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Port of Indiana marks 200th vessel in 2016

12/3 - The Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor joined in the celebration of the state's 200th anniversary Tuesday by honoring the arrival of the shipping season's 200th vessel.

Port director Rick Heimann and Perry Hammock, executive director of the Indiana Bicentennial Commission, presented the captain of the ship, the Federal Oshima, with a commemorative Port of Indiana steel stein to mark the milestone.

"In 1816, Indiana's founding fathers saw the potential for a Great Lakes port and extended the boundary line for 10 miles north, giving Indiana 45 miles of Lake Michigan shoreline," Heimann said. "This foresight has given the world direct access to the Midwest by way of the Atlantic Ocean, St. Lawrence Seaway and Great Lakes."

"From steel and grain to wind turbines and coal, shipping is an important part of Indiana's history and her future," said Hammock.

The steins are a tribute to Northwest Indiana's heritage as a major steel-producing region and the Port of Indiana as one of the top steel ports in the country. The port is home to 31 companies, 15 of which are steel-related.

They are only given out in special occasions, according to Ports of Indiana spokesman Rich Allen.

Allen said the public and private docks at the port typically receive more than 200 vessels a year, including ocean-going vessels, lakers and barges.

He said the Federal Oshima has been at the port several times in the past, but this was its first visit this year. The ship is owned and operated by Fednav Limited.

The Federal Oshima picked up steel cargo at the Port of Antwerp in Belgium and stopped in Milwaukee before making its stop in Burns Harbor, Allen said.

He said dock workers would unload more than 12,600 tons of steel before Capt. Pankaj Sah and his 22-member crew from India moved on to Thunder Bay in Ontario, Canada, to load potash before returning to Europe.

Chicago Tribune

 

Port Reports -  December 3

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived Duluth at 03:44 Friday and headed to CN to load iron ore pellets. Federal Katsura came in at 12:30 to load grain at CHS 1. Edgar B. Speer departed from Port Terminal during the evening and anchored off Duluth, with a posted destination of Two Harbors. Yulia continued discharging at Port Terminal. Labrador was expected to depart from Riverland Ag late Friday, and Sunda was tentatively expected to arrive from anchor to load.

Marquette, Mich. – Rod Burdick
Indiana Harbor unloaded coal at the Upper Harbor on Friday. The visit was her first since the early 1990s.

St. Marys River
Oakglen was upbound at the locks Friday evening on a rare trip to the upper lakes. She was headed to Thunder Bay for grain, as was the Federal Mackinac, which was ahead of her. Mississagi was upbound for Essar in the evening. Cason J. Callaway, Stewart J. Cort, Ojibway and Algoma Equinox were downbound during the late afternoon and evening.

Escanaba, Mich. – Jake H.
On Friday, the Joyce L. Vankevort/Great Lakes Trader arrived at CN took load ore.

Toledo, Ohio
Algoma Transport departed with grain in the morning Friday. The saltwater vessel Rodopi arrived to load at Anderson's K elevator.

 

Help wanted: Lakes Pilots Association seeking new pilots

12/3 - Lakes Pilots Association, based in Port Huron, Mich., is seeking applications from those interested in employment as a U.S. registered pilot on foreign vessels in District 2 of the Great Lakes. Lakes pilots provide pilotage service in all the waters and ports from Port Huron, Mich., to Buffalo, N.Y., excluding the Welland Canal. Applicants must hold a U.S. master, mate or pilot license with at least 24 months licensed service or comparable experience on vessels or integrated tugs and tows, of 4,000 gross tons, or over, operating on the Great Lakes or oceans. Those applicants qualifying with ocean service must have obtained at least six months of licensed service or comparable experience on the Great Lakes. A complete list of requirements may be found in CFR Title 46, Shipping, Part 401, Subpart B. Anyone interested must first apply to the Director of Great Lakes Pilotage in Washington, D.C. to determine eligibility. Please contact Lakes Pilots for more information at (810) 941-5152

Applications and Information can be obtained on the web at: http://www.uscg.mil/hq/cg5/cg552/pilotage.asp

Lakes Pilots Association
P.O. Box 610902
Port Huron, MI 48061
(810) 941-5152

Director of Great Lakes Pilotage
US Coast Guard
2100 2nd St SW
Washington, D.C. 20593-7580
(202) 372-1537

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 3

In 1918, the forward end of the former Pittsburgh steamer MANOLA sank during a gale on Lake Ontario. The after end received a new forward end and sailed for several years as the MAPLEDAWN.

On 03 December 1881, the DE PERE (wooden propeller, 736 tons, built in 1875, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin) was caught in a severe southwest gale and blizzard on Lake Michigan. She was driven ashore near Two Rivers, Wisconsin. All efforts to free her failed, so she was left to winter where she lay. In April 1882, she was pulled free by the Goodrich tug ARCTIC and towed to Manitowoc for repairs. Little damage was found and she was back in service quickly.

On 03 December 1891, the OGEMAW (wooden propeller freighter, 167 foot, 624 gross tons, built in 1881, at St. Clair, Michigan) sprang a leak on Big Bay de Noc and sank. Her decks and cabins were blown off as she sank in 11 fathoms of water, 1 1/2 miles northwest of Burnt Bluff. Her crew was rescued by her consorts MAXWELL and TILDEN. Although the vessel was removed from enrollment as a total loss, she was later raised, rebuilt, and re-documented in 1894. However, 03 December was a fateful date for this steamer because on that date in 1922, she burned 1-1/2 miles below Grand Point, near Harsens Island, on the St. Clair River Ð this time to a total and final loss.

Upper Lakes Shipping Ltd.'s CANADIAN AMBASSADOR (Hull#70) was launched December 3, 1982, at St. Catharines, Ontario, by Port Weller Drydocks Ltd.

ROBERT W. STEWART, b.) AMOCO MICHIGAN in 1962) was launched in 1927, at Lorain, Ohio (Hull # 802), by the American Ship Building Co.

In 1909, LE GRAND S. DEGRAFF collided with the steamer HARVARD while down bound in the Detroit River in fog.

IRVING S. OLDS was laid up for the final time on December 3, 1981, at the Hallett Dock #5, Duluth, Minnesota, due to market conditions and her inability to compete with the 60,000-ton carrying capacity of the self-unloading thousand-foot bulk freighters.

On 3 December 1872, the officers and crew of the schooner E. KANTER arrived home in Detroit, Michigan. They reported that their vessel was driven ashore near Leland, Michigan in Lake Michigan on 26 November and was broken up by the waves.

On 3 December 1850, HENRY CLAY (2-mast wooden brig, 87 foot, 163 tons, built in 1842, at Huron, Ohio) was driven ashore at Point Nipigon in the Straits of Mackinac. She suffered little damage, but she was high and dry and unsalvageable. Her crew and passengers were picked up by the passing steamer TROY.

Back during the rough days of November on the lakes, the crews of the Imperial Oil tankers would wet the tablecloths in the mess rooms to keep plates, glasses and silverware from sliding off the tables.

1909: BARGE 101, a whaleback built on the Great Lakes in 1888, sank off Seal Island, Maine enroute from Boston to Halifax with coal tar. The crew of seven was lost.

1942: Yesterday and today the tug ADMIRAL and petroleum barge CLEVECO were lost with all hands off Euclid Beach, Ohio. A total of 32 sailors perished.

1954: The tug ROUILLE sank off Cape Smoky, NS with the loss of 5 lives. The vessel was built in 1929 as Hull 83 at the Collingwood Shipyard and had been on the lakes earlier in the year.

1959: THEODORUS A., seized earlier on Lake St. Clair due to debts, went aground twice while under tow to be unloaded. The vessel was released and spent the winter on the lakes. The crew was sent home.

1963: LIONEL and MANCHESTER MERCHANT collided at the entrance to the Seaway. The former caught fire and was beached at Ronde Island with heavy damage. It was rebuilt at Drammen, Norway, in 1964, returned inland as b) SKAGATIND in 1965 and was scrapped following another fire as e) ALECOS in 1982.

1967: TORONTO CITY, a Seaway trader from 1959 through 1962, went aground near the Elbe I Light enroute from Rostock, Germany, to Rotterdam, Holland, as d) EMMANUEL M. The crew was rescued and the ship was refloated July 7, 1970, sold for scrap, and broken up at Hamburg, Germany.

1985: An engine room fire broke out aboard the SKRADIN at Augusta, Italy, and the ship was a total loss. It had been a Seaway trader as b) BALTIC WASA beginning in 1971 and first returned under the current name in 1976. The damaged vessel was quickly sold for scrap and arrived at Split, Yugoslavia, December 28, 1985, for dismantling.

1987: The former Straits of Mackinac passenger and auto ferry VACATIONLAND sank off Oregon while under tow for scrapping in the Far East.

1993: HOPE I was seriously damaged when it hit bottom east of Quebec City. The ship had traded inland as a) NOSIRA MADELEINE beginning in 1983 and had returned as b) HOPE I earlier in 1993. It was repaired at Lauzon and continued Great Lakes service through 2002. The bulk carrier was back as c) HOPE in 2004.

1995: The former Canada Steamship Lines bulk carrier RIMOUSKI, renamed b) CANADIAN HARVEST, broke in two 114 miles NE of Sable Island while under tow for scrapping in India. The stern sank first. The bow was released two days later and was also lost.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ron LaDue, Russ Plumb, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  December 2

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
On the first day of December, Vlieborg arrived Duluth at 00:03 to load beet pulp pellets at Peavey. She was followed into port by Arthur M. Anderson, which arrived at 00:21 with limestone for C. Reiss. Her sister Cason J. Callaway then departed from CN at 02:24. The saltie Yulia passed under the lift bridge at 10:50 with clay to discharge at Port Terminal. Algoma Enterprise then departed from Hallett #5 with coke at 12:38. Also in port was Labrador, which continued loading at Riverland, Edgar B. Speer was at Port Terminal, and Sunda remained at anchor. Vlieborg was expected to depart from Peavey late Thursday night. In Superior, Stewart J. Cort departed from BN at 06:11, and Algorail arrived at 08:41 to load.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Ojibway departed downbound in the afternoon Thursday, while Algoma Equinox left at mid-evening. Federal Elbe and Baie Comeau were loading. Federal Ems was at anchor.

St. Marys River
Fog early Thursday delayed some traffic. After it lifted, Iryda picked up the hook and departed downbound from the Nine Mine anchorage. Other downbound traffic included Presque Isle, Burns Harbor, Algoma Discovery and Lee A. Tregurtha. Upbounders included John B. Aird (to Essar) and Redhead.

Cedarville, Mich.
Philip R. Clarke was loading Thursday evening.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Federal Biscay was still in port on Thursday. Hanse Gate departed and headed north Hanse Gate departed, and was eastbound in the Straits at dusk.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Thunder Bay was in port Thursday evening.

S. Chicago, Ill.
The saltie Redhead remained in port on Wednesday afternoon. The tug Heath Wood and her tank barge were upriver, presumably loading.

Alpena, Mich. – Ben & Chanda McClain
Wednesday was a busy day, with four vessels calling at Lafarge. Overnight the tug G.L Ostrander and barge Integrity arrived to load cement. The tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 tied up at Lafarge as well and unloaded product throughout the day. The Alpena took on another load of cement and mid-day was outbound by late afternoon. The Samuel de Champlain and barge Innovation came into port Wednesday evening.

Saginaw River – Todd Shorkey & Gordy Garris
There were a total of seven commercial vessel passages on the Saginaw River during November. This represents nine fewer passages as compared to November 2015, and eight fewer then the five-year average of 15. For the total vessel passages for the year to date, there have been a total of 103. This is 25 less than in 2015 and 16 fewer than the five-year average of 119.

After two weeks without any traffic on the Saginaw River, Thursday saw the arrival of three vessels. The steamer Alpena arrived first in the early morning to unload cement at the Lafarge Terminal in Essexville. Inbound a few hours after the Alpena were the tug Dorothy Ann and the barge Pathfinder. The pair moored directly in front of the Alpena to unload at the Lafarge stone dock. Once finished unloading there, Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder backed downriver and made the turn length-wise across the river to pull into the Bay Aggregates slip to complete unloading. Expert maneuvering by the captain allowed for the turn against the wind, as the pair made the narrow turn around past the Alpena without any problem. Once finished unloading at the Bay Aggregate dock, they were back outbound for the lake Thursday evening. Passing the outbound Dorothy Ann/Pathfinder in the Saginaw Bay was the Manitowoc. Manitowoc passed through Downtown Bay City around 10 p.m. Thursday on her way upriver to unload in Saginaw. Both Manitowoc and Alpena are expected to be back outbound for the lake on Friday.

Toronto, Ont. – Jens Juhl
The bulk carrier Cape (ex Heloise) departed from Redpath early Thursday morning. As Heloise the ship made news when it collided with the tug Ocean Georgie Bain in the Port of Montreal back August 2013. Just over a week ago the Cape's sister ship Sunda (ex Emilie) delivered a cargo of sugar from Paranagua, Brazil. As recently as last year, both bulkers traded into the Great Lakes under their old names as part of the Hong Kong-based Parakou Shipping group. The new owners purchased the two five-year-old handy-size bulk carriers at bargain prices. Clarkson Ship Brokers reports that the price of a good used bulk carrier has dropped by 50 percent and ship owners are upgrading their fleets by scrapping older vessels and buying relatively new used ships. The website of ship broker NautiSNP shows some incredible prices: The 13 year old Puffin has a price tag of $ 3.5 million and the 20-year-old, ice-strengthened Federal Saguenay can be bought for only $2.4 million.

Seaway
Joseph L. Block continued her unusual trip to Quebec City Thursday. The U.S.-flag laker passed through the Eisenhower lock in the early evening.

 

Ian Hamilton named new president and CEO of Hamilton Port Authority

12/2 - Hamilton, Ont. – Ian Hamilton will assume the role of President and CEO of the Hamilton Port Authority effective Jan. 1, 2017. He has served as the port’s Vice President of Business Development and Real Estate since 2008.

Hamilton has more than 25 years of experience in international transportation and logistics in Europe and North America, and has held progressively senior positions in the liner shipping industry, including Transatlantic Trade Director (Europe) for CP Ships and Business Development Manager for Hapag-Lloyd. He holds an MBA from Aston University (UK) and a BSc in business administration and economics from the College of Charleston, South Carolina.

Since 2008, he has been responsible for managing the port’s $500M real estate portfolio. In recent years, the Port of Hamilton has attracted more than $300M in investment.

Port of Hamilton

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 2

On this day in 1942, the tug ADMIRAL and tanker-barge CLEVCO encountered a late season blizzard on Lake Erie. The ADMIRAL sank approximately 10 miles off Avon Point, Ohio, with a loss of 11. The CLEVCO sank 30 hours later off Euclid Beach with a loss of 19.

On 02 December 1857, the NAPOLEON (wooden propeller, 92 foot, 181 tons, built in 1845, at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, as a schooner) went to the assistance of the schooner DREADNAUGHT. In the rescue attempt, the NAPOLEON bent her rudder and disabled her engine. Helpless, she went on a reef off Saugeen, Ontario, and was pounded to pieces. Her engine, boiler and gear were salvaged in the autumn of 1858, and sold at Detroit, Michigan.

Hall Corporation of Canada’s OTTERCLIFFE HALL (Hull # 667) was launched December 2, 1968, at Lauzon, Quebec, by Davie Shipbuilding Co. Ltd.

GEORGE R. FINK, b) ERNEST T. WEIR under tow passed Gibraltar on December 2, 1973, and arrived at Gandia, Spain, prior to December 7, 1973, for scrapping.

Pittsburgh Steamship Co.’s GOVERNOR MILLER (Hull # 810) was launched in1937, at Lorain, Ohio, by American Ship Building Co.

NIPIGON BAY last ran in 1982, and was laid up at Montreal on December 2nd.

December 2, 1975, the brand new carferry WOLFE ISLANDER III sailed into Kingston from Thunder Bay, Ontario. The new 55-car ferry would replace the older ferries WOLFE ISLANDER and UPPER CANADA.

On 2 December 1874, the steam barge GERMANIA was launched at King's yard in Marine City, Michigan. The Port Huron Times of 4 December 1874 reported that she "is probably the cheapest boat ever built in Marine City, wages and material, iron, etc. being very low." This was due to the nation just recovering from the "Panic of 1873." The vessel's dimensions were 144 feet overall x 56 feet 2 inches x 11 feet 9 inches.

On 2 December 1832, the wooden schooner CAROLINE was carrying dry goods worth more than $30,000 from Oswego to Ogdensburg, New York, in a violent storm. She capsized and sank off Ducks Island on Lake Ontario with the loss of one life. Five survived in the yawl and made it to the island in 6 hours. After much suffering from the cold and snow, they were rescued by the schooner HURON.

Duluth - December 2, 1950 - In the early part of this week there were as many as 41 Great Lakes vessels lined up in the Duluth-Superior harbor awaiting their turn to take on their cargoes of iron ore. Freezing temperatures prevailed at the head of the lakes and ore steaming operations permitted loading only of about 10 boats per day.

1964: The anchors of AGIOS NICOLAOS II dragged in a storm on the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the ship drifted aground at Sea-Cow Head, near Summerside, Prince Edward Island. The ship was released and towed to Halifax but not repaired. It had first come through the Seaway as a) ALKAID in 1961 and made one trip inland as b) AGIOS NICOLAOS II in 1964. Following a sale for scrap, the ship arrived at Bilbao, Spain, under tow of the tug PRAIA DE ADRAGA, on April 2, 1965.

1967: The tanker LUBROLAKE and tug IRVING BEECH were blown aground on Cape Breton Island, near New Waterford, NS at a site called the No. 12 Stone Dump. Both ships were abandoned and broken up to the waterline there at a later date.

1976: PEARL ASIA went aground off Port Weller while waiting clearance to head upbound to Thorold with a cargo of bauxite. After being lightered to MAPLEHEATH, the vessel was pulled free. It had begun Seaway trading as a) CRYSTAL CROWN in 1960 and first returned as b) PEARL ASIA in 1971.

1977: KEFALONIA SKY arrived at New Orleans with engine trouble that was later deemed beyond economic repair. The vessel was sold for scrapping at Brownsville, Texas, in 1978. It had first visited the Seaway as NIEUWE TONGE in 1960 and returned as b) AMSTELDIEP in 1963.

2006: The tug SENECA broke loose of the SUSAN B. HOEY on Lake Superior and was blown aground 21 miles east of Grand Marais, Mich. It was refloated on Dec. 23 and taken to Sault Ste. Marie for assessment.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Dave Wobser, Brian Johnson, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Indiana Harbor departs Duluth on first trip of the season

12/1 - American Steamship Co.’s 1,000-foot Indiana Harbor, which has been laid up at Lakehead Pipeline in Superior this season, departed her layup dock on Tuesday and fueled at Calumet before shifting to Midwest Energy to load 68,000 tons of coal for the Presque Isle power plant. After loading throughout the late morning and afternoon Wednesday, she departed Duluth on Wednesday evening. This is her first trip since arriving at Superior for the winter of 2015-16 on November 3, 2015.

Daniel Lindner

 

Port Reports -  December 1

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
The Duluth harbor was filled with ships on Wednesday. During the morning, Cason J. Callaway arrived with limestone for Hallett #5 at 03:24, and Edgar B. Speer arrived at 10:00. As of midday Wednesday, Labrador was at Riverland loading, Edgar B. Speer was at the Port Terminal, Pilica was at Peavey taking on wheat, Indiana Harbor was at Midwest Energy, Cason J. Callaway was loading ore at CN and Algoma Enterprise was loading coke at Hallett #5. On Wednesday evening, Pilica and Indiana Harbor departed, the latter on her first trip of the season after leaving layup. Cason J. Callaway and Algoma Enterprise were also expected to depart. At 21:00 Wednesday night, Arthur M. Anderson and Vlieborg were passing Two Harbors on their way to Duluth, the former with limestone and the latter to load beet pulp pellets. In Superior, Burns Harbor finished loading at BN and departed at 04:15. Stewart J. Cort arrived at 18:00 to load.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Algoma Equinox, Algoma Discovery and Ojibway were loading grain Wednesday afternoon; Algoma Discovery departed after dark. Federal Ems was at anchor, while Baie Comeau was expected in the evening.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic on Wednesday included Cedarglen, Lee A. Tregurtha, John J. Boland, Yulia, Blacky, Edwin H. Gott, Walter J. McCarthy Jr., American Mariner and Roger Blough. Downbounders included American Spirit, Radcliffe R. Latimer, Manitowoc (from Essar), Mesabi Miner and the tug Leonard M with the barge Huron Spirit (from Essar). Scrapping has begun on Yankcanuck at the Purvis north dock, with the top part of pilothouse being cut away this week.

Cedarville, Mich.
Wilfred Sykes was loading stone on Wednesday afternoon. She departed at dusk for Port Inland. The Sykes’ out-of-the-ordinary trip to Lake Superior has been cancelled. Frontenac was up next to load.

Escanaba, Mich. – Jake H.
On Wednesday, James R Barker arrived at the CN dock to load ore

Green Bay, Wis.
Herbert C. Jackson arrived to unload Wednesday in the late afternoon.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Federal Biscay and Hanse Gate remained in port on Wednesday.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Federal Oshima was still in port Wednesday.

S. Chicago, Ill.
The saltie Redhead remained in port on Wednesday afternoon. The tug Heath Wood and her tank barge were upriver, presumably loading.

St. Clair River
Michipicoten was downbound on Wednesday afternoon on another trip to Quebec City.

Detroit, Mich.
Philip R. Clarke and Hon. James L. Oberstar were unloading up the Rouge River on Wednesday evening. The saltie Rodopi remained in the Belle Isle anchorage. Her next port will be Toledo.

Toledo, Ohio
Algoma Olympic was at the CSX Coal Dock Wednesday afternoon, and departed around dusk. Algoma Transport was inbound and went upriver to the grain docks. G3 Marquis departed with grain Wednesday morning. The tug Olive L. Moore was at the CSX Dock undergoing repairs. Her barge Lewis J. Kuber is in temporary layup. Algowood was inbound at mid-evening.

Welland Canal
Canada Steamship Lines’ Oakglen left the Welland Canal late Wednesday afternoon. She has a destination listed as Thunder Bay. The new Federal Champlain also passed through the Canal Wednesday. AIS lists her next port as Goderich.

Hamilton, Ont.
Federal Rideau, Garganey, Drawsko, Algoscotia and Fearless were at docks on Wednesday. Federal Hudson, Shoveler, Federal Columbia and Ardita were at anchor.

Eastern Lake Ontario
Joseph L. Block passed was at anchor Wednesday night west of Cape Vincent, N.Y., on her rare trip to Quebec City.

 

Water temperatures in the Great Lakes mild for this time of year: NOAA

12/1 - Barrie, Ont. – We could be in for quite a bit of snow, if recent water temperatures in the Great Lakes are any indication of what’s to come. According to data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, surface water temperatures in the lakes are the warmest they’ve seen in late November since at least 2010.

The NOAA says water temperatures are hovering at around 7 C as of Tuesday. Last year the temperatures were at about 5 C, while in 2014 they were closer to 4 C.

“The combination of warm lake waters and cold winter winds blowing across them is a perfect combination for lake effect snow,” the NOAA said in a statement on Monday.

Environment Canada has said the frontend of winter would likely be on the mild side. The numbers from the NOAA also match up with their prediction for lake effect snow. Environment Canada says there’s a chance that snow could arrive before Christmas.

Barrie CTV News

 

Presque Isle Lighthouse, proposed sanctuary seen as tourist draws

12/1 - Lake Erie – During the first entire summer it was open to the public, the Presque Isle Lighthouse drew tens of thousands of visitors, with 13,500 of them each paying $6 to climb to its top. A proposed national marine sanctuary also could bring crowds to the area and could add to the local economy.

"I think this is a fantastic opportunity for our region," Erie County Executive Kathy Dahlkemper said about the possible sanctuary.

Dahlkemper spoke to the Presque Isle Advisory Committee recently, where the group heard about both the proposed Lake Erie Quadrangle National Marine Sanctuary and the lighthouse located on the state park.

The historic lighthouse was open for tours, and trips up the 78-step tower, from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend. Executive Director Michael Sullivan said that during that time, an estimated 30,000 people went through the house.

"The people just kept coming," he told the advisory committee. Sullivan said the 13,500 who went up the tower included representatives of 48 states and 16 countries.

The lighthouse, which is run by a nonprofit group with plans to restore the structure, generated more than $80,000 in visitor revenue and a small gift shop made about $14,000 in profit, he said. This year, the lighthouse was open Thursdays through Mondays. "Next year, we're discussing being open seven days a week," Sullivan said.

A national marine sanctuary also could bring people to Erie, along with economic benefits for the region, Dahlkemper told the advisory group.

She said the Thunder Bay sanctuary in Lake Huron near Alpena, Michigan, has become a driving force in the local economy there.

Erie County submitted a sanctuary application to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at the end of 2015. The proposed national marine sanctuary would include all Lake Erie waters in Pennsylvania but not Presque Isle Bay.

Dahlkemper said national marine sanctuaries are defined as "areas of the marine environment with special conservation, recreational, ecological, historical, cultural, archaeological or aesthetic qualities."

Such a designation for the Lake Erie Quadrangle wouldn't affect recreation like fishing, she said, but would protect shipwrecks and could create educational and research opportunities.

Now that the application is in, Dahlkemper said, NOAA will have to decide if it wants to move forward on sanctuary designation here. If so, that process could take two years and would involve local input.

"If at the end of the day we don't like it, we can say we don't want it," she said.

GoErie.com

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  December 1

In 1940, the Columbia Transportation steamer CARROLLTON laid up in the Cuyahoga River with a storage load of 75,000 bushels of potatoes.

On 01 December 1884, the N BOUTIN (wooden propeller tug, 68 foot, 46 gross tons, built in 1882, at Buffalo, New York) sank in ten feet of water near Washburn, Wisconsin. Newspaper reports stated that she was leaking badly and was run toward shore to beach her but no details are given regarding the cause of the leak. She was recovered and repaired.

On December 1, 1974, the Canadian motor vessel JENNIFER foundered on Lake Michigan in a storm. Her steel cargo apparently shifted and she foundered 24 miles southwest of Charlevoix, Michigan. The JENNIFER went to the bottom in water too deep for any salvage attempt.

FRED G. HARTWELL, the last boat built for the Franklin Steamship Co., was delivered to her owners on December 1, 1922, but her maiden voyage didn't occur until early 1923, because of unfavorable weather conditions.

The SASKATOON's ownership was transferred to the Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., Montreal, on December 1, 1913, when the company was formed and all six vessels of the Merchants Mutual Line were absorbed by CSL in 1914.

HUDSON TRANSPORT was put up for sale by Marine Salvage in December 1982.

On 1 December 1875, BRIDGEWATER (3-mast wooden schooner, 706 tons, built in 1866, at Buffalo, New York, as a bark) grounded on Waugoshance Point in the Straits of Mackinac. She was released fairly quickly and then was towed to Buffalo, New York, for repairs. In Buffalo, she was gutted by fire. In 1880-82, the propeller KEYSTONE was built on her hull.

In 1909, the MARQUETTE & BESSEMER NO 2 sank on Lake Erie, 31 lives were lost.

December 1, 1985 - SPARTAN broke loose from her moorings at Ludington in a storm and ended up near Buttersville Island. She was pulled off on December 5, by the Canonie tugs SOUTH HAVEN and MUSKEGON with the help of the CITY OF MIDLAND 41. It took about 10 hours.

On 1 December 1875, the Port Huron Times reported: "The schooner MARY E. PEREW went ashore in the Straits of Mackinac and by the brave efforts of the people on shore, her crew was rescued from perishing in the cold. Her decks were completely covered with ice and the seas were breaking over her. The vessel has a large hole in her bottom made by a rock that came through her. She will prove a total loss." On 7 December 1875, that newspaper reported that MARY E. PEREW had been raised by a wrecker and would be repaired.

On 1 December 1882, DAVID M. FOSTER (wooden 3-mast schooner, 121 foot, 251 tons, built in 1863, at Port Burwell, Ontario as a bark) was carrying lumber from Toronto to Oswego, New York, in a storm. She was picked up by a harbor tug outside of Oswego for a tow into the harbor, but the towline broke. The FOSTER went bows-on into the breakwater. She was holed and sank. No lives were lost. Her loss was valued at $3,300.

On 01 December 1934, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter ESCANABA (WPG 64) (165 foot, 718 gross tons, built in 1932, at W. Bay City, Michigan) was involved in the rescue of the crew of the whaleback HENRY CORT off the piers at Muskegon, Michigan. Also that winter, she delivered food to the residents of Beaver Island, who were isolated due to the bad weather.

SULLIVAN BROTHERS (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 430 foot, 4897 gross tons, built in 1901, at Chicago, Illinois as FREDERICK B. WELLS) grounded at Vidal Shoal on Tuesday evening, 01 Dec 1953. She was loaded with grain and rested on solid rock. She was recovered.

1934: The whaleback steamer HENRY CORT hit the north pier at Muskegon, MI and was wrecked. All on board were saved but one rescuer perished when the U.S.C.G. surfboat overturned. HENRY CORT was cut up for scrap on location during World War Two.

1961: The Canada Steamship Lines bulk canaller ELGIN struck the Charelvoix Bridge on the Lachine Canal when the structure did not open properly due to a faulty bridge mechanism. The waterway was closed for several days but the ship was not damaged.

1961: ARIE H., a Liberian flagged Liberty ship, went aground near the Snell Lock but was refloated and, the following day, departed the Seaway as the last oceangoing ship of the season.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Daniel J. Morrell shipwreck 50 years ago brought tragic loss, incredible survival

11/30 - Duluth, Minn. – Fifty years ago, in the early morning of Nov. 29, 1966, the freighter Daniel J. Morrell was steaming up the Great Lakes, bound for Taconite Harbor to pick up a load of iron ore, and struggling to push through a wicked November storm on Lake Huron.

The 60-year-old, 603-foot-long ship and its crew of 29 had been pounded for hours by 65 mph winds and 20, 25, 30-foot waves when the aged ship started breaking up. In the frigid darkness on the open lake, with alarms sounding, the crew — five of whom had ties to the Northland — scrambled to reach life rafts as the vessel split in two.

Only one member of the crew would be rescued to tell the tale of tragic loss and incredible survival. Dennis Hale was a 26-year-old watchman from Ohio when the Morrell began its 34th and last scheduled trip of the 1966 shipping season, departing Buffalo in ballast for Taconite Harbor.

While the storm raged outside at about 2 a.m. on Nov. 29, Hale was off-duty and asleep; an ominous bang jolted him awake. Figuring the anchor was bouncing off the hull of the vessel, he rolled over and closed his eyes. But then there was another bang, louder than the first. And then the boat's alarms sounded, he recounted in interviews with the News Tribune in 2002 and again in 2012; Hale died in September 2015 at age 75 after years of sharing his story and keeping alive the memory of his ship and crewmates.

Wearing only his sleeping clothes — a pair of boxer shorts — Hale grabbed a life jacket and a peacoat and sloshed barefoot across the boat's flooded deck.

The National Transportation Safety Board later determined that the pre-1948 low-carbon steel used to build the Morrell had a propensity for "brittle fracture.'' The big boat snapped in half under the stress of the storm. The stern slammed the bow broadside and then, remarkably, pushed past.

Hale, several shipmates and a life raft were pitched into the 44-degree water. He thought he was a dead man.

"I thought, If I can get to the raft, I stand a better chance," he told the News Tribune in 2012. "I looked around and I couldn't see the raft. Finally I saw it between waves."

He swam to the raft, joining John J. Cleary Jr. and Arthur E. Stojek. Charles Fosbender arrived shortly afterwards. The four watched the bow sink. The stern, its engine still running, disappeared in the darkness to sink several miles away. The men fired emergency flares; they talked of home and their chances of seeing family again. The air temperature hovered around freezing.

Cleary and Stojek died about 6 a.m. About 2 p.m. Fosbender and Hale talked about families and being home.

"Then we grew silent again until just before he passed away" about 4 p.m., Hale recalled in 2012. "He boosted himself up on the raft and put one hand on my hip and said that it wouldn't be long until we would be bottoming out on the beach."

It was hard watching shipmates die, Hale said, but under the circumstances, "you don't care if you live or die, you just want it over. The first wave we went through, I was there." But he survived another 24 hours in the raft, alone except for the bodies of his three shipmates.

"I remember looking at John Cleary in front of me and seeing that he was all encased in ice," Hale said. "I got angry and got up on my elbow and shook my fist at the sky and cussed God, asking him why he was making me suffer so much."

He also remembers praying, playing mind games and moving his limbs in an effort to hold off frostbite. On the afternoon of Nov. 30, Hale had an out-of-body experience. A visitor came to him. A ghost, an angel — Hale said years later that he didn't know. It was a strange-looking man.

"Don't eat the ice off your peacoat," the man warned. "You'll lower your body temperature and die."

Later, Hale recalled in a 2002 interview with the News Tribune, he hovered above his raft. He could see himself and his crewmates below. Through a cloud above he could see a bright white footbridge. Relatives who had died before him stood on the far end. They beckoned him across. But his crewmates were there, too, the ones who had perished the night before. So was the Morrell.

"No,'' a crewmate said to him. "It's not your time. You have to go back.'' Hale found himself back on the raft.

Meanwhile, efforts to find the Morrell and its crew had finally begun. At about noon Nov. 30 the ship's owners notified the Coast Guard that the ship — which never had a chance to transmit a distress call — was missing. At 1:12 p.m. another vessel reported sighting a body wearing a life jacket stenciled with the missing ship's name. About 4 p.m., two Coast Guard helicopters spotted a life raft aground on a shoal along the shore near Harbor Beach, Mich., about 100 miles north-northeast of Detroit.

Hale saw one and waved. A searcher later said Hale's wave was so slight and feeble he believed the helicopter's rotor wash might have caused it. Both helicopters descended, and rescuers converged on the raft. It took the whole helicopter crew to lift the frostbitten Hale out of the raft.

Hale told the News Tribune in 2002 that he remembered being rescued. He remembers the Coast Guard helicopter, being carried to an ambulance and then to a hospital. He remembers the priest offering him last rites, nurses gasping at how blue he was, doctors telling him he would be all right, but probably not believing it.

Hale suffered severe frostbite to his feet, vascular damage to his lower legs and a gash under his chin that required stitches.

Hale was a heavier man who withstood a huge weight loss over two days. Wearing only undershorts on his lower body, he wasn't bogged down by heavy, frozen pants. He didn't eat the ice off his coat. His life jacket being under the peacoat helped insulate his heart and lungs.

Among the 28 men who died in the loss of the Morrell were five from the Northland: George A. Dahl, 38, and Joseph A. Mahsem, 59, both of Duluth; Alfred G. Norkunas, 39, of Superior; Albert P. Wieme, 51, of Knife River; and Phillip E. Kapets, 51, of Ironwood, Mich.

And there nearly was a sixth victim from the area. Hjalmer Edwards, 61, of Ashland became ill with pneumonia when the ship was downbound and was transferred from the ship to a Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., hospital. He was still in the hospital when the Morrell sank.

Hale later suffered from decades of substance abuse and the torment of guilt. Like many survivors of tragedies, he asked himself time and again: "Why me? Why did I survive when so many others perished?"

His public silence lasted for years, including after the freighter Edmund Fitzgerald sank in another November storm, on Lake Superior, nine years later with the loss of its crew of 29.

The Fitzgerald has remained vivid in the collective memory of the Great Lakes region thanks in part to the Gordon Lightfoot song about the tragedy. The Morrell has no such cult following. Eventually Hale agreed to attend a screening of a documentary about the Morrell. He said a few words about it and felt better.

That gradually led Hale to devote the last 25 years of his life to sharing his story. He even agreed to be hypnotized, to unearth more memories of his 38-hour ordeal.

"That was very therapeutic for him," his widow, Barbara Hale, told the Buffalo News. "It got to the point that he wanted his shipmates to be remembered. You hear all about the Fitzgerald. You never heard about the Morrell. He wanted his shipmates remembered. That was his family."

Hale visited the Northland several times to speak about his experience, including at the Gales of November conference in Duluth in 2002. He also wrote a book and contributed to another on the Morrell

"He didn't think of himself as a hero," Barbara Hale said. "He said he was put into a situation, and he happened to survive it."

Several remembrances of the 50th anniversary are being held this week, including a memorial service today in Ashtabula, Ohio, where a bell will be rung for each of the 28 victims. "And now that Dennis has passed," his widow said, "they'll ring the bell for him, too."

Duluth News Tribune

 

Port Reports -  November 30

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Paul R. Tregurtha arrived Duluth at 04:30 on Tuesday, and headed to Midwest Energy. Her fleetmate Mesabi Miner departed from CN with ore at 10:45. Labrador arrived from anchor at 11:35, and docked at Riverland Ag to load wheat. Algoma Enterprise arrived on a somewhat rare trip an hour after Labrador to load coke a Hallett #5. Paul R. Tregurtha departed with coal just before 21:00 Tuesday. As of Tuesday night, Pilica was at Peavey loading, Iryda was at CHS 2, Algoma Enterprise was at Hallett #5, Labrador was at Riverland, and Sunda was anchored offshore. Indiana Harbor was expected to shift to Calumet to fuel before moving to Midwest Energy to load coal. This will be her first trip of 2016. In Superior, Radcliffe R. Latimer departed from BN at 05:16, and Burns Harbor arrived to load at 13:52.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic Tuesday included Vlieborg, Arthur M. Anderson and, after midnight, Algorail (bound for Superior, Wis.) and Baie Comeau. Downbounders included American Century, Michipicoten and Kaye E. Barker. Federal Katsura emained at the Essar Export Dock. Herbert C. Jackson, which had been anchored for weather, resumed her trip westbound in the afternoon.

Manistee, Mich.
Great Republic left Sandusky Tuesday morning showing a Manistee destination.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Federal Oshima was in port Tuesday.

S Chicago, Ill.
The saltie Redhead remained in port on Tuesday. The tug Heath Wood and her tank barge moved further up the river to load.

Toledo, Ohio
Algoma Transport arrived Tuesday evening. Algoma Olympic is bound for the CSX Coal Dock with an ETA of 3 a.m. Wednesday. The following boats are also due in at the coal dock on Wednesday: Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin, Hon. James L. Oberstar, and Algowood. At the ore dock, the Victory/James L. Kuber are due on Wednesday around 3 p.m. The saltwater vessel Rodopi is still anchored in the Belle Isle anchorage on the Detroit River awaiting dock space. G-3 Marquis remains at Anderson's K Elevator loading grain. The tug Olive L. Moore is at the CSX Dock undergoing repairs. Her barge Lewis J. Kuber is in temporary layup.

Seaway – Ron Beaupre
Oaklglen went up the river Tuesday morning fresh from the shipyard at Les Méchins.

 

Book talk, Santa on the tug, speaker series at Door County Marine Museum

11/30 - Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – The Door County Maritime Museum is in for a busy week with a look at a maritime book, a visit from a popular December guest, and the start of its popular Maritime Speaker Series.

In partnership with Write On, Door County, the museum resumes its Great Lakes/Great Books series with a discussion of the nonfiction book "The Windward Shore: A Winter on the Great Lakes" by Jerry Dennis.

The series is a book club that meets the first Thursday of the month from November through May and features books with a Great Lakes focus. Fiction, nonfiction, and poetry will be discussed with a facilitator from Write On.

"The Windward Shore" is the result of Dennis spending a winter living on the shores of Lake Michigan and Lake Superior, chronicling the people he met, the little-seen places on the lakes, the relationships he observed between nature and man under harsh conditions, and more.

Future books scheduled to be discussed in the series are "Ashes Under Water: The SS Eastland and the Shipwreck that Shook America" by Michael McCarthy, January; "The Bone House" by Brian Freeman, February; "Ship Captain’s Daughter: Growing up on the Great Lakes" by Ann Michler Lewis, March; "Water Music: The Great Lakes State Poetry Anthology" by the Poetry Society of Michigan, April; and "The Death and Life of the Great Lakes" by Dan Egan, May.

The Great Lakes/Great Books discussion of "The Windward Shore" is at 10:30 a.m. Dec. 1 at the museum.

One of the popular, traditional family events at DCMM is the annual appearance by Santa Claus on the tug John Purves, docked outside the museum, which takes place this year from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 3. The Man in Red will visit with children and hear their Christmas wishes. Because of the size of the tug, only two adults can accompany each child on board. An adult museum admission that day includes the Santa visit.

The museum’s Maritime Speaker Series opens at 7 p.m. Dec. 8 with a “A Doll, a Wrench, and a Thimble — Remembering the loss of the ‘Palace Steamer’ Niagara" presented by former DCMM executive director Bob Desh.

The talk will help conclude the shipwreck artifact exhibit that had been showing in the upper lobby, and Desh will touch on some of the poignant reminders from the Niagara’s wreck on display.

Desh will detail the tragic event that took place in September 1856 when the Niagara burned during a voyage from Sheboygan to Port Washington and a total of 150 souls were lost. He will also discuss the significant role this class of passenger vessel played in the European emigration westward, including to Door County.

Also scheduled for the series are programs with Steve Selvick on the history of Selvick Tugs, Jan. 5; and Mike Peters on his time crewing the tall ship Baltimore, March 2. The February speaker program will be announced later.

All Maritime Speaker Series programs are free to attend, although a nonperishable food donation is requested.

The Door County Maritime Museum is at 120 N. Madison Ave., Sturgeon Bay; it also operates seasonal museums in Gills Rock and at the Cana Island Lighthouse. Regular hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, closed holidays. Admission is $10 for adults, $5 ages 5-17, free for DCMM members. For more information, call 920-743-5958 or visit www.dcmm.org.

Green Bay Press Gazette

 

Updates -  November 30

News Photo Gallery

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 30

On 30 November 1896, CITY OF KALAMAZOO (wooden propeller passenger/package freight steamer, 162 foot, 728 gross tons, built in 1892, at South Haven, Michigan) burned at her lay-up dock at South Haven, Michigan, with the loss of four lives. She was rebuilt and lasted until 1911, when she burned again.

On November 30, 1910, ATHABASCA (steel propeller passenger steamer, 263 foot, 1,774 gross tons, built in 1883, in Scotland) collided with the tug GENERAL near Lime Island in the St. Mary's River. As a result of the collision, the GENERAL sank. She was later recovered and rebuilt as a bulk freighter and lasted until she was broken up in 1948.

On 30 November 1934, HENRY CORT (steel propeller whaleback crane vessel, 320 foot, 2,394 gross tons, built in 1892, at W. Superior, Wisconsin as PILLSBURY) was driven onto the north pier at Muskegon, Michigan, in a storm. The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter ESCANABA rescued her crew, but one Coast Guardsman lost his life. The vessel settled in shallow water and then broke in half. Her remains were scrapped the following year.

CANADIAN PIONEER suffered a major engine room fire on 30 Nov 1987, at Nanticoke, Ontario.

On November 30, 1981, A.H. FERBERT was laid up for the last time at the Hallett Dock #5, Duluth, Minnesota. The PERE MARQUETTE 22 passed down the Welland Canal on November 30, 1973 in tow of the tugs JOHN PURVES and YVON SIMARD en route to Sorel, Quebec, where she was cut down to a barge for off-Lakes use.

On 30 Nov 1967, the CITY OF FLINT 32 was laid up, never to run again.

On 30 Nov 1900, ALMERON THOMAS (2-mast wooden schooner, 50 foot, 35 gross tons, built in 1891, at Bay City, Michigan) was carrying gravel in a storm on Lake Huron when she sprang a leak and ran for the beach. She struck bottom and then capsized. She broke up in twenty feet of water near Point Lookout in Saginaw Bay. No lives were lost.

The schooner S.J. HOLLY came into the harbor at Oswego, New York, on 30 November 1867, after a hard crossing of Lake Ontario. The previous day she left the Welland Canal and encountered a growing gale. Capt. Oscar Haynes sought calm water along the north shore, but the heavy seas and freezing winds made sailing perilous. The ropes and chains froze stiff and the schooner was almost unmanageable. The only canvas out was a two-reef foresail and it was frozen in place. With great skill, the skipper managed to limp into port, having lost the yawl and sustained serious damage to the cargo. Fortunately no lives were lost.

1905: The steel consort barge MADEIRA stranded at Split Rock, while under tow of the WILLIAM EDENBORN, broke in two and became a total loss.

1908: D.M. CLEMSON (i) disappeared on Lake Superior while upbound with a cargo of coal from Lorain to Superior. All 24 on board were lost and only 2 bodies were ever found.

1911: Three lives were lost when the wooden steamer RALEIGH sank off Port Colborne. The crew took to the yawl boats but these capsized. Spectators on shore helped pull the sailors to safety.

1922: MAPLEHURST foundered near the West Portage entry Lake Superior while upbound with coal. The captain sought shelter from a storm but the engine failed and the anchors did not hold. There were 11 casualties and the ship was a total loss.

1924: MAPLEDAWN was wrecked at Christian Island, Georgian Bay while downbound with barley. The hull was pounded and could only be salvaged in pieces for scrap about 1942.

1926: CITY OF BANGOR stranded on Keweenaw Point in a blizzard with zero visibility. The ship fell into the trough and was carried ashore. It could not be salvaged and the hull was cut up for scrap during World War II.

1943: RIVERTON, aground for two weeks at Lottie Wolf Shoal, Georgian Bay, was released and taken to Collingwood for repairs. It resumed sailing in 1944 as MOHAWK DEER.

1945: OUTARDE (i) sank at the Consul-Hall Coal Dock, Clayton, NY after being repeatedly pounded against the structure in a wild storm and holed by an underwater piece of steel. The ship was finally refloated on April 18, 1946.

1961: ALGOWAY (i) was damaged while shifting at Port Arthur when it hit a discarded underwater oxygen tank.

1987: A fire aboard the ULS self-unloader CANADIAN PIONEER at Nanticoke damaged the wiring under the control panel. The ship went to the Welland Dock for repairs and then left the Seaway for Sorel where it was reflagged Vanuatu and renamed b) PIONEER.

1997: The tug CAROLYN JO suffered a fire in the engine room off Snake Island, Lake Ontario, and had to be towed to Kingston. The ship is still sailing as d) SEAHOUND.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Another November gale delays traffic

11/29 - A strong southeast gale, with winds expected Monday night to gust over 40 mph near lakes Michigan and Huron and along the shoreline of Whitefish Bay, sent several vessels to anchor. Heavy rain is also expected.

On Lake Superior, Cason J. Callaway and Edgar B. Speer sought shelter near the shore just east of Marquette Monday evening. In the St. Marys River, Buffalo, Herbert C. Jackson and the tug Victory / barge Kuber were anchored above DeTour. The tug Anglian Lady and her barge were anchored in Maud Bay.

On Lake Huron, Philip R. Clarke and Arthur M. Anderson were loaded but waiting out the weather at Calcite. In the Mackinac Straits, the tug/barge Victorious/John J. Carrick were stopped between Waugoshance Point and Mackinaw City, while Saginaw was at anchor west of the bridge.

 

50 years after Morrell shipwreck took 28 lives, the lone survivor's tale

11/29 - Buffalo, N.Y. – The ill-fated ship had left the Bethlehem Steel Corp. in Lackawanna, heading toward Minnesota to pick up iron ore when it ran into a horrific storm packing winds exceeding 65 mph and creating 30-foot waves on frigid Lake Huron.

That combination proved deadly for the brittle steel hull of the SS Daniel J. Morrell, a Great Lakes freighter that split in two and sank, killing 28 of its 29 crewmen. The sinking of the Morrell occurred on Nov. 29, 1966 – 50 years ago today.

As often happens with national tragedies, the disaster had a strong Western New York connection. The 28 victims included eight local men – seven from Buffalo, Hamburg, Kenmore, Williamsville and Niagara Falls, plus a South Buffalo native who had moved to Wisconsin. And the ship had left Lackawanna on a planned route heading from Lake Erie to Lake Huron and, ultimately, to Lake Superior to pick up iron ore in Taconite Harbor, Minn.

Oddly enough, the Morrell had the same number of people on board, 29, as the much more heralded Edmund Fitzgerald, which sank in another November storm, on Lake Superior, nine years later. The Fitzgerald has remained a popular subject, thanks in part to the 1976 Gordon Lightfoot song about the tragedy.

The Morrell has no such cult following.

But the real story of the Lake Huron shipwreck was the plight of its lone survivor, watchman Dennis N. Hale, of Ashtabula, Ohio.

Hale, who died last fall at the age of 75, was the only person with a firsthand account of the Morrell shipwreck. He told that story to newspaper reporters, in speeches around the Great Lakes area and in his autobiography, "Shipwrecked: Reflections of the Sole Survivor."

Read more and view photos at this link: http://buffalonews.com/2016/11/27/50-years-great-lakes-shipwreck-took-28-lives-lone-survivors-tale

 

Atlantic Erie scrap tow update

11/29 - Tug Pacific Hickory, with the former CSL vessel Atlantic Erie in tow, passed through the Azores on Friday, Nov. 25. The tow will likely pass through the Strait of Gibraltar late on Monday or early Tuesday enroute to Aliaga, Turkey.

John Tokarz‎

 

Port Reports -  November 29

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Mesabi Miner arrived Duluth at 12:07 on Monday to load iron ore pellets at CN. Shortly after, the saltie Sunda, which has visited Duluth as Emilie, arrived and anchored in the harbor for a quick inspection. She departed Monday evening and joined the Labrador at anchor off Duluth. Labrador was expected to arrive Monday night to load wheat at Riverland Ag. Pilica was passing Two Harbors as of late Monday, and was also expected to arrive to load wheat at Peavey. Iryda continued loading at CHS 2. In Superior, Michipicoten departed from Burlington Northern at 12:04, and Radcliffe R. Latimer arrived from anchor at 12:15 and began loading. Indiana Harbor is expected to shift to Midwest Energy on Tuesday to load her first coal cargo of the season.

Marquette, Mich.
Manitowoc and Kaye E. Barker were westbound Monday evening, and should arrive early Tuesday.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic on a windy, rainy Monday included Exeborg, Buffalo, Federal Sakura, Vitosha and Whitefish Bay. Upbound traffic included Algoma Enterprise, Burns Harbor, Presque Isle, Manitowoc (from Essar), Kaye E. Barker (from Essar) and Ojibway. Tug Leonard M and barge were at Essar Steel and Federal Katsura remained at the Essar Export Dock.

