed at the CSX Railroad bridges on the way up. On her way back out she was held up for two hours when the Ohio St. bridge was closed due to a nearby fuel spill.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Production Resumes

09/11:
U.S. Steel's Minntac plant said it will resume operation of its No. 3 production line at the end of September.

Also, Cleveland-Cliffs announced that Hibbing Taconite will resume pellet production Sept. 12 following a temporary shutdown to adjust inventory. Cliffs did not say, however, when production would resume at its two idled mines in Michigan.

Minntac will begin firing its Line 3 kiln at the end of this month and resume production of flux taconite pellets on the line about 24 hours later.

"When we took it down, we had some excesses of inventories within the corporation," Minntac General Manager Jim Swearingen told the Duluth News-Tribune. "Those numbers have come back and the order book is strong enough where pellets are now needed."

Swearingen cautioned, however, that steel imports continue to threaten the nation's steelmaking industry.

Minntac Mine employs about 1,450 hourly workers and is North America's largest taconite producer. With Line 3 back in operation, Minntac will be operating five agglomerating lines. Those lines can produce more than 14 million tons of flux taconite pellets per year.

Line 3 -- which can produce about 1.6 million tons of taconite pellets annually or roughly 12 percent of Minntac's annual pellet production -- was idled on Oct. 5, 1998, amid record levels of steel imports and increased levels of taconite pellet inventories.

Minntac ships most of its pellets through Two Harbors aboard vessels of USS Great Lakes Fleet.

Hibbing Taconite, shut since Aug. 8 due to steel imports and high pellet inventories, announced it will resume full production Sunday.

"We took the shutdown due to high inventories and the downtime was enough to take the inventory out," said Dave Gardner, Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. spokesman.

The shutdown affected roughly 605 of Hibbing Taconite's 650 hourly workers. Start-up dates for the Empire and Tilden Mines in Upper Michigan, also idled to reduce pellet inventories, haven't been determined, said Gardner.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 11

The GEORGE M. HUMPHREY (1) was patched and refloated on September 11, 1944. She had sunk in 80 feet of water after a collision with the steamer D.M. CLEMSON (2) off Old Point Light, on June 15, 1943. On May 6, 1944 the barges MAITLAND NO.1 and HILDA were employed as pontoons for the salvage operation positioned over the sunken hull. cables were attached to the HUMPHREY's hull and to the barges. The hull was raised through a series of lifts which allowed it to be brought into shallower water. Partial buoyancy was provided by the HUMPHREY's ballast tanks which were pumped out to about 25% of capacity. The HUMPHREY was patched and refloated on September 11, 1944. She was taken to the Manitowoc Ship Building Co. first for an estimate of repairs which totaled $469,400, and then was towed to Sturgeon Bay for reconditioning which was completed at a reported cost of $437,000. Captain John Roen's Roen Transportation Co. assumed ownership on September 18, 1944 and the next year the ship was renamed b) CAPTAIN JOHN ROEN. She re-entered service on May 1, 1945 chartered to the Pioneer Steamship Co. on a commission basis.

On September 11, 1987 while in lay-up at Point Edward, the FORT YORK caught fire which gutted her bridge.

Carrying cargoes off the Lakes, the CANADA MARQUIS departed Halifax bound for Philadelphia with a cargo of grain. The HON. PAUL MARTIN departed Halifax the same day on her way to Tampa with a load of gypsum.

The HORACE JOHNSON sailed on her maiden voyage light from Lorain September 11, 1929 bound for Two Harbors, MN to load iron ore.

On 11 September 1895, S. P. AMES (2 mast wooden schooner, 61’, 43GT) was driven ashore at Pointe Aux Barques, MI in a storm. She was quickly stripped before she went to pieces. She had been built in 1879 at Montrose, MI, in farm country, well inland, on the Flint River by Mr. Seth Ames. He wanted to use her to return to sea, but he died the day before her hull was launched.

Data from: James Neumiller Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Talks Continue

09/10:
Duluth radio station KDAL reported Sept. 9 that Interlake Steamship Co. and Steelworkers Local 5000 have agreed to a "rolling" one-week extension in their contract talks.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Speer to Lay-up

09/10:
After completing her offload of ore yesterday the Edgar B. Speer was then to travel to Sturgeon Bay WI to lay-up. She is expected to arrive there on the 10th at 1000 and stay for three weeks.

She is the 3rd USS ship to lay up during the season most likely due to lack of cargo.

The Speer joins the Roger Blough which laid up on August 18th and the Anderson which laid up on September 5th. No word on if any of the other vessels will come back out this season or if more may join them.

Reported by: David French and Al Miller




Gaelic's tug Susan Hoey repositioned in Toledo

09/10:
In anticipation of a busy grain fall season, Gaelic Tugboat Company has repositioned their 1,800 hp harbor tug Susan Hoey to Toledo.

Gaelic completely rebuilt the tug and its machinery at their Detroit yard during the summer. She was used on several ship assistance jobs in Detroit over the past few weeks proving her performance was up to her designed capacities.

The Susan Hoey is a low profile tug, having a cabin height which allows her to pass under most of the draw bridges in Toledo without opening them. The transfer of this unit to Toledo allows Gaelic to handle the largest ships in the loaded condition in the tricky Maumee River with ease.

Reported by: D.J. Tugnut




Seaway Report

09/10:
The salt water vessel Lake Charles proceeded down to Cape Vincent area on one engine on the afternoon of Sept. 7. She anchored at 2 miles SW of Tibbetts at 1500. She reported engine trouble and was about to make repairs. She did not depart until approx. 1640 yesterday and was due at the Crossover at 1940. It is reported that the vessel had two loose connecting rods which needed repair.

