Manistee
IMO 5294307

St. Clair River, July 2005.
(John Meyland)


This L6-S-B1 design "Maritimer" class bulk freighter was built by Great Lakes Engineering Works, River Rouge (Detroit), MI at a cost of $2.2 million. The second of sixteen similar vessels built for the U.S Maritime Commission during World War II, this laker was launched as the Adirondack and delivered to the Reiss Steamship Co. (part of the C. Reiss Coal Co.) on May 25, 1943. Shortly after her delivery (on May 28th), she was rechristened Richard J. Reiss (2) at the company's home port of Sheboygan, WI. In exchange for this new tonnage, the Reiss Co. was required to turn over to the U.S. Maritime Commission older obsolete vessels. These older vessels were the steamers Richard J. Reiss (1) which was renamed Superior (3) in 1943 and the Alex B. Uhrig. Both of these vessels were scrapped shortly after the war. The Richard J. Reiss (2) was powered by a 2,500 horsepower triple expansion steam engine. The "L6-S-B1" designation meant that this was a Great Lakes vessel (L), 600-699 feet long (6), steam powered (S), particular design (B), and sub-design (1).

She continued sailing as a straight-decker for Reiss Steamships until 1964 when she was converted to a self-unloader. In addition to coal, she also carried other bulk commodities such as limestone and iron ore. On June 27,1969, the C. Reiss Coal Co. sold all of its vessel assets to American Steamship for a price of $10.5 million. The Reiss Steamship Co. continued to operate as a separate entity until July 23,1986 when Reiss Steamship was merged into the American Steamships fleet. The Richard J. Reiss (2) was chartered to the Erie Sand Steamship Co. (managed by Erie Sand & Gravel Co., Erie, PA) in 1986 who shortened her name to Richard Reiss at that time. Some say the name was shortened because crews believed it was unlucky for a vessel to sail with a 13 letter name.

The Richard Reiss is now powered by a 2,950 horsepower diesel engine (her original power plant being replaced in 1976) and is equipped with a bow thruster. Her 16 hatches feed into 6 compartments where she is capable of carrying 14,900 tons at her maximum mid-summer draft of 24' 7". She is equipped with a 250' bow-mounted self-unloading discharge boom that can be swung 105 degrees to port or starboard.

On Dec. 18, 2001 the Reiss entered what was expected to be normal winter lay-up at Erie, Penn. In January 2002 the Erie Sand & Gravel Company, including the Reiss, was purchased by the Oglebay Norton Company.

Ships sailing in the Oglebay Norton fleet took over the routes normally served by the Reiss and the steamer remained in lay-up.

As the Oglebay Norton Company struggled through financial difficulties in 2003 and 2004 the vessel was sold to Grand River Navigation in January, 2004 for 1.8 million dollars.

The new owners kept the Reiss name and paint scheme for the 2004 season with only the stack being painted in the Grand River Navigation colors. On December 17, 2004 the Reiss entered the Bayship graving dock at Sturgeon Bay, WI for its five-year inspection and was painted in the Lower Lakes / Grand River Navigation colors. Emerging from the drydock on Dec. 30, 2004, the Richard Reiss proceeded to Sarnia, ON where, on March 14, 2005, her new name Manistee was painted onto her hull. Of historical significance, this renaming ends an era of almost 100 years of the Reiss name appearing on the hull of a vessel on the Great Lakes.

Manistee went into long-term layup at Toledo in December 2015, with little hope of ever operating again.



Ship Particulars
Length 620' 06" (189.13m)
Beam 60' 03" (18.36m)
Depth 35' 00" (10.67m)
Midsummer Draft 24' 07" (7.49m)
Unloading Boom Length 250' (76.2m)
Capacity 14,900
Engine Power 10,880 bhp diesel
Previous Names
Manistee 2005 - Today
Richard Reiss 1986 - 2005
Richard J. Reiss 1943 - 1986
Adirondack (launched as) 1943 - 1943

 


Arriving at the Ontario 4 dock in Cleveland.
(TZ)

Unloading.
(TZ)

Close up of bow, Sept 14, 2000.
(TZ)

Close up of her stern.
(TZ)

Arriving in Cleveland, Oct. 31, 2000.
(TZ)

Stern view.
(TZ)

Inside the pilothouse, Nov. 13, 2000.
(TZ)

Close up of wheel.
(TZ)

View from the boom.
(TZ)

View aft from the pilothouse.
(TZ)

Detroit River, July 9, 2001.
(Mike Nicholls)

Stern view.
(Mike Nicholls)

Passing the Lorain Light, July 31, 2001.
(TZ)

Loading in Marble Head, Sept. 6, 2001.
(TZ)

Departing Cleveland, Sept. 20, 2001.
(TZ)

Downbound Port Huron.
(Rod Burdick)

In Erie.
(Jeff Thoreson)

On the St. Clair River.
(Don Coles)

Saginaw River, May 5, 2004.
(Todd Shorkey)

Stern view.
(Todd Shorkey)

Inbound Milwaukee, May 16, 2004.
(Andy LaBorde)

Saginaw River, July 9, 2004.
(Todd Shorkey)

Stern view.
(Todd Shorkey)

Detroit River, Aug. 1, 2004.
(Mike Nicholls)

Stern view.
(Mike Nicholls)

Moved from the drydock after painting and survey, Dec. 30, 2004.
(Andy LaBorde)

Sarnia, March 2005.
(Dave Wobser)

Underway Detroit River, April 28, 2005.
(Mike Nicholls)

Stern view.
(Mike Nicholls)

Another stern view, May 21, 2005.
(Todd Shorkey)

Stern view, June 1, 2005.
(Todd Shorkey)

Manistee upbound approaching the Sargent dock, June 26, 2005.
(Todd Shorkey)

Saginaw River with crew heading for shore to work the lines.
(Todd Shorkey)

Unloading.
(Todd Shorkey)

Alpena, July 2005.
(Ben & Chanda McClain)

Unloading Alpena.
(Ben & Chanda McClain)

Inbound Alpena.
(Ben & Chanda McClain)

Downbound at Port Huron, April 18, 2009.
(Matt Miner)

Close up of bow.
(Matt Miner)

Stern view.
(Matt Miner)

Laid up in Toledo, Feb. 21, 2016.
(Matt Miner)

Bow view.
(Matt Miner)

Stern view.
(Matt Miner)


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