Manistee, Mich.
The port of Manistee is about to receive its semi-annual visit from a McAshpalt Transportation tug/barge. Victorious/John J. Carrick were anchored in the Straits between Waugoshance Point and Mackinaw City Monday night showing an eventual Manistee destination on AIS.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Lee A. Tregurtha and Wilfred Sykes were unloading Monday night.

S Chicago, Ill.
The tug Heath Wood and her tank barge, as well as the saltie Redhead, remained in port on Monday.

Goderich, Ont.
Ocean Castle departed early Monday, while Algolake left later in the day. Both were downbound.

Toledo, Ohio
G3 Marquis arrived Monday morning to load grain. This is her first trip to Toledo. Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin departed in the late afternoon and headed eastbound.

Lake Erie
Joseph L. Block fueled at Mistersky in Detroit on Monday, then departed for Quebec City, an unusual trip for her. By late Monday she was nearly half way across Lake Erie headed for the Welland Canal. A second such trip may be in the offing.

Toronto, Ont. – Jens Juhl
The bulk carrier Cape was discharging the last cargo of sugar of the season at Redpath on Monday. The Ports Toronto tug Iron Guppy high was in the Toronto Drydock. To drydock a brand new tug generally indicates issues with the rudder, propeller or stern tube bearing.

 

Great Lakes Shipyard completes drydocking of Ryba Marine crane barge

11/29 - Cleveland, Ohio – Great Lakes Shipyard was awarded a drydocking contract by Ryba Marine for the crane barge CT-150 (150’ x 50’ x 10’) on Oct. 28. Maintenance and repairs that included drydocking, steel repairs and ABS load line inspection and renewal were completed on Nov. 14.

As a regular customer over the past year, Great Lakes Shipyard has completed several drydocking contracts for Ryba Marine.

Great Lakes Shipyard

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 29

In 1953, BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS, Captain H. C. Buckley, transported the last iron ore of the season through the Soo Locks. The ore originated at Two Harbors and was unloaded at Conneaut. After unloading, the FAIRLESS headed for Monroe, Michigan, for layup.

On 29 November 1886, ALFRED P. WRIGHT (wooden propeller tug, 56 gross tons, built in 1877, at Buffalo, New York) was towing the schooner A J DEWEY in a blizzard and gale in the harbor at Manistee, Michigan. The towline parted and fouled the WRIGHT's propeller. Disabled, she capsized and her crew clung to the overturned hull. One crewman swam 1,000 feet to shore and summoned the U.S. Lifesaving Service. The WRIGHT's and DEWEY's crews were both rescued but three lifesavers were lost in this effort.

On November 29, 1966, the DANIEL J. MORRELL sank approximately 20 miles north of Harbor Beach in Lake Huron. Her nearly identical sistership, the EDWARD Y. TOWNSEND, was traveling about 20 miles behind the MORRELL and made it to the Lime Island Fuel Dock in the St. Marys River where cracks were found in her deck; the TOWNSEND proceeded to Sault Ste. Marie where she was taken out of service. The TOWNSEND sank in the Atlantic on October 7, 1968, while being towed overseas for scrap.

E. B. BARBER was laid up for the last time at Toronto, Ontario, on 29 Nov. 1984.

On November 29, 1903, snow and stormy seas drove the two-and-a-half year old J. T. HUTCHINSON onto an uncharted rock (now known as Eagle River Reef) one-half mile off shore and 10 miles west of Eagle Harbor, Michigan near the northwestern coast of the Keweenaw Peninsula.

On November 29, 1974, the PERE MARQUETTE 21 was loaded with remnants of Port Huron's Peerless Cement Dock, which reportedly were bound for Saudi Arabia, and cleared there in tow of the Great Lakes Towing Co., tugs AMERICA and OHIO.

SYLVANIA was in a collision with the DIAMOND ALKALI in the Fighting Island Channel of the Detroit River on 29 Nov 1968, during a snow squall. SYLVANIA's bow was severely damaged.

The propeller BURLINGTON had barges in tow up bound on Lake Erie when she was damaged by the ice and sank in the Pelee Passage.

On 29 November 1856, ARABIAN (3-mast wooden bark, 116 foot, 350 tons, built in 1853, at Niagara, Ontario) had stranded on Goose Island Shoal, 10 miles ENE of Mackinac Island ten days earlier. She was relieved of her cargo and was being towed to Chicago by the propeller OGONTZ when a gale blew in and the towline parted. ARABIAN made for shore, her pumps working full force and OGONTZ following. During the night they were separated and ARABIAN sank off Point Betsey in Lake Michigan. Her crew escaped in her yawl.

In 1903, the PERE MARQUETTE 19 arrived Ludington on her maiden voyage. Captain John J. Doyle in command.

On 29 November 1881, the 149 foot wooden propeller NORTHERN QUEEN, which had been involved in a collision with the 136 foot wooden propeller canaller LAKE ERIE just five days before, struck the pier at Manistique so hard that she was wrecked. Besides her own crew, she also had LAKE ERIE's crew on board.

On 29 Nov 1902, BAY CITY (1-mast wood schooner-barge, 140 foot, 306 gross tons, built in 1857, at Saginaw, Michigan as a brig) was left at anchor in Thunder Bay by the steamer HURON CITY during a storm. BAY CITY's anchor chain parted and the vessel was driven against the Gilchrist dock at Alpena, Michigan and wrecked. Her crew managed to escape with much difficulty.

1902: The wooden bulk freighter CHARLES HEBARD (i) stranded on the Ontario shore of Lake Superior at Point Mamaise in a snowstorm. The hull broke up but all on board were rescued.

1950: ESSO ROCHESTER, a T-2 tanker, broke in two in heavy weather off Anticosti Island, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence while enroute, in ballast, from Montreal to Aruba. The two sections were taken in tow but the bow had to be cut loose in a storm on December 21, rolled over and was lost. The stern was taken to Newport News, VA and rebuilt. It was a Seaway trader in 1959 and scrapped at Onimichi, Japan, in July 1966.

1959: VILJA went aground in fog while outbound through the Brockville Narrows. The 14-year old ship was refloated on December 13 and had to spend the winter at Prescott. The Norwegian-flag freighter never returned inland and was scrapped at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, as c) SILVER HOPE in 1974.

1960: FRANCISCO MORAZON went aground on the rocks of South Manitou Island, Lake Michigan and the remains of the hull are still there.

1960: CATO II, a small survey vessel, was cut loose by vandals at Port Dalhousie, drifted with the current into Lake Ontario, and stranded on the rocks of the west pier off Port Weller. Despite gale force winds and cold, the hull was salvaged the next day. At last report, the ship was still intact and was owned by Seneca College of Toronto.

1964: The MARIA COSULICH was wrecked at the breakwall at Genoa, Italy, when the engine failed while outbound. The crew was saved but the vessel was a total loss. It had been built at Sturgeon Bay in 1943 as WILLIAM HOMAN.

1985: JALAGODAVARI sliced into the St. Louis road and rail bridge on the Seaway and navigation had to be suspended for seven days. The vessel was removed, taken to Montreal and arrested for damages. The ship was repaired and survived until scrapping as f) BLUE OCEAN in 2000-2001.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  November 28

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Sunday was a quiet day in the Twin Ports, with just the arrival of the Polish saltie Iryda on Sunday evening. She headed to CHS 2 to load wheat. In Superior, Michipicoten arrived at 15:30 to load ore at BN. Radcliffe R. Latimer arrived offshore during the evening, and dropped anchor to wait for the departure of Michipicoten.

Western Lake Superior
American Integrity was loading Sunday evening at Silver Bay. American Century was loading at Two Harbors.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Federal Sakura and Vitosha departed Sunday afternoon.

Marquette, Mich.
Manitowoc was in port Sunday. Edgar B. Speer, bound for Duluth, was at anchor offshore waiting for weather.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic Sunday included American Mariner, Walter J. McCarthy Jr., Fivelborg, CCGS Samuel Risley, Roger Blough, Puffin, Frontenac (bound for Midland, Ont.) and Spruceglen. Upbounders included American Spirit, Algoma Discovery, Sunda, Algoma Equinox, Pilica (went to anchor in the upper river), Hon James L. Oberstar, Federal Ems, Paul R. Tregurtha and Kaye E. Barker. Cason J. Callaway was approaching DeTour upbound late in the evening. Federal Katsura was at the Essar Export Dock Sunday.

Meldrum Bay, Ont.
Herbert C. Jackson was at anchor Sunday off Cockburn Island. Her AIS shows a destination of Meldrum Bay.

Cedarville, Mich.
Cason J. Callaway was loading Sunday night.

Sutton’s Bay – Al Miller
With warnings posted on Lake Michigan for a southeast gale on Monday and Monday night, the tug Bradshaw McKee with a St. Marys Cement barge anchored Sunday afternoon in Suttons Bay. The McKee and its barge are bound for the St. Marys Cement plant in Charlevoix, but the loading berth was occupied by tug Prentiss Brown and barge.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Federal Oshima and Hanse Gate were still in port Sunday.

S Chicago, Ill.
Tug Heath Wood and her tank barge has moved from Indiana Harbor to S. Chicago. The saltie Vlieborg was also in port.

Goderich, Ont.
Ocean Castle and Algolake were still in port loading Sunday.

Toledo, Ohio
Federal Clyde departed Sunday afternoon, and CSL Welland left in the evening. The tug Olive L. Moore was still undergoing rudder repairs. Evans Spirit remains in port. The Algoma Boat G3 Marquis will be arriving early Monday morning to load a grain cargo. This will be her first trip to Toledo.

Sandusky, Ohio
Barge Ashtabula and tug Defiance were loading Sunday evening.

Marblehead, Ohio
Cuyahoga was loading stone Sunday.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 28

In 1949, sea trials for the largest freighter built on the Great Lakes, the WILFRED SYKES, were held off Lorain, Ohio. SYKES was converted to a self-unloader in 1975.

In 1942, the Canadian grain carrier JUDGE HART grounded and then sank in Ashburton Bay, Lake Superior. The entire crew of the JUDGE HART was rescued by the JAMES B. EADS, Captain Stanley J. Tischart, and the whaleback JOHN ERICSSON, Captain Wilfred E. Ogg.

On 28 November 1867, MARQUETTE (wooden bark, 139 foot, 426 tons, built in 1856, at Newport [Marine City], Michigan) was carrying corn from Chicago to Collingwood, Ontario when she sprang a leak during a storm on Lake Huron. She was run ashore on Hope Island on Georgian Bay.

On November 28, 1905, the Pittsburgh Steamship Company vessel MATAAFA was wrecked as it tried to re-enter the Duluth Ship Canal in a severe storm. The MATAAFA had departed Duluth earlier but had decided to return to safety. After dropping her barge in the lake, the vessel was picked up by waves, was slammed against the north pier and was swung around to rest just hundreds of feet offshore north of the north pier, where it broke in two. Much of the crew froze to death in the cold snap that followed the storm, as there was no quick way to get out to the broken vessel for rescue. The MATAAFA was repaired prior to the 1906, season; she ultimately ended her career as an automobile carrier for the T.J. McCarthy Steamship Company and was sold for scrap in 1965.

The CANADIAN OLYMPIC's maiden voyage was 28 Nov 1976, to load coal at Conneaut, Ohio for Nanticoke, Ontario. Her name honored the Olympic games that were held at Montreal that year.

On November 28, 1983, while up bound after leaving the Poe Lock, the INDIANA HARBOR was in a collision, caused by high winds, with the downbound Greek salty ANANGEL SPIRIT resulting in a 10 foot gash in the laker's port bow.

LANCASHIRE (Hull#827) was launched at Lorain, Ohio on November 28, 1942. She would soon be renamed b) SEWELL AVERY.

CATHY B towed the GOVERNOR MILLER to Vigo, Spain on November 28, 1980, where she was broken up.

BENSON FORD was renamed e) US265808 and departed River Rouge on November 28, 1986, towed by the Sandrin tugs TUSKER and GLENADA bound for Ramey's Bend in the Welland Canal.

FRONTENAC arrived at the Fraser Shipyard, Superior, Wisconsin on November 28, 1979. Her keel, which had hogged four feet, was declared a constructive total loss.

The BRANSFORD stranded on a reef off Isle Royale in Lake Superior during a major storm on 28 November 1905, (the same storm that claimed the steamer MATAAFA). She was recovered.

On her third trip in 1892, the ANN ARBOR NO 1 again ran aground, this time three miles north of Ahnapee (now called Algoma). There was $15,000 damage to her cargo.

In 1906, the ANN ARBOR NO 4 left Cleveland bound for Frankfort on her maiden voyage. The ANN ARBOR NO 4 ran aground off Kewaunee in 1924.

On 28 November 1905, AMBOY (2-mast wooden schooner-barge, 209 foot, 894 gross tons, formerly HELENA) was carrying coal in tow of the wooden propeller GEORGE SPENCER in a gale on Lake Superior. In an effort to save both vessels, AMBOY was cut loose. The SPENCER was disabled quickly and was driven ashore near Little Marais, Minnesota. AMBOY struggled against the gale for a full day before finally going ashore near Thomasville, Ontario on 29 November. No lives were lost from either vessel.

On 28 November 1872, W O BROWN (wooden schooner, 140 foot, 306 tons, built in 1862, at Buffalo, New York) was carrying wheat in a storm on Lake Superior when she was driven ashore near Point Maimanse, Ontario and pounded to pieces. Six lives were lost. Three survivors struggled through a terrible cold spell and finally made it to the Soo on Christmas Day.

On 28 Nov 1874, the propeller JOHN PRIDGEON JR was launched at Clark's shipyard in Detroit, Michigan. She was built for Capt. John Pridgeon. Her dimensions were 235 X 36 X 17 feet. The engines of the B F WADE were installed in her.

On 28 Nov 1923, the Detroit & Windsor Ferry Company and Bob-Lo docks were destroyed by a fire caused by an overheated stove in the ferry dock waiting room. The blaze started at 3 a.m.

CANADIAN TRANSFER underwent repairs most of Tuesday, 28 Nov. 2000, at the Algoma Steel dock at Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. She had run aground the previous night in the Canadian channel approaching Algoma Steel. CANADIAN TRANSFER was freed by two Purvis Marine tugs. The vessel suffered a crack or hole in the hull plating about 10 feet from the bottom along its port side.

1918: The bow section of the former passenger steamer NORTH WEST sank in Lake Ontario. The ship had been cut in two for a tow out of the Great Lakes. The stern was later rebuilt as b) MAPLECOURT.

1923: LINDEN, a wooden bulk carrier, burned as a total loss in Tawas Bay.

1932: The Canadian freighter GEORGIAN stranded at Munising while downbound from Port Arthur to Detroit. The crew was rescued on December 3. The first salvage attempt failed on December 5 and the vessel was not released until May 1933.

1961: IQUITOS, enroute from Callao, Peru, to Manzanillo, Mexico, with fish meal, caught fire off the coast of Mexico and was abandoned by the crew. The vessel first visited the Great Lakes as a) RUTENFJELL in 1936 and returned on numerous occasions. It was back as b) POLYRIVER from 1951 to 1958. The abandoned IQUITOS drifted for months and was finally sunk by a U.S. destroyer as a hazard to navigation about 100 miles southeast of the Christmas Islands, on April 9, 1962.

1966: The Liberty ship TEGEAN ran aground on The Sisters rocks in fog south of Halifax while inbound for bunkers. All on board were saved by Coast Guard and Navy helicopters. The hull broke into 3 pieces and was dynamited by Navy divers as a hazard on December 16, 1966. The vessel had traded through the Seaway as b) ST. MALO in 1962.

1981: LONDON EARL went aground at Pointe aux Trembles while outbound from Thunder Bay to Hamburg, West Germany, with a cargo of wheat. Five tugs released the ship, with only minimal damage, on November 30. The vessel later returned through the Seaway as b) OLYMPIC LIBERTY beginning in 1983, as c) STABERG in 1990 and as d) ITHAKI in 1996. It was scrapped at Alang, India, in 2001.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Russ Plumb, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port of Thunder Bay continues strong grain move

11/27 - Thunder Bay, Ont. – The Port of Thunder Bay’s strong grain haul continued in October, with over 850,000 metric tonnes of the western Canadian cargo exported by vessel during the month. That is a third more than the 10-year October average of 645,000 metric tonnes.

The port is closing in on the end of a third consecutive shipping season featuring very strong grain shipments. Grain volumes for the three most recent shipping seasons (2014 through 2016) are 34 percent higher than the 10-year average from 2004 to 2013. This equates to an additional 2 million metric tonnes of grain being shipped through Thunder Bay elevators annually.

Thunder Bay Port Authority CEO Tim Heney said that these results are not a coincidence, but rather something of a new normal for Thunder Bay.

“A variety of factors are responsible for the port’s increased shipments, the first of which was the elimination of the Canadian Wheat Board’s monopoly on Western Canadian grain,” he explained. “Since that took place in 2012, grain companies now control the movement of their grain to market. Thunder Bay is the largest export port on the Great Lakes – St. Lawrence Seaway System; most Canadian grain companies operate elevator facilities in Thunder Bay and utilize the Seaway to transport grain for direct export and to their elevators in Quebec.”

Heney said that a major development in Thunder Bay was the re-opening of the former Viterra ‘ C’ elevator by Richardson International in late 2014. “The facility, Richardson Current River, increased the port’s grain throughput capacity by over two million tonnes.”

Another Canadian agribusiness has recently established a presence in the port. AGT Food and Ingredients is utilizing a loop track facility to export lentils directly from Thunder Bay via ocean vessels to international markets.

“There is an understanding of the Seaway and Thunder Bay as an efficient, effective route through which to access those markets,” added Heney.

Net News Ledger

 

Port Reports -  November 27

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic on a busy Saturday included Edwin H. Gott and Alpena in the late afternoon, followed after dark by Flevogracht, Mississagi, Manitowoc (to Essar) and Joseph L. Block on her rare trip to Quebec City. Upbounders included Radcliffe R. Latimer, Federal Katsura (going to Essar Export Dock in the late evening when Algoma Enterprise leaves), Labrador, Mesabi Miner and Edgar B. Speer.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Federal Oshima and Hanse Gate were in port Saturday.

Gary, Ind.
Philip R. Clarke and Presque Isle were unloading Saturday.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Stewart J. Cort and Burns Harbor were in port Saturday evening.

Indiana Harbor, Ind.
Tug Heath Wood and her tank barge were still in port loading Saturday evening.

Goderich, Ont.
Ocean Castle and Algolake were loading Saturday.

Toledo, Ohio
CSL Welland and Federal Clyde continued to load grain Saturday. Evans Spirit was also in port. The tug Olive L. Moore was undergoing rudder repairs.

 

Updates -  November 27

Saltie Gallery updated with pictures of the Barnacle, Billesborg, Brant, Drawsko, Federal Alster, Federal Clyde, Federal Columbia, HHL Rhine, Miedwie, Nassauborg, Qamutik, Rodopi, Roerborg, Shoveler, Sunda, Vitosha and Yulia.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 27

At 4:00 a.m. on 27 November 1872, the wooden schooner MIDDLESEX was struck by a terrible winter storm on Lake Superior. The winds caught the vessel with such force that she listed at a 45 degree angle and her cargo shifted. In danger of sinking, the crew jettisoned much of the cargo and the ship righted herself. Her lifeboat and much of her rigging and sails were washed away. She limped into Waiska Bay and anchored to ride out the storm. However, she had developed a leak and it was so cold that her pumps had frozen. To save the vessel, she was run ashore and sank in shallow water. The crew climbed into her rigging until the tug W. D. CUSHING rescued them.

ALGOSEA entered Lake service as a self-unloader for the first time with salt loaded at Goderich, Ontario and passed down bound in the Welland Canal November 27, 1976, for Quebec City.

AVONDALE was condemned and was not allowed to carry cargo after she arrived at Toledo, Ohio on November 27, 1975, to load soybeans.

The steam barge CHAUNCY HURLBUT was launched at the shipyard of Simon Langell at St. Clair, Michigan on Thanksgiving Day, 27 November 1873. She was built for Chandler Bros. of Detroit.

On 27 November 1886, COMANCHE (wooden schooner, 137 foot, 322 tons, built in 1867, at Oswego, New York) was carrying corn in a storm on Lake Ontario when she ran on a shoal and sank near Point Peninsula, New York. A local farmer died while trying to rescue her crew of 8. His was the only death. She was later recovered and rebuilt as THOMAS DOBBIE.

The PERE MARQUETTE 22 collided with the WABASH in heavy fog in 1937.

In 1966, the CITY OF MIDLAND 41 ran aground at Ludington, Michigan in a storm. Stranded on board were a number of passengers and 56 crewmen. Ballast tanks were flooded to hold the steamer on until the storm subsided. She was pulled off four days later by the Roen tug JOHN PURVES.

The propeller MONTGOMERY, which burned in June 1878, was raised on 27 November 1878. Her engine and boiler were removed and she was converted to a barge. She was rebuilt at Algonac, Michigan in the summer of 1879.

On 27 November 1866, the Oswego Advertiser & Times reported that the schooner HENRY FITZHUGH arrived at Oswego, New York with 17,700 bushels of wheat from Milwaukee. Her skipper was Captain Cal Becker. The round trip took 23 days, which was considered "pretty fast sailing".

The CITY OF FLINT 32 was launched in Manitowoc on 27 Nov 1929. Cut down to a rail barge at Nicholson's, Ecorse in 1970, renamed b.) ROANOKE.

On Monday, 27 Nov 1996, the Cyprus flag MALLARD of 1977, up bound, apparently bounced off the wall in the Welland Canal below Lock 1 and into the path of the CANADIAN ENTERPRISE. It was a sideswipe rather than a head on collision. The ENTERPRISE was repaired at Port Weller Dry Docks. The repairs to the gangway and ballast vent pipes took six hours. The MALLARD proceeded to Port Colborne to be repaired there.

At 10:20 p.m. on Monday, 27 Nov. 2000, CANADIAN TRANSFER radioed Soo Traffic to report that the vessel was aground off Algoma Steel and "taking on water but in no danger." The crew reported that they had two anchors down and one line on the dock. Purvis Marine was contacted.

1905: LAFAYETTE stranded at Encampment Island, Lake Superior, broke in two and was a total loss. MANILA, its consort barge, also came ashore but was later salvaged.

1942: JUDGE HART stranded at Fitzsimmons Rock, Ashburton Bay, Lake Superior, enroute to Toronto with 101,500 bushels of grain. All on board were rescued and the ship later slid off the rocks, drifted and sank.

1981: LOUKIA, a Greek flag visitor to the Great Lakes in 1976, arrived at Monrovia, Liberia, as f) DESPOULA and was abandoned. The vessel was looted before being sold for scrap. On September 2, 1982, while under tow for Yugoslavia for dismantling, the vessel broke loose in heavy seas and grounded about 14 miles north of Monrovia.

2006: SPAR OPAL had mechanical problems and ran aground near the Iroquois Lock. It was released on November 29. It did not return through the Seaway in 2007 but was back for two final trips in 2008. The ship was renamed h) ARWAD PRINCESS in 2012 and re-registered in Belize.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Wilfred Sykes to make rare Lake Superior trip

11/26 - The Duluth Shipping News web site is listing a next Friday arrival for Wilfred Sykes at Two Harbors, Minn., to load ore. She is expected past midnight, but that may change between now and then, depending on weather.

The Sykes doesn’t usually venture much off Lake Michigan. She loaded in Marquette in January 2004, and was up as far as Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario’s Export Dock on a night passage four or five years ago.

The Sykes isn’t the only Central Marine Logistics vessel making an unusual trip. Fleetmate Joseph L. Block was downbound on western Lake Superior Saturday evening headed for Quebec City with ore.

 

Port Reports -  November 26

Western Lake Superior
American Mariner was loading at Silver Bay, Minn., Friday evening. Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was loading at Two Harbors. Joseph L. Block was downbound with a destination of Quebec City. Fivelborg left the Twin Ports in the mid-evening with a cargo of beet pellets headed for Ireland.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
The salties Brant and Vitosha were heading in to load grain Friday evening. Whitefish Bay and Flevogracht were loading.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic on a busy Friday included Federal Sakura, CSL St. Laurent, Spruceglen, Buffalo, Frontenac, Anglian Lady with barge and, after dark, Saginaw, Iryda and Algoma Guardian. Federal Katsura entered the river in the late afternoon but went to anchor above DeTour. Downbound traffic included Sam Laud, Federal Baltic (which also went to anchor above DeTour) and, after dark, Pineglen and John J. Boland. Manitowoc was underway from Essar Steel upbound in the late afternoon. Algocanada was downbound from the Purvis Dock in the lower harbor in the early evening, headed for Nanticoke. Algoma Enterprise was at the Essar Export Dock.

Port Inland, Mich.
Great Lakes Trader was loading stone Friday evening.

Green Bay, Wis.
Great Republic was in and out of port on Friday.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Hanse Gate and Bradshaw McKee were in port Friday in the evening.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Federal Ems, Hon. James L. Oberstar and Burns Harbor were all in port late Friday.

Buffington, Ind.
Cason J. Callaway was loading slag Friday.

Indiana Harbor, Ind.
The new Kirby tug Heath Wood and her barge were loading on Friday evening, after which they are expected to head off-lakes. American Spirit was unloading.

Goderich, Ont.
The saltie Ocean Castle spent Friday loading grain. Algolake was loading salt.

Toledo, Ohio
CSL Welland and Federal Clyde continued to load grain Friday.

 

Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw to deliver Christmas trees to families in need

11/26 - Cheboygan, Mich. – The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw is getting ready to deliver 1,200 Christmas trees to Chicago.

A northern Michigan family had been delivering Christmas trees from northern Michigan to Chicago on what is known as the "Christmas Ship" since the late 1800's, but in 1912, the ship sank, taking the entire crew with it.

The Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw has been making the trip since the year 2000, but the story goes back a century.

“To provide for these families in need, it’s just been an ongoing tradition and it's a great way to memorialize those that were lost at sea, and here we are continuing the tradition," said Jonathan Gardner with the U.S. Coast Guard.

“Everyone sees how much Christmas trees can go for these days. And just having that little bit of extra money in their pockets so they can give their little one a gift that they thought they weren’t going to be able to afford, to see the smile on their face just knowing it’s going to make their Christmas a little extra special, it brings a smile to our face, it brings a smile to their face and it just makes us feel a little bit warmer during this holiday season.”

The trees come from all over northern Michigan.

The Mackinaw will be greeted by teams of organizations at the Navy Pier that will help unload the trees and bring them to families who need them this holiday season.

“We’re all looking forward to getting the trees on board and providing the families down in Chicago with a little present this holiday season," said Gardner.

The trees will be loaded onto the ship at 8 a.m. Monday morning, and then it will take about two days to travel to the Navy Pier in Chicago.

UpNorthLive

 

Home of the former passenger steamer Keewatin getting a facelift

11/26 - Port McNicoll, Ont. – The S.S. Keewatin returned to Port McNicoll to great fanfare in 2012. Now, its home is getting a big facelift. Redevelopment is currently underway at the Confederation Gateway to the West Docks of the 109-year-old steamship, located at the foot of Talbot Street. Eric Conroy, president and CEO of Friends of the Keewatin, said the work is part of a larger project to develop a park at the site.

“We are rebuilding the docks that were built in 1912,” he said. “It’s part of a project to turn the park over to the Township of Tay.” Conroy said the years have not been kind to the Keewatin’s original dock.

“The old dock is made out of wood,” he said. “Over the years, the water would go up and down and the wood started to rot. So what we’ve had to do is put a steel facing all the way around.”

Conroy said the work, which he hopes to see finished by Christmas, will also involve taking out old building foundations and railway tracks. “It’s probably the most money that’s been spent on a community project in Port McNicoll in many years,” said Conroy. “And it hasn’t cost the local taxpayers a penny.”

The dock redevelopment cost of $1 million is being shared between the Canada 150 Fund and Skyline Investments, the owner of the Keewatin. Conroy said the larger park project has already been designed and soon work will start on raising the estimated $2.5 million to finish it. The aim, once again, is to not use any municipal money.

“The Keewatin is a fabulous piece of Canadian history, but it really doesn’t have a nice ambience being in the middle of a parking lot,” said Conroy. “When it’s finished, it’s going to be really something.”

Simcoe.com

 

Foreign workers to replace Canadian crews aboard local shipping company tankers

11/26 - The union representing workers for Coastal Shipping Ltd. says its Canadian employees are being laid off during the winter season and replaced with workers from other countries to save money.

The Coastal Shipping fleet, part of the Labrador-based Woodward Group of Companies, which operates various aviation and transportation companies in the Happy Valley-Goose Bay area, has five tankers that work mainly along Canada's eastern seaboard and Nunavut transporting fuels.

According to the union, at least three of the vessels will now fly the flag of the Marshall Islands, a chain of islands in the Pacific Ocean between Hawaii and the Philippines, though the company says it may just be two. This gives the shipping company the ability to use non-Canadian crews when operating outside of Canadian waters.

"They can change the flag, they can change the crew, they can do whatever they want with the ship," said Patrice Caron, executive vice-president of the Seafarers International Union of Canada. Caron said, together with relief crews, anywhere from 60 to 100 workers could be affected by the layoffs if three or four of the vessels are reflagged, but the company said it would be less.

Dennis White, Coastal Shipping's general manager, told CBC the company is changing flags because there are normally five ships tied up at Lewisporte from December to May with no work. The ships will still have about four Canadian crew members, with another 10 cheaper foreign workers hired for the work in the Caribbean. White said it would cost a lot of money to keep an all-Canadian crew.

He said the number of workers affected would be less than the union's estimate of 60 to 100, because the ships would otherwise be idle with just seven crew members aboard.

"In light of extremely difficult trading conditions within the international market, owners have decided to reflag your vessel Canada flag to that of the Marshall Islands," read a notice posted Nov. 17 aboard the vessel Alsterstern. "Please … display this notice publicly onboard which serves as a layoff notice accordingly under the governing crew agreement."

A worker told CBC that crew members were let go two days after the layoff notice was posted on the Alsterstern while drydocking in Las Palmas, in the Canary Islands. He also said that tanker has already been reflagged.

"They have decided to change the flag to flag of conveniences, what we call FOCs, in order to get cheap labor on board their vessels," Caron said.

A worker for the company says the new workers being brought aboard are Filipino. "Why can't they keep the Canadian crews? We're good at what we're doing. We know the ships, we know the business," Caron said.

The company says the vessels would be reflagged and crewed by Canadians when they return to the country in the spring and operate in Newfoundland and Labrador and Nunavut. But a worker for the company, who spoke with the CBC on condition of anonymity, said Canadian workers have traditionally worked international contracts for the company under the Canadian flag.

He said up until a couple of weeks ago, everything seemed normal.

"Everyone I speak to, they say the same thing: they're devastated, they loved working there and they thought they were going to be working there the rest of their lives."

He said the company is replacing workers who have been with the company for 30 years for a cheaper option.

"The bottom line is we're being replaced by people who are being paid slave wages and they're working six months straight. I think it's coming down to they don't want to crew-change people overseas every six weeks, because if we were working, they'd have to crew-change us every six weeks," the worker said.

"Some guys are going to go bankrupt and those guys are going to lose their house. Bottom line is everyone's going to have to find new jobs right now."

CBC

 

Explorers find 1872 shipwreck of rare Great Lakes vessel

11/26 - The 144-year-old shipwreck of a rare sailing vessel that typically wasn't used for long voyages on the Great Lakes has been found in deep water off Lake Ontario's New York shore, according to two underwater explorers.

Western New York-based explorers Jim Kennard and Roger Pawlowski announced Friday that they identified the wreck as the Black Duck in September, three years after initially coming across it while using side-scan sonar in 350 feet of water off Oswego, New York.

The 51-foot-long, single-mast ship known as a scow-sloop sank during a gale while hauling goods along the lake's eastern end in August 1872. The ship's captain, his wife and a crewmember, the only people on board, all survived by getting into a small boat and reaching shore eight hours later.

Only a few scow-sloops sailed the Great Lakes, Kennard told The Associated Press. A search of nautical records turned up only about a dozen references to scow-sloops being built in the region, he said. The Black Duck wreck is believed to be the only fully intact scow-sloop to exist in the Great Lakes, Kennard said.

"It's definitely a rarity," said Carrie Sowden, archaeological director at the National Museum of the Great Lakes in Toledo, Ohio, which sponsors the New York team's explorations.

The vessels' simple design — squared bow and stern and a flat bottom — allowed it to be run up on beaches for loading and unloading of cargo. "Scows, because of their shape, are workhorses," Sowden said. "They're not there to move fast through the water. They're there to carry a lot of cargo."

Typically used on rivers or for short voyages on the Great Lakes, scow-sloops weren't constructed for high winds and waves in open water. The Black Duck got caught in such conditions on Aug. 8, 1872, during the 40-mile trip from Oswego to Sackett's Harbor on Lake Ontario's eastern end. The ship sank soon after springing a leak during a gale.

"They weren't built to withstand that kind of pounding," Kennard said.

The Black Duck is the latest Lake Ontario shipwreck discovery for Pawlowski, of Rochester, and Kennard, of nearby Fairport. Earlier this year, they and a third member of their team, Roland "Chip" Stevens, announced they had found the wreck of the sloop Washington, which sank during a storm in 1803. The find was the second-oldest confirmed shipwreck in the Great Lakes, the explorers said.

Associated Press

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 26

In 1952, the PHILIP R. CLARKE was launched at the American Ship Building yard at Lorain, Ohio. The 647- foot-long freighter became the flagship of the Pittsburgh Steamship Company. She was lengthened by 120 feet in 1974 and converted to a self-unloader in 1982.

On 26 November 1856, CHEROKEE (2-mast wooden schooner, 103 foot, 204 tons, built in 1849, at Racine, Wisconsin) foundered in a gale 7 miles south of Manistee, Michigan, on Lake Michigan. All aboard (estimates range from ten to fourteen persons) were lost.

The U.S.C.G.C. MESQUITE departed Charlevoix and locked through the Soo on November 26, 1989, to begin SUNDEW's normal buoy tending duties on Lake Superior.

The ELIZABETH HINDMAN was launched November 26, 1920, as a.) GLENCLOVA (Hull#9) at Midland, Ontario, by Midland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd.

On 26 November 1872, the steamer GEO W. REYNOLDS burned at 1 in the morning at the dock in Bay City. The fire supposedly originated in the engine room. She was owned by A. English of East Saginaw.

On 26 November 1853, ALBANY (wooden side wheel passenger/package freight, 202 foot, 669 tons, built in 1846, at Detroit, Michigan) was carrying passengers and miscellaneous cargo in a storm on Lake Huron.. She was making for the shelter of Presque Isle harbor when the gale drove her over a bar. Her crew and 200 passengers came ashore in her boats. Plans were made to haul her back across the bar when another storm wrecked her. Her boiler and most of her machinery were recovered the following year.

LAKE BREEZE (wooden propeller, 122 foot, 301 gross tons, built in 1868, at Toledo, Ohio) burned at her dock in Leamington, Ontario, on 26 November 1878. One man perished in the flames. She was raised in 1880, but the hull was deemed worthless. Her machinery and metal gear were removed in 1881, and sold to an American company.

The ANN ARBOR NO 5 (steel carferry, 359 foot, 2,988 gross tons) was launched by the Toledo Ship Building Company (Hull #118) on 26 Nov 1910. She was the first carferry to be built with a sea gate, as a result of the sinking of the PERE MARQUETTE 18 in September of 1910.

On 26 Nov 1881, JANE MILLER (wooden propeller passenger-package freight coaster, 78 foot, 210 gross tons, built in 1878, at Little Current, Ontario) departed Meaford, Ontario, for Wiarton - sailing out into the teeth of a gale and was never seen again. All 30 aboard were lost. She probably sank near the mouth of Colpoy's Bay in Georgian Bay. She had serviced the many small ports on the inside coast of the Bruce Peninsula.

HIRAM W. SIBLEY (wooden propeller freighter, 221 foot, 1,419 gross tons, built in 1890, at E. Saginaw, Michigan) was carrying 70,000 bushels of corn from Chicago for Detroit. On 26 Nov 1898, she stranded on the northwest corner of South Manitou Island in Lake Michigan during blizzard. (Some sources say this occurred on 27 November.) The tugs PROTECTOR and SWEEPSTAKES were dispatched for assistance but the SIBLEY refloated herself during the following night and then began to sink again. She was put ashore on South Fox Island to save her but she broke in half; then completely broke up during a gale on 7 December 1898.

During the early afternoon of 26 Nov 1999, the LOUIS R. DESMARAIS suffered an engine room fire while sailing in the western section of Lake Ontario. Crews onboard the DESMARAIS put out the fire and restarted her engines. The DESMARAIS proceeded to the Welland Canal where she was inspected by both U.S. and Canadian investigators. No significant damage was noted and the vessel was allowed to proceed.

1924: The wooden steamer J.C. FORD was destroyed by a fire while on the St. Marys River near DeTour.

1940: The coal-laden CHEYENNE went aground in a storm near Port Colborne while enroute to Montreal. The ship was released on December 1. It last sailed as c) SORELDOC (ii) in 1965 before being scrapped at Hamilton.

1942: L.E. BLOCK went aground in the Straits of Mackinac during a snowstorm.

1951: JOHN H. PRICE was at Ste. Anne des Monts to load pulpwood when a storm swept the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The ship broke loose early the next day, drifted to shore and was pounded on the rocks. All on board were saved and the vessel was refloated May 30, 1952.

1964: The Norwegian tanker STOLT DAGALI, a Seaway caller as a) DAGALI in 1960-1962, was sliced in two by the passenger vessel SHALOM about 28 miles southeast of the Ambrose Channel Light Vessel. The stern of the tanker sank but the bow was rebuilt using the stern of the C.T. GODSTAD that had grounding damage. The rebuilt ship resumed sailing as STOLT LADY.

1979: Despite clear visibility, PIERSON DAUGHTERS and JABLANICA collided off Alexandria Bay, NY, and both ships were damaged. The latter went aground on Broadway Shoal and had to be lightered before being released. It was a regular Seaway trader and was also back as b) ELLIE beginning in 1993. The ship was scrapped at Alang, India, as d) PINE TRADER in 2009.

1981: EURO PRINCESS, a Seaway trader beginning in 1976, went aground in the Atlantic near Sable Island and the crew of 26 was airlifted to safety. Despite a cracked hull, the ship was refloated and was back on the Great Lakes as c) EUROPEGASUS in 1985 and survived until scrapping in India in 1997-1998.

2000: The former BALSA I, a Seaway trader beginning in 1981, reported taking water off Hainan Island in the South China Sea and sank. The crew was saved by a passing freighter.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 25

In 1890, the WESTERN RESERVE delivered a record cargo of 95,488 bushels of wheat from Duluth to Buffalo.

In 1913, the schooner ROUSE SIMMONS, Captain August Schuenemann, departed Thompson Harbor (Michigan) with a load of fresh cut Christmas trees bound for Chicago. Somewhere between Kewaunee and Two Rivers, Wis., the SIMMONS was lost with all hands.

On 25 November 1857, ANTELOPE (wooden schooner, 220 tons, built in 1854, at Port Robinson, Ontario) was driven ashore by a gale near St. Joseph, Michigan. Five lives were lost. She was recovered the next year and rebuilt.

INCAN SUPERIOR was withdrawn from service after completing 2,386 trips between Thunder Bay and Superior and on November 25, 1992, she passed down bound at Sault Ste. Marie for service on the Canadian West Coast. Renamed PRINCESS SUPERIOR in 1993.

ROBERT C. STANLEY was laid up for the last time November 25, 1981, at the Tower Bay Slip, Superior, Wisconsin. She was scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey in 1989.

CITY OF MILWAUKEE (Hull#261) was launched November 25, 1930, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin, by Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co. She was sponsored by Mrs. Walter J. Wilde, wife of the collector of customs at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She entered service in January of 1931.

On 25 November 1866, F. W. BACKUS (wooden propeller, 133 foot, 289 tons, built in 1846, at Amherstburg, Ontario) was carrying hay, horses and cattle off Racine, Wisconsin. She was run to the beach when it was discovered that she was on fire. Her crew and passengers disembarked. The tug DAISY LEE towed her out while she was still burning, intending to scuttle her, but the towline burned through and she drifted back to shore and burned to the waterline. Her live cargo was pushed overboard while she was still well out and they swam to shore.

On 25 November 1874, WILLIAM SANDERSON (wooden schooner, 136 foot, 385 gross tons, built in 1853, at Oswego, New York) was carrying wheat in a storm on Lake Michigan when she foundered. The broken wreck washed ashore off Empire, Michigan, near Sleeping Bear. She was owned by Scott & Brown of Detroit.

During a storm on 25 November 1895, MATTIE C. BELL (wooden schooner, 181 foot, 769 gross tons, built in 1882, at E. Saginaw, Michigan) was in tow of the steamer JIM SHERRIFS on Lake Michigan. The schooner stranded at Big Summer Island, was abandoned in place and later broke up. No lives were lost.

On 25 Nov 1947, the CAPTAIN JOHN ROEN was renamed c.) ADAM E. CORNELIUS by the American Steamship Co. in 1958, CORNELIUS was renamed d.) CONSUMERS POWER. Eventually sold to Erie Sand, she was scrapped at Kaohsiung, Taiwan in 1988. Built in 1927, as a.) GEORGE M. HUMPHERY.

On 25 Nov 1905, the JOSEPH G. BUTLER JR (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 525 foot, 6,588 gross tons) entered service, departing Lorain, Ohio, for Duluth on her maiden voyage. The vessel was damaged in a severe storm on that first crossing of Lake Superior, but she was repaired and had a long career. She was renamed DONALD B GILLIES in 1935, and GROVEDALE in 1963. She was sunk as a dock in Hamilton in 1973, and finally sold for scrap in 1981.

1904: B.W. BLANCHARD stranded near Alpena, MI and was wrecked. The ship had become unmanageable in heavy weather while enroute to Detroit with a cargo of lumber and was a total loss.

1908: NORTH STAR sank in Lake Huron off Port Sanilac after a collision with NORTHERN QUEEN. The accident occurred in dense fog and the ship went down quickly. All were saved.

1927: THOUSAND ISLANDER cleared Sarnia for Midland under tow of C.S.L. fleetmate COLLINGWOOD and they encountered heavy weather on Lake Huron. The ship was overwhelmed southeast of Thunder Bay Island and sank.

1950: The cargo of steel and package freight aboard the C.S.L. steamer WEYBURN shifted on Lake Ontario in a wild fall storm and the ship took on a precarious list and almost capsized. The ship was escorted to Toronto by RENVOYLE where the problem was corrected.

1971: The Greek freighter ESTIA sank on the Caribbean north of French Guiana after a violent engine room explosion. The ship was bound for Brazil with phosphates and all on board were saved. The vessel had been a Great Lakes visitor as MANCHESTER SPINNER beginning in 1963.

2003: The yacht ALISON LAKE, rebuilt at Toronto from the U.S. Coast Guard ship SAUK, hit a submerged object and sank in very deep water south of Key West, FL. All on board were rescued.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Pilot boat Huron Spirit reaches home dock

11/24 - Port Huron, Mich. - The new pilot boat Huron Spirit arrived at its home dock at Lakes Pilots Association in Port Huron Wednesday afternoon. The boat left Erie PA Tuesday at noon and pounded through the remnants of the weekend storm and arrived at the Portofino Restaurant in Wyandotte that night.

Wednesday the crew was under way and quickly made it to the J.W. Westcott Co. where they opened the boat up for tours before continuing on to their home dock in Port Huron.

The delivery crew departed Somerset, MA on November 13, the boat represents the latest in pilot boat design and technology.

 

Port Reports -  November 24

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Paul R. Tregurtha departed Duluth from Midwest Energy at 04:40 Wednesday. Fivelborg arrived at 05:20 to load beet pulp pellets at Peavey. Her 2013-built fleetmate Exeborg arrived Duluth from Thunder Bay at 15:10 on her first visit for a quick hull inspection. She departed at 17:00 and went to anchor to wait for Fivelborg to finish loading. In Superior, Stewart J. Cort departed from BN at 10:00, and John B. Aird arrived from anchor at 10:35 to load ore.

Marquette, Mich.
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and Herbert C. Jackson were in port Thanksgiving eve.

St. Marys River
On Wednesday, BBC Mont Blanc, Lee A. Tregurtha, America Spirit, Kaministiqua and Burns Harbor were downbound. Roger Blough and Algoma Enterprise were upbound. John D. Leitch remained loading at the Essar Export Dock. Finnborg was at anchor above DeTour.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Federal Ems was headed in Wednesday evening.

Goderich, Ont.
Radcliffe R. Latimer departed in the morning Wednesday. She was replaced at the salt dock by Algowood. CCGS Samuel Risley was also in port. The saltie Ocean Castle is due.

Toledo, Ohio – Aaron J. Border
Federal Clyde remained at Anderson's E Elevator Wednesday loading grain. Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was at the coal docks. The saltie Rodopi is currently upbound in the Welland Canal with a Toledo destination. She appears to be a sister to the Lyulin and Osogovo that were here loading grain earlier this month. CSL Welland is still on track for an overnight arrival unless they anchor until after the holiday. Also of note is the G tug Colorado coming into Toledo from Detroit, possibly as a replacement or backup tug.

Nanticoke, Ont.
The 1,00-footer American Century was unloading Wednesday evening.

Oshawa, Ont.
The saltie Redhead was in port Wednesday.

 

Bay Shipbuilding delivers new Kirby ATB

11/24 - Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding's Sturgeon Bay, Wis., shipyard has delivered the Kirby 155-01, a 155,000-barrel capacity barge, and the Heath Wood, a 6,000HP tug for Kirby Corporation.

The tug and barge left BayShip on Wednesday headed south for Indiana Harbor. They may be going to pick up a cargo to take off-lakes.

The vessels are to be operated as an Articulated Tug-Barge unit ,and will haul petroleum and chemical products domestically. This is the first unit delivered under a 2014 contract for two identical ATB units. The second ATB unit is scheduled for delivery in the summer of 2017.

Houston based Kirby Corporation is America's largest tank barge operator, transporting bulk liquid products throughout the Mississippi River System, the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, along all three Unites States coasts, and in Alaska and Hawaii. Kirby currently operates several ATB units built by Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding in the mid-2000s.

MarineLog

 

Closure of coal plant could knock Holland down list of dredging priorities

11/24 - Holland, Mich. - The James DeYoung power plant stopped burning coal this past spring, a move that could have consequences for businesses that rely on dredging for Holland harbor. “Holland will likely fall further down the overall priority list of (dredging) funding needs,” Lynn Rose, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, said in an email.

Although classified as a “low-use commercial harbor” for its relatively light use as an engine of commerce, the harbor and its dredging are relied upon by several local businesses. Any reduction in the harbor's dredging schedule would prove irksome for those businesses that do rely on a deeper harbor.

“A two-year dredge cycle would be an issue for our ships,” said Phil Brewer, president of Brewer’s City Dock.

The James DeYoung power plant of Holland burned coal for 76 years. But with the construction of the new natural gas facility — dubbed Holland Energy Park — the DeYoung plant burned coal for the last time on April 14. The Holland City Council approved plans to build the new natural gas plant in 2012, which was effectively a decision to close down the DeYoung plant.

In July, the BPW sold the remaining 28,440 tons of coal at the DeYoung Plant to the C. Reiss Coal Co. at a price of $35 per ton. The BPW is planning to remediate the coal yard and ash ponds next year. The new natural gas plant is then expected to be fully operational in 2017.

As natural gas is considered a more environmentally friendly fuel source, the new plant has been touted as a local move toward greener energy. But the old plant’s closure cut the need for coal to be shipped into Holland harbor — a change that negatively affects Holland in terms of the Corps’ budgeting criteria.

The Army Corps of Engineers dredges approximately 35,000 cubic yards each year around the channel connecting Lake Michigan and Lake Macatawa. Another 45,000 to 65,000 cubic yards of lake bottom comes out of the inner harbor on a two- to four-year cycle. The corps’ criteria for ordering dredging priorities is based on two broad categories: “condition” and “consequence.”

Condition is measured based on how badly a harbor needs dredging — that is, how much the movement of the lake bottom obstructs a channel or harbor. In addition to other factors, consequence is tied to the cost of dredging and the total amount of commercial goods navigating in and out of the harbor.

Harbors handling more than 10 million tons a year are considered “high use,” while 1-10 million is “moderate use.” Harbors with less than 1 million annual tons of movement are “low use.” In 2014, the last year for which the corps has data, Holland received 210,000 tons of commodities — primarily limestone and no coal.

“For the past number of years, Holland Harbor has handled well below 1 million tons of commodities,” Rose said.

But even Holland harbor’s “low use” designation was offset to some degree by the presence of the DeYoung plant. The corps gives consideration to harbors with energy plants that have no other way of receiving coal. “This was a factor that strengthened the argument for funding dredging at Holland in the past,” Rose said. “The closing of the coal-fired power plant at Holland eliminates that factor.”

Most ships coming into the Holland harbor to the two commercial docks are coming from Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. They carry aggregate material that is sold to local companies and cities to help build roads. About 10 to 20 ships arrive at Brewer’s City Dock in Holland each year, carrying from 12,000 to 15,000 tons each. Brewer’s has been running operations there for almost 80 years. The dock markets and sells the material to both contractors and state and local governments.

The $8.19 million Ninth Street reconstruction in Holland, completed this year by the city, was done with material that came through Brewer’s City Dock, Brewer said.

“Towards the end of the dredge cycles, we do become impacted by the sediment that comes down the river,” Brewer said. “The boats have to carry less material because the water is too shallow for them.” The result: less material on the ships means higher prices for customers — and in the case of city and state road projects, more taxpayer dollars, Brewer said.

The sediment flows down the Macatawa River and immediately impacts Brewer’s City Dock, which is the first dock where the river meets the lake. If the sediment isn’t dredged out, Brewer fears the lake around his dock would continue to fill in and become a marsh like the area around Windmill Island. But the bigger issue is at the channel, Brewer said.

At the end of the piers into Lake Michigan, sand gets pulled around and deposited in the waterway between the big lake and Lake Macatawa, Brewer said. It’s there that Brewer said his ships have an issue passing through. Less frequent dredging in the channel, Brewer said, could prove to be an issue for his ships.

And over time, should the channel not be dredged consistently for commercial traffic, Brewer said he feels the depth of the channel would become an issue for larger leisure boats as well.