Reports have the Thorslake and Inviken as still being in Hamilton. The Thorslake is scheduled to go to Toronto next. The Thorscape was rumored to be leaving Toronto yesterday.

According to recent reports, the Liberian vessel Ellie was not allowed to enter the river (U.S. waters) until she was Y2K compliant. As a result she stayed in Canadian waters and passed Psyche Shoal at 2325. She expected to go to anchor yesterday 1 mile North of Main Duck Islands.



Reported by: Ron Walsh




Twin Ports Report

09/10:
The early lay-ups of Blough, Speer and Anderson will certainly be felt in Two Harbors, where all three are regular callers. (Blough and Speer load there almost exclusively.)The DMIR dock used to handle at least one boat a day, but now gaps are appearing in that schedule.

Here's the line-up for the next few days: Philip R. Clarke, Sept. 9; Presque Isle, Sept.10; Edwin H. Gott, Sept. 11; John G. Munson, Sept. 13 (this may change); American Mariner, Sept. 13; and Herbert C. Jackson, Sept. 15.

Duluth-Superior was busy on the morning of Sept. 9. Joe Block was loading at its usual spot under the gravity chutes at DMIR, Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was loading at Midwest Energy Terminal, Federal Mackenzie was loading at Cenex Harvest States, Algocape was unloading at St. Lawrence Cement, Ira was loading at Cargill, and Millenium Falcon was loading at AGP.

The Calcite II was reported under repair in Huron, Ohio, with no estimate of its departure time or date.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Columbus Makes Unscheduled Stop

09/10:
The German cruise ship c. Columbus made an impromptu stop at Bayfield after strong winds on Lake Superior kept the vessel from visiting Raspberry Island.

Ruth Goetz, a consultant for the Wisconsin Department of Tourism, credited Mayor Larry MacDonald and Chamber of Commerce representative Carol DeMars for quickly making arrangements to make the shore visit possible Wednesday by the passengers of the M.V. Columbus.

MacDonald presented the captain of the Columbus, Thilo Natke, with a hastily drafted proclamation welcoming the ship, crew and passengers.

In making the presentation, MacDonald said that as far as anyone could tell, the Columbus was the first cruise ship to visit Bayfield in 60 years.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Transfer to Port Stanley

09/10:
The Canadian Transfer was due to arrive at Port Stanley's west dock to put 9000 tons of salt in the north dome of Lakes Terminals. This is the first salt load of the 1999 season. The Transfer will then be heading to Ashtabula for a load of coal for the same company.



Reported by: Richard Hill




Today in Great Lakes History - September 10

The METEOR (2) was towed from Manitowoc by the tug JOHN ROEN IV to Superior on September 10, 1972.

The Harry Coulby (now Kinsman Enterprise) turns 71 years old on September 10. When she entered service on this date in 1927, the 631-foot bulk freighter was the third largest on the Great Lakes.

While upbound in the Welland Canal on September 9, 1986 it was noted that the port anchor of the J.W. McGIFFON was missing, her chain was almost touching the water.

On 10 September 1909, COLUMBUS (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 136', 439 GC, built in 1874 as the tug JOHN OWEN) burned to a total loss at her dock at Gargantua, Ontario in Lake Superior. She was cut loose and allowed to drift out into the bay where she sank. The top of her engine reportedly still shows above the water.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




More on The Joyce L.

09/09:
As reported yesterday the tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort will be heading for Sturgeon Bay in a few weeks for a coat of paint to the bottom of the hull. After the work is completed the tug will depart the Great Lakes for the Gulf and await the completion of the new 740' barge Upper Lakes Towing is having built.

The tug is being repainted with a special paint so she can make the trip on salt water to pick up the barge Great Lakes Trader when it is finished.

Below are pictures of the barge under construction in Pearlington, Mississippi.
View showing the slope of her cargo hold.
Shipyard employees working on a section of her hull.
Close up view of hull under construction.





Today in Great Lakes History - September 09

The WOLVERINE (4) was launched September 9, 1974 for the Union Commerce Bank (Ohio), Trustee (Oglebay Norton Co., mgr.), Cleveland, OH.

DETROIT EDISON (2) was launched September 9, 1954 as a) DETROIT EDISON (2) for the American Steamship Co. (Boland & Cornelius, mgr.) Buffalo, NY.

The Steamer Pere Marquette #18 sank on September 9, 1910 with a loss of 29 lives. No cause for the sinking has ever been determined. The Pere Marquette #17 picked up 33 survivors, losing 2 of her own crew during the rescue.

On 9 September 1929, ANDASTE (steel propeller self-unloading sandsucker, 247’, built in 1892 at Cleveland) was probably overloaded with gravel when she “went missing” west of Holland, MI. The entire crew of 25 was lost. When built, she was the sister of the “semi-whaleback” CHOCTAW, but was shortened 20 feet in 1920-21 to allow her to use the Welland Canal.

Data from: Max S. Hanley, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Joyce L. to Push New Barge

09/08:
The tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort, idle in Escanaba since the Dorothy Ann took over duties in the notch of the Dorothy Ann in late June, will be heading for Sturgeon Bay in a few weeks for a coat of paint to the bottom of the hull. After the work is completed the tug will depart the Great Lakes for the Gulf and await the completion on the new 740' barge Upper Lakes Towing is having built. Completion is due in late February or early March.

The return trip next spring should be interesting to say the least. The barge will have to lock through the Seaway without the tug in the notch due to the overall length of the tug/barge.