VerPlank Dock has been at 233 W. Eighth St. since 1972, when the company purchased the dock from the Harrington Coal Co., said Ron Matthews, president. VerPlank also imports construction aggregates from quarries in Michigan and Canada — most of which is limestone that’s supplied for asphalt and ready-mix concrete. It sells the material to major West Michigan paving companies, Matthews said. About 20 ships come into the VerPlank dock every year, Matthews said.

“That boat brings in about 300 trucks of material in one delivery,” Matthews said. “It’s the cheapest way to get it in here.”

Mitch Padnos, executive vice president of the third major commercial player on Holland harbor, also lauded the benefits of shipping via the lake, pointing out that barges keep semi-trucks off the road. "Every time a barge (of 5,000 tons) heads out of Holland harbor," Padnos said, "it eliminates 250 truck loads that would otherwise be headed out of town."

Padnos, the company, is an 111-year-old papers, plastics and metals recycler. Unlike VerPlank and Brewer's, Padnos’ primary use of the harbor is for shipping material out of Lake Macatawa rather than bringing it in. Because of the tug-boat systems used by the company, Executive Vice President Mitch Padnos said Padnos’ boats draw less water as they pass out of the channel, compared to VerPlank’s and Brewer’s ships.

Noting that every year is different, Padnos said the company’s ships haven’t had any issues in the past few years due to Lake Michigan’s high water level. Dredging, Padnos said, “is a constantly moving target” based on how much tonnage is being shipped out of the harbor, what the water levels are and what the Corps’ budget looks like.

He was bullish on the future of local dredging, however, pointing to President-elect Donald Trump’s promises to undertake a large-scale effort to rebuild the country’s infrastructure.

“If I had to bet, I would not believe those (infrastructure) budgets will be reduced going forward,” Padnos said. “(I would bet) that there is a better chance they will be increased.”

Grand Haven Tribune

 

U.S. Steel to pay $2.2 million fine, clean up Gary pollution

11/24 - U.S. Steel will pay a fine of $2.2 million and clean up pollution in Gary, Michigan and Illinois as part of an agreement with the U.S. Justice Department.

The Justice Department and the states of Indiana, Illinois and Michigan sued the Pittsburgh-based steelmaker in 2012 over alleged Clean Air Act violations. U.S. Steel reached an agreement Tuesday to settle the lawsuit that was filed in federal district court in the Northern District of Indiana.

As part of the consent decree, U.S. Steel agreed to remove contaminated transformers at Gary Works and repair a large opening in a metal shell around a blast furnace to cut down on emissions at the steel mill on Lake Michigan. Such construction projects typically result in jobs for local union tradespeople.

U. S. Steel further agreed to remove tires it dumped in Gary, and to remove and dispose PCB-contaminated lights at Gary schools, and replace them with more modern energy-efficient lighting that isn’t toxic.

“Defendant U. S. Steel, a major global iron and steel manufacturer, has agreed to curtail significant pollution from its three Midwest plants,” U.S. Justice Department Assistant Attorney General John Cruden said. “This outstanding settlement, whose results will especially benefit the three environmental justice communities most closely affected by defendant’s pollution, is another example of how the Department of Justice, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and our state counterparts often work hand-in-hand to enforce our federal and state clean air act laws to protect the health and welfare of our citizens.”

U.S. Steel also agreed to do environmental cleanups at its steel mills in Granite City, lllinois, and in Ecorse, Michigan.

NWI Times

 

 

Help wanted: Great Lakes Pilotage Authority

11/24 - The Great Lakes Pilotage Authority operates in the interest of safety a marine pilotage service in all Canadian waters in the provinces of Ontario, Manitoba and in Quebec south of the northern entrance to the St. Lambert Lock.

The Authority is currently recruiting eligible candidates for the following pilotage district in order to train them to become licensed marine pilots:

• Competition number CO-201604 – Cornwall District (waters of the St. Lawrence River and lakes between St. Lambert Lock, St-Lambert, QC and Snell Lock, Massena, N.Y.).

• Competition number D2-201602 – International District no. 2 (waters of the Welland Canal between Port Weller and Port Colborne, Ontario, Lake Erie and the waters of the connecting channels between Lake Erie and Lake Huron).

• Competition number D3-201601 – International District no. 3 (waters of Lake Huron north of latitude 43° 05.5’ N and the waters of Lakes Michigan and Superior, including the St-Marys River and Georgian Bay).

Apprentices must successfully complete the training program in order to be recommended by the training committee for evaluation by an examination board. An apprentice becomes a licensed pilot following successful evaluation by the board.

For details regarding the above positions and to submit your application, please consult the Authority’s website under the EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES tab at http://www.glpa-apgl.com/careers_e.asp.

Great Lakes Pilotage Authority

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 24

On this day in 1966, Hjalmer Edwards became ill while working as a second cook on the steamer DANIEL J. MORRELL. He was transferred to the hospital at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan when the MORRELL transited the locks for the last time on Thanksgiving Day. Five days later, the DANIEL J. MORRELL sank during a severe storm on Lake Huron with just Dennis Hale as its lone survivor.

On 24 November 1945, SCOTT E. LAND (steel propeller C4-S-A4 cargo ship, 496 foot, 10,654 gross tons) was launched at Kaiser Corporation (Hull #520) in Vancouver, Washington for the U.S. Maritime Commission. She was converted to a straight-deck bulk freighter at Baltimore, Maryland in 1951, and renamed TROY H. BROWNING. In 1955, she was renamed THOMAS F. PATTON. After serving on the Great Lakes, she was scrapped in Karachi, Pakistan, in 1981.

On November 24, 1950, while bound for South Chicago with iron ore, the ENDERS M. VOORHEES collided with the up bound steamer ELTON HOYT II (now the ST. MARYS CHALLENGER) in the Straits of Mackinac during a blinding snowstorm. Both vessels received such serious bow damage that they had to be beached near McGulpin Point west of Mackinaw City to avoid sinking.

ROSEMOUNT, stored with coal, sank alongside CSL's Century Coal Dock at Montreal, Quebec, on November 24, 1934.

Paterson's PRINDOC (Hull#657) was launched November 24, 1965, at Lauzon, Quebec, by Davie Shipbuilding Co. Ltd.

November 24, 1892 - The ANN ARBOR NO 1 ran aground on her first trip just north of the Kewaunee harbor.

On 24 Nov 1881, LAKE ERIE (wooden propeller canaller, 136 foot, 464 gross tons, built in 1873, at St, Catharine's, Ontario) collided with the steamer NORTHERN QUEEN in fog and a blizzard near Poverty Island by the mouth of Green Bay. LAKE ERIE sank in one hour 40 minutes. NORTHERN QUEEN took aboard the crew but one man was scalded and died before reaching Manistique.

The CITY OF SAGINAW 31 entered service in 1931.

On 24 November 1905, ARGO (steel propeller passenger/package freight, 174 foot, 1,089 tons, built in 1896, at Detroit, Michigan) dropped into a trough of a wave, hit bottom and sank in relatively shallow water while approaching the harbor at Holland, Michigan. 38 passengers and crew were taken off by breeches' buoy in a thrilling rescue by the U.S. Lifesaving Service.

NEPTUNE (wooden propeller, 185 foot, 774 gross tons, built in 1856, at Buffalo, New York) was laid up at East Saginaw, Michigan, on 24 November 1874, when she was discovered to be on fire at about 4:00 a.m. She burned to a total loss.

The ANN ARBOR NO 1 left Frankfort for Kewaunee on November 24, 1892. Because of the reluctance of shippers to trust their products on this new kind of ferry it was difficult to find cargo for this first trip. Finally, a fuel company which sold coal to the railroad routed four cars to Kewaunee via the ferry.

1905: ARGO missed the entrance to the harbor at Holland, MI while inbound from Chicago and went aground. All on board, an estimated 72 passengers and crew, were rescued by breeches buoy in a very challenging task. The ship was salvaged in January 1906.

1938: The idle former passenger ship CITY OF BENTON HARBOR was gutted by a fire at Sturgeon Bay.

1970: C.W. CADWELL hit a submerged rock in the Niagara River near Queenston and was stranded.

1988: KATIA was abandoned off Nova Scotia, enroute from Brazil to Carleton, QC, and all 27 on board were taken off by rescue helicopter. Despite salvage efforts, the listing ship sank November 26. It had been through the Seaway earlier in 1987 after previous inland voyages as c) TIMI in 1978 and d) HAPPY MED in 1981.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Jody Aho, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II, The Marine Historical Society of Detroit and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  November 23

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. finished loading at Midwest Energy and departed at 02:35 on Tuesday. BBC Mont Blanc completed discharging at Port Terminal and passed under the lift bridge light at 08:58 with a destination of Antwerp. Paul R. Tregurtha shifted mid-afternoon from Port Terminal to Midwest Energy to load coal. In Superior, Stewart J. Cort arrived from anchor at 12:40 to load at BN after Burns Harbor, which departed at 13:25 with iron ore pellets. John B. Aird arrived off Superior Tuesday evening and dropped anchor to wait for the dock.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Finnborg and Algoma Spirit departed downbound Tuesday afternoon. Kaministiqua, Pineglen, Exeborg and Flevogracht were loading.

S. Chicago, Ill.
The salties Federal Ems and Hanse Gate were in port Tuesday evening,

Indiana Harbor, Ind.
Wilfred Sykes departed with an AIS destination of Grand Haven, Mich., on Tuesday early evening. Joseph L. Block was unloading.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Hon. James L. Oberstar was unloading late Tuesday afternoon.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Radcliffe R. Latimer continued to load on Tuesday. The saltie Ocean Castle is due at the grain elevator, ETA to be announced.

Toledo, Ohio
Federal Clyde arrived Tuesday afternoon at Anderson's E Elevator. The next vessel due in will be CSL Welland. It is unknown when she will arrive.

Sandusky, Ohio
Algoma Olympic was loading Tuesday night.

 

Remembering the S.S. Carl D. Bradley 58 years later

11/23 - In the last 200 years of commercial shipping on the Great Lakes, some 12,000 sailors have lost their lives in upwards of 6000 shipwrecks.

Three of the most recent shipwrecks are the Carl D. Bradley, which sank during a storm in Lake Michigan Nov. 18, 1958; the Cedarville, which sank after a collision in the Straits of Mackinac May 7, 1965; and the Edmund Fitzgerald, which fell victim to a storm on Lake Superior on Nov. 10, 1975.

When the calendar page turns to November each year, the Edmund Fitzgerald, the most recent major shipwreck, and the subject of the famous song, “Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald," tends to get most of the media attention – unless you live in or near Rogers City, Mich. (near Alpena), where the loss of the Carl D. Bradley has never been forgotten.

“The Carl D. Bradley was a 639-foot-long freighter – the largest ship sailing on the Great Lakes at the time it went down,” said Valerie van Heest, board director with the Michigan Shipwreck Research Association, museum designer, and author of the book Lost & Found – Legendary Lake Michigan Shipwrecks.

“It was built in 1927, specifically to haul limestone from Rogers City, Michigan to Chicago, Illinois for use in making steel.”

The Bradley had survived many fierce storms, during its 30 years of service, but it wasn’t able to survive the storm it encountered in northern Lake Michigan on Nov. 18, 1958.

“The Carl D. Bradley was overdue for repairs,” said van Heest. “It suffered some damage in the spring of 1958, but the ships’ owner, U.S. Steel, decided to keep the Bradley in service delivering limestone until winter rather than lay it up for repairs.”

Then in early November, the Bradley grounded in shallow water, further damaging the hull. But U.S. Steel decided to make one last limestone delivery before sending it in for repairs.

Read more and view photos at this link: http://www.wzzm13.com/news/local/michigan-life/remembering-the-ss-carl-d-bradley-58-years-later/353737166

 

McKeil’s Evans Spirit named “Ship of the Year”

11/23 - McKeil Marine’s Evans Spirit won the International Bulk Journal’s 2016 Ship of the Year Award during the IBJ’s Salute to Excellence in the Maritime Bulk Industry gala awards ceremony in London November 21.

“It’s a fantastic way to closeout our 60th anniversary year (by) having a vessel named after our founder, Evans McKeil, win this prestigious international award,” said Steve Fletcher, president and CEO of McKeil Marine.

Acquired by McKeil in 2015, Evans Spirit is a cargo ship with the shallow draft characters of a tug and barge. However, compared to a tug-and-barge unit, she can transport approximately 40 per cent more cargo about 50 per cent faster on a very similar amount of fuel. She is in service throughout the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River.

The award is presented to the owner, operator or builder of an outstanding individual bulk ship. Judged on operational efficiency, design innovation, safety and environmental protection, the Evans Spirit was selected as winner.

McKeil Marine

 

CSL named 2016 Bulk Ship “Operator of the Year”

11/23 - CSL has been awarded the prestigious title of 2016 Bulk Ship Operator of the Year at the International Bulk Journal (IBJ) gala dinner held in London, England.

“I am honored to accept this award on behalf of CSL’s ship and shore employees who every day help us deliver exceptional service to our customers and motivate us to always aim higher,” said Rod Jones, president and CEO of The CSL Group.

“New ideas and new technologies are propelling us forward and the IBJ award is a great validation that we are heading in the right direction, that is, the future of shipping.”

Presented to the year’s most outstanding operator of dry bulk vessels, the award recognizes recent achievements in safety, efficiency and environmental protection, as well as contributions to world trade. IBJ judges selected CSL for the company’s overall achievements and made notable mention of CSL’s industry leading sustainability efforts.

“CSL’s environmentally responsible approach, research collaborations and comprehensive reporting impressed our judges and highlight the progressive approach taken by CSL to improve business sustainability and elevate industry standards,” said Jon Culshaw, host of the IBJ gala dinner.

Every year, the IBJ Awards salute excellence and achievements by individuals and organizations involved in the worldwide maritime bulk industry.

CSL

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 23

In 1940, the CONSUMERS POWER, a.) HARRY YATES of 1910, collided with the MARITANA on the Detroit River. The MARITANA sustained $11,089.91 in damage. MARITANA was scrapped at Hamilton, Ontario, in 1947.

On 23 November 1863, BAY OF QUINTE (wooden schooner, 250 tons, built in 1853, at Bath, Ontario) was carrying 7,500 bushels of wheat to Toronto when she was driven ashore on Salmon Point on Lake Ontario and wrecked. No lives were lost.

On 23 November 1882, the schooner MORNING LIGHT (wooden schooner, 256 tons, built in 1857, at Cleveland, Ohio) was sailing from Manistee for Chicago with a load of lumber when a storm drove her aground off Claybanks, south of Stony Lake, Michigan. One crewman swam to shore, the rest were saved by a lifesaving crew, local fishermen and the tug B. W. ALDRICH. Earlier that same year, she sank near St. Helen Island in the Straits of Mackinac. She was salvaged and put back in service, but she only lasted a few months.

After discharging her cargo, the SAMUEL MATHER, launched as a.) PILOT KNOB b.) FRANK ARMSTRONG (1943-73), proceeded to DeTour, Michigan, laying up for the last time at the Pickands Mather Coal Dock on November 23, 1981. She was scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey in 1988.

In 1987, the self-unloader ROGERS CITY was towed out of Menominee, Michigan, for scrapping in Brazil.

STADACONA's sea trials were completed on November 23, 1952, and was delivered to Canada Steamship Lines the next day.

On 23 November 1872, Capt. W. B. Morley launched the propeller JARVIS LORD at Marine City, Michigan. Her dimensions were 193 feet X 33 feet X 18 feet, 1,000 tons. She was the first double decker built at Marine City. Her engine was from Wm. Cowie of Detroit.

On 23 November 1867, S. A. CLARK (wooden propeller tug, 12 tons, built in 1863, at Buffalo, New York) was in Buffalo's harbor when her boiler exploded and she sank.

November 23, 1930 - The Ann Arbor carferry WABASH grounded in Betsie Lake. She bent her rudder stock and her steering engine was broken up.

On 23 November 1853, the wooden schooner PALESTINE was bound from Kingston to Cleveland with railroad iron at about the same time as the like-laden schooner ONTONAGON. Eight miles west of Rochester, New York, both vessels ran ashore, were pounded heavily by the waves and sank. Both vessels reported erratic variations in their compasses. The cargoes were removed and ONTONAGON was pulled free on 7 December, but PALESTINE was abandoned. A similar event happened with two other iron-laden vessels a few years previously at the same place.

On 23 November 1853, the Ward Line's wooden side-wheeler HURON struck an unseen obstruction in the Saginaw River and sank. She was raised on 12 December 1853, towed to Detroit and repaired at a cost of $12,000. She was then transferred to Lake Michigan to handle the cross-lake traffic given the Ward Line by the Michigan Central Railroad. The carferry GRAND HAVEN was sold to the West India Fruit & Steamship Co., Norfolk, Virginia in 1946, and was brought down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, Louisiana for reconditioning before reaching Port Everglades and the Port of Palm Beach, Florida. She was brought back to the Lakes and locked up bound through the Welland Canal on 23 Nov 1964. She was intended for roll on/roll off carrier service to haul truck trailers laden with steel coils from Stelco's plant at Hamilton, Ont.

CSL NIAGARA a.) J. W. McGIFFIN, passed Port Huron, Michigan on 23 Nov 1999, on her way to Thunder Bay to load grain. This was her first trip to the upper lakes since the vessel was re-launched as a SeawayMax carrier in June 1999.

1901: QUITO stranded off Lorain, Ohio, and broke up in a Lake Erie storm. All on board were saved.

1902: SILVANUS J. MACY was last observed battling heavy seas in Lake Erie off Port Burwell. The coal laden, wooden steamer was lost with all hands.

1936: A fire at Portsmouth, Ontario, just west of Kingston, destroyed several idle wooden steamers including the SIMON LANGELL and PALM BAY. Their remains were towed into Lake Ontario and scuttled in 1937.

1961: AMVRAKIKOS ran aground on Pancake Shoal, Lake Superior, on its first and only visit to the Great Lakes. This World War Two vintage Liberty ship was refloated on November 26, loaded scrap steel at Toledo for Japan and was the last saltwater ship of the 1961 season to depart the St. Lawrence Seaway.

1997: AN TAI, an SD 14 cargo carrier registered in Belize, began to list and then the hull cracked at the dock in Port Klang, Malaysia. The ship sank at the wharf the next day. The vessel had visited the Great Lakes, first as a) LONDON GRENADIER in 1972 and again as b) FIRST JAY in 1979. Subsequent salvage efforts failed and the hull was cut into sections, taken out to sea, and dumped in a fish breeding grounds.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Russ Plumb, Steve Haverty, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series

 

Vessels delayed on lower lakes, Seaway due to weather

11/22 - The first snowstorm of the year, combined with gale-force winds, is still playing havoc on vessels trying to transit the Seaway from Summerstown, Ont., to the Great Lakes to the Welland Canal. Several vessels were anchored Monday either due to wind or snow causing limited-to-no visibility, or were delayed because of the weather and are now waiting their turn to unload.

Seaway: Federal Katsura, Federal Oshima

Cape Vincent area: CSL Laurentien, Erria Swan, Federal Alster, tug Victorious, CSL Welland

Lake Erie: Rt. Hon Paul J. Martin, Algosteel, tug Dylan Cooper, tug Olive L Moore, H. Lee White and Cason J Callaway

Welland Canal: Ojibway, tug Everlast

Lake Ontario: Brant, Sunda, Adfines Sea, Ocean Castle, Vitosha, Algolake

Brenda Benoit

 

Port Reports -  November 22

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived Duluth at 15:42 on Monday and headed to Midwest Energy to load. Paul R. Tregurtha arrived mid-evening and docked at Calumet to fuel and wait for the McCarthy to finish loading. BBC Mont Blanc continued unloading at Port Terminal. In Superior, Burns Harbor arrived during the evening to load iron ore pellets at BN. At the Lakehead Pipeline dock, Indiana Harbor is showing an AIS signal for the first time since November 3, 2015, when she arrived Superior for the winter of 2015-16. She has remained laid up so far this season, and is expected to shift to Midwest Energy to load coal on December 8.

Silver Bay, Minn.
Mesabi Miner departed Silver Bay late this afternoon, once again showing an Ashtabula destination.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Algoma Harvester departed with grain on Sunday afternoon. Thunder Bay, Flevogracht, Federal Elbe, Exeborg and Finnborg were docked. Federal Baltic was at anchor.

St. Marys River
Wind warnings have again sent vessels to anchor in the St. Marys River. Clustered in Potaganissing Bay just above DeTour Monday evening were Arthur M. Anderson, Philip R. Clarke, Algoma Harvester and American Century. Edgar B. Speer was on the hook off Paradise, above the locks, while Pineglen was tucked into Goulais Bay. Fivelborg was upbound in the evening and Thunder Bay was downbound. The Roen tugs Chas Asher and Stephan M. Asher were docked in the lower harbor Monday. John D. Leitch was at the Essar Export Dock.

St. Ignace, Mich.
Kaye E. Barker was anchored between St. Ignace and Mackinac Island Monday night for weather.

Gary, Ind.
Edwin H. Gott was unloading on Monday.

Indiana Harbor, Ind.
Wilfred Sykes and James R. Barker were at ArcelorMittal unloading on Monday evening. The Barker departed in the late evening.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Hon. James L. Oberstar and Algoma Enterprise were unloading Monday. Federal Sakura arrived in the evening.

Goderich, Ont. – Bruce Douglas
Radcliffe R. Latimer arrived to load on Monday evening. The saltie Ocean Castle is due at the grain elevator.

 

Alexander Henry could be coming home to Thunder Bay

11/22 - Thunder Bay, Ont. - A group of Thunder Bay residents is hoping the Alexander Henry – a decommissioned icebreaker built in Thunder Bay decades ago – will soon be back home.

The ship has been on display at the Marine Museum of the Great Lakes in Kingston for years. However, the museum no longer has the space needed to house the ship, leaving its future up in the air, with scrapping the ship or sinking it and making an artificial reef both possibilities.

However, the Lakehead Transportation Museum Society (LTMS) is hoping to step in, return the ship to Thunder Bay, and display it here, if they can find the money.

"We're budgeting for around the $250,000 mark as far as the actual tow and bringing it back," said Charlie Brown, president of the LTMS, adding that the ship itself will cost $1 to acquire.

Brown said the group is currently working to secure the necessary funding. Part of that process is appearing before Thunder Bay City Council and asking for financial support. Brown wouldn't say how much the LTMS will be asking for during its council appearance, which they aim to make before the end of the year.

He did say they'll be seeking funds from more than one source, so the council request will not be for the full $250,000.

"What we'd need to do is have the city's commitment," Brown said. "The other thing that we're going to be looking for ... is hopefully a docking facility down on the waterfront."

Brown said the LTMS hopes that the Alexander Henry, should it return to Thunder Bay, will kickstart the Lakehead Transportation Museum itself.

Brown said the Alexander Henry was a revenue source for the Kingston museum, where people paid to visit the ship. The museum also ran a bed and breakfast on the ship for a number of years, Brown said, which is another possibility for Thunder Bay.

The Alexander Henry was built in 1958 at the Port Arthur Shipyards, and commissioned in 1959. The coast guard operated the icebreaker for decades, until it was decommissioned in 1984. There was an attempt to acquire the ship for Thunder Bay then, but it was unsuccessful, Brown said.

"It's one of those iconic things," he said. "It's a great boat, it's in great shape, and we have an opportunity that I think we should seize upon."

CBC

 

The mysteries of Michigan's Cemetery Island

11/22 - Isle Royale, Mich. – More than a few kayakers who've skirted the shoreline of Isle Royale have had this experience: You're paddling through a light mist around one of Michigan's most remote places only to see the nearby Cemetery Island rise out of the water, just off the mainland.

Contained inside this small island are at least nine marked or partially-marked graves that hark back to the 1850s - an era when the nation's copper rush stretched past the northern reaches of the Upper Peninsula.

Many of the graves likely are associated with the area's copper mines. At least one was dug for an infant. And there is island lore that perhaps ties others to the 1885 loss of the steamer Algoma, the deadliest shipwreck in Lake Superior's maritime history.

Read more and view photos at this link

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 22

In 1947, the Canadian tanker BRUCE HUDSON broke down shortly after departing Port Stanley, Ont. The U.S. tanker ROCKET, Captain R. B. Robbins, managed to get a line on the HUDSON and tow her 50 miles through high seas and a snow storm to shelter behind Point Pelee. Later, the tug ATOMIC arrived on scene and towed the Hudson to Toledo for repairs.

On 22 November 1860, WABASH VALLEY (wooden propeller, 592 tons, built in 1856, at Buffalo, New York) was caught in a blizzard and gale off Muskegon, Michigan, on Lake Michigan. Her skipper thought they were off Grand Haven and as he steamed to the harbor, visibility dropped to near zero. The vessel ran onto the beach. Her momentum and the large storm waves carried her well up onto the beach where she broke in two. Her machinery was salvaged and went into the new steamer SUNBEAM.

Scrapping of SPRUCEGLEN, a.) WILLIAM K. FIELD was completed on November 22, 1986, by Lakehead Scrap Metal Co. at Thunder Bay Ontario. SPRUCEGLEN was the last Canadian coal-fired bulker.

On 22 November 1869, CREAM CITY (3-mast wooden bark, 629 tons, built in 1862, at Sheboygan, Wisconsin) was carrying wheat in a gale when she lost her way and went ashore on Drummond Island. She appeared to be only slightly damaged, but several large pumps were unable to lower the water in her hull. She was finally abandoned as a total wreck on 8 December. She was built as a "steam bark" with an engine capable of pushing her at 5 or 6 mph. After two months of constant minor disasters, this was considered an unsuccessful experiment and the engine was removed.

CITY OF MILWAUKEE was chartered to the Ann Arbor Railroad Co. and started the Frankfort, Michigan-Kewaunee, Wisconsin service for them on November 22, 1978.

November 22, 1929 - CITY OF SAGINAW 31 went out on her sea trials.

On 22 November 1860, CIRCASSIAN (wooden schooner, 135 foot, 366 tons, built in 1856, at Irving, New York) was carrying grain in a gale and blizzard on Lake Michigan when she stranded on White Shoals near Beaver Island. She sank to her decks and then broke in two. Her crew was presumed lost, but actually made it to Hog Island in the blizzard and they were not rescued from there for two weeks.

A final note from the Big Gale of 1879. On 22 November 1879, The Port Huron Times reported, "The barge DALTON is still high and dry on the beach at Point Edward."

1878: The wooden passenger and freight steamer WAUBUNO was lost with all hands, 14 crew and 10 passengers, on Georgian Bay.

1898: ARTHUR ORR went aground on Isle Royale when the steering gear failed in a severe storm. It was later released and survived until scrapping at Hamilton in 1947-1948.

1898: S.S. CURRY was leaking badly after it struck a reef off Duck Island, Lake Huron.

1906: J.H. JONES, en route from Owen Sound to Lions Head, was lost with all hands. The wooden passenger and freight steamer went down in 60 mph winds.

1907: Fire broke out aboard the wooden freighter LIZZIE MADDEN shortly after clearing Bay City for Little Current. The crew was rescued by the LANGELL BOYS. The burning hull drifted ashore on Little Charity Island in Saginaw Bay and was a total loss.

1911: JOLIET sank in the St. Clair River following a collision with the HENRY PHIPPS. It had been anchored due to fog when hit and all on board were saved. The remains were dynamited as a hazard to navigation.

1919: The wooden steamer MYRON sank off Crisp Point, Lake Superior and 17 crew were lost.

1950: The former Canada Steamship Lines canaller MAPLETON was destroyed at the Port of Suez, Egypt as b) EASTERN MED when a fire broke out while loading oil drums. The remains of the ship were scrapped.

1975: PIERSON DAUGHTERS hit bottom off North Colban Island in the St. Lawrence and had to go to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs after unloading the cargo of iron ore at Conneaut.

1988: The Dutch flag freighter POOLSTER first came through the Seaway in 1969. It suffered an engineroom fire off Kuwait as e) ATLANTIC REEFER while bound for Dubai on this date. The badly damaged ship was towed to Sharjah and then sold for scrap. It was renamed f) VOYAGER I for the trip to Gadani Beach, Pakistan, and the vessel arrived April 4, 1989, for dismantling.

1998: SPAR OPAL went aground inside the breakwall at Port Colborne due to high winds and was released by the tugs UNDAUNTED and WELLAND. The ship had also been a Seaway trader beginning in 1984 as a) LAKE SHIDAKA, in 1991 as b) CONSENSUS ATLANTIC, and in 1992 as c) FEDERAL MATANE (i). It began Great Lakes service as e) SPAR OPAL in 1997.

2000: PRINSES IRENE of the Oranje Lijn made 16 trips into the Great Lakes, with passengers and freight, from 1959 through 1963. The vessel was observed beached at Jakarta, Indonesia, as c) TANJUNG OSINA on this date and appeared to be badly rusted and burned out. The hull was later reported to have been broken up.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Russ Plumb, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  November 21

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
On Sunday, American Integrity left Duluth from Midwest Energy at 14:30. She had departed anchor in Thunder Bay late Saturday and headed to Duluth to load coal. BBC Mont Blanc continued unloading at Port Terminal.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Algoma Harvester departed with grain on Sunday afternoon. Thunder Bay, Flevogracht, Federal Elbe, Exeborg and Finnborg were docked. Federal Baltic was at anchor.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic on a busy Sunday included Paul R. Tregurtha, American Spiritm, Algoma Spirit, Kaministiqua, Burns Harbor and Stewart J. Cort. Downbound traffic included Sedna Desgagnes, Arthur M. Anderson, Baie Comeau and Joseph L. Block. American Century remained at anchor above DeTour. Lee A. Tregurtha was still anchored off Paradise in the upper river. John D. Leitch was loading at the Essar Export Dock. John B. Aird, which had been at anchor in Goulais Bay, resumed her trip late Sunday night.

St. Ignace, Mich.
All vessels that had been anchored in the area during Saturday’s rough weather resumed their trips on Sunday.

Cedarville, Mich.
Mississagi was loading stone Sunday evening.

Port Inland, Mich.
Wilfred Sykes departed Sunday evening with stone. Calumet was headed in around 8:30 p.m.

South Chicago, Ill.
Federal Ems has moved from Milwaukee to South Chicago.

Indiana Harbor, Ind.
Great Lakes Trader and Joseph H. Thompson were unloading Sunday night.

Alpena, Mich. – Ben & Chanda McClain
Calumet unloaded coal at Lafarge on Saturday morning. Gale-force winds had the Great Republic anchored off Alpena throughout the day on Sunday.

Goderich, Ont.
No vessels were loading Sunday, however two vessels – Radcliffe R. Latimer and the saltie Ocean Castle – were enroute.

Detroit, Mich.
Ken Boothe Sr./Lakes Contender and Sam Laud were on the hook in the Belle Isle anchorage Sunday, waiting for water levels to come up. The upbound Algorail was anchored below the Detroit River Light.

Toledo, Ohio
Saginaw and Alpena were in port Sunday evening.

Hamilton, Ont.
Federal Weser and Algowood were at docks on Sunday. Ardita returned to anchor after docking for supplies.

Buffalo, N.Y. – Brian W.
American Mariner was unloading Sunday night.

Seaway to Lake Erie – Brenda Benoit
The snowstorm Sunday played havoc on vessels trying to transit the Seaway into the Great Lakes. Many ships anchored from Summerstown, Ont., to as far as Toledo, Ohio, on Lake Erie, due to little-to-no visibility. Vessels anchored at Quebec Head near Wolfe Island were CSL Welland, CSL Assiniboine and the tug Victorious. At Turkey Point/Point Pelee were the tugs Salvor and Avenger IV, Rt. Hon Paul J. Martin, Algonova, Algosteel, Algoma Olympic and Algosea. Near Port Clinton were the tug Victory and H Lee White. The weather for Monday calls for the snow to continue.

 

Seaway salties renamed

11/21 - A number of saltwater vessels, each having paid visits to the Great Lakes/Seaway system, have been renamed.

HHL Nile, which last visited in 2015, is now Heemskerkgracht of the Netherlands. This ship was also known as Beluga Faculty from 2009-11, first came inland as such in 2009, and last visited as such in 2010. It returned as HHL Nile in 2011.

HHL Amazon, which last visited in 2013, is now Hemgracht of the Netherlands. This ship was known as the Beluga Fairy from 2009-11, and first came inland as such in 2010 and last visited as such in 2011. It then returned as HHL Amazon in 2012.

Leandra, which first came inland as such in 2010 on its only visit, is now Marmindoro of Antigua and Barbuda registry. This vessel held the name Leandra from 2008-14, then became Thorco Cobra. She never returned inland.

The tanker Harbour Legend, which first came inland as such in 2012 and last visited in 2013, is now Caribe Angela of Liberia. Harbour Legend carried that name from 2011-16 and was known prior to that as Clipper Legend, a name it carried from 2004-11. As Clipper Legend, the ship first came inland as such in 2006 and last visited with that name in 2011.

Kent Timber, which first came inland as such in 2006 and last visited in 2008, is now Amineh M of the Cook Islands (New Zealand). This vessel was known as Antonie Oldendorff from 1997-2005, but she never came inland as such. It was renamed to the Kent Timber, a name it held from 2005 to April 2009. The ship was then renamed Asian Grace, and it carried that name from 2009 until May 2014 but never came inland as such. It was renamed again as London Spirit and did not come inland as such.

Clipper Makiri, which last visited in 2015, is now Thorco Merle of Gibraltar. This ship was originally known as Makiri Green, a name it held from 1999 until February 2010. It first came inland as such in 2003. The ship was renamed Sloman Server and it held that name from 2010 until December of that year. It did not come inland as such, was renamed Makiri Green for the second time and held that name from 2010 until December 2012, when it was renamed Clipper Makiri. It carried that name from 2012 until March 2016 and first came inland as such in 2015 on its only visit.

Evita-K, more familiar under its previous names Rubin Eagle and Batuv-V, has been renamed U Thar of Myanmar registry. She was known originally as Rubin Eagle, a name it held from 1995 until June 2003, and first came inland as such in 1995. It held the name Antoine until December 2003. The ship did not return inland as such. It was renamed Batur-V, and carried that name from 2003 until August 2006. The ship first came inland as the Batur-V in 2004. The vessel carried the name Evita-K from 2005 until August 2015 but did not return inland as such.

Denny Dushane

 

Program to mark 50th anniversary of Daniel J. Morrell sinking

11/21 - Ashtabula, Ohio – The Ashtabula Maritime & Surface Transportation Museum will host a program Nov. 29 commemorating the lives and legacy of the 29 seaman aboard the Daniel J. Morrell that sank on Lake Huron Nov. 29, 1966.

A video tribute to Dennis Hale, the wreck’s sole survivor, who died in 2015, will be included in the program.

The event will be at the Saybrook Banquet Center, 3116 North Bend Road, Ashtabula, Ohio, staring at 6:30 p.m. Admission will be by donation ($5 museum members, $10 non-members). Tickets/Information/Reservations at (440) 997-5370.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 21

In 1934, the package freighter EDWARD L. LOOMIS, Captain Alex McKenzie, collided with the W. C. FRANZ, Captain Alex McIntyre, about 30 miles southeast of Thunder Bay Island, Lake Huron. Four crewmen on the FRANZ drowned when the lifeboat turned over while being lowered.

On 21 November 1861, ENTERPRISE (2-mast wooden scow-schooner, 64 foot, 56 tons, built in 1854, at Port Huron, Michigan) was driven ashore near Bark Shanty at the tip of Michigan's thumb on Lake Huron. The storm waves pounded her to pieces. Her outfit was salvaged a few days later.

On the evening of 21 November 1890, the scow MOLLIE (wooden scow-schooner, 83 foot, 83 gross tons, built in 1867, at Fairport, Ohio) left Ludington, Michigan, with a load of lumber. About 8:00 p.m., when she was just 25 miles off Ludington, she started to leak in heavy seas, quickly becoming waterlogged. Capt. Anderson and his two-man crew had just abandoned the vessel in the yawl when the steamer F & P M NO 4 showed up, shortly after midnight. The rough weather washed Capt. Anderson out of the yawl, but he made it back in. At last a line from the F & P M NO 4 was caught and made fast to the yawl and the crew made it to the steamer. The men had a narrow escape, for the MOLLIE was going to pieces rapidly, and there was little likelihood of the yawl surviving in the gale.

PATERSON (Hull#113) was launched November 21, 1953, at Port Arthur, Ontario, by Port Arthur Ship Building Co. Ltd.

In 1924, MERTON E. FARR slammed into the Interstate Bridge that linked Superior, Wisconsin, with Duluth, Minnesota, causing extensive damage to the bridge. The bridge span fell into the water but the FARR received only minor damage to her bow.

On 21 November 1869, the ALLIANCE (wooden passenger sidewheeler, 87 foot, 197 gross tons, built in 1857, at Buffalo, New York) slipped her moorings at Lower Black Rock in the Niagara River and went over the falls. She had been laid up since the spring of 1869.

November 21, 1906 - The PERE MARQUETTE 17 encountered one of the worst storms in many years while westbound for the Wisconsin Central slip in Manitowoc. Wisconsin. She made port safely, but the wind was so high that she could not hold her course up the river without assistance. The tug ARCTIC assisted, and as they were proceeding through the 10th Street Bridge, a gust of wind from the south drove the ferry and tug against the north pilings of the 10th Street Bridge. The ARCTIC, pinned between the ferry and the bridge, was not damaged, but she crushed the hull of a fishing tug moored there, sinking her, and inflicted damage of a few hundred dollars to the bridge.

November 21, 1923 - Arthur Stoops, the lookout on the ANN ARBOR NO 6, was drowned while stepping from the apron onto the knuckle to cast off the headline.

On the night of 21 November 1870, C.W. ARMSTRONG (wooden propeller steam tug, 57 foot, 33 tons, built in 1856, at Albany, New York) burned at her dock at Bay City, Michigan. No lives were lost.

More incidents from the Big Gale of 1879. On 21 November 1879, The Port Huron Times reported "The schooner MERCURY is ashore at Pentwater. The schooner LUCKY is high and dry at Manistee; the schooner WAUBASHENE is on the beach east of Port Colborne. The schooner SUMATRA is on the beach at Cleveland; the large river tug J P Clark capsized and sunk at Belle Isle in the Detroit River on Wednesday [19 Nov.] and sank in 15 minutes. One drowned. The schooner PINTO of Oakville, Ontario, stone laden, went down in 30 feet of water about one mile down from Oakville. At Sand beach the barge PRAIRIE STATE is rapidly going to pieces.

1883: The boiler exploded aboard the salvage tug ERIE BELLE while working to free the schooner J.N. CARTER in the Kincardine area of Lake Huron. The former was wrecked but the boiler is still on what has become known as “Old Boiler Beach”.

1902: BANNOCKBURN disappeared on Lake Superior without a trace. Its final resting place has never been found. 1906: The wooden steamer RESOLUTE anchored off the Eastern Gap at Toronto to ride out a storm but the wind switched battering the vessel until it sank. The hull was salvaged in October 1907 and rebuilt as the JOHN ROLPH.

1936: HIBOU was lost in Owen Sound Bay within two miles of the dock and seven perished. The hull was refloated in 1942.

1941: HENRY C. DARYAW, requisitioned for war and on its delivery voyage stranded on rocks in the Brockville Narrows, rolled over and slid off into deep water and sank. It was to have been used on the east coast as a tender for ocean ships. One life was lost.

1957: MONTFAUCON was built at Wyandotte, MI in 1920 and later operated on the Great Lakes as b) E.M. BUNCE. It was at Naples, Italy, as g) ANNA MARIA IEVOLI when an internal explosion caused damage that led to the ship being scrapped.

1959: MOSES GAY was built at Duluth in 1943. It was severely damaged as e) HEANGURA in a storm at Ostra Kvarken, Sweden, and went aground. While salvaged, the ship was tied up at Turku, Finland, and sold for scrap in January 1960.

1961: The British freighter RAPALLO was anchored at Istanbul, Turkey, when struck and damaged by two different freighters, both out of control due to high winds. The vessel was repaired and began Seaway trading in 1963 for the Ellerman Wilson Line.

1961: The former Paterson canaller GANANDOC left the Great Lakes as b) SUGARLAND in October 1961. It had a brief career in the south and went aground at Arcas Reef, Bay of Campeche, while inbound for Coatzacoalcos, Mexico with 2,877 tons of phosphoric rock from Tampa. The ship was abandoned on November 26 as a total loss.

1962: BRO, a Norwegian pre-Seaway visitor as early as 1953, was abandoned by the crew after taking a severe list en route from Seville, Spain, to Rotterdam, Netherlands. The ship was taken in tow, reached Lisbon, Portugal, and was repaired.

1982: CAPTAIN PANAGOS D.P. went aground at Farasan Island in the Red Sea en route from Trois Rivieres, QC to Bandar Abbas, Iran. Fire broke out in the engine room and the ship was gutted. The hull was refloated and was noted lying off Qatar “derelict” in December 1986 and finally scrapped at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, as c) JENNY in 1988. The vessel first came through the Seaway as PANAGOS D. PATERAS in 1977 and returned as CAPTAIN PANAGOS D.P. in 1980.

1994: The Russian freighter FASTOV, upbound for Green Bay with pulpwood on its first trip to the Great Lakes, lost power and struck the Shell dock at Corunna, ON, resulting in considerable damage to the structure. The vessel returned inland as d) EVANGELOS in 1999 and was scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey, as f) JONA in 2011.

2007: The engine aboard the Lake Erie passenger ship JIIMAAN became disabled after the vessel snagged a fish net off Kingsville and the vessel grounded briefly.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Weather brings much of lakes traffic to a standstill

11/20 - There weren’t many vessels moving Saturday on the Great Lakes, as a huge winter storm sent much of the fleet to anchor and caused other mariners to remain safely in port.

According the National Weather Service, waves were expected to reach 19-20 feet Saturday on Lake Superior between Houghton and Marquette. Waves could reach 13 feet on the east shore of Lake Michigan,

The night the Edmund Fitzgerald sank, the waves were 25 to 35 feet high.

"Our biggest concern is the dangerous conditions of Lake Superior," USCG Sector Sault Ste. Marie chief of response, Carolyn Moberley, said Saturday. "The conditions on the Great Lakes can change very quickly and can become very dangerous."

Many of the freighters were anchored in safe spots like Thunder Bay, the St. Marys River or between St. Ignace and Mackinac Island.

At Thunder Bay, CSL Niagara, Federal Baltic, Finnborg and Thunder Bay were at anchor, while Exeborg, Flevogracht, Federal Bering and Puffin were docked, either loading or waiting for weather. By late evening Saturday, Baie Comeau had departed, heading down the lake. It appeared on AIS like Arthur M. Anderson was leaving sheltered waters as well. Joseph L. Block, American Integrity, Philip R. Clarke and Edwin H. Gott were following the north shore between Two Harbors and Grand Marais, Minn. Mesabi Miner spent Friday and Saturday deep in the lee of the Keweenaw Peninsula.

Only one vessel, the upbound saltie Federal Leda, was braving conditions mid-Lake Superior Saturday.

On the St. Marys River, several vessels were at anchor in Potagannissing Bay above DeTour Saturday, where winds were reported gusting to 50 mph, waiting for weather. They included Hon. James L. Oberstar, American Spirit, American Century, Mississagi and Burns Harbor. Lee A. Tregurtha was stopped in the upper river. Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and John B. Aird were anchored in Goulais Bay, on the Canadian side above the locks. Sedna Desgagnes, which left Thunder Bay downbound Friday, was anchored Saturday off Paradise in the lee of Whitefish Point.

At St. Ignace, Calumet, Edwin H. Gott, Cuyahoga, Algoma Enterprise and James R. Barker were on the hook Saturday evening, as were the tugs Michigan, Anglian Lady and Rebecca Lynn, with their barges.

In Detroit, Ken Boothe Sr./Lakes Contender dropped the hook Saturday afternoon, likely due to wind and water levels.

Lake Erie was also feeling the effects of the storm. A small flotilla of vessels sought shelter in the lee of Point Pelee, including Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin, Algosteel, Frontenac, Lubie, Algoma Olympic, Ojibway and the tugs Salvor and Avenger IV, both likely with barges. Westerly winds gusting to over 40 mph had push the water from the western basin of Lake Erie. Water levels at Gibraltar were plus 3 inches, a change of minus 32 inches in 24 hours.

 

Port Reports -  November 20

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Philip R. Clarke departed Duluth from CN at 11:15. The heavy weather prevented any other ships from arriving, leaving only BBC Mont Blanc at Port Terminal discharging general cargo.

Cedarville, Mich.
Wilfred Sykes was in port Saturday to load limestone.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Federal Ems was remained in port Saturday night.

Goderich, Ont.
No vessels were loading Saturday, however two vessels – Radcliffe R. Latimer and the saltie Ocean Castle – were enroute. ETAs are not available due to weather.

Toledo, Ohio
Saginaw was upriver loading grain on Saturday.

Buffalo, N.Y. – Brian W.
American Mariner was unloading grain at General Mills Saturday. By the looks of it, she arrived in the entrance channel around 1:25 a.m. Saturday.

Oswego, N.Y. – Ned Goebricher
Saturday the tug Cheyenne and barge Witte 2305 transited Lake Ontario for the NYS Barge Canal.

Seaway – Ron Beaupre
With fog delaying ships, traffic backed up a bit, and Saturday morning Iroquois Lock had 20 ships due over the next 30 hours.

 

Updates -  November 20

News Photo Gallery

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 20

In 1948, the ROBERT HOBSON was blown against the Duluth-Superior breakwall as she tried to enter the harbor during a 68-mph gale. Damage to the vessel was kept to a minimum when Captain John Mc Nellis ordered the seacocks opened to settle the HOBSON on a sandbar. Renamed b.) OUTARDE in 1975, she was scrapped at Port Colborne, Ontario in 1985.

On 20 November 1854, BURLINGTON (2-mast wooden brig, 80 foot, 117 tons, built in 1842, at Cleveland, Ohio) was driven hard aground near Port Bruce, Ontario, on Lake Huron while trying to assist the stranded Canadian bark GLOBE.

SAGINAW was christened at the Government Dock in Sarnia, Ontario, in 1999. Bonnie Bravener and Wendy Siddall broke the traditional bottle of champagne adding the second vessel to Lower Lakes Towing's fleet. The company then opened the vessel for tours to all those in the large crowd that had gathered to witness the event. She was built in 1953 as a.) JOHN J. BOLAND.

Hall Corporation of Canada's EAGLESCLIFFE HALL was launched in 1956, at Grangemouth, Scotland. Sold off the lakes, renamed b.) EAGLESCLIFFE in 1974, she sank two miles east of Galveston, Texas, on February 9, 1983.

The ferry WOLFE ISLANDER was christened on November 20, 1946, at Marysville, Wolfe Island. The new ferry was the unfinished OTTAWA MAYBROOK which was built to serve the war effort in the south Pacific Ocean. She replaced two landing barges which were pressed quickly into service following the condemned steamer WOLFE ISLANDER, a.) TOM FAWCETT of 1904, which had served the community for 42 years. Officially christened WOLFE ISLANDER by Mrs. Sarah Russell, it took five tries before the champagne bottle finally broke on her port side.

Pittsburgh Steamship's steamer RALPH H. WATSON (Hull#285) was launched in 1937, at River Rouge, Michigan, by Great Lakes Engineering Works.

On 20 November 1872, the side wheel steamer W. J .SPICER was finally laid up and the crew dismissed. She had served for many years as the Grand Trunk ferry at Fort Gratiot on the St. Clair River.

On 20 November 1880, BAY CITY (wooden barge, 199 foot, 480 tons, built in 1852, at Trenton, Michigan as the sidewheeler FOREST CITY) was carrying coal when she was cast adrift east of Erie, Pennsylvania by the steamer JAMES P. DONALDSON in a storm. She was driven ashore and wrecked. Her crew was saved by the U.S. Lifesaving Service using breeches' buoy. November 20, 1898. ANN ARBOR #3 left Cleveland, Ohio for Frankfort, Michigan, on her maiden voyage.

November 20, 1924 - Pere Marquette fleet engineer Finlay MacLaren died after 42 years with the railroad. He was succeeded by his brother Robert until Leland H. Kent was named fleet engineer in 1925.

On 20 Nov. 1871, the schooner E. B. ALLEN was sailing from Chicago to Buffalo with a load of corn when she crossed the bow of the bark NEWSBOY about six miles off the Thunder Bay Light on Lake Huron. The NEWSBOY slammed her bow deep into the schooner's hull amidships and the ALLEN sank in about 30 minutes. The crew escaped in the yawl. The NEWSBOY was badly damaged but did not sink.

On 20 Nov. 1999, the Bermuda-flag container ship CANMAR TRIUMPH went aground on the St. Lawrence River off Varennes about 15 kilometers downstream from Montreal. She was the third vessel to run aground in the St. Lawrence River that autumn. The Canadian Coast Guard reported that she was having engine problems and the CBC News reported that the vessel's rudder was damaged in the grounding.

On Saturday morning, 20 Nov. 1999, Marinette Marine Corporation of Marinette, Wisconsin, launched the 175-foot Coast Guard Cutter HENRY BLAKE. The BLAKE was one of the "Keeper" Class Coastal Class Buoy Tenders. Each ship in the "Keeper" class is named after a famous American lighthouse keeper. 1917: JOHAN MJELDE, built at Cleveland in 1916, was sailing as b) STORO when captured by the German submarine U-151 near the Azores and, after 22 tons of copper were removed, the ship was scuttled on November 26.

1920: J.H. SHEADLE ran aground on the rocks at Marquette when the steering failed while backing from the dock. The ship was badly damaged. It last sailed in 1979 as e) PIERSON INDEPENDENT.

1943: The former LAKE FINNEY, later a Pre-Seaway trader in the 1930s as SANTA EULALIA, was torpedoed and sunk by British forces as the enemy ship c) POLCEVERA off Carlovassi, Italy. 1966: The Liberty ship MOUNT EVANS made two trips through the Seaway in 1961. It stranded off Mapingil, Philippines as h) EASTERN ARGO on this date in 1966. The hull was refloated with damage and then towed to Taiwan for scrapping in 1967.