An escort tug will lock through first, the Joyce will push the barge in the lock and then back out. The second tug will pull the barge out of the lock after its raised and wait for the Joyce to then lock through. This will be repeated in all 7 locks of the Seaway and 8 locks of the Welland Canal.




Twin Ports Report

09/08:
The increase in Twin Ports grain traffic that began in August is expected to speed up now that fall has arrived. On Sept. 7, Nea Doxa was loading at Cargill and Olympic Merit and Federal MacKenzie were at Cenex Harvest States. Ira is expected to arrive off Duluth on Sept. 8 and drop anchor.

Also on Sept. 8, Hallett Dock will be unusually busy, receiving stone cargoes from both Joe Block and Philip R. Clarke.

St. Clair is scheduled to make a rare appearance Sept. 8 at Silver Bay.

The pace at Midwest Energy Terminal continues unabated. Here's the projected line-up: Fred R. White Jr. and Paul R. Tregurtha, Sept. 7; Jean Parisien and Walter J. McCarthy Jr., Sept. 8; Mesabi Miner, Sept. 10; Columbia Star, Canadian Enterprise and American Mariner, Sept. 11; Algolake, Sept. 12; and Paul R. Tregurtha, Sept. 13.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Buffalo Update

09/08:
The Norfolk Southern Rail Road is currently considering refurbishing an abandoned lift bridge on the Buffalo River. Rail traffic congestion over two other CSX bridges may cause the Southern to reopen the old Nickel Plate span between CP Draw and River Bridge in South Buffalo.

The Nickel Plate bridge was welded in place in the up position about 20 years ago due to a decrease in use. If reactivated this would be the only "rolling lift span" type bridge in operation in the city.

In a follow up to yesterday's story on the bomb found in Buffalo's outer harbor, the U.S. Coast Guard reports that the canister found by a marine patrol unit attached to a lifejacket contained two .22 caliber pistols and a working explosive device. The device was disarmed and removed from scene. The FBI and ATF are investigating.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Today in Great Lakes History - September 08

The GEMINI sailed on her maiden voyage in August 1978 from the shipyard to load fuel oil at Baytown, TX, for delivery at Detroit, MI. Passing upbound the next month on September 8th through the Welland Canal, GEMINI became the largest U.S. flagged tanker on the Great Lakes with a capacity of 76,000 barrels.

The W.E. FITZGERALD was launched September 8, 1906 for the Chicago Navigation Co., Chicago, IL (D. Sullivan, mgr.).

The W.W. HOLLOWAY was launched September 8, 1906 as the straight decker a) HENRY A. HAWGOOD for Minerva Steamship Co. (W.A. & H.A. Hawgood, mgr.), Cleveland.

The RADIANT departed the shipyard September 8, 1913 light on her maiden voyage bound for Montreal, Que.

On September 8, 1985 the downbound the Panamanian NORCHEM collided with the upbound CANADIAN PROSPECTOR near Kanawake. PROSPECTOR had little damage but NORCHEM was ripped open near her port anchor.

On 8 September 1885, ADVANCE (wooden schooner, 119’, 180GT, built in 1853 at Milwaukee) was carrying wood when she became waterlogged and capsized in a gale and blinding rain near Port Washington, WI in Lake Michigan. All but one of her crew of 7 drowned when her yawl capsized in the surf.

Data from: James Neumiller, Al Miller, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Twin Ports Report

09/07:
Overall boat traffic was slow on Labor Day, except at the ore docks. James R. Barker and Reserve both took loads at DMIR in Duluth and Stewart J. Cort loaded at BNSF in Superior.

Philip R. Clarke is scheduled to make an unusual call at Hallett Dock 5 in Duluth to unload stone. George A. Sloan and Cason J. Callaway are both scheduled for trips to Huron, Ohio. Sloan is due there Sept. 8 and the Callaway on the 9th.

Passenger ship C. Columbus is scheduled to arrive Duluth early on the morning of Sept. 7 and tie up behind the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center. It will depart at 11 p.m. See story below.

Also on the 7th, Fred R. White will make one of its periodic visits to the Reiss dock in Duluth to unload, then shift to Midwest Energy Terminal to load coal.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Bomb Found in Buffalo

09/07:
The US Coast Guard, Erie County Sheriff, New York State Police, Buffalo Police Department, and ATF were involved with a bomb recovery in Buffalo Harbor in the morning/afternoon of the 6th.

The Buffalo Outer Harbor was closed to all traffic while a recovery/deactivation operation was underway.

Pleasure craft and news media were kept at a distance while commercial vessels such as the tug Kurt Leudke were given escort through the channel.

A cooler was found underwater with grenade type explosives and weapons that were secured, deactivated and taken to the Buffalo Coast Guard Base for a multi-organization debrief. At 12 noon, the harbor was still closed as units performed a sweep to check for any other possible objects.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




C. Columbus to Arrive Today

09/07:
DULUTH, Minn., U.S.A. Port of Duluth
Superior citizens can once again greet the German cruise vessel Columbus on Tuesday, September 7, as she makes her fourth call on the Port.

She will spend a day in this community of boat lovers that has extended her a warm welcome during past visits, even though federal regulations prohibit public tours.

Her trips to the port are a result of continuing efforts by Port and City officials to revive major cruise ship operations on the Great Lakes and bring them to Duluth-Superior.