1990: GINA, a Lebanese freighter, began leaking at Varna, Bulgaria. The ship was later taken to Piraeus, Greece, and laid up. The superstructure was removed and installed on a fire damaged vessel while the hull was towed to Aliaga, Turkey, in October 1991 and dismantled. GINA had been a Great Lakes trader as a) MARCOSSA-I in 1972

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Brian Johnson, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Pilot Boat Huron Spirit Arrives in the Great Lakes

11/19 - On Thursday, Lakes Pilots Association’s new pilot boat Huron Spirit entered the Great Lakes at Oswego, NY and overnighted in Rochester, NY. She departed Rochester early Friday morning and arrived at the Welland Canal at 8 AM. There was very little traffic in the canal and they cleared Port Colborne piers 6 hours later. With gales posted on Lake Erie, the Huron Spirit found shelter at Erie Yacht Club in Erie, PA to await better weather before continuing to its permanent homeport of Port Huron, MI.

The delivery crew departed Somerset, MA on the 13th of November. They entered the Erie Canal at Waterford, NY November 15th and made stops in St. Johnsville and Brewerton, NY. Gladding-Hearn Shipyard in Somerset, MA worked steadily to get the boat ready to sail since its launching November 8th so that the delivery crew could beat the closing of the Erie Canal on November 20. The delivery crew until now has enjoyed unseasonably warm temperatures throughout the trip.

Huron Spirit has performed superbly so far without any malfunctions. The only thing that has broken down was the coffee pot which shorted out when brewing coffee in heavy wave action much to the crew’s disappointment. The boat has a maximum speed of 26 knots, cruises at 22 knots and is fitted out with all the latest in marine technology and systems for safe pilot changes in open waters and heavy seas.

To view photos and videos of the delivery trip, log onto Flickr.com and type Huron Spirit. The vessel can also be followed when underway by any AIS tracking website.

Lakes Pilots Association

 

Vessels seek shelter as first big November gale sweeps in

11/19 - The gales of November have arrived on the Great Lakes. Waves on Lake Superior are forecast to reach 22-33 feet on Lake Superior between 1 and 4 a.m. Saturday. Northerly winds gusting in excess of 50 mph were reported Friday in Duluth, with sustained winds in excess of 30 mph.

“The combination of gusty winds and snow will create near white-out conditions at times Saturday afternoon and evening, especially in lake-effect areas off Lake Michigan and Lake Superior,” the National Weather Service said in a statement on its website.

On Friday evening, vessels were hugging the north shore of Lake Superior (American Century, Edgar B. Speer and Joyce L. VanEnkevort/Great Lakes Trader), or at anchor. Mesabi Miner remained tucked in off Pequaming, Mich., at the bottom end of the Keweenaw Peninsula. Pineglen dropped the hook in Goulais Bay on the Canadian side of the upper St. Marys River. James R. Barker, the tugs Anglian Lady and Rebecca Lynn with their barges, and Algoma Enterprise were at anchor near St. Ignace Friday night.

In Marquette, the NWS forecast called for north to northwest winds gusting as high as 55 to 65 mph into Saturday afternoon, with some potential for wind gusts over 70 mph between Marquette and Shot Point Saturday morning. Wind gusts as high as 45 mph will continue into Saturday evening..

The NWS in Grand Rapids also issued gale warnings from 1 p.m. Friday till 5 a.m. Sunday from South Haven to Grand Haven, Mich. By Friday afternoon, winds will increase to 35 knots and waves on Lake Michigan could be over 10 feet Friday into Saturday.

The thumb area of Michigan is also in for severe weather. Port Hope, off the coast of Lake Huron, will see ongoing rain and snowfall. Waves will be up to 12 feet on Saturday night and could possibly hit 16 feet on Sunday. A gale warning is in effect from 1 a.m. Saturday to 4 a.m. Monday.

 

Yankcanuck’s career comes to a close as vessel arrives Friday at Purvis scrapyard

11/19 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. – Purvis Marine’s long-idle crane vessel Yankcanuck made her final voyage through the Soo Locks Friday around 8 a.m. She was towed from her lay-up berth at the Purvis Dock in the lower harbor on the Canadian side to scrapping facilities above the locks by the Purvis tugs W.I. Scott Purvis and Adanac III. She will be dismantled in the coming months.

The tow was not a surprise. In recent weeks, large openings had been cut in her superstructure so her accommodations could be gutted and equipment removed.

Yankcanuck was built in 1963 at Collingwood Shipyards for Capt. Frank “Skipper” Manzzutti’s Sault, Ont.-based Yankcanuck Steamship Co., and was the second vessel to bear the name. The 1945 wedding between Eleanor Louise Cox (an American, or “Yank”) and Capt. Frank Manzzutti (a Canadian, or “Canuck”) was the genesis for the name.

The vessel spent much of her early years shuttling steel coils from Algoma Steel to the lower lakes, and had a reputation of being one of the first boats out and the last boats in each season. She last sailed in 2008, and had been for sale for several years, however there were no takers. Fuel consumption and crew size likely contributed to her demise.

 

Port Huron’s new pilot boat passes through Welland Canal in route to new home

11/19 - Port Huron, Mich. – The pilot boat Huron Spirit locked through the Welland Canal on Friday on her way to her new home in Port Huron, Mich. They were expected to lay over in Erie, Pa., for weather Friday night. The boat cleared the Erie Canal Thursday at Oswego, N.Y., and spent the night in Rochester, N.Y.

Huron Spirit will be operated by the Lakes Pilots Association, a private company that provides piloting services to foreign vessels entering the lakes from the ocean.

Designed by C. Raymond Hunt & Associates and built by Gladding-Hearn in Somerset, Mass., the all-aluminum boat measures 52.5 feet overall, with a 16.6-foot beam and 4.75-foot draft. It has a top speed of 25 knots and is powered by twin Cummins QSM11 diesel engines.

A story published in the Port Huron Times Herald earlier this year said the new boat will replace the Huron Belle in Port Huron, which was built in 1979. Huron Belle will be moved to Detroit and replace the Huron Maid, which was not built for heavy seas.

 

Port Reports -  November 19

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
BBC Mont Blanc arrived Duluth at 00:32 on Friday, and backed into Port Terminal to discharge general cargo. Philip R. Clarke shifted from Hallett #5 to CN to load iron ore pellets after discharging limestone. American Integrity, which was expected to arrive on Friday, was at anchor in Thunder Bay waiting out the heavy weather on Lake Superior and isn't expected to arrive until Saturday.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Baie Comeau, Exeborg, Flevogracht, Federal Bering, Algoma Harvester and Puffin were at various docks on Friday afternoon, either loading or loaded and waiting on weather to leave. Sedna Desgagnes departed in the afternoon for Montreal. Federal Baltic, CSL Niagara, Finnborg and American Integrity were at anchor, the latter for weather.

St. Marys River
Thunder Bay and Lee A. Tregurtha were upbound Friday, as was Mississagi, which went to Essar Steel. As night fell, Federal Elbe and Walter J. McCarthy Jr. were approaching DeTour upbound. Thunder Bay and tug Victory / barge James L. Kuber were downbound in the evening. Hon. James L. Oberstar was anchored awaiting weather in Pot Bay, above DeTour.

Cedarville, Mich.
Wilfred Sykes was expected Friday around 9 p.m.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Federal Ems was in port Friday night.

Indiana Harbor, Ind.
Stewart J. Cort was unloading Friday evening.

Goderich, Ont.
Algoway departed with a load of salt for Parry Sound Friday mid-evening.

Toledo, Ohio
Saginaw was inbound Friday evening. Manitowoc was also in port.

 

Seaway announces closing dates

11/19 - Closing dates for the St. Lawrence Seaway have been announced, and are as follows.

Montreal-Lake Ontario Section The corporations have decided to waive the operational surcharges on December 21, 22, 23 and 24. Any transit of the Montreal Lake Ontario section of the Seaway after 23:59 hours, December 24, if permitted, will be subject to prior written agreement. Irrespective of operating conditions, all vessels must be clear of the Montreal-Lake Ontario section at 12:00 hours on December 31.

Welland Canal The Welland Canal will remain open until 23:59 hours on December 26. Any transits of the Welland Canal after 23:59 hours, December 26, if permitted, will be subject to prior written agreement. Irrespective of operating conditions, all vessels must be clear of the Welland Canal at 12:00 hours December 31.

Sault Ste. Marie Locks and Canal (United States) Closing of the Sault Ste. Marie locks (U.S.A.) is scheduled for January 15, 2017.

Ports East of Montreal Vessel owners and operators are advised that there are a number of ports east of the Seaway (St. Lambert Lock) on the St. Lawrence River that remain open to navigation.

Mariners are reminded that there is always a possibility that severe climatic conditions may occur during the closing period. Should that happen, there is a chance the dates outlined above may change.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 19

On this day in 1939, in a 24-hour-period, there were 132 transits of the Soo Locks. There were 71 upbound passages and 61 downbound passages.

On this day in 1952, Mrs. Ernest T. Weir smashed a bottle of champagne against the hull of the largest freighter built on the Great Lakes and the 690-foot ERNEST T. WEIR slid down the ways at the Lorain yard of American Ship Building Company. The new vessel had a crew of 38 under the command of Captain W. Ross Maitland and Chief Engineer C. F. Hoffman.

On 19 November 1897, NAHANT (wooden propeller freighter, 213 foot, 1,204 gross tons, built in 1873, at Detroit, Michigan) caught fire while docked near Escanaba, Michigan. Firefighters were hampered by sub-zero temperatures, and she burned to a total loss. The fire jumped to the dock and did $300,000 worth of damage. Two of the crew were burned to death. The wreckage of the vessel was still visible from the Escanaba lighthouse 100 years later.

American Steamship's SAM LAUD (Hull#712) was launched on this date in 1974 at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.

The keel for JOHN T. HUTCHINSON (Hull#1010) was laid November 19, 1942, at Cleveland, Ohio for the U.S. Maritime Commission.

The Kinsman Transit Co.'s steamer MERLE M. McCURDY was laid up for the last time at Buffalo, New York, on November 19, 1985. She was scrapped at Port Colborne, Ontario, in 1988.

On 19 November 1842, the wooden schooner BRANDYWINE was carrying flour in a storm on Lake Erie when she capsized and then drifted to the beach near Barcelona, New York. One passenger's body was found in the cabin, but the entire crew of 6 was lost.

More incidents from the terrible storm swept the Lakes in mid-November 1886. On 18-19 November of that year, The Port Huron Times listed the vessels that were known to have foundered in that storm. Here is the list of vessels that foundered as it appeared on 19 November 1886. "The barge EMERALD near Kewaunee, 5 lost. The barge F M DICKINSON near Kewaunee, 3 lost. Two unknown schooners (one supposed to be the HELEN) near Port Sherman. One unknown schooner near Hog Island Reef. The barge NORTH STAR near East Tawas, the fate of the crew is unknown." The list then continues with vessels ashore. "The barge WALLACE and consort on Choclay Beach, east of Marquette. The schooner SOUTH HAVEN near Pt. Sherman. The schooner MARY near Blenheim, Ontario. The schooner PATHFINDER near Two Rivers, the cargo and vessel are a total loss. The schooner CUYAHOGA and two scows in North Bay. The schooner P S MARSH and an unknown schooner at St. Ignace. The schooner HARVEY BISSELL near Alpena. The propeller CITY OF NEW YORK near Cheboygan. The schooner KOLFAGE near Goderich, Ontario has broken up. The propeller NASHUA on Grass Island, Green Bay. The barge BISSELL near Kewaunee. The schooner GOLDEN below China Beach. The propeller BELLE CROSS and barges across from China Beach. The schooner FLORIDA on Marquette Beach is a total loss. And the barges BUCKOUT, MC DOUGALL, BAKER, GOLDEN HARVEST near East Tawas.

The schooner HATTIE JOHNSTON sailed from Milwaukee loaded with 26,000 bushels of wheat on the night of 19 November 1879, and then a severe gale swept Lake Michigan. After two weeks, she was presumed lost with all hands. Aboard were Capt. D. D. Prouty, his wife and 8 crewmen.

On 19 Nov 1886, the steamer MANISTIQUE was towing the schooner-barges MARINETTE and MENEKAUNEE, all loaded with lumber, in a NW gale on Lake Michigan. The gale lasted three days. The barges broke loose after a long fight against the elements and both were wrecked near Frankfort, Michigan. Six of the seven aboard the MARINETTE were lost including the woman cook and her 13-year old daughter. MENEKAUNEE broke up before the Lifesaving Service could get to her and all seven aboard died. When the Lifesaving Service arrived on the beach, they found a jumbled mass of lumber and gear and the ship's dog keeping watch over the dead bodies. The dog also died soon after the Lifesaving crew arrived.

EMPIRE MALDON (steel tanker, 343 foot, 3,734 gross tons) was launched on 19 November 1945, by Sir James Laing & Sons, Ltd., at Sunderland, United Kingdom for the British Ministry of War Transport She was sold to Imperial Oil Co. of Canada in 1946, and renamed IMPERIAL HALIFAX and served on the Maritime Provinces-East Coast trade. In 1969, she was purchased by Johnstone Shipping, Ltd., of Toronto and served on the Great Lakes. She lasted until 1977, when she was scrapped by United Metals, Ltd. in Hamilton, Ontario.

On Friday morning, 19 Nov 1999, shortly after leaving the ADM dock in Windsor, the salty AVDEEVKA lost power in the Fighting Island Channel of the Detroit River. The main engine on the vessel quit while she was abreast of Grassy Island and she began drifting downstream. The stern anchor was dropped and then the port side bow anchor. She began swinging towards the middle of the channel with her stern outside the channel when the main engine was restarted and she headed back upstream for the Belle Isle anchorage. Once in the anchorage a team from the U.S. Coast Guard boarded the vessel to investigate. She was released the next day. It is reported that the vessel lost power due to main fuel valve being left closed after routine maintenance during her stay at the ADM dock.

1904: PHILIP MINCH caught fire 8 miles off Marblehead, Ohio, and sank in the navigation channel. All on board got off safely and rowed to Sandusky in the lifeboat. The remains were dynamited in 1906.

1914: C.F. CURTIS foundered in Lake Superior, 7 miles east of Grand Marais, with the loss of 14 lives. The towing barges ANNIE PETERSON and SHELDON E. MARVIN also went down after the trio ran into high winds and snow.

1956: The year old West German freighter WOLFGANG RUSS was beached in the St. Lawrence near Ile d'Orleans after a collision with the Cunard Line vessel ASIA. The former was inbound for Sorel and had to lightered and taken to Lauzon for repairs to the large hole in the side of the hull. The vessel began Great Lakes visits with the opening of the Seaway in 1959 and made 28 inland trips to the end of 1967. It arrived off Gadani Beach, Pakistan, for scrapping as b) KOTRONAS BEACH on Feb. 4, 1980.

1977: The Canada Steamship Lines self-unloader FRONTENAC grounded off Grassy Island in the St. Lawrence and about 5,000 tons of ore had to be lightered to the SAGUENAY to float free.

1979: The Liberian freighter DANILA was damaged when it struck the west pier while inbound at Port Weller in fog. The vessel first visited the Seaway as a) MAERSK CAPTAIN in 1976 and was back as b) DANILA in 1979. The ship was scrapped at Alang, India, as d) JAY BHAVANI in 1991-1992.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Vessels seeking sheltered routes on Lake Superior’s north shore

11/18 - In anticipation of high winds and waves Friday, several vessels were hugging the north shore of Lake Superior Thursday evening, among them Arthur M. Anderson, Great Lakes Traver / Joyce L. VanEnkevort and Edwin H. Gott, all eastbound. The westbound Mesabi Miner was tucked in off Pequaming, Mich., at the bottom of the Keweenaw Peninsula.

 

New Fednav vessels on, or heading for, Great Lakes

11/18 - Federal Clyde (IMO9671072 – hull # Oshima 10744) departed Hamilton Wednesday evening for Cleveland. Her sister ship, Federal Columbia, (IMO 9671084 – hull # Oshima 10745) is also headed for the Great Lakes on her maiden voyage. Her last position report was on Tuesday, when she was west of the Turks and Caicos Islands bound for Montreal before entering the Great Lakes.

Barry Andersen

 

Bunkering tanker Arca sold

11/18 - The bunkering tanker Arca’s Canadian registry was closed on Oct. 17, as she has been sold to Mexican interests. The vessel is currently at Sorel-Tracy, where she has been since June, but she is expected to leave soon. Arca was built at Port Weller in 1963 as Imperial Lachine, along with sister Imperial Verdun.

Rene Beauchamp

 

Port Reports -  November 18

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Great Lakes Trader/Joyce L. Van Enkevort departed Duluth Thursday at 09:41 with iron ore from CN. Philip R. Clarke arrived at 20:30 with limestone for Hallett #5. In Superior, American Century, which arrived late Wednesday to load ore at BN, departed at 16:34.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
BBC Mont Blanc departed Thursday afternoon, headed for Duluth. Federal Bering, Puffin, Algoma Harvester and Baie Comeau were loading. Sedna Desgagnes looked to have left the anchorage and was headed in to load Thursday evening. Federal Baltic and Finnborg remained at anchor. Flevogracht, CSL Niagara and Exeborg were inbound at mid-evening.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic Thursday included Kaye E. Barker, Ojibway and, after dark, Lubie, Frontenac and James R. Barker. Pineglen was upbound in the evening. John B. Aird remained at the Essar export dock.

Cedarville, Mich. – Denny Dushane
Cuyahoga was expected Thursday in the early evening. Due in Saturday is the Wilfred Sykes in the mid-afternoon and, following the Sykes, there is nothing due until November 23 when Arthur M. Anderson is due in the late afternoon. All times are subject to change due to weather.

Port Inland, Mich. – Denny Dushane
There were no vessels loading Thursday, and there are none expected Friday. For Saturday, three vessels are expected, with the first being Kaye E. Barker in the early morning, followed by Mississagi in the late afternoon to early evening. Calumet is also due in on Saturday in the early evening to load. There is nothing due for Sunday. Due Monday is the Joseph H. Thompson in the early morning. All times are subject to change due to weather.

Muskegon, Mich.
Calumet loaded coal from the now-closed power plant on Thursday afternoon. The coal will go to Alpena.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Federal Ems was headed in on Thursday late afternoon.

Tobermory, Ont.
Algoway unloaded salt Thursday.

Stoneport, Mich. – Denny Dushane
Herbert C. Jackson loaded Thursday and was due to depart around 8 p.m. Due Friday is the Cason J. Callaway during the early morning. For Saturday, Great Republic is expected in the late morning. Due Sunday is Cason J. Callaway again in the late evening. There are no vessels due next Monday-Wednesday. All times are subject to change due to weather.

Calcite, Mich. – Denny Dushane
There were no vessels loading on Thursday and none are expected to arrive until Sunday when Hon. James L. Oberstar is due to load during the early evening at the South Dock. There are no vessels scheduled Monday, November 21. Due Tuesday, November 22 are two vessels in the early morning, the Philip R. Clarke for the South Dock and the Great Republic for the North Dock. Friday is also the 58th anniversary of the sinking of the Carl D. Bradley, with memorial ceremonies to be held to commemorate the sinking and the lost crew of the Bradley, many of whom were from the Rogers City area. All times are subject to change due to weather.

Toledo, Ohio – Denny Dushane
Two vessels were expected at the CSX Coal Dock to load Thursday. Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin was due first during the late morning, followed in the early afternoon by the Algowood. Also due at CSX is Algoma Olympic on Friday in the late evening. Due at the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock is Cuyahoga on November 26 in the early morning. Lee A. Tregurtha was expected at the Torco Dock to unload iron ore pellets on Thursday during the early morning. Also due at Torco are the barge James L. Kuber and tug Victory on November 22 in the early morning. All times are subject to change due to weather. Vessels in port at the time of this report included the tug Olive L. Moore and barge Lewis J. Kuber, which was undergoing repairs, the G-tug Mississippi and, further up river, Cedarglen and Algoma Discovery, each loading grain.

Lorain, Ohio – Phil Leon
Hon. James L. Oberstar departed Thursday at noon. Joseph H. Thompson left Wednesday at 13:20.

Buffalo, N.Y. – Brian W.
Karen Andrie and barge Endeavor were inbound Thursday morning. Algosteel departed around midnight Thursday.

 

Canadian Coast Guard facing icebreaker shortage

11/18 - Ottawa, Ont. – The Canadian Coast Guard is looking at ways to deal with a looming shortage of icebreakers as its aging fleet faces a mounting threat of frequent mechanical breakdowns.

The federal government on Thursday asked industry to begin drawing up options for providing icebreaking services, including the potential cost and availability, should they be required.

The request comes days after one of the coast guard's existing ships was taken out of service for what officials described as an "engineering challenge," which they predicted will become more common in the coming years.

"Aging ships come with a greater risk of breakdowns and increased requirements for unplanned maintenance," said Chris Henderson, the coast guard's director general of national strategies. "This means we may face potential gaps in icebreaking services over the next five years."

The coast guard says it may need as many as five extra icebreakers at various times over the next few years as the current fleet goes through repairs and upgrades and a new polar icebreaker is built.

That polar icebreaker, Canadian Coast Guard Ship John G. Diefenbaker, was supposed to be finished next year, at which point the government would retire the 47-year-old CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent. But a scheduling conflict at the Vancouver shipyard responsible for building the $1.3-billion Diefenbaker means it won't be ready until the early 2020s and so the St-Laurent is being kept in the water.

The federal government has not started moving to replace any of the coast guard's other icebreakers, even though nearly all of them are over 30 years old and some are nearly 40. "We're dealing with an aging fleet that's going to need a lot of tender loving care," Henderson said.

Officials blamed increased demand caused by changing ice conditions and activity in the Arctic for their search for alternative icebreaking services for up to 20 years, and not bad planning.

"I think this is, from the coast guard's perspective, prudent planning so that we don't end up in a situation where we don't have sufficient icebreaking capability," Henderson said. "We're doing exactly what we feel is necessary to find out from industry how they can help fill gaps that were previously unforeseen."

Officials said they are also looking to lease two tugboats to respond to accidents and other emergencies, as part of the Liberal government's recent commitment to stronger ocean protection.

Lisa Campbell, who oversees military and marine projects at Public Procurement, said the government would lease the tugboats for about five years. At the end of that period, it would look at how much they were used and decide whether to keep leasing the vessels or buy new ones.

Niagara This Week

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 18

On 18 November 1869, EQUATOR (wooden propeller package freighter, 184 foot, 621 tons, built in 1857, at Buffalo, New York) was trying to pull the schooner SOUTHWEST off a reef near North Manitou Island on Lake Michigan. A storm swept in and EQUATOR foundered in the relatively shallow water. She was thought to be unsalvageable but was re-floated in 1870. Her hull was extensively rebuilt and became the barge ELDORADO in 1871, while her engine was used in the tug BISMARCK.

The CARL D. BRADLEY was lost in a violent storm on Lake Michigan on November 18, 1958.

The CANADIAN OLYMPIC's sea trials were conducted on 18 November 1976. Her maiden voyage was on 28 November 1976, to load coal at Conneaut, Ohio for Nanticoke, Ontario. Her name honors the Olympic Games that were held at Montreal that year.

The bow and stern sections of the vessel that was to become the STEWART J. CORT were built by Ingalls Shipbuilding Division, Litton Systems, Inc., Pascagoula, MS, as hull 1173. That 182 foot vessel, known as "STUBBY" was launched on 18 Nov 1969. "STUBBY" sailed under its own power from the Gulf of Mexico through the St. Lawrence Seaway and Welland Canal to Erie, Pennsylvania where the sections were cut apart by Erie Marine, Inc. and the 818 foot mid section was added -- making the Lakes first thousand footer.

The ASHCROFT was launched November 18, 1924, as a) GLENIFFER.

On 18 November 1873, the tug CRUSADER was launched at 1:20 p.m. at the Leighton & Dunford yard in Port Huron, Michigan. Her dimensions were 138 foot overall, 125 foot keel, 23 foot beam, and 12 foot depth. She was built for Mr. G. E. Brockway of Port Huron.

On 18 November 1842, CHICAGO (wooden passenger & package freight sidewheeler, 105 foot, 166 tons, built in 1837, at St. Joseph, Michigan) was struck by a gale between Ashtabula and Conneaut in Lake Erie. She lost both of her stacks and became unmanageable when her fires went out. She was driven ashore about 3 miles east of Silver Creek, New York and was wrecked. About 60 persons were on board and amazingly no lives were lost.

On 18 November 1882, DROMEDARY (wooden propeller, 120 foot, 255 gross tons, built in 1868, at Port Dalhousie, Ontario) burned to a total loss at the dock at Hamilton, Ontario when her banked fires overheated. She was owned by Burroughs & Co. No lives were lost.

A terrible storm swept the Lakes in mid-November 1886. On 18-19 November of that year, The Port Huron Times listed the vessels that were known to have foundered in that storm. Here is the list as it appeared on 18 November 1886. "The barge CHARLES HINCKLEY is ashore near Alpena. The schooner P S MARCH is ashore at St. Ignace. She will probably go to pieces. The schooner THOMAS P. SHELDON is ashore about 10 miles north of Alpena. The crew was rescued by the tug HAND. The schooner NELLIE REDINGTON is reported going to pieces at Two Rivers. Three of her crew reached harbor all right, but the other 7 men on board are in danger of their lives. The coal barges F. M. DICKINSON and EMERALD were driven ashore at Kewaunee, Wisconsin Wednesday morning [17 Nov]. Three of the DICKINSON's crew were drowned, the other four floated ashore on a plank. The EMERALD's crew started ashore in the yawl, but 5 were drowned.

On 18 November 1881, the schooner JAMES PLATT left Bay City with a cargo of lumber for Chicago. However, she was wrecked on Lake Michigan during a terrible snowstorm during the first week of December and never made it to Chicago. The storm lasted two full days and six of the crew survived but the rest were lost.

The ANN ARBOR NO 4 ran aground on Green Isle, the island in Green Bay to the north of her course between Sturgeon Bay and Menominee on 18 Nov 1913. ANN ARBOR NO 3 pulled her off undamaged after about 2 hours work.

1911: TURRET CAPE stranded near Cove Island, Lake Huron and was not released until 1912. It last sailed as c) WALTER INKSTER and was scrapped at Port Dalhousie in 1959.

1926: The passenger and freight carrier MONTREAL was built at Toronto in 1902. It caught fire and burned near St. Joseph de Sorel in the St. Lawrence River while operating late season in a freight only capacity. The superstructure was destroyed and the vessel was beached. Five deckhands, believed trapped in the bow area, died.

1958: CARL D. BRADLEY sank in Lake Michigan with the loss of 33 lives.

1970: SILLERY, a Canadian freighter that operated on the St. Lawrence, was heavily damaged aft due to an engineroom fire while enroute from Sept-Iles to Montreal. The ship was a total loss. The bow was later removed and transplanted to sistership CACOUNA which received collision damage on July 6, 1971. The latter was later lost on Lake Michigan as c) JENNIFER on December 1, 1974.

2006: JOHN G. MUNSON hit the Shell Fuel Dock at Corunna and knocked about 200 feet of the structure into the St. Clair River.

Data from: Skip Gilham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Faulty wiring likeliest cause of $4m Alpena blaze last December

11/17 - A National Transportation Safety Board report finds that the probable cause of a fire that broke out December 11, 2015 on a 1942-built Great Lakes steamship while in dry dock was an electrical fault and was not associated with the ongoing shipyard work or with any of the daily work being attended to by the ship’s crew living aboard.

According to the NTSB report, the fire aboard the ship, the Alpena, broke out about 1740 local time in the electrical control room for the aft winches while the ship was drydocked at Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding, Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

Shipyard workers evacuated the vessel and notified the local fire department, which extinguished the fire. No one was injured, but the Alpena sustained nearly $4 million in damage.

By 1903 local time, the fire was under control, and by 0117, all spaces were fully cleared. In total, more than 80 firefighters responded to the accident. The Sturgeon Bay fire chief restricted access to the aft section of the vessel to preserve the scene for subsequent investigation into the cause of the fire.

Access to the fire-affected spaces was not authorized until December 15, 2015, because atmospheric readings for lead and asbestos were considered too high for entry. Until asbestos remediation could be undertaken, entry into the galley and accommodation spaces required a respirator.

The NTSB report says that, based on both the Coast Guard and fire department investigations, the most likely cause of the fire was an electrical fault in the wiring from the electrical control panel to the aft winch.

The electrical system for the aft winch was original to the vessel and complied with regulations for original equipment; however, it did not have the more extensive circuit protection that modern shipboard electrical systems have.

The power cable to the aft winch was completely melted for a length of 10–15 feet. Similar conductors in the same wiring bundle were not damaged, which led investigators to believe that this specific conductor experienced a fault of some kind rather than being destroyed by the heat of the ensuing fire.

As further evidence to support this conclusion, the same cable’s sheathing and insulation had signs of significant deterioration on the boat deck, several decks above where the fire started, where the aft winch is located. This area of the vessel was not affected by the fire.

NTSB reached its conclusion based on investigations by the US Coast Guard (USCG) and the Sturgeon Bay fire department.

Repairs and modifications to the Alpena have included additional circuit protection. The ship resumed sailing this year. It is operated by Inland Lakes Management Inc. Its routes include all five of the Great Lakes and its cargo is usually cement.

MarineLog, gCaptain

 

Lake Superior weather could get wild this weekend

11/17 - The weather synopsis from the National Weather Service issued Wednesday is predicting winds for western Lake Superior on Friday will be from the northeast 30-40 knots. For Friday night through Saturday, going to northwest for all the lake at 40-45 knots, with storm-force winds of over 50 knots possible.

 

Grain up, iron slowly rallies in October shipping

11/17 - Duluth, Minn. – As a below-average shipping season wanes, officials are applauding a growth in grain exports and crossing their fingers iron ore maintains its hesitant rally.

"Grain tonnage is on track to outpace 2015 and our five-year average," Vanta Coda, Duluth Seaway Port Authority CEO, said in a Chamber of Marine Commerce press release Monday. "This is great news for this port, the regional economy and for the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway system as a whole."

Grain's gains, reported earlier this month, have been driven by exports to Canada and abroad as the port of Duluth-Superior and others take advantage of inbound lakers and salties looking for return cargo.

"Project cargo makes its way through this binational waterway, and backhauls of grain along those same trade lanes make freight rates even more competitive," Vanta said.

Iron ore shipments were 10 percent below the five-year average in October and roughly matched the ore output in October 2015, according to the Lake Carriers' Association, which represents 56 American vessels.

In the Twin Ports, U.S.-flagged ships carried nearly 1.4 million tons out of a total of 5.3 million tons shipped last month, an improvement on last year's numbers but still in need of a late-season boost to get back to average shipments.

Shipments from Canadian ports have practically disappeared, pulling down an otherwise increasing trade at U.S. ports. But the port of Quebec has seen plenty of action this year as ore exports to Asia are propping up the struggling sector.

"A surge of U.S. iron ore pellet exports to Japan and China is also keeping the St. Lawrence Seaway bustling in the critical months before the shipping season winds down," said Chamber of Marine Commerce President Raymond Johnston in a press release.

More than 1 million tons of ore has been exported from Minnesota and Michigan mines this year, according to the chamber, with some traveling directly to Quebec City via Canadian ships and some stopping through Conneaut, Ohio.

There is some cognitive dissonance when it comes to exporting ore to China and its steel-producers, which are often blamed for the mining downturn here. But the marine chamber sees it as a business opportunity.

"It's a great example of how the binational shipping system can act quickly to find innovative logistics solutions for customers like the mining sector."

Since March, overall shipments in the seaway are down more than 5 percent as of Oct. 31 compared to last year, and October's numbers weren't anything spectacular.

"The (seaway) saw a steady flow of traditional cargos during the month of October," Betty Sutton, St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. administrator, said in a news release.

The Great Lakes Seaway Partnership said it expects ships that traded in October to make one last call before the end of the season.

Duluth News Tribune

 

Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor expects surge in shipments

11/17 - Great Lakes cargo is down so far this year, but the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor expects a late-year surge.

Through Oct. 21, about 25.8 million tons of international cargo has passed through the St. Lawrence Seaway in Canada into the Great Lakes. That’s a 5.3 percent decline compared to the same time in 2015.

“The Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway System saw a steady flow of traditional cargoes during the month of October,” said Betty Sutton, administrator of the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. “Last month, shipments of aluminum, steel, generators, crane components, iron ore and containerized goods moved in the system. Thanks to a robust U.S and Canadian grain crop, agricultural products including corn, soy beans, wheat and sugar beet pellets made up the majority of the exported cargoes.”

Most ships on the Great Lakes are expected to make one last call before the navigation season ends.

Tonnage at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor has been slightly down from near-record levels, but the deepwater port of Lake Michigan expects to end on a strong suit.

“Ag and steel-related cargoes are primary drivers for our 2016 shipments and Québec continues to be a key trading partner for exchanging Indiana commodities with world markets,” Port Director Rick Heimann said. “Looking ahead, we are expecting a surge in end-of-year shipments of steel products and bulk commodities for the steel industry in Northwest Indiana. Based on current projections, November could prove to be a near record month, especially for Seaway cargoes.”

Grain shipments from the port in Porter County, one of the state’s biggest international exports, more than double the 2015 year-to-day total.

NW Indiana Times

 

Port Reports -  November 17

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
On Wednesday, Great Lakes Trader/tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort arrived Duluth at 01:01 with limestone for Hallett #5. Arthur M. Anderson passed under the lift bridge at 03:07 and headed to Graymont Superior to discharge limestone. Kaye E. Barker departed from Midwest Energy 04:35. James R. Barker departed with ore at 17:00, and Great Lakes Trader took her spot at CN. American Century was expected to arrive late Wednesday night to load coal. In Superior, Robert S. Pierson departed at 00:51 with ore.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Saginaw departed downbound with grain on Wednesday afternoon, while Lubie and Ojibway left in the evening. Puffin and BBC Mont Blanc were loading. Federal Baltic, Finnborg, Algoma Harvester and Sedna Desgagnes were at anchor. Baie Comeau arrived in the late evening.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic Wednesday included John J. Boland, Paul R. Tregurtha, Stewart J. Cort, Atlantic Huron Michipicoten (on a unusual trip to Quebec City), Bluebill and H. Lee White. Upbound traffic included Philip R. Clarke, Mesabi Miner and Federal Bering. CSL Niagara and Flevogracht were inbound at DeTour around 11 p.m., both headed for Thunder Bay. John B. Aird was at the Essar export dock.

Green Bay, Wis.
Alpena and Dylan Cooper with a barge were in port Wednesday. Great Republic departed for Drummond Island.

Saginaw River – Gordy Garris
American Integrity delivered coal to Consumers Energy dock in Essexville Wednesday afternoon. Once finished unloading, the Integrity backed from the dock out to Light 12 in the Saginaw Bay, turned around and was headed outbound for the lake in the early evening.

Toledo, Ohio
The saltwater vessel Lyulin departed Wednesday morning. Algoma Discovery and Cedarglen spent the day loading upriver.

Sandusky, Ohio
Algowood and Algoma Olympic were loading on Wednesday evening.

Buffalo, N.Y. – Brian W.
Algosteel backed in and unloaded salt on the bulk product apron at Gateway Metroport in Lackawanna Wednesday morning. They were still there at 2:45 p.m.

Hamilton, Ont.
John D. Leitch, Federal Clyde and Barnacle were at docks on Wednesday evening.

 

The hunt for sunken ships at the bottom of Lake Superior

11/17 - The steamer Hiram W. Sibley tugged the old schooner loaded with coal through nervous waters. The plan was to escort the 186-foot Antelope to Ashland, Wisconsin, where her cargo would offload. The Sibley would go on to Duluth.

Winds were noticeable, but far from punishing on Oct. 7, 1897 as the pair traveled about 75 miles east of Duluth. The Antelope, built in 1861 and considered an ancient mariner by that point, couldn't withstand the stress.

Seams in its wooden bottom cracked. Pumps couldn't keep up with the deluge. Sibley crewmen severed the towline. The Antelope's crew abandoned ship. Men from both boats watched the watery undertaker receive the dying vessel.

Unknown and unseen was the boat's grave for 119 years. That was until a group of shipwreck hunters discovered the Antelope 300 feet down near the Apostle Islands this fall.

The ship had aged well. Its hull was noticeably intact. Two of its three masts were still standing. Its wheel and rudder were broken off, laying alongside the wooden husk. According to Fridley's Ken Merryman, who'd been looking for the Antelope for years, it's easily one of the best-preserved wrecks on Lake Superior.

"We know from experience, ships carrying grain or coal, more buoyant materials than, say, ore or steel rails, won't split open when they hit the bottom," he says. "Since the Antelope was carrying coal, we guessed it might be in pretty good shape, which is why we decided to search for it."

History, novelty, and possibility are the sirens for Merryman and Nick Lintgen of New Hope. This year has been an exceptionally productive one for the underwater explorers. They were able to locate two previously undiscovered wrecks. The Antelope was actually the second.

"Some of these boats have great stories of loss and tragedy and heroism, and to be able to touch that is pretty neat," says Merryman. "Some of them are mysteries. Some are just great examples of what kind of boats there were throughout history."

There's about 350 wrecks on Superior. Maybe 30 of which remain undiscovered. Before launching a new hunt, these men research the sinking, identify a search area, and "mow the lawn."

"That's what we call it because wreck hunting is mostly about as exciting as mowing the lawn," Merryman says. "It's often days and days and days of boredom."

The hunters took that M.O. this summer. Using old charts and historical accounts, the searchers were close enough to the wreck of the J.S. Seaverns that sonar confirmed they'd found its 132-year-old resting place.

About 60 passengers and crew were on board the 130-foot Seaverns in May 1884 when it struck rock outside a remote port 100 miles north of Sault Ste. Marie. Everyone on board survived. So did some of what it carried.

A wood planing machine that was likely being transported to a lumber yard is still there. Dishes, some still stacked in cupboards, stayed too. Anchors sit on the deck. The wheel leans on the hull. Some of the passenger cabins are largely intact. One houses bunks and a sink stand. They also discovered a heating stove.

"A lot of times wrecks, depending if they sank in a storm, water depth, the time that's elapsed, all you'll find are pieces left scattered on the bottom," says Lintgen. "To find one intact is great. To find stuff still on it that was part of its cargo, and its from the 1800s, is especially unique."

Merryman is just starting to eye potential wreck sites for 2017.

The 193-steamer R.G. Coburn might be one. More than 30 passengers and crew drowned in 1871 when a gale ransacked the vessel, which was carrying wheat, flour, and ore.

Another could be the James Caruthers. The Great Lakes Storm of 1913 claimed the 529-freighter and its 22-person crew. How the boat, which was new, sank remains a mystery. Being able to explain that is tempting, Merryman admits.

"That would be a good, but most likely improbable, one to find," he says. "That's the thing. You don't know. But to be able to touch a piece of history like that that nobody has, it's a part of why we keep doing this."

City Pages

 

Multi-million dollar restoration planned for North Manitou Shoal Lighthouse

11/17 - Leelanau County, Mich. – Big plans are in store for a historic Leelanau County landmark. Within five years, North Manitou Shoal Lighthouse is expected to open for tours after a proposed $2 million refurbishing.

The lighthouse – nicknamed The Crib – still guides vessels through the Manitou Passage. But since lighthouse keepers left for good in 1980, it has fallen into disrepair.

At the end of the projected five-year endeavor, visitors to the 81-year-old lighthouse will see great views of the surrounding area. "Being out there it feels right. It may sound cheesy but it feels like this is what we're meant to do," says Anna Oginsky, with North Manitou Light Keepers, a non-profit corporation that is dedicated to the lighthouse’s restoration, maintenance and operation.

The group paid $73,000 for the lighthouse and expects to close on the lighthouse in the next few months. With the purchase from the government, the group is making plans to rehabilitate the lighthouse and make it available to the public for tours and maybe overnight stays.

It's a project that makes the Leelanau Historical Society and Museum very happy.

"Seeing it preserved and knowing that the steps are being taken to make it accessible to the public is really exciting news, and there's kinda this very positive buzz amongst the community about it," said Kim Kelderhouse, curator of collections with the museum.

The group is using that momentum to open the lighthouse to the public on July 4th, 2021.

The nickname comes from the way it's anchored to the lake floor, 26 feet below the water's surface. It's a crib of steel filled with large stones and cement. The Crib is a 15-minute boat ride from Leland in Leelanau County.

Up North Live

 

Chamber of Marine Commerce appoints new president

11/17 - The board of directors of the Chamber of Marine Commerce (CMC) has announced the appointment of Bruce R. Burrows as president, effective December 1st, 2016.

Burrows joins the chamber as the bi-national industry association enters a new chapter, having recently completed a merger with the Canadian Shipowners Association in September.

Burrows brings almost 35 years of government relations, business development and consensus-building expertise to the position, with senior leadership roles in the commercial transportation and industry association sectors.

Burrows started his career at Canadian Pacific, holding successively senior roles in the areas of marketing, asset management and government relations across Canada and in the U.K. He was vice-president and acting President and CEO of the Rail Association of Canada between 2000 and 2013, where among other achievements he improved cross-border operations for rail with a new Canada/U.S. border action plan. He is currently Senior Associate at Ottawa-based TACTIX Government Relations and Public Affairs.

Burrows is also a board member of The Vimy Foundation. In 2012, he was awarded the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for his work to preserve and promote Canada’s First World War legacy.

Chamber of Marine Commerce

 

Marine Mart this Saturday at Dossin Great Lakes Museum

11/17 - Detroit, Mich. – The annual Marine Mart returns to the Dossin Great Lakes Museum this Saturday, Nov. 19. The mart is a vendor marketplace designed for Great Lakes enthusiasts. It features nautical items and treasures, including lighthouse prints, nautical stipple ink prints, original and acrylic prints, unique nautical gifts, hand painted Christmas ornaments with Michigan lighthouses, postcards, magazines, china, souvenirs, clocks, marine art, nautical charts, maritime artifacts, boat items, nautical artifacts, nautical photographs, woodworking, lithographs, brochures, acrylic paintings, out-of-print Great Lakes books, ship models and more.

All tickets are available at the door. Between 9 and 10 a.m., early birds will pay $7 for adults (children aged 12 and under are free). After 10 a.m., the Dossin opens to the public and admission to the Marine Mart is free to everyone.

Dossin Great Lakes Museum

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 17

On 17 November 1884, PHOENIX (wooden propeller wrecking tug, 173 gross tons, built in 1862, at Cleveland, Ohio) caught fire in one of her coal bunkers at 7 a.m. while she was tied up to the C. S. R. Railroad slip at Amherstburg, Ontario. Several vessels, including the Dunbar tug SHAUGHRAUN and the steam barge MARSH, tried to save her. The SHAUGHRAUN finally got a line on her and pulled her away from the dock and towed her near Norwell’s wharf where she burned and sank.

On 17 Nov 1969, the RIDGETOWN (steel propeller bulk freighter, 557 foot, 7,637 gross tons, built in 1905, at Chicago, Illinois as WILLIAM E. COREY) was laid up at Toronto for the last time with a load of grain. In the spring of 1970, Upper Lakes Shipping, Ltd. sold her to Canadian Dredge & Dock Co., Ltd. of Toronto. She was sunk at Nanticoke, Ontario, for use as a temporary breakwater during the construction of harbor facilities in the summer of 1970. Still later, she was raised and sunk again in the summer of 1974, as a breakwater to protect marina facilities at Port Credit, Ontario.

On November 17, 1984, the EUGENE P. THOMAS was towed by the TUG MALCOLM to Thunder Bay, Ontario, for scrapping by Shearmet.

In the morning of 17 November 1926, the PETER A.B. WIDENER (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 580 foot, 7,053 gross tons, built in 1906, at Chicago, Illinois) was running up bound on Lake Superior in ballast when it encountered strong Northeasterly winds. About six miles Southwest of the Rock of Ages Light on Isle Royale, the captain gave orders to change course for Duluth, Minnesota. There was no response because the wheel chains had parted from the drum, thus disabling the rudder. Repairs cost $4,000.

On 15 Nov 1972, the MICHIPICOTEN (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 549 foot, 6,490 gross tons, built in 1905, at W. Bay City, Michigan, as HENRY C. FRICK) departed Quebec in tow of Polish tug KORAL for scrapping in Spain. The tow encountered bad weather and the MICHIPICOTEN broke in two during a major fall storm on the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Her forward section sank on 17 November off Anticosti Island, and the after section sank the next day.

The propeller JOHN STUART burned about two miles from Sebawaing, Michigan, at 9:00 p.m., 17 November 1872. She had been aground there for some time.

On 17 November 1887, ARIZONA (wooden propeller package freighter, 189 foot, 962 gross tons, built in 1868, at Cleveland, Ohio) was carrying oils and acid used in mining operations when her dangerous cargo caught fire as she approached the harbor at Marquette, Michigan, in heavy seas. Poisonous fumes drove all of the crew topside, leaving the vessel unmanageable. She ran against the breakwater and the crew jumped off. The burning steamer "chased" the crew down the breakwater toward town with the poisonous fumes blowing ashore. She finally beached herself and burned herself out. She was later recovered and rebuilt.

On 17 November 1873, the wooden 2-mast schooner E.M. CARRINGTON sank in nine feet of water at Au Sable, Michigan. She had a load of 500 barrels of flour and 7,000 bushels of grain. She was recovered and lasted another seven years.

On 17 November 1880, GARIBALDI (2-mast wooden schooner, 124 foot, 209 tons, built in 1863, at Port Rowan, Ontario) was carrying coal in a storm on Lake Ontario. She anchored to ride out the storm, but after riding out the gale for 15 hours, her anchor cable parted and her crew was forced to try to bring her into Weller's Bay. She stranded on the bar. One of the crew froze solid in a standing position and his ghost is supposed to still haunt that area. The vessel was recovered and rebuilt. She lasted until at least 1898.

1902: The wooden steamer ROBERT WALLACE sank 13 miles out of Two Harbors while towing the barge ASHLAND.

1922: CITY OF DRESDEN was anchored off Long Point due to high winds and some of the cargo was thrown overboard. The ship beached on the west side of Long Point and broke up as a total loss. One sailor perished.

1922: MALTON went aground on Main Duck Island in Lake Ontario and was stuck until November 30.

1936: The steering cable of the SIDNEY E. SMITH gave way entering the harbor at Fairport, Ohio, and the ship stranded on the break wall. While released on November 22, the heavily damaged vessel was broken up for scrap the following year.

1939: VARDEFJELL, which inaugurated regular Great Lakes service for the Fjell Line in 1932, was torpedoed and sunk as b) KAUNAS 6.5 miles WNW of Noord Harbor, N. Hinder Light, River Schelde.

1996: SEADANIEL went aground at Duluth due to high winds after the anchors dragged. The ship was released, undamaged, by tugs. It last visited the Great Lakes in November 1998 and arrived at Alang, India, for scrapping on May 5, 1999.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley, and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

 

Anchor from passenger ship Greater Detroit pulled from Detroit River

11/16 - Detroit, Mich. - After 60 years underwater, an anchor from a bygone era of the Great Lakes emerged from the Detroit River on Tuesday covered in muck and mire.

It took divers and crews working with a crane less than 20 minutes to pull the 6,000-pound steel anchor, which was once affixed to the luxury steamer Greater Detroit, from the clay riverbed just west of Joe Louis Arena downtown.

For historians from the Great Lakes Maritime Institute it was an important day. The anchor is a valuable piece of Detroit’s history.

The anchor was attached to a ship once referred to as the “Leviathan of the Lakes,” which transported thousands over the water through what’s now known as the Rust Belt region. The ship was popular with honeymooning couples looking to vacation in Buffalo, New York, in the 20th century, according to John Polacsek, Great Lakes Maritime Institute trustee.

Polacsek worked for the Detroit Historical Museum when the anchor was located in 2005. He’s been part of every conversation to salvage the anchor since, he said. “It’s one of the few artifacts of that era,” he said. “It’s part of the local heritage.”

The 536-foot-long Greater Detroit was one of the two largest side-wheel steamer ships in the world. The ship, launched in 1923, could haul more than 2,100 passengers around the Great Lakes. It had more than 600 private rooms and was covered in plasterwork, woodwork and murals, according to maritime historians. When it was built, it cost $3.5 million.

But by the early 1950s, airplane travel and highways pushed the Greater Detroit and an entire network of similar liners that traveled the Great Lakes region out of business. In 1956, after floating unused in port in downtown Detroit, the Greater Detroit’s anchor was cut and the ship was towed to Lake St. Clair and set on fire so the metal hull could be scrapped. “This is a forgotten story,” Polacsek said. “You can’t travel like that nowadays.”

After a scrub, the 6,000-pound anchor that was once affixed to the Greater Detroit will be displayed in an exhibit at the Detroit and Wayne County Port Authority office up the river at 130 Atwater.

For divers and crews, Tuesday’s “rescue” was a bit of fun.

“You find a lot of neat stuff down there,” said Tom Parnin, one of three volunteer divers who worked to pull the anchor from the 48-degree water. “It’s a very cool thing to do.”

The Great Lakes Maritime Institute executed a similar project in 1992, when an anchor from the SS Edmund Fitzgerald was found on the bottom of the river. That anchor can now be found at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Isle.

“Detroit enjoys an illustrious maritime history,” said John Loftus, executive director of the Port Authority, in a news release. “We are proud that we will be able to display a piece of this history.”

The Detroit News

 

U.S.-flag lakes cargos down more than 9 percent in October

11/16 - Cleveland, Ohio – U.S.-flag Great Lakes freighters moved 8.8 million tons of cargo in October, a decrease of 9.2 percent compared to a year ago, and 10.2 percent below the month’s 5-year average. October was also the sixth consecutive month in which cargos trailed the previous year.

Iron ore cargos for the steel industry totaled 4.4 million tons in October, an increase of 5.3 percent compared to a year ago. However, coal shipments to power plants and steel mills fell to 1.3 million tons, a decrease of 43 percent. Limestone for construction projects and steel production totaled 2.6 million tons, a decrease of 6.7 percent compared to a year ago.

Year-over-year U.S.-flag carriage stands at 67.8 million tons, a decrease of 5.7 percent. Iron ore cargos are up 4.1 percent, but coal loads have dipped 26.4 percent. Limestone shipments trail last year by 6.7 percent.

Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Port Reports -  November 16

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Paul R. Tregurtha departed Duluth with coal at 04:52 on Monday. American Mariner and Nassauborg departed from CHS 1 and 2 mid-evening with grain. Kaye E. Barker also arrived during the evening for Midwest Energy. Cornelia was expected to depart from Riverland late Tuesday, and James R. Barker was expected to arrive to load at CN. On the south side of the harbor, Stewart J. Cort departed from BN at 06:25, and Michipicoten arrived from anchor an hour later to load. She departed at 12:35. Her fleetmate Robert S. Pierson arrived at 14:45 to load at Burlington Northern.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Atlantic Huron was departing Tuesday evening, followed by Bluebill. Ojibway was heading in, also in the evening. Sedna Desgagnes, Federal Baltic, Finnborg and Algoma Harvester were at anchor. Lubie, Puffin, Frontenac and BBC Mont Blanc were loading.

Port Inland, Mich.
Calumet was loading stone late Tuesday evening.

Green Bay, Wis.
Alpena was passing Washington Island headed for Green Bay Tuesday around 8 p.m. Great Republic was also due in the late evening Wednesday.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Federal Bering departed on Tuesday. AIS says she is going to Thunder Bay.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Algoma Transport departed up the lake Tuesday after loading grain.

Gary, Ind.
Edgar B. Speer was unloading Tuesday evening.

Goderich, Ont.
Algoway was loading salt Tuesday late.

Toledo, Ohio
The saltwater vessel Lyulin was loading grain upriver Tuesday. Exeborg departed in the afternoon with a destination of Thunder Bay. Cedarglen entered Lake Erie around 2:15 p.m. Tuesday and should be arriving at Toledo around 6-7 a.m. Wednesday. She most likely will be bound for one of the Anderson's elevators.

Sandusky, Ohio
Algoma Olympic was loading Tuesday evening.

Hamilton, Ont.
Barnacle, Federal Clyde and Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin were at docks on Tuesday. SCT Monte Rosa, engine repairs complete, departed late Monday or early Tuesday, and by Tuesday evening was approaching Cape Vincent, N.Y.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 16

On 16 November 1870, BADGER STATE (3-mast wooden bark, 150 foot, 302 tons, built in 1853, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin) stranded and wrecked at Sleeping Bear Dune on Lake Michigan during a storm.

The tug portion of the PRESQUE ISLE (Hull#322) built by Halter Marine Services, New Orleans, Louisiana, was up bound in the Welland Canal on November 16,1973, en route to Erie, Pennsylvania, to join with the barge.

FRED R. WHITE JR (Hull#722) was launched in 1978, at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.

On 16 Nov 1909, the JAMES S. DUNHAM (steel propeller bulk freighter, 420 foot, 4,795 gross tons, built in 1906, at W. Bay City, Michigan) encountered heavy seas and began hitting bottom where charts indicated 35 feet of water, even though she was in ballast and only drawing 17 feet of water. Rather than risk tearing the bottom out of her, the captain decided to beach her at Marble Point, just east of the Bad River outlet. After the heavy snow showers cleared, a message in a bottle was floated ashore to an observer.

The steel bulk freighters SIR JAMES DUNN and GEORGIAN BAY in tow of the Panamanian tug MC THUNDER arrived at Aliaga, Turkey for scrapping on 16 Nov 1989, 129 days after departing Thunder Bay.

On 16 November 1887, PACIFIC (wooden propeller freighter, 187 foot, 766 gross tons, built in 1864, at Cleveland, Ohio) was loaded with lumber bound from Deer Park, Michigan, for Michigan City, Indiana. After leaving the dock, she grounded on a shoal due to low water levels. The nearby Lifesaving Service took her crew off and then returned for the captain's dog. She was broken up by a gale on 19 November.

In 1892, the ANN ARBOR NO 1 arrived at Frankfort, Michigan on her maiden trip.

November 16, 1990 - MWT ceased operations, ending more than a century of carferry service. The last run was made by the BADGER, with Capt. Bruce Masse in command.

In 1981, Interlake's JOHN SHERWIN entered lay-up in Superior, Wisconsin and has not seen service since.

On 16 November 1869, ADELL (2-mast wooden schooner, 48 foot, 25 gross tons, built in 1860, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin) was driven ashore during a storm about a half mile below Bay View Pier near Milwaukee. Her skipper had every penny he owned sunk into that vessel. He was able to salvage her rigging and spars and left them on the beach overnight. The next day he returned and found that all had been stolen during the night.

On 16 Nov 1883, MANISTEE (wooden side-wheeler, 184 foot, 677 tons, built in 1867, at Cleveland, Ohio) broke up in a gale west of the Keweenaw Peninsula off of Eagle Harbor, Michigan. This is one of Lake Superior's worst disasters. Estimates of the number who died range from 23 to 37.

1901: The wooden freighter ELFIN-MERE was damaged by fire at Green Bay after a lamp exploded in the engineroom. The crew got away safely although an engineer was burned. The vessel was rebuilt the following year and returned to service in 1903 as b) CHARLES B. PACKARD.

1908: PASCAL P. PRATT was carrying anthracite coal from Buffalo to Milwaukee when it caught fire in the engineroom off Long Point, Lake Erie. The blaze spread quickly and the wooden vessel was beached. All of the crew got away safely. The hull burned to the waterline and the remains sank.

1923: GLENSTRIVEN, loaded with 160,000 bushels of oats, was wrecked at Cove Island, Georgian Bay in wind and fog. The vessel was enroute to Midland and was salvaged December 5 by the Reid Wrecking Co. The damage was too severe to repair and the hull was scrapped at Collingwood in 1924.

1927: JOLLY INEZ stranded at Saddlebag Island in the False Detour Channel and was abandoned.

1964: THOMAS F. COLE and INVEREWE collided in heavy fog off the southern end of Pipe Island in the St. Marys River. Both ships were repaired but the latter was later lost as d) THEOKEETOR off Mexico following another collision on June 20, 1973.

1965: The LAWRENCECLIFFE HALL sank in the St. Lawrence after an early morning collision with the SUNEK off Ile d'Orleans. The former, a laker in the Halco fleet, rolled on its side but all on board were saved. The ship was refloated in March 1966, repaired and returned to service. It later sailed as DAVID K. GARDINER and CANADIAN VENTURE before scrapping at Alang, India, in 2005. SUNEK received bow damage but this was repaired and this ship was scrapped at Barcelona, Spain, as b) NOTOS in 1979.

1967: CALIFORNIA SUN, a Liberty ship, made one trip through the Seaway in 1966. It suffered an engineroom explosion off Nicobar Island on the Indian Ocean and was gutted. The abandoned ship was taken in tow by JALARAJAN, a familiar Seaway salty, and delivered to the Seychelles.

1978: MONT ST. MARTIN was battered by a storm on Lake Erie and escorted to Southeast Shoal area by the STEELTON.

1978: NYX visited the Great Lakes in 1958 and returned through the Seaway in 1959. It sustained severe fire damage at Sidon, Lebanon, as c) DOMINION TRADER. It was subsequently blown aground by strong winds November 30-December 1 and broke in two.

1979: ALDORA dragged anchor while off Port Weller and was blown aground, only to be freed the same day. This ship was scrapped at Vado, Italy, in 1985-1986.

1979: SARONIC SEA was also anchored off Port Weller when it dragged anchor and stranded at the foot of Geneva Street in St. Catharines. The hull was not refloated until December 6. The ship had first visited the Great Lakes as RAVNANGER in 1964 and was later a victim of the war between Iran and Iraq, being shelled with mortar fire at Basrah on September 25, 1980.

1986: CARINA, an SD-14, first came through the Seaway in 1969. It was abandoned by the crew as d) HYMETUS when the hull cracked in heavy weather 180 miles SSE of Hong Kong while enroute to Shanghai, with steel. The ship sank the next day in the South China Sea.

2009: CSL ASSINIBOINE went aground near Cardinal. It had to be lightered and was released on November 21.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Steve Haverty and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.


Lakes Pilots Association Takes Delivery of New Pilot Boat

11/15 - The new Pilot Boat Huron Spirit left Gladding-Hearn Shipyard in Somerset, Massachusetts on Sunday, November 13, heading for the Great Lakes and her permanent home of Port Huron, MI. The 53’ Chesapeake Class vessel was launched only a week ago on November 8 at 11:40 AM and the shipyard crew worked steadily on fitting the vessel out so that she could beat the closing of the New York Erie Canal system.

The delivery crew has brought the boat to the canal entrance at Waterford, New York as of Monday evening knocking out two days of the 8 day delivery trip. They departed the shipyard at 9 AM Sunday and bucked steady 25 to 30 knot westerly winds all day from Narragansett Bay across Long Island Sound. The initial destination was Glen Cove, NY but that was changed due to an extremely low tide from the full moon making the water levels too shallow. The crew then transited New York City’s East River at night and stayed in Jersey City, NJ across from Manhattan. Yesterday, the vessel traveled up the Hudson River and locked through the Federal Lock at Troy, NY around 6 PM. It will take 3 days to transit the Erie Canal and reach Oswego, NY as the canal operates only in the daytime hours. Intended stops are St. Johnsville, Brewerton, Oswego, NY before heading for the Welland Canal.

The vessel is all-aluminum with twin 600 HP Cummins engines with all the latest technology in electronics and marine systems for making safe pilot changes in open water and heavy weather. Her maximum speed is 26 kts. The current Port Huron pilot boat “Huron Belle” also built at Gladding-Hearn in 1979 will be stationed at Detroit soon after the “Huron Spirit” arrives.

Lakes Pilots Association provides pilotage service on all foreign vessels from Port Huron, MI to Buffalo, NY and all the ports of Lake Erie.

Lakes Pilots Association

 

Grain and project cargo dominate St. Lawrence Seaway traffic in October

11/15 - Washington, D.C. – The Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway System saw a steady flow of traditional cargoes during the month of October, according to Betty Sutton, Administrator of the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation.

“Last month, shipments of aluminum, steel, generators, crane components, iron ore and containerized goods moved in the system,” she said. “Thanks to a robust U.S and Canadian grain crop, agricultural products including corn, soy beans, wheat and sugar beet pellets made up the majority of the exported cargos.”

Many of the ships that traded in the Seaway System this month will most likely make one last call before the end of the 2016 navigation season.

October brought with it two pieces of good news for the Port of Duluth-Superior. The Duluth Seaway Port Authority’s $18 million dock redevelopment project was completed, nearly tripling the Clure Public Marine Terminal’s outdoor storage capacity and doubling its heavy-lift cargo handling capabilities. Grain shipments through the Port of Duluth-Superior are also up this fall – on track to outpace 2016 and the Port’s five-year average.

“The upward trend in grain is great news for this port, the regional economy and for the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway System as a whole,” said Vanta Coda, Duluth Seaway Port Authority executive director. “Moving grain overseas from the heartland of North America remains one of the most tangible components of our region’s international trade pattern. Project cargo makes its way in through this bi-national waterway, and backhauls of grain along those same trade lanes make freight rates even more competitive.”

Cleveland is also on the upswing.

“Despite the challenges in our traditional non-containerized steel segment, the Port of Cleveland continues to make positive gains in the project cargo market, thanks to the efforts of our two terminal operators, Federal Marine Terminals and C-Port Maritime Services,” said David Gutheil, Vice President, Maritime and Logistics for the Port.

“In October, we handled multiple large project cargo moves from Europe, one of which consisted of multiple presses from Germany for the automotive industry. The other project was comprised of multiple pieces for a new natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant (CCPP) that will be built in northeast Ohio. The largest piece weighs in excess of 300 metric tons, and is the heaviest piece of project cargo that has moved through the Port of Cleveland in over a decade.”

Meanwhile, shipments of grain at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor are more than double the 2015 year-to-date total and include two recent export shipments to Québec.

“Ag and steel-related cargoes are primary drivers for our 2016 shipments and Québec continues to be a key trading partner for exchanging Indiana commodities with world markets,” said Port Director Rick Heimann. “Looking ahead, we are expecting a surge in end-of-year shipments of steel products and bulk commodities for the steel industry in Northwest Indiana. Based on current projections, November could prove to be a near record month, especially for Seaway cargoes.”

Milwaukee is also doing a brisk business.

“With arrivals at the Port of Milwaukee scheduled well into December, we are likely to see both steel and agricultural products well ahead of last year’s volumes,” said Port Director Paul Vornholt. “Additionally, the port took delivery of a new crane this month, a 300-ton capacity Manitowoc crawler, adding to its efficiency in handling project cargo.”

The St. Lawrence Seaway reported that year-to-date cargo shipments for the period March 21 to October 31 were 25.8 million metric tons, down 5.23 percent over the same period in 2015. The dry bulk category was down 11 percent. Iron ore was down almost 10 percent; coal was down18 percent. The general cargo category was down 9 percent overall, with domestic general cargo posting a 9.5 percent increase. The liquid bulk category was at 22.6 percent over 2015.

Great Lakes / Seaway Partnership

 

Latest figures: Grain and iron ore lead the way for October shipping

11/15 - North American grain and iron ore exports have kept Great Lakes-Seaway shipping on course in October, according to the latest statistics.

"U.S. grain traffic continues to increase through the Seaway, having grown 30 percent since 2014,” said Raymond Johnston, President of the Chamber of Marine Commerce. “A surge of U.S. iron ore pellet exports to Japan and China is also keeping the St. Lawrence Seaway bustling in the critical months before the shipping season winds down.”

Total Seaway year-to-date shipments for 2016 (March 21 through October 31) have reached nearly 25.8 million metric tons, down 5 percent over 2015, but an improvement over earlier in the season.

U.S. grain totaled 1.8 million metric tons for that period, just slightly ahead of the 2015 season’s robust performance.

For the Port of Duluth-Superior, grain shipments are up. “Grain tonnage is on track to outpace 2015 and our five-year average,” said Vanta Coda, Duluth Seaway Port Authority Executive Director. “Many of those grain cargoes have been loaded onto Canadian vessels heading for Canadian ports. This is great news for this port, the regional economy and for the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway system as a whole.”

The Port of Milwaukee is also seeing a strong year for agricultural exports with cargo volumes up more than 300 percent over last year. “One of the keys to this year’s success for agricultural product exports is the importing of steel,” said Port of Milwaukee spokesperson Jeff Fleming. “The ships bringing in steel are looking for return cargos. It’s more economical if there are products like grain to ship out.” Fleming adds that the Wisconsin-grown products are going to a variety of destinations, including Northern Europe and Africa.

Johnston added that more than 1 million metric tons of iron ore pellets are being exported this year from Minnesota and Michigan mines via docks in Duluth-Superior, Escanaba, Michigan, Marquette, Michigan and Conneaut, Ohio.

“The iron ore is being loaded by Canadian ships and carried to the Port of Quebec where its loaded on ocean carriers for onward transport to Asia for steel production,” he said. “We’re also seeing American lakers carrying iron ore from Duluth-Superior to Conneaut, then picked up by Canadian domestic ships for transport via the Seaway. It’s a great example of how the bi-national shipping system can act quickly to find innovative logistics solutions for customers like the mining sector.”

Chamber of Marine Commerce

 

Anchor on Detroit River bottom to be raised

11/15 - Detroit, Mich. – Divers and crews are planning to raise a 6,000-pound anchor from the Detroit River bottom where it has rested for six decades.

A barge fitted with a crane will haul up the Greater Detroit’s anchor Tuesday afternoon. Once cleaned and restored, it will be displayed at the Detroit/Wayne County Port Authority downtown. The Great Lakes Maritime Institute is seeking donations to help offset some costs.

The 536-foot Greater Detroit ferried passengers around the Great Lakes. The sidewheel steamer took her maiden voyage in 1924. It could carry more than 2,000 people.

Commercial airline travel and modern freeways ended the usefulness of luxury steamships and the Greater Detroit was scrapped and its anchor cut. The steamer was towed to Lake St. Clair where it was burned in 1956.

Detroit News

 

Port Reports -  November 15

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Nassauborg arrived Duluth at 05:10 to load grain at CHS 2. Lakes Contender/tug Ken Boothe Sr. arrived at 08:50 with coal for C. Reiss. Cason J. Callaway passed the pair in the harbor and departed at 09:00 with ore. Paul R. Tregurtha departed Silver Bay at 11:10 after unloading, and arrived in Duluth four hours later to load coal at Midwest Energy. Lakes Contender was departing Duluth at 21:30, bound for Silver Bay to load. Cornelia continued loading at Riverland, while American Mariner was at CHS 1 and Nassauborg at CHS 2. In Superior, Burns Harbor departed with ore at 09:40, and Stewart J. Cort arrived from anchor at 09:53 to load at BN. Michipicoten remained at anchor offshore.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
HHL Rhine and Bluebill were loading Monday. Sedna Desgagnes and Finnborg were at anchor. Puffin arrived in the evening.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic on another unseasonably warm Monday included Atlantic Huron, Saginaw, Kaye E. Barker, Frontenac and, after dark, Presque Isle, James R. Barker and Arthur M. Anderson. American Integrity and Hon. James L. Oberstar were downbound early. Yankcanuck was moved to the outer facing of the Purvis dock on Monday. The 1963-built crane ship is in the process of being stripped.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Federal Bering remained in port loading grain on Monday.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
On Monday, Algoma Transport was still at the Cargill elevator loading grain.

Gary, Ind.
Algolake was unloading Monday afternoon.

Goderich, Ont.
Algosteel was loading salt on Monday afternoon.

Toledo, Ohio
The saltwater vessel Lyulin was loading grain upriver Monday. Exeborg and the tug Calusa Coast and barge were also in port Monday. As of 9:45 pm Monday, Cedarglen has been delayed in the Welland Canal and it is unknown when she will arrive at Toledo.

Marblehead, Ohio
On Monday afternoon, Manitowoc was loading stone.

Ashtabula, Ohio
Mesabi Miner was unloading ore from Silver Bay on Monday.

Hamilton, Ont.
CSL Laurentien and Barnacle were docked on Monday. SCT Monte Rosa and Ardita remained at anchor.

Oshawa, Ont.
Flevogracht departed Monday afternoon after unloading steel products. Her next destination is listed as Thunder Bay.

 

Door County Maritime Museum speaker series begins Dec. 8

11/15 - Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – Mark your calendars: The Door County Maritime Museum’s Maritime Speaker Series returns with four monthly programs beginning Thursday, Dec. 8 and continuing until March 2, 2017.

This year’s series begins with a program presented by former museum Executive Director Bob Desh that will not only serve to conclude the shipwreck artifact exhibit that had been showing in the Sturgeon Bay museum’s upper lobby but emphasize the significant collection of shipwreck titles for sale in the museum’s gift shop. The store’s book collection offers an excellent selection of possible Christmas gift ideas for the maritime enthusiast on your list.

Desh will kick things off with a program titled “A Doll, a Wrench, and a Thimble -- Remembering the loss of the ‘Palace Steamer’ Niagara.” He will touch on some of the poignant reminders from Niagara’s wreck that will continue to be on display through the Dec. 8 presentation. He will detail that tragic event that took place in September of 1856 when the Niagara burned during a voyage from Sheboygan to Port Washington and a total of 150 souls were lost. Desh will also discuss the significant role this class of passenger vessel played in the European immigration westward, including Door County.

Three additional programs will follow the holidays beginning on Thursday, Jan. 5, when Steve Selvick will offer a program on the history of the Selvick tugs. The tugs have been a fixture on Sturgeon Bay’s waterfront for nearly 50 years, and he will talk about his and the rest of his family’s involvement with the company.

Programs will continue the first Thursday of the month in February and March. The February program is not yet confirmed, but Mike Peters will be at the museum on March 2 for a presentation on his time crewing the tall ship Baltimore.

All of the evening programs are free of charge with a non-perishable food donation requested. They begin at 7 p.m. at the Sturgeon Bay museum. Call (920) 743-5958 or visit www.dcmm.org for more information.

Door County Maritime Museum Book club offered by Door County Maritime Museum, Write On, Door County Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – Write On, Door County is partnering with the Door County Maritime Museum to present Great Lakes/ Great Books, a monthly book club featuring books with a Great Lakes focus.

Books of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry that have the Great Lakes as subject matter or as settings will be discussed with a facilitator from Write On. A complete list of titles will be available at the first meeting Thursday, Nov. 3, at 10:30 am at the Door County Maritime Museum in Sturgeon Bay. This way interest in particular titles can be gauged. If everyone wants to read nonfi

ction, for instance, the book list can be adjusted. The group will continue to meet at 10:30 am the first Thursday of each month at the museum. Those dates are December 1, January 5, February 2, March 2, April 6 and May 4. If you would like to participate in the Great Lakes/Great Books Club, call the museum at (920) 743-5958.

Door County Maritime Museum

 

Grand Haven hopes for $55K grant for lighthouse work

11/15 - Grand Haven, Mich. – While the public has been focused on the pier and catwalk projects recently, plans are in the works to make more improvements to Grand Haven’s two lighthouses. The city has applied for a $55,820 grant from the Michigan Lighthouse Assistance Program. City Council gave its OK to the application Monday night.

If approved, the grant would help fund more than $83,000 worth of improvements to the two lighthouses.

“We will probably hear about the grant as soon as spring time,” City Manager Pat McGinnis said. “If we get it, we hope to get in there as soon as the pier construction is done in late 2017.”

The Michigan Lighthouse Assistance Program was established to help in the preservation, rehabilitation and protection of historic lighthouses in the state. The grant program is managed through the State Historic Preservation Office and the Michigan State Housing Development Authority, and program funds come from the sale of lighthouse license plates.

City officials say the Grand Haven Lighthouse Conservancy, with help from the Abonmarche AE engineering firm, identified several deficiencies in the condition of the lights that need to be addressed. “There’s tons of work that needs to be done with these things,” McGinnis said.

Work to be accomplished includes concrete repair around the entrance light, replacement of six windows at the entrance light, replacement or repair of seven portholes at the entrance light, removal of paint from five portholes in the inner light, and weather stripping of the lantern doors at both lights.

The total estimated costs of all repairs is $83,732.

If the city successfully obtains it, the $55,820 grant would be used in conjunction with $27,912 in matching funds from the local conservancy group. No taxpayer funds would be used, McGinnis said.

McGinnis noted that the goal for the city and the conservancy is that both lighthouses reach a point where they can be opened to the public for tours.

Grand Haven Tribune

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 15

In 1883, the schooner E. FITZGERALD, Captain Daniel Lanigan, went ashore and was completely covered with ice. The crew of six drowned while attempting to make shore in the yawl. A couple days after the loss, Mrs. Lanigan received a prophetic letter from her son stating he was tired of sailing and this would be his last trip.

On 15 November 1871, EVERGREEN CITY (wooden propeller freighter, 193 foot, 624 gross tons, built in 1856, at Cleveland, Ohio) was carrying lumber camp supplies when she was driven on to the southwest coast of Long Point on Lake Erie by a westerly gale. She hogged and broke up. Most of her cargo and fittings were stolen over the winter. Surprisingly, she was recovered and rebuilt in 1872-1873, but only lasted until 1875, when she was abandoned at Buffalo, New York.

The cargo mid-body of the then-under construction GEORGE A. STINSON was towed from Toledo, where it was built, to Lorain, Ohio, in 1977.

PAUL THAYER left Lorain on her maiden voyage November 15, 1973, light for Escanaba, Michigan to load iron ore. Renamed b.) EARL W. OGLEBAY in 1995.

On November 15, 1974, W. W. HOLLOWAY struck an embankment at Burns Harbor, Indiana, causing extensive damage.

Departing Duluth on November 15, 1909, the BRANSFORD encountered a gale driven snowstorm. She battled the storm the entire day only to end up on the rocks near Siskiwit Bay on Isle Royale.

On 15 November 1894, ANTELOPE (wooden schooner, 56 foot, 32 gross tons, built in 1878, at Grand Haven, Michigan) capsized in a storm while trying to make harbor at Grand Haven, Michigan. 4 lives were lost.

November 15, 1924 - The carferry PERE MARQUETTE was renamed PERE MARQUETTE 15.

On 15 November 1875, The Port Huron Times reported that "there is little doubt but that the scow SUTLER GIRL has been lost with all hands on Lake Erie. She has now been overdue two weeks."

On 15 November 1869, W. W. ARNOLD (wooden schooner, 426 gross tons, built in 1863, at Buffalo, New York) was carrying iron ore when she was driven ashore near the mouth of the Two Hearted River on Lake Superior during the great gale of November 1869. The violent storm tore the schooner apart and she sank quickly losing all hands (11) including several passengers.

On 15 Nov 1905, the W. K. BIXBY (steel straight-deck bulk freighter, 480 foot, 5,712 gross tons, later b.) J.L. REISS, then c.) SIDNEY E. SMITH JR) was launched at Wyandotte, Michigan, for the National Steamship Co. (M.B. McMillan). She lasted until 1972, when she was wrecked at Sarnia, Ontario, in a collision with the PARKER EVANS.

1901: The consort barge JOHN SMEATON broke loose of the steamer HARVARD and came ashore on the rocks off Au Train, Mich., and rested in 4 feet of water. The crew was safe and the ship released at the end of the month by Reid Wrecking and went to Superior for repairs.

1909: The Canadian freighter OTTAWA foundered stern first off Passage Isle, Lake Superior when the cargo of grain shifted. The crew, while they suffered terribly, were able to reach the safety of Keweenaw Point in the lifeboats after 12 hours on the open lake in wild seas.

1915: A. McVITTIE took out the gate at Lock 12 of the Third Welland Canal leading to a washout.

1919: J.S. CROUSE was enroute from Glen Haven to Traverse City when fire was discovered around the stack. The blaze spread quickly. The ship burned to the water line and sank in Sleeping Bear Bay, Lake Michigan.

1920: The wooden hulled steamer MAPLEGULF broke her back in a Lake Ontario storm. It was considered beyond economical repair and beached at Kingston.

1931: A storm forced the wooden passenger and freight steamer WINONA back to Spragge, Ontario, and the next day the ship was found to be on fire over the boiler. The vessel was towed from the dock to protect a pile of lumber and it became a total loss.

1952: The newly-built tanker B.A. PEERLESS lost power and went aground below the Detroit River Light. It was refloated on November 17.

1975: The ocean tanker GATUN LOCKS made one trip through the Seaway in 1959. The vessel was lying at Piraeus Roads, Greece, as c) SUNARUSSA when it was gutted by a fire. The hull was sold for scrap in 1977 and broken up at Laurion, Greece, beginning on April 26, 1977.

1981: ALFRED was gutted by a fire off Benghazi, Libya, after the blaze broke out in the engineroom. The hull was scuttled 100 miles out in the Mediterranean on November 24. The ship had been on the Great Lakes earlier in the year and first traveled inland as a) ALFRED REHDER in 1972.

1994: The Turkish freighter FIRAT was blown ashore at Port Everglades, FL by Hurricane Gordon when the anchors failed to hold. The ship was a beach attraction until lightered and released on November 26. FIRAT first came through the Seaway in 1990 and was scrapped at Alang, India, in 1997, after sailing 27 years under the same name.

2007: CALUMET was damaged when it struck a wall at Cleveland while moving to the salt dock. It was sold for scrap and departed for Port Colborne two days later.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Algoma denied tanker coasting license

11/14 - Algoma Tankers applied to the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) for a coasting license to allow the foreign tanker Edzard Schulte to transport refined product between Montreal and Great Lakes Canadian ports.

Due to a reduction in operating pressure on a major pipeline, refiners were concerned about a fuel shortage in the Greater Toronto Area and Algoma asked for a fast track approval process for the license.

Coastal Shipping Ltd. Intervened, offering three Canadian flag tankers that it has been operating successfully for several years for other oil companies. Algoma countered that they did not meet the oil company's operations criteria, but the CTA found no merit in that argument, stating in effect, that those rules could not supercede Canadian law.

Canada permits foreign-flag ships to trade between Canadian ports, under license, when it can be determined that no suitable Canadian ship is available.

CSL was not known previously to be a tanker operator, but references in the proceedings indicate that the tankers cited by CSL are the Coastal Shipping Co. tankers of the Woodward Group of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Newfoundland, and Labrador. Coastal Shipping names Travestern and Sten Fjord as two of the available tankers.

Mac Mackay

 

Port Reports -  November 14

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Cason J. Callaway arrived Duluth at 03:55 Sunday and discharged limestone at C. Reiss. Paul R. Tregurtha departed Midwest Energy with coal at 04:20. American Spirit followed her out at 09:50 with iron ore pellets from CN. On Sunday evening, Cason J. Callaway was loading ore at CN, American Mariner was loading grain at CHS 1 after unloading limestone, and Cornelia was loading grain at Riverland Ag. In Superior, Burns Harbor arrived at 05:00 Sunday, and was still loading through the evening. Stewart J. Cort was at anchor waiting for the dock, and Michipicoten was expected to anchor late Sunday night to wait for the Cort.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
HHL Rhine was loading Sunday. Sedna Desgagnes was at anchor. Finnborg was expected sometime Monday morning.

Marquette, Mich.
Hon. James L. Oberstar and the USCG Alder were in port Sunday evening.

St. Marys River
On a slow Sunday, John D. Leitch was downbound in the afternoon, followed by Isolda in the evening. Puffin and Saginaw were upbound in the lower river after dark.

Grand Haven, Mich. – Sam Hankinson
Herbert C. Jackson was unloading at Verplank’s dock Sunday afternoon.

Milwaukee, Wis.
The Fednav saltie Federal Bering was in port on Sunday.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
On Sunday, Algoma Transport was at the Cargill elevator loading grain.

Indiana Harbor, Ind.
On Sunday evening, John B. Aird was loading, and Joseph L. Block was headed in.

Saginaw River – Gordy Garris
Cuyahoga was inbound the Saginaw River around 2 p.m. Sunday with a split load for the Buena Vista dock in Zilwaukee and the Lafarge Stone dock in Saginaw. Cuyahoga arrived in Zilwaukee around 5 p.m., and after completed unloading at the Buena Vista dock, shifted upriver to the Lafarge Stone dock around 10 p.m. Sunday. Cuyahoga is expected to be back outbound for the lake early Monday morning.

Toledo, Ohio
The saltwater vessel Lyulin was loading grain upriver. Exeborg and the tug Wilf Seymour and barge were also in port Sunday.

Cleveland, Ohio
Buffalo and Fivelborg were in port Sunday evening.

Long Point, Ont.
Manitoulin and the tug Sharon M were at anchor in the lee of Long Point Sunday, most likely waiting for weather.

Port Colborne, Ont.
Four vessels were anchored offshore Sunday evening. Marsgracht, Federal Bristol, Mederal Maas and Algocanada were most likely awaiting weather or pilots.

Hamilton, Ont.
CSL Laurentien was in port Sunday evening, while Algoma Olympic was expected. Barnacle and Ardita remained at anchor, as was SCT Monte Rosa, which is in for engine repairs.

Oshawa, Ont.
Flevogracht was unloading steel products on Sunday.

Oswego, N.Y. – Ned Goebricher
On Sunday, the tug Margot and a flat barge transited Lake Ontario for the NYS barge canal.

 

At 116 years old, fireboat Edward M. Cotter still in fighting form

11/14 - Buffalo, N.Y. – The Edward M. Cotter fireboat celebrated its 116th birthday – "sweet 16 plus 100" – on Saturday, complete with a party, tours and cake. But this vessel is no museum relic.

When a massive fire broke out this week at the Bethlehem Steel site, the Buffalo Fire Department considering sending the Cotter to help battle the blaze, said Buffalo Fire Commissioner Garnell Whitfield Jr.

That turned out not to be logistically feasible. But the vessel billed as the world's oldest working fireboat remains essential to the department, from fighting fires to breaking ice in the Buffalo River in order to prevent flooding in towns upstream, Whitfield said.

The public got a chance to take free tours of the vessel on Saturday, and can do so again on Sunday, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Buffalo Naval and Military Park.

The Fireboat E.M. Cotter Conservancy is raising funds to restore the vessel, and hopes the tours will increase awareness about the Cotter's active service as well as its place in history, said Sandy Beckman, the conservancy's president.

"They can get to touch and see our history on the waterfront, especially with the redevelopment of the waterfront," Beckman said. "This is really the grandfather of the waterfront."

Fillmore Council Member David Franczyk noted the vessel was serving the city even before Theodore Roosevelt was inaugurated as president here. And with new commercial and residential projects rising along the Buffalo River, the fireboat remains as vital as ever, he said.

But firefighting is only part of the Cotter's job. Sam Guadagna, a retired Cotter captain, recalled the vessel breaking "as much as a foot of ice with no problem. It would go through it like it was a sheet of newspaper."

Guadagna had the honor of cutting the Cotter's cake, flanked by Whitfield and Mayor Byron Brown.

The Buffalo News

 

New USS Little Rock undergoing tests in advance of commissioning in Buffalo

11/14 - Buffalo, N.Y. – This Veteran’s Day holiday, the contractor that has built what will soon become the new USS Little Rock is hoping to build excitement for what will be the first-ever commissioning of a Naval vessel next to its decommissioned counterpart.

Lockheed Martin is creating the Freedom Class of Littoral Combat Ships, which includes the new Little Rock. Representatives of the aerospace, defense and security company were in Western New York for the Buffalo Renaissance Foundation's Veterans Day lunch, and are hoping local people with an interest in military matters will become increasingly excited in advance of the new USS Little Rock's commissioning next year.

The new LCS9 has already been built and launched and is undergoing tests on Lake Michigan.

"The ship is actually out on trials now for the first set of tests,” said Lockheed Martin spokesman John Torrisi. “We do many sets of tests. We build these ships in Wisconsin, so we actually have the ship out, running its paces before we have the Navy do that."

The ship features a helipad, ample space to reconfigure as the mission requires and, through a combination of gas, diesel and water propulsion systems, the ability to travel more than 40 knots in open water.

“It can turn on a dime and can also operate in very shallow water, hence the name Littoral,” Torrisi said. “This ship's draft is about 14 feet, or a little bit less depending on how it's loaded up.”

The vessel also features a steel hull with aluminum superstructure and could hold a crew of 50 to about 90 people. And, according to Torrisi, was relatively inexpensive to build.

“Cost has been an important part of this program from the very beginning," he said. "Using a block buy approach, we've been able to achieve an average cost, across the ten ships in that block, of 360 million dollars, which sounds like a lot but in shipbuilding and military procurement is a good value for taxpayers. ”

The Navy has not yet set a for the commissioning ceremony at the Buffalo and Erie County Naval and Military Park, but it's anticipated to be some time in mid 2017.

WBFO

 

Program to mark 50th anniversary of Daniel J. Morrell sinking

11/14 - Ashtabula, Ohio – The Ashtabula Maritime & Surface Transportation Museum will host a program Nov. 29 commemorating the lives and legacy of the 29 seaman aboard the Daniel J. Morrell that sank on Lake Huron Nov. 29, 1966.

A video tribute to Dennis Hale, the wreck’s sole survivor, who died in 2015, will be included in the program.

The event will be at the Saybrook Banquet Center, 3116 North Bend Road, Ashtabula, Ohio, staring at 6:30 p.m. Admission will be by donation ($5 museum members, $10 non-members). Tickets/Information/Reservations at (440) 997-5370.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 14

ALGOBAY (steel propeller bulk freighter, 719 foot, 22,466 gross tons, built at Collingwood, Ontario in 1978) departed Sept Iles, Quebec on 14 Nov 1978, with an iron ore pellet cargo for Sydney, Nova Scotia when she collided with the 90,000 ton Italian-flag ore carrier CIELO BIANCO. The Collingwood-built tug POINTE MARGUERITE, which was towing the big salty, was unfortunately crushed between the two vessels and sank, killing two crewmembers.

On November 14, 1934, the WILLIAM A. REISS grounded off Sheboygan and was declared a constructive total loss. Built as the a.) FRANK H. PEAVEY in 1901, renamed b.) WILLIAM A. REISS in 1916. She was scrapped at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin in 1935.

Cracks across the ENDERS M. VOORHEES' spar deck were first noticed in a storm on Lake Superior November 14, 1942. Her fleetmate NORMAN B. REAM came to her assistance by releasing storm oil which helped calm the seas so the crew of the VOORHEES could run cables the length of her deck and winch them tight to arrest the cracking. She proceeded to the Soo escorted by the REAM and later sailed to the Great Lake Engineering Works for repairs.

The THOMAS WILSON (Hull#826) was launched November 14, 1942, at Lorain, Ohio, for the U.S. Maritime Commission.

The U.S. Coast Guard buoy tender MESQUITE (Hull#76) was launched November 14, 1942, at a cost of $894,000, by Marine Iron & Shipbuilding Co. at Duluth, Minnesota. MESQUITE ran aground off Keweenaw Point on December 4, 1989, and was declared a total loss. MESQUITE was scuttled off Keweenaw Point on July 14, 1990.

On November 14, 1952, the SPARROWS POINT, b.) BUCKEYE entered service for Bethlehem Steel Corp. Reduced to a barge at Erie, Pennsylvania, and renamed c.) LEWIS J KUBER in 2006.

On 14 November 1879, C G BREED (2 mast wooden schooner, 140 foot, 385 tons, built in 1862, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin) was carrying 24,000 bushels of wheat from Detroit to Buffalo when she capsized and sank in a sudden squall near Ashtabula, Ohio in Lake Erie. 5 lives were lost, but 3 were saved. The three survivors were rescued by three different vessels.

In 1940, following the Armistice Day Storm, The CITY OF FLINT 32 was freed by the tug JOHN F. CUSHING assisted by the PERE MARQUETTE 21.

In 1990, Glen Bowden (of MWT) announced that he would suspend cross-Lake Michigan ferry service indefinitely. On 14 November 1886, the steamer BELLE WILSON was crossing Lake Ontario with a load of 11,800 bushels of oats when a severe gale and snowstorm blew in. The vessel lost her rudder and the crew rigged sails, but these were blown away. Then they rigged a drag made of 600 feet of line and a log to help maneuver the vessel and they headed for Oswego, New York. This lasted for 12 hours, but the chain parted at 3:00 a.m. and the vessel was driven ashore at Ford's Shoals, 4 miles east of Oswego harbor. No lives were lost.

On 14 November 1892, the 2-mast, 95 foot wooden schooner MINNIE DAVIS was rammed on a dark night by the 2-mast, 117 foot wooden schooner HUNTER SAVIDGE near Amherstburg, Ontario. The DAVIS sank, but no lives were lost. The wreckage was removed in May 1893.

1922: The composite hulled freighter JOS. L. SIMPSON was upbound on Lake Ontario from Ogdensburg to Milwaukee when it stranded at Tibbett's Point. The repair bill was close to $12,000 but the vessel returned to service and last operated in 1957 as YANKCANUCK (i).

1933: The wheat laden D.E. CALLENDAR stranded in Lake Erie off Long Point and was a total loss. The hull was salvaged in 1934 and laid up at Toledo. It was taken to New Orleans during World War Two for reconstruction as a barge but the change was never registered and the hull was likely scrapped.

1933: The wooden tug FLORENCE sank off False Duck Island in a storm that brought snow, high winds and waves on Lake Ontario. All 7 on board were saved and taken aboard the barge PETER G. CAMPBELL.

1943: RIVERTON stranded at Lottie Wolf Shoal, Georgian Bay and declared a total loss. Later salvaged and repaired, it returned to service as MOHAWK DEER.

1960: ISLAND KING II was destroyed by a fire while laid up for the winter at Lachine, QC. The vessel had been built as DALHOUSIE CITY and operated across western Lake Ontario between Toronto and St. Catharines from 1911 until the end of the 1949 season before being sold and moving to Montreal.

1966: The Liberian freighter FREIDA went aground at Poe's Reef, Lake Huron, and had to be lightered by MAITLAND NO. 1. The ocean ship began Great Lakes terading as c) SEAWAY STAR in 1960 and returned as d) DEALMOUTH in 1962 and as e) FREIDA earlier in 1966.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Jody Aho and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

High winds slow traffic Saturday on western end of Lake Superior

11/13 - Five vessels were anchored just off Duluth Saturday – Cason J. Callaway, Edgar B. Speer, Paul R. Tregurtha, American Mariner and Walter J. McCarthy Jr. In addition, Sam Laud and Roger Blough were hugging the south shore off the U.P. Ken Boothe Sr./Lakes Contender were anchored off the lower Keweenaw entry, and the John J. Boland was also in the area. When the National Weather Service gave its Lake Superior weather Saturday morning, the report from Rock of Ages were for winds of 40 knots. The weather buoy 48 miles north of Ironwood had winds of 29 knots with 10-foot waves.

 

Rand Logistics posts sharp drop in net income, revenues

11/13 - Rand Logistics, Inc., a provider of bulk freight shipping services throughout the Great Lakes region, reported net income applicable to common stockholders for the fiscal year 2017 second quarter, which ended Sept. 30, tumbled 77.5 percent year-over-year to $2.6 million.

Total revenues fell 24.4 percent year-over-year to $39.2 million.

“Our results in the second quarter of fiscal year 2017 reflected an unexpected decline in demand from our aggregates customers, particularly as it related to materials for use in public infrastructure projects,” Rand Logistics president and CEO Ed Levy said.

Vessel margin per day during the quarter slipped 4.4 percent from the same period last year to $14,441, which Levy attributed to the drop in lakes-wide stone demand combined with lower salt tonnage resulting from higher than normal inventories due to last year’s mild winter in the Great Lakes region.

American Shipper

 

Port Reports -  November 13

Thunder Bay, Ont.
HHL Rhine was loading Saturday. John D. Leitch departed in the afternoon. Bluebill remained at anchor. Sedna Desgagnes is expected Sunday morning.

Munising, Mich.
H. Lee White was upbound at the Soo Locks Saturday afternoon, headed for Munising with coal. However she went to anchor in the upper river in the early evening, waiting for winds to die down.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic Saturday included a rare passage of Sedna Desgagnes, headed for Thunder Bay. She was followed by Stewart J. Cort, H. Lee White and, after dark, Nassauborg, Hon. James L. Oberstar and Finnborg. Downbound traffic included CSL Niagara early, followed by Algoma Equinox and Mesabi Miner.

Port Inland, Mich.
Wilfred Sykes was loading stone Saturday evening.

Cedarville, Mich.
Joseph H. Thompson was loading Saturday.

St. Ignace, Mich.
The tugs Mary E. Hannah and Dylan Cooper, along with their barges, were at anchor awaiting weather Saturday night.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Algoma Transport departed Saturday afternoon. Tug Anglian Lady and her barge, and Algolake were in port Saturday.

Indiana Harbor, Ind.
James R. Barker and Lee A. Tregurtha were unloading Saturday at Arcelor/Mittal. By mid-evening, the Tregurtha had departed for Marquette.

Alpena, Mich. – Ben & Chanda McClain
The tug Undaunted and barge Pere Marquette 41 unloaded at Lafarge on Thursday. Gale force winds on Friday morning had some vessels at anchor out in the bay. The tug Undaunted remained anchored, as well as Great Republic and tug Dylan Cooper. Saturday evening the tug Samuel de Champlain and barge Innovation arrived at Lafarge to load cement.

Goderich, Ont.
Radcliffe R. Latimer departed with salt Saturday late afternoon.

Toledo, Ohio
Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin arrived at the coal dock Saturday afternoon. The saltwater vessel Lyulin was loading grain upriver. Exeborg is expected on Sunday.

Sandusky, Ohio
Arthur M. Anderson spent Saturday unloading.

Cleveland, Ohio
BBC Mont Blanc and the tug/barge Defiance/Ashtabula were at docks along the Cuyahoga River Saturday evening.

Nanticoke, Ont.
Frontenac was unloading ore Saturday afternoon.

Hamilton, Ont.
G3 Marquis departed with an AIS destination of Sarnia on Saturday afternoon. Barnacle, and SCT Monte Rosa were at anchor. The salties Sichem Defiance and Pacific Huron were docked. Ardita remained at anchor long term.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 13

In 1952, the 626-foot SPARROWS POINT successfully completed her sea trials and departed Chicago on her maiden trip. The new Bethlehem boat, the largest boat to enter the lakes via the Mississippi River Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, was under the command of Captain Wilfred Couture and Chief Engineer James Meinke. She was lengthened to 682 feet in 1958, converted to a self-unloader in 1980, renamed b.) BUCKEYE in 1991, converted to a barge in 2006, renamed c.) LEWIS J. KUBER.

ARAB (2-mast wooden schooner, 100 foot, 158 tons, built in 1854, at Buffalo, New York) beached on 01 November 1883, near St. Joseph, Michigan, during a storm, but quick work by salvagers got her free. However on 13 November 1883, while being towed to Racine, Wisconsin, she capsized and sank well off of Arcadia, Michigan. One man lost his life, an engineer who was desperately trying to start her pumps when she rolled.

On November 13, 1976, the TEMPLE BAR (later LAKE WABUSH and ALGONORTH) arrived at Singapore, where she was lengthened 202 feet.

CONDARRELL was laid up for the last time on November 13, 1981. Built in 1953 as a.) D. C. EVEREST, she was renamed b.) CONDARRELL in 1982.

GEORGE HINDMAN was in collision with the British salty MANCHESTER EXPLORER on Lake St. Louis, above the Lachine Lock in 1956. Built in 1921, as a.) GLENCLOVA, renamed b.) ANTICOSTI in 1927, c.) RISACUA in 1946, d.) GEORGE HINDMAN in 1955, and e.) ELIZABETH HINDMAN in 1962. Scrapped at Duluth, Minnesota, in 1971.

J. P. MORGAN JR (Hull#373) was launched November 13, 1909, at Lorain, Ohio, for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co.

HOMER D. WILLIAMS was involved in a collision with the steamer OTTO M. REISS at Duluth November 13, 1917.

In 1984, HOMER D. WILLIAMS was towed to Thunder Bay, Ontario, by the tug MALCOLM for dismantling.

On 13 November 1870, the schooner E. FITZGERALD left Port Huron on her maiden voyage to load lumber at Au Sable, Michigan, for Chicago. She was commanded by Capt. A. McTavish.

On 13 November 1883, H. C. AKELEY (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 240 foot, 1,187 tons, built in 1881, at Grand Haven, Michigan) was carrying corn from Chicago to Buffalo when she encountered a heavy storm off Holland, Michigan. She took the disabled tug PROTECTOR in tow but let her go when her own rudder broke off. AKELEY anchored but started to sink when she fell into the troughs of the waves. The disabled schooner DRIVER managed to save 12 of the crew who had taken to AKELEY's yawl before she went down. 6 lives were lost.

Captain W. H. Van Dyke was born at Escanaba, Michigan, on November 13, 1871, and spent most of his life on the Great Lakes (he joined the crew of a schooner at the age of 15). He first captained the Pere Marquette Line Steamer PERE MARQUETTE 8 then, in 1916, he joined the Pere Marquette carferry fleet. His first command was the str. PERE MARQUETTE 15. Then for 10 years he served as master of the PERE MARQUETTE 17, and after the launch of the CITY OF FLINT 32 in 1929, he served as master of the PERE MARQUETTE 22.

On 13 November 1865, CLARA PARKER (3-mast wooden schooner, 175 foot, 425 gross tons, built in 1865, at Detroit, Michigan) was fighting a losing battle with storm induced leaks, so she was beached 400 yards off shore near the mouth of the Pigeon River, south of Grand Haven, Michigan. The local Lifesaving Service plucked all 9 of the crew from the rigging by breeches buoy after the vessel had gone down to her decks and was breaking up.

On 13 November 1888, LELAND (wooden steam barge, 148 foot, 366 gross tons, built in 1873, at New Jerusalem, Ohio) burned at Huron, Ohio. She was valued at $20,000 and insured for $15,000. She was rebuilt and lasted until 1910.

JAMES DAVIDSON (steel propeller bulk freighter, 587 foot, 8,349 gross tons, built at Wyandotte, Michigan, in 1920) entered service on 13 Nov 1920, for the Globe Steamship Co. (G. A. Tomlinson, mgr.) when she loaded 439,000 bushels of wheat at Duluth, Minnesota, for delivery to Buffalo, New York. She was the last ship built at Wyandotte, Michigan.

An unnamed salty (formerly RANGUINI) arrived at Milwaukee's heavy lift dock on Saturday night, 13 Nov 1999, to load a large desalinization filtration system built in Milwaukee for Korea. The vessel entered the Seaway in ballast for Milwaukee on 09 Nov 1999. The following day, the crew rigged scaffolding over the side so the new name BBC GERMANY could be painted on the ship.

The Toledo Blade published the following vessel passages for Detroit on this date in 1903: -Up- VOLUNTEER, AMAZON, HARLOW, 12:30 Friday morning; ROCKEFELLER, 4:20; MARISKA, 4:40; FRENCH, 5:20; CONEMAUGH, 6; S M STEPHENSON, FAUSTIN, barges, 7:30; OLIVER, MITCHELL, (sailed), 7:50; AVERILL, 8.

1909: The steamers CHARLES WESTON and WARD AMES collided in lower Whitefish Bay. The former, which had been at anchor waiting to head downbound through the Soo Locks, ran for shore but settled on the bottom. The ship was saved, repaired and last sailed as c) SAUCON for Bethlehem Transportation before being scrapped at Hamilton, ON in 1950.

1909: JAMES H. HOYT went aground on a reef about two miles off the northeast corner of Outer Island after the engine was disabled in a snowstorm. The vessel was refloated November 29 and later became the BRICOLDOC.

1929: BRITON was wrecked in Lake Erie off Point Abino. The stranded vessel was battered for two days before being abandoned as a total loss.

1934: WILLIAM A. REISS (i) stranded off Sheboygan while inbound with 7025 tons of coal from Toledo. The ship was refloated November 17 with heavy damage and considered a total loss.

1942: H.M. PELLATT, a former Great Lakes canal freighter, was sailing as f) SCILLIN under the flag of Italy, when it was hit by gunfire from the British submarine H.M.S. PROTEUS while 9 miles off Kuriat, Tunisia, and sank.

1956: The downbound and grain-laden GEORGE HINDMAN and the upbound MANCHESTER EXPLORER collided in fog on the St. Lawrence above Lachine and both ships were damaged.

1958: LUNAN, a Pre-Seaway trader on the Great Lakes, sustained major bottom damage in a grounding on the St. Lawrence near Murray Bay. The ship was refloated, towed to Lauzon for repairs and it returned to service as b) MARIDAN C. in 1959.

1967: SANTA REGINA, the first American saltwater vessel to use the St. Lawrence Seaway, put into San Francisco with boiler problems and machinery damage while headed from Los Angeles to Saigon, South Vietnam as f) NORBERTO CAPAY. The vessel was sold at auction and towed to Kaohsiung, Taiwan, for scrapping in 1969.

1971: The small St. Lawrence freighter C. DE BAILLON, better known as a) DONNACONA NO. 2 and b) MIRON C., went aground at Mont Louis and was a total loss.

1975: There was a boiler explosion on the Egyptian freighter CLEOPATRA after leaving Hartlepool, England, for Alexandria, Egypt, and 8 crewmen were severely injured with at least one fatality. The former Victory Ship first traveled through the Seaway in 1963. It was scrapped at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, in 1981.

1976: OCEAN SOVEREIGN lost steering at Sault Ste. Marie and was wedged into the wall at the Soo Locks. The rudder was damaged and the Greek saltie had to be towed to Lauzon, Quebec, for repairs. The vessel initially traded inland as a) BOLNES in 1970 and returned as b) OCEAN SOVEREIGN for the first time in 1973. It was scrapped at Ulsan, South Korea, as d) MARIA JOSE after being blown aground from the anchorage during Typhoon Vera on September 27, 1986.

1979: A steering failure put VANDOC aground at Harvey Island in the Brockville Narrows. The vessel spent time at Port Weller Dry Docks after being released.

1996: JOLLITY reported it was taking water in the engine room (Pos: 17.47 N / 119.20 E). The ship was was taken in tow two days later and reached Hong Kong on November 18. The vessel was scrapped at Chittagong, Bangladesh, in 1999.

1997: ARCADIA BERLIN visited the Great Lakes in 1971 when it was a year old. The ship was carrying bagged cement and sailing as f) ALLISSA when it collided with and sank the Ukrainian vessel SMENA off Yangon, Myanmar. The former was apparently laid up with collision damage and scrapped at Alang, India, in 1998.

2002: WILFRED SYKES was inbound with a cargo of limestone when it went aground in Muskegon Lake. Some of the cargo was lightered to PERE MARQUETTE 41 and the stranded ship was pulled free.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Great Lakes/Seaway iron ore trade unchanged in October

11/12 - Cleveland, Ohio – Shipments of iron ore on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway totaled 5.3 million tons in October, a virtual tie with a year ago. However, shipments trailed the month’s 5-year average by 10 percent.

Shipments from U.S. Great Lakes ports totaled 4.8 million tons in October, an increase of 5.4 percent. However, loadings at Canadian terminals in the Seaway fell nearly 35 percent to just 482,720 tons.

Year-to-date the iron ore trade stands at 43.4 million tons, a decrease of 2.2 percent compared to the same point in 2015. Year-over-year, loadings at U.S. ports total 39.1 million tons, an increase of 1.5 percent, but shipments from Canadian ports in the St. Lawrence Seaway have slipped to 4.3 million tons, a decrease of nearly 27 percent.

Lake Carriers’ Association

 

Beaver Island ferry stranded in Lake Michigan, escorted back to shore

11/12 - Beaver Island, Mich. – In windy, wavy conditions on the water a ferry had to call for back up when it became stranded in Lake Michigan. The Beaver Island Boat Company's Emerald Isle lost propulsion shortly after it left for its 8:30 a.m. trip Thursday.

The ferry left Beaver Island and was heading to Charlevoix when it happened. The engineer onboard was able to fix the issue, but decided to head back to the island as the U.S. Coast Guard escorted them back. They believe there was a fuel issue that caused the boat to stop moving. The ferry with four people onboard made it to Beaver Island around 2:30 p.m.

"The weather is a little rough today and so we were concerned for our passengers and the safety of the vessel," Beaver Island Boat Company president Margo Marks said. "We were escorted back to Beaver Island."

Anyone who needs to get off Beaver Island will have to use flight service for the time being.

9 & 10 News

 

Port Reports -  November 12

Silver Bay, Minn.
Mesabi Miner, according to AIS, is headed for Ashtabula after loading pellets in Silver Bay. This will be her third straight trip on this run.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Isolda and HHL Rhine were loading grain on Friday. Bluebill was at anchor.

Munising, Mich.
H. Lee White was upbound in lower Lake Huron Friday evening showing a Munising destination.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Federal Baltic was docked on Friday, and Algoma Transport was at anchor.

Indiana Harbor, Ind.
Baie St. Paul was unloading at ArcelorMittal Friday evening.

Port Inland, Mich. – Denny Dushane
Herbert C. Jackson was expected to load on Veterans Day in the late afternoon. Wilfred Sykes is expected to arrive on Saturday in the early morning. Following the Sykes, there are no vessels until Tuesday, November 15, when Calumet is expected to arrive in the mid-afternoon.

Cedarville, Mich. – Denny Dushane
There were no vessels loading on Veterans Day and none were expected. Due in for Saturday is the Joseph H. Thompson in the late morning. Following the Thompson there are no vessels due until Tuesday, November 15, when Cuyahoga is expected during the early morning.

Calcite, Mich. – Denny Dushane
There were no vessels loading on Veterans Day and none are due until Sunday when the Great Republic is expected in the early afternoon for the North Dock.

Stoneport, Mich. – Denny Dushane
Philip R. Clarke was expected on Veterans Day in the late afternoon to early evening to load. There are no boats scheduled for Saturday. Two vessels are due for Sunday, with the barge Great Lakes Trader / tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort expected during the morning, followed by Herbert C. Jackson in the late afternoon. There are no vessels scheduled for Monday, November 14. Due in Tuesday, November 15, is the Cason J. Callaway in the early morning.

Goderich, Ont.
Radcliffe R. Latimer was at anchor Friday evening, possibly waiting for more favorable winds before entering port.

Toledo, Ohio – Denny Dushane
As of 8 p.m. Friday, the saltwater vessel Lyulin had left the Port Colborne, Ont., anchorage and was underway for Toledo. According to her AIS, she has an ETA of noon Saturday. Hon. James L. Oberstar was at the Torco Dock unloading iron ore pellets on Veterans Day. Also due at Torco are the barge James L. Kuber / tug Victory on November 14 in the mid-afternoon. Lee A. Tregurtha is also due at Torco on November 16 in the early morning. Due at the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock is the barge Lewis J. Kuber / tug Olive L. Moore on November 13 in the late afternoon. Michipicoten is due at the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock November 14 in the mid-afternoon. Due at the CSX Coal Dock is the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin on Saturday in the early afternoon. The barge James L. Kuber / tug Victory are due at CSX on November 14 in the evening. The CSL Welland remained in port upriver Friday, continuing to load grain at one of the elevators.

Sandusky, Ohio – Don Lee
Arthur M. Anderson arrived at 10 p.m. Friday. A load at Sandusky typically takes 8-12 hours.

 

Huron makes its last trip as Arnold Line ferry; 138-year legacy ends Friday

11/12 - Mackinac Island, Mich. – Friday marked the beginning of a new era for Star Line Mackinac Island Hydrojet Ferry by purchasing Arnold Line's assets. It also marked the end of the iconic Arnold Line.

Arnold Line was the oldest Mackinac Island ferry, offering service to the island for 138 years. The ferry Huron took it's last run under an Arnold Line captain Thursday night.

It's something Arnold Line employees say was hard to come to grips with. While about 75 people lost their jobs, long-time employees say the hardest part is seeing the end to the history.

"We're all standing together and we said last night, as long as we're all still alive, the Arnold Transit Company still exists. They can take the boats from us. They can take the docks from us," long time Arnold Line Captain Preston Allers said. "All the workers made this company."

Arnold Line operated winter service in the iconic Huron for more than 60 years.

9 & 10 News

 

Michigan company recovers WWII planes from bottom of Lake Michigan

11/12 - South Bend, Ind. – On this Veterans Day, we remember an important part of World War II history that took place on the waters of Lake Michigan. The U.S. Navy used the lake to train thousands of pilots heading to fight in the Pacific. Pilots learned how to take off and land on makeshift aircraft carriers.

When Pearl Harbor was attacked - the U.S. Navy was not prepared to wage a large-scale war. The U.S. had to ramp up airplane production and train pilots to fly them. Lake Michigan proved to be a great spot for this naval aircraft training. It was protected from enemy fire because it was insulated by U.S. and Canadian territory.

17,000 pilots became certified naval aviators over the lake. About 130 aircraft were lost to the depths of the lake, and 10 pilots lost their lives there between March 1942 and September 1945. Close to 50 of those have since been recovered. Many of those efforts are thanks to A & T Recovery, a company that works to rescue these forgotten aircraft.

"It was a dangerous operation – especially having to do it all year long. And they had to, because the war didn't stop," says Taras Lyssenko, A&T Recovery general manager.

Decades after the last plane dove into the lake, A & T Recovery seeks to bring them back out to see the light of day. They use a side-scan sonar to find the aircraft underwater. It's similar to an ultrasound.

The process of recovering and restoring the planes is a long process. Three of recovered planes are currently at the Air Zoo in Kalamazoo. One is fully restored, while two are undergoing restoration.

At least 100 volunteers are working to get the planes just as they appeared when they sank. "We have to create our own tools to be able to fix the parts that – those tools aren't available anymore," restoration volunteer Kevin Mazer said.

"When these airplanes come out of the water they are covered inside and out with mussel shells, and they're living creatures," says Greg Ward, Air Zoo aircraft conservator. "They're invasive species that were brought into Lake Michigan, and they cause corrosion."

Ward has been restoring planes at the Air Zoo for 28 years. At the moment, he and restoration volunteers have their hands full with these two planes now, but that's not distracting him from the need to rescue others resting at the bottom of the lake. He is concerned that time is ticking.

"Think about all of the other airplanes that are sitting on the bottom of the lake, covered in these mussels. Now, it's become almost an emergency to get funding, and get these airplanes recovered before they get turned to dust underwater," says Ward.

That's something A & T Recovery and the Air Zoo won't stop working on. The Air Zoo invites schools and the public to come help with the restoration process.

"Instead of doing it in a black box somewhere - where it goes in and five years later 'voila' look at our new airplane - we're actually doing it on our exhibit floor because we want our community to not only see it and watch the evolution of it, but we also want them to take part in it," said Air Zoo CEO Troy Thrash.

WSBT

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 12

In 1920, FRANCIS WIDLAR stranded on Pancake Shoal in Lake Superior and was written off as a total constructive loss of $327,700. The wreck was purchased by Mathews Steamship Company in 1921 and placed back in service as BAYTON. The BAYTON sailed until 1966, and the hull was later used as a temporary breakwall during construction at Burns Harbor, Indiana.

On 12 November 1878, JAMES R. BENTLEY (3-mast wooden schooner, 170 foot, 575 tons, built in 1867, at Fairport, Ohio) was carrying grain when she struck a shoal in heavy weather and foundered off 40 Mile Point on Lake Huron. Her crew was rescued in the rough seas by the bark ERASTUS CORNING.

On 12 Nov 1964, THOMAS F. COLE (steel propeller bulk freighter, 580 foot, 7,268 gross tons, built in 1907, at Ecorse, Michigan) collided with the British motor vessel INVEREWE off the south end of Pipe Island on the lower St. Marys River in foggy conditions. The COLE suffered severe damage to the port bow and was taken to Lorain for repairs.

On 12 Nov 1980, ALVA C. DINKEY (steel propeller bulk freighter, 580 foot, 7,514 gross tons, built in 1909, at Lorain, Ohio) and GOVERNOR MILLER (steel propeller bulk freighter, 593 foot, 8,240 gross tons, built in 1938, at Lorain, Ohio) arrived near El Ferrol del Caudillo, Spain for scrapping in tow of the FedNav tug CATHY B. Demolition by Miguel Partins began on 28 Nov 1980, at Vigo, Spain.

On November 12, 1919, PANAY, upbound on Lake Superior for Duluth, Minnesota, in rough weather, was one of the last vessels to see the down bound JOHN OWEN which, apparently later the same day, disappeared with all hands. Renamed b.) WILLIAM NELSON in 1928, and c.) BEN E. TATE in 1936. Scrapped at Bilbao, Spain in 1969.

On 12 November 1881, BRUNSWICK (iron propeller bulk freighter, 248 foot, built in 1881, at Wyandotte, Michigan) was carrying 1,500 tons of hard coal in a night of fitful squalls in Lake Erie. CARLINGFORD (wooden schooner, 155 foot, built in 1869, at Port Huron, Michigan) was also sailing there, loaded with 26,000 bushels of wheat. They collided. After the skipper of BRUNSWICK made sure that the sinking schooner's crew were in their lifeboats, he ran for shore with his sinking vessel, but sank a few miles off Dunkirk, New York. A total of 4 lives were lost.

On 12 November 1835, the small wooden schooner ROBERT BRUCE was sailing from Kingston, Ontario to Howell, New York when she was wrecked west of Henderson, New York. Her crew of 4, plus one passenger, were all lost.

On 12 Nov 1886, the tug WM L. PROCTOR (wooden tug, 104 foot, 117 gross tons, built in 1883, at Buffalo, New York) left Oswego, New York with the schooner-barges BOLIVIA and E.C. BUCK in tow before a big storm struck. During the snowstorm, the tug got lost and the towline broke. Alone, the PROCTOR finally made it to Charlotte, New York, badly iced up, but there was no word on the barges. They were presumed lost with all onboard.

1881: BRUNSWICK sank in Lake Erie after a collision with the CARLINGFORD. The wooden hulled, coal-laden steamer, made a run for the American shore but the effort fell short. Three lives were lost.

1914: The wooden steamer COLONIAL began to leak on Lake Erie and was beached in Rondeau Bay only to be pounded to pieces by gale force winds. All on board were rescued.

1967: The Swedish freighter TORSHOLM began visiting the Great Lakes as early as 1953. The ship was enroute from the Seaway to Stockholm when it ran aground near Uto, Sweden, and became a total loss.

1968: CLARA CLAUSEN, a Danish freighter, ran aground at Les Escoumins on the St. Lawrence and was abandoned. After being salvaged, the vessel came to the Great Lakes in 1970 and was rebuilt at Kingston as ATLANTEAN.

1974: BELVOIR (ii), enroute from Puerto Cortes, Honduras, to Corpus Christi, Texas, with a load of ore concentrates, struck a submerged object in the Gulf of Honduras and sank. Only 4 crew members are rescued while the other 21 were presumed lost.

1980: The former Lake Michigan rail car ferry PERE MARQUETTE 21 left the Great Lakes in 1974. It was lost on this date as the barge d) CONSOLIDATOR. It was hit by Hurricane Jean off the coast of Honduras while carrying a load of truck trailers.

2005: SPAN TERZA, an Italian freighter, first came through the Seaway in 1977 and returned as b) ANANGEL HORIZON in 1983. It was damaged on this date as d) SALAM 4 in a collision near Dondra Head, Sri Lanka, with SHANGHAI PRIDE and had to go to Colombo for assessment. The ship was repaired and eventually scrapped as e) ALINA at Xinhui, China, in 2009.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Vessels anchor due to wind

11/11 - Several vessels were anchored Thursday night for weather. On Lake Superior, John J. Boland, Walter J. McCarthy Jr. and the American Mariner were anchored in Bete Grise Bay off the Keweenaw. Further south, Cason J. Callaway was anchored in Keweenaw Bay. Sam Laud was anchored behind Whitefish Point. Near the Straits, James R. Barker, tug Mary E. Hannah and tug/barge Michigan/Great Lakes were anchored between St. Ignace and Mackinac Island.

 

Cross-lake shipping service planned between Milwaukee, Muskegon ports

11/11 - Milwaukee, Wis. – A group of companies from both sides of Lake Michigan plan to start a regular shipping service between the ports of Milwaukee and Muskegon, Michigan beginning in March.

Grand Rapids, Michigan-based Supply Chain Solutions Inc. is partnering with Muskegon-based Eco Ships to launch the service but is still fine-tuning the exact plans for operations. Depending on which ships are used, each crossing could make one or two round trips each day.

The idea is to move truck trailers, containers and other cargo, potentially increasing the number of loads a truck and driver can make in each trip. It would also allow companies to avoid moving cargo through Chicago and Indiana, potentially saving cost and reducing the impact on infrastructure.

“It’s going to be a significant new avenue of moving freight,” said Les Brand, Supply Chain Solutions chief executive officer. Brand and others involved in the project held a meeting Wednesday at the Port of Milwaukee with interested parties in an effort to get feedback on the needs of the market.

“I think on so many levels, this could be a winner for so many parties on both sides of the lake and for jobs and the economy,” said Paul Vornholt, Port of Milwaukee director.

Illinois-based Multi-Modal Transport Inc. will serve as the port operator for the project in Milwaukee.

Beyond helping companies save time and money on shipping, the long-term goal of the project is also to convince a rail provider to bring an intermodal station back to the Port of Milwaukee. Canadian Pacific closed its intermodal station there about four years ago. The result is container shipments have to be trucked down to Chicago before going on trains to the West Coast. Not only do the trucks have to deal with congestion on Chicago’s highways, but the containers are delayed at Chicago’s railyards. Brand said officials in Indiana and Chicago are supportive of the new service concept, believing it will reduce congestion in their infrastructure.

Jonathan Van Wylen, co-founder of Eco Ships, hopes to eventually provide on-demand service throughout the Great Lakes.

Biz Times

 

Kathryn Spirit, abandoned on Montreal's South Shore, to be dismantled, at last

11/11 - Beauharnois, Que. – The federal government has laid out its plans to eventually dismantle Kathryn Spirit, a cargo ship abandoned on Montreal's South Shore since 2011. Transport Minister Marc Garneau said Thursday a local construction company will begin work in December to build a protective embankment around the ship in order to prevent a spill and isolate it from the marine environment.

Plans and funding for the next phases, including dismantlement and removal of the vessel, are currently being finalized. Work is expected to begin in spring 2017, Garneau said in a statement. "The government of Canada recognizes the risks that abandoned, derelict and wrecked vessels pose to safe navigation, the marine environment, public health and local economies," he said.

A drop in water levels in Lac Saint-Louis over the summer led to increased concerns about the Kathryn Spirit's stability. The vessel is listing heavily to one side and is at risk of leaking millions of litres of contaminated water if it keels over.

The deputy commissioner of the Canadian Coast Guard, Julie Gascon, said the dismantling will take place on site because the ship's condition rules out transporting it elsewhere. "The situation with the vessel is stable, however, building the embankment is a priority in order to isolate completely the vessel from the environment,'' Gascon said.

Beauharnois Mayor Claude Haineault called on Ottawa to take urgent action last July, saying Lac Saint-Louis risks being contaminated if there is a spill. Original plan to scrap ship scrapped

Ironically, the government has awarded the contract to build the embankment to Groupe St-Pierre – the demolition company that towed the ship to Beauharnois in the first place, hoping to dismantle it and sell it for scrap. That plan encountered stiff opposition from local activists and environmentalists and never materialized.

The ship was then sold to a Mexican recycling company, which later went bankrupt. Garneau defended the decision to award the contract to Groupe St-Pierre, explaining that the company is located near the ship and is able to begin construction immediately. Once the first phase is done, Ottawa will put out a tender for the ship's dismantling, probably next spring.

Garneau said a five-year, $1.5-billion ocean protection plan announced last Monday would help address the larger problem of what to do about hundreds of abandoned vessels across the country. While the exact numbers aren't available, Garneau said estimates suggest there are between 600 and 700 abandoned vessels on Canada's three coasts.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the funding will go towards creating a marine safety system, restoring marine ecosystems and research into oil spill cleanup methods.

CBC

 

Port Reports -  November 11

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Edgar B. Speer departed Duluth from Port Terminal at 05:50 Thursday, and dropped anchor offshore. CSL Niagara arrived through the Superior entry at 06:18 and headed up the harbor to CN Duluth to load iron ore pellets. Cornelia arrived from anchor at 14:10 and docked at Port Terminal. Federal Maas departed from Riverland Ag at 15:00. CSL Niagara followed her out Thursday evening with ore from CN. Cornelia shifted to Riverland to load in the evening. In Superior, Manitoulin arrived at 01:15 to load ore at BN. She departed at 11:30.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Isolda, HHL Rhine and Bluebill were at anchor Thursday. Algoma Equinox was loading.

Drummond Island, Mich.
Mississagi was loading stone on Thursday night.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Lubie was in port Thursday evening. Algoma Transport and Federal Baltic were expected.

Port Inland, Mich. – Denny Dushane
Herbert C. Jackson arrived Wednesday in the early morning to load. Wilfred Sykes was also due in on Wednesday and went to anchor awaiting the departure of the Jackson. There were no boats scheduled Thursday. Herbert C. Jackson is due to load again on Friday in the early morning.

Cedarville, Mich. – Denny Dushane
There were no vessels loading on Wednesday and no vessels are scheduled until Saturday, when the Joseph H. Thompson is due during the early morning to load. There are no vessels scheduled Sunday. Due Monday, November 14, is the Cuyahoga in the early morning to load. Following that, there are tentatively no vessels scheduled until November 20, when Cason J. Callaway is due in the early evening.

Calcite, Mich. – Denny Dushane
Philip R. Clarke loaded Wednesday and was due to depart around 3 p.m. There are no other vessels scheduled until Sunday, November 13, when the Great Republic is expected to arrive in the late morning for the North Dock.

Stoneport, Mich. – Denny Dushane
Arthur M. Anderson arrived Wednesday in the early evening. They were expected to depart on Thursday at around 7 a.m. Due Thursday was the Great Republic in the late morning. They were expected to depart around 9:30 p.m. Due Friday at noon is the Philip R. Clarke. There are no vessels scheduled for Saturday. Due in Sunday are the barge Great Lakes Trader / tug Joyce L. Van Enkevort in the morning, and Herbert C. Jackson in the mid-afternoon. Due Monday, November 14 during the early morning is the Cason J. Callaway. There are no vessels due Tuesday, November 15. Expected Wednesday, November 16, is the Joseph H. Thompson in the late evening.

Goderich, Ont.
Federal Bristol was still loading grain on Thursday afternoon. Radcliffe R. Latimer was enroute in the late evening for salt.

Toledo, Ohio – Denny Dushane
The barge Lakes Contender / tug Ken Boothe Sr. loaded at the CSX Coal Dock on Wednesday. Also due at CSX is the H. Lee White, expected Thursday in the early afternoon. Next at CSX is the Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin, due on Saturday in the early morning. The tug Victory / barge James L. Kuber are due at CSX on Monday in the early evening. Algowood is due at CSX on Tuesday, November 15, in the mid-afternoon. Two vessels are scheduled for arrivals at the Midwest Terminal Stone Dock. First are the barge Lewis J. Kuber / tug Olive L. Moore, making a rare, possibly first-ever visit to the dock on November 12 during the evening. Also making a rare visit is the Michipicoten, due on November 13 in the late evening. At the Torco Dock, Hon. James L. Oberstar is expected on Veterans Day in the morning. The barge James L. Kuber / tug Victory are due at Torco on November 14 in the early afternoon, and Lee A. Tregurtha is due at Torco on November 16 in the early morning. Vessels in port at the time of this report included Cuyahoga, docked along the Maumee River, and CSL Welland loading grain.

 

Great Lakes water temperatures going up when they should be cooling

11/11 - The water temperatures on the Great Lakes continue to amaze on the warm side. In fact, in this recent much warmer than normal weather pattern, Great Lakes surface water actually warmed.

The lake wide surface water temperature warmed one degree in the past few days of November. This occurred at a time when water temperatures should steadily decrease.

Read more, and view a video and graphs at this link

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 11

The Port of Huron, Ohio received its first grain boat in seven years when Westdale Shipping's AVONDALE arrived at the Pillsbury Elevator on November 11, 1971, to load 200,000 bushels of soybeans for Toronto, Ontario.

On 11 November 1883, NEMESIS (2-mast wooden schooner, 74 foot, 82 gross tons, built in 1868, at Goderich, Ontario) was wrecked in a terrific storm that some called a hurricane. She went ashore near Bayfield, Ontario, on Lake Huron. She may have been recovered since her registration was not closed until 1907. In 1876, this little schooner rescued all but one of the crew from the sinking freighter NEW YORK.

The Armistice Day Storm of November 11, 1940, was one of the worst storms in the recorded history of Lake Michigan. In all, the storm claimed 5 vessels, and 66 lives. The storm hit late Monday afternoon, November 11th, with winds of hurricane proportions. The winds struck suddenly from the southwest at about 2:30 p.m. and were accompanied by drenching rain, which later changed to snow. The winds reached peak velocities of 75 miles per hour, the highest in local maritime history.

Some of the vessels affected were: CITY OF FLINT 32: Beached at Ludington, no damage. Jens Vevang, relief captain, in command. Her regular captain, Charles Robertson, was on shore leave. Also: PERE MARQUETTE 21: Blown into a piling at Ludington, no damage, captained by Arthur Altschwager. She had 5 passengers aboard. CITY OF SAGINAW 31: Arrived Milwaukee 6 hours late with over a foot of water in her hull. The wireless aerial was missing and her seagate was smashed by the waves. She was captained by Ed Cronberg. Ann Arbor carferry WABASH: A railcar broke loose from its moorings on her car deck and rolled over, nearly crushing a crewman. The steamer NOVADOC: Ran aground at Juniper Beach, South of Pentwater, Michigan. Two crewman (cooks) drowned when the ship broke in half. Seventeen crewman, found huddled in the pilothouse, were rescued by Captain Clyde Cross and his 2 crewman, Gustave Fisher and Joe Fontane of the fishing tug THREE BROTHERS. CONNEAUT of 1916, ran hard aground on Lansing Shoal near Manistique, Michigan, on Lake Michigan. She reportedly had lost her propeller and rudder. Two days later she was pulled off. The SINALOA had taken on a load of sand near Green Island and was heading for Chicago through Death's Door on Wisconsin's Door Peninsula when the November 11th Armistice Day storm of 1940, struck in upper Lake Michigan. During the storm the SINALOA lost her rudder. The anchor was dropped but her anchor cable parted. In this helpless condition she ran aground at Sac Bay on Michigan's Garden Peninsula. Fortunately the stricken vessel was close to shore where the Coast Guard was able to rescue the entire crew. Declared a constructive total loss, her owner collected the insurance and forfeited the vessel to the Roen Salvage Co.

ANNA C MINCH: Sank South of Pentwater with a loss of 24 lives.

WILLIAM B DAVOCK: of the Interlake fleet, Capt. Charles W. Allen, sank in 215 of water off Pentwater, Michigan. There were no survivors among the crew of 33.

The fishing tugs INDIAN and RICHARD H: Lost with all hands off South Haven, Michigan.

On 11 November 1872, the schooner WILLIS collided with the bark ELIZABETH JONES on Lake Erie and sank in a few minutes. The crew was saved.

On 11 November 1936, J. OSWALD BOYD (steel propeller fuel tanker, 244 foot, 1,806 gross tons, built in 1913, in Scotland) was carrying 900,000 gallons of gasoline when she stranded on Simmons Reef on the north side of Beaver Island. The U.S. Coast Guard from Beaver Island rescued the entire crew of 20.

On 11 November 1890, BRUNO (wooden propeller bulk freighter, 136 foot. 475 gross tons, built in 1863, at Montreal) was carrying coal to Cleveland with the schooner LOUISA in tow when she struck Magnetic Reef, south of Cockburn Island in Georgian Bay and sank in rough weather. No lives were lost.

On 11 November 1835, the 2-mast wooden schooner COMET was carrying iron and ashes on Lake Erie when she foundered in a gale, one mile northwest of Dunkirk, New York. Just her topmasts protruded from the water. All seven on board lost their lives, including a passenger who was a college student bound for Vermont.

In a storm on the night of 11 November 1874, The schooner LA PETITE (3-mast wooden schooner, 119 foot, 172 gross tons, built 1866, J. Ketchum, Huron, Ohio) was on Lake Michigan carrying a cargo of wheat and corn from Chicago when she sprang a bad leak and tried first to reach Ludington, then Manistee. Before reaching safety, she grounded off Big Point au Sable, eight miles from land, in eight feet of water. Previous to striking, the vessel had lost her bowsprit and foremast. After she struck, her main and mizzenmasts went by the board, and the schooner began to break up rapidly. The crew clung to the forecastle deck, and when that washed away, four men were drowned. Captain O. B. Wood had his arms broken by the falling off a square-sail yard. When he fell into the water, the ship's dog jumped in and kept him afloat until they were rescued by the crew of the steam barge CHARLES REITZ. Of the 10 crewmen, six were saved. The LA PETITE was salvaged and repaired and lasted until 1903, when she was lost in another storm.

On 11 Nov 1999, the Maltese flag bulk carrier ALCOR was examined by personnel from Transport Canada, the Canadian Coast Guard, a salvage company and the vessel's owners in hopes of forming a plan to save the vessel. She ran aground on a sand bar off the eastern tip of d'Orleans Island on the St. Lawrence River two days earlier. This vessel did not visit Great Lakes ports under the name ALCOR, but she did so under her two previous names, firstly as PATRICIA V and then as the Soviet flag MEKHANIK DREN. The Groupe Desgagnes finally refloated the ALCOR on 05 Dec 1999, after part of the cargo of clinker had been removed. The ship was then towed to Quebec City. Later, it was reported that Groupe Desgagnes purchased the ALCOR from its Greek owners.

Below is a first hand account of the Storm of 1913, from the journal of John Mc Laughlin transcribed by his great grandson Hugh McNichol. John was working on an unknown vessel during the Storm of 1913. The boat was captained by John McAlpine and Harry Roberts as Chief Engineer. The boat was loading iron ore in Escanaba when the storm started on November 8th.

Tuesday, November 11, 1913: I got up at 12 a.m. and went on watch. We were above Presque Isle. It is still blowing hard and quite a sea running. Presque Isle at 1:45 a.m., Thunder Bay Island at 4:30 a.m., Harbor Beach at 1:00 p.m., we are about in the River at 7:05 p.m. It is fine tonight, wind gone down.

1940: The famous Armistice Day storm claims the ANNA C. MINCH, WILLIAM B. DAVOCK and NOVADOC (ii), on Lake Michigan and leaves CITY OF FLINT 32 and SINALOA aground and damaged.

1946: The former Canada Steamship lines bulk canaller LANARK was scuttled off the coast of Ireland with a load of World War Two bombs.

1977: The 380-foot, 8-inch long West German freighter GLORIA made 4 visits to the Great Lakes in 1959-1960. It went aground on the Adriatic at Sestrice Island as d) ARISTOTELES. While the 25-year old hull was refloated, it was declared a total loss and towed to Split, Yugoslavia, for scrapping.

1980: The DINIE S. suffered an engineroom fire at Palermo, Italy and became a total loss. The ship had visited the Seaway as a) CATHERINE SARTORI (1959-1967) and b) CURSA (1967) and was sailing under a seventh name. It was scrapped at Palermo in 1985

1980: CITY OF LICHFIELD stranded near Antalya, Turkey, while leaving the anchorage in heavy weather as c) CITY OF LEEDS. The ship was refloated but never sailed again and was eventually scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey, in 1984. The ship had visited the Great Lakes in 1964.

1995: JAMES NORRIS was loading stone at Colborne, ON when the wind changed leaving the hull exposed to the gale. The ship was repeatedly pounded against the dock until it settled on the bottom. Subsequent hull repairs at Port Weller Dry Docks resulted in the port side being all welded while the starboard remained riveted.

1995: The Cuban freighter AREITO had a mechanical problem in the St. Lambert Lock and had to be towed back to Montreal for repairs. This SD-14 class vessel was scrapped at Alang, India, as e) DUNLIN in 2001.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Community remembers Edmund Fitzgerald 41 years later

11/10 - Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. – The Edmund Fitzgerald’s recovered bell will toll 30 times throughout the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum on Thursday to commemorate the 41st anniversary of the famed freighter succumbing to Lake Superior.

The public is invited to gather at the Paradise museum for the 7 p.m. memorial service. There is a full day scheduled in memory of the Great Lakes’ most famous shipwreck starting at noon.

“What we do is have a couple speakers come in each year. In some cases, they speak of their experience on the night the boat went down,” said Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum Executive Director Bruce Lynn, describing the steamer’s memorial service. “This year will be Jim MacDonald… He’s going to be speaking of some of his experiences on the morning of Nov. 11 (1975).”

Lynn explained that MacDonald used his personal fishing tugboat to help search for survivors the morning after the storm that sank the Fitzgerald. MacDonald sailed from Mamainse Harbour, Ont., to the Whitefish Point resting spot to help search. None of the 29 crewmembers were found alive.

“We ring the bell 30 times,” added Lynn (29 times for the lost sailors and once for all sailors who have perished on the Great Lakes before and since). The Fitzgerald’s bell was recovered by scuba-divers in 1995.

The Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum will also be opening at noon to mark the special occasion.

“During the day, the museum is going to be open noon until 4 p.m.,” said Lynn, adding that the entry fee will be by donation. “Our shipwreck theatre, which will show Fitzgerald related videos, will be open from noon until 4 p.m.”

Soo Evening News

 

Port Reports -  November 10

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
American Century arrived Duluth at 01:02 and headed to Midwest Energy to load coal. Edgar B. Speer arrived at 01:49 and docked in a slip to wait for an opening at the dock in Two Harbors. Lee A. Tregurtha then departed with ore from CN Duluth at 03:42, bound for Indiana Harbor. American Century finished loading and departed at 14:50. Her fleetmate John J. Boland arrived shortly after at 15:25, and also headed to Midwest Energy. Edgar B. Speer was expected to depart and head for Two Harbors late Wednesday night. Federal Maas continued loading at Riverland Ag. In Superior, Frontenac arrived at 07:24 to load iron ore pellets at BN. She departed at 16:10.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
HHL Amur departed on Wednesday. Isolda, HHL Rhine and Bluebill were at anchor. Algoma Guardian was expected in the late evening or early morning.

Marquette, Mich.
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. was in port Wednesday afternoon. Michipicoten and Kaye E. Barker were headed in in the late evening.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Burns Harbor, Stewart J. Cort and Federal Bering remained in port on Wednesday, likely delayed by problems with the unloading equipment on the dock. Lubie was downbound for Burns Harbor Wednesday afternoon.

Gary, Ind.
Roger Blough arrived to unload on Wednesday early evening.

Rogers City, Mich.
Philip R. Clarke departed Wednesday afternoon after loading stone.

Goderich, Ont.
Federal Bristol was still loading grain on Wednesday afternoon. Radcliffe R. Latimer is enroute.

Toledo, Ohio – Jim Hoffman
At 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, CSL Welland was going upriver to one of the elevators to load grain. She has been at Windsor for the past several days, so she may only be in port for a short visit.

Buffalo, N.Y. – Brian W.
Samuel de Champlain / Innovation pulled into Lafarge around 4 a.m. Wednesday. They remained at the dock at 6:20 p.m.

Kingston, Ont.
The chemical tanker SCT Monte Rosa finished her engine repairs and was headed westbound for Hamilton Wednesday afternoon. She had been anchored off Tibbetts Point since last Thursday.

 

Local steel output falls for fifth straight week

11/10 - Raw steel production in the Great Lakes region fell to 612,000 tons last week, down from 615,000 tons a week earlier.

The drop of 3,000 tons was the fifth straight week of decline in the Great Lakes region.

Capacity utilization nationwide was only 67.5 percent last week, the ninth straight week it’s been mired under 70 percent. Overall U.S. steel output rose by 27,000 tons last week to 1.6 million tons, according to an American Iron and Steel Institute estimate.

Nationally, steel output so far this year continues to trail the sluggish 2015 pace by about 1.36 million tons, a decline of 1.77 percent. In 2015, during the worst import crisis in more than a decade, steel output in the United States declined by 10.5 percent from the year before, according to the World Steel Association.

Much of the raw steel production in the Great Lakes region takes place in Lake and Porter counties in Indiana.

Production in the Southern District, which spans mini-mills across the South, rose to 570,000 tons last week, up from 546,000 tons the previous week, a 4.3 percent gain.

National steel production through Nov. 7 of this year totaled 75.1 million tons, a decline of 1.8 percent, at a capacity utilization rate of 71.3 percent. The United States made 76.4 million tons of steel at a capacity utilization rate of 70.9 percent through the same period last year.

NW Indiana Times

 

Great Lakes museum looking for WWII Navy pilots

11/10 - Lakewood, Ohio – The head of the National Museum of the Great Lakes is on a quest. He’s trying to locate Navy pilots who trained on Lake Michigan during World War II. It’s a little known chapter of the lake’s history.

Between 1942 and 1945, thousands of pilots landed planes on the USS Wolverine and USS Sable, two aircraft carriers stationed on Lake Michigan. Among the pilots, former president George H.W. Bush.

A new documentary called “Heroes on Deck” details that mission. The film features home videos captured by one of the pilots, as well as video from the National Archives. A screening is scheduled at 7 p.m., Dec. 2, at the Lakewood Civic Auditorium near Cleveland, Ohio.

“It’s the story of the operation of these aircraft carriers and what remains of their activities, which are essentially plane wrecks – almost 100 plane wrecks that occurred on Lake Michigan during training,” said Christopher Gillcrist, executive director of the National Museum of the Great Lakes.

The film’s director, John Davies, says pilots practiced landing planes for just one day before heading to California and then to Japan. “They had one day in the classroom, one day practicing chalk outlines in local fields,” said Davies. “Day 3, it was out to the carrier. They had to find one of these 2 carriers, land and take off from it 8 times.”

Gillcrist wants pilots who trained on Lake Michigan to be a part of a December showing in Lakewood.

“We’ll be able to interview some of about their experiences and help better understand what it was like to land a navy aircraft on Lake Michigan,” said Gillcrist. He estimates that about 2,000 pilots are still alive – and fewer than 10 may be in Northeast Ohio.

Davies will speak at next month’s screening. He started looking into the military’s operation on Lake Michigan in the 80s after a chance encounter at a bar.

“A guy told me there was a 100 planes sitting at the bottom of lake Michigan,” explained Davies. He learned more about the mission and realeased a 20 minute film in 1988 called “Top Guns of 1943”. Davies’ interest returned after a call from a friend who was on a team of divers searching for the planes in the lake.

Davies says he’s amazed by the number of pilots he’s seen at screenings of the film.

“At most of these screenings that I do around the country, sometimes somebody stands up in the audience and says, ‘I was a pilot, I flew off those carriers,’” said Davies. “They’re usually late 80s, early 90s.”

Pilots or their families can contact the Great Lakes Museum at glhs1@inlandseas.org.

Great Lakes Echo

 

Coast Guard hosts outreach forum for new towing vessel regulations

11/10 - Lemont, Ill. — Marine Safety Unit Chicago and the U.S. Coast Guard Towing Vessel National Center of Expertise hosted an informational outreach forum Wednesday with towing vessel operators to explain the implementation of the new regulations for the inspection of towing vessels, Subchapter M.

The meeting was held at the offices of Illinois Marine Towing in Lemont Wednesday morning with more than 80 industry representatives from the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River Basin attending.

This informational outreach forum coordinated by Marine Safety Unit Chicago was one of several national outreach forums designed to educate towing vessel operators of the new regulations establishing safety regulations governing the inspection, standards, and safety management systems of towing vessels.

“Outreach efforts such as this meeting are needed throughout the Great Lakes and convey that we’re all working towards the same goal – safety,” said Cmdr. Zeita Merchant, commanding officer of MSU Chicago. “Educating industry on inspections requirements is crucial to achieving compliance with the regulations and ensuring the safe operation of commercial vessels.”

In addition to 100 miles of shoreline along the southern portion of Lake Michigan, MSU Chicago is responsible for 186 miles of the Illinois River system. This waterway is a critical artery for the transit of towing vessels moving goods and services as far north as Minneapolis, Minnesota, to the basin of the Mississippi River. There are approximately 77 towing vessels within MSU Chicago’s area of responsibility that will be regulated by Subchapter M.

Subchapter M will be incorporated into Title 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations and outlines the requirements for the design, construction, onboard equipment and operation of new and existing towing vessels.

The regulations were effective July 20, 2016, with a compliance date of July 30, 2018; however, there are provisions that allow for certain regulations to be phased in over time.

The complete final rule is available via the Federal Register at: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2016/06/20/2016-12857/inspection-of-towing-vessel

USCG

 

Dossin Museum hosts sold out Lost Mariners Remembrance, free webcast this evening

11/10 - Detroit, Mich. – Lake Erie’s very own Perfect Storm hit on October 20, 1916. Through the course of the day and night, four commercial vessels were lost to their watery graves, taking more than 50 sailors with them. Join Carrie Sowden, Archaeological Director of the National Museum of the Great Lakes, as we discuss each ship, their history, and what happened as they went down – all across Lake Erie. The stories of the D.L Filer, James B Colgate, Merida, and Marshall Butters are as different as can be. In this year, the 100th anniversary of the storm and losses, we will honor the sailors and their vessels.

The sold out event starts at 6:20 p.m. the Lost Mariners Remembrance webcast will be streamed from the museum starting with a concert by Lee Murdock followed by the Remembrance program.

Webcast will be streamed on Facebook at Facebook.com/Boatnerd

Detroit Historical Society

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 10

On this day in 1892, whaleback barge 102 loaded 2,073 tons of iron ore at Superior consigned to Cleveland. This was the first shipment of Mesabi Range iron ore carried by Oglebay Norton.

On 10 November 1901, the ROBERT A. PACKER (wooden freighter, 209 foot, 921 tons, built in 1882, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin) was found by the wrecking tug RUMBLE eleven miles north of off De Tour, Michigan, ablaze and abandoned by her crew. Captain Isaac Zess of the RUMBLE fought the flames for four hours and then was helped by the THOMAS W. PALMER. The fire was speedily extinguished with both vessels pouring water on the flames and the PACKER was tied up at the dock in DeTour, Michigan.

On 10 November 1887, A. BOODY (wooden schooner, 137 foot, 287 gross tons, built in 1863, at Toledo, Ohio) struck the Port Austin reef on Lake Huron and was declared a total loss. However, after ten days of hard work, the BOODY was finally pulled off the reef.

The EDMUND FITZGERALD foundered on Lake Superior during a severe storm November 10, 1975, at approximately 7:10 p.m. about 17 miles north-northwest of Whitefish Point, Michigan, at position 47 0'N by 85 7'W in Canadian waters.

IMPERIAL ST CLAIR (Hull#57) was launched November 10, 1973 , by Port Weller Drydocks at St. Catharines, Ontario. Renamed b.) ALGOSAR in 1998, sold off the lakes, renamed c.) GENESIS EXPLORER in 2005.

The STEELTON sailed on her maiden voyage for Bethlehem Steel Corp. on November 10, 1943.

The ROBERT C. STANLEY, in her first season of operation, on November 10, 1943 during a Lake Superior storm, developed a significant crack across her spar deck and 12 to 14 feet down both sides of her hull. As the hull worked in the heavy seas, the crack widened to as much as three to four inches. The crew ran cables between the fore and aft winches that maintained a force sufficient to hold the hull together.

November 10, 1972, in the vicinity of the entrance to the East Outer Channel near Amherstburg, Ontario, the UNITED STATES GYPSUM collided with her towing tug MAINE and as a result her bow was punctured. The GYPSUM was beached to prevent sinking.

Pittsburgh Steamship's WILLIAM A. IRVIN (Hull#811) was launched November 10, 1937, at Lorain, Ohio. The IRVIN serves as a museum ship in Duluth, Minnesota since 1986.

November 10, 1892, the carferry ANN ARBOR NO 1 left the shipyard in Toledo, Ohio, bound for Frankfort on her maiden voyage. In 1895, the first major accident caused by cars coming free on the car deck of a rail ferry happened when the ANN ARBOR NO 1, was on an eastbound voyage. Approaching Frankfort in a northwest gale, she rolled so violently that many of the car fastenings broke and the cargo began to move about on the car deck. None of the early rear-loading car ferries were equipped with a sea gate to protect the stern from the seas, and seven cars of flour and butter went off the deck of the NO 1 into the lake. Captain Charles Moody resigned from the Ann Arbor as a result of this incident and returned to the Pere Marquette and Goodrich lines.

ATLANTIC (formerly MANITOULIN, wooden propeller passenger/package freight, 147 foot, 683 gross tons, built in 1880, at Owen Sound, Ontario) was bound for Byng Inlet with lumber camp supplies when she was caught in a storm and grounded in the lee of Pancake Island in Georgian Bay. Her cargo and aft cabin were thrown overboard to lighten her, but she caught fire and was destroyed. Her passengers and crew took to her boats and survived.

On 10 November 1856, ST JOSEPH (wooden propeller steam barge, 170 foot, 460 tons, built in 1846, at Buffalo, New York) stranded and was wrecked near Fairport, Ohio. No lives were lost.

November 10, 1911 - The ANN ARBOR NO 4 was back in service after damaging several plates in October. The tanker MARIA DESGAGNES struck bottom in the St. Lawrence Seaway on 10 November 1999. After temporary repairs were made, the vessel was cleared to proceed to Hamilton, Ontario, to discharge its cargo of jet fuel. A survey of the seaway was completed with no indications as to what caused the vessel to ground.

On 10 November 1887, BLAZING STAR (wooden schooner, 137 foot, 265 tons, built in 1873, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin) was sailing on Lake Michigan in fine weather with a load of lumber. However, she grounded on Fisherman Shoal near Washington Island, Wisconsin even though the wreck of the steamer I N FOSTER was in full view on that reef. The captain was unable to locate a tug to pull the BLAZING STAR off and later she broke up in heavy weather. No lives were lost.

Below is a first hand account of the Storm of 1913, from the journal of John Mc Laughlin transcribed by his great grandson Hugh Mc Nichol. John was working on an unknown vessel during the Storm of 1913. The boat was captained by John Mc Alpine and Harry Roberts as Chief Engineer. The boat was loading iron ore in Escanaba when the storm started on November 8th.

Monday, November 10, 1913: I got up at 12 a.m. and went on watch. We were laying at anchor. It was blowing a living gale and kept it up. They hove up the anchor near 10 o'clock but monkeyed around until after dinner. We got under way. We passed the Light Ship about 3, and White Shoal at 5:15.

More entries from the Storm of 1913 tomorrow.

1900: The iron package freighter ARABIAN went aground 8 miles west of Whitefish Point, Lake Superior due to heavy weather. The ship was salvaged with only minor damage. It was later part of the Canada Steamship Lines fleet and was broken up about 1939.

1903: The passenger and freight steamer ATLANTIC was destroyed by a fire on Georgian Bay enroute to Parry Sound. The blaze apparently started in the cargo of hay that had become soaked with coal oil while riding out a late fall storm off Spruce Island west of its destination.

1922: Fleetmates GLENMAVIS and GLENCLOVA were in a collision at Montreal. Both were repaired and remained as part of the Great Lakes fleet for years as ACADIAN and GEORGE HINDMAN (ii) respectively. 1936: SIR WILLIAM FAIRBAIRN was upbound in Lake Huron and ran into a fall storm that damaged 62 automobiles as part of the deckload of new Packard & Chrysler cars.

1968: MANTADOC and FRANCOIS L.D. collided in heavy fog on the Seaway and sustained considerable bow damage. Both were repaired and the former still sails as d) MANITOBA while the latter was scrapped at Alang, India, as b) CINTA in 1987.

1989: ELPIS, Freedom Class deep sea freighter, first came through the Seaway in 1978. It raised considerable ire after stranding on a coral reef off Key Largo, FL while carrying sugar to Mexico. When it was refloated on November 12, the ship was seized by U.S. Marshals until assessment of the damage to the delicate coral reef could be made. The ship was later released and survived further trading until being scrapped at Alang, India, as c) CITY OF HOUSTON, in 2001.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Jody Aho, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley and Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  November 9

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner, Denny Dushane
Walter J. McCarthy Jr. arrived Duluth at 02:53 Tuesday to load coal at Midwest Energy. She departed at 13:50 after an 11-hour load. Lee A. Tregurtha arrived during the evening and docked at CN Duluth to load iron ore pellets. Federal Maas continued loading at Riverland Ag, and Cornelia remained at anchor. The Midwest Energy website is reporting the Indiana Harbor will load coal in Superior on Saturday, Nov. 26, for the St. Clair and Monroe power plants. This will be her first trip of the season.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Thunder Bay departed Tuesday late afternoon. HHL Amur and Algoma Equinox were loading. Isolda, HHL Rhine and Bluebill were at anchor.

Marquette, Mich.
Hon. James L. Oberstar was expected just after midnight Wednesday.

St. Marys River
Cason J. Callaway, Mesabi Miner, Edwin H. Gott and CSL Niagara were upbound in the lower river Tuesday evening, with Algoma Guardian approaching DeTour. Ludogorets was downbound.

Cedarville, Mich.
Joseph H. Thompson was loading Tuesday evening. Wilfred Sykes will be next in line.

Port Inland, Mich.
American Mariner was loading stone Tuesday evening.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Burns Harbor, Stewart J. Cort and Federal Bering remained in port on Tuesday.

Alpena, Mich.
Alpena was loading cement in her namesake port late Tuesday.

Rogers City, Mich.
Philip R. Clarke was loading Tuesday evening.

Goderich, Ont.
Capt. Henry Jackman was loading salt Tuesday. Federal Bristol was loading grain.

Toledo, Ohio
Tim S. Dool departed with grain Tuesday evening, assisted by the tug Mississippi.

Kingston, Ont.
The chemical tanker SCT Monte Rosa remained at anchor with engine trouble off Tibbetts Point Tuesday evening. She has been there since last Thursday.

 

Getting ready for winter, Lake Superior outflow to be reduced

11/9 - Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. – The gate setting of the control structure will be reduced in stages in November to allow for a gradual reduction in St. Marys Rapids flows and water levels.

The International Lake Superior Board of Control, under authority granted to it by the International Joint Commission (IJC), has set the Lake Superior outflow to 2,590 cubic meters per second (m3/s) (91.5 thousand cubic feet per second (tcfs)) for the month of November, effective Nov. 1.

The November outflow is 70 m3/s less than that prescribed by Regulation Plan 2012. The Board continues to adjust the outflow of Lake Superior in accordance with the approved deviation strategy to accommodate expected maintenance at the hydropower plants and reduce the potential for adverse consequences of high and fluctuating flows and water levels in the St. Marys Rapids. The Board released flows greater than Plan 2012 in June through August, and expects to release less than Plan 2012-prescribed flows in September through November.

The outflow is expected to exceed the combined capacities of the hydropower plants on the St. Marys River, which will be approximately 2,182 m3/s (77.1 tcfs) in November, and most of the excess flow will be released through the control structure at the head of the St. Marys Rapids.