"We're finally seeing a return on our work to persuade additional lines to bring service to this westernmost tip of Lake Superior," said Port Promotion Manager Lisa Marciniak. "The Columbus is making a stop here this year and is committed to returning twice in the new millennium. The French-owned, five-star cruise ship Le Levant, which made its maiden voyage through the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway in 1999, is expected to add Duluth to its itinerary by 2001." The Columbus is scheduled to arrive under the Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge at approximately 7:45 a.m., then proceed to the Duluth Entertainment and Convention Center Dock. The public is invited to an 8:15 a.m. dockside welcoming ceremony.

Duluth Mayor Gary Doty, Superior Mayor Margaret Ciccone, and Port Director Davis Helberg will extend a welcome to Captain Thilo Natke and Cruise Director Martin Elliger. The Proctor Community Band under the direction of Bruce Rapp will perform prior to the ceremony. The Duluth Convention and Visitors Bureau has arranged shore tours for the passengers during the day, and the vessel is scheduled to depart at midnight.

The Columbus entered the lakes in August for six Great Lakes cruises-from Toronto to Chicago, Chicago to Port Colborne, Ont., Port Colborne to Chicago, Chicago to Windsor, Ont., Windsor to Detroit, and Detroit to Toronto. Her call to Duluth-Superior is part of the Chicago to Port Colborne cruise. he itineraries beginning or ending in alternating U.S. and Canadian ports are required because of an 1886 law called the Passenger Services Act. It prohibits foreign-flag carriers from providing passenger service that originates at one U.S. port and terminates at another U.S. Port.

The Columbus is operated by Hapag-Lloyd Cruiseship Management, GmbH, Hamburg. She was built in 1997 at the MTW shipyard, Wismar, Germany, and has five passenger decks that include a swimming pool, sauna, spa, gym, hospital, library, boutique, salon, wine bar and a lounge with a stage and a dance floor.

Reported by: Duluth Seaway Port Authority




Dennis Hale Named Curator at Ashtabula Museum

09/07:
Dennis Hale, sole survivor of the DANIEL J. MORRELL, has been named the resident curator at the Great Lakes Marine & U. S. Coast Guard Memorial Museum in Ashtabula, Ohio. Dennis is on hand most weekends, and talks to museum visitors. The museum is located on a hill overlooking the Conrail coal docks and Pinney ore dock, and is open from Memorial Day to Labor Day, on Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Holidays, Noon to 6pm. There is no charge, but donations are welcomed.

The museum has a nice display of memorabilia and pictures. Featured are activities around the Ashtabula harbor, which saw ship building and scrapping, railroad car ferry service, and coal shipping and ore receiving over the last 100 years and more.

They also have a giant working model of a Hulett Unloader, similar to the 8 that once worked the Ashtabula docks. Outside the museum is the cab of a Hulett that will be part of a display in a park across the street.

Reported by: Dave Wobser




Today in Great Lakes History - September 07

On September 7, 1978 the ROGER M. KYES (b. ADAM E. CORNELIUS) lost all power in Lake St. Clair requiring tug assistance from the GLT tugs MARYLAND and MAINE which escorted her to the Great Lakes Steel dock.

The CADILLAC (4) was laid up on September 7, 1981 for the last time at Toledo, OH. She was later transferred to a West coast marine operation in preparation for conversion for a proposed container ship for service between Chicago, Detroit and Quebec City. However these plans never materialized.

On September 7, 1921, the D.G. KERR pulled up to the ore dock at Two Harbors, MN to load exactly 12,507 gross tons of iron ore in the record breaking time of sixteen and a half minutes. This was accomplished through the cooperation of the dock superintendent, the dock employees concerned, the ship's captain and crew and the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. as a means of "showing up" the competition. Her time of arrival and departure to and from the dock took only nineteen minutes. For comparison, a good average loading time at that time was about three hours and forty-five minutes.

On September 7, 1975 on the St. Marys River loaded with iron ore pellets, the WILLIAM G. MATHER, forced out of the channel by a salt water vessel, struck bottom. Upon proceeding further onto Lake Huron it was soon discovered that her pumps were unable to cope with incoming water caused by the damage. She was beached at Frying Pan Island in 19 feet of water when it became evident they couldn't make dock.

On 7 September 1883, LAURA BELL (wooden schooner, 138’, 269GT, built in 1870 at Toledo, OH) was carrying coal from Cleveland to Marquette, MI when she stranded off Shot Point, east of Marquette in Lake Superior. Her crew spent 3 days in her rigging and all but one were rescued by a tug from Marquette.

Data from: Tin Stackers - The History of the Pittsburgh Steamship Company, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Talks Continue

09/06:
Interlake Steamship Co. and Steelworkers Local 5000 agreed to continue negotiating until Wednesday in efforts to settle a contract for unlicensed personnel aboard Interlake's eight vessels, the Duluth News-Tribune reported Sept. 4.

Meanwhile, operations of Interlake vessels will continue as normal, a fleet official said.

Interlake made additional concessions on wages and benefits during talks held Friday, a fleet official told the News-Tribune.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Canadian Prospector Goes South

09/06:
On Saturday the M.V. Canadian Prospector, an Upper Lakes Group straight deck bulk carrier, took a very strange course down Quebec City on the St-Lawrence River.

About 20 miles down from Quebec the Prospector in ballast took a no longer used (since the 70's) route, south of the very busy northern channel. The Chenal du Sud (South Channel) has not been dredge for at least 20 years and Canadian Cost Guard no longer maintains aids to navigation in the waterway.

Only experienced sailors or old pilots are able to use the South Channel near Montmagny Islands.

Reported by: J.F. Boutin




Dredging Continues in Buffalo

09/06:
Dredging operations are slowly moving downriver from the Mobil Docks in Buffalo. Derrick boat #16 is stationed in the Republic Steel Turning Basin just below South Park Ave. Bridge. She will soon be moved further down river past the twin CSX bridges in South Buffalo. Once clear of railroad property she will be in full view from public land.

The dredging is actually quite interesting to watch as the derrick, tug and barges dance with each other in the restricted waters of the shipping channel every time a full scow is replaced with an empty one.

All sorts of items are coming up including some home appliances, car parts etc.

There is talk of possible dredging under the hulls of the Naval Park ships Little Rock and Sullivans. They may need to be moved as part of harbor redevelopment and are sitting on the bottom most of the time.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Clipper Hosts TV Crew

09/06:
According to a front page article in the August 24 edition of the Muskegon Chronicle, the Milwaukee Clipper recently played host to a TV crew shooting a History Channel special on the 1956 sinking of the luxury Italian passenger liner Andrea Doria off the Nantucket coast.

The Clipper is standing in for the Doria in the special "Wrath of God: Disasters in America," which is scheduled to air at 9 p.m. October 16.

In an interesting sidelight, Bob Priefer, who once served as captain of the Milwaukee Clipper, played the role of Andria Doria Captain Pietro Calamai.

Filmmakers worked around buckets of paint and scaffolding - the Clipper is currently being restored by the Great Lakes Clipper Preservation Society.

Reported by: Roger LeLievre




Lost E-mail

09/06:
Due to a software problem I lost about a dozen e-mails sent to me Sunday. If you sent an update and it has not appeared please resend .




Today in Great Lakes History - September 06

The S.S. Badger was launched on September 6, 1952, at Sturgeon Bay, WI. In a christening ceremony that included the S.S. Spartan (launched earlier that year). The S.S. Badger was named in honor of the University of Wisconsin. The Badger was built by Christy Corporation, and is powered by two Skinner 4 cylinder Steeple Compound Unaflow Marine Steam engines, developing over 7,000 horsepower. She was the last of the large, coal-fired steamers to be built in the United States, and the only ship of her type still operating on the Great Lakes. The S.S. Badger offers seasonal passenger service from Ludington, MI to Manitowoc, WI from mid May to early October.

The BELLE RIVER began her maiden voyage when she loaded 56,073 long tons of western coal at Superior, WI on August 31, 1977 and arrived at Edison CO's Belle River power plant at Recors Point on September 6, 1977. today sails as: b) WALTER J. McCARTHY JR.

On Sunday morning September 6, 1990 at approximately 0800, the BUFFALO, traveling upstream on the Saginaw River, passed the JUPITER which was unloading gasoline at the Total Petroleum dock near Bay City, MI. The ship's passing caused a suction which pulled the JUPITER away from the dock. The aft pilings subsequently broke away and the parting fuel lines caused a spark which resulted in a fire which totally destroyed the tanker. One of the JUPITER's crew was lost overboard.

On September 6, 1992 the H. LEE WHITE was in tow of the "G" tugs COLORADO and LOUISIANA entering the Trenton Channel when she struck a section of the toll bridge at Grosse Ile, MI knocking down a 150 foot span immediately east of the main river channel. The WHITE was not damaged but a new section of the bridge had to be installed at a cost of $1.7 million. The bridge was back in service in late January, 1993.

The CHARLES E. WILSON completed her sea trials on September 6th.

The GEORGIAN BAY collided with the steamer CHARLES HUBBARD in the fog-covered lower St. Marys River September 6, 1955.

On September 6, 1989 the Twin Screw Rail Car Ferry GRAND RAPIDS left Muskegon in tow of the tugs ANGLIAN LADY and PRINCESS NO.1 and arrived at Port Maitland, Ont. on September llth. Scrapping was completed in the fall of 1994.

On 6 September 1887, BLUE BELL (2-mast wooden scow-schooner, 84’, 122GT, built in 1867 at Milwaukee) was carrying lumber from Wilt’s Bay, MI to Milwaukee when she missed the harbor entrance at Sturgeon Bay, WI in a storm. She was driven ashore where she broke up. Her crew made it to the beach with the aid of the local U.S. Life Saving crew. The total loss was valued at $5,000. Data from: Max S. Hanley Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Anderson to Lay-Up

09/05:
The Arthur M. Anderson is scheduled to enter Fraser Shipyards in Superior at 0800 on September 5 for "temporary layup," according to Great Lakes Fleet.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Today in Great Lakes History - September 05

On September 5, 1964, the 730-foot bulk freighter Leecliffe Hall sank after colliding with the Greek ocean vessel Appolonia in the St. Lawrence River.

The CHI-CHEEMAUN completed her sea trials on September 5, 1974 and then cleared the shipyard on September 26th.

The BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS cleared Lorain on her maiden voyage September 5, 1942.

The MORGAN, JR. returned to service September 5, 1948 after repairs suffered in an accident in June.

The NEW QUEDOC arrived at McLouth Steel, Trenton, MI on her maiden voyage September 5, 1960 with a load of Labrador iron ore.

The WYANDOTTE (2) was towed down the Welland Canal on September 5th & 6th on her way to the cutters torch.

On 5 September 1905, ABERCORN (wooden propeller “rabbit”, 126’, 261GT, built in 1873 at Marine City, MI) burned at the dock at Goderich, Ont. While unloading coal. She reportedly caught fire from the explosion of a signal lamp.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Strike Update

09/04:
Members of Steelworkers Local 5000 will vote next week on tentative contract agreements with Oglebay Norton, USS Great Lakes Fleet and Bethlehem Steel, a union spokesman told the Duluth News-Tribune.