The gate setting of the control structure will be reduced in stages in November to allow for a gradual reduction in St. Marys Rapids flows and water levels prior to winter. From Nov. 7 to 9, the gate setting will be reduced to the equivalent of approximately two gates open by setting Gates #2 through #13 to a partially open setting of 31 cm (12 in) each. During this transition, the Board will take the opportunity to collect flow measurements in the St. Marys Rapids. The gates are then expected to be further lowered the week of Nov. 28 to coincide with underwater inspections of the international railway bridge piers, with the schedule to be determined at a later date. There will be no change to the setting of Gate #1, which supplies a flow of about 15 m3/s to the channel north of the Fishery Remedial Dike.

The net water supplies to Lake Superior were below average in October. The level of Lake Superior declined 9 cm (4 in) from the previous month, while on average the lake declines 3 cm (1 in) in October. The Lake Superior level at the beginning-of-November is 13 cm (5 in) above average, 4 cm (2 in) above the level recorded a year ago at this time, and 42 cm (17 in) above its chart datum level. The net water supplies to Lake Michigan-Huron were below average in October. The level of Lake Michigan-Huron dropped 8 cm (3 in) last month, while on average the lake declines 7 cm (3 in) in October. The level of Lake Michigan-Huron is 25 cm (10 in) above its long-term average beginning-of-November level, 9 cm (4 in) higher than it was a year ago, and 64 cm (25 in) above its chart datum level.

The levels of Lake Superior and Lake Michigan-Huron are both expected to continue their seasonal declines in November.

Brigadier General Mark Toy is the United States Board Member. Mr. Jean-Francois Cantin is the Board Member for Canada.

International Lake Superior Board of Control

 

Detroit/Wayne County Port Authority deputy director named to committee

11/9 - Detroit, Mich. – The Detroit/Wayne County Port Authority (DWCPA) Deputy Director, Kyle Burleson, was recently named by Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder to the Port Authority Advisory Committee. Housed within the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC), the nine-member board gives recommendations to the Michigan Strategic Fund board of directors regarding projects related to port facilities. Burleson serves as a nominee of the Senate Majority Leader for the Michigan Senate.

“It is an honor to be asked to serve on this commission,” said Burleson. “I look forward to the opportunity to implement the governor’s maritime strategy, as well as advancing the state’s maritime industry to create jobs and other economic development opportunities for Michigan.”

Burleson became deputy director of the DWCPA in 2014. He is responsible for increasing maritime commerce for the city of Detroit, which includes advocating for policy changes at a federal and state level, administering federal grant programs and supporting the Great Lakes cruise industry. Prior to working fro DWCPA, Burleson worked for Congresswoman Candice Miller (MI-10) as legislative director and handled issues that arose through her work on the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, as well as Great Lakes and environmental issues.

Burleson joins eight other appointees from different regions and industries across the state. Members serve terms expiring at the pleasure of the governor.

 

Updates -  November 9

Saltie Gallery updated with pictures of the Barnacle, BBC Switzerland, Bluebill, Federal Alster, Heleen C, HHL Amur, HHL Rhine, Ludogorets, Lyulin, Mandarin, MarBacan, MarBioko, Oborishte, Osogovo and SCT Breithorn.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 9

The NIMROD (3-mast wooden schooner, 184 foot, 559 tons, built in 1873, at Toledo, Ohio) was carrying 37,000 bushels of corn from Chicago to Buffalo. On 08 November 1874, she encountered thick fog on Lake Erie and the large double decked schooner MICHIGAN collided with her. The MICHIGAN continued on her course while the NIMROD filled with water and sank in 70 feet of water off Port Burwell-Port Stanley, Ontario. The crew escaped in the yawl and were picked up by the schooner GRANTHAM. The wreck was discovered in 1978, when Capt. Robert Hamilton, a commercial fisherman, snagged his nets on it.

COLUMBIA STAR (steel propeller bulk freighter, 1000 foot, 35,923 gross tons) was launched November 8, 1980, at Bay Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin (Hull#726) . She was part of the Oglebay Norton fleet. Renamed b.) AMERICAN CENTURY in 2006.

BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS and IRVING S. OLDS arrived on November 8, 1988, at Kaohsiung, Taiwan for scrapping by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.

The Great Lakes Engineering Works built steamer STADACONA of 1909, renamed b.) W. H. McGEAN in 1920, was renamed c.) ROBERT S. McNAMARA by its new owner Ford Motor Company's Marine Division on November 8, 1962. The McNAMARA was rescued from potential scrapping when Ford purchased her for $80,000 and spent $15,000 for renovation at AmShip's Toledo yard. J. P. MORGAN JR. arrived in Spain on November 8, 1980, for scrapping.

PETER A. B. WIDENER passed down the Welland Canal November 8, 1986, towed by the tugs TUSKER and GLENADA en route to Lauzon, Quebec. From there she was towed overseas for scrapping. When built, the PETER A. B. WIDENER and fleet mates J. PIERPONT MORGAN, NORMAN B. REAM and HENRY H. ROGERS were the first 600-footers built for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. as "The Class of 1906."

On 08 Nov 1986, B. F. AFFLECK (steel propeller freighter, 588 foot, 7,964 gross tons, built in 1927, at Toledo, Ohio), under tow of the tug THUNDER CAPE, went adrift on Lake Superior in a storm after the tug lost power. The tug AVENGER IV was dispatched to pick up the AFFLECK, which was headed for scrap, and the tanker EASTERN SHELL towed the THUNDER CAPE to Thunder Bay for repairs.

BEN HUR, a wooden schooner-barge wrecker, 314 tons, built in 1874, at Dunville, Ontario, had been purchased for the job of salvaging the schooner M. E. TREMBLE. On 8 November 1890, she was at the job near Port Huron in the St. Clair River when she was rammed and sunk by the schooner-barge SUPERIOR which was being towed by the steamer PASSAIC. BEN HUR settled on top of the schooner she was attempting to salvage and a lighter-scow she was using also went down with her.

On 8 November 1877, the bark GREAT WEST was carrying 262,000 feet of lumber from Caseville to Chicago. Much of it was piled topside. In a big storm on Lake Michigan, she lost her deck load. She then became waterlogged and finally went ashore near Hyde Park, Illinois on 10 November. The crew were all saved.

On 8 November 1877, KATE L. BRUCE (3-mast wooden schooner, 307 tons, built in 1872, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin) was carrying wheat in tow of the tug JOHNSON when she was let go in heavy weather. She disappeared with all eight of her crew off Alpena, Michigan. A bureau containing her papers washed ashore in August 1878. The sunken wreck was discovered in 6 fathoms of water in Thunder Bay during the Autumn of 1879.

The forebody of the former CANADIAN EXPLORER arrived in Prescott on 05 Nov 2000, under tow of the Trois Rivieres tug DUGA. It remained there for three days. The previous March, it was reported that the hull was undergoing conversion to a 498-foot grain storage barge for Les Elevateurs des Trois Rivieres, Quebec. (The engine room portion of the former CANADIAN EXPLORER was mated to the forward section of the HAMILTON TRANSFER in 1998, and is now the CANADIAN TRANSFER.)

1981: EMERALD, the former LACHINEDOC, sank in the Persian Gulf during heavy weather while carrying steel mesh and aggregates. Nine members of the crew were missing while another three were rescued.

2007: SPIRIT OF NANTUCKET, the former NANTUCKET CLIPPER, struck an uncharted object in the Intercoastal Waterway and had to be beached. The ship was repaired at Norfolk, VA and resumed its journey to the Pacific for a new career as an Alaska cruise ship after earlier Great Lakes, St. Lawrence and East Coast service.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody Aho, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Grain gains in Twin Ports

11/8 - Duluth, Minn. – Ben Herstad watched wheat fill yet another cargo ship last week at the CHS terminal in Superior. It was a busy day. It’s been a busy year. As a stevedore for Ceres Terminals, Herstad sees firsthand how well grain exports are going this year.

“It’s picking up a little over last year, and last year was a better year than the year before,” he said. Herstad doesn’t have to count every grain to know that — reported tonnage this year is on track to outpace last year.

“It’s slow and steady increases over the last three years here,” he said. “I’m sure we’ll surpass 2015 easily.”

That’s good news for the port of Duluth-Superior, where overall shipments this year have been down more than 2 million tons to date and the iron ore trade is only now showing signs of recovery from the downturn.

“The upward trend is a rewarding story, this year in particular,” said Adele Yorde, spokeswoman for the Duluth Seaway Port Authority. “Trying to balance out those commodities means a lot more people are working — stevedores, longshoremen and the folks at the grain terminals themselves.”

In the grand scheme of shipping cargos, grain is just 10 percent of what moves in and out of the port, at least by weight. (It turns out taconite pellets are a little heavier than grain.) But just count all the grain elevators and silos and it’s easy to see why even a slight uptick can be reason for celebration.

Through September, more than 1 million tons of grain had moved through the Twin Ports (and plenty more has since, reports Herstad.) There was a 60,000 ton spike in September compared to 2015, helping push the year-to-date total 80,000 tons above last year’s rate — though October is typically a busy grain month in any year.

But with October’s traffic and boats still scheduled to receive grain yet this year, Herstad has good reason to think this year will beat the last.

Yet tracking why the trade is up, or how to keep it that way, is another question. Like anything in global trade, there are a lot of factors that could contribute to grain’s gains.

“It’s world politics and weather and freight rates for other things, demand for other ships and (crop) disease,” said shipping agent Stephen Sydow with Daniel’s Shipping Services Inc.

Sydow explained one of the biggest factors contributing to the Twin Ports’ grain exports is the import of anything else here. It isn’t often economical to bring an empty ship to pick up commodities like durum wheat.

“So if there’s no ships coming in to discharge heavy stuff like steel and coils and stuff like that then it’s expensive to ship things out,” Sydow said. “It essentially subsidizes what we export, grain.”

Take the oceangoing freighter Cornelia, for example. She’s been parked in the lake since arriving in port a few weeks ago with cement. With grain flowing as it has been out of the port, the ship’s owner appears to be waiting to strike a deal to carry out some grain rather than hunt for a shipment elsewhere.

“They think they can; they feel the highest probability is here, and it’s free to sit here and wait,” Sydow said. “It’s sitting out there waiting for a deal to be made — an excellent indication of how things are going.”

There must be demand for grain at a port somewhere, or why else wait? Yet that’s just one of dozens more factors going into why and when grain leaves the port.

“We don’t have any impact on freight decisions — those decisions are made outside the port,” Sydow said. “Just in general we hope (shipping prices) are low. “Low prices mean more business, and more business is better for us.”

Wheat is by far the dominant overseas and Canadian grain export from Duluth-Superior, followed by canola and beet pulp pellets. But wheat is an unlikely U.S. export, considering we produce just 8 percent of the world’s supply. Yet while our share of the world market has diminished since leading in the 1980s, exports have continued to rise steadily, and Lake Superior has a role in that.

“It was the movement of grain that made this port an international seaport and connects us to the global market,” Yorde said.

Duluth News Tribune

 

Will warm Great Lakes mean less ice this winter?

11/8 - Buffalo, N.Y. – The Great Lakes are much warmer than usual, and that will be a factor in limiting ice formation this winter, the National Weather Service says in its "freeze-up outlook."

How warm is it? Here's a sampling of water temperatures at harbors around the region. Buffalo: 60, normal 54. Cleveland: 62, normal 56. Chicago: 60, normal 53. Duluth: 52, normal 44.

The weather service forecast considers many other factors, including the possibility of a La Nina system that would shift the jet stream's flow and limit ice formation. It notes that water temperatures "could quickly return back to normal after the first cold air outbreak hits the region." Storms that bring high winds could speed up that process.

If temperatures stay mild, the outlook has a grim prediction: "Relatively low ice formation on the Great Lakes will lead to the potential for the combination of increased storm activity and significant lake effect snow accumulation during the cold air outbreaks."

WBFO

 

Remembering the Great Storm of 1913: Deadliest storm to hit the Great Lakes

11/8 - Cleveland, Ohio – Yesterday marked the 103rd anniversary of the Great Storm of 1913 – the deadliest storm in history to hit the Great Lakes, consuming 250 lives, and destroying over 42 ships, earning the nickname "White Hurricane" and actually a tale of two storms.

It all began with a storm that hit the lakes on Nov. 7.

This storm primarily impacted Lake Superior and Lake Michigan, pummeling them with strong winds up to 80 mph, dense snow, numerous roaring thunderstorms, freezing spray and dangerous waves through Nov. 8.

Several large ships were damaged when driven ashore, crippled because they were no match for the pounding whitecaps. The White Hurricane followed the next day, and was the deadliest and most intense phase of the Great Lakes storm. For three days the Great Lakes endured persistent hurricane-force winds, blinding snowfall, freezing spray and monstrous waves.

Read more, and view photos at this link

 

New Federal Alster makes first inland voyage

11/8 - Federal Alster (IMO 9766164), built in 2016 at the New Times Shipbuilding yard in Jingjiang, China, for Intership Navigation, is making its first trip to the Great Lakes. She arrived at Sorel, Que., on Nov. 4 to unload steel products before departing on Nov. 6. The ship arrived in Montreal on Nov. 6 and departed on the morning of Nov. 7 enroute to Hamilton, Ont., where it is expected to arrive sometime on Tuesday.

Federal Alster is the first of three new vessels being built in China for Intership and chartered to Fednav Ltd. for the next 10 years. The other two are Federal Ruhr (IMO 9766176) and Federal Mosel (IMO 9766188). Each are 36,500 DWT box-shaped "Lakesmax" bulk carriers. She is a near-sistership to Federal Danube, Federal Elbe, Federal Ems, Federal Leda and Federal Weser, all of which were built for Intership and chartered to Fednav. All have been frequent visitors to the Great Lakes/Seaway system.

Denny Dushane

 

Port Reports -  November 8

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Monday remained very quiet on western Lake Superior. Federal Maas arrived off Duluth early Monday morning and dropped anchor outside of port. She later arrived at 16:23 and docked at Riverland Ag to load wheat. Cornelia remained at anchor offshore.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Ludogorets departed in the early evening Monday. Thunder Bay was loading. Isolda, Bluebill and HHL Amur were at anchor.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic Monday included Presque Isle early, followed by Great Lakes Trader, Lee A. Tregurtha, Michipicoten, Edgar B. Speer, Esta Desgagnes and American Century. Frontenac was upbound at DeTour in the late evening. On the downbound side were Algowood and Roger Blough.

Port Inland, Mich. – Denny Dushane
There were no vessels loading on Monday. Two vessels are scheduled Tuesday, with the first being the American Mariner in the late morning. Due during the late evening is the Herbert C. Jackson. Wilfred Sykes is due Wednesday in the early morning.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Stewart J. Cort and Burns Harbor were unloading ore Monday evening. Federal Bering remained in port.

Cedarville, Mich. – Denny Dushane
There were no vessels loading Monday. Two vessels are expected Tuesday, with Joseph H. Thompson due in at noon followed by Wilfred Sykes in the late afternoon. There is nothing else on the schedule until Nov. 12, when Joseph H. Thompson returns to load.

Stoneport, Mich. – Denny Dushane
Cason J. Callaway was expected Monday in the morning to load.

Calcite, Mich. – Denny Dushane
There were no vessels loading on Monday, and none are expected until Sunday, Nov. 13, when Great Republic is due in the morning for the North Dock. Due on Monday, Nov. 14, will be Philip R. Clarke in the early evening for the South Dock.

Goderich, Ont.
Federal Bristol was still loading at the grain elevator Monday.

Toledo, Ohio – Denny Dushane
Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin is expected at the CSX Coal Dock to load on Tuesday in the early morning. Also due at CSX Tuesday evening are the barge Lakes Contender and tug Ken Boothe Sr., and H. Lee White. The White is due back at CSX on Thursday in the late morning to load. Making a rare and possibly a first ever visit to the Midwest Terminal Stone with at stone cargo will be the barge Lewis J. Kuber and tug Olive L. Moore, due there on Nov. 12 in the early afternoon. Also making a rare visit to the stone dock is the Michipicoten, due Nov. 13 in the early afternoon. Vessels due at the Torco Dock with ore include the barge James L. Kuber and tug Victory on Nov. 8 in the early morning. Hon. James L. Oberstar is due at Torco on Nov. 11 in the early morning, followed by a return visit by the James L. Kuber on Nov.14 in the early morning. Vessels in port at the time of this report included the Philip R. Clarke, Evans Spirit, tug Mary E. Hannah, G-tug Mississippi, tug Dylan Cooper and a barge. Further upriver loading grain were Tim S. Dool and Osogovo of Maltese registry.

Buffalo, N.Y. – Brian W.
Algoma Central’s Algoma Enterprise came in with a load of salt out of Goderich for the Gateway Metroport in Lackawanna Monday morning. She arrived off the breakwall around 8 a.m., came in through the South Entrance Channel and winded in the Outer Harbor. Then the Enterprise backed into the Lackawanna slip for the main dock, where she unloaded until around 12:45 p.m. She headed straight out the South Entrance for the lake, departing at 1:15 p.m.

Kingston, Ont.
The chemical tanker SCT Monte Rosa was still at anchor with engine trouble off Tibbetts Point Monday evening. She has been there since last Thursday.

 

Fednav’s new Federal Clyde headed for Canada and the Great Lakes

11/8 - Federal Clyde (IMO 9671072), built in 2016 at the Oshima Shipbuilding yard in Oshima, Japan, for the Fednav Ltd. fleet, is expected to arrive at Belledune, N.B., sometime on Nov. 8, arriving from Antwerp, Belgium, where it arrived to load on Oct. 22 and departed Oct. 30.

This will be the vessel’s first trip and visit to Canada. The ship is expected to stay in Belledune until Nov. 10, and from there is expected to proceed to Hamilton, Ont., and Cleveland, Ohio, on its first inland voyage.

This is the second vessel to carry the name Federal Clyde in the Fednav fleet. The original Federal Clyde, built in 1978, carried that name from 1978 to 1981 before it was sold and renamed the President Quezon, a name it carried from 1981 to 1987 before it became the Federal St. Clair from 1987 to 1994. In 1994 it became Hui Fu of Chinese registry. Federal Clyde visited the lakes with all of its names except as the Hui Fu.

The current Federal Clyde is one of 12 new vessels built for Fednav Ltd. at Oshima, Japan, following the “B-series” in 2015. The B-series consists of the Federal Baltic, Federal Barents, Federal Beaufort, Federal Bering, Federal Biscay and Federal Bristol all of which seem to be named for and represent Bays.

The “C-series” emerged in 2016 with an additional six vessels. The C-series consists of Federal Caribou, Federal Cedar, Federal Champlain, Federal Churchill, Federal Clyde and Federal Columbia. Thus far, only the Federal Clyde and Federal Columbia have yet to make any inland voyages. All of the rest have done so.

Denny Dushane

 

Updated list of new saltwater vessels

11/8 - As of Nov. 1 there have been 44 saltwater vessels making their first-ever westbound trips to the Great Lakes/Seaway at the Eisenhower Lock in Massena, N.Y. They are Ardita, BBC Haren, BBC Hudson, BBC Kansas, BBC Manitoba, Beauforce, Belasitza, Bro Agnes, Cape, Coe Leni, Fearless, Federal Biscay, Federal Caribou, Federal Cedar, Federal Champlain, Federal Churchill, Floretgracht, Halit Bey, Heleen C, HHL Rhine, Industrial Charger, Industrial Chief, Jan Van Gent, Jule, Lake St. Clair, Ludogorets, Malmo, Marsgracht, Minervagracht, Mona Swan, MTM Southport, Njord Clear, Njord Cloud, Oborishte, Ocean Castle, Roerborg, San, SCT Matterhorn, SCT Monte Rosa, SCT Stockhorn, Stade, Thorco Marjanne, Tradewind Adventure and Vectis Castle. On April 13, Vectis Castle was re-flagged Canadian and chartered to Groupe Desgagnes Inc. for the 2016 shipping season. Since Nov. 1, two additional new visitors have made inland voyages – the tanker SCT Breithorn and Federal Alster.

Denny Dushane

 

 

Great Lakes Historical Society vacates property with huge sale

11/8 - Vermilion, Ohio – After nearly 65 years, the Great Lakes Historical Society will formally close its operations in Vermilion and vacate the property by Dec. 31. The society is holding a Price Marked or Best Offer Sale on office and store fixtures, old exhibit material, duplicate published material and non-essential artifacts. The sale is this Saturday, Nov. 12, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. There is a $3 admission to the sale, but if someone purchases $20 or more of material they will have their admission returned. The sale of fixtures includes desks, filing cabinets, museum store cases, chairs and other material.

The published material consists of more than 1,000 books and annual marine publications. List of Merchant Vessels, Green’s directories, Great Lakes Red Books and Shipmasters annual listings are just a few of the publications being sold. Also, framed and unframed lithographic prints, signed and unsigned, will be sold. The society will also sell over 2,000 marine postcards. All of this material duplicates material kept in the collection. Also included will be a few choice artifacts that are now deemed non-essential to the organization including the pilothouse from the Canopus, the propeller from the tug Pennsylvania, framed photographs and a large anchor.

Anyone interested in specific information should contact the society at glhs1@inlandseas.org.

Great Lakes Historical Society

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 8

The NIMROD (3-mast wooden schooner, 184 foot, 559 tons, built in 1873, at Toledo, Ohio) was carrying 37,000 bushels of corn from Chicago to Buffalo. On 08 November 1874, she encountered thick fog on Lake Erie and the large double decked schooner MICHIGAN collided with her. The MICHIGAN continued on her course while the NIMROD filled with water and sank in 70 feet of water off Port Burwell-Port Stanley, Ontario. The crew escaped in the yawl and were picked up by the schooner GRANTHAM. The wreck was discovered in 1978, when Capt. Robert Hamilton, a commercial fisherman, snagged his nets on it.

COLUMBIA STAR (steel propeller bulk freighter, 1000 foot, 35,923 gross tons) was launched November 8, 1980, at Bay Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin (Hull#726) . She was part of the Oglebay Norton fleet. Renamed b.) AMERICAN CENTURY in 2006.

BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS and IRVING S. OLDS arrived on November 8, 1988, at Kaohsiung, Taiwan for scrapping by Sing Cheng Yung Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.

The Great Lakes Engineering Works built steamer STADACONA of 1909, renamed b.) W. H. McGEAN in 1920, was renamed c.) ROBERT S. McNAMARA by its new owner Ford Motor Company's Marine Division on November 8, 1962. The McNAMARA was rescued from potential scrapping when Ford purchased her for $80,000 and spent $15,000 for renovation at AmShip's Toledo yard. J. P. MORGAN JR. arrived in Spain on November 8, 1980, for scrapping.

PETER A. B. WIDENER passed down the Welland Canal November 8, 1986, towed by the tugs TUSKER and GLENADA en route to Lauzon, Quebec. From there she was towed overseas for scrapping. When built, the PETER A. B. WIDENER and fleet mates J. PIERPONT MORGAN, NORMAN B. REAM and HENRY H. ROGERS were the first 600-footers built for the Pittsburgh Steamship Co. as "The Class of 1906."

On 08 Nov 1986, B. F. AFFLECK (steel propeller freighter, 588 foot, 7,964 gross tons, built in 1927, at Toledo, Ohio), under tow of the tug THUNDER CAPE, went adrift on Lake Superior in a storm after the tug lost power. The tug AVENGER IV was dispatched to pick up the AFFLECK, which was headed for scrap, and the tanker EASTERN SHELL towed the THUNDER CAPE to Thunder Bay for repairs.

BEN HUR, a wooden schooner-barge wrecker, 314 tons, built in 1874, at Dunville, Ontario, had been purchased for the job of salvaging the schooner M. E. TREMBLE. On 8 November 1890, she was at the job near Port Huron in the St. Clair River when she was rammed and sunk by the schooner-barge SUPERIOR which was being towed by the steamer PASSAIC. BEN HUR settled on top of the schooner she was attempting to salvage and a lighter-scow she was using also went down with her.

On 8 November 1877, the bark GREAT WEST was carrying 262,000 feet of lumber from Caseville to Chicago. Much of it was piled topside. In a big storm on Lake Michigan, she lost her deck load. She then became waterlogged and finally went ashore near Hyde Park, Illinois on 10 November. The crew were all saved.

On 8 November 1877, KATE L. BRUCE (3-mast wooden schooner, 307 tons, built in 1872, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin) was carrying wheat in tow of the tug JOHNSON when she was let go in heavy weather. She disappeared with all eight of her crew off Alpena, Michigan. A bureau containing her papers washed ashore in August 1878. The sunken wreck was discovered in 6 fathoms of water in Thunder Bay during the Autumn of 1879.

The forebody of the former CANADIAN EXPLORER arrived in Prescott on 05 Nov 2000, under tow of the Trois Rivieres tug DUGA. It remained there for three days. The previous March, it was reported that the hull was undergoing conversion to a 498-foot grain storage barge for Les Elevateurs des Trois Rivieres, Quebec. (The engine room portion of the former CANADIAN EXPLORER was mated to the forward section of the HAMILTON TRANSFER in 1998, and is now the CANADIAN TRANSFER.)

1981: EMERALD, the former LACHINEDOC, sank in the Persian Gulf during heavy weather while carrying steel mesh and aggregates. Nine members of the crew were missing while another three were rescued.

2007: SPIRIT OF NANTUCKET, the former NANTUCKET CLIPPER, struck an uncharted object in the Intercoastal Waterway and had to be beached. The ship was repaired at Norfolk, VA and resumed its journey to the Pacific for a new career as an Alaska cruise ship after earlier Great Lakes, St. Lawrence and East Coast service.

During the 24 hour period ending on midnight, November 8, 1886 a total of 113 vessels entered Chicago harbor.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Jody Aho, Russ Plumb, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Interlake Steamship boss hails 'end of steam era'

11/7 - Duluth, Minn. – In an age-old industry, suddenly everything is new again. "Our boats may look classic, but they're very modern," said Interlake Steamship Co. President Mark Barker. "It's an example of what is going on in the industry."

Barker gave the keynote speech at Friday's kickoff of Gales of November, the 79th annual fundraiser for the Lake Superior Marine Museum Association. His talk focused on how Great Lakes fleets are getting repowered, moving from steam to diesel, heavy oil or even liquid natural gas.

"It is the end of the steam era," Barker said. "We're not sitting still. All the fleets are focusing on making sure we have a viable fleet for the future."

Interlake, based in Ohio, has repowered much of its fleet, most recently the Herbert C. Jackson at Superior's Fraser Shipyards over the past year. The Jackson launched for sea trials in September following some delays, tied in part to an Occupational Safety and Health Administration investigation into reports of workers being overexposed to lead during the project.

On Friday, Barker detailed how each ship's repowering presented its own challenge, and why the company likes heavy oil as a fuel source. "It comes in dirty but leaves cleaner than diesel," thanks to exhaust gas scrubbers, he said.

The company was ready to commit to liquid natural gas before that plan "fell apart," Barker said, and he's glad the company went the way it did.

Answering critics who say shipping remains dirty while other modes of transport are becoming more efficient, Barker said rushing technology is risky because there's more at stake on the water — if something goes wrong there won't immediately be someone to help.

"It's very easy to say the industry is moving slow, but we operate in a different world than a highway or train tracks," he said.

Repowering is a costly decision that has to balance up-front expenditures with long-term costs, but with regulations on emissions closing in, the company had to make a choice — and with the successful repowering of the Lee A. Tregurtha in 2006, it was an easy choice.

"This is a lot of new technology, and we've all had to adapt to it pretty quick," Barker said. "It's been a big culture change."

Duluth News Tribune

 

Port Reports -  November 7

Duluth-Superior – Daniel Lindner
Western Lake Superior was very quiet on Sunday, with no ship traffic in Duluth, Superior or Silver Bay. Two Harbors saw the only traffic of the day, with Roger Blough departing with ore from CN at 10:55.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Ludogorets and Algoma Mariner were loading grain Sunday. Isolda, Bluebill and HHL Amur were at anchor.

Marquette, Mich. – Rod Burdick
Algowood loaded ore at the Upper Harbor on Sunday. The visit was her first since 2013.

St. Marys River
Fog closed the river Sunday morning. Once it lifted, downbound traffic included Mississagi, Arthur M. Anderson, Lakes Contender/Ken Boothe Sr., Michipicoten, Paul R. Tregurtha and American Spirit. Upbound traffic included Thunder Bay, HHL Rhine, Walter J. McCarthy Jr., James L. Barker and the tug Leonard M / barge Huron Spirit.

Port Inland, Mich.
John J. Boland loaded stone Sunday morning.

Green Bay, Wis.
Alpena arrived early Sunday morning on her 19th trip to the port this season.

Indiana Harbor, Ind.
Hon. James L. Oberstar was unloading Sunday night at ArcelorMittal.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Federal Bering and Burns Harbor were in port Sunday night. Wilfred Sykes was expected.

Goderich, Ont.
Federal Bristol was still loading at the grain elevator Sunday. Manitoulin was loading salt at Sifto.

Toledo, Ohio
Osogovo and Tim S. Dool were loading grain upriver on Sunday. Evans Spirit was also in port, unloading an unknown cargo.

Cleveland, Ohio
The saltie Lubie and the tug Defiance / barge Ashtabula were in port Sunday evening. Tug Dorothy Ann/barge Pathfinder appeared to be running the Cuyahoga River ore shuttle.

Oshawa, Ont.
The saltie Nassauborg has been in port the past several days.

Oswego, N.Y. – Ned Goebricher
The Lafarge Cement barge Innovation with her tug Samuel de Champlain were in port Sunday unloading.

Buffalo, N.Y. – Brian W.
Algoma Enterprise should arrive with salt from Goderich mid-morning Monday for Lackawanna.

Kingston, Ont.
The chemical tanker SCT Monte Rosa was still at anchor with engine trouble off Tibbetts Point Sunday evening. She has been there since Thursday afternoon. Radio traffic indicates the ship’s engineers cannot find the problem and are waiting for a shore engineer to come aboard, according to a Coast Guard statement. The vessel is operating under the flag of Switzerland, and is managed by Mega Chemicals Schiffahrt.

 

USCG Bristol Bay on her way back to lakes after refit

11/7 - USCG Bristol Bay (WTGB-102) is on its way from Baltimore, via New York and Boston, to the Great Lakes. Fresh from a Service Life Extension Project (SLEP) refit at the coast guard base in Baltimore, the light icebreaker left its Detroit, Mich., homeport in August 2015 for the extensive upgrade.

Mac Mackay

 

Fitzgerald Memorial Beacon Lighting Thursday at Split Rock Lighthouse

11/7 - On Thursday, Nov. 10, Split Rock Lighthouse, on Lake Superior’s north shore, will commemorate the 1975 sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald with its annual Memorial Beacon Lighting. A film about the Fitzgerald will be shown in the visitor center theater continuously throughout the afternoon. The lighthouse and the fog signal building will be open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The lighthouse will close temporarily at 4:30 p.m. while the names of the 29 lost crew members are read to the tolling of a ship’s bell. Following the ceremony, the beacon will be lit and the tower once again opened for visitors to tour. This is the only opportunity each year when visitors can climb to the top of the tower and see the beacon lit and revolving. Admission: Adults: $10; Seniors & College Students: $8; Children (age 5-17): $7 Free for Minnesota Historical Society members.

Minnesota Historical Society

 

Whitefish Point to remember Edmund Fitzgerald on Thursday

11/7 - Whitefish Point, Mich. – The annual Edmund Fitzgerald Memorial Ceremony will be held in the Main Gallery of the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum on Thursday. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m., ceremony begins at 7:00 p.m. Admission is free. Refit complete, CCGS Samuel Risley headed back to Parry Sound The Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker / buoy tender Samuel Risley left St. John's last Friday, with an ETA for her Parry Sound home base of Nov.14. She is fresh from a $3.6 million refit at Newdock – St. John's Dockyard Ltd.

Work on the Risley began in June 2016, and included replacement of the bow thruster, a crane overhaul and a recoating of the hull. The galley was also refurbished and various pieces of equipment onboard the vessel were inspected.

The Risley has a capability to break ice up to two feet thick. She joined the Coast Guard fleet in 1985. The vessel is named after the first Chairman of the Board of Steamship Inspection in 1858.

 

Proposed rule change at Iroquois Lock would add four Seaway pilot jobs

11/7 - Massena, N.Y. – The U.S. Coast Guard is proposing adding a mandatory pilot change point at Iroquois Lock near Ogdensburg, a move that would necessitate four additional pilots joining the St. Lawrence Seaway Pilots Association based in Cape Vincent.

The Coast Guard is in the process of finalizing its proposed 2017 pilotage rates for the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway system, even as a legal challenge of its 2016 rate schedule remains pending in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, Washington. Several operators of ports, vessel operating companies and maritime trade associations, filed suit in May claiming the 2016 rates added too great a cost for pilotage.

Under federal law, all ocean-going vessels operating on the Seaway system must hire local pilots to assist with navigation, as these pilots are familiar with local conditions. The Coast Guard regulates all aspects of pilotage on the system and sets pilotage rates annually. This is done through agreements with the three pilots associations, including the St. Lawrence Seaway Pilots Association.

The Coast Guard issued its “notice of proposed rulemaking” establishing 2017 rates Oct. 19, a proposal that includes the recommendation that a mandatory pilot change point be established at Iroquois Lock. According to the notice, the change is necessary to “mitigate fatigue” for pilots. A similar proposal was made for the 2016 shipping season, but the Seaway pilots’ association informed the Coast Guard that it needed additional time to hire and train pilots before the change could be implemented.

According to the Coast Guard, the transit between Snell Lock in Massena and Cape Vincent takes about 11 hours “under ideal circumstances.” The Coast Guard wants to limit each pilot’s assignment to eight hours and making Iroquois Lock a mandatory change point can accomplish this.

The Coast Guard’s notice states that about 40 percent of pilot assignment changes now occur at Iroquois Lock due to night relief working rules or a slow-moving vessel. The Coast Guard has traditionally counted these assignments as one assignment, even though it takes two pilots to complete it. Based on the new calculations, the agency proposes that four pilots be added to the existing 13 to account for the Iroquois Lock changeover.

According to the notice, the Seaway pilots’ association has said that it will have the necessary number of pilots trained for the 2017 shipping season. The association, along with the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp. and the Great Lakes Pilot Authority have concluded that the additional use of the change point will not require any capital expenses as the point will use an existing pilot boat and dock and current staff.

The Coast Guard maintained in its 2016 rate schedule that there is a shortage of qualified pilots, which prompted it to increase its targeted compensation from about $235,000 in 2015 to $326,000 in 2016 in order to attract new pilots. The compensation includes benefits and ancillary costs, in addition to wages. Its proposed 2017 rate freezes targeted compensation at 2016 levels.

Watertown Daily Times

 

Updates -  November 7

News Photo Gallery

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 7

On 07 November 1871, M COURTRIGHT (wooden schooner, 276 tons, built in 1856, at Erie, Pennsylvania) was carrying lumber in a storm on Lake Michigan. She struck bottom after her anchor dragged. She then became waterlogged. The crew abandoned in the yawl. The vessel went ashore several miles south of Kenosha, Wisconsin. The revenue cutter ANDREW JOHNSON tried in vain to pull her free but couldn't. The COURTRIGHT broke up a few days later.

On 7 November 1852, ST LOUIS (wooden side-wheeler, 190 foot, 618 tons, built in 1844, at Perrysburg, Ohio) was carrying railroad cars when she capsized and sank in a gale off Kelley's Island on Lake Erie. She was owned by Beer & Samuel Ward.

On 07 Nov 1906, the Grand Trunk carferry GRAND HAVEN (steel carferry, 306 foot, 2,320 gross tons built in 1903, at Toledo, Ohio) was put up for sale at a receiver's auction when the Grand Trunk Car Ferry Line defaulted on its bonds. It was purchased by a new Grand Trunk subsidiary, the Grand Trunk Milwaukee Car Ferry Company. This vessel had a long career both on the Lakes and in the Caribbean. She was finally scrapped at Hamilton, Ontario in 1970.

The T-2 converted laker HILDA MARJANNE's 1961, German-built hull forward of the engine room, minus her pilot house, was towed by the tugs G W ROGERS and BAGOTVILLE to Port Weller Dry Docks arriving there on November 7, 1983. This section was to become part of the CANADIAN RANGER.

On November 7, 1989, the SAMUEL MATHER, a.) HENRY FORD II, was moved to Toledo's C & O Frog Pond on her way to the cutter's torch.

ARTHUR B HOMER (Hull#303) was launched November 7, 1959, for the Bethlehem Steel Corp., Cleveland, Ohio. She was the last ship built by Great Lakes Engineering at River Rouge, Michigan.

In 1902, BRANSFORD rammed and sank the tug RECORD with a loss of a tug crewman in the Portage Lake Ship Canal in Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula. Renamed b.) JOHN H MC GEAN in 1916, and c.) CLIFFORD F. HOOD in 1943, the HOOD was scrapped in Bilbao, Spain in 1974.

On November 7, 1913, the storm responsible for sinking or damaging more vessels than any other began a six-day assault on the Great Lakes. The "Big Blow" of 1913, struck Lake Superior on November 7 and reached Lake Michigan by November 8, where the Pittsburgh Steamship Company vessel CLARENCE A. BLACK was severely damaged by the waves at the dock in Gary, Indiana.

On 7 November 1893, ALBANY (steel propeller package freighter, 267 foot, 1,918 gross tons, built in 1884, at Wyandotte, Michigan) collided with the iron freighter PHILADELPHIA in a thick fog. PHILADELPHIA took ALBANY in tow to try to save her, but she sank a few miles off Pointe aux Barques, Michigan. Her crew transferred to PHILADELPHIA, but they soon had to abandon her too since she also sank. Eight lives were lost, presumably when one of the lifeboats was run down by the still running, but abandoned, PHILADELPHIA.

On 7 November 1865, LILY DANCEY (2-mast wooden schooner, 92 foot, 132 gross tons built in 1856, at Goderich, Ontario) was carrying grain in a gale on Lake Huron when she was driven ashore near Port Elgin or Kincardine, Ontario. Her cargo was later recovered, but the schooner broke up by 27 November of that year.

CITY OF FLINT 32 ran aground at Manitowoc, Wisconsin in 1947.

1885: ALGOMA hit Greenstone Rock off Isle Royale, Lake Superior and became a total loss. There were 46 casualties and only 16 on board were saved.

1887: OSCEOLA ran aground on Flat Rock Reef, Saginaw Bay, and all on board were rescued. The ship was abandoned as a total loss in December but refloated in the spring of 1888 and rebuilt.

1910: WASAGA caught fire and burned off Copper Harbor while seeking shelter in a storm, but all on board survived.

1921: ARAGON stranded off Salmon Point, Lake Ontario. It was released the following year but declared a total loss. The hull was sold and rebuilt and last sailed as BAYANNA in 1962.

1921: The wooden schooner barge MARY E. McLAUCHLAN sank in a storm on Nipigon Bay, Lake Superior.

1947: WILLIAM C. WARREN ran aground near Presque Isle Point, Lake Huron, while downbound with grain and had to be abandoned to the underwriters. It was not released until the following year.

1969: The Norwegian tanker CATE BROVIG hit the wall while upbound at the Eisenhower Lock and had a hole punched in the hull. The vessel was headed for Duluth. The ship first came inland in 1959 and was scrapped at Split, Yugoslavia as c) STAVROS T. in 1976.

1974: IRIS had come to the Great Lakes in 1969 and 1971. It sank as d) EUROPEAN PERSISTENCE while 510 miles southeast of Bermuda after developing leaks while enroute from Tampa to Venice. All on board were rescued.

1991: The former Swedish freighter FALKON, a first time Seaway trader in 1984, sank as c) APPOLONIA FAITH off the southwest coast of Sardinia while traveling from Valencia, Spain, to Piraeus, Greece. Two lives were lost.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Father Dowling Collection, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Jody Aho, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  November 6

Duluth-Superior
On a quiet Saturday, Arthur M. Anderson departed Duluth at 00:06 with iron ore pellets from CN. Paul R. Tregurtha finished loading at Midwest Energy and departed at 06:09. Cornelia remained at anchor - she isn't expected to arrive until Nov. 9 to load grain.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Ludogorets and Federal Cedar were loading grain Saturday. Isolda, Bluebill and HHL Amur were at anchor.

Marquette, Mich.
Algowood was in port loading Saturday night.

St. Marys River
Downbound traffic Saturday included Edwin H. Gott, Hon. James L. Oberstar, CSL Welland, Manitoulin, Sam Laud, Radcliffe R. Latimer, Kaye E. Barker, Kaministiqua and Stewart J. Cort. Upbound traffic included included Algoma Mariner, Mississagi and Federal Mass. Saginaw was unloading at Essar in the mid-afternoon.

Port Inland, Mich.
Wilfred Sykes spent Saturday afternoon loading limestone.

Marinette, Mich.
HHL Rhine departed Saturday for Thunder Bay after discharging pig iron.

Gary, Ind.
Edgar B. Speer arrived Saturday afternoon to unload.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Federal Bering remained in port Saturday.

Goderich, Ont.
Federal Bristol replaced Algoma Mariner at the grain elevator Saturday. Algoma Enterprise was loading salt at Sifto.

Toledo, Ohio
As of 8:15a.m. Saturday, tugs were upriver to bring out the Federal Danube. Ojibway and the saltie Osogovo arrived early Friday for grain. As of 9:15 p.m. Saturday evening, Ojibway had departed the ADM Elevator. Tim S. Dool will be arriving Sunday morning, and will be heading upriver for one of the elevators to load grain. Saturday night, AIS has the saltie Lyulin at anchor of Port Colborne showing destination of "US TOL" on Tuesday.

Kingston, Ont. – Ron Walsh
The chemical tanker SCT Monte Rosa was still at anchor with engine trouble off Tibbetts Point Saturday evening. She has been there since Thursday afternoon.

 

Updates -  November 6

News Photo Gallery

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 6

On 06 November 1880, the W. R. HANNA (2-mast scow-schooner, 86 foot, 103 gross tons, built in 1857), carrying 1,600 tamarack railroad ties to Toledo, sank in Lake Huron in a snowstorm. She sprang a leak off Pointe aux Barques and filled so fast that the pump was of no use. She broached to and rolled over when about 5 miles north of Sand Beach, Michigan, (now Harbor Beach). s the sun set the snow storm turned into a blizzard. The icy waves swept over the hull while the crew clung on as best they could. Four hours later, they drifted past Sand Beach, not 500 feet from the breakwater. They shouted for help, saw lights moving here and there on the breakwater, but no help came. When the wind shifted and started to blow the vessel out into the lake, the skipper cut away the weather lanyards and the vessel righted herself and they dropped the anchor. The weather was freezing cold; and there was no dry place left. The cabin was gone and the only spot out of water was on one side forward - a space about four feet wide by ten feet long. The waves kept washing over the waterlogged vessel, drenching the crew. The crew survived through the night. Heavy snow kept falling, cutting visibility to almost zero. Finally, at 10 a.m., the following morning, the storm broke and the propeller H. LUELLA WORTHINGTON (wooden propeller freighter, 148 foot, 375 gross tons, built in 1880, at Lorain, Ohio), which was in the harbor, saw the wreck and rescued the crew. The skipper of the WORTHINGTON stated that he had heard the cries of the crew throughout the night, but couldn't navigate in the blinding snowstorm. He was awake all night waiting for the storm to break so he could rescue the crew.

On 06 November 1867, ALBEMARLE (3-mast wooden schooner, 154 foot, 413 gross tons, built in 1867, at Buffalo, New York) was carrying iron ore from Escanaba, Michigan, to Cleveland, Ohio in a storm when she stranded and wrecked near Point Nipigon in the Straits of Mackinac. This was her first year of operation. She had been put into service just the previous July.

The US266029, a.) WILLIAM CLAY FORD was towed from Nicholson's River Rouge dock November 6, 1986, by tugs TUSKER and GLENADA to Port Maitland, Ontario for scrapping.

On November 6, 1913, the J. H. SHEADLE left Fort William, Ontario bound for Erie, Pennsylvania, with grain and encountered fog, gale winds and a snow blizzard in one of the fiercest storms of the century.

On November 6, 1925, the Northern Navigation passenger steamer HAMONIC lost her propeller 20 miles west of Caribou Island in Lake Superior and was wallowing in gale force winds with gusts to 80 m.p.h. She was towed to safety by Pittsburgh Steamship Co.’s RICHARD TRIMBLE.

On 06 Nov 1985, Desguaces Heme began scrapping the LEON FALK, JR. in Gijon, Spain. This vessel was built in Chester, Pennsylvania, in 1945, as the tanker a.) WINTER HILL, (504 foot, 10,534 gross tons) and then was converted to a 710 foot, 12,501 gross ton bulk freighter in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1960-61.

On 6 November 1872, the wooden propeller tug MILDRED, while towing a vessel out of Alpena, Michigan, had her engine fail. Soon she was in trouble and sank. The crew was saved.

On 6 November 1827, ANN (wooden schooner, 53 foot, 58 tons, built in 1819, or 1821, at Black River, Ohio) was carrying salt, general merchandise and passengers when she was driven ashore on Long Point almost opposite Erie, Pennsylvania. 7 Lives were lost, including 5 passengers. 6 survived.

In 1912, the Pere Marquette Railroad announced plans to build a new roundhouse at Ludington, Michigan. It still stands today.

On 6 November 1874, The Port Huron Times listed the following vessels lost in the month of October and in the first week of November of that year: Propellers - BROOKLYN, FRANKFORT, NEW YORK; tug DOUGLAS; schooners - CITY OF PAINSVILLE, WANDERER, PREBLE, THOS S MOTT; and barges - CLIFTON and SHERMAN.

On 6 November 1883, GUIDING STAR (3-mast wooden schooner, 139 foot, 324 tons, built in 1869, at Oswego, New York) was carrying coal to Milwaukee in fog when she went ashore 12 miles north of Milwaukee. Four of the crew made it to shore in the yawl, but it was wrecked in the process. The rest of the crew was finally rescued by the Milwaukee Lifesavers.

Crews began painting the hull of the SAGINAW (formerly JOHN J. BOLAND) in the colors of Lower Lakes Towing Ltd. (gray) on 06 Nov 1999, at Sarnia, Ontario. The vessel had recently been purchased from American Steamship Co. Inside the vessel, crews were gutting the living quarters to remove asbestos and add fireproof walls and new flooring. The engine room equipment and the unloading gear were also refurbished.

On November 6, 1897, the Minnesota Steamship boat MARIPOSA (steel, 348', 2898 gross tons, built in 1892, Globe Iron Works, Cleveland, Ohio) under the command of Capt. Frank Root, rescued the two remaining survivors of the wreck of the package freighter IDAHO (wooden package freighter, 220', 915 gross tons, built in 1863, Peck & Masters, Cleveland, Ohio.) off Long Point, Ontario on Lake Erie. The MARIPOSA'S first mate, Capt. Myron K. Chamberlain, had sighted the two Idaho survivors clinging to the 100' spar of the sunken IDAHO. Gale winds and seas of 12'-15' overtook the IDAHO taking with it to their deaths 19 crewmen including Captain Alexander Gillies. "In what is considered one of the greatest accomplishments of ship handling and rescue by a major Great Lakes vessel,” Capt. Root and his crewmen were able to turn the MARIPOSA around ("rolling her rails under") three times in the midst of a gale, bringing their vessel right up to the spar where IDAHO Second Mate Louis LaForce Jr. and Deckhand William Gill were pulled "half dead" on board the MARIPOSA by the officers and deck crew. Both LaForce & Gill recovered. An appreciative City of Buffalo, (hometown to most of the IDAHO crew), and the Minnesota Steamship Company awarded Capt. Root a gold watch, and instructed him to award his first mate and chief engineer each an extra month's pay, and the MARIPOSA crew each an extra half month's pay for a job well done.

At 10 p.m. on November 6, 1975 the newly refurbished sidewheel ferry TRILLIUM was towed from the drydock at Ramey's Bend, Ontario, down the Welland Canal by the Canada Dredge & Dock tugs G. W. Rogers and BAGOTVILLE, arriving at Toronto on early on a foggy November 7.

1918: CHESTER A. CONGDON cleared Fort William with grain and stranded on Canoe Rock, Isle Royale in rough weather and poor visibility. The crew was rescued but the ship broke up and was listed as the first $1 million dollar loss in Great Lakes’ history.

1928: A.W. THOMPSON served as a Great Lakes consort barge before going to the Atlantic in 1918. The vessel foundered 60 miles south of Brunswick, GA, enroute from Wilmington, DE to a Gulf of Mexico port.

1968: OAK HILL visited the Great Lakes for seven trips in 1961-1962. It arrived at Singapore under tow as c) AGENOR on this date with leaking in the engine room while on a delivery trip to Chinese shipbreakers at Whampoa. The vessel was resold for scrapping in Singapore.

1969: REINHART LORENZ RUSS made 22 trips through the Seaway from 1960 through 1966. It sank as b) NAIS one mile off Raffles Light, Singapore, after a collision with the Norwegian tanker BERGEBRAGD (68/80,003) and one life was lost.

1981: LA LOMA, an early and frequent Seaway trader, arrived at Cape Town, South Africa, with hull damage as e) AEGEAN SUN. The ship was traveling from China to Abidjan, Ivory Coast. It was assessed as beyond economical repair and laid up at Mombasa. The vessel was eventually sold to Pakistani shipbreakers and arrived at Gadani Beach under tow on April 18, 1985, for dismantling.

1983: EVA MARIA C., a Seaway caller in 1976, developed leaks as c) LAGADA BEACH and sank about 200 miles northeast of Aden. The vessel was enroute to Bandar Abbas, Iran, with iron and steel products.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Historical Collections of the Great Lakes, Father Dowling Collection, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Tug tows CSL’s former Atlantic Erie on final journey

11/5 - The self-unloading bulk carrier Spirit of Shpongle, formerly known as Atlantic Erie, left the Port of Montreal for the last time Friday morning bound for an eco-friendly recycling yard in Turkey.

The dismantling of the 31-year-old vessel is part of CSL’s fleet optimization and capacity management programs that introduced six new state-of-the art Trillium Class vessels to the Canadian fleet and retired five older, less efficient ships, including Atlantic Erie.

“Our ships are like family so the decision to retire one is never easy,” said Allister Paterson, President of Canada Steamship Lines. “But in a mature market like the Great Lakes, it’s the responsible thing to do. As technologically-superior ships enter the market, we need to recycle the older ships that market demand will no longer support.”

Atlantic Erie was sold “as-is where-is” to a vessel broker, who is towing the renamed vessel to a ship recycling yard in Turkey in full compliance with international rules and regulations and according to CSL’s own rigorous vessel recycling policy. The towing tug was Pacific Hickory. Spirit of Schongle is flying the flag of Saint Vincent & the Grenadines.