In its Sept. 3 editions, the News-Tribune reported that Central Marine Logistics has agreed to an extension of negotiations until Sept. 14. No further talks were scheduled as of Sept. 2.

Prospects for a settlement between the union and Interlake Steamship Co. remained uncertain. Interlake's original agreement with the union, reached Aug. 1, was rejected by union members. The union notified Interlake that a strike deadline had been set for this weekend. An official for Interlake said that the deadline didn't mean the union members would necessarily strike, and that the company remains hopeful the situation can be settled.

The News-Tribune reported that Interlake has filed a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board charging the union with unfair labor practices.

Meanwhile, officials of Oglebay Norton, USS Great Lakes Fleet and Central Marine Logistics told the newspaper that they expect to see normal operations this weekend and during the contract ratification process.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Twin Ports Reports

09/04:
Kinsman Independent this week made its first trip back to the Twin Ports following layup. It was loading at the Cenex Harvest States elevator in Superior, due to leave about 10 p.m. Sept. 3. Also loading on the 3rd -- and due to depart that day -- were Lake Charles at Peavey and Ziemia Zamojska at Cargill. Anchored on the lake and due at Cargill is Nea Doxa.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Continental Grain in Milwaukee still for sale

09/04:
An article in the Sept. 1 issue of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that the Continental Grain terminal was not included in the July sale of Continental facilities to Cargill, Inc. The US Justice Dept. citing competition concerns, OK'd the deal only if the Milwaukee elevators and 7 other facilities were not included in the deal. Continental is taking bids through Thursday in hopes of finding a buyer.

Reported by: Bob Strauss




Today in Great Lakes History - September 04

Two favorites of many boatwatchers, entered service on August 4. The William Clay Ford (1) entered service on August 4, 1953, and the Edward L. Ryerson entered service on August 4, 1960.

The MELISSA DESGAGNES sailed to Holland under her 'a' name ONTADOC (2) with a load of Bentonite from Chicago on August 4, 1979.

The E.J. BLOCK was laid up for the last time at Indiana Harbor, IN on August 4 1984, the E.J. BLOCK was sold for scrap in late May, 1987.

The D.M. CLEMSON (2) left Superior on August 4, 1980 in tow of Malcolm Marine's tug TUG MALCOLM for Thunder Bay where she was dismantled.

The HOCHELAGA (2) was launched August 4, 1949 at the Collingwood Shipyards Ltd., Collingwood, Ont. for Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., Montreal, Que

On a foggy August 4, 1977 the POINTE NOIRE went hard aground near the entrance to the Rock Cut in the St. Marys River and blocked the channel. After her grain cargo was lightered by Columbia Transportation's crane steamer BUCKEYE, the POINTE NOIRE was released on August 6th. She was reloaded in Hay Lake and continued her downbound trip. Repairs to her bottom damage were completed at Thunder Bay. Ont.

On 4 September 1902, ALICE M. BEERS (2-mast wooden schooner, 105’, 154GT, built in 1864 at Algonac, MI) was light when she hove to off the dock at Glen Arbor, MI in a gale. However, she slipped her anchor and was driven onto the channel marker. She was holed and drifted ashore where she later broke up. No lives lost.

Data from: Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Possible Strike Update

09/03:
The negotiations in Pittsburgh between Steelworkers Local 5000 and four major Great Lakes fleets has resulted in a tentative agreement with three of the fleets in question.

In a phone call to the union yesterday afternoon, a representative with Local 5000 confirmed that a tentative agreement had been reached with Central Marine Logistics, Oglebay Norton Co. and USS Great Lakes Fleet.

This tentative agreement will allow vessels of those fleets to continue sailing. For the contract to be ratified, the union members must vote to except the new contract.

Please stop back, updates will be added as new information becomes available.




Norris Makes Rare Trip

09/03:
The James Norris made a rare call to the Port of Goderich for salt on Sunday. The ship was met in the lake by the MacDonald Marine tugs Dover and Debbie Lyn who assisted the vessel in her turn and backing from the lake to the Salt dock. The ship was inbound from Detroit and bound for Toledo with its salt cargo.




September Vessel Report

09/03:
The major U.S.-Flag Lakes lines had 61 of their 69 vessels in service on September 1, a decrease of 5 ships compared to a year ago. The decrease reflects the season-long lay-ups for the EDWARD L. RYERSON and JOHN J. BOLAND and the August idlings of the ELTON HOYT 2ND and ROGER BLOUGH. Additionally, the H. LEE WHITE was in drydock on the survey date undergoing her 5-year inspection.

Reported by: Lake Carriers' Association Click here for more information




Today in Great Lakes History - September 03

On September 3, 1977, the Belle River (now Walter J. McCarthy, Jr.) set a Great Lakes record for coal when it loaded 62,802 tons of coal at Superior Midwest Energy Terminal on its maiden voyage. This record has since been surpassed many times.

On September 3, 1981, the U.S. Steel bulk freighter Sewell Avery was laid up for the final time in Duluth.

Keel laying ceremonies for the 437 foot bow section of the ROGER BLOUGH took place on September 3, 1968 and was float launched December 21, 1968 less ballast tanks because the existing dry dock wasn’t wide enough to accommodate her 105 foot width.

SOODOC (b) AMELIA DESGAGNES ) departed on her maiden voyage when she loaded salt at Goderich, Ont. on September 3, 1976.

The SEWELL AVERY was laid up for the last time September 3, 1981 at Superior, WI.

The THOMAS LAMONT was cited for “exemplary service” by the U.S. Coast Guard. On September 3, 1981 for her role in the rescue of seventeen crew members from the burning CARTIERCLIFFE HALL on Lake Superior. The THOMAS LAMONT was laid up for the last time at Duluth’s Hallett dock #6A.

The H.H. PORTER sailed on her maiden voyage September 3, 1920 light from Lorain to load iron ore at Two Harbors, MN.

On September 3, 1985, PHILIP R. CLARKE plowed into the Drawbridge Cove Marina in Lorain's Black River damaging 5-10 small craft and sinking one at the steel dock. CLARKE managed to stop before hitting the Route 6 drawbridge.

On 3 September 1887, BULGARIA (wooden propeller, 280’, 1888GT) was launched at W. Bay City, MI by J. Davidson (hull #16).

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Possible Strike Update

09/02:
Negotiations between five Great Lakes fleets and Steelworkers Local 5000 continued Sept. 1, and at least one fleet official continued to voice hopes that a walkout could be averted, the Duluth News-Tribune reported Sept. 2.

Members of Steelworkers Local 5000, a Cleveland-based union that represents hundreds of deck hands, engine room helpers and other laborers for five Great Lakes fleets, may go on strike at midnight Friday unless a settlement is reached or another extension is approved. Licensed vessel officers are represented by a different union. At issue are pay and benefits, say those familiar with the negotiations.

"We're all (the major fleets) still trying to nail down an agreement with the rank and file and we thought we were there several weeks ago, but there's been some bumps in the road," Stuart Theis, president of Oglebay Norton Co., told the News-Tribune. Oglebay Norton, with 12 vessels, operates the largest of the fleets that could be idled. Theis said he is hopeful a settlement can still be reached.

The Steelworkers' contract expired Aug. 1, but the union and fleet operators agreed to a one-month extension after a tentative agreement was reached. Time is running out on that extension this week and union members are threatening to walk.

"Talks are continuing, but if they fail to be successful then we will be laying the boats up come Saturday morning," said Leland Barr, vice president and manager of operations for Central Marine Logistics, which owns three vessels but is currently only operating two. "We've been notified by the union that they are going to strike us at 12:01 (Saturday) and we'll have the boats circling the nearest shipyard and head in there at that time."

Other fleets represented by Local 5000 include Bethlehem Steel, Interlake Steamship and USS Great Lakes Fleet. Reports that Bethlehem Steel had settled its contract with Local 5000 could not be confirmed Wednesday. A representative of the union was unavailable for comment. Representatives of the other three fleets did not return phone calls Wednesday.

A shutdown would curtail much of the coal and iron ore shipping from Duluth and Superior, although grain shipments would continue because nearly all the tonnage is carried by Canadian lakers and salties. Production at Iron Range taconite plants probably would not be affected because most already are facing production cutbacks, and plenty of storage space is available at the mines and at ore docks.

The potential of a strike already is affecting at least some vessel schedules. USS Great Lakes Fleet's recorded 'vessel hotline' said Sept. 1 that Cason J. Callaway and Calcite II would go to anchor off Calcite "pending future orders." Other vessels were mentioned with destinations only through Sept. 2 and 3.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Saguenay Update

09/02:
As reported yesterday the M.A.C. Gagne (former Saguenay) entered the Pascol Engineering drydock in Thunder Bay on Monday. Pascol employees then began removing the vessel's self-unloading boom. As of three p.m. yesterday, the rear third of her boom had been removed and placed on the ground beside the drydock. Workmen were taking apart the front half or what is left of the boom.

It was originally reported that the vessel was to have her engines removed. It is unclear if this is still the case.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Twin Ports Report

09/02:
Middletown put in a rare appearance at Midwest Energy Terminal on Sept. 1. It will be followed by Mesabi Miner on Sept. 1; Paul R. Tregurtha and Walter J. McCarthy jr. on Sept. 2; Canadian Transport, Sept. 3; and Canadian Enterprise and Columbia Star on Sept. 4.

John G. Munson made another trip to Ontonagon, Mich., to unload on Aug. 31. George A. Sloan is scheduled to arrive at Sturgeon Bay on Sept. 3 - there was no indication from GLF whether it was for layup or repairs.

Employees at Hibbing Taconite near Hibbing, Minn., and National Steel Pellet Co. in Keewatin, Minn., have ratified five-year labor contracts reached earlier this summer. Both companies ship their taconite pellets through the BNSF dock in Superior.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




Boland to Sail For Lower Lakes Towing?

09/02:
For months rumors have circulated that Lower Lakes Towing may be looking at the John J. Boland as a possible fleet mate to the Cuyahoga. The Boland is currently owned by American Steamship Company and has not sailed in the 1999 season.

Latest rumors say that a deal between the two companies is close to being signed. If signed, the Boland could be taken from Duluth to Sarnia within a few weeks. Once in Sarnia the vessel would be fitted out meeting Canadian code and possibly sailing by mid-November.

Reported by: Todd L. Davidson




Today in Great Lakes History - September 02

ALGOSEA (built in 1970 by Lithgows Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland as Hull #1177) was launched on September 2, 1970 as a) BROOKNES for "Langra" Schiffahrsges G.m.b.H. & Co., Hamburg, Germany. She is now the c) SAUNIERE

ROBERT KOCH's first trip was on September 2, 1977 up the Welland Canal bound for Buffalo with cement.