Originally named Hon. Paul Martin, the Great Lakes and ocean class vessel was built for Canada Steamship Lines in 1984 at the Collingwood shipyard in Ont. The ship was renamed Atlantic Erie in 1988 to reflect the dual ocean and Great Lakes services she would perform throughout her active life.

Canada Steamship Lines, Claude Marcil, Ron Beaupre

 

Port Reports -  November 5

Duluth-Superior
American Spirit was loading at BN Friday evening for Detroit’s Zug Island. Paul R. Tregurtha was at SMET taking on coal. Arthur M. Anderson was also in Duluth, while the saltie Cornelia was at anchor.

Silver Bay, Minn.
Mesabi Miner departed Silver Bay late Friday afternoon/early evening and was showing an Ashtabula destination on AIS.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Kaministiqua and Radcliffe R. Latimer departed downbound Friday evening after loading grain. Federal Cedar was still loading Friday. Isolda and Ludogorets were still at anchor.

St. Marys River
Roger Blough and Bluebill were upbound Friday morning, and Algoma Harvester was downbound. Joseph L. Block was downbound in the afternoon, while Cedarglen, Lee A. Tregurtha, Pineglen and Mesabi Miner followed later in the day. As night fell, Manitoulin was upbound in the lower river, followed by Saginaw and Michipicoten.

Marinette, Mich.
HHL Rhine was discharging pig iron on Friday.

Milwaukee, Wis. – Alan
Federal Mayumi sailed early evening Thursday, bound for Montreal and presumably to sea. Federal Maas arrived just before daybreak Friday morning, mooring at one of the lakeside piers. Bradshaw McKee and barge arrived Friday morning and went, as usual, to the St. Marys cement plant in the Kinnickinnic River. The tug John Marshall continued its shuttle between Milwaukee and Oak Creek with its cargo of aggregate.

Goderich, Ont.
Algoma Mariner remained at the grain elevator on Friday.

Toledo, Ohio
Ojibway and the saltie Osogovo arrived early Friday for grain. Algoway arrived with salt in the evening. Federal Danube continued to load grain upriver.

Kingston, Ont. – Ron Walsh
The chemical tanker SCT Monte Rosa was still at anchor with engine trouble off Tibbetts Point Friday evening. She has been there since Thursday afternoon.

 

National Weather Service releases Great Lakes freeze-up forecast

11/5 - Cleveland, Ohio – Wondering when the Great Lakes are going to freeze? According to the National Weather Service, during La Niña years, for which we are forecasted to see conditions this winter, ice begins to cause problems for shipping during the first week of January, especially in the western basin of Lake Erie.

Right now North America is under a "La Niña watch," which means there's a 55 percent chance of La Niña conditions continuing through this winter. La Niña brings cooler temperatures and snowier conditions across the northern states.

Here's how the National Weather Service puts it: "La Niñas develop a blocking high pressure center over the Gulf of Alaska, forcing the jet stream to track east across central Alaska, and then southeast through Alberta, Canada into the Ohio Valley.

"This track is variable through the winter, but favors colder air across the Great Lakes region. This track also favors the interaction of the cold, arctic air from Canada with the warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico. Hence...this scenario favors greater chances for precipitation across the lower Great Lakes region."

So La Niña is going to bring in cooler temperatures and more snow for the Great Lakes.

The National Weather Service outlines that the increase in ice from the colder temperatures due to La Niña wasn't exactly extremely significant. During previous La Niña years, ice completely covered Lake Erie, Green Bay, the Bays de Noc, Saginaw Bay, and along the immediate shores of Lake Superior.

The National Weather Service outlines that the increase in ice from the colder temperatures due to La Niña wasn't exactly extremely significant. During previous La Niña years, ice completely covered Lake Erie, Green Bay, the Bays de Noc, Saginaw Bay, and along the immediate shores of Lake Superior.

But forecasting ice development is very complicated. Development could be earlier, or later than previous years, because it's highly dependent upon the occurrence of cold air outbreaks and warm periods in the next couple of months.

There are two major factors that influence when freezing starts: the amount of heat stored in the water from the summer and how fast the heat can be removed by arctic outbreaks of polar air and high winds.

So, while the first freeze during La Niña years is usually around the first week of January, there could be some small variation this year due to these other factors.

Cleveland.com

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 5

At 2 a.m. 05 November 1884, the steamer GRACE GRUMMOND (iron side-wheel excursion steamer, 138 foot, 250 tons, built in 1856, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as the survey steamer JEFFERSON DAVIS, specifically for the survey of the Great Lakes) burned at Grand Haven, Michigan. Her cargo of apples, pears and potatoes was also destroyed. No lives were lost. After the fire she was towed to Chicago to lay up until it was decided what to do with her. It is not known if she ever operated as a steamer again, but in 1887, she was rebuilt as a schooner at Milwaukee. She was one of the only sizable iron-hulled schooners ever used on the lakes. In 1904, as a tow-barge, she was sold Canadian and renamed BALTIC (C.116760). She was later used as a breakwater at Clear Creek, Ontario and was finally scrapped in 1939.

On 05 November 1852, BUCKEYE STATE (3-mast wooden bark, 132 foot, 310 tons, built in 1852, at Black River, Ohio) stranded off S. Milwaukee Point on Lake Michigan in a storm and was then broken up by waves. This was her first year of operation and she had been in service less than three months.

LOUIS R. DESMARAIS cleared Owen Sound, Ontario on her maiden voyage November 5, 1977, bound for Thunder Bay, Ontario, to load 27,117 gross tons of iron ore for Stelco at Hamilton, Ontario. Her forward end was replaced at Port Weller in 2001, and renamed b.) CSL LAURENTIEN.

On her final trip, the IRVIN L. CLYMER passed up bound at the Soo on November 5, 1990, and arrived at Duluth two days later to unload limestone at the Hallet Dock #5, after which she moved to her final lay-up berth at Fraser Shipyard and tied up, blowing one last three long and two short salute from her whistle. In 1993, she was sold to Azcon Corp. of Duluth, Minnesota for scrapping.

GRAND HAVEN was raised on November 5, 1969, from the Old River Bed, where she sank on September 19, 1969. She was raised for scrapping.

Mr. J. W. Isherwood visited the Great Lakes Engineering Works shipyard on November 5, 1910, and personally inspected the hull which was being built according to his patented design. This vessel, the WILLIAM P. PALMER, was the first vessel on the Great Lakes built to the Isherwood system of longitudinal framing.

On 05 Nov 1917, a foggy and rainy day, the JAMES S. DUNHAM (steel propeller bulk freighter, 420 foot, 4,795 gross tons, built in 1906, at W. Bay City, Michigan) sank in a collision with the steamer ROBERT FULTON (steel propeller bulk freighter, 424 foot, 4,219 gross tons, built 1896, at Wyandotte, Michigan) just below Grassy Island on the Detroit River. Repairs for both vessels totaled $125,000.

On 5 November 1896, ACADIA (iron-framed wooden propeller, 176 foot, built in 1867, at Hamilton, Ontario) was driven ashore and broke up in a gale near the mouth of the Michipicoten River in Lake Superior. Her crew made it to shore and five of them spent more than a week trying to make it to the Soo.

The Port Huron Times of 5 November 1878: "The schooner J. P. MARCH is reported lost with all on board. She was lost at Little Traverse Bay on the northern shore of Lake Michigan. The MARCH was a three-masted schooner and was owned by Benton & Pierce of Chicago."

On 5 November 1838, TOLEDO (2-mast wooden schooner, 98 foot, 215 tons, built in 1836, at Buffalo) was carrying dry goods valued at more than $100,000 up-bound on Lake Erie when she was driven ashore by a gale a half mile east of the mouth of the Grand River. She broke in two. No lives were lost.

On 5 November 1869, TITAN (wooden schooner, 132 foot, 361 gross tons, built in 1856, at Oswego, New York) was carrying 17,500 bushels of wheat on Lake Michigan in a terrific gale. She was driven toward shore. Her anchors were dropped as she came close in and they held for about an hour. However, the ship finally dragged ashore, losing both of her masts and breaking up as she struck. Of the nine on board, only one survived and that one was found crawling along the beach in a dazed state. When she was new, TITAN broke the record by completing the trip from Chicago to Oswego in only 8 days and 4 hours. Her record only lasted one day since the schooner SURPRISE broke it by 6 hours the following day.

In the summer of 1875, the propeller EAST ran down and sank the tug JOE MAC, not even pausing to save her crew from drowning. The following winter Messrs. Seymour & Co., owners of the JOE MAC, obtained a judgment in a U.S. Court against the owners of the EAST. Since the EAST was a Canadian vessel, they were unable to seize her because the judgment could only be effected in American waters. On Sunday morning, 05 Nov 1876, the steam tug SEYMOUR, with a United States Marshal and posse on board, proceeded up to Allen's (presumably at Ogdensburg, New York), and there lay in wait for the EAST, which went up by the Crossover light channel into American waters. The SEYMOUR ran out and captured the vessel and brought her to Averell's wharf in U.S. waters to await justice.

CALCITE II arrived in Sarnia at 6 a.m. on Sunday, 05 Nov. 2000, for lay-up. After leaving Cleveland the previous day, she anchored in Western Lake Erie, so she could arrive at the North Slip in Sarnia when shoreside personnel would be on-hand to assist. A chartered bus from Rogers City left about noon to take many of the crew home. Around 4:10 p.m., the downbound MYRON C. TAYLOR passed her fleetmate CALCITE II, perhaps for the last time in USS Great Lakes Fleet colors, and she blew her sister an extended 3 long and 2 short master salute. The TAYLOR was bound for Cleveland with a load of stone.

1885: The Canadian Pacific passenger and freight steamer ALGOMA cleared Owen Sound on its final trip with 11 passengers and headed for the Canadian Lakehead.

1897: IDAHO departed Buffalo and was caught in a wild storm on Lake Erie. The wooden passenger and freight carrier fell into the trough and only two survived. They had climbed the mast and were plucked from the crow's nest the next morning in a heroic effort by the crew of the MARIPOSA.

1940: SPARTA was wrecked near the Pictured Rocks after stranding on a reef in a heavy gale. The hull was abandoned on November 11 but salvaged in 1941 and never repaired.

1957: The Finnish freighter KORSO struck a drifting World War Two mine off Cape Mondjego, Portugal, and sank as a belated casualty of the conflict. The vessel had been built at Kingston, ON in 1942 as H.M.C.S. IRONBOUND and converted for mercantile use in 1948.

1962: EDWIN REITH, a West German salty, grounded near Tibbetts Point, Lake Ontario, and had to be lightered to P.S. BARGE NO. 1. It was released and came to Toronto to unload on November 14.

1967: The Canadian laker MOHAWK DEER, enroute to La Spezia, Italy, for scrapping, ran aground in the Gulf of Genoa near Portofino, Italy, and sank the next day.

1987: CATHARINA WIARDS sank in the Red Sea as d) TRADER after the engine room flooded during a voyage from Augusta, Italy, to China. The vessel was a year old when it came through the Seaway for the first time in 1970.

1991: OLYMPIC PEACE, a Seaway trader for the first time in 1976, arrived at Piraeus, Greece, with damage to the main engine cooling system as c) FREE PEACE. It was later seized by Banco-Hellenique and sold at auction. The ship was scrapped in China during 1994 as e) PATMOS I.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Atlantic Erie scrap tow expected to leave Friday

11/4 - The former Canada Steamship Lines self-unloader Atlantic Erie is expected to be towed out of Montreal about 6 a.m. Friday by the tug Pacific Hickory, with Ocean Bravo assisting. She is headed for scrapping in Turkey.

Mac Mackay, Rene Beauchamp

 

Star Line buying Arnold's assets as longtime Mackinac Island ferry closes

11/4 - St. Ignace, Mich. – Longtime Mackinac Island ferry service Arnold Transit is shuttering after years of trying to stay afloat amid financial difficulties. Competitor Star Line Mackinac Island Ferry is buying Arnold's assets for an undisclosed amount, Star Line CEO Jerry Fetty said on Thursday.

"Star Line is looking forward to increasing and improving options for our passengers while keeping the historic boats and properties that families have grown to love over the years, operational," Fetty said.

In recent years, ownership of the struggling Arnold Transit had become a legal battle between controlling investors and former owners.

In early 2014, investors ousted the former president, James Wynn, and installed new managers after he sold land at the foot of Arnold's island dock to a developer and took out a massive mortgage on the company without their approval.

Concerns about the company's financial instability prompted longtime client Mission Point Resort to drop its contract with Arnold.

Arnold Transit has provided ferry service from Michigan's famed Mackinac Island to Mackinac City and St. Ignace since 1878. In recent years, Arnold has offered the cheapest fares but with less frequent runs than its two competitors, Star Line and Shepler's ferry services.

Read more and view a photo gallery at this link

 

Port Reports -  November 4

Duluth, Minn. – Daniel Lindner
Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin arrived Duluth at 00:01 on Thursday and headed to CN to load iron ore pellets. Algorail departed from Hallett #8 at 02:03 and cleaned her holds offshore. American Century arrived at 04:29 to load coal at Midwest Energy. Algorail re-arrived at 05:25 and headed down to Superior to wait for Burns Harbor to finish loading at BN. Hon. James L. Oberstar arrived next at 15:25 to load iron ore pellets at CN after Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin, which departed with her load at 16:52. Arthur M. Anderson arrived mid-evening to discharge stone at Hallett #8, and American Century departed a few minutes later with her cargo of coal for St. Clair. Roerborg finished loading grain at CHS 1 and departed at 21:30. HHL Amur continued unloading at Port Terminal. In Superior, Burns Harbor departed at 13:41, and Algorail took the dock next. She departed at 21:00 Thursday evening. Stewart J. Cort was expected to arrive late Thursday night to load ore.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Kaministiqua, Radicliffe R. Latimer and Federal Cedar were loading late Thursday. Isolda and Ludogorets were at anchor. Algoma Harvester departed earlier in the day.

Cedarville, Mich.
Cuyahoga was loading stone on Thursday evening.

Goderich, Ont.
Algoma Mariner was at the grain elevator Thursday evening, while fleetmate Algoway was loading salt at Sifto.

Toledo, Ohio
Alpena was discharging cement Thursday. Other vessels in port included Algoma Enterprise and Federal Danube.

Buffalo, N.Y. – Brian W.
Tug Calusa Coast / barge Delaware were headed down the Black Rock Canal Thursday afternoon, bound for Tonawanda.

Kingston, Ont. – Ron Walsh
The chemical tanker SCT Monte Rosa has been anchored off Tibbetts Point since 1345 Thursday. She has engine problems and radio traffic indicates the ship's engineers cannot find the problem and are waiting for a shore engineer to come aboard. That will likely be Friday morning.

 

Lake Superior drops 4 inches in October

11/4 - Duluth, Minn. – Lake Superior had one of its largest monthly declines in years in October, dropping 4 inches in a month the big lake usually drops only an inch. A warmer, dryer October contributed to the decline, with the water supply to the lake lower than usual, according to the International Lake Superior Board of Control.

The lake now sits 5 inches above the long-term average for Nov. 1 and is still 2 inches above the level on Nov. 1, 2015. Lake Superior usually drops from September to March and then rises from April to August.

Lakes Huron and Michigan also saw less new water entering, dropping 3 inches in October, which is about average for the month. The lakes now sit 10 inches above their long-term normal and 4 inches higher than Nov. 1, 2015.

Duluth News Tribune

 

Vessels with Great Lakes / Seaway connection - reported as a Casualty or Sold for Demolition

11/4 - The following information is taken from the November issue of Marine News - Journal of the World Ship Society.

Casualties – none reported

Demolitions
Algosoo - (7343619 - Canada) 21,716 / 1974 - self-discharging bulk carrier. By Algoma Central Corporation (ACC, Canada) to International Marine Salvage Co. and arrived Port Colborne 2/10/2016

Catherine III - (5133979 - Sierra Leone) ex Catherine Desgagnes-15, Thorold-85, Gosforth-72 - 5,675 / 1962 general cargo By R.J. MacIsaac Construction Ltd., Canada to Ersay Gemi Geri Donusum, Turkey and arrived Aliaga 25/05/2016 - scrapping commenced 27/05/2016

Federal St. Laurent (3) - (9110896 - Barbados) - 20,837 / 1996 - bulk carrier. By Federal Atlantic Ltd. (Fednav Ltd.) Barbados to Jiangmen Zhong Xin Shipbreaking, China and arrived Xinhui Guangdong 12/06/2016

Mari - (6816607 - Sierra Leone) ex Algomarine-16, Lake Manitoba-87 - 18,338 / 1968 - self-discharging bulk carrier. By Algoma Central Corporation (ACC, Canada) to Leyal Demtas Gemi Sokum, Turkey and arrived Aliaga 18/06/2016 - scrapping commenced 23/06/2016

Navi - (6707961 - Sierra Leone) ex Algoma Navigator-16, Canadian Navigator-11, St. Lawrence Navigator-79, Demeterton-75 - 18,788 / 1967 - self-discharging bulk carrier. By Algoma Central Corporation (ACC, Canada) to Leyal Gemi Sokum Ltd., Turkey and arrived Aliaga 25/06/2016 - scrapping commenced 25/06/2016 Peter - (8016641 - Sierra Leone) ex Peter R. Cresswell-16, Algowest-01 - 19,853 / 1982 - self-discharging bulk carrier. By Algoma Central Corporation (ACC, Canada) to unspecified breakers and arrived Aliaga, Turkey 18/07/2016

Submitted by Barry Andersen and René Beauchamp

 

Singer Dan Hall to help open new gallery in Holly, Mich.

11/4 - Holly, Mich. – Maritime photographer Mike Mishler, owner of Lincat Photography, along with the Holly Veterans Resource Center, will host a gallery grand opening on Friday from 7-10 p.m. at the Karl Richter Community Center - Room 215, 300 East St., Holly, Mich. The gallery will feature Mishler’s maritime photography as well as art by local veterans.

Great Lakes-themed singer-songwriter Dan Hall will perform from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. in celebration of the event. Tickets for the concert will be $15 or $25 for two. The concert will be held in the auditorium. Call 248-909-4558 for details.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 4

The Great Lakes Steamship Company steamer NORWAY passed downbound through the Soo Locks with 6,609 tons of rye. This cargo increased the total tonnage transiting the locks in 1953 to 120,206,088 tons – a new one-season tonnage record. Renamed b.) RUTH HINDMAN in 1964, she was scrapped at Thunder Bay, Ontario in 1978.

On 04 November 1883, MAYFLOWER (wooden propeller freighter “steam barge,” 185 foot, 623 gross tons, built in 1852, at Buffalo, New York) was carrying lumber when she stranded in a gale off Point Abino near Buffalo, New York where the waves pounded her to pieces. The crew made it to shore in the yawl. She was built as a very fine passenger steamer for the Western Transportation Line then in 1868, she was rebuilt as a “steam barge.”

On 4 November 1875, SWAN (wooden propeller tug, 11 gross tons, built in 1862, at Buffalo, New York) caught fire while lying out in the Saginaw River near East Saginaw. She was abandoned by the crew and burned to the water’s edge.

JOSEPH G. BUTLER JR (steel bulk freighter, 525 foot, 6,588 gross tons) was launched on 04 Nov 1905, at Lorain, Ohio for the Tonopah Steamship Co. (Hutchinson & Co., mgr.). She lasted until 1971, when she was stripped of her cabins and scuttled, along with HENRY R. PLATT JR., at Steel Co. of Canada plant, Burlington Bay, Hamilton, Ontario, as breakwater and fill.

CARTIERCLIFFE HALL was registered at Toronto, Ontario, on 04 Nov 1977, but didn't enter service until the spring of 1978 because of mechanical difficulties during her sea trials.

On 04 Nov, 1986, TEXACO CHIEF was renamed A.G. FARQUHARSON. She was renamed c.) ALGONOVA (i) in 1998.

CALCITE II departed Cleveland at 5:30 a.m. Saturday, 04 Nov 2000, on her last trip for USS Great Lakes Fleet. She sailed upbound for Sarnia, Ontario, where she spent the winter in lay-up. Grand River Transportation had entered into a sale agreement with USS Great Lakes Fleet, Inc. for the purchase of the CALCITE II, GEORGE A. SLOAN and MYRON C. TAYLOR. Built as the WILLIAM G. CLYDE in 1929, CALCITE II is awaiting scrapping as c.) MAUMEE.

HERON BAY proceeded under her own power to Lauzon, Quebec, for her final lay-up on November 4, 1978.

CSL's NIPIGON BAY was launched November 4, 1950.

CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON developed a sizable leak and almost sank November 4, 1925, during her tow to Superior after she struck a reef a few nights before.

ROBERT C. STANLEY's keel was laid November 4, 1942.

UNITED STATES GYPSUM of 1910 grounded at Toledo, Ohio, on November 4, 1972, resulting in damage totaling $125,000. Her propeller was removed and the rudder shaft was locked in position to finish the season as a manned barge on the coal run from Toledo to Detroit, Michigan.

JOSEPH H. THOMPSON became not only the largest vessel on the Great Lakes but also the longest dry bulk cargo vessel in the world when it entered service on November 4, 1952, departing Chicago on its first trip.

Setting the stage for the fateful storm that followed less than a week later that sank the EDMUND FITZGERALD, many locations in Minnesota and Wisconsin were setting all-time record high temperatures for the month of November during the period of November 4-6, 1975. Grand Marais, Minnesota, reached 67 degrees on November 5 and Superior reached 74 degrees on November 6, both all-time records for the month. Many other notable Great Lakes storms, including the Armistice Day storm of 1940, and the storm that sank the HENRY STEINBRENNER in 1953, were proceeded by record-setting warm weather.

On 4 November 1877, MARY BOOTH (wooden scow-schooner, 132 tons, built in 1857, at Buffalo, New York) was carrying maple lumber in a storm in Lake Michigan. She became waterlogged but her crew doggedly clung to her until she appeared ready to turn turtle. Then her crew abandoned her and she rolled over. She drifted in the lake for several days. The crew landed at White Lake, Michigan and they were near death.

The Port Huron Times of 4 November 1878: "The propeller CITY OF MONTREAL is believed to have gone down on Lake Michigan on Friday [1 NOV 1878]. The schooner LIVELY, laden with coal for Bay City, is reported ashore 6 miles above Sand Beach, having gone on at 12 o'clock Sunday night [3 NOV 1878]. The schooner WOODRUFF, ashore at Whitehall, is a total loss. Two men were drowned, one died from injuries received, and Capt. Lingham was saved. The tugs E M PECK and MYSTIC, which went from the Sault to the assistance of the propeller QUEBEC, were wrecked near where she lies, one being on the beach and the other sunk below her decks. Both crews were rescued and were taken to St. Joseph Island."

On 4 November 1856, J W BROOKS (wooden propeller, 136 foot, 322 tons, built in 1851, at Detroit) was carrying provisions and copper ingots to Ogdensburg, New York in a storm when she foundered on Lake Ontario, 8 miles northeast of False Ducks Light. Estimates of the loss of lives range from 22 to 50. In July 1857, she was partially raised and some of her cargo was recovered. She only had a five year career, but besides this final incident, she had her share of disasters. In July 1855, she had a boiler explosion and in May of that same year, she sank in Canadian waters.

In 1980 the tug LAUREN CASTLE sank while towing the AMOCO WISCONSIN near Lee Point in Traverse Bay. Engineer William Stephan was lost.

1891: The iron freighter NORTH, which had become the first ocean ship to be cut in two and brought to the Great Lakes, arrived at Collingwood to be rebuilt as b) CAMPANA for the passenger & freight trades on the upper lakes.

1898: The wooden passenger and freight steamer PACIFIC burned at the Grand Trunk Railway dock in Collingwood along with the freight sheds and their contents. The blaze had begun the previous evening and roared for hours. The vessel was valued at $65,000.

1959: WESTRIVER arrived at Halifax for repairs after an earlier engine room explosion on Lake Superior had left the ship with significant damage.

1967: PEARL LIGHT, a World War II Empire ship, came through the Seaway for one trip in 1965. It was wrecked off Vietnam as g) HABIB MARIKAR while enroute from Dalian, China, to Chittagong, Bangladesh, with bagged cement. One life was lost.

1972: INLAND TRANSPORT went aground off Garden Island Bank, near Little Current, Manitoulin Island, and received major hull damage that led to the retirement of that Halco tanker after one more trip.

1991: CARLI METZ struck the wall below Lock 2 of the Welland Canal and the vessel had to go to Port Weller Dry Docks for repairs. It had been inbound for the first time earlier in the year and returned in 1992. It was scrapped at Chittagong, Bangladesh, as d) METZ ITALIA in 2001.

1993: ZIEMIA ZAMOJSKA, while under tow, struck the raised 106th Street Bridge on the Calumet River at Chicago resulting in damage to the structure and traffic problems. The corn-laden vessel received a hole in the port bow, which was repaired at Montreal.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  November 3

Duluth, Minn. – Daniel Lindner
Joseph L. Block departed Duluth from Hallett #5 with a partial load of BFT at 02:38 and headed for Two Harbors to complete loading. Algorail arrived at 15:25 to unload salt at Hallett #8. About the same time, Roerborg departed from her dock at Port Terminal and shifted to CHS 1 to begin loading grain. HHL Amur continued unloading at Port Terminal. In Superior, Frontenac arrived at 10:42 to load at Burlington Northern. She departed later in the evening with ore. Burns Harbor was expected to arrive Wednesday night.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Wicko departed downbound with grain on Wednesday. Pineglen and Federal Cedar were loading. Isolda, Radcliffe R. Latimer and Ludogorets were at anchor.

St. Marys River Downbound traffic Wednesday included Tecumseh, Algoma Spirit and Algoma Mariner. Upbound traffic included Arthur M. Anderson, Hon. James L. Oberstar, Edwin H. Gott, Stewart J. Cort, Kaministiqua (late) and Sam Laud. Algowood left Essar downbound in the early hours. Cuyahoga was there unloading during the day, and left in the evening downbound. The Soo Locks Visitor Center is closed for the season.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Federal Mayumi remained at Nidera loading grain on Wednesday.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Solina departed upbound on Wednesday. Federal Maas arrived.

Goderich, Ont.
Federal Seto departed Wednesday with grain. By evening, she was downbound in the Detroit River.

Windsor, Ont.
The Netherlands-flagged Qamutik was anchored in the Detroit River Wednesday evening, possible waiting for another saltie, Vectis Castle, to finish unloading. Toledo, Ohio
The Lower Lakes Towing vessel Ojibway is underway in the St Lawrence River and bound for Toledo to load grain. Her tentative ETA is Friday Nov. 4.

Huron, Ohio
Cason J. Callaway arrived with a cargo of stone Wednesday evening.

Buffalo, N.Y. – Brian W.
American Mariner was expected to arrive at the Frontier elevator with grain around 6 p.m. Wednesday. English River was towed upriver stern first by the Washington at 7:45 a.m. for the Lafarge plant on Ohio Street.

Welland Canal
H. Lee White was downbound in the Welland Canal Wednesday morning with more ore for Quebec.

 

Wreck found along 'outlandishly' remote stretch of Lake Superior shore

11/3 - Duluth, Minn. – His ship sunk, his belongings gone but for the clothes on his back, L.S. Upson surveyed the scene along the remote shore of Lake Superior 100 miles north of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.

Upson was one of about 60 passengers and crew who survived the sinking of the package steamer J.S. Seaverns near Michipicoten Harbor in May 1884.

It had been a harrowing experience for the survivors — "it was a fine night or all (would) have been lost," Upson noted in a letter home that was later reprinted in the Chicago Inter Ocean newspaper.

But while they may have been glad to be alive, the passengers and crew must have lamented their lot, with their possessions and supplies now on the bottom of the lake — and a wait of indeterminate length until they all could be picked up from the isolated outpost.

"This," Upson wrote of his surroundings, "is the most outlandish out-of-a-way place in the world."

Read more and view photos and a video at this link

 

Get your Christmas tree from Toledo's "Christmas Tree Ship"

11/3 - Toledo, Ohio – On Saturday, Dec. 3, fresh-cut Christmas trees will arrive at the National Museum of the Great Lakes, brought by the tug Josephine and escorted by Santa. Come down to the museum to participate in this Toledo tradition. Pre-purchase your tree and watch it come off the tug and into your hands, just like the Christmas tree ships of old. The trees will be approximately 5 to 7 feet tall. Each tree is $40 and includes refreshments and a meeting with Santa.

Call 419-214-5000 ext. 200 to purchase online by Tuesday, Nov. 29 to pre-order a tree. No walk-up sales will be available. Spectators are welcome with museum admission.

This year the museum is working with Heroes in Action to provide trees for service members, veterans and their families. Purchase a Christmas tree to donate and help spread holiday cheer.

National Museum of the Great Lakes

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 3

On 03 November 1907, tug ESCORT (wooden propeller, 45 foot, 40 gross tons, built in 1894, at Port Colborne, Ontario) tried to pass the barge BENJ HARRISON at the mouth of the Niagara River. In a navigational error, the tug sheared under the barge’s bow, was run over and sunk. Three lives were lost.

B. A. PEERLESS sailed on her maiden voyage November 3, 1952, bound for Superior, Wisconsin, where 110,291 barrels of crude oil were loaded destined for British-American's refinery at Clarkson, Ontario. The PEERLESS was built for the express purpose of transporting crude oil from the Interprovincial / Lakehead Pipeline terminus at Superior to B / A's Clarkson refinery. The vessel lasted until 1991, when she was broken up.

On 3 November 1898, PACIFIC (wooden propeller passenger/package freighter, 179 foot, 918 gross tons, built in 1883, at Owen Sound, Ontario) caught fire at the Grand Trunk dock at Collingwood, Ontario. She burned to a shell despite a concerted effort to save her. She was later towed out into Georgian Bay and scuttled.

On 3 November 1855, DELAWARE (wooden propeller, 173 foot, 368 tons, built in 1846, at Black River, Ohio) was carrying general merchandise from Chicago to Buffalo with a stop at Milwaukee. She was driven ashore by a gale eight miles south of Sheboygan, Wisconsin and sank. Ten or 11 of the 18 on board lost their lives. Within a few days, only her arches were visible above the water.

Dismantling of the H. C. HEIMBECKER began on 03 Nov 1981, by Triad Salvage Company at Ashtabula, Ohio, and was completed the following year. This vessel was originally named GEORGE W. PERKINS (steel bulk freighter, 556 foot, 6,553 gross tons, built in 1905, at Superior, Wisconsin.)

1928: CANADIAN TRADER was Hull 39 of the Port Arthur shipyard. Following a sale to Japanese interests, the ship departed Seattle on this date in 1928 on its delivery voyage, still as c) GUILDA SCUDERI, and was never seen again.

1953: The tug J.A. CORNETT went hard aground about seven miles north of Clayton, NY and was leaking badly. The vessel was eventually refloated and survived at Port Dover, ON at least as recently as 2011. It has been laid up there since 1992 and is now in derelict condition.

1965: The tug MISEFORD was towing the barge CHARLES W. JOHNSON when they were caught in a storm on the St. Marys River. The tug was pulled over on her side and rested on the bottom. MISEFORD was salvaged in the spring of 1966 and remains in service in 2012 as a harbor tug at Thunder Bay, Ont.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Port Reports -  November 2

Duluth, Minn. – Daniel Lindner
Joseph L. Block arrived Duluth at 02:17 on Tuesday and docked at Graymont Superior plant. She remained there throughout the morning, and around midday, she shifted to Hallett #5 to load blast furnace trim. She took the dock after Great Republic, which arrived on Monday, finished unloading limestone. The Republic shifted to Midwest Energy to load coal and departed mid-evening. On Tuesday night, Maccoa topped off at CHS 1 and departed with the assistance of G-tugs Arkansas and Kentucky. HHL Amur and Roerborg, which both arrived on Monday, were in the Port Terminal slip. The former was unloading general cargo, and the latter was docked at the entrance to the slip waiting for Maccoa to complete loading at CHS 1. Both the Block and HHL Amur were expected to depart late Tuesday night. In Superior, James R. Barker departed mid-evening after spending over 48 hours docked at BN.

Keweenaw Peninsula
Frontenac and Edgar B. Speer were at anchor in the lee of the Keweenaw Peninsula Tuesday waiting for weather. By late evening they were on the move westbound, followed by Algorail.

St. Marys River
Upbound traffic Tuesday included Algoma Harvester (early), Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin, Radcliffe R. Latimer, the saltie Ludogorets (ex-Fritz) and American Century. Downbounders included Burns Harbor in the morning, Isadora in the afternoon and Philip R. Clarke late.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Federal Mayumi remained at Nidera loading grain on Tuesday.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Solina remained at the unloading dock on Tuesday.

Goderich, Ont.
Federal Seto was still at the grain dock on Tuesday.

Toledo, Ohio
Baie Comeau, Saginaw, tug Dylan Cooper and her barge, Federal Danube, the tug Michigan / barge Great Lakes, tug Samuel de Champlain / barge Innovation and tug Victory / barge James L. Kuber were all at docks on the Maumee River Tuesday.

Gulf of St. Lawrence
The tug Ocean Artique appeared to be towing the disabled saltie Gadwall, a frequent lakes visitor, to Sept Iles Tuesday for unspecified repairs.

Correction: A port report Oct. 31 from Toronto incorrectly stated that the Federal Churchill was on her maiden voyage into the Great Lakes at that time. Federal Churchill was first in the lakes in mid-July, when she loaded grain in Duluth at Riverland Ag.

 

November at Dossin Great Lakes Museum includes memorials, marine mart

11/2 - Detroit, Mich. – The annual “Lost Mariners Remembrance” program at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Isle Thursday, Nov. 10 is sold out, but the public is welcome to watch the flotilla from the riverbank adjacent to the museum at no charge.

The entire program will be Live Streamed on Facebook, check back for details.

Tickets are still available for the program “Morrell: Untold Stories” on Sunday, Nov. 13. Four presentations will remember the sinking of the freighter Daniel J. Morrell 50 years ago.

The annual Marine Mart returns to the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Saturday, Nov. 19. The Mart is a vendor marketplace designed for Great Lakes enthusiasts. It features shiploads of nautical items and treasures, including lighthouse prints, nautical stipple ink prints, original and acrylic prints, unique nautical gifts, hand painted Christmas ornaments with Michigan lighthouses, postcards, magazines, china, souvenirs, clocks, marine art, nautical charts, maritime artifacts, boat items, nautical artifacts, nautical photographs, woodworking, lithographs, brochures, acrylic paintings, out-of-print Great Lakes books, ship models and more.

All tickets are available at the door. Between 9 and 10 a.m., early birds will pay $7 for adults (children aged 12 and under are free). After 10 a.m., the Dossin opens to the public and admission to the Marine Mart is free to everyone.

Dossin Great Lakes Museum

 

Mariners Memorial Service next week in Traverse City

11/2 - Traverse City, Mich. – The public is invited to attend the 41st annual Mariners Memorial Service next Thursday, Nov. 10, at noon in the courtyard of Northwestern Michigan College's Great Lakes Campus.

The memorial service is held to remember and honor mariners who have perished on the Great Lakes and oceans. The event is sponsored by the Student Propeller Club, Port 150, of the Great Lakes Maritime Academy.

For more information, call the Great Lakes Maritime Academy at 231-995-1200.

 

Updates -  November 2

News Photo Gallery

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 2

On 02 November 1924, TURRET CROWN (steel propeller "turret ship,” 253 foot, 1,827 tons, built in 1895, in England) was driven ashore in a gale on Meldrum Point on the north side of Manitoulin Island on Lake Huron. Her hull was wrecked during the storms that winter. She was cut up and removed for scrap the following year.

On November 2, 1984, the tugs ATOMIC and ELMORE M. MISNER towed the ERINDALE, a.) W.F. WHITE, to the International Marine Salvage scrap dock at Port Colborne, Ontario, where demolition began that month.

H.C. HEIMBECKER proceeded under her own power to Ashtabula, Ohio, for scrapping, arriving there November 2, 1981.

On November 2, 1948, FRANK ARMSTRONG collided head-on with the c.) JOHN J. BOLAND of 1905, a.) STEPHEN B. CLEMENT, in a heavy fog on Lake Erie near Colchester, Ontario. Both vessels were badly damaged and resulted in one fatality on the BOLAND. The ARMSTRONG was towed to Toledo, Ohio, for repairs.

In 1972, the A. E. NETTLETON's towline parted from the OLIVE L. MOORE during a snowstorm with gale force winds 17 miles west of the Keweenaw Peninsula on Lake Superior. The barge developed a 15-degree list when her load of grain shifted. Three of her five-member crew were air lifted by a U.S.C.G. helicopter to the MOORE to assist in re-rigging the towline. The NETTLETON was towed the next day into the Lily Pond on the Keweenaw Waterway to trim her cargo.

The WILLIAM C. MORELAND was abandoned to the underwriters on November 2, 1910, as a constructive total loss, amounting to $445,000. She had stranded on Sawtooth Reef off Eagle Harbor, Michigan, on Lake Superior in mid October.

The keel of the new section, identified as Hull #28, was laid down on November 2, 1959. A new forward pilothouse and a hatch crane were installed and her steam turbine engine and water tube boilers were reconditioned. The vessel was named c.) RED WING after the Detroit Red Wing hockey team, honoring a long association with Upper Lakes Shipping and James Norris, the founder of ULS, and his two sons, James D. and Bruce, owners of the National Hockey League team.

In 1971, the Lake Michigan carferry BADGER was laid up due to a coal strike.

On 2 November 1889, FRANCIS PALMS (wooden schooner, 173 foot, 560 tons, built in 1868, at Marine City, Michigan, as a bark) was sailing from Escanaba to Detroit with a load of iron ore when she was driven ashore near Beaver Island in Lake Michigan. Her entire crew was taken off by the tug GLADIATOR that also pulled in vain while trying to free the PALMS. The PALMS was pounded to pieces by the storm waves. November was a bad month for the PALMS since she had previously been wrecked on Long Point in Lake Erie in November 1874, and again at Duluth in November 1872.

During the first week of November 1878, The Port Huron Times reported wrecks and mishaps that occurred during a severe storm that swept over the Lakes on Friday and Saturday, 1-3 November. The information was reported on 2, 4 & 5 November as the reports came in. The same reports will appear here starting today: The Port Huron Times of 2 November 1878: "The schooner L. C. WOODRUFF of Cleveland is ashore at the mouth of the White River with her foremast gone. She is loaded with corn. Three schooners went ashore at Grand Haven Friday morning, the AMERICA, MONTPELIER, and AUSTRALIAN. One man was drowned off the AUSTRALIAN. The schooner WORTS is ashore and full of water on Beaver Island. Her cargo consists of pork for Collingwood. The tug LEVIATHAN has gone to her aid. The schooner LAKE FOREST is ashore at Hammond's Bay, Lake Huron, and is full of water. She has a cargo of corn aboard. The tug A J SMITH has gone to her rescue. The barge S. C. WOODRUFF has gone down in 13 feet of water off Whitehall and her crew is clinging to the rigging at last accounts. A lifeboat has been sent to her relief. The barge RUTTER is in 25 feet of water and all the crew are now safe."

On 2 November 1874, PREBLE (2-mast wooden schooner, 98 foot, 166 tons, built in 1842, at Buffalo, New York as a brig) was lost in a storm off Long Point on Lake Erie and broke up in the waves. The steamer ST PAUL rescued her crew.

On 02 Nov 1862, BAY STATE (wooden propeller, 137 foot, 372 tons, built in 1852, at Buffalo, New York) was bound for Lake Erie ports from Oswego, New York when she broke up offshore in a terrific gale in the vicinity of Oswego. All 22 onboard, including six passengers, lost their lives. The shoreline was strewn with her wreckage for miles.

PAUL H. CARNAHAN was christened at the foot of West Grand Boulevard in Detroit, Michigan on 02 Nov 1961. She had been converted from the tanker b.) ATLANTIC DEALER to a dry bulk cargo carrier by American Ship Building Co. at Lorain, Ohio and came out on her maiden bulk freighter voyage just two weeks before this christening ceremony.

1912: JUNO, which had lost the barge P.B. LOCKE the previous day on Lake Ontario, arrived safely at Cobourg and then sank at the dock.

1923: The wooden steamer WESEE caught fire in Lake Erie off Middle Bass Island and burned as a total loss. The crew took to the yawl boats and all were saved.

1956: The former schooner J.T. WING, which had operated as a museum at Belle Isle in Detroit until condemned due to rotting timbers, was burned.

1981: FROSSO K., an SD 14 ocean freighter, suffered an engine room fire enroute from Vancouver to Japan. The ship was towed back to Vancouver November 15 and repaired. It first came through the Seaway in 1974 and arrived at Cartagena, Columbia, under tow, for scrapping on February 15, 1995, as e) MAMER.

1981: The West German freighter POSEIDON first came through the Seaway in 1962 and became a regular inland trader. It was abandoned, in leaking condition on this date, as e) VIKI K. in the Red Sea. There was some suspicion that the vessel was scuttled as part of an insurance fraud. 1988: PETER MISENER struck a shoal while upbound in the Saguenay River for Port Alfred with coke. There was major damage and the ship went to Montreal for repairs.

2001: AUDACIOUS stranded at Keleman Island, Indonesia, but was refloated two days later. The damage was severe and the vessel was laid up at Singapore and then sold to shipbreakers. The ship arrived at Alang, India, to be broken up, on April 27, 2002. The ship visited the Great Lakes as a) WELSH VOYAGER in 1977, and returned as b) LONDON VOYAGER in 1982 and c) OLYMPIC LEADER in 1983. It made its first inland voyage as d) AUDACIOUS in 1996 and its final call in 2000.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Max Hanley, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.

 

Cutting crew proceeding full speed ahead on Algosoo

11/1 - Scrappers at the Marine Recycling Corporation in Port Colborne, Ont., are wasting no time with the former Algoma Central Corp. self-unloader Algosoo.

The forward superstructure was removed on Friday and the boom has been cut in several places. Cut lines on her bulwark indicate they will cut the bow down further in her present position.

It was just a month ago, on Oct. 2, that Algosoo passed upbound under her own power en route to the scrap dock.

Ted Wilush

 

Port Reports -  November 1

Lake Superior
Westbound CSL Welland, Frontenac and Edgar B. Speer were hugging the south shore near Munising Monday night due to wind.

Thunder Bay, Ont.
Isadora departed for Montreal with grain Monday evening. Wicko, Federal Cedar, Tecumseh and Pineglen were loading. Cedarglen and Isolda were at anchor.

St. Marys River
American Mariner, Kaye E. Barker, Roger Blough and Esta Desgagnes were downbound Monday afternoon / evening. Algowood was at the Essar export dock.

Grand Haven, Mich.
Wilfred Sykes was in early Monday morning with slag. Joseph H. Thompson arrived in the evening.

Milwaukee, Wis.
Federal Mayumi remained at Nidera loading grain on Monday. The tug Anglian Lady (likely with a barge), and tug Undaunted with barge Pere Marquette 41 were also in port.

Burns Harbor, Ind.
Solina and Stewart J. Cort were unloading Monday.

Goderich, Ont.
Federal Seto was at the grain dock on Monday, while Algolake was loading salt.

Bay City, Mich.
Herbert C. Jackson departed Monday evening, headed for Stoneport.

Toledo, Ohio
Baie Comeau, Saginaw, Federal Yukon, Dylan Cooper and barge, tug Michigan and barge Great Lakes, and Federal Danube were at various docks along the Maumee River Monday.

Sandusky, Ohio
John J. Boland was loading stone Monday evening,

Buffalo, N.Y. – Brian W.
Manitoulin was towed in stern first by the tug Washington at 5 a.m. Monday. American Mariner was downbound at the Soo Monday and should arrive Wednesday afternoon/evening to unload.

Seaway
USS Detroit is expected to arrive at the St. Lambert Lock Tuesday around 7:30 a.m. She will stop in Montreal in the Old Port.

 

Door County museum’s Merry-Time Festival of Trees begins Nov. 12

11/1 - Sturgeon Bay, Wis. – More trees, more activities and more fun sum up the return of the Merry-Time Festival of Trees at the Door County Maritime Museum in Sturgeon Bay. Celebrate the holidays by enjoying dozens of beautifully decorated Christmas trees scattered throughout the museum’s galleries.

The festival will run Nov. 12-Dec. 13, and will feature artificial trees decorated by local organizations and businesses. Ornaments and special surprises adorn each of these 28 trees and wreaths. Visitors may see this holiday extravaganza during regular museum hours of 10 am to 5 pm daily and have the opportunity to enter a raffle in the hopes of winning their favorite tree to take home for Christmas.

The popular Maritime Speaker Series presented annually by the museum will have its December program during the festival, when former Door County Maritime Museum Executive Director Bob Desh will present a program on Tuesday, Dec. 8, at 7 p.m. It will involve a more in-depth look at one or more of the shipwrecks featured in the museum’s current upper lobby exhibit. Admission is free with a non-perishable food item requested. The Merry-Time Festival of Trees raffle tickets will also be available for sale.

The second highly sought-after family event occurs with the annual appearance by Santa Claus on the tug John Purves, Saturday, Dec. 3 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Join Santa onboard the historic tugboat to share Christmas wishes. Due to the size of the tug, only two adults can accompany each child. Adult museum admission includes a Santa visit.

For more information, contact the museum at (920) 743-5958 or visit www.dcmm.org.

 

Today in Great Lakes History -  November 1

The LEHIGH, Captain Edward P. Fitch in command, cleared the Great Lakes Engineering Works yard at River Rouge, Michigan, to begin her maiden trip on this day in 1943. The LEHIGH was one of two Maritimers (the other was the STEELTON) acquired by Bethlehem Steel Corp. as part of a government program to upgrade and increase the capacity of the Great Lakes fleet during World War II. Bethlehem exchanged three older vessels, the JOHNSTOWN of 1905, the SAUCON, and the CORNWALL, plus cash for the two Maritimers.

On 01 November 1880, NINA BAILEY (wooden schooner, 30 tons, built in 1873, at Ludington, Michigan) filled with water and went out of control in a storm on Lake Michigan. She struck the North Pier at St. Joseph, Michigan and capsized. Her crew climbed up on her keel and was rescued by the Lifesaving Service. The vessel later broke up in the waves.

The Grand Trunk Western Railway was granted permission by the Interstate Commerce Commission on November 1, 1978, to discontinue its Lake Michigan service between Muskegon, Michigan and Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

MAITLAND NO 1 made her maiden voyage on November 1, 1916, from Ashtabula, Ohio to Port Maitland, Ontario, transporting rail cars with coal for the steel mills at Hamilton, Ontario.

SCOTT MISENER of 1954 returned to service in the grain trade on November 1, 1986, after a 3-year lay-up.

On 1 November 1917, ALVA B (wooden steam tug, 74 foot, 84 gross tons, built in 1890, at Buffalo, New York) apparently mistook amusement park lights for the harbor markers at Avon Lake, Ohio during a storm. She struck bottom in the shallows and was destroyed by waves.

On 1 November 1862, BLACK HAWK (wooden brig, 138 foot, 385 tons, built in 1854, at Ohio City, Ohio) was carrying 19,000 bushels of corn and some stained glass when a gale drove her ashore and wrecked her near Point Betsie. In 1858, this vessel had sailed from Detroit, Michigan to Liverpool, England and back.

On 1 Nov 1862, CHIEF JUSTICE MARSHALL (2-mast wooden schooner, 105 foot, 182 tons, built in 1830, at Cape Vincent, New York) was driven aground between Dunkirk and Barcelona, New York during a storm. All hands were lost and the vessel was a total loss.

The Mackinac Bridge was opened to traffic on 01 November 1957.

The CITY OF MILWAUKEE (steel propeller carferry, 347 foot, 2,988 gross tons, built in 1931, at Manitowoc, Wisconsin) made her last run for Grand Trunk's rail car ferry service on 01 November 1978. In the fall of 1978, after termination of Grand Trunk's carferry service, she was then chartered to Ann Arbor Railroad. She is currently a museum ship at Manistee, Michigan.

Port Maitland Shipbreaking Ltd. began scrapping P & H Shipping's f.) ELMGLEN on 01 November 1984. She had a long career, being built in 1909, at Ecorse, Michigan as the a.) SHENANGO (steel propeller bulk freighter, 580 foot. 8,047 gross tons).

1907: WILLIAM A. REIS settled on the bottom of the St. Clair River following a collision with the MONROE C. SMITH. It was finally refloated for good on December 7 after several earlier efforts were short lived. The former last sailed as SASKADOC in 1966.

1908: TELEGRAM, a wooden passenger and freight carrier, stranded at Horse Island, Rattlesnake Harbour, Georgian Bay. The ship caught fire when the stove upset and the vessel was a total loss. All on board were rescued.

1912: The barge P.B. LOCKE, under tow of the JUNO, was lost in a storm on Lake Ontario enroute from Pointe Anne to Toronto.

1921: The Canadian wooden freighter CANOBIE, a) IRON KING received major storm damage on Lake Erie and arrived at Erie, Pa., in a leaking condition. The ship was stripped of valuable parts and abandoned. It later caught fire and subsequently scuttled about 2 miles offshore.

1924: GLENLYON stranded at Menagerie Island, Siskiwit Bay, Lake Superior while enroute to Port Colborne with 150,000 bushels of wheat. It had been seeking shelter in a storm but grounded as a total loss and then sank over the winter. All on board were saved.

1929: KEYSTATE and the schooner MAGGIE L. collided in the St. Lawrence near Clayton, NY, and the latter was lost.

1956: JAMES B. EADS and fleetmate GREY BEAVER were in a collision in western Lake Ontario and both received bow damage.

1965: High winds blew the Taiwanese freighter KALLY aground on a mud bank at Essexville, MI while inbound to load a cargo of scrap. The ship was released the next day.

2000: The Panamanian freighter OXFORD was only two years old when it came through the Seaway in November 1984. It got caught in typhoon Xangsene, as d) MANILA SPIRIT, on this date in 2000. The ship, still flagged in Panama, was driven aground and then sank off Hualien, Taiwan. One crewman was apparently able to swim to shore but the other 23 sailors were missing and presumed lost.

Data from: Skip Gillham, Joe Barr, Dave Swayze, Jody Aho, Russ Plumb, Father Dowling Collection, Ahoy & Farewell II and the Great Lakes Ships We Remember series.


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