The W.F WHITE was one of the earliest ships built as a self-unloader on the Great Lakes. On her maiden voyage September 2, 1915 the WHITE loaded coal at Erie, PA and sailed for Menominee, MI. She was the largest self-unloading bulk carrier on the Lakes at that time with a cargo capacity of 10,500 tons.

The RALPH H. WATSON departed light September 2, 1938 from Detroit, MI upbound to load iron ore at Duluth, MN. She was built as part of a fleet modernization plan for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co., Cleveland, OH. of four new "GOVERNOR MILLER' class bulk carriers.

On September 2, 1938, the Ralph H. Watson, only the fourth steam turbine powered vessel on the Lakes, entered service.

HUBERT GAUCHER ran aground in the lower St. Lawrence on September 2, 1988. It took three tugs to free her, repairs took place at Quebec City.

ZIEMIA TARNOWSKA lost her engine while docking at Pier 24 in Cleveland, ramming the dock and caused about $100,000 in damage to the dock on September 2, 1988. The Polish vessel had minimal damage to her bulbous bow.

On 2 September 1851, BUNKER HILL (wooden sidewheeler, 154’, 457T, built in 1835 at Black River, OH) burned to a total loss at Tonawanda, NY.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history




Possible Strike

09/01:
The labor contracts between four of the shipping companies and Steelworkers Union Local 5000 are set to expired at 12:01 am September 4, 1999.

The four companies that have not settled are reported as: Interlake, Central Marine Logistics., Oglebay Norton Co. and USS Great Lakes Fleet. Meetings began yesterday in Pittsburgh, and will continue again today. Please stop back, updates will be added as the information becomes available.




Twin Ports Report

09/01:
Oglebay Norton boats were busy on Lake Superior early this week. On Aug. 30, Reserve and Buckeye were scheduled for Silver Bay and Columbia Star was due into Taconite Harbor. Armco was at the Duluth DMIR ore dock early on Aug. 31, loading in the spot usually used by Inland Steel boats.

The Twin Ports grain trade remains brisk. On Aug. 31, Montrealais was loading at Cargill; Isa was at AGP; and Algoville was at General Mills in Duluth. Over in Superior, Ikan Sepat and Lady Hamilton were at Cenex Harvest States. Nea Doxa was anchored on Lake Superior.

Although Roger Blough is the largest vessel to enter Fraser Shipyards in recent years, it's not the largest ever. The 1,000-foot Lewis Wilson Foy was squeaked into the yard in the late '80s for thruster repairs.

Reported by: Al Miller
Click here for a new book written by Al.




H Lee White Enters Drydock in Toledo

09/01:
The H. Lee White entered the drydock at the Toledo Ship Repair yard yesterday. She was assisted in by two tugboats and is expected to leave the yard some time around the 12th of September. The vessel is undergoing her 5-year inspection.




Former Saguenay Enters Drydock

09/01:
The deadship M.A.C. Gagne, the former Saguenay, was moved from the Pierre Gagne dock in Thunder Bay on Monday and placed on Pascol Engineering's drydock.

The vessel had been in long term lay-up in Toronto since 1992 and was moved to Thunder Bay in October of 1997. Her name was then changed and the vessel was used to hold the spoils from a dredging operation.

This latest move has some speculating that Lower Lakes Towing may be looking at the vessel as a possible fleet mate to the Cuyahoga.

Reported by: Ron Konkol




Engine Trials End in Rescue

09/01:
A USCG 47-foot motor lifeboat from station St. Ignace was underway conducting engine trials in northern Lake Huron when the crew spotted a capsized 12-foot sailboat and a 43-year-old man nearby waving his arms for attention. The motor lifeboat crew recovered the man in good condition, then dewatered and towed the sailboat to safety.




Rare Trip For Republic

09/01:
The Buffalo based American Steamship Company will be sending their 635-foot self unloader American Republic to the Founder's Sand Dock on the Buffalo Ship Canal on the morning of the 2nd.

The Republic is considered the most maneuverable ship on the Great Lakes with bow and stern thrusters and rudders on both sides of her props.

Reported by: Brian Wroblewski




Today in Great Lakes History - September 01

Tragedy struck four days after the launch of the AGAWA CANYON, September 1, 1970, when the ship was rocked by an engine room explosion killing one of the crew and injuring seven more. The AGAWA CANYON entered service in November, 1970. New engines were fitted in 1975, equipped with four 10 cylinder, two stroke cycle, single acting opposed piston diesel engines, built in 1970 by Fairbanks, Morse (Canada), Kingston, Ont. Total bhp 6,680. Rated service speed: 12 knots (13.8 mph).

LAKE NIPIGON was launched September 1, 1970 as a) TEMPLE BAR, BR.341240, for Lambert Bros. (Shipping) Ltd., London, England.

Upon her arrival at Quebec City on September 1, 1962, the LAKE WINNIPEG was the first vessel to enter the Nipigon Transport fleet.

ROGERS CITY (2) was launched September 1, 1923 as a) B.H. TAYLOR, the third self-unloader built for the Bradley Transportation Co., Rogers City, MI.

From September 1, 1947 to September 15, 1959 the MESQUITE was stationed at Sault Ste. Marie, MI

On 1 September 1854, ABIAH (2-mast wooden schooner or brig, 134’, 353T, built in 1848 at Irving, NY) was sailing light from Chicago to Oconto, WI when she capsized and sank in a squall about 10 miles off Sheboygan, WI. The schooner L. LUDDINGTON rescued her crew and 2 passengers.

Data from: James Neumiller, Jody L. Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

This is a small sample, the books include many other vessels with a much more detailed history
Please e-mail if you would like to contribute a significant event in Great Lakes history





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